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Sample records for acute tbi patients

  1. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, John L.; Waller, Edmund K.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael; Hall, William A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Esiashvili, Natia; Khoury, H. Jean; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  2. Quality management in traumatic brain injury (TBI) lessons from the prospective study in 6.800 patients after acute TBI in respect of neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    von Wild, K R H; Wenzlaff, P

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary results on epidemiology, acute hospital care, and neurorehabilitation of TBI are presented of the first ever prospective controlled German study to analyse the use of regional structures and quality management as provided by the German social healthcare system. The sum of inhabitants in Hannover and Münster area was 2,114 million. Within an area of 100 kilometres diameter each. 6.783 acute TBI (58% male) were admitted for acute treatment from March 2000 to 2001. Definition of acute TBI was according to the ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 in combination with dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. The incidence was 321/100.000 population. Cause of TBI was traffic accident in 26%, during leisure time 35%, at home 30% and at work 15%. Initial GCS (emergency room) was only assessed in 3.731 TBI (=55%). Out of those 3.395 = 90,9% were mild, 145 = 3,9% were moderate, and 191 = 5,2% severe TBI. 28% of 6.783 patients were <1 to 15 years, 18% > 65 years of age. The number admitted to hospital treatment is 5.221 = 77%, of whom 72 patients (=1,4%) died caused by TBI. One year follow-up in 4.307 TBI patients (=63.5%) revealed that only 258 patients (=3,8%) received neurorehabilitation (73% male), but 68% within one month of injury. Five percent of these patients were <16 years of age, 25% > 65 years. Early rehabilitation "B" was performed in 100 patients (=39%), 19% within one week following TBI. The management of frequent complications in 148 patients (=57%) and the high number of one or more different consultations (n = 196) confirmed the author's concept for early neurosurgical rehabilitation in TBI when rehabilitation centres were compared regarding GCS and GOS: Early GOS 1 = 4%; GOS 2 = 2,7%, GOS 3 = 37,3%, GOS 4 = 26,7%, GOS 5 = 29,3%, final GOS scores were 1 = 1,2%, 2 = 1,7%, 3 = 21,8%, 4 = 36,2%, and 5 = 39,1% of all patients at the end of rehabilitation

  3. Impact of conditioning intensity and TBI on acute GVHD after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, H; Fukuda, T; Kanda, J; Mori, T; Yano, S; Kobayashi, T; Miyamura, K; Eto, T; Kanamori, H; Iwato, K; Uchida, N; Mori, S; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Ichinohe, T; Atsuta, Y; Teshima, T; Murata, M

    2015-04-01

    The impact of the conditioning intensity and TBI on acute GVHD (aGVHD) is still a matter of debate. We analyzed 6848 adult recipients who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) between 2006 and 2011 in Japan. The subjects were divided into groups who had received myeloablative conditioning (MAC) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), either with or without TBI. There was a significant difference in the incidence of aGVHD 2-4 among the different conditioning types: 39% in TBI-MAC, 35% in TBI-RIC and 32% in both no-TBI MAC and no-TBI-RIC (P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, TBI-MAC, but not no-TBI MAC, was significantly associated with an increased risk of aGVHD 2-4 (hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, P<0.01), whereas TBI-RIC was associated with an increased risk of GVHD 3-4 (HR 1.36, P=0.048). TBI-MAC and TBI-RIC were significantly associated with skin and gastrointestinal aGVHD. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that not only TBI-MAC, but also TBI-RIC, was significantly associated with aGVHD 2-4 in older patients. Furthermore, high-dose TBI only had an adverse impact on aGVHD 2-4 in HLA-matched HCT. Impacts of intensity and TBI on aGVHD differ by patient backgrounds, and this difference should be considered to establish a risk-adapted strategy for the prevention of aGVHD.

  4. Posttraumatic rehabilitation and one year outcome following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): data from the well defined population based German Prospective Study 2000-2002.

    PubMed

    von Wild, K R H

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up examination to review the one-year outcome of patients after craniocerebral trauma with respect to health related quality of life (QoL) and social reintegration. The data are derived from the prospective controlled, well defined population based, multiple centre study that was performed in Germany for the first time in the years 2000-2001 with emphasis on quality management (structural, process, outcome) and regarding the patient's age, physical troubles, and impaired mental-cognitive, neurobehavioral functioning. TBI severity assessment is according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Early outcome after rehabilitation is assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of patients following rehabilitation and of 63% of all TBI with the aid of follow-up examination (simplified questionnaire) after one year. Catchment areas are Hanover (industrial) and Münster (more rural) with 2,114 million inhabitants. TBI is diagnosed according to ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 with at least two of the following symptoms: dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. Within one year 6.783 patients (58% male) were examined in the regional hospitals after acute TBI. The regional TBI incidence regarding hospital admission was 321/100.000 TBI. 28% of patients were < 1 to 15 years, 18% > 65 years of age. GCS was only assessed in 55% of patients. They were 90.9% mild, 3.9% moderate, and 5.2% severe TBI. A total of 5.221 TBI (= 77%) was hospitalised; 1.4% of them died. Only 258 patients (= 4.9%) of the hospitalized TBI received in-hospital neurorehabilitation (73% male), 68% within one month after injury. They were 10.9% severe, 23.4% moderate, and 65.7 mild TBI. 5% were < 16 years, 25% > 65 years. One-year follow-up examinations of 4307 individuals (= 63.5% of all TBI) are discussed. A total of 883 patients (= 20.6%) reported posttraumatic troubles, one half were > 64 years

  5. Acute CSF interleukin-6 trajectories after TBI: associations with neuroinflammation, polytrauma, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R G; Diamond, M L; Boles, J A; Berger, R P; Tisherman, S A; Kochanek, P M; Wagner, A K

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a significant inflammatory burden that perpetuates the production of inflammatory mediators and biomarkers. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to be elevated after trauma, and a major contributor to the inflammatory response following TBI. Previous studies have investigated associations between IL-6 and outcome following TBI, but to date, studies have been inconsistent in their conclusions. We hypothesized that cohort heterogeneity, temporal inflammatory profiles, and concurrent inflammatory marker associations are critical to characterize when targeting subpopulations for anti-inflammatory therapies. Toward this objective, we used serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to generate temporal acute IL-6 trajectory (TRAJ) profiles in a prospective cohort of adults with severe TBI (n=114). We examined the impact of injury type on IL-6 profiles, and how IL-6 profiles impact sub-acute (2weeks-3months) serum inflammatory marker load and long-term global outcome 6-12months post-injury. There were two distinct acute CSF IL-6 profiles, a high and low TRAJ group. Individuals in the high TRAJ had increased odds of unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6months (adjusted OR=3.436, 95% CI: 1.259, 9.380). Individuals in the high TRAJ also had higher mean acute CSF inflammatory load compared to individuals in the low TRAJ (p⩽0.05). The two groups did not differ with respect acute serum profiles; however, individuals in the high CSF IL-6 TRAJ also had higher mean sub-acute serum IL-1β and IL-6 levels compared with the low TRAJ group (p⩽0.05). Lastly, injury type (isolated TBI vs. TBI+polytrauma) was associated with IL-6 TRAJ group (χ(2)=5.31, p=0.02). Specifically, there was 70% concordance between those with TBI+polytrauma and the low TRAJ; in contrast, isolated TBI was similarly distributed between TRAJ groups. These data provide evidence that sustained, elevated levels of CSF IL-6 are associated

  6. Different quantitative EEG alterations induced by TBI among patients with different APOE genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Yin, Xiaohong; Yin, Cheng; Zhou, Shuai; Dan, Wei; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2011-11-14

    Although several studies have revealed the EEG alterations in AD and TBI patients, the influence of APOE (apolipoprotein E) genotype in EEG at the early stage of TBI has not been reported yet. We have previously studied EEG alterations caused by TBI among different APOE genotype carriers. In this study, we firstly investigated the relationship between APOE polymorphisms and quantitative EEG (QEEG) changes after TBI. A total of 118 consecutive TBI patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 9 or higher were recruited, and 40 normal adults were also included as a control group. APOE genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP for each subject, and QEEG recordings were performed in rest, relaxed, awake and with eyes closed in normal subjects and TBI patients during 1-3 days after TBI. In the normal control group, both APOEɛ4 carriers and non-carriers had normal EEG, and no significant difference of QEEG data was found between APOEɛ4 carriers and non-carriers. But in the TBI group, APOEɛ4 carriers had more focal or global irregular slow wave activities than APOEɛ4 non-carriers. APOE gene did not influence brain electrical activity under normal conditions, but TBI can induce different alterations among different APOE gene carriers, and APOEɛ4 allele enhances the EEG abnormalities at the early stage of TBI.

  7. Multimodal Approach to Testing the Acute Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    included several key staff changes, a major instrument acquisition, repairs and upgrades to the MEG , combined with substantial progress with patient...patients to non-head trauma controls in the first days after injury. Multiple modalities of behavioral, electrophysiological, and most strikingly, MEG ...changes were found. The MEG of all mTBI patients had delta activity in the frontal lobes that was absent in all controls. A scientific abstract on

  8. TBI-QOL: Development and Calibration of Item Banks to Measure Patient Reported Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Carlozzi, Noelle; Bushnik, Tamara; Sherer, Mark; Choi, Seung W.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Sander, Angelle M.; Englander, Jeffrey; Hanks, Robin; Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie; Roth, Elliot; Gershon, Richard; Rosenthal, Mitchell; Cella, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a patient-centered approach or participatory action research design combined with advanced psychometrics to develop a comprehensive patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measurement system specifically for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This TBI Quality-of-Life (TBI-QOL) measurement system expands the work of other large PRO measurement initiatives, that is, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the Neurology Quality-of-Life measurement initiative. Setting: Five TBI Model Systems centers across the United States. Participants: Adults with TBI. Design: Classical and modern test development methodologies were used. Qualitative input was obtained from individuals with TBI, TBI clinicians, and caregivers of individuals with TBI through multiple methods, including focus groups, individual interviews, patient consultation, and cognitive debriefing interviews. Item pools were field tested in a large multisite sample (n = 675) and calibrated using item response theory methods. Main Outcomes Measures: Twenty-two TBI-QOL item banks/scales. Results: The TBI-QOL consists of 20 independent calibrated item banks and 2 uncalibrated scales that measure physical, emotional, cognitive, and social aspects of health-related quality of life. Conclusions: The TBI-QOL measurement system has potential as a common data element in TBI research and to enhance collection of health-related quality-of-life and PRO data in rehabilitation research and clinical settings. PMID:25931184

  9. Immunosuppression prior to marrow transplantation for sensitized aplastic anemia patients: comparison of TLI with TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Brochstein, J.A.; Castro-Malaspina, H.; Yahalom, J.; Bonfiglio, P.; O'Reilly, R.J.

    1988-06-01

    From May 1980 through July 1986, 26 patients with severe aplastic anemia, sensitized with multiple transfusions of blood products, were treated on either of two immunosuppressive regimens in preparation for bone marrow transplantation from a matched donor. There were 10 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), 200 cGy/fraction X 4 daily fractions (800 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg/d X 2 d. An additional 16 patients were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (or, if they were infants, a modified TLI or thoracoabdominal irradiation (TAI)), 100 cGy/fraction, 3 fractions/d X 2 d (600 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 40 mg/kg/d X 4 d. The extent of immunosuppression was similar in both groups as measured by peripheral blood lymphocyte depression at the completion of the course of irradiation (5% of initial concentration for TBI and 24% for TLI), neutrophil engraftment (10/10 for TBI and 15/16 for TLI), and time to neutrophil engraftment (median of 22 d for TBI and 17 d for TLI). Marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis for assessment of percent donor cells was also compared in those patients in whom it was available. 2/2 patients studied with TBI had 100% donor cells, whereas 6/11 with TLI had 100% donor cells. Of the five who did not, three were stable mixed chimeras with greater than or equal to 70% donor cells, one became a mixed chimera with about 50% donor cells, but became aplastic again after Cyclosporine A cessation 5 mo post-transplant, and the fifth reverted to all host cells by d. 18 post-transplant. Overall actuarial survival at 2 years was 56% in the TLI group compared with 30% in the TBI group although this was not statistically significant. No survival decrement has been seen after 2 years in either group.

  10. Antileukemic and long-term effects of two regimens with or without TBI in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dai, Q Y; Souillet, G; Bertrand, Y; Galambrun, C; Bleyzac, N; Manel, A M; Bruno, B; Souillet, A L; Homole, E; Pages, M P; Berlier, P; David, M; Berthier, J C; Massenavette, B; Contamin, B; Philippe, N

    2004-10-01

    Between September 1986 and June 1997, 24 children with high-risk ALL in CR1 were allografted after TAM (fractionated TBI, high-dose Ara-C, and melphalan; n = 10) or BAM protocol (busulfan, high-dose Ara-C, and melphalan; n = 14). The EFS for transplants from sibling donors was 33% with TAM and 62% with BAM (P = 0.148). The probability of acute GvHD was 70% with TAM and 15% with BAM (P = 0.003). Four of 17 evaluable patients relapsed: one after TAM and three after BAM. In all, 46 other children transplanted in CR beyond CR1 were studied for sequelae. Long-term side effects were more frequent in TAM vs BAM. In children with ALL, busulfan may be a good alternative to TBI to improve the quality of life.

  11. Intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI in high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Glaubiger, D.; Diesseroth, A.; Makuch, R.; Waller, B.; Pizzo, P.; Glatstein, E.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-four high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients were treated on an intensive combined modality protocol including low-dose fractionated total body irradiaiton (TBI) and autologous bone marrow infusion (ABMI). Twenty patients (83%) achieved a complete clinical response to the primary and/or metastatic sites following induction therapy. The median disease-free interval was 18 months, and nine patients remain disease-free with a follow-up of 22 to 72 months. Local failure as a manifestation of initial relapse occurred in only three patients (15%), each having synchronous distant failure. Eight patients failed initially with only distant metastases, usually within 1-2 years following a complete clinical response. Two patterns of granulocyte recovery following consolidative therapy (including TBI and ABMI) were recognized. The time to platelet recovery was different for the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. Patients with late recovery did not tolerate maintenance chemotherapy. However, there was no difference in disease-free and overall survival, when comparing the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. It is concluded that these high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients remain a poor-prognosis group in spite of intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI. The control of microscopic systemic disease remains the major challenge to improving the cure rate. A new combined modality protocol with high-dose 'therapeutic' TBI (800 rad/2 fractions) is being used and the protocol design is outlined.

  12. Post-traumatic anosmia in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): A systematic and illustrated review

    PubMed Central

    Proskynitopoulos, Phileas J.; Stippler, Martina; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Olfactory dysfunction (OD) is a disorder associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is prevalent in up to 20% of patients suffering from TBI. Nevertheless, most studies focusing on the relationship between OD and TBIs do not differentiate between the different types of TBI (mild, medium, and severe). In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive and systematic review of the existing literature for the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and OD in order to examine their relationship, focusing on its neurosurgical management and the radiographic characteristics. Methods: The MEDLINE database was systematically reviewed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. We found 66 articles, of which 10 fulfilled our criteria. Results: All except two studies reported a significant association between trauma severity and olfaction. Two studies found a negative correlation between TBI severity and olfactory bulb volume with one reporting an r value of −0.62). Three studies reported an association between the observation of radiographic intracranial hemorrhage or skull base fractures and the history of TBI. Conclusion: According to our search results, we conclude that OD is a prevalent but underdiagnosed problem in mTBI. Because OD is associated with a significant decrease in quality of life, we think that neurosurgical teams need to asses olfactory function in mTBI patients when they report to clinics. To illustrate this scenario, we include two distinct cases of patients with anosmia after mTBI in this review. Finally, we suggest a treatment algorithm for patients with mTBI so that a possible OD can be diagnosed and treated as early as possible. PMID:27213113

  13. ANAM4 TBI reaction time-based tests have prognostic utility for acute concussion.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jacob N; Carr, Walter; Herzig, Thomas; Labrie, D Walter; Sams, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Concussion Restoration Care Center has used the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics version 4 Traumatic Brain Injury (ANAM4 TBI) battery in clinical assessment of concussion. The study's aim is to evaluate the prognostic utility of the ANAM4 TBI. In 165 concussed active duty personnel (all ultimately returned to duty) seen and tested on the ANAM4 TBI on days 3 and 5 (median times) from their injury, Spearman's ρ statistics showed that all performance subtests (at day 5) were associated with fewer days return-to-duty (RTD) time, whereas concussion history or age did not. Kruskal-Wallis statistics showed that ANAM4 TBI, loss of consciousness, and post-traumatic amnesia were associated with increased RTD time; ANAM4 TBI reaction time-based subtests, collectively, showed the largest effect sizes. A survival analysis using a Kaplan-Meier plot showed that the lowest 25% on the reaction time-based subtests had a median RTD time of 19 days, whereas those in the upper 25% had a median RTD time of approximately 7 days. Results indicate that until validated neurocognitive testing is introduced, the ANAM4 TBI battery, especially reaction time-based tests, has prognostic utility.

  14. Measuring executive function in control subjects and TBI patients with question completion time (QCT)

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Yund, E. William; Wyma, John M.; Ruff, Ron; Herron, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaire completion is a complex task that places demands on cognitive functions subserving reading, introspective memory, decision-making, and motor control. Although computerized questionnaires and surveys are used with increasing frequency in clinical practice, few studies have examined question completion time (QCT), the time required to complete each question. Here, we analyzed QCTs in 172 control subjects and 31 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who completed two computerized questionnaires, the 17-question Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist (PCL) and the 25-question Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ). In control subjects, robust correlations were found between self-paced QCTs on the PCL and CFQ (r = 0.82). QCTs on individual questions correlated strongly with the number of words in the question, indicating the critical role of reading speed. QCTs increased significantly with age, and were reduced in females and in subjects with increased education and computer experience. QCT z-scores, corrected for age, education, computer use, and sex, correlated more strongly with each other than with the results of other cognitive tests. Patients with a history of severe TBI showed significantly delayed QCTs, but QCTs fell within the normal range in patients with a history of mild TBI. When questionnaires are used to gather relevant patient information, simultaneous QCT measures provide reliable and clinically sensitive measures of processing speed and executive function. PMID:26042021

  15. A longitudinal fMRI study of working memory in severe TBI patients with diffuse axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Carrion, Rocio; Fernandez-Espejo, Davinia; Junque, Carme; Falcon, Carles; Bargallo, Nuria; Roig, Teresa; Bernabeu, Montserrat; Tormos, José M; Vendrell, Pere

    2008-11-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients have working memory deficits and altered patterns of brain activation during this function. The evolution of the impairment has not been examined to date. This study investigated longitudinal changes in brain activation during a working memory task. Twelve patients with severe and diffuse TBI and ten healthy matched controls were fMRI scanned twice at a 6-month interval during an n-back task (0-, 2- and 3-back). All the TBI patients selected presented signs of diffuse axonal injury on CT but had no evidence of focal lesions on MRI clinical examination. Significant changes in brain activation over time were observed in patients, but not in controls. During the first examination, though both groups engaged bilateral fronto-parietal regions known to be involved in working memory, activation of the right superior frontal gyrus was low in the TBI group. However, the difference between TBI and controls had decreased significantly after 6 months. A factor analysis confirmed the greater increase in activation in the right superior frontal cortex in the TBI group than in healthy controls, leading to normalization of the brain activation pattern. In conclusion, this longitudinal study provides evidence of a progressive normalization of the working memory activation pattern after diffuse axonal injury in severe TBI, coinciding with an improvement in performance on this function.

  16. (13)C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Keri L H; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P; Menon, David K; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R; Pickard, John D; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-06-16

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons' tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver (13)C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the (13)C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution (13)C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of (13)C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and (13)C research modalities addressing them.

  17. Opioid use after TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and prefrontal-parietal white matter tracts ACUTELY after TBI in...Five days prior to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine ...the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and prefrontal-parietal white matter tracts after TBI in rats o Obtain and optimize protocols for the

  18. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI: What do participants report?

    PubMed

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Use of assistive devices has been shown to be beneficial as a compensatory memory strategy among brain injury survivors, but little is known about possible advantages and disadvantages of the technology. As part of an intervention study participants were interviewed about their experiences with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid followed by a brief structured open-ended interview regarding satisfaction with and advantages and disadvantages of the compensatory strategy. Ten of 13 participants continued to use a smartphone as their primary compensatory strategy. Audible and visual reminders were the most frequently mentioned advantages of the smartphone, and, second, the capability as an all-in-one memory device. In contrast, battery life was the most often mentioned disadvantage, followed by concerns about loss or failure of the device. Use of a smartphone seems to be a satisfactory compensatory memory strategy to many patients with TBI and smartphones come with features that are advantageous to other compensatory strategies. However, some benefits come hand-in-hand with drawbacks, such as the feeling of dependency. These aspects should be taken into account when choosing assistive technology as a memory compensatory strategy.

  19. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C.; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J.; Gerritsen, Marleen J. J.; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI), in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests) and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT)). The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear. PMID:27870900

  20. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  1. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  2. Advanced Sensors for TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    increases in intracranial pressure ( ICP ) combined with longer-term measurements of biological ICP and intracranial temperature during experimental TBI...Experiments will measure of acute transmission of pressure waves through the brain, longer-term changes in biological ICP , and intracranial temperature...measure the immediate increases in ICP combined with longer- term measurements of biological ICP and intracranial temperature. The experience

  3. SEGMENTATION OF SERIAL MRI OF TBI PATIENTS USING PERSONALIZED ATLAS CONSTRUCTION AND TOPOLOGICAL CHANGE ESTIMATION.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Prastawa, Marcel; Awate, Suyash P; Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Vespa, Paul M; van Horn, John D; Gerig, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to falls, car accidents, and warfare affects millions of people annually. Determining personalized therapy and assessment of treatment efficacy can substantially benefit from longitudinal (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this paper, we propose a method for segmenting longitudinal brain MR images with TBI using personalized atlas construction. Longitudinal images with TBI typically present topological changes over time due to the effect of the impact force on tissue, skull, and blood vessels and the recovery process. We address this issue by defining a novel atlas construction scheme that explicitly models the effect of topological changes. Our method automatically estimates the probability of topological changes jointly with the personalized atlas. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on MR images with TBI that also have been segmented by human raters, where our method that integrates 4D information yields improved validation measures compared to temporally independent segmentations.

  4. A phase I study of WR-2721 in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in patients with refractory lymphoid malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Coia, L.; Krigel, R.; Hanks, G.; Comis, R.; Algazy, K.; Peters, R.; McCulloch, W.; Schien, P. )

    1992-01-01

    This Phase I study was designed to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of WR-2721 when given twice weekly with total body irradiation (TBI) in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory lymphoid malignancies and to define the toxicities of this combination and schedule. Patients eligible for this study had advanced recurrent indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients had symptomatic or progressive disease, a performance status of 0, 1, or 2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal function. Only patients failing one or two regimens of prior chemotherapy were eligible. Patients who had received prior extended field irradiation were ineligible. Patients received TBI twice weekly (Tuesday and Friday) to a total of 10 doses at 15 cGy/fx. WR-2721 was given intravenously over 15 min beginning 30 min before irradiation. The escalation of WR-2721 was Level 1: 740 mg/m2 and Level 2: 910 mg/m2. The MTD of WR-2721 was that dose which produced predictable and reversible toxicity and would not interfere with patient well-being. Seven patients were entered onto the study, three at 740 mg/m2 and four at 910 mg/m2. Five patients had CLL and two patients small lymphocytic NHL. No patient had hypotension or nausea requiring reduction in dose level or even interruption of infusion of WR-2721. At 740 mg/m2 no grade 3 or 4 toxicities related to WR-2721 were observed, but two patients could not complete treatment because of TBI-induced prolonged thrombocytopenia following treatments 5 and 8. One patient completed all 10 treatments. At 910 mg/m2 of WR-2721, two patients requested removal from study because of malaise, one after 5 cycles and one after 7 cycles. One patient completed all 10 treatments.

  5. Clinical caveats on medical assessment and treatment of pain after TBI.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, Cindy B; Hartman, Eric T

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of pain in the patient with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be difficult in light of the limitations imposed by the cognitive, language, and behavioral deficits. With patients in the acute rehabilitation setting, one must be vigilant for the often subtle signs and symptoms of pain. Causes more commonly seen in the population with TBI as a consequence of the injury itself include dysautonomia, neuropathic pain, spasticity, and heterotopic ossification. Headaches may be a consequence of TBI or associated with it for other reasons. Sources of pain associated with TBI include deep venous thrombosis and others. The reader is reminded that patients with TBI are subject to all the causes of pain that affect the general population.

  6. Virtual Environment TBI Screen (VETS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    postural control, which will assist with clinical screening of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Knowledge of acute symptoms associated with TBI can help...Military test sites have been established and testing will begin as soon as HRPO approval for these sites is granted. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain ...C-0189 1 INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study is to validate and test the reliability of the Virtual Environment Traumatic Brain Injury

  7. Patient Characterization Protocols for Psychophysiological Studies of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-TBI Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Paul E.; Rosenberg, Brenna M.; Keyser, David O.; Nathan, Dominic; Toruno, Kevin M.; Cellucci, Christopher J.; Albano, Alfonso M.; Wylie, Scott A.; Gibson, Douglas; Gilpin, Adele M. K.; Bashore, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    Psychophysiological investigations of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are being conducted for several reasons, including the objective of learning more about the underlying physiological mechanisms of the pathological processes that can be initiated by a head injury. Additional goals include the development of objective physiologically based measures that can be used to monitor the response to treatment and to identify minimally symptomatic individuals who are at risk of delayed-onset neuropsychiatric disorders following injury. Research programs studying TBI search for relationships between psychophysiological measures, particularly ERP (event-related potential) component properties (e.g., timing, amplitude, scalp distribution), and a participant’s clinical condition. Moreover, the complex relationships between brain injury and psychiatric disorders are receiving increased research attention, and ERP technologies are making contributions to this effort. This review has two objectives supporting such research efforts. The first is to review evidence indicating that TBI is a significant risk factor for post-injury neuropsychiatric disorders. The second objective is to introduce ERP researchers who are not familiar with neuropsychiatric assessment to the instruments that are available for characterizing TBI, post-concussion syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Specific recommendations within this very large literature are made. We have proceeded on the assumption that, as is typically the case in an ERP laboratory, the investigators are not clinically qualified and that they will not have access to participant medical records. PMID:23885250

  8. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-02

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis.

  9. The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI): I. Construct validity.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; McCauley, Stephen R; Kelly, Tara M; Weyand, Annie M; Pedroza, Claudia; Levin, Harvey S; Clifton, Guy L; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Shah, Monika V; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure adapted from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and is intended to capture essential neurological deficits impacting individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) (see Wilde et al., 2010 ). In the present study we evaluate the measure's construct validity via comparison with a quantified neurological examination performed by a neurologist. Spearman rank-order correlation between the NOS-TBI and the neurological examination was rho = 0.76, p < 0.0001, suggesting a high degree of correspondence (construct validity) between these two measures of neurological function. Additionally, items from the NOS-TBI compared favorably to the neurological examination items, with correlations ranging from 0.60 to 0.99 (all p < 0.0001). On formal neurological examination, some degree of neurological impairment was observed in every participant in this cohort of individuals undergoing rehabilitation for TBI, and on the NOS-TBI neurological impairment was evident in all but one participant. This study documents the presence of measurable neurological sequelae in a sample of patients with TBI in a post-acute rehabilitation setting, underscoring the need for formal measurement of the frequency and severity of neurological deficits in this population. The results suggest that the NOS-TBI is a valid measure of neurological functioning in patients with TBI.

  10. Dose distribution homogeneity in two TBI techniques—Analysis of 208 irradiated patients conducted in Stanislaw Leszczynski Memorial Hospital, Katowice

    PubMed Central

    Kawa-Iwanicka, Aneta; Łobodziec, Włodzimierz; Dybek, Marcin; Nenko, Dorota; Iwanicki, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Background To analyze and compare dose distribution homogeneity in selected points (especially in the chest wall region) for patients irradiated with two different TBI techniques to achieve a uniform total dose (excluding lungs area) specified in the range of 11.4–14.0 Gy. Material and methods From August 2000 to December 2009, a group of 158 patients was treated by the use of 15 MV photon irradiation consisting of six fractions: four opposed lateral and two anterior–posterior/posterior–anterior (AP/PA). Patients were irradiated with the fraction dose of 2 Gy twice a day for 3 consecutive days. The prescribed dose to PC point (specified at intersection of the beam axis with the mid-plane of the patient irradiated laterally) was 12 Gy. Since January 2010 until closing the study, another group of 50 patients was treated according to a modified protocol. The treatment was carried out in six lateral fractions only, twice a day, for three following days and a lateral lung shield was used for a part of total irradiation time. The measurements of doses in 20 selected points of patient's body were carried out by means of MOSFET detectors. Results The modified TBI technique allows to achieve an expected homogenous dose in the points of interest similar to that obtained by using the initial protocol. The calculated and measured in vivo doses met the specified range of 11.4–14 Gy for both applied TBI protocols. Conclusions Our results indicate that for all patients the homogenous dose distribution in the specified range was achieved. PMID:24377040

  11. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  12. Consultation Dilemma Catatonia in a Patient with Prior TBI: MentaI or Medical Disorder?

    PubMed

    Khalafian, Andrey; Dukes, Charles; Tucker, Phebe

    2015-08-01

    Mr. R, a 27 year old Hispanic male with history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) over ten years prior but no psychiatric history, presents to the psychiatric consultation service with recent onset of mutism, psychotic behavior and new diagnosis of epilepsy. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes both medical and psychiatric causes: post-ictal state, non-convulsive status epilepticus, delirium due to metabolic conditions, drugs, catatonia, conversion disorder, major depression with psychotic features, new onset schizophrenia or a combination of these possible diagnoses. We explore different medical causes that can present with symptoms of catatonia, as it is crucial to rule out a possible treatable medical cause.

  13. Advanced MRI In Blast-Related TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Care 4 TBI Not Associated with Blast 1 Prior Significant TBI 1 Incidental Brain Tumor Discovered We have obtained supplementary funding to recruit an...performance on the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) at LRMC (p= 0.03, 1-sided t-test). A generalized linear model incorporating these early

  14. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for Acute Renal Failure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Yong; Choi, Hyun-Yong; You, Nam-Kyu; Roh, Tae Hoon; Seo, Sook Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on survival and relevant factors in patients who underwent CRRT after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the laboratory, clinical, and radiological data of 29 patients who underwent CRRT among 1,190 TBI patients treated at our institution between April 2011 and June 2015. There were 20 men and 9 women, and the mean age was 60.2 years. The mean initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 9.2, and the mean injury severity score was 24. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used for analysis of survival and relevant factors. Results The actuarial median survival time of the 29 patients was 163 days (range, 3-317). Among the above 29 patients, 22 died with a median survival time of 8 days (range, 3-55). The causes of death were TBI-related in 8, sepsis due to pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in 4, and multi-organ failure in 10. Among the various factors, urine quantity of more than 500 mL for 24-hours before receiving CRRT was a significant and favorable factor for survival in the multivariate analysis (p=0.026). Conclusion According to our results, we suggest that early intervention with CRRT may be beneficial in the treatment of TBI patients with impending acute renal failure (ARF). To define the therapeutic advantages of early CRRT in the TBI patients with ARF, a well-designed and controlled study with more cases is required. PMID:27857914

  15. Predicting the post-treatment recovery of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Krempl, Georg; Spiliopoulou, Myra; Peña, Jose M; Paul, Nuria; Maestu, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Predicting the evolution of individuals is a rather new mining task with applications in medicine. Medical researchers are interested in the progression of a disease and/or how do patients evolve or recover when they are subjected to some treatment. In this study, we investigate the problem of patients' evolution on the basis of medical tests before and after treatment after brain trauma: we want to understand to what extend a patient can become similar to a healthy participant. We face two challenges. First, we have less information on healthy participants than on the patients. Second, the values of the medical tests for patients, even after treatment started, remain well-separated from those of healthy people; this is typical for neurodegenerative diseases, but also for further brain impairments. Our approach encompasses methods for modelling patient evolution and for predicting the health improvement of different patients' subpopulations, i.e. prediction of label if they recovered or not. We test our approach on a cohort of patients treated after brain trauma and a corresponding cohort of controls.

  16. TBI-the most complex disease in the most complex organ: the CENTER-TBI trial-a commentary.

    PubMed

    Wheble, Joanna L C; Menon, D K

    2016-04-01

    Each year, approximately 2.5 million people experience some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Europe. One million of these are admitted to hospital and 75 000 will die. TBI represents a major cause of death and disability, particularly among those of working age. Substantial investments have been made in an effort to improve diagnosis, management and survival in TBI, but with little success. The Collaborative European Neuro-Trauma Effectiveness Research in TBI (CENTER-TBI) study promises to use the natural variability seen in the management of TBI across Europe with the application of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). It will generate repositories of baseline and comprehensive TBI patient data, neuroimaging, neurogenetics and biomarkers, which aim to improve the diagnosis, stratification, management and prognostication of patients with TBI.

  17. Growth hormone treatment impact on growth rate and final height of patients who received HSCT with TBI or/and cranial irradiation in childhood: a report from the French Leukaemia Long-Term Follow-Up Study (LEA).

    PubMed

    Isfan, F; Kanold, J; Merlin, E; Contet, A; Sirvent, N; Rochette, E; Poiree, M; Terral, D; Carla-Malpuech, H; Reynaud, R; Pereira, B; Chastagner, P; Simeoni, M C; Auquier, P; Michel, G; Deméocq, F

    2012-05-01

    The literature contains a substantial amount of information about factors that adversely influence the linear growth in up to 85% of patients undergoing haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) with TBI and/or cranial irradiation (CI) for acute leukaemia (AL). By contrast, only a few studies have evaluated the impact of growth hormone (GH) therapy on growth rate and final height (FH) in these children. We evaluated growth rates during the pre- and post-transplant periods to FH in a group of 25 children treated with HSCT (n=22), TBI (n=21) or/and CI (n=8) for AL and receiving GH therapy. At the start of GH treatment, the median height Z-score was -2.19 (-3.95 to 0.02), significantly lower than at AL diagnosis (P<0.001). Overall height gain from start of GH treatment to FH was 0.59Z (-2.72 to 2.93) with a median height Z-score at FH of -1.35 (-5.35 to 0.27). This overall height gain effect was greater in girls than in boys (P=0.04). The number of children with heights in the reference population range was greater after than before GH therapy (P=0.07). At FH the GVHD and GH treatments lasting <2 years were associated with shorter FH (P=0.02 and 0.05). We found a measurable beneficial effect of GH treatment on growth up to FH.

  18. Defining the Pathophysiological Role of Tau in Experimental TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    pathway that is both preferentially vulnerable in early-stage AD and critically important for long-term memory . The model confines expression of...function of the hippocampus after TBI, and whether TBI exacerbates ongoing tauopathy to promote a chronic neurodegenerative condition. In addition...evidence that mild TBI impairs hippocampus -dependent spatial learning acutely post-injury, and pathological human tau does not exacerbate this

  19. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M; Suh, T; Han, B; Xing, L; Jenkins, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  20. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L.; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Artz, Andrew S.; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Epstein, Robert B.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard F.; Selby, George B.; Williams, Kirsten M.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; McCarthy, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI N=948, TBICy N=821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) who received TBI (1200-1500cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The two cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Ph+ ALL, HLA matched siblings, stem cell source, anti-thymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect TRM (24% vs. 23% at 3y, p=0.67; relative risk [RR] 1.01, p=0.91), leukemia relapse (27% vs. 29% at 3y, p=0.34; RR 0.89, p=0.18), leukemia-free survival (49% vs. 48% at3y, p=0.27; RR 0.93, p=0.29), chronic GVHD (45% vs. 47% at 1y, p=0.39; RR 0.9, p=0.11) or overall survival (53% vs. 52% at 3y, p=0.62; RR 0.96, p=0.57) for CyTBI and TBICy respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (p=0.08). This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplant outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing HCT with myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25840335

  1. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and develop criteria for assessing which patients with a mild TBI are...Introduction: The purpose of this project will be to study the diagnosis of post traumatic hypopituitarism after MTBI. We will determine the incidence...of hypopituitarism following MTBI and develop criteria for assessing which MTBI patients are at high risk for developing posttraumatic

  2. Efficiency of high-dose cytarabine added to CY/TBI in cord blood transplantation for myeloid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Takeda, June; Aoki, Kazunari; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takahashi, Satoshi; Onishi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Kouzai, Yasuji; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Ota, Shuichi; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2015-07-16

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) is an effective therapeutic option for adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after the conventional cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (CY/TBI) regimen, but posttransplant relapse is still of high importance. High-dose cytarabine (HDCA) can be added to CY/TBI for an intensified regimen; however, its additional effects have not yet been completely elucidated. Therefore, we conducted a cohort study to compare the prognosis of HDCA/CY/TBI (n = 617) and CY/TBI (n = 312) in CBT for AML/MDS, using a Japanese transplant registry database. The median age was 40 years, and 86.2% of the patients had AML; high-risk disease was observed in 56.2% of the patients. The median follow-up period after CBT was approximately 3.5 years. Overall survival was significantly superior in the HDCA/CY/TBI group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.69; P < .01), and tumor-related mortality was lower (HR, 0.50; P < .01). The incidence of grade II to IV acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and chronic GVHD was significantly higher in the HDCA/CY/TBI group (HR, 1.33 and 2.30, respectively), but not grade III to IV aGVHD. Incidence of infectious episodes showed no significant difference. Nonrelapse mortality was not increased by the addition of HDCA. Higher-dose CA (12 rather than 8 g/m(2)) was more effective, particularly in patients at high-risk for disease. This study is the first to show the superiority of HDCA/CY/TBI to CY/TBI in CBT for AML/MDS. A large-scale prospective study is warranted to establish new conditioning regimens including HDCA administration.

  3. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and develop criteria for assessing which patients with a mild TBI are at risk for...project occurs. 20 subjects were found to have hypopituitarism . Further details are in the body of this report 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic... hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT

  4. Rehabilitation of Communicative Abilities in Patients with a History of TBI: Behavioral Improvements and Cerebral Changes in Resting-State Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Gabbatore, Ilaria; Geda, Elisabetta; Duca, Sergio; Cauda, Franco; Bara, Bruno G.; Bosco, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    A targeted training program for the rehabilitation of communicative abilities—Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment (CPT)—has been developed and previously tested on a sample of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), whose performance was found to have improved. Since cortical plasticity has been recognized as the main mechanism of functional recovery, we investigated whether and how behavioral improvements following the training program are accompanied by brain modifications. Eight TBI patients took part in the training program and were behaviorally assessed pre- and post-treatment; six of these patients were also evaluated with pre- and post-treatment resting state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). At the end of the rehabilitation program patients showed improvement in overall communicative performance, in both comprehension and production tasks. A follow-up retest revealed the stability of these results 3 months after completing the training program. At the brain level, we found significant increases in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) index in the bilateral precentral gyrus, in the right middle and superior temporal gyri, in the right cingulate gyrus, and in the left inferior parietal lobule. We discuss these differences of brain activity in terms of their possible contribution to promoting recovery. PMID:27047353

  5. Comparison of total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide with busulfan plus cyclophosphamide as conditioning regimens in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Celalettin; Pala, Cigdem; Kaynar, Leylagül; Yaray, Kadir; Aksozen, M Tarkan; Bankir, Mehmet; Zararsız, Gökmen; Orhan, Okan; Gündog, Mete; Yıldız, Oguz G; Eser, Bülent; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Conditioning regimens used during stem cell transplant provide prolonged control or cure of the disease in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we present a comparison of treatment results for 95 patients with ALL who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) with total body irradiation plus cyclophosphamide (TBI + Cy) or busulfan plus cyclophosphamide (Bu + Cy) as conditioning regimen. Median age was 25 (range: 9-54) years. Median follow-up was 24 (range: 3-107) months. Median overall survival (OS) was found to be 29 months. Median event-free survival (EFS) was 9 months. Median OS was 37 months in the TBI + Cy arm, while it was 12 months in the Bu + Cy arm, suggesting a significant advantage favoring the TBI + Cy arm (p = 0.003). Median EFS was 13 months in the TBI + Cy arm, while it was 4 months in the Bu + Cy arm, indicating a significant difference (p = 0.006). In univariate and multivariate analysis, it was found that high OS and EFS were significantly correlated with TBI + Cy conditioning regimen and lack of transplant-related mortality (p < 0.05). The TBI + Cy conditioning regimen was found to be superior to the Bu + Cy regimen in patients with ALL undergoing AHSCT regarding both OS and EFS.

  6. Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. Rosenthal, Joseph; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches.

  7. Cultural beliefs about TBI in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Mbakile-Mahlanza, Lingani; Manderson, Lenore; Ponsford, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    Cultural differences have been shown to have an influence on outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined illness representations and the nature of beliefs about TBI in Botswana, a small middle income country in southern Africa. Participants included 26 people who had sustained moderate to severe TBI, 18 caregivers (all significant others) and 27 healthcare workers. A mixed-methods approach was utilised. Illness representations were assessed using the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R), and beliefs and perceptions about cause of injury were established through semi-structured qualitative interviews. Results indicated that participants considered TBI to be chronic in nature and accompanied by serious consequences. Participants held positive attitudes about the manageability of symptoms despite having little understanding about TBI and its consequences. People with TBI tended to report fewer symptoms than did their caregivers. In addition, although some participants held concrete beliefs about the causes of injury, many participants attributed the injury to supernatural causes. Religious interpretations were also commonly held. Although age appeared to be associated with beliefs, no significant relationships existed between demographic factors and beliefs about the injury. This study highlights the importance of understanding the cultural perspectives of patients and their families in order to provide effective care.

  8. Mood Disorders after TBI

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Ricardo E.; Arciniegas, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis In this article, we will examine the epidemiology and risk factors for the development of the most common mood disorders observed in the aftermath of TBI: depressive disorders and bipolar spectrum disorders. We will describe the classification approach and diagnostic criteria proposed in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-V). We will also examine the differential diagnosis of post-TBI mood disorders and describe the mainstay of the evaluation process. Finally, we will place a special emphasis on the analysis of the different therapeutic options and provide guidelines for the appropriate management of these conditions. PMID:24529421

  9. TBI-ROC Part Nine: Diagnosing TBI and Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie; Mustafa, Ruman

    2011-01-01

    This article is the ninth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). It focuses on the process of diagnosing TBI and psychiatric disorders. Diagnosing traumatic brain injury can be challenging. It can be difficult differentiating TBI and psychiatric symptoms, as both have similar symptoms (e.g., memory problems, emotional outbursts,…

  10. TBI-ROC Part Six: Lifelong Living after TBI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeing, Marianne; Barton, Barbara; Zinsmeister, Paula; Brouwers, Lynn; Trudel, Tina M.; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This article is the sixth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and discusses lifelong living after TBI. Following TBI, lifelong outcomes vary depending on the individual affected, treatment provided and severity of injury. Fortunately, many individuals who experience mild concussions common to childhood have no lasting symptoms.…

  11. Intact theory of mind in TBI with behavioural disturbance.

    PubMed

    Bach, L J; Happe, F; Fleminger, S; David, A S

    2006-03-01

    Behavioural disturbance following TBI is common. Theory of mind(ToM) deficits have been noted in autism where difficulties with social interaction and communication are evident. It was hypothesised that TBI patients with behavioural disturbance would show deficits on ToM tasks independent of executive function. Twenty TBI patients with behavioural disturbance and 20 TBI patients without were assessed on verbal (stories) and non-verbal (cartoons) ToM tasks,standard psychometry, and measures of executive function.TBI patients were unimpaired on the ToM tasks. Both groups were unimpaired on standard tests of executive function (verbal fluency and trail making test) but were impaired on the Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS). Groups did not differ significantly on these tests. It is concluded that ToM ability does not predict behavioural disturbance and may be independent of executive functioning.

  12. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin K W; Yang, Zhihui; Yue, John K; Zhang, Zhiqun; Winkler, Ethan A; Puccio, Ava M; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Lingsma, Hester F; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Valadka, Alex B; Gordon, Wayne A; Okonkwo, David O; Manley, Geoffrey T; Cooper, Shelly R; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Hricik, Allison J; Inoue, Tomoo; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Schnyer, David M; Sinha, Tuhin K; Vassar, Mary J

    2016-07-01

    We described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter observational study Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI Pilot (TRACK-TBI Pilot) to cover the full spectrum of TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale 3-15) by using acute (<24 h) plasma samples from 196 patients with acute TBI admitted to three Level I trauma centers, and a second cohort of 21 participants with chronic TBI admitted to inpatient TBI rehabilitation. We find that acute patients self-reporting previous TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) (n = 43) had higher day 1 AutoAb[GFAP] (mean ± standard error: 9.11 ± 1.42; n = 43) than healthy controls (2.90 ± 0.92; n = 16; p = 0.032) and acute patients reporting no previous TBI (2.97 ± 0.37; n = 106; p < 0.001), but not acute patients reporting previous TBI without LOC (8.01 ± 1.80; n = 47; p = 0.906). These data suggest that while exposure to TBI may trigger the AutoAb[GFAP] response, circulating antibodies are elevated specifically in acute TBI patients with a history of TBI. AutoAb[GFAP] levels for participants with chronic TBI (average post-TBI time 176 days or 6.21 months) were also significantly higher (15.08 ± 2.82; n = 21) than healthy controls (p < 0.001). These data suggest a persistent upregulation of the autoimmune response to specific brain antigen(s) in the subacute to chronic phase after TBI, as well as after repeated TBI insults. Hence, AutoAb[GFAP] may be a sensitive assay to study the dynamic interactions between post-injury brain and patient-specific autoimmune responses across acute and chronic settings after TBI.

  13. Towards Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    changes to brain due to TBI. Use of such systems in and near the field should improve clinical outcome for patients suffering from TBI. Our long...due to TBI. Use of such systems in and near the field should improve clinical outcome for patients suffering from TBI. Our long-term goal is to...tissue in support of methodology development exploring in particular the effect of time after euthanasia on inferred brain-tissue stiffness (Figure

  14. The impact of previous traumatic brain injury on health and functioning: a TRACK-TBI study.

    PubMed

    Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Spielman, Lisa; Singh, Ayushi; Gordon, Wayne A; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Manley, Geoffrey T; Mukherjee, Pratik; Okonkwo, David O; Puccio, Ava M; Schnyer, David M; Valadka, Alex B; Yue, John K; Yuh, Esther L

    2013-12-15

    The idea that multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have a cumulative detrimental effect on functioning is widely accepted. Most research supporting this idea comes from athlete samples, and it is not known whether remote history of previous TBI affects functioning after subsequent TBI in community-based samples. This study investigates whether a previous history of TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) is associated with worse health and functioning in a sample of individuals who require emergency department care for current TBI. Twenty-three percent of the 586 individuals with current TBI in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury study reported having sustained a previous TBI with LOC. Individuals with previous TBI were more likely to be unemployed (χ(2)=17.86; p=0.000), report a variety of chronic medical and psychiatric conditions (4.75≤χ(2)≥24.16; p<0.05), and report substance use (16.35≤χ(2)≥27.57; p<0.01) before the acute injury, compared to those with no previous TBI history. Those with a previous TBI had less-severe acute injuries, but experienced worse outcomes at 6-month follow-up. Results of a series of regression analyses controlling for demographics and acute injury severity indicated that individuals with previous TBI reported more mood symptoms, more postconcussive symptoms, lower life satisfaction, and had slower processing speed and poorer verbal learning, compared to those with no previous TBI history. These findings suggest that history of TBI with LOC may have important implications for health and psychological functioning after TBI in community-based samples.

  15. Serum neurogranin measurement as a biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Korley, Frederick K.; Dai, Min; Everett, Allen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neurogranin (NRGN) is a small neuronal protein that plays an important role in synaptic signaling by regulating calmodulin (CaM) availability. In this study, we developed an ELISA to measure NRGN quantitatively in serum samples from a cohort of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients and a non-TBI control cohort, and explored the potential value of NRGN as a circulating biomarker for TBI. Design and methods Recombinant His-NRGN protein was used to develop mouse monoclonal capture and rabbit polyclonal detection antibodies, and they were used to develop a sandwich ELISA. After validation, we used this ELISA to measure serum samples from a cohort of typical adult acute TBI patients (N = 76 TBI cases) and non-TBI control patients (N = 150 controls). Results The NRGN ELISA lower limit of detection was 0.055 ng/mL, lower limit of quantification was 0.2 ng/mL, and interassay CVs were ≤ 10.7%. The average recovery was 99.9% (range from 97.2–102%). Serum NRGN concentrations in TBI cases were significantly higher than in controls (median values were 0.18 ng/mL vs. 0.02 ng/mL, p < 0.0001), but did not discriminate TBI cases with intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.09). Conclusions We have developed a highly sensitive and reproducible ELISA for measuring circulating NRGN in blood samples. Serum NRGN concentrations in acute TBI patients were significantly higher than in controls, indicating that NRGN could have utility as a circulating biomarker for acute TBI. This report provides evidence to support larger and controlled TBI clinical studies for NRGN validation and prediction of outcomes. PMID:26025774

  16. Improved outcomes from the administration of progesterone for patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guomin; Wei, Jing; Yan, Weiqi; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Zhenhui

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been increasing with greater incidence of injuries from traffic or sporting accidents. Although there are a number of animal models of TBI using progesterone for head injury, the effects of progesterone on neurologic outcome of acute TBI patients remain unclear. The aim of the present clinical study was to assess the longer-term efficacy of progesterone on the improvement in neurologic outcome of patients with acute severe TBI. Methods A total of 159 patients who arrived within 8 hours of injury with a Glasgow Coma Score ≤ 8 were enrolled in the study. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of progesterone was conducted in the Neurotrauma Center of our teaching hospital. The patients were randomized to receive either progesterone or placebo. The primary endpoint was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score 3 months after brain injury. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the modified Functional Independence Measure score and mortality. In a follow-up protocol at 6 months, the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Functional Independence Measure scores were again determined. Results Of the 159 patients randomized, 82 received progesterone and 77 received placebo. The demographic characteristics, the mechanism of injury, and the time of treatment were compared for the two groups. After 3 months and 6 months of treatment, the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale score analysis exhibited more favorable outcomes among the patients who were given progesterone compared with the control individuals (P = 0.034 and P = 0.048, respectively). The modified Functional Independence Measure scores in the progesterone group were higher than those in the placebo group at both 3-month and 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The mortality rate of the progesterone group was significantly lower than that of the placebo group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). The mean intracranial pressure values 72 hours and 7 days after

  17. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  18. [Mean ICP, ICP amplitude, mean AP and mean CPP dynamic in changing the position of the head of the bed in patients with severe TBI].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The study included 34 patient with severe TBI (GCS--5.6 +/- 1.2, age--35 +/- 8.2 years). ICP, AP and CPP monitored by Philips MP 4060 with ICM Plus software (UK). Autoregulation of blood flow was evaluated with Prx index. The backrest position was moving in the range 0-30-60-30-0 degrees. Minimal mean ICP was noted in 300 position. ICP in positions 0 degrees and 60 degrees did'nt differ significantly ICP in position 60 degrees was higher then ICP in position 30 degrees. ICP amplitude was raising during changing the position from 0 degrees to 60 degrees and was decreasing during reversing changing. Arterial pressure (AP) was decreasing during movement the head of the bed from 0 degrees to 60 degrees, the maximum of AP was noted in flat position. CPP was increasing during lowering the head of the bed. ICP amplitude and CPP had inverse correlation. ICP amplitude is a simple method of assessment of CPP adequacy during changing the position of the head of the bed in patients with intact autoregulation of cerebral blood flow.

  19. Human Serum Metabolites Associate With Severity and Patient Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Orešič, Matej; Posti, Jussi P; Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja H; Takala, Riikka S K; Lingsma, Hester F; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Katila, Ari J; Carpenter, Keri L H; Ala-Seppälä, Henna; Kyllönen, Anna; Maanpää, Henna-Riikka; Tallus, Jussi; Coles, Jonathan P; Heino, Iiro; Frantzén, Janek; Hutchinson, Peter J; Menon, David K; Tenovuo, Olli; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. TBI is an example of a medical condition where there are still major lacks in diagnostics and outcome prediction. Here we apply comprehensive metabolic profiling of serum samples from TBI patients and controls in two independent cohorts. The discovery study included 144 TBI patients, with the samples taken at the time of hospitalization. The patients were diagnosed as severe (sTBI; n=22), moderate (moTBI; n=14) or mild TBI (mTBI; n=108) according to Glasgow Coma Scale. The control group (n=28) comprised of acute orthopedic non-brain injuries. The validation study included sTBI (n=23), moTBI (n=7), mTBI (n=37) patients and controls (n=27). We show that two medium-chain fatty acids (decanoic and octanoic acids) and sugar derivatives including 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid are strongly associated with severity of TBI, and most of them are also detected at high concentrations in brain microdialysates of TBI patients. Based on metabolite concentrations from TBI patients at the time of hospitalization, an algorithm was developed that accurately predicted the patient outcomes (AUC=0.84 in validation cohort). Addition of the metabolites to the established clinical model (CRASH), comprising clinical and computed tomography data, significantly improved prediction of patient outcomes. The identified 'TBI metabotype' in serum, that may be indicative of disrupted blood-brain barrier, of protective physiological response and altered metabolism due to head trauma, offers a new avenue for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers of broad spectrum of TBIs.

  20. Autobiographical memory and structural brain changes in chronic phase TBI.

    PubMed

    Esopenko, Carrie; Levine, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a range of neuropsychological deficits, including attention, memory, and executive functioning attributable to diffuse axonal injury (DAI) with accompanying focal frontal and temporal damage. Although the memory deficit of TBI has been well characterized with laboratory tests, comparatively little research has examined retrograde autobiographical memory (AM) at the chronic phase of TBI, with no prior studies of unselected patients drawn directly from hospital admissions for trauma. Moreover, little is known about the effects of TBI on canonical episodic and non-episodic (e.g., semantic) AM processes. In the present study, we assessed the effects of chronic-phase TBI on AM in patients with focal and DAI spanning the range of TBI severity. Patients and socioeconomic- and age-matched controls were administered the Autobiographical Interview (AI) (Levine, Svoboda, Hay, Winocur, & Moscovitch, 2002) a widely used method for dissociating episodic and semantic elements of AM, along with tests of neuropsychological and functional outcome. Measures of episodic and non-episodic AM were compared with regional brain volumes derived from high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Severe TBI (but not mild or moderate TBI) was associated with reduced recall of episodic autobiographical details and increased recall of non-episodic details relative to healthy comparison participants. There were no significant associations between AM performance and neuropsychological or functional outcome measures. Within the full TBI sample, autobiographical episodic memory was associated with reduced volume distributed across temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions considered to be part of the brain's AM network. These results suggest that TBI-related distributed volume loss affects episodic autobiographical recollection.

  1. The young patient with acute bloody diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ninan, S; Hamlin, J

    2014-01-01

    Acute bloody diarrhoea may be commonly encountered in the acute medical unit. Among young patients, the main differential diagnoses are acute infectious colitis, and first presentation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A combination of clinical, laboratory, radiological, endoscopic and histological investigations are required to make the diagnosis. If inflammatory bowel disease is suspected, then the patient should be admitted to a specialist gastroenterology ward and receive input from the surgical team, IBD nurses and specialist stoma nurses. Intravenous steroid therapy for acute severe disease should be started before stool cultures are back unless there is a strong clinical suspicion of amoebiasis. All patients require thromboprophylaxis and close attention paid to fluid balance and nutritional requirements. Daily clinical review is required. The Travis criteria may be employed at day 3 to assess the likelihood of requiring surgery and plans for rescue therapy, medical or surgical should be made between day 3-7 if the patient is not responding adequately to initial medical therapy.

  2. Acute appendicitis in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hall, A; Wright, T M

    1976-02-01

    Fifty patients over 60 with proven acute appendictis are analyzed with regards to the preoperative clinical picture, diagnosis, operative findings and management, and the role of associated medical diseases.

  3. Health status of childhood leukemia survivors who received hematopoietic cell transplantation after BU or TBI: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Auquier, P; Herrmann, I; Contet, A; Poiree, M; Demeocq, F; Plantaz, D; Galambrun, C; Barlogis, V; Berbis, J; Garnier, F; Sirvent, N; Kanold, J; Chastagner, P; Chambost, H; Michel, G

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to compare the long-term impact of a preparative regimen with either BUBU or TBI on health status and quality of life (QoL) in childhood acute leukemia survivors treated with hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). Two-hundred and forty patients were included. Sixty-six had received BU, while 174 had received TBI. Median follow-up from HSCT was 10.1 years. Multivariate analyses were performed to assess the occurrence of late effects according to treatment. QoL was assessed in 130 adults using SF-36 questionnaires. Patients developed fewer late complications after BU (2.35 vs 3.01, P=0.03) while the risk to present with at least one complication was equivalent in both groups (87.9% after BU and 93.1% after TBI, P=0.66). Detailed multivariate analyses revealed a lower risk of height growth failure (OR=0.2), cataract (OR=0.1) and iron overload (OR=0.2) after BU, and an increased risk of overweight (OR=3.9) and alopecia (OR=11.2). SF-36 mental and physical composite scores were similar in both treatment groups and proved significantly lower than French norms. Late effects induced by BU might differ from those experienced after TBI. Although less frequent, they are still of considerable importance and may affect patients' QoL.

  4. Acute epiglottitis: A review of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Lon, Shafkat Ahmad; Lateef, Mohd; Sajad, Mir

    2006-04-01

    We reviewed 50 patients admitted to the department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery of Govt Medical College Srinagar from September 19% to September 2002 diagnosed with acute epiglottitis. Male were more commonly involved than females in the ratio of 2.8:1 with only 6 cases younger than 10 years of age. The highest incidence was in the month of January (22%). The common symptoms of acute epiglottitis were sorethroat(92%) and odynophagia(88%). Any patient with sudden onset of these symptoms should be suspected of having acute epiglottitis and should have an indirect laryngoscopy. Blood culture was obtained in 20 cases Cultures were positive only in 5 cases, out of which 4 were positive for Hemophilus influenzae type B. Throat cultures were not obtamed The primary treatment of acute epiglottitis is intravenous antibiotics, steriods, and humidified air. Treacheostomy was needed only in 4 patients. There were no deaths.

  5. Leveraging Game Consoles for the Delivery of TBI Rehabilitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Super, Taryn; Mastaglio, Thomas; Shen, Yuzhong; Walker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel are at a greater risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) than the civilian population. In addition, the increase in exposure to explosives, i.e. , improvised explosive devices, in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, along with more effective body armor, has resulted in far more surviving casualties suffering from TBI than in previous wars. This effort presents the results of a feasibility study and early prototype of a brain injury rehabilitation delivery system (BIRDS). BIRDS is designed to provide medical personnel treating TBI with a capability to prescribe game activities for patients to execute using a commercially available game console, either in a clinical setting or in their homes. These therapeutic activities will contribute to recovery or remediation of the patients' cognitive dysfunctions. Solutions such as this that provide new applications for existing platforms have significant potential to address the growing incidence of TBI today.

  6. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  7. Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L; Creasey, Graham H; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16 to 74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI+TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI+ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI+contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the contralateral

  8. Combined SCI and TBI: Recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L.; Creasey, Graham H.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16–74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI + TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6 weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI + ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI + contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the

  9. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  10. Acute hepatitis C in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Griveas, I; Germanidis, G; Visvardis, G; Morice, Y; Perelson, A S; Pawlotsky, J M; Papadopoulou, D

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in patients with end-stage renal disease treated by chronic dialysis, with a prevalence varying from 10-65% according to the geographical data. The prevalence is significantly associated with the duration of dialysis and the number of transfused blood products[1,2] and has dramatically declined with efficient blood screening.[3] We studied patients with acute HCV infection in a dialysis unit. The diagnosis was based on both anti-HCV detection and HCV-RNA detection. Other virological tools including HCV genotype determination was also used to tailor treatment to the individual patient and determine its efficacy for a one-year follow-up period. Seventeen patients (7 male and 10 female, mean age: 63.7 +/- 11.6 SD) with acute hepatitis C were enrolled to our study. All of them were followed up for a period of one year after the diagnosis was established. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two separate HCV subtypes 1b, which were both responsible for this acute infection (see Figure 1). These types did not differ in their behavior on the clinical situation of our patients, as confirmed by the fact that in both groups of patients, there was only one patient who presented with acute illness. Six patients of our study group, three months after the acute infection, received pegylated interferon (Peg-IFNa2a) 135 mug for a six-month period. Four of them responded very well to therapy and at the first determination HCV RNA was below the cutoff point. One of our patients with very high HCV levels (HCV RNA > 50,000,000 IU/mL), despite receiving the same therapy, did not respond well and developed cirrhosis. In conclusion, it is clear from our experience that better information is needed about the current incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for HCV infection in dialysis patients. Algorithms for the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C should be developed by academic societies. Routine screening for hepatitis C also would allow

  11. Opioid Use after TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    abused prescription pain medications is oxycodone, especially in its sustained release formulation OxyContin3. This pain medication and others in the...suggestive of increased impulsivity • No differences were detected between groups in baseline nociception or in response to the acute anti- nociceptive ...performance was stable ( 3 days >20% change) Assessment of nociception with warm water tail withdrawal: • Rats were habituated to the test apparatus

  12. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  13. Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Multiple-Frequency Bands in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Bai, Lijun; Kuang, Hongmei; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO). Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01-0.08 Hz) in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4) frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the mini-mental state examination score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory, and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  14. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  15. Proceedings of the military mTBI Diagnostics Workshop, St. Pete Beach, August 2010.

    PubMed

    Marion, Donald W; Curley, Kenneth C; Schwab, Karen; Hicks, Ramona R

    2011-04-01

    Approximately 28,000 service members (SMs) sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in the U.S. military. The majority of the injuries result either in a brief or no loss of consciousness, and are classified as a mild TBI (mTBI or concussion). Current evaluation guidelines of SMs suspected of having a mTBI rely heavily on self-reports. However, there is concern that SMs typically minimize or do not report their symptoms of mTBI for fear that doing so will result in being removed from the battlefield. Because mTBI often results in headaches, cognitive dysfunction, attention difficulties, and balance problems, returning to the battlefield before resolution of their symptoms can be dangerous for the SM and for their unit. Sustaining a second concussion before resolution of a previous mTBI also may make long-term neuronal injury more likely. The mTBI Diagnostics Workshop was designed as a forum where civilian and military experts from a variety of TBI-related clinical and basic science disciplines could meet to define the diagnostic tools, alone or in combination, that were most likely to result in an acute, objective diagnosis of mTBI. The premise of the meeting was that a small number of well-focused research projects conducted over the next 2-3 years could be done to validate the optimal test, or more likely combination of tests, that would be practical and reliable for the acute diagnosis of mTBI within 2-3 h of injury in theater. The recommendations of the Workshop are provided in this report.

  16. Similar outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a modified FLAMSA conditioning protocol substituting 4 Gy TBI with treosulfan in an elderly population with high-risk AML.

    PubMed

    Holtick, Udo; Herling, Marco; Pflug, Natali; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Leitzke, Silke; Wolf, Dominik; Hallek, Michael; Scheid, Christof; Chemnitz, Jens M

    2017-03-01

    The fludarabine, amsacrine, and cytarabine (FLAMSA)-reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) protocol has been described to be effective in patients with high-risk and refractory acute myeloic leukemia (AML) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aSCT). To increase safety and tolerability of the conditioning, we previously reported the feasibility to substitute the TBI component by treosulfan in elderly AML patients. We now present long-term follow-up data on patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan compared to the original FLAMSA/4Gy TBI protocol. We retrospectively analyzed 130 consecutive patients with high-risk or relapsed AML after aSCT following FLAMSA conditioning at our center. Fifty-eight patients were treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan due to age and/or comorbidities. Seventy-two patients were treated with FLAMSA/TBI. Median age of patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan was 60 years compared to 46 years in those treated with FLAMSA/TBI. The cumulative incidence of a non-relapse mortality at 4 years was 28% in FLAMSA/treosulfan patients as compared to 13% in FLAMSA/TBI. Cumulative incidence of relapse was higher in patients treated with FLAMSA/TBI (46 vs. 32%). This difference was even more prominent for patients treated in blast persistence prior to transplant (relapse incidence 70% for TBI vs. 35% for treosulfan). The overall and relapse-free survival rates at 4 years were 47 and 41%, respectively, for patients treated with FLAMSA/TBI as compared to 43 and 40% in patients treated with FLAMSA/treosulfan. These data indicate an anti-leukemic activity by FLAMSA/treosulfan especially in patients with a blast persistence prior to transplant. Older age was an independent factor for a higher non-relapse mortality. Translating FLAMSA/treosulfan to younger patients, a lower non-relapse mortality, and an improved anti-leukemic activity might add up to improved overall survival. Randomized studies are required to demonstrate an improved efficacy

  17. Early Administration of Selenium in Patients with Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Double-blinded Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Hassani, Valiollah; Mozari, Shakiba

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out to examine this hypothesis that administration of selenium can prevent the development of injuries by brain trauma and thus can modulate patients’ functional recovery and also improve posttraumatic outcome. Materials and Methods: This double-blinded controlled trial was carried out on 113 patients who were hospitalized following traumatic brain injury (TBI) with Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4–12 that were randomly assigned to receive selenium within 8 h after injury plus standard treatment group or routine standard treatment alone as the control. The primary endpoint was to assess patients’ functional recovery at 2 months after the injury based on extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score (GOS-E). Secondary outcomes included the changes in Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score (FOUR) score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score, side effects of selenium, length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, and length of hospital stay. Results: There was no difference in the length of ICU and hospital stay, the trend of the change in FOUR and SOFA scores within 15 days of first interventions, and the mean APACHE III score on the 1st and 15th days between the two groups. Mortality was 15.8% in selenium group and 19.6% in control group with no between-group difference. No difference was revealed between the two groups in appropriate outcome according to GOS-E score at 60 ± 10 days and also 30 ± 5 days according to the severity of TBI. Conclusion: This human trial study could not demonstrate beneficial effects of intravenous infusion of selenium in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI. PMID:28250601

  18. Comparison of acute and chronic traumatic brain injury using semi-automatic multimodal segmentation of MR volumes.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Alger, Jeffry R; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D

    2011-11-01

    Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... data.cdc.gov . Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, ... related Hospitalizations by Age Group and Injury Mechanism Deaths Rates of TBI-related Deaths by Sex Rates ...

  20. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  1. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in older adults: aging with a TBI versus incident TBI in the aged.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew E

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 39 million older adults (age >65) were evaluated for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in United States emergency departments during the 2-year period from 2009 to 2010, representing a 61% increase in estimates from prior years (Albrecht et al., 2015a). Across the lifespan, an estimated 5.3 million Americans are living with a TBI-related disability (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2003). With improved recognition and management, more individuals experiencing TBI are surviving to die of other causes later in life (Flanagan et al., 2005). Taken together, these statistics highlight two important populations: those who are "aging with a TBI" and "incident TBI in the aged."

  2. Tracing patients from acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Double, D; MacPherson, R; Wong, T

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of those admitted to acute psychiatric wards in Sheffield in 1985 was traced to establish whether or not the patients were homeless 5 years later. Contrary to expectations none were found to be homeless. Although the proportion of mentally ill amongst the homeless may be significantly high, the number discharged from psychiatric hospital, at least in Sheffield, living consistently 'on the streets' or staying regularly in night shelters seems small as a proportion of all discharges. PMID:8410893

  3. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial infarction using Tc-99m TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Campbell, S.; Kirshenbaum, J.M.; Lister-James, J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Antman, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cationic complex Tc-99m t-butylisonitrile (TBI) concentrates in the myocardial tissue of several animal species. Its myocardial distribution is proportional to blood flow both in zones of ischemia and in normal myocardium at rest. Planar, tomographic, and gated myocardial images have been obtained using Tc-99m TBI in the human. The authors investigated the potential application of Tc-99m TBI imaging to detect and localize myocardial infarction. Four subjects without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease and five patients with ECG evidence of previous myocardial infarction were studied. Tc-99m TBI (10mCi) was injected intravenously with the patient in a resting state with planar imaging in the anterior, 30 and 70 degree LAO projections beginning one hr after injection. The distribution of the tracer was homogeneous throughout the left ventricular wall in the normal subjects. Regional perfusion defects were present in 4/5 of the patients with myocardial infarction. Location of the defects corresponded to the location of the infarct using ECG criteria (2 inferoposterior and 2 anterior). The patient in whom the Tc-99m TBI image appeared normal had sustained a subendocardial myocardial infarct which could not be localized by ECG; the other 4 pts had transmural infarcts. Anterior and 30 degree LAO images were of excellent quality in all cases; there was overlap of the liver on the inferior wall of the left ventricle on the 70 degree LAO views. The authors conclude that accurate perfusion imaging may be possible using Tc-99m TBI in patients with transmural myocardial infarction.

  4. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  5. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Kathryn A.; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Menon, David K.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT “Lab” model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research. PMID:25898072

  6. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  7. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    motion by the blast, (3) being thrown to the ground or against another stationary object or (4) inhaling toxic fumes, smoke or dust (Finkel, 2006;Warden...14. Cooper, D.B., Chau, P.M., Armistead-Jehle, P., Vanderploeg, R.D. and Bowles , A.O. (2012). Relationship between mechanism of injury and

  8. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    brain injury in Afghanistan." Neurology 85(3): 219-227. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26109715 Binder, E. B., Bradley , R. G., Liu, W., Epstein...J., Carroll , L.J., Holm, L.W., and Cassidy, J.D. 2014. Systematic review of 401 prognosis after mild traumatic brain injury in the military: results

  9. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    and performance on several neuropsychological test measures (Fig. 4B–D). Sleep deprivation was self-reported as FIG. 3. Post-traumatic stress disorder...Likewise, FIG 4. Correlations between self-reported sleep deprivation and test performance . (A) Positive correlation with Neurobehavioral Rating Scale...arrows indicate direction of worse performance . A. Simple reaction time. B. Simple reaction time repeated. C. Sleep deprivation by self-report (hours

  10. Pupillometry and Saccades as Objective mTBI Biomark

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    objective biomarkers 14. ABSTRACT The objective of the study is to validate pupillary light reflex (PLR), saccadic and convergence eye movements as...pupillary light reflex (PLR), saccadic and convergence eye movements as objective biomarkers for the identification of Warfighters with acute mTBI using...groups, had normal pupil response and no afferent pupil defect with the manual penlight examination. Pupillary light reflexes (Figure 1) and

  11. Phase I Trial of Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation Transplantation Conditioning in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Anthony; Palmer, Joycelynne; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Al Malki, Monzr M; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Ali, Haris; Aribi, Ahmed; Farol, Len; Karanes, Chatchada; Khaled, Samer; Liu, An; O'Donnell, Margaret; Parker, Pablo; Pawlowska, Anna; Pullarkat, Vinod; Radany, Eric; Rosenthal, Joseph; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Salhotra, Amandeep; Sanchez, James F; Schultheiss, Tim; Spielberger, Ricardo; Thomas, Sandra H; Snyder, David; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Marcucci, Guido; Forman, Stephen J; Wong, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    Current conditioning regimens provide insufficient disease control in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with active disease. Intensification of chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation (TBI) is not feasible because of excessive toxicity. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) allows for precise delivery and increased intensity treatment via sculpting radiation to sites with high disease burden or high risk for disease involvement, while sparing normal tissue. We conducted a phase I trial in 51 patients (age range, 16 to 57 years) with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia undergoing HSCT (matched related, matched unrelated, or 1-allele mismatched unrelated) with active disease, combining escalating doses of TMLI (range, 1200 to 2000 cGy) with cyclophosphamide (CY) and etoposide (VP16). The maximum tolerated dose was declared at 2000 cGy, as TMLI simulation studies indicated that >2000 cGy might deliver doses toxic for normal organs at or exceeding those delivered by standard TBI. The post-transplantation nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was only 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], .7 to 12.0) at day +100 and 8.1% (95% CI, 2.5 to 18.0) at 1 year. The cumulative incidence of grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 43.1% (95% CI, 29.2 to 56.3) and for grade III and IV, it was 13.7% (95% CI, 6.9 to 27.3). The day +30 complete remission rate for all patients was 88% and was 100% for those treated at 2000 cGy. The overall 1-year survival was 55.5% (95% CI, 40.7 to 68.1). The TMLI/CY/VP16 conditioning regimen is well tolerated at TMLI doses up to 2000 cGy with a low 100-day and 1-year NRM rate and no increased risk of GVHD with higher doses of radiation.

  12. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Seecheran, Valmiki K.; Giddings, Stanley L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has considerably increased the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of mortality in patients infected with HIV. This is primarily attributed to their increased survival, HAART-induced metabolic derangements, and to HIV itself. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in HIV is both multifactorial and complex – involving direct endothelial injury and dysfunction, hypercoagulability, and a significant contribution from traditional cardiac risk factors. The advent of HAART has since heralded a remarkable improvement in outcomes, but at the expense of other unforeseen issues. It is thus of paramount importance to swiftly recognize and manage acute coronary syndromes in HIV-infected patients to attenuate adverse complications, which should translate into improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27845996

  13. Proceedings of the Military mTBI Diagnostics Workshop, St. Pete Beach, August 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    oculomotor Physical examination findings Neurological soft signs (two-point discrimination); structured clinical interview MACE, Military Acute...spectrum of diagnostic tests were carefully con - sidered, and potential advantages and disadvantages of each test were discussed. There was general...promising for early mTBI diagnosis are listed first. mTBI, mild traumatic brain injury; ELISA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; FDA, U.S. Food and Drug

  14. Backscatter Correction Algorithm for TBI Treatment Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Arrans, R.; Terron, J.A.; Errazquin, L.

    2015-01-15

    The accuracy requirements in target dose delivery is, according to ICRU, ±5%. This is so not only in standard radiotherapy but also in total body irradiation (TBI). Physical dosimetry plays an important role in achieving this recommended level. The semi-infinite phantoms, customarily used for dosimetry purposes, give scatter conditions different to those of the finite thickness of the patient. So dose calculated in patient’s points close to beam exit surface may be overestimated. It is then necessary to quantify the backscatter factor in order to decrease the uncertainty in this dose calculation. The backward scatter has been well studied at standard distances. The present work intends to evaluate the backscatter phenomenon under our particular TBI treatment conditions. As a consequence of this study, a semi-empirical expression has been derived to calculate (within 0.3% uncertainty) the backscatter factor. This factor depends lineally on the depth and exponentially on the underlying tissue. Differences found in the qualitative behavior with respect to standard distances are due to scatter in the bunker wall close to the measurement point.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  16. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  17. Ultrasonic evaluation of patients with acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Laing, F C; Federle, M P; Jeffrey, R B; Brown, T W

    1981-08-01

    To define the role of ultrasound in evaluating acute right upper quadrant pain, a prospective study was performed on 52 patients having clinically suspected acute cholecystitis. Ultrasonographic determination of acute or chronic cholecystitis, or diagnosis of a normal gallbladder, was based on analysis of location of tenderness, calculi, sludge, and wall thickness. The diagnosis of acute cholecystitis (34.6% of patients) was based on the highly significant observations of focal gallbladder tenderness and calculi. Sludge and wall thickening were also statistically significant, but to a lesser degree. Cholelithiasis allowed differentiation of patients with chronic cholecystitis (32.7%) from patients with normal gallbladders (32.7%). Neither of these two groups had significant focal gallbladder tenderness, sludge, or thickened walls. Because acute cholecystitis is found in the minority of patients with acute right upper quadrant pain, and because ultrasound is rapid, accurate, and noninvasive, it should be the initial modality used to evaluate these patients.

  18. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  19. Catecholaminergic based therapies for functional recovery after TBI.

    PubMed

    Osier, Nicole D; Dixon, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    Among the many pathophysiologic consequences of traumatic brain injury are changes in catecholamines, including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. In the context of TBI, dopamine is the one most extensively studied, though some research exploring epinephrine and norepinephrine have also been published. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence surrounding use of drugs that target the catecholaminergic system on pathophysiological and functional outcomes of TBI using published evidence from pre-clinical and clinical brain injury studies. Evidence of the effects of specific drugs that target catecholamines as agonists or antagonists will be discussed. Taken together, available evidence suggests that therapies targeting the catecholaminergic system may attenuate functional deficits after TBI. Notably, it is fairly common for TBI patients to be treated with catecholamine agonists for either physiological symptoms of TBI (e.g. altered cerebral perfusion pressures) or a co-occuring condition (e.g. shock), or cognitive symptoms (e.g. attentional and arousal deficits). Previous clinical trials are limited by methodological limitations, failure to replicate findings, challenges translating therapies to clinical practice, the complexity or lack of specificity of catecholamine receptors, as well as potentially counfounding effects of personal and genetic factors. Overall, there is a need for additional research evidence, along with a need for systematic dissemination of important study details and results as outlined in the common data elements published by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. Ultimately, a better understanding of catecholamines in the context of TBI may lead to therapeutic advancements. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery.

  20. Mapping the Vasculome for Biomarkers in TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    moderate TBI. In this proposal, our plan was to develop a “vasculome” database for TBI brain . By mapping the vasculome (i.e. entire gene expression profile...proposal, our plan was to develop a “vasculome” database for TBI brain . By mapping the vasculome (i.e. entire gene expression profile in blood vessels...secretes proteins into blood. Because the endothelium can survey the entire brain , they act as cellular integrators and sensors of brain dysfunction

  1. Traumatic brain injury results in acute rarefication of the vascular network.

    PubMed

    Obenaus, Andre; Ng, Michelle; Orantes, Amanda M; Kinney-Lang, Eli; Rashid, Faisal; Hamer, Mary; DeFazio, Richard A; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H; Pearce, William J

    2017-03-22

    The role of the cerebrovascular network and its acute response to TBI is poorly defined and emerging evidence suggests that cerebrovascular reactivity is altered. We explored how cortical vessels are physically altered following TBI using a newly developed technique, vessel painting. We tested our hypothesis that a focal moderate TBI results in global decrements to structural aspects of the vasculature. Rats (naïve, sham-operated, TBI) underwent a moderate controlled cortical impact. Animals underwent vessel painting perfusion to label the entire cortex at 1 day post TBI followed by whole brain axial and coronal images using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Cortical vessel network characteristics were analyzed for classical angiographic features (junctions, lengths) wherein we observed significant global (both hemispheres) reductions in vessel junctions and vessel lengths of 33% and 22%, respectively. Biological complexity can be quantified using fractal geometric features where we observed that fractal measures were also reduced significantly by 33%, 16% and 13% for kurtosis, peak value frequency and skewness, respectively. Acutely after TBI there is a reduction in vascular network and vascular complexity that are exacerbated at the lesion site and provide structural evidence for the bilateral hemodynamic alterations that have been reported in patients after TBI.

  2. Salivary secretion in children after fractionated or single-dose TBI.

    PubMed

    Garming Legert, K; Remberger, M; Ringdèn, O; Heimdahl, A; Dahllöf, G

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of long-term oral complications after hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) varies between 60 and 100%. The aim of this study was to compare the salivary secretion rate and the contribution of known risk factors for a low salivary secretion rate 1 year after HSCT in children conditioned with fractionated TBI (fTBI) and in children conditioned with single-dose TBI (sTBI). The study involved 44 patients, 27 conditioned with sTBI and 17 conditioned with fTBI. The unstimulated and stimulated salivary secretion rates (USSRs and SSSRs) were estimated before HSCT and at 1-year follow-up. Risk factors that may have influenced the salivary secretion rate were recorded. An SSSR of ≤0.5 mL/min and a USSR of ≤0.1 mL/min were chosen as cut-off points for salivary dysfunction. The median reduction in stimulated salivary flow 1 year after HSCT was 56% in the sTBI group and 12% in the fTBI group (P=0.003). The median reduction in unstimulated salivary flow 1 year after HSCT was 74% in the sTBI group and 33% in the fTBI group (P=0.003). In the multivariate model, a significant correlation between both sTBI (odds ratio (OR)=6.49, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.40-30, P=0.014) and seropositivity of the recipient for 3-4 herpesviruses (OR=6.57, 95% CI=1.26-34, P=0.021) and a low stimulated salivary secretion rate (<0.5 mL/min) was found 1 year after HSCT.

  3. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally.

  4. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  5. SU-E-T-812: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy-Total Body Irradiation (VMAT-TBI) V.s. Conventional Extended SSD-TBI (cTBI): A Dosimetric Comparisom

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, L; Folkerts, M; Lee, H; Ramirez, E; Timmerman, R; Abdulrahman, R; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric evaluation on a new developed volumetric modulated arc therapy based total body irradiation (VMAT-TBI). Methods: Three patients were CT scanned with an indexed rotatable body frame to get whole body CT images. Concatenated CT images were imported in Pinnacle treatment planning system and whole body and lung were contoured as PTV and organ at risk, respectively. Treatment plans were generated by matching multiple isocenter volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) fields of the upper body and multiple isocenter parallel-opposed fields of the lower body. For each plan, 1200 cGy in 8 fractions was prescribed to the whole body volume and the lung dose was constrained to a mean dose of 750 cGy. Such a two-level dose plan was achieved by inverse planning of the torso VMAT fields. For comparison, conventional standing TBI (cTBI) plans were generated on the same whole body CT images at an extended SSD (550cm).The shape of compensators and lung blocks are simulated using body segments and lung contours Compensation was calculated based on the patient CT images, in mimic of the standing TBI treatment. The whole body dose distribution of cTBI plans were calculated with a home-developed GPU Monte Carlo dose engine. Calculated cTBI dose distribution was prescribed to the mid-body point at umbilical level. Results: The VMAT-TBI treatment plans of three patients’ plans achieved 80.2%±5.0% coverage of the total body volume within ±10% of the prescription dose, while cTBI treatment plans achieved 72.2%±4.0% coverage of the total body volume. The averaged mean lung dose of all three patients is lower for VMAT-TBI (7.48 cGy) than for cTBI (8.96 cGy). Conclusion: The proposed patient comfort-oriented VMAT-TBI technique provides for a uniform dose distribution within the total body while reducing the dose to the lungs.

  6. Recovery in memory function, and its relationship to academic success, at 24 months following pediatric TBI.

    PubMed

    Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2007-05-01

    While a number of research papers have reported findings on memory deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI), only limited studies have monitored the recovery of these skills over time. The present study examined memory ability and its effect on academic success in a group of children who had sustained a mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Results showed that the severe TBI group exhibited greater deficits on memory tasks, irrespective of modality, in the acute, 6-, 12-, and 24-month postinjury stages, in comparison to mild and moderate TBI groups. Performance on academic measures was dependent on both injury severity and task demands. Preinjury academic ability and verbal memory indices best predicted academic success.

  7. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  8. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  9. Common biochemical defects linkage between post-traumatic stress disorders, mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and penetrating TBI.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kedar N; Bondy, Stephen C

    2015-03-02

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder with psychological and emotional components, caused by exposure to single or repeated extreme traumatic events found in war, terrorist attacks, natural or man-caused disasters, and by violent personal assaults and accidents. Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when the brain is violently rocked back and forth within the skull following a blow to the head or neck as in contact sports, or when in close proximity to a blast pressure wave following detonation of explosives in the battlefield. Penetrating TBI occurs when an object penetrates the skull and damages the brain, and is caused by vehicle crashes, gunshot wound to the head, and exposure to solid fragments in the proximity of explosions, and other combat-related head injuries. Despite clinical studies and improved understanding of the mechanisms of cellular damage, prevention and treatment strategies for patients with PTSD and TBI remain unsatisfactory. To develop an improved plan for treating and impeding progression of PTSD and TBI, it is important to identify underlying biochemical changes that may play key role in the initiation and progression of these disorders. This review identifies three common biochemical events, namely oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and excitotoxicity that participate in the initiation and progression of these conditions. While these features are separately discussed, in many instances, they overlap. This review also addresses the goal of developing novel treatments and drug regimens, aimed at combating this triad of events common to, and underlying, injury to the brain.

  10. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  11. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, L; Alam, J; Lane, S

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  12. Exploring the relationship between boredom proneness and self-control in traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Isacescu, Julia; Danckert, James

    2016-05-23

    Characterized as an agitated state in which the individual is motivated to engage in their environment but all attempts to do so fail to satisfy, boredom represents a disengaged attentional state that is associated with negative affect and poor self-control. There have been anecdotal reports of increased levels of boredom post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). For the first time, we provide objective evidence that TBI patients do indeed experience higher levels of boredom proneness. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that the presence and severity of head injury were a significant positive predictor of levels of boredom proneness and a negative predictor of self-control. As with healthy controls, TBI patients showed a strong negative correlation between boredom proneness and self-control-those with lower levels of self-control exhibited higher levels of boredom proneness. This was despite the fact that our TBI patients reported higher overall levels of self-control (probably concomitant with their older mean age). The TBI patients also showed strong positive correlations between boredom proneness and measures of physical aggression and anger. Together, this suggests that patients with TBI may be more susceptible to increased levels of boredom proneness and other negative affective states that arise as a consequence of failures of self-control.

  13. EYE-TRAC: monitoring attention and utility for mTBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruta, Jun; Tong, Jianliang; Lee, Stephanie W.; Iqbal, Zarah; Schonberger, Alison; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2012-06-01

    Attention is a core function in cognition and also the most prevalent cognitive deficit in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Predictive timing is an essential element of attention functioning because sensory processing and execution of goal-oriented behavior are facilitated by temporally accurate prediction. It is hypothesized that impaired synchronization between prediction and external events accounts for the attention deficit in mTBI. Other cognitive and somatic or affective symptoms associated with mTBI may be explained as secondary consequences of impaired predictive timing. Eye-Tracking Rapid Attention Computation (EYE-TRAC) is the quantification of predictive timing with indices of dynamic visuo-motor synchronization (DVS) between the gaze and the target during continuous predictive visual tracking. Such quantification allows for cognitive performance monitoring in comparison to the overall population as well as within individuals over time. We report preliminary results of normative data and data collected from subjects with a history of mTBI within 2 weeks of injury and post-concussive symptoms at the time of recruitment. A substantial proportion of mTBI subjects demonstrated DVS scores worse than 95% of normal subjects. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of acute mTBI subjects showed that initially abnormal DVS scores were followed by improvement toward the normal range. In summary, EYE-TRAC provides fast and objective indices of DVS that allow comparison of attention performance to a normative standard and monitoring of within-individual changes.

  14. Telerehabilitation for Veterans with Combat Related TBI/PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-205 15 - 1 Telerehabilitation for Veterans with Combat Related TBI/PTSD Kris Siddharthan, PhD James A Haley Veterans Hospital...impairments in physical, cognitive, behavioural and social function. Objectives: The ongoing telerehabilitation at the James Haley Veterans...coordination to meet the needs of OIF/OEF veterans with combat injuries. 2) Determine the immediate and sustained effects of telerehabilitation on patient

  15. Acute suppurative parotitis in a 33-day-old patient.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Belet, Nursen; Karli, Arzu; Sensoy, Gulnar

    2015-06-01

    Acute suppurative parotitis is a rare disease in childhood. Its incidence is higher in premature newborns. Parotid swelling and pus drainage from Stenson's duct is pathognomonic, and Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent in most cases. Here, a 33-day-old patient with acute suppurative parotitis is presented.

  16. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  19. Bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute coma.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Enise; Voss, Frederik; Gerigk, Roland; Lauterbach, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Loss of protective airway reflexes in patients with acute coma puts these patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia complicating the course of the primary disease. Available data vary considerably with regard to bacteriology, role of anaerobic bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Our objective was to research the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in acute coma patients who were not pre-treated with antibiotics or hospitalized within 30 days prior to the event. We prospectively analyzed 127 patient records from adult patients admitted, intubated and ventilated to a tertiary medical intensive care unit with acute coma. Bacteriology and antibiotic resistance testing from tracheal aspirate sampled within 24 h after admission, blood cultures, ICU scores (APACHE II, SOFA), hematology, and clinical chemistry were assessed. Patients were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The majority of patients with acute coma suffered from acute cardiovascular disorders, predominantly myocardial infarction, followed by poisonings, and coma of unknown cause. In a majority of our patients, microaspiration resulted in overt infection. Most frequently S. aureus, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae were isolated. Anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides spec., Fusobacteria, Prevotella spec.) were isolated from tracheal aspirate in a minority of patients, and predominantly as part of a mixed infection. Antibiotic monotherapy with a 2nd generation cephalosporin, or a 3rd generation gyrase inhibitor, was most effective in our patients regardless of the presence of anaerobic bacteria.

  20. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Euler de Medeiros Ázaro; Galvão, Thales Delmondes; Ettinger, João Eduardo Marques de Menezes; Silva Reis, Jadson Murilo; Lima, Marcos; Fahel, Edvaldo

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the major complication of biliary lithiasis, for which laparoscopic treatment has been established as the standard therapy. With longer life expectancy, acute cholecystitis has often been seen in elderly patients (>65 years old) and is often accompanied by comorbity and severe complications. We sought to compare the outcome of laparoscopic treatment for acute cholecystitis with special focus on comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients. Method: This study was a prospective analysis of 190 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute cholecystitis or chronic acute cholecystitis, comparing elderly and nonelderly patients. Results: Of 190 patients, 39 (21%) were elderly (>65 years old) and 151 (79%) were not elderly (≤65 years), with conversion rates of 10.3% and 6.6% (P=0.49), respectively. The incidence of postoperative complications in elderly and nonelderly patients were the following, respectively: atelectasis 5.1% and 2.0% (P=0.27); respiratory infection 5.1% and 2.7% (P=0.6); bile leakage 5.1% and 2.0% (P=0.27), and intraabdominal abscess 1 case (0.7%) and no incidence (P=1). Conclusion: According to our data, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in patients older than 65 years of age. PMID:17575761

  1. Combat veterans with comorbid PTSD and mild TBI exhibit a greater inhibitory processing ERP from the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Shu, I-Wei; Onton, Julie A; O'Connell, Ryan M; Simmons, Alan N; Matthews, Scott C

    2014-10-30

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among combat personnel with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While patients with either PTSD or mTBI share abnormal activation of multiple frontal brain areas, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity during inhibitory processing may be particularly affected by PTSD. To further test this hypothesis, we recorded electroencephalography from 32 combat veterans with mTBI-17 of whom were also comorbid for PTSD (mTBI+PTSD) and 15 without PTSD (mTBI-only). Subjects performed the Stop Task, a validated inhibitory control task requiring inhibition of initiated motor responses. We observed a larger inhibitory processing eventrelated potential (ERP) in veterans with mTBI+PTSD, including greater N200 negativity. Furthermore, greater N200 negativity correlated with greater PTSD severity. This correlation was most dependent on contributions from the dorsal ACC. Support vector machine analysis demonstrated that N200 and P300 amplitudes objectively classified veterans into mTBI-only or mTBI+PTSD groups with 79.4% accuracy. Our results support a model where, in combat veterans with mTBI, larger ERPs from cingulate areas are associated with greater PTSD severity and likely related to difficulty controlling ongoing brain processes, including trauma-related thoughts and feelings.

  2. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Grill RJ, Parsley MA, Unabia G, Hulsebosch CE. Anti- inflammatory treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Society for Neuroscience, 2009...Hulsebosch, CD, DeWitt DS, Dash PK, Grill RJ, Parsley MA, Unabia, BC, Rea HC, & Perez-Polo, JR Role of IL-1 and TNF receptor activation in neurological...deficits at TBI. Military health Research Forum, 2009. Hulsebosch, CD, DeWitt DS, Dash PK, Grill RJ, Parsley MA, Unabia, BC, Rea HC, & Perez-Polo, JR

  3. Associations between Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity and the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) in Civilian Mild TBI

    PubMed Central

    Sours, Chandler; Rosenberg, Joseph; Kane, Robert; Roys, Steve; Zhuo, Jiachen; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Gullapalli, Rao P.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive deficits and alterations in resting state functional connectivity in civilian mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) participants with high and low symptoms. Forty-one mTBI participants completed a resting state fMRI scan and the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) during initial testing (<10 days of injury) and a one month follow up. Data were compared to 30 healthy control subjects. Results from the ANAM demonstrate that mTBI participants performed significantly worse than controls on the code substitution delayed subtest (p=0.032) and weighted throughput score (p=0.001). Among the mTBI patients, high symptom mTBI participants performed worse than those with low symptoms on the code substitution delayed (p=0.017), code substitution (p=0.012), repeated simple reaction time (p=0.031), and weighted throughput score (p=0.009). Imaging results reveal that during the initial visit, low symptom mTBI participants had reduced interhemispheric functional connectivity (IH-FC) within the lateral parietal lobe (p=0.020); however, during follow up, high symptom mTBI participants showed reduced IH-FC compared to the control group within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (p=0.013). Reduced IH-FC within the DLPFC during the follow-up was associated with reduced cognitive performance. Together, these findings suggest that reduced rs-FC may contribute to the subtle cognitive deficits noted in high symptom mTBI participants compared to control subjects and low symptom mTBI participants. PMID:24557591

  4. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  5. Blast TBI Models, Neuropathology, and Implications for Seizure Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S. Krisztian; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S. F.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies. PMID:24782820

  6. fNIRS-based investigation of the Stroop task after TBI.

    PubMed

    Plenger, Patrick; Krishnan, Kamini; Cloud, Matthew; Bosworth, Chris; Qualls, Devin; Marquez de la Plata, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate neural changes during a Stroop task among individuals with TBI using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Thirteen healthy controls and 14 patients with moderate to severe TBI were included in this study. Oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) was recorded every tenth of a second using a 52-channel fNIRS unit. Data were acquired using a block design during a Stroop task (i.e., Condition A = Dot Color Naming, Condition B = Incongruent Condition). Visual stimuli were presented on a computer monitor. Behaviorally, response accuracy was similar between groups for condition A, but the TBI group made more errors than the control group during condition B. During condition A, the patient group demonstrated significant increases in HbO within bilateral frontal regions compared to controls (p < 0.01). When examining the Stroop interference effect (B-A), controls showed increased HbO in bilateral frontal lobes and left inferior parietal region suggesting increased neural response to increased cognitive demand, whereas no differences were detected among the TBI group (p < 0.05). No between group differences in latency of HbO response was observed during either condition. While the TBI group performed as accurately as controls on the simpler dot color naming condition of the Stroop task, neural activity was greater within the frontal lobes during this relatively simple task among the TBI group suggesting neural inefficiency. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of neural activity related to the interference effect was not different among patients, suggesting the neural demand for the simpler task was comparable to that of the more cognitive demanding task among the TBI sample. The results suggest that fNIRS can identify frontal lobe inefficiency in TBI commonly observed with fMRI.

  7. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  8. Fludarabine/2 Gy TBI is Superior to 2 Gy TBI as Conditioning for HLA-Matched Related HCT: A Phase III Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Maloney, David G.; Storb, Rainer; Storek, Jan; Hari, Parameswaran; Vucinic, Vladan; Maziarz, Richard T.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Hübel, Kai; Bouvier, Michelle E.; Fukuda, Takahiro; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    The risk/benefit of adding fludarabine to a 2 Gy total body irradiation nonmyeloablative regimen is unknown. For this reason we conducted a prospective randomized trial comparing 2 Gy TBI alone or in combination with 90mg/m2 fludarabine (FLU/TBI) before transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells from HLA-matched related donors. Eighty-five patients with hematological malignancies were randomized to be conditioned with TBI alone (n=44) or FLU/TBI (n=41). All patients had initial engraftment. Two graft rejections were observed, both in the TBI group. Infection rates, nonrelapse mortality, and GVHD were similar between groups. Three-year overall survival was lower in the TBI group (54% vs. 65%; hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; p=0.09), with higher incidences of relapse/progression (55% vs. 40%; HR 0.55; p=0.06) and relapse-related mortality (37% vs. 28%; HR 0.53; p=0.09), and a lower progression-free survival (36% vs. 53%; HR 0.56; p=0.05). Median donor T-cell chimerism levels were significantly lower in the TBI group at days 28 (61% vs. 90%; p<0.0001) and 84 (68% vs. 92%; p<0.0001), as was NK-cell chimerism on day 28 (75% vs. 96%, p=0.0005). In conclusion, this randomized trial demonstrates the importance of fludarabine in augmenting the graft-versus-tumor effect by ensuring prompt and durable high level donor engraftment early post-transplant. PMID:23769990

  9. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  10. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  11. A patient with seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ryoji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiji; Takeyama, Koh; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2005-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis. At the first visit to the clinic, the patient wished to check whether he had Chlamydia trachomatis in his genital tract, because his wife had been diagnosed as having chlamydial cervicitis. He had no specific symptoms at that time; however, transrectal ultrasonograpy (TRUS) revealed swelling of seminal vesicles, which suggested the presence of seminal vesiculitis. Two days after the first visit, he had high-grade fever and was diagnosed as having acute epididymitis caused by C. trachomatis. We had previously reported that seminal vesiculitis was always complicated with acute epididymitis, so this case could provide important evidence that seminal vesiculitis might precede acute epididymitis. It suggested that acute epididymitis could be affected by seminal vesiculitis via the retrograde transmission route.

  12. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  14. Acute coronary syndrome among older patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerasamy, Murugapathy; Edwards, Richard; Ford, Gary; Kirkwood, Tom; Newton, Julia; Jones, Dave; Kunadian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Due to advances in medicine in the past few decades, life expectancy has increased resulting in an aging population in developed and developing countries. Acute coronary syndrome causes greater morbidity and mortality in this group of older patients, which appears to be due to age-related comorbidities. This review examines the incidence and prevalence of acute coronary syndrome among older patients, examines current treatment strategies, and evaluates the predictors of adverse outcomes. In particular, the impact of frailty on outcomes and the need for frailty assessment in developing future research and management strategies among older patients are discussed.

  15. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  16. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  17. Determination of Serum Lost Goodwill Target Proteome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongming; Hu, Changchen; Zhang, Gangli; Ren, Jinrui; Tan, Yihu; Sun, Wenxiao; Wang, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchao; Xie, Ruifan; Hao, Zhipeng; Guo, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the biokinetics of LGT proteome, a potential biomarker of severe TBI, in serum of severe TBI patients. The LGT proteome presents in the serum of severe TBI patients. The abundance diversity of LGT proteome is closely associated with pathologic condition of TBI patients. Serum LGT proteome may be used as a promising marker for evaluating severity of severe TBI.

  18. [Methohexital clearance in patients with acute hepatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, E; Gallenkamp, H; Heusler, H; Zilly, W; Breimer, D D

    1979-10-26

    Pharmacokinetics of methohexital were studied in patients with acute hepatitis and after a treatment period either with "essential phospholipids" or phenobarbital. During the acute phase the distribution of methohexital was significantly altered. No change had been observed in the methohexital clearance. During remission the distribution of methohexital was in a normal range. After treatment with phenobarbital the methohexital clearance increased significantly whereas no change was observed after treatment with "essential phospholipids".

  19. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (P<0.001 and P=0.009, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression revealed that pneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, P<0.001). In conclusion, pneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  20. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  1. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  2. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tara D.; Hylin, Michael J.; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N.; Waxham, M. Neal; Dash, Pramod K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  3. Adolescent TBI-induced hypopituitarism causes sexual dysfunction in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Greco, Tiffany; Hovda, David A; Prins, Mayumi L

    2015-02-01

    Adolescents are at greatest risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and repeat TBI (RTBI). TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been documented in both adults and juveniles and despite the necessity of pituitary function for normal physical and brain development, it is still unrecognized and untreated in adolescents following TBI. TBI induced hormonal dysfunction during a critical developmental window has the potential to cause long-term cognitive and behavioral deficits and the topic currently remains unaddressed. The purpose of this study was to determine if four mild TBIs delivered to adolescent male rats disrupts testosterone production and adult behavioral outcomes. Plasma testosterone was quantified from 72 hrs preinjury to 3 months postinjury and pubertal onset, reproductive organ growth, erectile function and reproductive behaviors were assessed at 1 and 2 months postinjury. RTBI resulted in both acute and chronic decreases in testosterone production and delayed onset of puberty. Significant deficits were observed in reproductive organ growth, erectile function and reproductive behaviors in adult rats at both 1 and 2 months postinjury. These data suggest adolescent RTBI-induced hypopituitarism underlies abnormal behavioral changes observed during adulthood. The impact of undiagnosed hypopituitarism following RTBI in adolescence has significance not only for growth and puberty, but also for brain development and neurobehavioral function as adults.

  4. Health-related quality of life after TBI: a systematic review of study design, instruments, measurement properties, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Polinder, Suzanne; Haagsma, Juanita A; van Klaveren, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Beeck, Ed F

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQL) is essential to quantify the subjective burden of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in survivors. We performed a systematic review of HRQL studies in TBI to evaluate study design, instruments used, methodological quality, and outcome. Fifty-eight studies were included, showing large variation in HRQL instruments and assessment time points used. The Short Form-36 (SF-36) was most frequently used. A high prevalence of health problems during and after the first year of TBI was a common finding of the studies included. In the long term, patients with a TBI still showed large deficits from full recovery compared to population norms. Positive results for internal consistency and interpretability of the SF-36 were reported in validity studies. The Quality of Life after Brain Injury instrument (QOLIBRI), European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ), Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life short version (WHOQOL-BREF) showed positive results, but evidence was limited. Meta-analysis of SF-36 showed that TBI outcome is heterogeneous, encompassing a broad spectrum of HRQL, with most problems reported in the physical, emotional, and social functioning domain. The use of SF-36 in combination with a TBI-specific instrument, i.e., QOLIBRI, seems promising. Consensus on preferred methodologies of HRQL measurement in TBI would facilitate comparability across studies, resulting in improved insights in recovery patterns and better estimates of the burden of TBI.

  5. Abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Philbrick, T H; Kaude, J V; McInnis, A N; Wright, P G

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonography was performed as the first imaging procedure in 100 patients who presented with acute right upper quadrant pain suggestive of cholecystitis or cholelithiasis. In the final analysis 46 patients were found to have gallbladder disease (40 patients with cholelithiasis, 5 with acalculous cholecystitis, and 1 with a cholesterol polyp in the gallbladder). In 22 of 54 patients with a normal gallbladder, other abdominal disease was found. The error rate for ultrasound was 5%, and in 4 patients ultrasound was not the suitable procedure for the diagnosis. In 91 patients the ultrasonographic diagnosis was correct.

  6. Successful selective arterial thrombolysis in patient with acute abdominal thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Tsekov, Christo; Loukova, Anelia; Gelev, Valeri

    2016-06-01

    The paper reports successful thrombolysis conducted in 64 years old woman admitted to the clinic with clinical and angiographic data for acute surgical abdomen caused by acute tromboembolia of arteria mesenterica superior (AMS). The therapeutic approach required to undertake lifesaving decision on i.e. surgical vs. invasive treatment in conditions of emergency. Finally, it was decided to undertake invasive treatment with successful restoration of blood flow in the related artery. The patient was discharged from the clinic with considerable clinical improvement on the fifth day of her stay. The case report includes discussion on issues relating the consequence of the diagnostic and interventional procedures in such patients, opportunities for conducting emergency thrombolysis in acute embolia of AMS and preventive measures in patients with high tromboembolic risk.

  7. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Dalwadi, Pradip P.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Tayde, Parimal S.; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women) were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3) and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening PMID:28217503

  8. Burden of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Canet, Emmanuel; Lemiale, Virginie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Simon, François; Azoulay, Elie; Legoff, Jérôme

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory viruses (RVs) are ubiquitous pathogens that represent a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia and chronic pulmonary diseases exacerbations. However, their contribution to acute respiratory failure events requiring intensive care unit admission in the era of rapid multiplex molecular assay deserves further evaluation. This study investigated the burden of viral infections in non immunocompromised patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure using a multiplex molecular assay. Patients were investigated for RVs using immunofluoresence testing and a commercial multiplex molecular assay, and for bacteria using conventional culture. Half the patients (34/70, 49%) had a documented RVs infection. No other pathogen was found in 24 (71%) patients. Viral infection was detected more frequently in patients with obstructive respiratory diseases (64% vs. 29%; P = 0.0075). Multiplex molecular assay should be considered as an usefull diagnostic tool in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure, especially those with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  9. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  10. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  11. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-jun; Zhu, Ding-liang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hai-ya; Ji, Kai-da; Lu, Yi-ming; Gao, Ping-jin

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that a mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) occurs after acute cerebrovascular diseases, we evaluated the number of EPCs in the process of acute stroke. A total of 203 individuals were examined, including 100 patients with ischemic strokes, 36 patients with hemorrhagic strokes and 67 healthy controls. Ninety-eight patients were observed at days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after acute stroke. Circulating EPCs were defined by the surface markers CD133/KDR and analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were determined by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry using the N high sensitivity CRP Reagent. Patients with acute stroke had lower numbers of EPCs (0.037+/-0.001/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) vs. 0.06+/-0.002/100 PMNCs, P<0.05) and higher levels of serum hs-CRP (1.99 vs. 0.03 mg per 100 ml, P<0.05) than control subjects after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. There were no differences in EPCs counts or serum hs-CRP levels between patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In univariate analyses, BMI, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (T-cho), blood glucose and hs-CRP (P<0.001) were inversely correlated with EPCs counts. Multivariate analyses showed SBP and total cholesterol as independent predictors of EPCs levels. The number of EPCs gradually increased at day 7 after acute onset, remained elevated at day 14; and returned to baseline by day 28. Our results suggest a possible contribution of circulating EPCs in acute stroke. SBP and total cholesterol are independent factors of reduced EPCs numbers. A transient early increment of EPCs may result from the mobilization of EPCs in response to stroke stress.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  13. TBI: Our Teachers Are Not Prepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouldin, Kelly V.

    2005-01-01

    A graduate student preparing to teach, who suffered from traumatic brain injury (TBI) that resulted in partial amnesia and learning disabilities when she was a high school student, describes her experience. She illustrates the difficulties she faced in returning to school and recommends strategies educators could use to help similar student they…

  14. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  15. Rhythm and conduction analysis of patients with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Balli, Sevket; Oflaz, Mehmet Burhan; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Ece, Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    Various rhythm and conduction abnormalities can develop in acute rheumatic fever. This study investigated rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever using a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram and 24-h rhythm Holter recordings. This multicenter retrospective study, performed between August 2011 and March 2012, enrolled 73 consecutive children with acute rheumatic fever. Standard electrocardiography was used to measure PR and corrected QT intervals. Holter recordings were evaluated for all the patients, and 52 of the patients (71.2 %) had carditis that was either isolated or together with other major criteria. A positive correlation was detected between carditis and the mean PR interval on standard electrocardiography, but this was not significant (p > 0.05). Standard electrocardiography showed a significant positive correlation between PR and corrected QT intervals (p = 0.03; r = 0.55). Standard electrocardiography showed only three patients (4.2 %) with premature contractions, whereas 24-h electrocardiography showed 26 patients (35.6 %) with premature contractions. Carditis was positively correlated with premature contractions (p < 0.01; r = 0.57). One patient with junctional rhythm and one patient with left bundle block were detected by standard electrocardiography. Whereas some patients with carditis exhibited no arrhythmic evidence on standard electrocardiograms, complete atrioventricular block, supraventricular tachycardia, and Mobitz type 1 block were observed on 24-h Holter recordings. A positive correlation also was observed between the presence of premature contractions and serum levels of acute-phase reactants (p = 0.03; r = 0.62). These findings led to the conclusion that rhythm and conduction disorders in acute rheumatic fever are more common than previously thought.

  16. What Are Common Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with TBI may or may not lose consciousness—loss of consciousness is not always a sign of severe TBI. ... with memory, concentration, attention, or thinking Loss of consciousness lasting a few seconds to minutes 1 Sensitivity ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  18. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  19. [Pseudotumorous cardiac infiltration in a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orts, M; Ribera, J M; Calatrava, A; Larrouse, E; Catalán, R; Navarro, J T; Millá, F; Feliu, E

    1996-04-13

    Although cardiac infiltration is common in advanced stage of acute leukaemia, it is not usually diagnosed at life and it is extremely rare for it to become pseudotumoral. A 25-years-old patient with an acute monoblastic leukaemia who had a leukaemic infiltration which affected the main part of the left ventricle at the time of diagnosis, is referred. The heart infiltration was detected by a two dimension echocardiography. In spite of a massive infiltration, heart failure was not present and the left ventricle's ejection fraction was 50%. Even though chemotherapy was administered, the patient died four days after diagnosis due to septic shock of respiratory origin. The most relevant autopsy finding was a widespread pseudotumoral infiltration of the left ventricle, the back side of the right ventricle and the interventricular wall. The pseudotumoral infiltration of the heart by acute leukaemia is uncommon and must be differentiated from granulocytic sarcoma. The usefulness of the different diagnostic procedures is discussed.

  20. Augmentation of the antileukemia potency of total-body irradiation (TBI) by a novel P-site inhibitor of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK).

    PubMed

    Uckun, F M; Dibirdik, I; Qazi, S

    2010-10-01

    A novel spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) P-site inhibitor, 1,4-Bis (9-O dihydroquinidinyl) phthalazine/hydroquinidine 1,4-phathalazinediyl diether (C-61), (but not vehicle) markedly enhanced H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis of primary leukemia cells from each of five relapsed B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, as measured by in vitro TUNEL assays. A highly radiation-resistant subclone of the murine B-lineage leukemia cell line BCL-1 was next used to investigate the in vivo radiosensitizing effects of C-61. C-61 enhanced the antileukemia potency of 7 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI) in the context of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at 20% of its nonobservable adverse effect level (NOAEL) that does not exhibit detectable single-agent activity against BCL-1 leukemia in vivo. Based on this preclinical proof-of-principle study, we hypothesize that the incorporation of C-61 into the pretransplant TBI regimens of patients with recurrent or high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will help overcome the radiochemotherapy resistance of their leukemia cells and thereby improve their treatment response and survival outcome after BMT.

  1. [Sexuality in acute myocardial infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Casado Dones, Ma J; de Andrés Gimeno, B; Moreno González, C; Fernández Balcones, C; Cruz Martín, R Ma; Colmenar García, C

    2002-01-01

    We as nurses in the Coronary Unit we do not see the sexuality of the patients sufficiently addressed neither by us nor by the patients themselves. In this article we are trying to analize the reasons and to emphasize the need to include this subject in our Nursing Problem List. In it we explaine the fears and the wrong ideas that we have identified in our patients. The sexual function is not affected by a myocardial infarction but psychological factors, age, drugs and other associated diseases might be a reason. A quiet enviroment, a fit training plan and looking for personalise proper alternatives may help the patient to start a satisfactory sexual life again.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Practice-Based Evidence Study: Design and Patients, Centers, Treatments, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Susan D.; Corrigan, John D.; Bogner, Jennifer; Hammond, Flora M.; Seel, Ronald T.; Smout, Randall J.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Whiteneck, Gale G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe study design, patients, centers, treatments, and outcomes of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) practice-based evidence (PBE) study and to evaluate the generalizability of the findings to the US TBI inpatient rehabilitation population. Design Prospective, longitudinal observational study Setting 10 inpatient rehabilitation centers (9 US, 1 Canada) Participants Patients (n=2130) enrolled between October 2008 and Sept 2011, and admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after an index TBI injury Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Return to acute care during rehabilitation, rehabilitation length of stay, Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge, residence at discharge, and 9 months post-discharge rehospitalization, FIM, participation, and subjective wellbeing. Results Level of admission FIM Cognitive score was found to create relatively homogeneous subgroups for subsequent analysis of best treatment combinations. There were significant differences in patient and injury characteristics, treatments, rehabilitation course, and outcomes by admission FIM Cognitive subgroups. TBI-PBE study patients overall were similar to US national TBI inpatient rehabilitation populations. Conclusions This TBI-PBE study succeeded in capturing naturally occurring variation within patients and treatments, offering opportunities to study best treatments for specific patient deficits. Subsequent papers in this issue report differences between patients and treatments and associations with outcomes in greater detail. PMID:26212396

  3. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    A tachyarrhythmia is defined as a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute in conjunction with abnormal cardiac conduction. This article aims to inform nurses and other healthcare professionals about the predominant acute tachyarrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment and management of patients with this condition using case study examples.

  4. TBI lung dose comparisons using bilateral and anteroposterior delivery techniques and tissue density corrections.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel W; Wang, Iris Z; Lakeman, Tara; Hales, Lee D; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-03-08

    This study compares lung dose distributions for two common techniques of total body photon irradiation (TBI) at extended source-to-surface distance calculated with, and without, tissue density correction (TDC). Lung dose correction factors as a function of lateral thorax separation are approximated for bilateral opposed TBI (supine), similar to those published for anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques in AAPM Report 17 (i.e., Task Group 29). 3D treatment plans were created retrospectively for 24 patients treated with bilateral TBI, and for whom CT data had been acquired from the head to the lower leg. These plans included bilateral opposed and AP-PA techniques- each with and without - TDC, using source-to-axis distance of 377 cm and largest possible field size. On average, bilateral TBI requires 40% more monitor units than AP-PA TBI due to increased separation (26% more for 23 MV). Calculation of midline thorax dose without TDC leads to dose underestimation of 17% on average (standard deviation, 4%) for bilateral 6 MV TBI, and 11% on average (standard deviation, 3%) for 23 MV. Lung dose correction factors (CF) are calculated as the ratio of midlung dose (with TDC) to midline thorax dose (without TDC). Bilateral CF generally increases with patient separation, though with high variability due to individual uniqueness of anatomy. Bilateral CF are 5% (standard deviation, 4%) higher than the same corrections calculated for AP-PA TBI in the 6 MV case, and 4% higher (standard deviation, 2%) for 23 MV. The maximum lung dose is much higher with bilateral TBI (up to 40% higher than prescribed, depending on patient anatomy) due to the absence of arm tissue blocking the anterior chest. Dose calculations for bilateral TBI without TDC are incorrect by up to 24% in the thorax for 6 MV and up to 16% for 23 MV. Bilateral lung CF may be calculated as 1.05 times the values published in Table 6 of AAPM Report 17, though a larger patient pool is necessary to better

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  6. Treatment of TBI and Concomitant Hemorrhage with Ghrelin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    TITLE: Treatment of TBI and concomitant hemorrhage with ghrelin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rongqian Wu...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment of TBI and concomitant hemorrhage with ghrelin 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...injured brain and doubles TBI mortality. Therefore, a therapeutic intervention to treat posttraumatic hypotension and prevent secondary ischemia

  7. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  8. Decreasing Falls in Acute Care Medical Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Leslie; Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2017-02-06

    Falls in acute care medical patients are a complex problem impacted by the constantly changing risk factors affecting this population. This integrative literature review analyzes current evidence to determine factors that continue to make falls a top patient safety problem within the medical unit microsystem. The goal of this review is to develop an evidence-based structure to guide process improvement and effective use of organization resources.

  9. MR imaging of the acutely injured patient with cervical traction.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Wright, J W; Prevost, W J; Dornfest, D J; Amparo, E G

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the patient with acute cervical injury is important because of the potential prognostic significance of the appearance of the spinal cord at the time of injury. However, cervical traction may involve equipment incompatible with the magnetic environment, and transferring the patient to the imaging table may make it difficult to maintain traction. The authors describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method for providing cervical traction within the magnet room.

  10. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  11. Gastrointestinal decontamination in the acutely poisoned patient

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To define the role of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Sources A computer-based PubMed/MEDLINE search of the literature on GI decontamination in the poisoned patient with cross referencing of sources. Study Selection and Data Extraction Clinical, animal and in vitro studies were reviewed for clinical relevance to GI decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Synthesis The literature suggests that previously, widely used, aggressive approaches including the use of ipecac syrup, gastric lavage, and cathartics are now rarely recommended. Whole bowel irrigation is still often recommended for slow-release drugs, metals, and patients who "pack" or "stuff" foreign bodies filled with drugs of abuse, but with little quality data to support it. Activated charcoal (AC), single or multiple doses, was also a previous mainstay of GI decontamination, but the utility of AC is now recognized to be limited and more time dependent than previously practiced. These recommendations have resulted in several treatment guidelines that are mostly based on retrospective analysis, animal studies or small case series, and rarely based on randomized clinical trials. Conclusions The current literature supports limited use of GI decontamination of the poisoned patient. PMID:21992527

  12. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  13. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. Patients and methods: We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia’s. Results: Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Conclusion: Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere. PMID:23378691

  14. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  15. Delirium in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated neuropsychiatric complication most commonly observed in terminally ill cancer patients. To our knowledge this is the first report describing delirium in two patients aged less than 60 years and enrolled in an intensive chemotherapeutic protocol for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Case presentation Two female Caucasian acute promyelocytic leukemia patients aged 46 and 56 years developed delirium during their induction treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. In both cases symptoms were initially attributed to all-trans retinoic acid that was therefore immediately suspended. In these two patients several situations may have contribute to the delirium: in patient 1 a previous psychiatric disorder, concomitant treatments with steroids and benzodiazepines, a severe infection and central nervous system bleeding while in patient 2 steroid treatment and isolation. In patient 1 delirium was treated with short-term low-doses of haloperidol while in patient 2 non-pharmacologic interventions had a beneficial role. When the diagnosis of delirium was clear, induction treatment was resumed and both patients completed their therapeutic program without any relapse of the psychiatric symptoms. Both patients are alive and in complete remission as far as their leukemia is concerned. Conclusions We suggest that patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia eligible to intensive chemotherapy should be carefully evaluated by a multisciplinary team including psychiatrists in order to early recognize symptoms of delirium and avoid inadequate treatments. In case of delirium, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions may be considered. PMID:24237998

  16. Impact of TBI on late effects in children treated by megatherapy for Stage IV neuroblastoma. A study of the French Society of Pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flandin, Isabelle; Michon, Jean; Pinkerton, Ross; Coze, Carole; Stephan, Jean Louis; Fourquet, Bernard; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the contribution of total body irradiation (TBI) to late sequelae in children treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for Stage IV neuroblastoma. Patients and Methods: We compared two populations that were similar with regard to age, stage, pre-autologous bone marrow transplantation chemotherapy (CT) regimen, period of treatment, and follow-up (12 years). The TBI group (n = 32) received TBI as part of the megatherapy procedure (1982-1993), whereas the CT group (n 30) received conditioning without TBI (1985-1992). Analysis 12 years later focused on growth, weight and corpulence (body mass index) delay; hormonal deficiencies; liver, kidney, heart, ear, eye, and dental sequelae; school performance; and the incidence of secondary tumors. Results: Impact of TBI was most marked in relation to growth and weight delay, although the mean delay was not severe, probably because of treatment with growth hormones. Other consequences of TBI were thyroid insufficiency, cataracts, and a high incidence of secondary tumors. Hearing loss and dental agenesis were more prominent in the group treated with CT alone. No differences were observed in school performance. Conclusion: The most frequent side effects of TBI were cataracts, thyroid insufficiency, and growth delay, but more worrying is the risk of secondary tumors. Because of the young mean age of patients and the toxicity of TBI regimens without any survival advantage, regimens without TBI are preferable in the management of Stage IV neuroblastoma.

  17. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  18. Statistical machine learning to identify traumatic brain injury (TBI) from structural disconnections of white matter networks.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Jhimli; Shen, Kai-kai; Ghose, Soumya; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Pannek, Kerstin; Taylor, D Jamie; Mathias, Jane L; Rose, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Identifying diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting with normal appearing radiological MRI presents a significant challenge. Neuroimaging methods such as diffusion MRI and probabilistic tractography, which probe the connectivity of neural networks, show significant promise. We present a machine learning approach to classify TBI participants primarily with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on altered structural connectivity patterns derived through the network based statistical analysis of structural connectomes generated from TBI and age-matched control groups. In this approach, higher order diffusion models were used to map white matter connections between 116 cortical and subcortical regions. Tracts between these regions were generated using probabilistic tracking and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) measures along these connections were encoded in the connectivity matrices. Network-based statistical analysis of the connectivity matrices was performed to identify the network differences between a representative subset of the two groups. The affected network connections provided the feature vectors for principal component analysis and subsequent classification by random forest. The validity of the approach was tested using data acquired from a total of 179 TBI patients and 146 controls participants. The analysis revealed altered connectivity within a number of intra- and inter-hemispheric white matter pathways associated with DAI, in consensus with existing literature. A mean classification accuracy of 68.16%±1.81% and mean sensitivity of 80.0%±2.36% were achieved in correctly classifying the TBI patients evaluated on the subset of the participants that was not used for the statistical analysis, in a 10-fold cross-validation framework. These results highlight the potential for statistical machine learning approaches applied to structural connectomes to identify patients with diffusive axonal injury.

  19. Geriatric multidimensional assessment for elderly patients with acute respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Bruni, Adriana; Malerba, Mara; Mazzone, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano; Pesci, Alberto; Annoni, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    The case of an 87-year-old woman who falls at home and is admitted to the Emergency Department of an acute hospital with delirium exemplify a common situation that physicians face in their everyday clinical practice. We describe the typical context of frailty in which acute illnesses frequently present in frail elderly patients and, in particular, the relationship between comorbidity, disability and frailty. We also report the current knowledge about frailty theories and we focus on the "atypical" presentation of many acute illnesses. Major attention is devoted on delirium and on mobility impairment, two of the most common atypical symptoms of elderly frail subjects. Finally we describe the evidence on the comprehensive geriatric assessment, i.e., the method that is required to identify and understand the ultimate needs of elderly complex subjects.

  20. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  1. Neuroanatomical Predictors of Awakening in Acutely Comatose Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Robert G.; Buitrago, Manuel M.; Duckworth, Josh; Chonka, Zachary D.; Puttgen, H. Adrian; Stevens, Robert D.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lateral brain displacement has been associated with loss of consciousness and poor outcome in a range of acute neurologic disorders. We studied the association between lateral brain displacement and awakening from acute coma. Methods This prospective observational study included all new onset coma patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit (NCCU) over 12 consecutive months. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed independently at coma onset, after awakening, and at follow-up. Primary outcome measure was awakening, defined as the ability to follow commands before hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), modified Rankin Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale, and hospital and NCCU lengths of stay. Results Of the 85 patients studied, the mean age was 58 ± 16 years, 51% were female, and 78% had cerebrovascular etiology of coma. Fifty-one percent of patients had midline shift on head CT at coma onset and 43 (51%) patients awakened. In a multivariate analysis, independent predictors of awakening were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.039, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.002–1.079, p = 0.040), higher GCS score at coma onset (OR = 1.455, 95% CI = 1.157–1.831, p = 0.001), nontraumatic coma etiology (OR = 4.464, 95% CI = 1.011–19.608, p = 0.048), lesser pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 1.316, 95% CI = 1.073–1.615, p = 0.009), and reduction or no increase in pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 11.628, 95% CI = 2.207–62.500, p = 0.004). Interpretation Reversal and/or limitation of lateral brain displacement are associated with acute awakening in comatose patients. These findings suggest objective parameters to guide prognosis and treatment in patients with acute onset of coma. PMID:25628166

  2. Relationships between risky sexual behaviour, dysexecutive problems, and mental health in the years following interdisciplinary TBI rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jhon Alexander; McKerral, Michelle

    2016-02-12

    Little is known about the long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) regarding risky sexual behaviour. The objectives of the study were (1) to compare risky sexual behaviour in a sample of individuals with TBI having received interdisciplinary rehabilitation with that of healthy controls, and (2) to explore the relationships between risky sexual behaviour, executive functions, and mental health in individuals with TBI. The study group consisted of 42 individuals with TBI with a mean age of 37.9 years (SD = 9.7), 12.8 years of education (SD = 3.3), and 3.3 years post-injury (SD = 4.3). Healthy controls consisted of 47 participants, with a mean age of 37.6 years (SD = 10.7), and 13 years of education (SD = 3). Risky sexual behaviour was measured with the Sexual Risk Survey and executive function with the Dysexecutive Questionnaire. Mental health measures included the Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression. Compared to healthy controls, individuals with TBI reported more dysexecutive and mental health problems, without differences in risky sexual behaviour. In individuals with TBI, risky sexual behaviour was associated with behavioural, cognitive and emotional dysexecutive problems, but not with anxiety or depression. It was concluded that special attention should be given to individuals with TBI showing difficulties in executive functions given their association with risky sexual behaviour.

  3. Update on TBI and Cognitive Impairment in Military Veterans.

    PubMed

    Elder, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in military life. Interest in military TBI has increased recently due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Certain types of TBI are relatively unique to the military, the most prominent being blast-related TBI. Blast-related mild TBI has been of particular concern in veterans from the most recent conflicts although controversy remains concerning its separation from post-traumatic stress disorder. TBI is also a risk factor for the later development of neurodegenerative diseases in which cognitive impairment is prominent putting veterans at risk for disorders including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Recent evidence associating TBI with chronic cognitive impairment is reviewed in the context of its relevance to military veterans.

  4. Fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Myojin, Miyako

    1996-12-31

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been considered to bring about immunosuppressive effects on organisms. The conclusion is derived from data obtained by sublethal doses of TBI, but there are no data on how low doses of TBI act on organisms. On the other hand, it is known that low doses of TBI are effective on some malignant lymphoma or chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the effect of low doses of TBI is rarely investigated radiobiologically. For 15 yr, the authors have studied the effects of low doses of TBI on normal or tumor-bearing mice and its immunological background. In this paper, they show the results of fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by low doses of TBI.

  5. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    modalities. We recruited to the project Margaret A. Parsley to carry out the Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries (MTBIs) under the supervision of Doug DeWitt...abstracts: Hulsebosch CE, Johnson KM, Dewitt DS, Dash PK, Grill R, Parsley MA, Unabia G, Rea H, Perez-Polo JR. Role of IL-1 and TNF receptor activation in...neurological deficits after TBI National Neurotrauma Society, 2010 Johnson KM, Dewitt DS, Dash PK, Grill R, Parsley MA, Unabia G, Rea H, Perez-Polo

  6. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild...31 subjects (55%) that met the criteria for hypopituitarism , with this finding, similar to that found in moderate-severe TBI population. 15...SUBJECT TERMS- Post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  7. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH) in mild TBI and...begun. 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...this project will be to study the diagnosis of post traumatic hypopituitarism after MTBI. We will determine the incidence of hypopituitarism

  8. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  9. Investigating Microstructural Abnormalities and Neurocognition in Sub-Acute and Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Normal-Appearing White Matter: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Eyesha; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Papinutto, Nico; Lewis, Caroline E.; Jing, Ruiwei; Charles, Onella; Zhang, Shudong; Lin, Amy; Graham, Simon J.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Bharatha, Aditya; Cusimano, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    For a significant percentage of subjects, with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), who report persisting cognitive impairment and functional loss, the diagnosis is often impeded by the fact that routine neuroimaging often does not reveal any abnormalities. In this paper, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the apparently normal white matter (as assessed by routine magnetic resonance imaging) in the brains of 19 subjects with sub-acute (9) and chronic (10) TBI. We also assessed memory, executive function, and visual-motor coordination in these subjects. Using a voxel-wise approach, we investigated if parameters of diffusion were significantly different between TBI subjects and 17 healthy controls (HC), who were demographically matched to the TBI group. We also investigated if changes in DTI parameters were associated with neuropsychological performance in either group. Our results indicate significantly increased mean and axial diffusivity (MD and AD, respectively) values in widespread brain locations in TBI subjects, while controlling for age, sex, and time since injury. HC performed significantly better than the TBI subjects on tests of memory and executive function, indicating the persisting functional loss in chronic TBI. We found no correlation between diffusion parameters and performance on test of executive function in either group. We found negative correlation between FA and composite memory scores, and positive correlation between RD and visuomotor coordination test scores, in various tracts in both groups. Our study suggests that changes in MD and AD can indicate persisting micro-structure abnormalities in normal-appearing white matter in the brains of subjects with chronic TBI. Our results also suggest that FA in major white matter tracts is correlated with memory in health and in disease, alike; larger and longitudinal studies are needed to discern potential differences in these correlations in the two groups. PMID:28373856

  10. Investigating Microstructural Abnormalities and Neurocognition in Sub-Acute and Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Normal-Appearing White Matter: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Eyesha; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Papinutto, Nico; Lewis, Caroline E; Jing, Ruiwei; Charles, Onella; Zhang, Shudong; Lin, Amy; Graham, Simon J; Schweizer, Tom A; Bharatha, Aditya; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    For a significant percentage of subjects, with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), who report persisting cognitive impairment and functional loss, the diagnosis is often impeded by the fact that routine neuroimaging often does not reveal any abnormalities. In this paper, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the apparently normal white matter (as assessed by routine magnetic resonance imaging) in the brains of 19 subjects with sub-acute (9) and chronic (10) TBI. We also assessed memory, executive function, and visual-motor coordination in these subjects. Using a voxel-wise approach, we investigated if parameters of diffusion were significantly different between TBI subjects and 17 healthy controls (HC), who were demographically matched to the TBI group. We also investigated if changes in DTI parameters were associated with neuropsychological performance in either group. Our results indicate significantly increased mean and axial diffusivity (MD and AD, respectively) values in widespread brain locations in TBI subjects, while controlling for age, sex, and time since injury. HC performed significantly better than the TBI subjects on tests of memory and executive function, indicating the persisting functional loss in chronic TBI. We found no correlation between diffusion parameters and performance on test of executive function in either group. We found negative correlation between FA and composite memory scores, and positive correlation between RD and visuomotor coordination test scores, in various tracts in both groups. Our study suggests that changes in MD and AD can indicate persisting micro-structure abnormalities in normal-appearing white matter in the brains of subjects with chronic TBI. Our results also suggest that FA in major white matter tracts is correlated with memory in health and in disease, alike; larger and longitudinal studies are needed to discern potential differences in these correlations in the two groups.

  11. Blockade of acute microglial activation by minocycline promotes neuroprotection and reduces locomotor hyperactivity after closed head injury in mice: a twelve-week follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Homsi, Shadi; Piaggio, Tomaso; Croci, Nicole; Noble, Florence; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz

    2010-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes a wide spectrum of consequences, such as microglial activation, cerebral inflammation, and focal and diffuse brain injury, as well as functional impairment. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of acute treatment with minocycline as an inhibitor of microglial activation on cerebral focal and diffuse lesions, and on the spontaneous locomotor activity following TBI. The weight-drop model was used to induce TBI in mice. Microglial activation and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) were detected by immunohistochemistry using CD11b and ss-amyloid precursor protein (ss-APP) immunolabeling, respectively. Focal injury was determined by the measurement of the brain lesion volume. Horizontal and vertical locomotor activities were measured for up to 12 weeks post-injury by an automated actimeter. Minocycline or vehicle were administered three times post-insult, at 5 min (90 mg/kg i.p.), 3 h, and 9 h post-TBI (45 mg/kg i.p.). Minocycline treatment attenuated microglial activation by 59% and reduced brain lesion volume by 58%, yet it did not affect DAI at 24 h post-TBI. More interestingly, minocycline significantly decreased TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity at 48 h post-TBI, and its effect lasted for up to 8 weeks. Taken together, the results indicate that microglial activation appears to play an important role in the development of TBI-induced focal injury and the subsequent locomotor hyperactivity, and its short-term inhibition provides long-lasting functional recovery after TBI. These findings emphasize the fact that minocycline could be a promising new therapeutic strategy for head-injured patients.

  12. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in hemodialysis patients: Acute and chronic intervention.

    PubMed

    Avery-Lynch, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Protein and calorie malnutrition have been encountered more frequently than expected in the hemodialysis patients. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) has been documented to improve nutritional status in hemodialysis patients in both acute and chronic settings (Henrich, 1996). The aim of this study was to support the usage of IDPN in our malnourished hemodialysis patients. Serum concentration of albumin is one of the main indicators of mortality in the dialysis population. The serum albumin concentration for six out of eight of our hemodialysis (HD) patients receiving IDPN increased significantly. There was a mean increase of 7.0 g/L of plasma albumin for the eight patients assessed. These results demonstrate that IDPN is an effective nutritional intervention for malnourished hemodialysis patients.

  13. Octreotide treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Mayo, A; Paran, D; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Zissin, R; Singer, P; Kaplan, O; Skornik, Y; Freund, U

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of octreotide in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a case-control study. Experimental and clinical studies on the effect of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis have shown controversial results. Since January 1992, we have been conducting a prospective randomized study on the effect of octreotide in severe acute pancreatitis, in three hospitals in Israel. The entering criteria included three or more of the Ranson prognostic signs and CT findings of severe pancreatitis. Patients were randomly assigned to conservative treatment either with or without octreotide (0.1 mg subcutaneously three times a day). The end points of the study included: complication rate (ARDS, sepsis, renal failure, pseudocyst, fistula, and abscess), length of hospital stay, and mortality. From January 1992 to December 1996, 60 patients entered the study. After evaluating the files, 10 patients were excluded due to failure to meet the entering criteria, incomplete data, or incorrect diagnosis. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were assigned to octreotide (treatment group) and 25 to conservative treatment only (control group). The two groups matched with regard to age, sex, etiology, and severity of the disease. The complication rate was lower in the treatment group with regard to sepsis (24% vs 76%, P = 0.0002) and ARDS (28% vs 56%, P = 0.04). The hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group (20.6 vs 33.1 days, P = 0.04). Two patients died in the treatment group and eight in the control group (P < 0.019). These results suggest that octreotide may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  15. Electrolyte disturbances and acute kidney injury in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    The interrelation between kidney disease and cancer is complex and reciprocal. Among the most frequent cancer-associated kidney diseases are the electrolyte and acid-base disturbances, which occur frequently and often are associated with an ominous prognosis, and acute kidney injury. Tumor lysis syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition that frequently occurs in patients with a high tumor burden and high cellular turnover after cytotoxic therapy (including steroids in steroid-sensitive hematologic malignancies). Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are the consequence of neoplastic spread, anticancer treatment, or, more rarely, paraneoplastic phenomena of all types of tumors. This article reviews hyponatremia and hypernatremia, hypokalemia and hyperkalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and the most important disturbances in acid-base balance in cancer patients. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent occurrence in cancer patients and has the potential to substantially alter the outcome of patients with cancer and jeopardize their chances of receiving optimal cancer treatment and a potential cure. As in many other circumstances, the etiology of AKI in cancer patients is multifactorial. Initiation and/or continuation of dialysis in the AKI cancer patient should be based on the general clinical condition and overall life expectancy and the personal patient expectations on quality of life after eventual recovery.

  16. Microglia in the TBI Brain: The Good, The Bad, And The Dysregulated

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Kumar, Alok

    2015-01-01

    As the major cellular component of the innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and the first line of defense whenever injury or disease occurs, microglia play a critical role in neuroinflammation following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the injured brain microglia can produce neuroprotective factors, clear cellular debris and orchestrate neurorestorative processes that are beneficial for neurological recovery after TBI. However, microglia can also become dysregulated and can produce high levels of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that hinder CNS repair and contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cell death. The dual role of microglial activation in promoting beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons may be accounted for by their polarization state and functional responses after injury. In this review article we discuss emerging research on microglial activation phenotypes in the context of acute brain injury, and the potential role of microglia in phenotype-specific neurotrestorative processes such as neurogenesis, angiogenesis, olgogendrogenesis and regeneration. We also describe some of the known molecular mechanisms that regulate phenotype switching, and highlight new therapeutic approaches that alter microglial activation state balance to enhance long-term functional recovery after TBI. An improved understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control microglial phenotypic shifts may advance our knowledge of post-injury recovery and repair, and provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TBI. PMID:26342753

  17. Microglia in the TBI brain: The good, the bad, and the dysregulated.

    PubMed

    Loane, David J; Kumar, Alok

    2016-01-01

    As the major cellular component of the innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and the first line of defense whenever injury or disease occurs, microglia play a critical role in neuroinflammation following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the injured brain microglia can produce neuroprotective factors, clear cellular debris and orchestrate neurorestorative processes that are beneficial for neurological recovery after TBI. However, microglia can also become dysregulated and can produce high levels of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that hinder CNS repair and contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cell death. The dual role of microglial activation in promoting beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons may be accounted for by their polarization state and functional responses after injury. In this review article we discuss emerging research on microglial activation phenotypes in the context of acute brain injury, and the potential role of microglia in phenotype-specific neurorestorative processes such as neurogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogenesis and regeneration. We also describe some of the known molecular mechanisms that regulate phenotype switching, and highlight new therapeutic approaches that alter microglial activation state balance to enhance long-term functional recovery after TBI. An improved understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control microglial phenotypic shifts may advance our knowledge of post-injury recovery and repair, and provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  18. Simultaneous acute appendicitis and pseudomembranous colitis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Steven R; Cortina, Chandler; Black, Marissa; Vidrine, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause for pediatric surgery, with an increasing incidence as this population ages. Pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) from Clostridum difficle is being seen more frequently in pediatric patients, especially after treatment with antibiotics and in those with Hirschsprung's disease. Only three prior cases of appendicitis associated with PMC have been described in the literature, and all of them occurred in adult patients. Here, we describe the first documented pediatric case: a 16-year-old female who developed acute appendicitis while concomitantly being treated for suspected pseudomembranous colitis. We concur with previous authors that there may be an association between these two pathologies; furthermore, this association may not always be clinically apparent and may be both under-diagnosed and under-reported.

  19. Body Mass Index and Mortality in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Rathore, Saif S.; Reid, Kimberly J.; Jones, Philip G.; Chan, Paul S.; Rich, Michael W.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an “obesity paradox” with heart failure, whereby higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with lower mortality. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on survival after acute myocardial infarction. Methods Data from 2 registries of patients hospitalized in the United States with acute myocardial infarction between 2003–04 (PREMIER) and 2005–08 (TRIUMPH) were used to examine the association of BMI with mortality. Patients (n=6359) were categorized into BMI groups (kg/m2) using baseline measurements. Two sets of analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression with fractional polynomials to model BMI as categorical and continuous variables. To assess the independent association of BMI with mortality, analyses were repeated adjusting for 7 domains of patient and clinical characteristics. Results Median BMI was 28.6. BMI was inversely associated with crude 1-year mortality (normal, 9.2%; overweight, 6.1%; obese, 4.7%; morbidly obese; 4.6%; p<0.001), which persisted after multivariable adjustment. When BMI was examined as a continuous variable, the hazards curve declined with increasing BMI and then increased above a BMI of 40. Compared with patients with a BMI of 18.5, patients with higher BMIs had a 20% to 68% lower mortality at 1 year. No interactions between age (p=0.37), gender (p=0.87) or diabetes mellitus (p=0.55) were observed. Conclusions There appears to be an “obesity paradox” among acute myocardial infarction patients such that higher BMI is associated with lower mortality, an effect that was not modified by patient characteristics and was comparable across age, gender, and diabetes subgroups. PMID:22483510

  20. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). Material/Methods Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. Results A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm2) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. Conclusions Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP

  1. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-02-26

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. RESULTS A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm²) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. CONCLUSIONS Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted

  2. Pharmacokinetics of quinine in African patients with acute falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Sowunmi, A; Walker, O

    1998-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of quinine were studied in six Nigerian patients during acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria and convalescent periods. An oral dose of 10 mg/kg quinine dihydrochloride administered 8-hourly for 7 days gave parasite and fever clearance times of 36.0 +/- 16.6 h and 18.0 +/- 6.4 h, respectively. From the individual quinine plasma profiles the mean plasma concentration of quinine at the time of parasite clearance was estimated as 4.5 +/- 1.1 micrograms/ml. Plasma quinine levels during malaria rose rapidly reaching a peak around the second and third days and declining thereafter as patients improved clinically. In acute malaria plasma quinine levels were more than two-fold higher than in convalescence; the mean AUC(0-12) in malaria was 37.9 +/- 14.7 micrograms.h/ml compared to 17.9 +/- 8.5 micrograms.h/ml in convalescence. The apparent oral clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (Vd/F) during the acute phase of the malaria (1.9 +/- 0.7 ml/min/kg and 1.8 +/- 0.9 l/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than in convalescence (4.5 +/- 2.1 ml/min/kg and 4.2 +/- 3.2 l/kg). The present data suggest that malaria parasites in African patients are still very sensitive to quinine and that the current dosage of quinine is effective for the treatment of acute falciparum malaria in African patients without augmenting therapy with any other drug such as tetracycline or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. It also confirms that malaria significantly alters the pharmacokinetics of quinine in humans.

  3. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  4. Challenges in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eleni, Lagadinou D.; Nicholas, Zoumbos C.; Alexandros, Spyridonidis

    2010-01-01

    Whereas in younger patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is straightforward and the goal is cure, the optimal treatment decision for older adults remains highly controversial. Physicians need to determine whether palliation, “something” beyond palliation, intensive therapy, or an investigational therapy is the most appropriate treatment option. This requires understanding of the biology and risk profile of the AML, clinical judgment in evaluating the functional status of the patient, communication skills in understanding the patient's wishes and social background, and medical expertise in available therapies. The physician has to accurately inform the patient about (a) the unique biological considerations of his leukemia and his prognosis; (b) the risks and benefits of all available treatment options; (c) novel therapeutic approaches and how the patient can get access to these treatments. Last but not least, he has to recommend a treatment. This paper tries to discuss each of these issues. PMID:20628485

  5. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  6. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making.

  7. Total body irradiation in a patient with fragile X syndrome for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in preparation for stem cell transplantation: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Collins, D T; Mannina, E M; Mendonca, M

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a congenital disorder caused by expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeat at the 5' end of the fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1) on the X chromosome that leads to chromosomal instability and diminished serum levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Afflicted individuals often have elongated features, marfanoid habitus, macroorchidism and intellectual impairment. Evolving literature suggests the condition may actually protect from malignancy while chromosomal instability would presumably elevate the risk. Increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation should also be predicted by unstable sites within the DNA. Interestingly, in this report, we detail a patient with FXS diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with induction followed by subsequent cycles of hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone) with a complete response who then was recommended to undergo peripheral stem cell transplantation. The patient underwent total body irradiation (TBI) as a component of his conditioning regimen and despite the concern of his clinicians, developed minimal acute toxicity and successful engraftment. The pertinent literature regarding irradiation of patients with FXS is also reviewed.

  8. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Herpes zoster-associated acute urinary retention in immunocompetent patient*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Hortense, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster-associated urinary retention is an uncommon event related to virus infection of the S2-S4 dermatome. The possible major reasons are ipsilateral hemicystitis, neuritis-induced or myelitis-associated virus infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompetent female patient who presented an acute urinary retention after four days under treatment with valacyclovir for gluteal herpes zoster. The patient had to use a vesical catheter, was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and fully recovered after eight weeks. PMID:25387508

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Acute kidney injury in patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Rognant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent clinical event in patients with liver disease, compounding their prognosis. Furthermore, it is likely that the occurrence of AKI has a detrimental impact on the subsequent renal function and the long-term survival of these patients. Recently, some authors advocated the use of new diagnostic criteria for detecting acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis. These criteria are based on the rapidity and extent of the creatinine increase comparing to the basal creatinine and also on the kinetics of diuresis decrease. Although their validity in this population requires further studies to be clearly established, these new criteria could have two advantages: (1) to allow earlier diagnosis of AKI and, thus, hepatorenal syndrome for which earlier intervention could improve patients’ survival; and (2) to promote more intensive monitoring of renal function in these patients with high risk of AKI. Finally, recent practice guidelines about the prevention and treatment of general AKI have been published which should be useful in optimising the management of AKI in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25954481

  12. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  13. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  15. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  16. A brief overview of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Michael S; Meyer, Kimberly S

    2009-11-01

    The current conflicts in the Middle East have yielded increasing awareness of the acute and chronic effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The increasing frequency of exposure to blast and multiple deployments potentially impact the probability that a service member may sustain one of these injuries. The 2008 International Conference on Behavioral Health and Traumatic Brain Injury united experts in the fields of behavioral health and traumatic brain injury to address these significant health concerns. This article summarizes current Department of Defense (DOD) initiatives related to TBI and PTSD.

  17. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. [Fever and lymphadenopathy: acute toxoplasmosis in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Kaparos, Nikolaos; Favrat, Bernard; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2014-11-26

    Toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. In Switzerland about a third of the population has antibodies against this pathogen and has thus already been in contact with the parasite or has contracted the disease. Immunocompetent patients are usually asymptomatic (80-90%) during primary infection. The most common symptom is neck or occipital lymphadenopathy. Serology is the diagnostic gold standard in immunocompetent individuals. The presence of IgM antibodies is however not sufficient to make a definite diagnosis of acute toxoplasmosis. Distinction between acute and chronic toxoplasmosis requires additional serological tests (IgG avidity test). If required, the most used and probably most effective treatment is the combination of pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine, with folinic acid.

  19. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  20. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments.

  1. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  2. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  3. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  4. Acute cervical cord injuries in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J W; Kendall, B E; Kocen, R S; Milligan, N M

    1982-01-01

    Seven cases with acute cervical cord lesions associated with a fit and fall, were found in approximately 500 patients with epilepsy over a period of 7 years. In all patients the epilepsy was refractory to drug therapy and six suffered tonic fits which resulted in falls and frequent head injuries. Notable radiological changes were found in the cervical spine; there was ankylosis in five, hyperostosis in four and the minimum sagittal diameter of the bony canal was less than 11mm in three cases. The findings indicate that repetitive trauma may be a factor in producing bony changes in the cervical spine which put the patient at risk of cervical cord injury, especially when the spinal canal is developmentally narrow. Images PMID:7143009

  5. [Severe and acute hyponatremia in a schizophrenic patient with potomania].

    PubMed

    Macías Robles, M D; López Fonticiella, M P; Maciá Bobés, M; Fernández San Martín, A

    2009-01-01

    Acute and severe hyponatremia causes a metabolic encephalothy. It is physiopathologically based on the cerebral edema, and its fatal symptoms include seizures and coma. We present a case of an extreme hyponatremia of multifactorial etiology in a schizophrenic patient with potomania. Potomania does not usually cause hyponatremia, unless it coexists with other trigger factors. This patient had a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), and a deep hypokaliemia, due to vomiting and a treatment with indapamida, which perpetuates the deficit of extracellular sodium. In the patient's treatment, aripiprazole was the only recently introduced drug with which cases of inappropriate vasopressin secretion have been reported. Management of a severe hyponatremia must be considered a vital emergency, independent of the cause, and 3% hypertonic saline must be administered. The increase of the sodium level must not be higher than 25 mmol/L in the first 24-48 hours, to avoid a secondary brain injury.

  6. Management of older or unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Estey, E H

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults, for whom optimal treatment strategies remain controversial. Because of the concern for therapeutic resistance and, in particular, excessive toxicity or even treatment-related mortality, many older or medically unfit patients do not receive AML-directed therapy. Yet, evidence suggests that outcomes are improved if essentially all of these patients are offered AML therapy, ideally at a specialized cancer center. Medical fitness for tolerating intensive chemotherapy can be estimated relatively accurately with multiparameter assessment tools; this information should serve as basis for the assignment to intensive or non-intensive therapy. Until our accuracy in predicting the success of individual therapies improves, all patients should be considered for participation in a randomized controlled trial. Comparisons between individual trials will be facilitated once standardized, improved response criteria are developed, and standard treatment approaches have been defined against which novel therapies can be tested.

  7. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  8. Neurologic Functional and Quality of Life Outcomes after TBI: Clinic Attendees versus Non-Attendees.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur B; Wilson, Laura D; Bregman, Jana A; Leath, Taylor C; Humble, Stephen S; Davidson, Mario A; de Riesthal, Michael R; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2015-07-01

    This investigation describes the relationship between TBI patient demographics, quality of life outcome, and functional status outcome among clinic attendees and non-attendees. Of adult TBI survivors with intracranial hemorrhage, 63 attended our TBI clinic and 167 did not attend. All were telephone surveyed using the Extended-Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) scale, and a post-discharge therapy questionnaire. To determine risk factors for GOSE and QOLIBRI outcomes, we created multivariable regression models employing covariates of age, injury characteristics, clinic attendance, insurance status, post-discharge rehabilitation, and time from injury. Compared with those with severe TBI, higher GOSE scores were identified in individuals with both mild (odds ratio [OR]=2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-3.6) and moderate (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.6-14.1) TBIs. In addition, survivors with private insurance had higher GOSE scores, compared with those with public insurance (OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.6), workers' compensation (OR=8.4; 95% CI: 2.6-26.9), and no insurance (OR=3.1; 95% CI: 1.6-6.2). Compared with those with severe TBI, QOLIBRI scores were 11.7 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.7) higher in survivors with mild TBI and 17.3 points (95% CI: 3.2-31.5) higher in survivors with moderate TBI. In addition, survivors who received post-discharge rehabilitation had higher QOLIBRI scores by 11.4 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.1) than those who did not. Survivors with private insurance had QOLIBRI scores that were 25.5 points higher (95% CI: 11.3-39.7) than those with workers' compensation and 16.8 points higher (95% CI: 7.4-26.2) than those without insurance. Because neurologic injury severity, insurance status, and receipt of rehabilitation or therapy are independent risk factors for functional and quality of life outcomes, future directions will include improving earlier access to post-TBI rehabilitation, social work services, affordable insurance

  9. Neurologic Functional and Quality of Life Outcomes after TBI: Clinic Attendees versus Non-Attendees

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura D.; Bregman, Jana A.; Leath, Taylor C.; Humble, Stephen S.; Davidson, Mario A.; de Riesthal, Michael R.; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This investigation describes the relationship between TBI patient demographics, quality of life outcome, and functional status outcome among clinic attendees and non-attendees. Of adult TBI survivors with intracranial hemorrhage, 63 attended our TBI clinic and 167 did not attend. All were telephone surveyed using the Extended-Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) scale, and a post-discharge therapy questionnaire. To determine risk factors for GOSE and QOLIBRI outcomes, we created multivariable regression models employing covariates of age, injury characteristics, clinic attendance, insurance status, post-discharge rehabilitation, and time from injury. Compared with those with severe TBI, higher GOSE scores were identified in individuals with both mild (odds ratio [OR]=2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–3.6) and moderate (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.6–14.1) TBIs. In addition, survivors with private insurance had higher GOSE scores, compared with those with public insurance (OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.6), workers' compensation (OR=8.4; 95% CI: 2.6–26.9), and no insurance (OR=3.1; 95% CI: 1.6–6.2). Compared with those with severe TBI, QOLIBRI scores were 11.7 points (95% CI: 3.7–19.7) higher in survivors with mild TBI and 17.3 points (95% CI: 3.2–31.5) higher in survivors with moderate TBI. In addition, survivors who received post-discharge rehabilitation had higher QOLIBRI scores by 11.4 points (95% CI: 3.7–19.1) than those who did not. Survivors with private insurance had QOLIBRI scores that were 25.5 points higher (95% CI: 11.3–39.7) than those with workers' compensation and 16.8 points higher (95% CI: 7.4–26.2) than those without insurance. Because neurologic injury severity, insurance status, and receipt of rehabilitation or therapy are independent risk factors for functional and quality of life outcomes, future directions will include improving earlier access to post-TBI rehabilitation, social work

  10. TBI Assessment of Readiness Using a Gait Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    members sustaining some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) over the past 14 years, the lack of an objective measurement tool for evaluation and...determine the validity and reliability of an Android device-based mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) screening test app for assessing motor function. The...task, 0% With up to 320,000 service members sustaining some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) over the past 14 years, the lack of an objective

  11. Linac-based total body irradiation (TBI) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, B.; Durmus, I. F.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate dose distribution of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning tecnique using Versa HD® lineer accelerator to deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) on the coach. Eight TBI patient's Treatment Planning System (TPS) were performed with dual arc VMAT for each patient. The VMAT-TBI consisted of three isocentres and three dual overlapping arcs. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy. Mean dose to lung and kidney were restricted less than 10 Gy and max. dose to lens were restricted less than 6 Gy. The plans were verified using 2D array and ion chamber. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by γ-index analysis and absolute dose. An average total delivery time was determined 923±34 seconds and an average MU was determined 2614±228 MUs for dual arc VMAT. Mean dose to lungs was 9.7±0.2 Gy, mean dose to kidneys was 8.8±0.3 Gy, max. dose to lens was 5.5±0.3 Gy and max. dose was 14.6±0.3 Gy, HI of PTV was 1.13±0.2, mean dose to PTV was 12.6±1.5 Gy and mean γ-index pass rate was %97.1±1.9. The results show that the tecnique for TBI using VMAT on the treatment coach is feasible.

  12. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  13. Thrombin generation in patients after acute deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J; Dielis, Arne W J H; Spronk, Henri M H; van Oerle, René; Hamulyák, Karly; Prins, Martin H; ten Cate, Hugo

    2008-08-01

    Thrombin generation measurement may be of value for assessing the risk of venous thromboembolism, but its long term profile has not been assessed in patients. We evaluated thrombin generation by Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT) in plasma during follow up of 104 consecutive patients after an acute episode of deep venous thrombosis. Blood was drawn three times over the course of 24 months. Thrombin generation was measured in absence and presence of thrombomodulin and compared to a reference range derived from thrombin generation curves in 137 healthy volunteers. Thrombin generation of patients showed significantly higher endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) and peak height compared to the reference population. Differences were more pronounced in assays triggered with 1 pM TF. Inhibition by thrombomodulin was attenuated in patients off anticoagulants as compared to the reference population (21% vs. 42.2%, p < 0.0001); inhibition in patients on anticoagulant treatment was less pronounced (9.7%, p < 0.0001). Protein C activity, protein S antigen as well as free protein S showed highly negative correlation with ETP in all patients. A significant negative relation was found between FVIII levels and thrombomodulin induced reduction of ETP and peak height. In conclusion, thrombin generation by CAT reflects changes in coagulation status in patients following a thromboembolic event and is most sensitive at CAT analysis triggered with 1 pM TF. A role for factor VIII as an important attributable cause of hypercoagulability is reflected by the reduced inhibitory effect of thrombomodulin at high factor VIII levels.

  14. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  15. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  16. Therapeutic Targeting of P2X7 after TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-16

    evacuation of acute subdural hematoma : brain shift and the dynamics of extraaxial collections. Neurol Res, 26(7), 763-766. Cold, G. E., & Jensen, F. T...of consecutive bilateral surgeries for patients with acute 31 Kimbler, Donald E N10-P10 subdural hematoma who develop contralateral acute epi...or subdural hematoma . Surg Neurol, 60(1), 23-30; discussion 30. Miller, J. D., Becker, D. P., Ward, J. D., Sullivan, H. G., Adams, W. E., & Rosner, M

  17. Acute arterial ischemia in a patient with polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Soro Marín, Sandra; Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Alamillo Sanz, Antonio Salvador; Sánchez Nievas, Ginés

    Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate at cold temperatures. Their presence can be related to a type of vasculitis referred to as cryoglobulinemia. This condition, especially mixed cryoglobulinemia, has been associated with viral infections like hepatitis C virus in 60%-90% of cases, but it has also been reported in relation to connective tissue diseases, usually resulting in a more severe course. We describe the case of a patient with seronegative polyarthritis who developed acute arterial ischemia in association with cryoglobulinemia, with a good response to rituximab therapy.

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup; Hong, Goohyeon

    2017-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO.

  20. Disruptions in Resting State Functional Connectivity and Cerebral Blood Flow in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sours, Chandler; Zhuo, Jiachen; Roys, Steven; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Gullapalli, Rao P.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is often occult to conventional imaging techniques. However, there is growing evidence that mTBI patients who lack evidence of structural intracranial injury may develop post-concussive syndrome (PCS). We investigated longitudinal alterations in resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in brain networks in a population of 28 patients compared to 28 matched control participants. Rs-FC and cerebral blood flow (CBF) within the nodes of the Default Mode Network (DMN) and Task Positive Network (TPN) were assessed at three time points including acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages following mTBI. Participants received the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) to assess cognitive performance. Main findings indicate that despite normalized cognitive performance, chronic mTBI patients demonstrate increased rs-FC between the DMN and regions associated with the salience network (SN) and TPN compared to the control populations, as well as reduced strength of rs-FC within the DMN at the acute stage of injury. In addition, chronic mTBI patients demonstrate an imbalance in the ratio of CBF between nodes of the DMN and TPN. Furthermore, preliminary exploratory analysis suggests that compared to those without chronic PCS, patients with chronic PCS reveal an imbalance in the ratio of CBF between the DMN nodes and TPN nodes across multiple stages of recovery. Findings suggest that the altered network perfusion with the associated changes in rs-FC may be a possible predictor of which mTBI patients will develop chronic PCS. PMID:26241476

  1. Impact on long-term OS of conditioning regimen in allogeneic BMT for children with AML in first CR: TBI+CY versus BU+CY: a report from the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    de Berranger, E; Cousien, A; Petit, A; Peffault de Latour, R; Galambrun, C; Bertrand, Y; Salmon, A; Rialland, F; Rohrlich, P-S; Vannier, J-P; Lutz, P; Yakouben, K; Duhamel, A; Bruno, B; Michel, G; Dalle, J-H

    2014-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) appears to be an efficient tool to cure high-risk AML in first CR but the choice between BU-based or TBI-based conditioning regimens still remains controversial. In order to analyze the impact of conditioning regimen on long-term survival, we conducted a retrospective analysis from French registry data including all consecutive patients under 18 years old (n=226) from 1980 to 2004 transplanted for AML in CR1 from sibling (n=142) or matched unrelated donors and given either TBI-1200 cGy and CY 120 mg/kg (TBI-Cy, n=84) or BU 16 mg/kg and CY 200 mg/kg (BuCy200, n=142). Patient subgroups were comparable for all criteria except for median age at diagnosis and HSCT and for donor type. Both 5-year OS and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly better in BuCy200 group (P=0.02 and 0.005, respectively). In multivariate analysis, both HLA matching and BuCy200 appeared as good prognostic factors for treatment-related mortality and DFS. Grade 2-4 acute GvHD and chronic GvHD rates were statistically higher in TBI-Cy group than in Bu-Cy200 one with a RR at 2 (P=0.002). In total, Bu-Cy200 conditioning regimen gives better outcome compared with TBI-Cy irrespective of the stem cell source and the donor type.

  2. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units.

  3. Acute kidney injury in patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fu, Chung-Ming; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Su-Wei; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is overlooked in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk factors for and long-term outcomes of this complication remain unknown. This study evaluated the predictors and prognosis of AKI in patients with PE. This retrospective cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We enrolled a total of 7588 patients who were admitted to a hospital for PE from January1997 to December 2011 and administered anticoagulation or thrombolytic agents. All demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes were analyzed. AKI was diagnosed in 372 (4.9%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed pre-existing chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, massive PE, anemia, and sepsis as independent risk factors for AKI. In the long-term follow-up, the survival rate was similar in the AKI and non-AKI groups. Careful risk factor screening and intensive intervention in patients with AKI might yield outcomes similar to those in patients without AKI. PMID:28248851

  4. Noninvasive ventilation for patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Laurent; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Akoumianaki, Evangelia; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2014-08-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has an established efficacy to improve gas exchange and reduce the work of breathing in patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. The clinical efficacy in terms of meaningful outcome is less clear and depends very much on patient selection and assessment of the risks of the technique. The potential risks include an insufficient reduction of the oxygen consumption of the respiratory muscles in case of shock, an excessive increase in tidal volume in case of lung injury, and a risk of delayed or emergent intubation. With a careful selection of patients and a rapid decision regarding the need for intubation in case of failure, great benefits can be offered to patients. Emerging indications include its use in patients with treatment limitations, in the postoperative period, and in patients with immunosuppression. This last indication will necessitate reappraisal because the prognosis of the conditions associated with immunosuppression has improved over the years. In all cases, there is both a time window and a severity window for NIV to work, after which delaying endotracheal intubation may worsen outcome. The preventive use of NIV seems promising in this setting but needs more research. An emerging interesting new option is the use of high flow humidified oxygen, which seems to be intermediate between oxygen alone and NIV.

  5. Impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masashi; Ishihara, Masaharu; Honda, Satoshi; Kawakami, Shoji; Yamane, Takafumi; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Kumasaka, Leon; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Michio; Noguchi, Teruo; Kusano, Kengo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Goto, Yoichi; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-12-15

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute hyperglycemia (acute-HG) and chronic hyperglycemia (chronic-HG) on short-term outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study consisted of 696 patients with AMI. Acute-HG was defined as admission plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dl and chronic-HG as hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%. Acute-HG was associated with higher peak serum creatine kinase (4,094 ± 4,594 vs 2,526 ± 2,227 IU/L, p <0.001) and in-hospital mortality (9.8% vs 1.6%, p <0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in peak creatine kinase (2,803 ± 2,661 vs 2,940 ± 3,181 IU/L, p = 0.59) and mortality (3.3 vs 3.7%, p = 0.79) between patients with chronic-HG and those without. Multivariate analysis showed that admission plasma glucose was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27, p <0.001), but hemoglobin A1c was not. When only patients with acute-HG were analyzed, chronic-HG was associated with a significantly smaller infarct size (3,221 ± 3,001 vs 5,904 ± 6,473 IU/L, p <0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (5.5 vs 18.9%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, these results suggested that acute-HG, but not chronic-HG, was associated with adverse short-term outcomes after AMI. Paradoxically, in patients with acute-HG, chronic-HG might abate the adverse effects of acute-HG.

  6. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  7. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  8. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  9. Concussion in the Military: an Evidence-Base Review of mTBI in US Military Personnel Focused on Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Matthew D; Grimes, Jamie; Ling, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an alteration in brain function caused by an external force. Mild TBI or concussion is now well recognized to be a risk of military service as well as participation in athletic sports such as football. Posttraumatic headache (PTH) is the most common symptom after mTBI in US service members. PTH most commonly presents with migraine-like headache features. The following is an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, prognosis, complications, and treatment of mTBI and associated comorbidities with a focus on PTH. There is a particular emphasis on emerging evidence-based clinical practice. One important medical consequence of the recognition that mTBI is a highly prevalent among military service members is that the Department of Defense (DoD) is dedicating significant financial and intellectual resources to better understanding and developing treatments for TBI. The identification of the importance of TBI among the US military population has had the added benefit of increasing awareness of this condition among civilian populations, particularly those engaged in both professional and youth sports. The NIH and NSF are also supporting important TBI research. President Obama's Brain Initiative is also providing additional impetus for these efforts. Unfortunately, the understanding of the acute and chronic effects of mTBI on the brain remains limited. Gratefully, there is hope that through innovative research, there will be advances in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology, which will lead to clinical and prognostic indicators, ultimately resulting in new treatment options for this very complicated set of disorders.

  10. A Patient with Acute Kidney Pain and High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality. PMID:25583291

  11. A patient with acute kidney pain and high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Debbie L; Soulen, Michael C

    2015-04-07

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality.

  12. Hypothermia-induced acute kidney injury in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mun Chul; Park, Jae Woo; Yang, Min A; Lee, Cheon Beom; Sun, In O; Lee, Kwang Young

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia, defined as an unintentional decline in the core body temperature to below 35℃, is a life-threatening condition. Patients with malnutrition and diabetes mellitus as well as those of advanced age are at high risk for accidental hypothermia. Due to the high mortality rates of accidental hypothermia, proper management is critical for the wellbeing of patients. Accidental hypothermia was reported to be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) in over 40% of cases. Although the pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, vasoconstriction and ischemia in the kidney were considered to be the main mechanisms involved. Cases of AKI associated with hypothermia have been reported worldwide, but there have been few reports of hypothermia-induced AKI in Korea. Here, we present a case of hypothermia-induced AKI that was treated successfully with rewarming and supportive care.

  13. Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Sandeep K; Lee, Edwin; Fox, John; Rachko, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare. We describe a case of AMI in patient with ITP. An 81-year-old woman presented with acute inferoposterior MI with low platelet count on admission (34,000/µl). Coronary angiography revealed significant mid right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis with thrombus, subsequently underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In some patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura and acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention is a therapeutic option.

  14. Very late nonfatal consequences of fractionated TBI in children undergoing bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Maura; Cohen, Amnon; Lanino, Edoardo; Sacco, Oliviero; Cabria, Manlio; De Marco, Riccardo; Stella, Gilberto; Dallorso, Sandro; Vitale, Vito; Dini, Giorgio

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term late consequences in children who received total body irradiation (TBI) for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 10 years earlier. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 42 children treated with TBI between 1985 and 1993, still alive at least 10 years after fractionated TBI (FTBI), was evaluated. Twenty-five patients received FTBI at 330 cGy/day for 3 days (total dose 990 cGy), whereas 17 children were administered fractions of 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days (total dose 1200 cGy). Twenty-seven patients received autologous and 16 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median age at TBI was 6.3 years, and 18.4 years at most recent follow-up. Results: Cataract was diagnosed in 78% of patients after a median of 5.7 years. Hypothyroidism was detected in 12%, whereas thyroid nodules were observed in 60% of our population after a median interval of 10.2 years. Patients treated with 990 cGy developed thyroid nodules more frequently than those treated with 1200 cGy (p = 0.0002). Thyroid carcinoma was diagnosed in 14% of the total population. Females who received FTBI after menarche more frequently developed temporary ovarian dysfunction than those treated before menarche, but cases of persistent ovarian dysfunction did not differ between the two groups. Indirect signs of germinal testicular dysfunction were detected in 87% of males. Restrictive pulmonary disease was observed in 74% of patients. Osteochondroma was found in 29% of patients after a median interval of 9.2 years. This latter complication appeared more frequently in patients irradiated before the age of 3 years (p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study shows that late effects that are likely permanent, although not fatal, are frequent in survivors 10 years after TBI. However, some of the side effects observed shortly after TBI either disappeared or remained unchanged without signs of evolution. Monitoring is recommended to pursue secondary prevention strategies and counseling

  15. Primary coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Popma, J J; Chuang, Y C; Satler, L F; Kleiber, B; Leon, M B

    1994-01-01

    In some patients with acute myocardial infarction, thrombolytic therapy may be limited by its failure to reperfuse the occluded artery, by recurrent ischemia (despite initially successful reperfusion), and by major hemorrhagic complications. Primary coronary angioplasty may circumvent these limitations. This article reviews the results of primary angioplasty reported in patients with myocardial infarction and makes recommendations for its use. The review includes pertinent articles found in the English language literature from July 1987 to July 1993 on MEDLINE. Nonrandomized series of primary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction have demonstrated high procedural success rates (86% to 99%) and infrequent recurrent ischemia (4%). Two randomized trials comparing primary angioplasty and thrombolytic therapy have shown that primary angioplasty results in lower mortality, less recurrent ischemia, shorter length of hospital stay, and improved left ventricular function. Two other randomized studies have shown little benefit from primary angioplasty on myocardial salvage, recurrent ischemia, or ventricular function. One major limitation of primary angioplasty is that it requires 24-hour availability of a catheterization laboratory and experienced surgical personnel. Primary angioplasty may be the preferred approach in patients with extensive myocardial infarction who have immediate (< 120 min) access to a cardiac catheterization laboratory with experienced personnel. Patients having 1) contraindications to thrombolytic therapy, 2) cardiogenic shock, 3) prior coronary bypass surgery, or 4) "stuttering" onset of pain may also benefit from primary angioplasty. Poor candidates for this procedure are those with a small myocardial infarction, those in whom undue delays in access to a cardiac catheterization facility would be expected, or those with complex coronary anatomy, including left main coronary artery disease. PMID:8061539

  16. Cytomegalovirus in Plasma of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskaya, E. A.; Grivel, J.C.; Maryukhnich, E. V.; Lebedeva, A. M.; Ivanova, O. I.; Savvinova, P. P.; Shpektor, A. V.; Margolis, L. B.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and local and systemic inflammation, including accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and upregulation of blood cytokines (e.g., C-reactive protein (CRP)), has been known for more than 100 years. The atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory response has been traditionally considered as an immune system reaction to low-density lipoproteins. At the same time, some data have indicated a potential involvement of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the activation and progression of atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, leading to ACS. However, these data have been tangential and mainly concerned the relationship between a coronary artery disease (CAD) prognosis and the anti-CMV antibody titer. We assumed that ACS might be associated with CMV reactivation and virus release into the bloodstream. The study’s aim was to test this assumption through a comparison of the plasma CMV DNA level in patients with various CAD forms and in healthy subjects. To our knowledge, no similar research has been undertaken yet. A total of 150 subjects (97 CAD patients and 53 healthy subjects) were examined. Real- time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the number of plasma CMV DNA copies. We demonstrated that the number of plasma CMV genome copies in ACS patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (p = 0.01). The CMV genome copy number was correlated with the plasma CRP level (p = 0.002). These findings indicate a potential relationship between CMV activation and atherosclerosis exacerbation that, in turn, leads to the development of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction. Monitoring of the CMV plasma level in CAD patients may be helpful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to coronary atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27437144

  17. Airway pressure release ventilation in morbidly obese surgical patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Testerman, George M; Breitman, Igal; Hensley, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Morbidly obese patients with body mass index greater than 40 kg/m(2) and respiratory failure requiring critical care services are increasingly seen in trauma and acute care surgical centers. Baseline respiratory pathophysiology including decreased pulmonary compliance with dependent atelectasis and abnormal ventilation-perfusion relationships predisposes these patients to acute lung injury (ALI) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as prolonged stays in the intensive care unit. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is an increasingly used alternative mode for salvage therapy in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure that also provides lung protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides the conceptual advantage of an "open lung" approach to ventilation that may be extended to the morbidly obese patient population with ALI and ARDS. We discuss the theoretical benefits and a recent clinical experience of APRV ventilation in the morbidly obese patient with respiratory failure at a Level I trauma, surgical critical care, and acute care surgery center.

  18. Towards systemic sustainable performance of TBI care systems: emergency leadership frontiers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) continue as a twenty-first century subterranean and almost invisible scourge internationally. TBI care systems provide a safety net for survival, recovery, and reintegration into social communities from this scourge, particularly in Canada, the European Union, and the USA. Aims This paper examines the underlying issues of systemic performance and sustainability of TBI care systems, in the light of decreasing care resources and increasing demands for services. Methods This paper reviews the extant literature on TBI care systems, systems reengineering, and emergency leadership literature. Results This paper presents a seven care layer paradigm, which forms the essence of systemic performance in the care of patients with TBIs. It also identifies five key strategic drivers that hold promise for the future systemic sustainability of TBI care systems. Conclusions Transformational leadership and engagement from the international emergency medical community is the key to generating positive change. The sustainability/performance care framework is relevant and pertinent for consideration internationally and in the context of other emergency medical populations. PMID:21373305

  19. Chronic neuropathologies of single and repetitive TBI: substrates of dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Douglas H.; Johnson, Victoria E.; Stewart, William

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been recognized to be a risk factor for dementia. This association has, however, only recently gained widespread attention through the increased awareness of ‘chronic traumatic encephalopathy’ (CTE) in athletes exposed to repetitive head injury. Originally termed ‘dementia pugilistica’ and linked to a career in boxing, descriptions of the neuropathological features of CTE include brain atrophy, cavum septum pellucidum, and amyloid-β, tau and TDP-43 pathologies, many of which might contribute to clinical syndromes of cognitive impairment. Similar chronic pathologies are also commonly found years after just a single moderate to severe TBI. However, little consensus currently exists on specific features of these post-TBI syndromes that might permit their confident clinical and/or pathological diagnosis. Moreover, the mechanisms contributing to neurodegeneration following TBI largely remain unknown. Here, we review the current literature and controversies in the study of chronic neuropathological changes after TBI. PMID:23458973

  20. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  1. Assessment and management of patients with acute red eye.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Sue

    2013-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of the nurse in the assessment and management of five ocular conditions that give rise to an acute red eye in older people. The conditions discussed are acute closed angle glaucoma, acute iritis, acute conjunctivitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus and bacterial corneal ulcer.

  2. Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Review of 97 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan; Buddaraju, Kiran; Majeed, Anas; Sharma, Suryanarayana; Javali, Mahendra; Acharya, Purushottam; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has now become a standard treatment in eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who present within 4.5 h of symptom onset. Objective: To determine the usefulness of IVT and the subset of patients who will benefit from IVT in AIS within 4.5 h. Materials and Methods: Patients with AIS within 4.5 h of symptom onset who underwent IVT were studied prospectively. The study period was from October 2011 to October 2015. Results: A total of 97 patients were thrombolysed intravenously. The mean onset to needle time in all patients was 177.2 ± 62 min (range: 60–360). At 3 months follow-up, favorable outcome was seen in 65 patients (67.1%) and poor outcome including death in the remaining 32 patients (32.9%). Factors predicting favorable outcome was age <65 years (P = 0.02), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) <15 (P < 0.001), small vessel occlusion (P = 0.006), cardioembolism (P = 0.006), and random blood sugar (RBS) <250 mg/dl (P < 0.001). Factors predicting poor outcome was diabetes mellitus (P = 0.01), dyslipidemia (P = 0.01), NIHSS at admission >15 (P = 0.03), RBS >250 mg/dl (P = 0.01), Dense cerebral artery sign, age, glucose level on admission, onset-to-treatment time, NIHSS on admission score >5 (P = 0.03), and occlusion of large artery (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Milder baseline stroke severity, blood glucose <250 mg/dL, younger patients (<65 years), cardioembolic stroke, and small vessel occlusion benefit from recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. PMID:28149079

  3. Healthcare Utilization of Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoer, Ariane; Behrendt, Susann; Schmidt, Torsten; Lottmann, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the health care utilization of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) of one German statutory health insurance. The utilization of ambulatory services as well as of inpatient rehabilitation should be regarded. Moreover, the study should reveal the prescription of drugs for secondary prevention. Here, patients showing guideline corresponding prescriptions should be compared with patients without such prescriptions. Methods A retrospective claims data analysis of one German statutory health insurance was conducted. Health care utilization was considered in the first year after an index hospitalization due to ACS. Beneficiaries for whom an ICD-10 discharge diagnosis of ACS was reported between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2009 were included. In order to reveal differences in health care utilization depending on the type of ACS (STEMI versus NSTEMI/UA) stratified analyses were performed. Another stratification was done for patients with and without defined drug prescriptions. Results From 45,188 patients with ACS almost three quarters were assigned to the group of NSTEMI/UA. For 8.9% of all ACS patients (18.74% STEMI, 8.89% NSTEMI/UA), inpatient post-hospital rehabilitation related to ACS was recorded. Ambulatory care related to CHD diagnosis was utilized by 77.6% of patients, more often by STEMI than by NSTEMI/UA patients. For 36.7% and 45.7% of ACS patients, a prescription of aspirin or clopidogrel was recorded, respectively, 79.4% of STEMI patients received at least one prescription for antiplatelet drugs, the corresponding proportion of NSTEMI/UA was 59.8%. A considerable part of patients without prescription dropped out within the first 90 days after the index event. Conclusions A claims data analysis of one German statutory health insurance fund showed that health care utilization of ACS patients varied depending on the ACS type. It is necessary to distinguish between STEMI and NSTEMI/UA patients when

  4. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  6. Clinical features of acute corpus callosum infarction patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Li; Huang, Yi-Ning; Cui, Zhi-Tang

    2014-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of acute corpus callosum (CC) infarction is lack of specificity and complex, so it is easily missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis in the early stage. The present study aims to describe the clinical features of the acute CC infarction. In this study, 25 patients with corpus callosum infarction confirmed by the brain MRI/DWI and the risk factors were summarized. Patients were classified into genu infarction (3 cases), body infarction (4cases), body and genu infarction (4 cases), body and splenium infarction (1 case), splenium infarction (13 cases) according to lesion location. Clinical manifestation and prognosis were analyzed among groups. The results indicated that CC infarction in patients with high-risk group accounted for 72%, moderate-risk group accounted for 20%, low-risk group (8%). The main risk factors are carotid intimal thickening or plaque formation, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cerebral artery stenosis, and so on. The CC infarction often merged with other parts infarction, and splenium infarction had the highest incidence, the clinical symptoms in the body infarction which can appear typical signs and symptoms, but in other parts infarction which always merged many nerve defect symptoms. The body infarction prognosis is poor; the rest parts of infarction are more favorable prognosis. In conclusion, CC infarction has the highest incidence in the stroke of high-risk group; neck color Doppler and TCD examination can be found as early as possible to explore the pathogenic factors. Prognosis is usually much better by treatment according to the location and risk factors. PMID:25197390

  7. Measurement of serum melatonin in intensive care unit patients: changes in traumatic brain injury, trauma, and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Seifman, Marc A; Gomes, Keith; Nguyen, Phuong N; Bailey, Michael; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Cooper, David J; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone mainly produced by the pineal gland whose dysfunction leads to abnormal sleeping patterns. Changes in melatonin have been reported in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the impact of environmental conditions typical of the intensive care unit (ICU) has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to compare daily melatonin production in three patient populations treated at the ICU to differentiate the role of TBI versus ICU conditions. Forty-five patients were recruited and divided into severe TBI, trauma without TBI, medical conditions without trauma, and compared to healthy volunteers. Serum melatonin levels were measured at four daily intervals at 0400 h, 1000 h, 1600 h, and 2200 h for 7 days post-ICU admission by commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The geometric mean concentrations (95% confidence intervals) of melatonin in these groups showed no difference being 8.3 (6.3-11.0), 9.3 (7.0-12.3), and 8.9 (6.6-11.9) pg/mL, respectively, in TBI, trauma, and intensive care cohorts. All of these patient groups demonstrated decreased melatonin concentrations when compared to control patients. This study suggests that TBI as well as ICU conditions, may have a role in the dysfunction of melatonin. Monitoring and possibly substituting melatonin acutely in these settings may assist in ameliorating long-term sleep dysfunction in all of these groups, and possibly contribute to reducing secondary brain injury in severe TBI.

  8. Lipidomic approach for stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefanko, Adam; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; Simons, Kai; Grzybek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis and progression of many tumors, including hematologic malignancies is highly dependent on enhanced lipogenesis. De novo fatty-acid synthesis permits accelerated proliferation of tumor cells by providing membrane components but these may also alter physicochemical properties of lipid bilayers, which can impact signaling or even increase drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer type-specific lipid profiles would permit us to monitor and interpret actual effects of lipid changes, potential fingerprints of individual tumors to be explored as diagnostic markers. We have used the shotgun MS approach to identify lipid patterns in different types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients that either show no karyotype change or belong to t(8;21) or inv16 types. Differences in lipidomes of t(8;21) and inv(16) patients, as compared to AML patients without karyotype change, presented mostly as substantial modulation of ceramide/sphingolipid synthesis. Furthermore, between the t(8;21) and all other patients we observed significant changes in physicochemical membrane properties. These were related to a marked alteration in lipid saturation levels. The discovered differences in lipid profiles of various AML types improve our understanding of the pathobiochemical pathways involved and may serve in the development of diagnostic tools. PMID:28207743

  9. Sympathoadrenal Activation is Associated with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy and Endotheliopathy in Isolated Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Alex P.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Lejnieks, Brandon; Min, Arimie; Shiu, Maria Y.; Peng, Henry T.; Baker, Andrew J.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Churchill, Nathan; Inaba, Kenji; Nascimento, Bartolomeu B.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Beckett, Andrew; Rhind, Shawn G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly characterized. Objectives: To examine early posttraumatic alterations in coagulofibrinolytic, endothelial, and inflammatory blood biomarkers in relation to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and 6-month patient outcomes, using multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. Patients and Methods: A multicenter observational study of 159 adult isolated TBI patients admitted to the emergency department at an urban level I trauma center, was performed. Plasma concentrations of 6 coagulofibrinolytic, 10 vascular endothelial, 19 inflammatory, and 2 catecholamine biomarkers were measured by immunoassay on admission and 24 h postinjury. Neurological outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. PLS-discriminant analysis was used to identify salient biomarker contributions to unfavorable outcome, whereas PLS regression analysis was used to evaluate the covariance between SNS correlates (catecholamines) and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation. Results: Biomarker profiles in patients with an unfavorable outcome displayed procoagulation, hyperfibrinolysis, glycocalyx and endothelial damage, vasculature activation, and inflammation. A strong covariant relationship was evident between catecholamines and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation at both admission and 24 h postinjury. Conclusions: Biomarkers of coagulopathy and endotheliopathy are associated with poor outcome after TBI. Catecholamine levels were highly correlated with endotheliopathy and coagulopathy markers within the first 24 h after injury. Further research is warranted to characterize the pathogenic role of SNS-mediated hemostatic alterations in isolated TBI. PMID:27206278

  10. [Acute respiratory insufficiency in burn patients from smoke inhalation].

    PubMed

    Gartner, R; Griffe, O; Captier, G; Selloumi, D; Otman, S; Brabet, M; Baro, B

    2002-03-01

    Respiratory injuries by smoke inhalation are one of the most frequent reasons for acute respiratory failure in burn victims. They are most often of chemical origin and are responsible of a 20 to 70% increase of the mortality compared to the mortality of patients with similar burn injuries, but without inhalation lesions. They are often associated to a certain degree to other factors of acute respiratory failure: superior air way obstruction by oedema in face and neck burns, thoracic expansion hindrance due to thoracic burns, lung trauma lesions by blast injury. The generalized inflammatory reaction due to the extent of burns and an initial inadequate resuscitation are worsening factors. The inflammatory process may be responsible of lung injuries similar to those induced by smoke inhalation, even when there is no inhalation. The treatment remains symptomatic and based on the oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, prevention of infections and maintain of homeostasis by hydroelectrolytic adequate resuscitation. The nitric oxyde associated to the almitrin allows in a certain number of cases to minimize intra pulmonary shunting and to normalize the VA/O ratio. The development of treatments allowing to modulate inflammatory mediators may lead to news therapies in the future.

  11. Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Combined Conditioning in Cord Blood Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Retrospective Study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Aoki, Jun; Onishi, Yasushi; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Masuko, Masayoshi; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Miyamura, Kouichi; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kato, Seiko; Asano, Shigetaka; Takami, Akiyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) increases the susceptibility of dormant malignant or nonmalignant hematopoietic cells to cytarabine arabinoside (Ara-C) through the induction of cell cycle entry. Therefore, G-CSF-combined conditioning before allogeneic stem cell transplantation might positively contribute to decreased incidences of relapse and graft failure without having to increase the dose of cytotoxic drugs. We conducted a retrospective nationwide study of 336 adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) after single-unit cord blood transplantation (CBT) who underwent 4 different kinds of conditioning regimens: total body irradiation (TBI) ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + cyclophosphamide (CY) (n = 65), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C + CY (n = 119), TBI ≥ 8 Gy + other (n = 104), or TBI < 8 Gy or non-TBI (n = 48). The TBI ≥ 8 Gy + Ara-C/G-CSF + CY regimen showed significantly higher incidence of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 2.08; P = .009) and lower overall mortality (hazard ratio, .46; 95% CI, .26 to .82; P = .008) rates compared with those without a G-CSF regimen. This retrospective study shows that the G-CSF-combined conditioning regimen provides better engraftment and survival results in CBT for adults with MDS and sAML.

  12. Warfarin usage among elderly atrial fibrillation patients with traumatic injury, an analysis of United States Medicare fee-for-service enrollees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinggang; Baumgarten, Mona; Smith, Gordon; Gambert, Steven; Gottlieb, Stephen; Rattinger, Gail; Albrecht, Jennifer; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene

    2015-01-01

    This study examined warfarin usage for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with atrial fibrillation (AF) who suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), hip fracture, or torso injuries. Using the 5% Chronic Condition Data Warehouse administrative claims data, this study included fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who had a single injury hospitalization (TBI, hip fracture, or major torso injury) between 1/1/2007 and 12/31/2009, with complete Medicare Parts A, B (no Medicare Advantage), and D coverage 6 months before injury, and who were aged 66 years or older and diagnosed with AF at least 1 year before injury. About 45% of the AF patients were using warfarin before TBI or torso injury, and 35% before hip fracture. After injury, there was a dramatic and persistent decrease in warfarin use in TBI and torso injury groups (30% for TBI and 37% for torso injury at 12 months after injury). Warfarin usage in hip fracture patients also dropped after injury but returned to pre-injury level within 4 months. TBI and torso injury lead to significant decreases in warfarin usage in elderly AF patients. Further research is needed to understand reasons for the pattern and to develop evidence-based management strategies in the post-acute setting.

  13. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  14. Structural white matter differences underlying heterogeneous learning abilities after TBI.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Kathy S; Genova, Helen M; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D

    2016-12-01

    The existence of learning deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is generally accepted; however, our understanding of the structural brain mechanisms underlying learning impairment after TBI is limited. Furthermore, our understanding of learning after TBI is often at risk for overgeneralization, as research often overlooks within sample heterogeneity in learning abilities. The present study examined differences in white matter integrity in a sample of adults with moderate to severe TBI who differed in learning abilities. Adults with moderate to severe TBI were grouped into learners and non-learners based upon achievement of the learning criterion of the open-trial Selective Reminding Test (SRT). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to identify white matter differences between the learners and non-learners. Adults with TBI who were able to meet the learning criterion had greater white matter integrity (as indicated by higher fractional anisotropy [FA] values) in the right anterior thalamic radiation, forceps minor, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and forceps minor than non-learners. The results of the study suggest that differences in white matter integrity may explain the observed heterogeneity in learning ability after moderate to severe TBI. This also supports emerging evidence for the involvement of the thalamus in higher order cognition, and the role of thalamo-cortical tracts in connecting functional networks associated with learning.

  15. Do microglia play a role in sex differences in TBI?

    PubMed

    Caplan, Henry W; Cox, Charles S; Bedi, Supinder S

    2017-01-02

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both males and females and is, thus, a major focus of current study. Although the overall death rate of TBI for males is roughly three times higher than that for females, males have been disproportionately represented in clinical and preclinical studies. Gender differences are known to exist in many neurologic disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and stroke, and differences appear to exist in TBI. Furthermore, it is known that microglia have sexually dimorphic roles in CNS development and other neurologic conditions; however, most animal studies of microglia and TBI have focused on male subjects. Microglia are a current target of many preclinical and clinical therapeutic trials for TBI. Understanding the relationship among sex, sex hormones, and microglia is critical to truly understanding the pathophysiology of TBI. However, the evidence for sex differences in TBI centers mainly on sex hormones, and evidenced-based conclusions are often contradictory. In an attempt to review the current literature, it is apparent that sex differences likely exist, but the contradictory nature and magnitude of such differences in the existing literature does not allow definite conclusions to be drawn, except that more investigation of this issue is necessary. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cortisol Mediates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Relationships to Mortality after Severe TBI: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Miranda J; Kumar, Raj G; Oh, Byung-Mo; Conley, Yvette P; Wang, Zhensheng; Failla, Michelle D; Wagner, Amy K

    2017-01-01

    Distinct regulatory signaling mechanisms exist between cortisol and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that may influence secondary injury cascades associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and predict outcome. We investigated concurrent CSF BDNF and cortisol relationships in 117 patients sampled days 0-6 after severe TBI while accounting for BDNF genetics and age. We also determined associations between CSF BDNF and cortisol with 6-month mortality. BDNF variants, rs6265 and rs7124442, were used to create a gene risk score (GRS) in reference to previously published hypothesized risk for mortality in "younger patients" (<48 years) and hypothesized BDNF production/secretion capacity with these variants. Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to create two cortisol groups (high and low trajectories). A Bayesian estimation approach informed the mediation models. Results show CSF BDNF predicted patient cortisol TRAJ group (P = 0.001). Also, GRS moderated BDNF associations with cortisol TRAJ group. Additionally, cortisol TRAJ predicted 6-month mortality (P = 0.001). In a mediation analysis, BDNF predicted mortality, with cortisol acting as the mediator (P = 0.011), yielding a mediation percentage of 29.92%. Mediation effects increased to 45.45% among younger patients. A BDNF(*)GRS interaction predicted mortality in younger patients (P = 0.004). Thus, we conclude 6-month mortality after severe TBI can be predicted through a mediation model with CSF cortisol and BDNF, suggesting a regulatory role for cortisol with BDNF's contribution to TBI pathophysiology and mortality, particularly among younger individuals with severe TBI. Based on the literature, cortisol modulated BDNF effects on mortality after TBI may be related to known hormone and neurotrophin relationships to neurological injury severity and autonomic nervous system imbalance.

  17. Quantified MRI and cognition in TBI with diffuse and focal damage(☆)

    PubMed

    Levine, Brian; Kovacevic, Natasa; Nica, Elena Irina; Schwartz, Michael L; Gao, Fuqiang; Black, Sandra E

    2013-04-10

    In patients with chronic-phase traumatic brain injury (TBI), structural MRI is readily attainable and provides rich anatomical information, yet the relationship between whole-brain structural MRI measures and neurocognitive outcome is relatively unexplored and can be complicated by the presence of combined focal and diffuse injury. In this study, sixty-three patients spanning the full range of TBI severity received high-resolution structural MRI concurrent with neuropsychological testing. Multivariate statistical analysis assessed covariance patterns between volumes of grey matter, white matter, and sulcal/subdural and ventricular CSF across 38 brain regions and neuropsychological test performance. Patients with diffuse and diffuse + focal injury were analyzed both separately and together. Tests of speeded attention, working memory, and verbal learning and memory robustly covaried with a distributed pattern of volume loss over temporal, ventromedial prefrontal, right parietal regions, and cingulate regions. This pattern was modulated by the presence of large focal lesions, but held even when analyses were restricted to those with diffuse injury. Effects were most consistently observed within grey matter. Relative to regional brain volumetric data, clinically defined injury severity (depth of coma at time of injury) showed only weak relation to neuropsychological outcome. The results showed that neuropsychological test performance in patients with TBI is related to a distributed pattern of volume loss in regions mediating mnemonic and attentional processing. This relationship holds for patients with and without focal lesions, indicating that diffuse injury alone is sufficient to cause significant neuropsychological disability in relation to regional volume loss. Quantified structural brain imaging data provides a highly sensitive index of brain integrity that is related to cognitive functioning in chronic phase TBI.

  18. Acute Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei in An Immunocompetent Patient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingli; Chen, Youfei; Xu, Hao; Ding, Liren; Wu, Zuqun; Xu, Zhijiang; Wang, Kai

    2017-03-27

    Talaromyces marneffei (also called Penicilliosis Marneffei or T. marneffei) is a rare fungal disease that is prevalent mainly in Southeast Asia and commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. It was rarely observed in immunocompetent hosts. We report a case of acute disseminated T. marneffei in an immunocompetent patient in the non-prevalent region. This patient had never visited the endemic area. The patient experienced a persistent fever. Brain CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a mass in the right frontal with osteolytic damage. Excessive white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein content were observed. Antibiotics including meropenem and linezolid could not play an effect, and another two hard masses appeared in his right neck and front chest wall. The aspirates from the right frontal mass and bone marrow were cultured. The final diagnose of this infection was disseminated T. marneffei. After voriconazole treatment, all symptoms improved gradually. We present this case and aim to promote more clinicians and microbiologists in the non-endemic region to recognize this rare disease.

  19. Novel drugs for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Montalban-Bravo, G; Garcia-Manero, G

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia and the most frequent cause of leukemia-related deaths in the United States. The incidence of AML increases with advancing age and the prognosis for patients with AML worsens substantially with increasing age. Many older patients are ineligible for intensive treatment and require other therapeutic approaches to optimize clinical outcome. To address this treatment gap, novel agents with varying mechanisms of action targeting different cellular processes are currently in development. Hypomethylating agents (azacitidine, decitabine, SGI-110), histone deacetylase inhibitors (vorinostat, pracinostat, panobinostat), FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 inhibitors (quizartinib, sorafenib, midostaurin, crenolanib), cytotoxic agents (clofarabine, sapacitabine, vosaroxin), cell cycle inhibitors (barasertib, volasertib, rigosertib) and monoclonal antibodies (gentuzumab ozogamicin, lintuzumab-Ac225) represent some of these promising new treatments. This review provides an overview of novel agents that have either completed or are currently in ongoing phase III trials in patients with previously untreated AML for whom intensive treatment is not an option. Other potential drugs in earlier stages of development will also be addressed in this review.

  20. Prediction of patient survival in cases of acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sae-Yong; Lee, Ji-Sung; Sun, In O; Lee, Kwang-Young; Gil, Hyo-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat concentration-time data have been used to predict the clinical outcome following ingestion. However, these studies have included only small populations, although paraquat poisoning has a very high mortality rate. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and reliable model to predict survival according to the time interval post-ingestion in patients with acute paraquat poisoning. Data were retrospectively collected for patients who were admitted with paraquat poisoning to Soonchunhyang University Choenan Hospital between January 2005 and December 2012. Plasma paraquat levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. To validate the model we developed, we used external data from 788 subjects admitted to the Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju, Korea, between January 2007 and December 2012. Two thousand one hundred thirty six patients were included in this study. The overall survival rate was 44% (939/2136). The probability of survival for any specified time and concentration could be predicted as (exp(logit))/(1+exp(logit)), where logit = 1.3544+[-3.4688 × log10(plasma paraquat μg/M[Formula: see text])]+[-2.3169 × log10(hours since ingestion)]. The external validation study showed that our model was highly accurate for the prediction of survival (C statics 0.964; 95% CI [0.952-0.975]). We have developed a model that is effective for predicting survival after paraquat intoxication.

  1. Structured assessment of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1242 patients: the German interdisciplinary database.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald J; Schneider, Manfred; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Tuschy, Ulrich; Wallaschofski, Henri; Fleck, Steffen; Faust, Michael; Renner, Caroline I E; Kopczak, Anna; Saller, Bernhard; Buchfelder, Michael; Jordan, Martina; Stalla, Günter K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are frequent causes of long-term disturbances of hypothalamo-pituitary function. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in a large national registry of patients with TBI and SAH. Data were collected from 14 centers in Germany and Austria treating patients for TBI or SAH and performing endocrine assessments. Data were collected using a structured, internet-based study sheet, obtaining information on clinical, radiological, and hormonal parameters. A total of 1242 patients (825 TBI, age 43.5±19.7 years; 417 SAH, age 49.7±11.8 years) were included. We studied the prevalence of hypopituitarism reported based on different definitions of laboratory values and stimulation tests. Stimulation tests for the corticotropic and somatotropic axes were performed in 26% and 22% of the patients, respectively. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in the chronic phase (at least 5 months after the event) by laboratory values, physician diagnoses, and stimulation tests, was 35%, 36%, and 70%, respectively. Hypopituitarism was less common in the acute phase. According to the frequency of endocrine dysfunction, pituitary hormone secretion was impaired in the following sequence: ACTH, LH/FSH, GH, and TSH. TBI patients with abnormal stimulation tests had suffered from more severe TBI than patients with normal stimulation tests. In conclusion, our data confirm that hypopituitarism is a common complication of TBI and SAH. It is possible that patients with a higher likelihood of hypopituitarism were selected for endocrine stimulation tests.

  2. Patient Expectations as Predictors of Outcome In Patients with Acute Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Russell S.; Davis, Roger B.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Legedza, Anna; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Hrbek, Andrea; Buring, Julie E.; Post, Diana; Connelly, Maureen T.; Eisenberg, David M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have evaluated the association between patient expectations for recovery and clinical outcomes, and no study has evaluated whether asking patients to choose their therapy modifies such an association. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between patients’ expectations and functional recovery in patients with acute low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether that association is affected by giving patients choice of therapy. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care alone to usual care plus choice of chiropractic, acupuncture, or massage in 444 adults with acute LBP, lasting less than 21 days. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Primary outcome was functional disability (Roland score) at 5 and 12 weeks. Patients’ general expectations for improvement were associated with improvement in functional status (β = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.56, 1.36). A 1-point increase in general expectations was associated with a 0.96-point improvement in Roland score. The association of expectation with outcome was 2–3 times greater in the usual care group than the choice group. However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS In patients with acute LBP, higher expectations for recovery are associated with greater functional improvement. Eliciting patient expectations for improvement may be a simple way to identify patients with the highest (or lowest) likelihood of experiencing functional improvement. Incorporating questions about patient expectations in future trials may clarify the role of this important correlate of clinical outcomes. PMID:18066631

  3. [Acute pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy in patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cougard, P; Peix, J L; Peschaud, F; Goudet, P

    2001-05-01

    Two cases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis after bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy were observed in patients with an ectopic ACTH syndrome. Two reasons may be suspected: the difficulty of dissection in such patients and the specific morbidity in relation to hypercorticism.

  4. [Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain].

    PubMed

    Grosse, A; Grosse, C

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cortisol Mediates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Relationships to Mortality after Severe TBI: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Miranda J.; Kumar, Raj G.; Oh, Byung-Mo; Conley, Yvette P.; Wang, Zhensheng; Failla, Michelle D.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2017-01-01

    Distinct regulatory signaling mechanisms exist between cortisol and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that may influence secondary injury cascades associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and predict outcome. We investigated concurrent CSF BDNF and cortisol relationships in 117 patients sampled days 0–6 after severe TBI while accounting for BDNF genetics and age. We also determined associations between CSF BDNF and cortisol with 6-month mortality. BDNF variants, rs6265 and rs7124442, were used to create a gene risk score (GRS) in reference to previously published hypothesized risk for mortality in “younger patients” (<48 years) and hypothesized BDNF production/secretion capacity with these variants. Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to create two cortisol groups (high and low trajectories). A Bayesian estimation approach informed the mediation models. Results show CSF BDNF predicted patient cortisol TRAJ group (P = 0.001). Also, GRS moderated BDNF associations with cortisol TRAJ group. Additionally, cortisol TRAJ predicted 6-month mortality (P = 0.001). In a mediation analysis, BDNF predicted mortality, with cortisol acting as the mediator (P = 0.011), yielding a mediation percentage of 29.92%. Mediation effects increased to 45.45% among younger patients. A BDNF*GRS interaction predicted mortality in younger patients (P = 0.004). Thus, we conclude 6-month mortality after severe TBI can be predicted through a mediation model with CSF cortisol and BDNF, suggesting a regulatory role for cortisol with BDNF's contribution to TBI pathophysiology and mortality, particularly among younger individuals with severe TBI. Based on the literature, cortisol modulated BDNF effects on mortality after TBI may be related to known hormone and neurotrophin relationships to neurological injury severity and autonomic nervous system imbalance. PMID:28337122

  6. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  7. The Separate and Cumulative Effects of TBI and PTSD on Cognitive Function and Emotional Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Subtle impairments in executive func- tion could hinder the effectiveness of PTSD treatments that rely on the retrieval of autobiographical memories ...study (Exp. 4). We also prepared the draft of a manuscript on the dual task/working memory study (another aspect of Exp. 4) that describes results...from mTBI/PTSD patients and military controls (Appendix 3; Honzel et al., in preparation). To better understand the nature of the working memory

  8. Development of Posiphen, an Inhibitor of Phosphorylated Tau Expression, as a Treatment of TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Posiphen reversed this deficit, indicating a beneficial effect of the drug in brain even at the lowest concentration used in this study. We...APP, tau, alpha-synuclein, drug trial 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...clinical studies testing efficacy of this small molecule drug to treat TBI patients. The studies funded to date (“base”) intended to demonstrate

  9. SU-E-T-485: In Vivo Dosimetry with EBT3 Radiochromic Films for TBI Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lozares, S; Gracia, M; Olasolo, J; Gallardo, N; Fuentemilla, N; Pellejero, S; Miquelez, S; Maneru, F; Martin, M; Bragado, L; Rubio, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a technique that requires special equipment to control “in vivo” the dose to the patient because it is a complex technique performed in extraordinary conditions. There are several devices to perform this task (diodes, TLDs, ionization chambers, MOSFET). In this paper we study the possibility of performing these measurements with radiochromic films EBT3 properly calibrated. This method has been compared to the PTW diodes system for TBI. Methods: Once made the TC to the patients, we measured different thicknesses of the relevant areas of the body (head, neck, chest with or without arms, umbilicus area, knees and ankles); for each of these thicknesses we measured dose rate (cGy / UM) in RW3 phantom, in TBI conditions, with ionization chamber in the center; in turn, the input diode and the output of each configuration is placed to assign dose to each set of diodes. Movie calibration is performed according to manufacturer’s recommendations but TBI conditions. The dose at the center of each thickness compared to a linear interpolation of the dose at the entrance and exit, resulting in an adequate approximation. Finally in each session for each patient put a piece of film (2×2 cm2) at the entrance and another at the exit in each area, obtaining these readings and interpolating the estimated center dose, as with the diodes. Results: These results show a greater homogeneity in the distribution for use with film and validate the use of the same for this task and, if necessary, to avoid purchasing diode group if they have not. Conclusion: By using radiochromic films for this technique gives us a proper calculation of the dose received by the patient in the absence of other methods, or gives us a second additional track that already used normally.

  10. [Acute abdomen due to cytomegalovirus in AIDS patients. Apropos 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ferré, C; Mascaró, J; Benasco, C; Ramos, E; Pérez, J L; Podzamczer, D

    1994-07-09

    Two cases of acute abdomen--because of acute appendicitis and paralytic ileus--due to cytomegalovirus infection in AIDS patients are reported. In both patients evolution was subacute and cytomegalic inclusions were seen in the histologic examination of the surgical samples. The two patients died after surgery. The possibility of cytomegalovirus infection must be kept in mind in AIDS patients who undergo urgent abdominal laparatomy and early treatment should be instituted.

  11. Toxicokinetics of paraquat in Korean patients with acute poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Hwayoung; Bae, Jun-Seok; Kown, Jun-Tack; Gil, Hyo-Wook

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a kinetic study of paraquat (PQ), we investigated 9 patients with acute PQ intoxication. All of them ingested more than 20 ml of undiluted PQ herbicide to commit suicide and arrived at our hospital early, not later than 7 h after PQ ingestion. The urine dithionite test for PQ in all of the nine patients was strongly positive at emergency room. Blood samples were obtained every 30 min for the first 2~3 h and then every 1 or 2 h, as long as the clinical progression was stable among the patients for 30 h after PQ ingestion. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCinf), which was extrapolated to infinity, was calculated using the trapezoidal rule. Toxicokinetic parameters, such as the terminal elimination half-life, apparent oral clearance, and apparent volume of distribution (Vd/F) were calculated. The maximum PQ concentration (Cmax) and the time to reach maximum PQ concentration (Tmax) were also obtained. Plasma PQ concentrations in nine patients were well described by a bi-exponential curve with a mean terminal elimination half-life of 13.1±6.8 h. Cmax and AUCinf were 20.8±25.7 mg/l and 172.5±160.3 h·mg/l, respectively. Apparent volume of distribution and apparent oral clearance were 50.9±61.3 l/kg and 173.4±111.2 l/h, respectively. There were a significant correlation (r =0.84; p<0.05) between the PQ amount ingested and Cmax. AUCinf also showed a significant correlation (r =0.83; p<0.05) with the PQ amount ingested. These correlations provide evidence that PQ has dose-linear toxicokinetic characteristics. PMID:26807021

  12. Acute alcohol consumption and motivation to reduce drinking among injured patients in a Swedish emergency department.

    PubMed

    Trinks, Anna; Festin, Karin; Bendtsen, Preben; Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Nilsen, Per

    2012-10-01

    Injuries constitute a major public health problem. Millions of people are injured each year, and acute drinking is a well-known risk factor for injuries. Research suggests that acknowledgment of alcohol as a factor in an injury enhances willingness to change drinking behavior, possibly because the patient becomes aware of the negative consequences of their drinking. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of acute alcohol consumption (drinking before the event) among injury patients and to examine the importance of factors potentially associated with motivation to reduce alcohol consumption among these patients. All patients aged 18-69 years were requested to answer alcohol-related questions on a touchscreen computer. Fifteen percent of injured patients were categorized as acute drinkers, and of these, 64% reported that their injury was connected to alcohol. There were significant differences for all sociodemographic and drinking characteristics between acute drinkers and nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were categorized as risky drinkers to a much higher extent than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had a considerably higher average weekly alcohol consumption and engaged far more frequently in heavy episodic drinking than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were motivated to reduce their alcohol intake to a greater extent than nonacute drinkers; 51% were in the action, preparation, and contemplation stages, compared with 19% of the nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had considerably more detrimental alcohol consumption than nonacute drinkers, and the acute drinkers were more motivated to reduce their drinking than the nonacute drinkers.

  13. Reducing anger outbursts after a severe TBI: a single-case study.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Manolov, Rumen; Aboulafia-Brakha, Tatiana; Berner-Burkard, Christina; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-12-23

    Anger outbursts constitute a frequent behavioural issue after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have a strong negative impact on the social outcomes resulting from the TBI. However, few studies have examined the efficacy of specific intervention strategies to reduce the frequency and intensity of anger outbursts. We therefore performed a single-case study on this topic by administering two successive and complementary psychological interventions with an AB design with maintenance (first intervention) and an AC design with maintenance plus a one-month follow-up (second intervention) to a patient with a severe TBI. Whereas the first intervention focused on improving the recognition and expression of basic emotions, the second consisted of a self-regulation programme, including various features such as psychoeducation about self-control strategies, relaxation and assertiveness training that aimed to establish adequate behaviours, which were further promoted by an implementation intentions strategy in the patient's daily life. The results indicated that all interventions resulted in a reduced frequency and intensity of anger outbursts, and the data upheld the specificity of these effects. In addition, a meta-analytic integration of the effects of both interventions on the outcomes indicated a medium effect size. Further research is needed on other patients who experience long-standing anger outbursts to examine whether the observed gains can be replicated, sustained on a longer-term basis and improved.

  14. Demographic profile and extent of healthcare resource utilisation of patients with severe traumatic brain injury: still a major public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jing Zhong; Yang, Yun Rui Jasmine; Lee, Qian Yi Ruth; Cao, Kelly; Chong, Chin Ted

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Trauma is the fifth principal cause of death in Singapore, with traumatic brain injury (TBI) being the leading specific subordinate cause. METHODS This study was an eight-year retrospective review of the demographic profiles of patients with severe TBI who were admitted to the neurointensive care unit (NICU) of the National Neuroscience Institute at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, between 2004 and 2011. RESULTS A total of 780 TBI patients were admitted during the study period; 365 (46.8%) patients sustained severe TBI (i.e. Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8), with the majority (75.3%) being male. The ages of patients with severe TBI ranged from 14–93 years, with a bimodal preponderance in young adults (i.e. 21–40 years) and elderly persons (i.e. > 60 years). Motor vehicle accidents (48.8%) and falls (42.5%) were the main mechanisms of injury. Invasive line monitoring was frequently employed; invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring and central venous pressure monitoring were used in 81.6% and 60.0% of the patients, respectively, while intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement was required in 47.4% of the patients. The use of tiered therapy to control ICP (e.g. sedation, osmotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, moderate hyperventilation and barbiturate-induced coma) converged with international practices. CONCLUSION The high-risk groups for severe TBI were young adults and elderly persons involved in motor vehicle accidents and falls, respectively. In the NICU, the care of patients with severe TBI requires heavy utilisation of resources. The healthcare burden of these patients extends beyond the acute critical care phase. PMID:26768061

  15. Thioredoxin-Mimetic-Peptides Protect Cognitive Function after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    PubMed Central

    Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Deselms, Hanna; Heim, Leore Raphael; Khomski, Lena; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is recognized as a common injury among children, sportsmen, and elderly population. mTBI lacks visible objective structural brain damage but patients frequently suffer from long-lasting cognitive, behavioral and emotional difficulties associated with biochemical and cellular changes. Currently there is no effective treatment for patients with mTBI. The thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin pathway (TrxR/Trx1) has both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. If the system is compromised, Trx1 remains oxidized and triggers cell death via an ASK1-Trx1 signal transduction mechanism. We previously showed tri and tetra peptides which were derived from the canonical -CxxC- motif of the Trx1-active site, called thioredoxin mimetic (TXM) peptides, reversed inflammatory and oxidative stress damage mimicking Trx1 activity. Here, TXM-peptides were examined for protecting cognitive function following weight drop closed-head injury in a mouse model of mTBI. TXM-CB3 (AcCys-Pro-CysNH2), TXM-CB13 (DY-70; AcCys-Met-Lys-CysNH2) or AD4 (ACysNH2) were administered at 50 mg/kg, 60 min after injury and cognitive performance was monitored by the novel-object-recognition and Y-maze tests. Behavioral deficits subsequent to mTBI injury were reversed by a single dose of TXM-CB3, TXM-CB13 and, to a lesser extent, by AD4. TXM-CB13 similar to TXM-CB3 and AD4 reversed oxidative stress-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinases, p38MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, (JNK) in human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. We conclude that significantly improved cognitive behavior post mTBI by the TXM-peptides could result from anti-apoptotic, and/or anti-inflammatory activities. Future preclinical studies are required to establish the TXM-peptides as potential therapeutic drugs for brain injuries. PMID:27285176

  16. Normalized power transmission between ABP and ICP in TBI.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, S; Hallen, T; McKelvey, T; Ritzen, C; Rydenhag, B

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to study the pulse transmission between the cerebrovascular bed and the intracranial space is presented. In the proposed approach, the normalized power transmission between ABP and ICP has got the main attention rather than the actual power transmission. Evaluating the gain of the proposed transfer function at any single frequency can reveal how the percentage of contribution of that specific frequency component has been changed through the cerebrospinal system. The gain of the new transfer function at the fundamental cardiac frequency was utilized to evaluate the state of the brain in three TBI patients. Results were assessed using the reference evaluations achieved by a novel CT scan-based scoring scheme. In all three study cases, the gain of the transfer function showed a good capability to follow the trend of the CT scores and describe the brain state. Comparing the new transfer function with the traditional one and also the index of compensatory reserve, the proposed transfer function was found more informative about the state of the brain in the patients under study.

  17. [Risk and prophylaxis acute pancreatitis while enteral tube feeding in patients operated for destructive cholecystitis].

    PubMed

    Zhurikhina, A V; Kitiashvili, I Z; Kutukov, V V; Kondrashova, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Determined by risk and method of prophylaxis of acute pancreatitis in the postoperative enteral tube feeding in patients with destructive cholecystitis, analyzed levels of a-amylase in blood serum and clinical manifestations of acute pancreatitis in 135 operated patients. It was established that the use of nasoduodenal access is more likely to cause the elevated level of serum amylase (p<0,05) and more incidence of sings of acute pancreatitis in contrast to nasoduodenal tube placement. For the prevention of acute pancreatitis with enteral tube feeding is preferred mode designed using nasoduodenal access.

  18. Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    efficacy of veliparib and NAD as agents for suppressing inflammation and improving outcomes after traumatic brain injury. The animal models include...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0091 TITLE: Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...COVERED 25 Sep 2014 - 24 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI 5b. GRANT

  19. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0641 TITLE: Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2013 – 14 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD 5a. CONTRACT...therapy (CPT), an empirically supported treatment for PTSD, in which CPT is enhanced with compensatory cognitive rehabilitation principles. The

  20. Frontoparietal Priority Maps as Biomarkers for mTBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0534 TITLE: Frontoparietal Priority Maps as Biomarkers for mTBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cheryl A Olman...Frontoparietal Priority Maps as Biomarkers for mTBI 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0534 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...determine the degree to which difficulties with visual attention, saccade targeting and motion perception associated with mild traumatic brain injury

  1. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Akagi, Satoshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Ogawa, Aiko; Fuke, Soichiro; Fujio, Hideki; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Nagase, Satoshi; Kohno, Kunihisa; Morita, Hiroshi; Kusano, Kengo F; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ohe, Tohru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Acute vasoreactivity testing for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been reported to be useful to identify patients with sustained beneficial response to oral calcium-channel blockers (CCBs), but there is a risk of exacerbation during the testing with oral CCBs. Therefore, we developed a testing method utilizing intravenous nicardipine, a short-acting CCB, and examined the safety and usefulness of acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine in PAH patients. Acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine was performed in 65 PAH patients. Nicardipine was administered by short-time continuous infusion (1 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min and 2 μg·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ for 5 min) followed by bolus injection (5 μg/kg). Hemodynamic responses were continuously measured using a right heart catheter. Acute responders were defined as patients who showed a decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure of at least 10 mmHg to an absolute level below 40 mmHg with preserved or increased cardiac output. Two acute responders and sixty-three non-acute responders were identified. There was no hemodynamic instability requiring additional inotropic agents or death during the testing. Acute responders had good responses to long-term oral CCBs. The acute vasoreactivity testing with nicardipine might be safe and useful for identifying CCB responders in PAH patients.

  2. Using the public health model to address unintentional injuries and TBI: A perspective from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Grant; Breiding, Matt; Sleet, David

    2016-06-30

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have long term effects on mental and physical health, and can disrupt vocational, educational, and social functioning. TBIs can range from mild to severe and their effects can last many years after the initial injury. CDC seeks to reduce the burden of TBI from unintentional injuries through a focus on primary prevention, improved recognition and management, and intervening to improve health outcomes after TBI. CDC uses a 4-stage public health model to guide TBI prevention, moving from 1) surveillance of TBI, 2) identification of risk and protective factors for TBI, 3) development and testing of evidence-based interventions, to 4) bringing effective intervention to scale through widespread adoption. CDC's unintentional injury prevention activities focus on the prevention of sports-related concussions, motor vehicle crashes, and older adult falls. For concussion prevention, CDC developed Heads Up - an awareness initiative focusing on ways to prevent a concussion in sports, and identifying how to recognize and manage potential concussions. In motor vehicle injury prevention, CDC has developed a tool (MV PICCS) to calculate the expected number of injuries prevented and lives saved using various evidence-based motor vehicle crash prevention strategies. To help prevent TBI related to older adult falls, CDC has developed STEADI, an initiative to help primary care providers identify their patients' falls risk and provide effective interventions. In the future, CDC is focused on advancing our understanding of the public health burden of TBI through improved surveillance in order to produce more comprehensive estimates of the public health burden of TBI.

  3. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  4. Statistical Issues in TBI Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Paul E.; Cellucci, Christopher J.; Keyser, David O.; Gilpin, Adele M. K.; Darmon, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The identification and longitudinal assessment of traumatic brain injury presents several challenges. Because these injuries can have subtle effects, efforts to find quantitative physiological measures that can be used to characterize traumatic brain injury are receiving increased attention. The results of this research must be considered with care. Six reasons for cautious assessment are outlined in this paper. None of the issues raised here are new. They are standard elements in the technical literature that describes the mathematical analysis of clinical data. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to these issues because they need to be considered when clinicians evaluate the usefulness of this research. In some instances these points are demonstrated by simulation studies of diagnostic processes. We take as an additional objective the explicit presentation of the mathematical methods used to reach these conclusions. This material is in the appendices. The following points are made: (1) A statistically significant separation of a clinical population from a control population does not ensure a successful diagnostic procedure. (2) Adding more variables to a diagnostic discrimination can, in some instances, actually reduce classification accuracy. (3) A high sensitivity and specificity in a TBI versus control population classification does not ensure diagnostic successes when the method is applied in a more general neuropsychiatric population. (4) Evaluation of treatment effectiveness must recognize that high variability is a pronounced characteristic of an injured central nervous system and that results can be confounded by either disease progression or spontaneous recovery. A large pre-treatment versus post-treatment effect size does not, of itself, establish a successful treatment. (5) A procedure for discriminating between treatment responders and non-responders requires, minimally, a two phase investigation. This procedure must include a mechanism to

  5. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  6. Fracture of a HTR-PMI cranioplastic implant after severe TBI.

    PubMed

    López González, Antonio; Pérez Borredá, Pedro; Conde Sardón, Rebeca

    2015-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a large left fronto-parietal hard-tissue replacement patient-matched implant (HTR®-PMI) cranioplasty-since she suffered from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) 6 years ago-had a new severe TBI that detached and fractured the implant as well as caused a left subdural hematoma and a large frontal contusion. The hematoma and contusion were removed and the implant was substituted by a provisional titanium mesh. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported about an HTR®-PMI fracture. It is theorized that the bone ingrowth into the macroporous implants, like those of hydroxyapatite, gives strength and resistance to the implant. But in the case we describe, no macroscopic bone ingrowth was detected 6 years after implantation and the traumatic force that impacted over the cranioplasty exceeded its properties.

  7. Graph Analysis of Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Posttraumatic complaints are frequently reported, interfering with outcome. However, a consistent neural substrate has not yet been found. We used graph analysis to further unravel the complex interactions between functional brain networks, complaints, anxiety and depression in the sub-acute stage after mTBI. This study included 54 patients with uncomplicated mTBI and 20 matched healthy controls. Posttraumatic complaints, anxiety and depression were measured at two weeks post-injury. Patients were selected based on presence (n = 34) or absence (n = 20) of complaints. Resting-state fMRI scans were made approximately four weeks post-injury. High order independent component analysis resulted in 89 neural components that were included in subsequent graph analyses. No differences in graph measures were found between patients with mTBI and healthy controls. Regarding the two patient subgroups, degree, strength, local efficiency and eigenvector centrality of the bilateral posterior cingulate/precuneus and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus were higher, and eigenvector centrality of the frontal pole/ bilateral middle & superior frontal gyrus was lower in patients with complaints compared to patients without complaints. In patients with mTBI, higher degree, strength and eigenvector centrality of default mode network components were related to higher depression scores, and higher degree and eigenvector centrality of executive network components were related to lower depression scores. In patients without complaints, one extra module was found compared to patients with complaints and healthy controls, consisting of the cingulate areas. In conclusion, this research extends the knowledge of functional network connectivity after mTBI. Specifically, our results suggest that an imbalance in the function of the default mode- and executive network plays a central role in the interaction

  8. 13C-labelled microdialysis studies of cerebral metabolism in TBI patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Gallagher, Clare N.; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J.; Mason, Andrew; Timofeev, Ivan; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P.; Menon, David K.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sutherland, Garnette R.; Pickard, John D.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain chemistry is incompletely understood and better methodologies are needed. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes metabolic perturbations, one result of which includes increased brain lactate levels. Attention has largely focussed on glycolysis, whereby glucose is converted to pyruvate and lactate, and is proposed to act as an energy source by feeding into neurons’ tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, generating ATP. Also reportedly upregulated by TBI is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) that does not generate ATP but produces various molecules that are putatively neuroprotective, antioxidant and reparative, in addition to lactate among the end products. We have developed a novel combination of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis both to deliver 13C-labelled substrates into brains of TBI patients and recover the 13C-labelled metabolites, with high-resolution 13C NMR analysis of the microdialysates. This methodology has enabled us to achieve the first direct demonstration in humans that the brain can utilise lactate via the TCA cycle. We are currently using this methodology to make the first direct comparison of glycolysis and the PPP in human brain. In this article, we consider the application of 13C-labelled cerebral microdialysis for studying brain energy metabolism in patients. We set this methodology within the context of metabolic pathways in the brain, and 13C research modalities addressing them. PMID:24361470

  9. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Calcular Cholecystitis in a Patient with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Albarrak, Abdullah A; Khairy, Sami; Ahmed, Alzahrani Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who have ventriculoperitoneal shunt presenting with acute calcular cholecystitis has remained a clinical challenge. In this paper, the hospital course and the follow-up of a patient presenting with acute calcular cholecystitis and ventriculoperitoneal shunt managed with laparoscopic cholecystectomy are presented followed by literature review on the management of acute calcular cholecystitis in patients who have ventriculoperitoneal shunts.

  10. Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as acute vascular occlusion in a young female patient.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Del Pozo, Francisco Javier Fonseca; Álvarez, Manuel Vaquero; Pedraza, Jorge; Aguayo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Almudena

    2016-10-10

    Acquired thrombotic and thromboembolic disorders may be presented initially with symptoms and signs of acute ischaemia or organ dysfunction that will lead many of these patients to seek care in the emergency department. We report a case of a 19-year-old female patient who developed catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS syndrome or Asherson syndrome) 6 weeks post stillbirth with an initial presentation of acute vascular occlusion. The patient was immediately operated and anticoagulated with significant improvement.

  11. A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:56, 2015 A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients J Alan...Chung, MC USA*‡ ABSTRACT Background: The objective of this report was to compare the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and...Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of burn injury and is associated with poor outcomes. Previous reports using

  12. Acute fulminant neuropathy in a patient with Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K. K.; Yeung, H. M.; Loo, K. T.; Chan, H. M.; Wong, C. K.; Li, P. C.

    1997-01-01

    We report a patient with an acute neuropathy initially mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome, both clinically and electrophysiologically. Persistent eosinophilia, positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and eosinophilic vasculitis in sural nerve biopsy later confirmed Churg-Strauss syndrome. Since vasculitic neuropathy can present in an acute and fulminant form, the role of early antibody testing and sural nerve biopsy in atypical cases of acute neuropathy is emphasized. Images Figure PMID:9156128

  13. Approaches to Predicting Outcomes in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saly, Danielle; Yang, Alina; Triebwasser, Corey; Oh, Janice; Sun, Qisi; Testani, Jeffrey; Parikh, Chirag R.; Bia, Joshua; Biswas, Aditya; Stetson, Chess; Chaisanguanthum, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Despite recognition that Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) leads to substantial increases in morbidity, mortality, and length of stay, accurate prognostication of these clinical events remains difficult. It remains unclear which approaches to variable selection and model building are most robust. We used data from a randomized trial of AKI alerting to develop time-updated prognostic models using stepwise regression compared to more advanced variable selection techniques. We randomly split data into training and validation cohorts. Outcomes of interest were death within 7 days, dialysis within 7 days, and length of stay. Data elements eligible for model-building included lab values, medications and dosages, procedures, and demographics. We assessed model discrimination using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve and r-squared values. 2241 individuals were available for analysis. Both modeling techniques created viable models with very good discrimination ability, with AUCs exceeding 0.85 for dialysis and 0.8 for death prediction. Model performance was similar across model building strategies, though the strategy employing more advanced variable selection was more parsimonious. Very good to excellent prediction of outcome events is feasible in patients with AKI. More advanced techniques may lead to more parsimonious models, which may facilitate adoption in other settings. PMID:28122032

  14. Interleukin-3 priming in acute myeloid leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, A; de Felice, L; Goodacre, A; Fenu, S; Petrucci, M T; Valentini, T; Alimena, G; Petti, M C; Meloni, G; Mandelli, F

    1995-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that G-CSF, GM-CSF and, in particular, IL-3 can effectively recruit acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts into the cell cycle, resulting in a significant increase in cytosine-arabinoside (Ara-C) mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Since IL-3 has shown biological and clinical activity, we investigated the cell kinetic effects of rIL-3 and high-dose Ara-C/idarubicin in three patients with refractory AML selected for the presence of chromosome 7 monosomy; this enabled differentiation between the effects of IL-3 on leukaemic and on normal cells. The in vivo administration of rhIL-3 (250 micrograms/m2d s.c. for 6-10d) recruited AML blasts into the cell cycle in two of the three patients, and this effect resulted in an increase in in vitro growth of clonogenic cells (CFU-L) and of their S-phase fraction. The percentage of leukaemic cells with monosomy 7 increased only in the two cases who showed a proliferative response. Normal cells were not recruited, even when rhIL-3 was administered for up to 10 d. In vitro studies showed an increased Ara-C cytotoxicity on clonogenic AML cells, in particular with IL-3 plus GM-CSF, thus confirming the priming effects of IL-3 in the two responding cases. The results of this study suggest that rhIL-3 can selectively recruit leukaemic cells into the cell cycle. Although leukaemic blasts can be sensitized to Ara-C, other mechanisms of primary blast resistance may limit the clinical benefit of kinetic-based approaches.

  15. Preventing and Treating Acute Kidney Injury Among Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis and Ascites: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Bonder, Alan; Cardenas, Andres

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites and cirrhosis is a medical emergency characterized by significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians other than gastroenterologists are often the front line against acute kidney injury for patients with ascites. Owing to the specifics of cirrhotic physiology, the treatment and prevention of acute kidney injury in the setting of ascites has unique features, widespread knowledge of which will benefit our patients with cirrhosis. Early detection and treatment of infection, maximization of cardiac output, and avoidance of medications that limit cardiorenal adaptations to arterial underfilling are part of a multipronged strategy to protect the renal function of our patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

  16. Alcohol consumption in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sand, J; Lankisch, P G; Nordback, I

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the relation between the alcoholic consumption and the development of pancreatitis should help in defining the alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Although the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years, it remains still unclear why some alcoholics develop pancreatitis and some do not. Surprisingly little data are available about alcohol amounts, drinking patterns, type of alcohol consumed and other habits such as dietary habits or smoking in respect to pancreatitis preceding the attack of acute pancreatitis or the time of the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. This review summarizes the current knowledge. Epidemiological studies clearly show connection between the alcohol consumption in population and the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis. In the individual level the risk to develop either acute or chronic pancreatitis increases along with the alcohol consumption. Moreover, the risk for recurrent acute pancreatitis after the first acute pancreatitis episode seems also to be highly dependent on the level of alcohol consumption. Abstaining from alcohol may prohibit recurrent acute pancreatitis and reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis. Therefore, all the attempts to decrease alcohol consumption after acute pancreatitis and even after the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis should be encouraged. Smoking seems to be a remarkable co-factor together with alcohol in the development of chronic pancreatitis, whereas no hard data are available for this association in acute pancreatitis. Setting the limits for accepting the alcohol as the etiology cannot currently be based on published data, but rather on the 'political' agreement.

  17. [Halotherapy in combined non-puncture therapy of patients with acute purulent maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, N V

    2003-01-01

    Halotherapy was applied for non-puncture treatment of 45 patients with acute purulent maxillary sinusitis. The response was evaluated by changes in clinico-immunological, cytological, x-ray and bacteriological parameters. Halotherapy was found effective in the treatment of acute purulent maxillary sinusitis without puncture.

  18. Acute rheumatic fever in adults: case report together with an analysis of 25 patients with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2009-07-01

    We reported the oldest acute rheumatic fever (ARF) patient with initial attack at the age of 90 years and experience with ARF in adults in 20 years of observation. The case files of all ARF patients treated by rheumatology unit, Chiang Mai University, were reviewed. Demographic data and clinical profile were recorded and compared between patients with initial attack and patients with recurrent attack. A total of 25 patients with ARF were included. There was no different incidence of arthritis and carditis between two groups. Initial attack patients have higher incidence of prolonged PR-interval (67 vs. 12%, P = 0.049) and longer duration of admission to diagnosis (5 vs. 2 days, P = 0.05). Thirty percent presented initial attack after 30 years of age. ARF is more common in adults than previously recognized. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of this condition and include it in their differential diagnosis of the febrile patients with arthritis.

  19. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage: Independent Component and Seed-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Iraji, Armin; Benson, Randall R.; Welch, Robert D.; O'Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Imran Ayaz, Syed; Kulek, Andrew; Mika, Valerie; Medado, Patrick; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Liu, Tianming; Haacke, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for more than 1 million emergency visits each year. Most of the injured stay in the emergency department for a few hours and are discharged home without a specific follow-up plan because of their negative clinical structural imaging. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly functional MRI (fMRI), has been reported as being sensitive to functional disturbances after brain injury. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department of our local Level-1 trauma center for an advanced MRI scan at the acute stage. Sixteen age- and sex-matched controls were also recruited for comparison. Both group-based and individual-based independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in both posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus regions in comparison with controls, which is part of the default mode network (DMN). Further seed-based analysis confirmed reduced functional connectivity in these two regions and also demonstrated increased connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain in mTBI. Seed-based analysis using the thalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala regions further demonstrated increased functional connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain, particularly in the frontal lobe, in mTBI. Our data demonstrate alterations of multiple brain networks at the resting state, particularly increased functional connectivity in the frontal lobe, in response to brain concussion at the acute stage. Resting-state functional connectivity of the DMN could serve as a potential biomarker for improved detection of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:25285363

  20. Acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis resembling ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction in a young patient

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Margarita; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Olivas-Chacon, Cristina; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taveras, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocarditis can be induced by various concomitant disease processes including infections. Most of these cases are viral in origin; however, bacterial infections are also implicated to a lesser degree. Group A streptococcus is a frequent culprit in bacterial-induced myocarditis. Its diagnosis is suspected by the presence of signs and symptoms of rheumatic fever as established by the Jones criteria. The development and refinement of current diagnostic tools has improved our ability to identify specific pathogens. It has been found that group A streptococcus may be responsible for more cases of infection-induced acute myocarditis than previously thought, and often without the clinical features of rheumatic fever. We present the case of a 43-year-old man hospitalized with chest pain that was initially diagnosed as an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Further evaluation confirmed that his chief complaint was due to acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis. PMID:25829649

  1. Acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis resembling ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Jose L; Jurado, Margarita; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Olivas-Chacon, Cristina; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taveras, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Acute myocarditis can be induced by various concomitant disease processes including infections. Most of these cases are viral in origin; however, bacterial infections are also implicated to a lesser degree. Group A streptococcus is a frequent culprit in bacterial-induced myocarditis. Its diagnosis is suspected by the presence of signs and symptoms of rheumatic fever as established by the Jones criteria. The development and refinement of current diagnostic tools has improved our ability to identify specific pathogens. It has been found that group A streptococcus may be responsible for more cases of infection-induced acute myocarditis than previously thought, and often without the clinical features of rheumatic fever. We present the case of a 43-year-old man hospitalized with chest pain that was initially diagnosed as an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Further evaluation confirmed that his chief complaint was due to acute nonrheumatic streptococcal myocarditis.

  2. Diagnostic Performance of Resting CT Myocardial Perfusion in Patients With Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Kelley R.; Busey, Janet; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared; Caldwell, James H.; Busch, Joshua H.; Shuman, William P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Coronary CT angiography has high sensitivity, but modest specificity, to detect acute coronary syndrome. We studied whether adding resting CT myocardial perfusion imaging improved the detection of acute coronary syndrome. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Patients with low-to-intermediate cardiac risk presenting with possible acute coronary syndrome received both the standard of care evaluation and a research thoracic 64-MDCT examination. Patients with an obstructive (> 50%) stenosis or a nonevaluable coronary segment on CT were diagnosed with possible acute coronary syndrome. CT perfusion was determined by applying gray and color Hounsfield unit maps to resting CT angiography images. Adjudicated patient diagnoses were based on the standard of care and 3-month follow-up. Patient-level diagnostic performance for acute coronary syndrome was calculated for coronary CT, CT perfusion, and combined techniques. RESULTS A total of 105 patients were enrolled. Of the nine (9%) patients with acute coronary syndrome, all had obstructive CT stenoses but only three had abnormal CT perfusion. CT perfusion was normal in all other patients. To detect acute coronary syndrome, CT angiography had 100% sensitivity, 89% specificity, and a positive predictive value of 45%. For CT perfusion, specificity and positive predictive value were each 100%, and sensitivity was 33%. Combined cardiac CT and CT perfusion had similar specificity but a higher positive predictive value (100%) than did CT angiography. CONCLUSION Resting CT perfusion using CT angiographic images may have high specificity and may improve CT positive predictive value for acute coronary syndrome without added radiation and contrast. However, normal resting CT perfusion cannot exclude acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23617513

  3. Closed-Head TBI Model of Multiple Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Floyd J; Hou, Jiamei; Bose, Prodip K

    2016-01-01

    Successful therapy for TBI disabilities awaits refinement in the understanding of TBI neurobiology, quantitative measurement of treatment-induced incremental changes in recovery trajectories, and effective translation to human TBI using quantitative methods and protocols that were effective to monitor recovery in preclinical models. Details of the specific neurobiology that underlies these injuries and effective quantitation of treatment-induced changes are beginning to emerge utilizing a variety of preclinical and clinical models (for reviews see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Fujimoto et al., Neurosci Biobehav Rev 28:365-378, 2004; Cernak, NeuroRx 2:410-422, 2005; Smith et al., J Neurotrauma 22:1485-1502, 2005; Bose et al., J Neurotrauma 30:1177-1191, 2013; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Bose et al., Brain neurotrauma: molecular, neuropsychological, and rehabilitation aspects, CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, 2015)). Preclinical models of TBI, essential for the efficient study of TBI neurobiology, benefit from the setting of controlled injury and optimal opportunities for biometric quantitation of injury and treatment-induced changes in the trajectories of disability. Several preclinical models are currently used, and each offer opportunities for study of different aspects of TBI primary and secondary injuries (for review see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Dixon et al., J Neurotrauma 5:91-104, 1988)). The closed-head, impact-acceleration model of TBI designed by Marmarou et al., 1994 (J Neurosurg 80:291-300, 1994), when used to produce mild to moderate TBI, produces diffuse axonal injuries without significant additional focal injuries of the

  4. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bao-chun; Liu, Li-jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO2) and oxygen partial pressure (PaO2). To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO2 and PaO2, but received no treatment. rSO2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth. PMID:27857747

  5. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  6. Sleep disturbances, TBI and PTSD: Implications for treatment and recovery.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Kark, Sarah M; Gehrman, Philip; Bogdanova, Yelena

    2015-08-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and sleep problems significantly affect recovery and functional status in military personnel and Veterans returning from combat. Despite recent attention, sleep is understudied in the Veteran population. Few treatments and rehabilitation protocols target sleep, although poor sleep remains at clinical levels and continues to adversely impact functioning even after the resolution of PTSD or mild TBI symptoms. Recent developments in non-pharmacologic sleep treatments have proven efficacious as stand-alone interventions and have potential to improve treatment outcomes by augmenting traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. This review discusses the extensive scope of work in the area of sleep as it relates to TBI and PTSD, including pathophysiology and neurobiology of sleep; existing and emerging treatment options; as well as methodological issues in sleep measurements for TBI and PTSD. Understanding sleep problems and their role in the development and maintenance of PTSD and TBI symptoms may lead to improvement in overall treatment outcomes while offering a non-stigmatizing entry in mental health services and make current treatments more comprehensive by helping to address a broader spectrum of difficulties.

  7. Sleep Disturbances, TBI and PTSD: Implications for Treatment and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Kark, Sarah M.; Gehrman, Philip; Bogdanova, Yelena

    2015-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and sleep problems significantly affect recovery and functional status in military personnel and Veterans returning from combat. Despite recent attention, sleep is understudied in the Veteran population. Few treatments and rehabilitation protocols target sleep, although poor sleep remains at clinical levels and continues to adversely impact functioning even after the resolution of PTSD or mild TBI symptoms. Recent developments in non-pharmacologic sleep treatments have proven efficacious as stand-alone interventions and have potential to improve treatment outcomes by augmenting traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. This review discusses the extensive scope of work in the area of sleep as it relates to TBI and PTSD, including pathophysiology and neurobiology of sleep; existing and emerging treatment options; as well as methodological issues in sleep measurements for TBI and PTSD. Understanding sleep problems and their role in the development and maintenance of PTSD and TBI symptoms may lead to improvement in overall treatment outcomes while offering a non-stigmatizing entry in mental health services and make current treatments more comprehensive by helping to address a broader spectrum of difficulties. PMID:26164549

  8. Professional development in TBI for educators: the importance of context.

    PubMed

    Glang, Ann; Todis, Bonnie; Sublette, Patricia; Brown, Brenda Eagan; Vaccaro, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Effective instructional and behavioral support strategies implemented by trained educators can help mitigate the academic and behavioral challenges associated with childhood brain injury. However, the training provided by university teacher preparation programs is clearly inadequate, a problem that cuts across the professions that work with school-aged students. Educators need training in methods validated for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in adapting strategies validated for students with other disabilities. Almost 10 years after Ylvisaker and colleagues proposed a research and professional development agenda in the area of teacher training, students with TBI continue to be underserved and underidentified for educational supports. Effective staff development practices for educators must include training in evidence-based interventions, supervised practice with new skills, and continued mentoring, feedback, and consultation in the school setting. Two models currently in use-the TBI Consulting Team and BrainSTARS models-incorporate those features. Preliminary evidence suggests that these models help teachers feel more prepared and knowledgeable in working with students with TBI. Given the urgent needs of students with TBI, validating these promising practices should be a high priority for the field of pediatric brain injury.

  9. Rapid Aspirin Challenge in Patients with Aspirin Allergy and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin A; White, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin allergy in a patient with acute coronary syndrome represents one of the more urgent challenges an allergist may face. Adverse reactions to aspirin are reported in 1.5% of patients with coronary artery disease. A history of adverse reaction to aspirin often leads to unnecessary withholding of this medication or use of alternative antiplatelet therapy which may be inferior or more costly. Aspirin therapy has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. Rapid aspirin challenge/desensitization in the aspirin allergic patient has been consistently shown to be both safe and successful in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  10. Acute presentations of renal artery stenosis in three patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Pun, E; Dowling, R J; Mitchell, P J

    2004-12-01

    Renal artery stenosis can present uncommonly in the acute state as flash pulmonary oedema and hypertensive encephalopathy. We present three such cases in patients with a solitary functioning kidney, with successful management via renal artery angioplasty and stent insertion.

  11. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings in adult civilian, military, and sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): a systematic critical review.

    PubMed

    Asken, Breton Michael; DeKosky, Steven T; Clugston, James R; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2017-03-24

    This review seeks to summarize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies that have evaluated structural changes attributed to the mechanisms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adult civilian, military, and athlete populations. Articles from 2002 to 2016 were retrieved from PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar, using a Boolean search string containing the following terms: "diffusion tensor imaging", "diffusion imaging", "DTI", "white matter", "concussion", "mild traumatic brain injury", "mTBI", "traumatic brain injury", and "TBI". We added studies not identified by this method that were found via manually-searched reference lists. We identified 86 eligible studies from English-language journals using, adult, human samples. Studies were evaluated based on duration between injury and DTI assessment, categorized as acute, subacute/chronic, remote mTBI, and repetitive brain trauma considerations. Since changes in brain structure after mTBI can also be affected by other co-occurring medical and demographic factors, we also briefly review DTI studies that have addressed socioeconomic status factors (SES), major depressive disorder (MDD), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The review describes population-specific risks and the complications of clinical versus pathophysiological outcomes of mTBI. We had anticipated that the distinct population groups (civilian, military, and athlete) would require separate consideration, and various aspects of the study characteristics supported this. In general, study results suggested widespread but inconsistent differences in white matter diffusion metrics (primarily fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], radial diffusivity [RD], and axial diffusivity [AD]) following mTBI/concussion. Inspection of study designs and results revealed potential explanations for discrepant DTI findings, such as control group variability, analytic techniques, the manner in which regional differences were reported, and

  13. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leukocyte antigen implies their participation in exchange of specific proteins in the course of acute myocardial infarction. Future studies of CD45(+) platelets in peripheral blood of acute myocardial infarction patients in association with generate reactive oxygen species production may provide a new insight into the complex mechanisms of cell-cell interactions associated with acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  15. QuickBrain MRI for the detection of acute pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Newgard, Craig D; Selden, Nathan R; Jafri, Mubeen A; Hansen, Matthew L

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The current gold-standard imaging modality for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is CT, but it confers risks associated with ionizing radiation. QuickBrain MRI (qbMRI) is a rapid brain MRI protocol that has been studied in the setting of hydrocephalus, but its ability to detect traumatic injuries is unknown. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric patients with TBI who were undergoing evaluation at a single Level I trauma center between February 2010 and December 2013. Patients who underwent CT imaging of the head and qbMRI during their acute hospitalization were included. Images were reviewed independently by 2 neuroradiology fellows blinded to patient identifiers. Image review consisted of identifying traumatic mass lesions and their intracranial compartment and the presence or absence of midline shift. CT imaging was used as the reference against which qbMRI was measured. RESULTS A total of 54 patients met the inclusion criteria; the median patient age was 3.24 years, 65% were male, and 74% were noted to have a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or greater. The sensitivity and specificity of qbMRI to detect any lesion were 85% (95% CI 73%-93%) and 100% (95% CI 61%-100%), respectively; the sensitivity increased to 100% (95% CI 89%-100%) for clinically important TBIs as previously defined. The mean interval between CT and qbMRI was 27.5 hours, and approximately half of the images were obtained within 12 hours. CONCLUSIONS In this retrospective pilot study, qbMRI demonstrated reasonable sensitivity and specificity for detecting a lesion or injury seen with neuroimaging (radiographic TBI) and clinically important acute pediatric TBI.

  16. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  17. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  18. Urinary Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Serves as a Potential Biomarker for Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming-Yuan; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chuang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Conventional markers of kidney function that are familiar to clinicians, including the serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels, are unable to reveal genuine injury to the kidney, and their use may delay treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine, and the predictive role and pathogenic mechanism of MIF deregulation during kidney infections involving acute kidney injury (AKI) are not currently known. In this study, we showed that elevated urinary MIF levels accompanied the development of AKI during kidney infection in patients with acute pyelonephritis (APN). In addition to the MIF level, the urinary levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 were also upregulated and were positively correlated with the levels of urinary MIF. An elevated urinary MIF level, along with elevated IL-1β and KIM-1 levels, is speculated to be a potential biomarker for the presence of AKI in APN patients. PMID:23319831

  19. EEG screening for temporal lobe epilepsy in patients with acute psychosis.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Jillian E; Alfers, Cory; Cho, Yong won; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar M; Epstein, Steven A; Motamedi, Gholam K

    2012-01-01

    Seizures may present with ictal or interictal psychosis mimicking primary psychiatric disorders. The authors reviewed EEG, brain-imaging, and clinical data of 240 patients presenting with acute psychotic episode to assess the diagnostic value of EEG in differentiating ictal psychosis from primary psychosis. Seven patients had interictal spikes, but there were no patients with ictal discharges. There were no significant associations between the tested variables except that taking neuroleptics/antidepressants was associated with abnormal EEG, and older age and taking anti-epileptic drugs were associated with abnormal CT scans. These findings do not support routine use of EEG in patients presenting with acute psychosis.

  20. Serologically proven acute rubella infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of dengue.

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, J.; Hamdan, A.; Loroño, M. A.; Montero, M. T.; Gómez, B.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with a clinical diagnosis of dengue but negative by serological testing were studied for rubella infection. Paired sera were obtained from 69 patients during an outbreak in Yucatán, México. The presence of specific anti-viral IgM in the acute sera was considered as diagnostic for rubella infection. The immunoglobulin was determined by measuring the difference in the inhibition of hemagglutination between the non-reduced and the reduced fractionated sera. Immunoglobulins were separated by sucrose density centrifugation. Acute rubella infection was found in 7 (10.1%) of the patients. These results demonstrate active rubella infection in patients clinically diagnosed as dengue. PMID:2323361

  1. Cisplatin and bleomycin-induced acute peripheral-vascular stenosis in patient with testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Tayyar Alp; Aydin, Ufuk; Ay, Derih; Cebeci, I. Oguz Ozden

    2016-01-01

    After cisplatin and bleomycin-containing chemotherapy (CTx) for testicular cancer, part of the patients may develop acute or long-term cardiovascular toxicity. In the present case, we reported that a 58-year-old male patient presenting with testicular tumors who developed acute peripheral arterial disease during combination CTx with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin. Superficial femoral artery occlusion not responded to structure thrombolytic and anticoagulators treatment. Left lower extremity was amputated below knee. In patients with high risk of cardiovascular disease, prophylactic anticoagulation may be recommended. The risk of causing factors of thromboembolism in patients with testicular cancer under cisplatin and bleomycin-containing CTx should be evaluated. PMID:28057998

  2. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  3. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome.

  4. Angiopoietin-2 Is an Early Indicator of Acute Pancreatic-Renal Syndrome in Patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sporek, Mateusz; Dumnicka, Paulina; Gala-Bladzinska, Agnieszka; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembinski, Artur; Stepien, Ewa; Walocha, Jerzy; Drozdz, Ryszard; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Within the first week of the disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is among the most common causes of mortality in acute pancreatitis (AP). Recently, serum angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has been associated with hyperdynamic state of the systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between Ang-2 and the clinical AP severity during the first 72 hours of the disease, and organ disfunction, including AKI. Methods. Study included patients admitted to the surgery ward, diagnosed with AP. AKI was diagnosed according to KDIGO guidelines and renal failure according to modified Marshall scoring system. Ang-2 was determined in serum with ELISA. Results. AP was classified as mild (MAP) in 71% of patients, moderately severe (MSAP) in 22%, and severe (SAP) in 8%. During the first 72 hours of AP, 11 patients developed AKI and 6 developed renal failure. Ang-2 at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the onset of AP symptoms significantly predicted SAP and MSAP, as well as AKI and renal failure. Also, Ang-2 significantly correlated with acute phase proteins as well as with the indicators of renal disfunction. Conclusions. Serum Ang-2 may be a relevant predictor of AP severity, in particular of the development of AP-renal syndrome. PMID:27022209

  5. Early white matter injuries in patients with acute carbon monoxide intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of acute white matter injuries caused by carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can be limited by conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) for early detection of white matter alterations in patients with acute CO intoxication. A total of 30 subjects including 15 acute CO patients and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. MR examinations were performed on a 3T MR scanner within 8 days after CO intoxication. DKI data were acquired to derive axial, radial, and mean kurtosis, as well as fractional anisotropy (FA), axial, radial, and mean diffusivity for tract-specific comparisons between the 2 groups. Significant decreases of mean kurtosis were shown in the genu of corpus callosum, cingulum, and motor-related tracts (corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts) in patients with acute CO intoxication as compared with controls. On the contrary, significant differences of FA values were merely shown in the regions of corticospinal tracts. DKI demonstrated comparably stronger potential than diffusion tensor imaging in terms of early detection of white matter changes in patients with acute CO intoxication. This may have implications in therapeutic strategy for managing acute CO intoxication patients. PMID:28151889

  6. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  7. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    PubMed Central

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  8. [Treatment of acute porphyrias. The importance of follow-up of patients and carriers].

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gyöngyi; Bor, Márta; Pusztai, Agnes

    2003-05-11

    Acute porphyrias are caused by the inherited decreased activity of the enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the affected enzyme there are 4 types of them: acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria variegata, coproporphyria and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficient porphyria, listed in order of their frequency. Basically the clinical picture is the same in the four types of acute porphyria. The most frequent complaints and symptoms are: cramping abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness of the limbs then, in the advanced phase, there is a red-colored urine, hyponatremia, subileus, acute psychosis and Landry-type paralysis. Without proper treatment death is caused by respiratory paralysis or serious arrhythmia. In case of suspicion of acute porphyria it is mandatory to identify the type of the acute porphyria and the actual status of the patient. The later indicates what kind of treatment should be used. In the acute phase the early therapy with heme arginate is the treatment of choice. Since the clinical symptoms are precipitated by endogenous or exogenous inducing factors--most often by drugs-, the drugs negatively affecting the heme biosynthesis should be omitted at once even in the suspicion of acute porphyria. The role of the inducing factors in the manifestation of the clinical symptoms makes possible the prevention. It is possible to avoid the inducing factors and this way to prevent the acute attack if the acute porphyrias are recognized in time and the patients and the carriers are under regular control. The patients receive special identification card and the up-to-date list of safe drugs. They can use only these drugs in any kind of illness. Other drugs should be considered as porphyrinogenic since it is impossible to predict based on their chemical structure if they negatively affect the heme biosynthesis.

  9. Risk Factors for Hemorrhagic Transformation in Patients with Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

    PubMed Central

    ÖCEK, Levent; GÜNER, Derya; ULUDAĞ, İrem Fatma; TİFTİKÇİOĞLU, Bedile İrem; ZORLU, Yaşar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can be seen at any time following ischemic stroke. Although HT usually occurs as a complication of antithrombotic, anticoagulant, or thrombolytic treatments, it can also occur spontaneously. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of early HT and its relevant risk factors in patients diagnosed with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction who were not treated with thrombolytic agents. Methods We recruited 171 patients with acute MCA infarction between January 2011 and July 2012 who were not treated with thrombolytic agents and were suitable to our inclusion criteria. Controlled neuroimaging was performed immediately in patients with deterioration, otherwise on day 7 following stroke. All patients were investigated for AIS risk factors and biochemical analyses were performed. Patients with HT in controlled neuroimaging were grouped both clinically (i.e., symptomatic or asymptomatic) and radiologically, according to “European Cooperative Acute Stroke Radiological Study” (ECASS), and risk factors were examined. Results We enrolled 171 patients [94 men (55%) and 77 women (45%)] in the study. HT developed in 37 patients (21.63%). In terms of risk factor analysis, the most frequent etiological factor was atherosclerosis in AIS patients (50.3%). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were significantly higher both in sHT patients according to asHT patients and in HT patients on day 7 compared with their initial scores. Serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (TC) levels were significantly lower in patients with HT (p<.001). Conclusion HT is a major complication in AIS that considerably increases the morbidity and mortality. To reduce the occurrence of HT, risk factors for each patient population should be determined. Acute thrombolytic therapy should be used cautiously in high-risk patients, and appropriate alternative therapies should

  10. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  11. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  12. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  13. Bcl-2 associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenic patients in an acute phase.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Liou, Chia-Wei; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lin, I-Mei; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2013-12-30

    B cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2) may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of Bcl-2 in schizophrenic patients in an acute phase, and evaluate Bcl-2 level changes after antipsychotic treatment. We consecutively enrolled 41 schizophrenia patients in an acute phase; 28 were followed up with a 4-week antipsychotic treatment. Serum Bcl-2 levels were measured with assay kits. All patients were evaluated by examining the correlation between Bcl-2 levels and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores, using Pearson correlation coefficients. In schizophrenic patients in an acute phase, positive PANSS subscores were significantly negatively correlated with Bcl-2 levels. In addition, we found Bcl-2 levels had a significantly negative correlation with PANSS total scores and positive subscores in male patients in an acute phase. Using the paired t-test, we found no significant changes in Bcl-2 levels in schizophrenia patients who had received the 4-week treatment with antipsychotic drugs (n=28). In conclusion, our results suggest that Bcl-2 might be an indicator of schizophrenia severity in the acute phase. In addition, Bcl-2 levels might be associated with positive symptoms in male patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unstable angina: comparison with acute myocardial infarction and normals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M.; Johnson, R.F. Jr.; Fawcett, H.D.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1988-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in characterizing normal, ischemic and infarcted segments of myocardium was examined in 8 patients with unstable angina, 11 patients with acute myocardial infarction, and 7 patients with stable angina. Eleven normal volunteers were imaged for comparison. Myocardial segments in short axis magnetic resonance images were classified as normal or abnormal on the basis of perfusion changes observed in thallium-201 images in 22 patients and according to the electrocariographic localization of infarction in 4 patients. T2 relaxation time was measured in 57 myocardial segments with abnormal perfusion (24 with reversible and 33 with irreversible perfusion changes) and in 25 normally perfused segments. T2 measurements in normally perfused segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina and stable angina were within normal range derived from T2 measurements in 48 myocardial segments of 11 normal volunteers (42 +/- 10 ms). T2 in abnormal myocardial segments of patients with stable angina also was not significantly different from normal. T2 of abnormal segments in patients with unstable angina (64 +/- 14 in reversibly ischemic and 67 +/- 21 in the irreversibly ischemic segments) was prolonged when compared to normal (p less than 0.0001) and was not significantly different from T2 in abnormal segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction (62 +/- 18 for reversibly and 66 +/- 11 for irreversibly ischemic segments). The data indicate that T2 prolongation is not specific for acute myocardial infarction and may be observed in abnormally perfused segments of patients with unstable angina.

  15. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 35 Final Diagnosis: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy Symptoms: Seizures Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean section Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. Case Report: We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. Conclusions: Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome. PMID:27658947

  16. Historical Review of the Fluid-Percussion TBI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lyeth, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern worldwide. Laboratory studies utilizing animal models of TBI are essential for addressing pathological mechanisms of brain injury and development of innovative treatments. Over the past 75 years, pioneering head injury researchers have devised and tested a number of fluid percussive methods to reproduce the concussive clinical syndrome in animals. The fluid-percussion brain injury technique has evolved from early investigations that applied a generalized loading of the brain to more recent computer-controlled systems. Of the many preclinical TBI models, the fluid-percussion technique is one of the most extensively characterized and widely used models. Some of the most important advances involved the development of the Stalhammer device to produce concussion in cats and the later characterization of this device for application in rodents. The goal of this historical review is to provide readers with an appreciation for the time and effort expended by the pioneering researchers who have led to today’s state of the art fluid-percussion animal models of TBI. PMID:27994570

  17. Disconnection and hyper-connectivity underlie reorganization after TBI: A rodent functional connectomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, N G; Verley, D R; Gutman, B A; Thompson, P M; Yeh, H J; Brown, J A

    2016-03-01

    predicted by the structural deficits, not only within the primary sensorimotor injury site and pericontused regions, but the normally connected homotopic cortex, as well as subcortical regions, all of which persisted chronically. Especially novel in this study is the unanticipated finding of widespread increases in connection strength that dwarf both the degree and extent of the functional disconnections, and which persist chronically in some sensorimotor and subcortically connected regions. Exploratory global network analysis showed changes in network parameters indicative of possible acutely increased random connectivity and temporary reductions in modularity that were matched by local increases in connectedness and increased efficiency among more weakly connected regions. The global network parameters: shortest path-length, clustering coefficient and modularity that were most affected by trauma also scaled with the severity of injury, so that the corresponding regional measures were correlated to the injury severity most notably at 7 and 14 days and especially within, but not limited to, the contralateral cortex. These changes in functional network parameters are discussed in relation to the known time-course of physiologic and anatomic data that underlie structural and functional reorganization in this experiment model of TBI.

  18. Disconnection and hyper-connectivity underlie reorganization after TBI: A rodent functional connectomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N.G.; Verley, D.R.; Gutman, B.A.; Thompson, P.M.; Yeh, H.J.; Brown, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    predicted by the structural deficits, not only within the primary sensorimotor injury site and pericontused regions, but the normally connected homotopic cortex, as well as subcortical regions, all of which persisted chronically. Especially novel in this study is the unanticipated finding of widespread increases in connection strength that dwarf both the degree and extent of the functional disconnections, and which persist chronically in some sensorimotor and subcortically connected regions. Exploratory global network analysis showed changes in network parameters indicative of possible acutely increased random connectivity and temporary reductions in modularity that were matched by local increases in connectedness and increased efficiency among more weakly connected regions. The global network parameters: shortest path-length, clustering coefficient and modularity that were most affected by trauma also scaled with the severity of injury, so that the corresponding regional measures were correlated to the injury severity most notably at 7 and 14 days and especially within, but not limited to, the contralateral cortex. These changes in functional network parameters are discussed in relation to the known time-course of physiologic and anatomic data that underlie structural and functional reorganization in this experiment model of TBI. PMID:26730520

  19. Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Sierks CONTRACTING...Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 12109023 5c

  20. Changing the Odds A North Carolina family's search to help those with TBI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Injury Changing the Odds A North Carolina family's search to help those with TBI Past Issues / ... with traumatic brain injury (TBI)—and changed his family's life forever. "Back then there were no roadmaps ...

  1. In vitro radiation studies on Ewing's sarcoma cell lines and human bone marrow: application to the clinical use of total body irradiation (TBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; McPherson, S.; Miser, J.; Triche, T.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-07-01

    Patients with Ewing's sarcoma who present with a central axis or proximal extremity primary and/or with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis despite aggressive combination chemotherapy and local irradiation. In this high risk group of patients, total body irradiation (TBI) has been proposed as a systemic adjuvant. To aid in the design of a clinical TBI protocol, the authors have studied in the in vitro radiation response of two established cell lines of Ewing's sarcoma and human bone marrow CFUc. The Ewing's lines showed a larger D/sub 0/ and anti-n compared to the bone marrow CFU. No repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLDR) was found after 4.5 Gy in plateau phase Ewing's sarcoma cells. A theoretical split dose survival curve for both the Ewing's sarcoma lines and human bone marrow CFUc using this TBI schedule shows a significantly lower surviving fraction (10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/) for the bone marrow CFUc. Based on these in vitro results, two 4.0 Gy fractions separated by 24 hours is proposed as the TBI regimen. Because of the potentially irreversible damage to bone marrow, autologous bone marrow transplantation following the TBI is felt to be necessary. The details of this clinical protocol in high risk Ewing's sarcoma patients are outlined.

  2. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  3. A qualitative study of nursing care for hospitalized patients with acute mania.

    PubMed

    Daggenvoorde, Thea; Geerling, Bart; Goossens, Peter J J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with a bipolar disorder and currently experiencing acute mania often require hospitalization. We explored patient problems, desired patient outcomes, and nursing interventions by individually interviewing 22 nurses. Qualitative content analysis gave a top five of patients problems, desired patient outcomes and nursing interventions, identified as most important in the interviews. We then conducted three focus group meetings to gain greater insight into these results. Intensive nursing care is needed, fine-tuning on the patient as a unique person is essential, taking into account the nature and severity of the manic symptoms of the patient.

  4. Acute Pulmonary Edema in an Eclamptic Pregnant Patient: A Rare Case of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Kunal; Bortz, Brandon; Vaida, Sonia

    2016-09-23

    BACKGROUND Acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Takotsubo syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a rare cause of acute pulmonary edema in a pregnant patient, especially prior to delivery of the fetus. CASE REPORT We describe a case of a pregnant patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and eclampsia and was found to have Takotsubo syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, eclampsia as a precipitating factor for Takotsubo syndrome has not been described in literature. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians taking care of pregnant patients should be aware of the potential link between eclampsia and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Prompt correction of the precipitating cause along with supportive management as described is the key to a successful outcome.

  5. [Clinical and immunological features of acute hepatitis B in patients with concomitant chronic toxic liver damage].

    PubMed

    Furyk, E; Ryabokon, E

    2013-02-01

    The article presents information obtained during the survey in 64 patients with acute hepatitis B. We show that acute hepatitis B in patients with concomitant chronic toxic liver characterized by a marked imbalance of cytokine status due to a lower level of interleukin-2 and a higher content of interleukin-8, the highest levels of nitrite content, spontaneous oxidative modifications of blood proteins and the lowest content of L -arginine in the blood serum in the dynamics of disease compared with patients without this concomitant factor. In the period of convalescence these changes in patients with acute hepatitis B with concomitant chronic toxic liver characterized combined with higher cytolysis of liver cells, often circulating in the blood of HBsAg seroconversion and less frequently with the advent of anti-HBeAg.

  6. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia.

    PubMed

    Elsharif, M; Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-11-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients.

  7. Scintigraphy of sacroiliac joints in acute anterior uveitis. A study of thirty patients.

    PubMed

    Russell, A S; Lentle, B C; Percy, J S; Jackson, F I

    1976-11-01

    HLA-B27 is a transplantation antigen found in a high proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Recently, an association has been shown to exist between HLA-B27 and acute uveitis, even in the absence of ankylosing spondylitis. We have examined the HLA antigen profile of 45 patients with acute nongranulomatous anterior uveitis and have confirmed this relation. In addition, using 90mtechnetium stannous pyrophosphate we have been able to demonstrate abnormal bone scan in 19 of 30 patients studied. Such abnormalities are limited to the sacroiliac joints but are otherwise the same as those seen in overt ankylosing spondylitis. Seven of the 19 patients did not have HLA-B27. These factors suggest that acute anterior uveitis may often represent a manifestation of a spondylitic diathesis even in the complete absence of any suggestive symptomatic or radiologic change and, in some cases, even though the antigenic marker HLA-B27 may be absent.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction after heart irradiation in young patients with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, H.

    1989-02-01

    Forty-seven patients younger than 40 years at the time of the diagnosis, and irradiated to the mediastinum for Hodgkin's disease at Turku University Central Hospital from 1977 to 1982, were regularly followed for 56 to 127 months after therapy. Two patients developed an acute myocardial infarction ten and 50 months after cardiac irradiation at the age of only 28 and 24 years, respectively. None of the patients died from lymphoma within five years from the diagnosis, but one of the infarctions was eventually fatal. Since acute myocardial infarction is rare in this age group, the result suggests strongly that prior cardiac irradiation is a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. The possibility of radiation-induced myocardial infarction should be taken into account both in treatment planning and follow-up of patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  9. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  10. Extended duration of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: optimizing therapy?

    PubMed

    Turpie, A G G

    2007-01-01

    Summary. Patients who are hospitalized for an acute medical illness are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current evidence-based guidelines recommend prophylaxis with unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin in acutely ill medical patients who are admitted to hospital with congestive heart failure, severe respiratory disease, or who are bedridden with an additional VTE risk factor. The need for thromboprophylaxis is therefore clear in this patient population; however, the optimal duration of prophylaxis in these patients is less clear. In patients undergoing orthopedic or cancer surgery, extended-duration prophylaxis has been shown to be superior to placebo. To date, however, no large-scale clinical trials have assessed the benefits of extended-duration prophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients. This review therefore focuses on the VTE risk profile of acutely ill medical patients, examines the currently available literature for evidence of a potential benefit of extended-duration prophylaxis in these patients, and provides a rationale for the testing of such a hypothesis in a randomized clinical trial.

  11. Early Clinical Implications of Microalbuminuria in Patients with Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stroke accounts for the second leading cause of death, about 11.13% of total deaths worldwide. Microalbuminuria is known to be associated with increased risk of mortality in ischaemic stroke patients. But there have been no studies to assess whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Aim This study aims to investigate whether microalbuminuria affects the early clinical outcome of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Materials and Methods This is a prospective study of patients with ischaemic stroke (who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset) who were consecutively admitted in three tertiary care centres during the time period from November 2013 to June 2015. Early clinical outcomes in patients were assessed by investigating the presence of Early Neurological Deterioration (END) using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Urine albumin creatinine ratio was divided into two categories – Normal (less than 30mg/g of creatinine) or Urine Microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/g of creatinine). Results Total 42 out of 70 patients (60%) were found to have microalbuminuria. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, microalbuminuria was found to be independently associated with END in patients with acute ischaemic stroke (p=0.044). Conclusion In the early periods following acute ischaemic stroke, patients with microalbuminuria have worse clinical outcome. PMID:27790489

  12. [The content of selen in blood plasma in patients with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E N; Nizov, A A; Ivanova, A Yu; Sidorova, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    The level of blood plasma selenium was analyzed by microfluorimetric method in in-patients and out-patients with acute coronary syndrome with ST-elevation resulting in acute Q-wave myocardial infarction. 72 patients, 40-75 years old, with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction were followed during a month. The initial decreased concentration of blood plasma selenium was recorded in most patients in the acute period of the myocardial infarction: deficiency of the microelement (< 90 mcg/l) was found in 30 subjects, the critical ranges (< 70 mcg/l) were stated in 33 patients. Just 2 patients had optimal concentration and 7 patients had a suboptimal one (90-114 mcg/l). Blood plasma level of the microelement increased in 2 weeks after myocardial infarction (in subacute stage) but it was still within deficient or critical levels. No difference was detected in selen concentration depending on gender, age, location on myocardial infarction, accompanying diseases, presence of some risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, hereditary predisposition to coronary artery disease). At the same time we revealed a significant Spearman rank correlation in patients with Q-wave myocardial infarction between basal level of blood serum selenium on the one hand, and electrocardiography indices (reflecting the rate of myocardial lesion and necrosis), echocardiography. data (which characterize myocardium reparation processes and remodeling), CPK (a prognostic marker of the myocardial necrosis), HDL-cholesterol (lipid profile index), blood potassium level and BMI on the other.

  13. Cognitive Impairment and Whole Brain Diffusion in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica after Acute Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Diane; Wu, Qizhu; Chen, Xiuying; Zhao, Daidi; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study investigated cognitive impairments and their correlations with fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) without visible lesions on conventional brain MRI during acute relapse. Twenty one patients with NMO and 21 normal control subjects received several cognitive…

  14. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  15. Meperidine (pethidine) versus morphine in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Solhi, Hassan; Sanaei-Zadeh, Hossein; Solhi, Sadra; Azizi Nadian, Mohammad Ali; Gharibi, Morteza; Sadeghi Sedeh, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of morphine and meperidine (pethidine) as pain relief in opioid-dependent patients with acute pain. A total of 122 opioid-dependent patients with acute pain were included in the study. Their pain severity was assessed, using visual analog scale (VAS) scores ranging from 0 to 10. The patients randomly received intravenous morphine (up to 0.15 mg/kg) or meperidine (up to 1.5 mg/kg) for pain control by patient control analgesia (PCA) pump. The clinical opioid withdrawal scale (COWS) was employed for the assessment of withdrawal symptoms. The pain relief and the emergence of withdrawal symptoms were measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after drug administration. The patients who received morphine reported a better pain control compared to those who received meperidine (mean ± standard deviation [SD] VAS scores 4.11±1.90 vs 5.85±2.08 at the end of the study; P<0.001). On the other hand, the patients who received meperidine indicated prominent withdrawal symptoms (mean ± SD COWS scores 4.80±2.18 vs. 1.98±0.82 at the end of the study; P<0.001). Our findings revealed that morphine can be recommended in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients. In addition, emergency physicians should ask their patients about any drug dependence before selecting the appropriate drug for their acute pain management. PMID:27621675

  16. Eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis in an HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Dennis Baroni; Friedrisch, Bruno Kras; Fontanive Junior, Vilmar; da Rocha, Vívian Wünderlich

    2012-01-01

    A 29 year old female HIV-positive patient presented in emergency with acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tenderness and positive Blumberg sign. Laboratorial tests revealed eosinophilia, anaemia and leukocytosis. She underwent exploratory laparotomy followed by appendectomy. The pathological analysis of the appendix revealed acute appendicitis, accentuated eosinophilia and infestation by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis. She did well after surgery and adequate treatment. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by these two parasitic worms reported in the medical literature. PMID:22605801

  17. Roles of nurse aides and family members in acute patient care in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2004-01-01

    To improve the nursing care quality in acute care hospitals in Taiwan after the 2003 SARS epidemic, the Taipei City Government Department of Health has allocated about US dollars 6 million for nurse aides' salaries and costs for recruitment, training, and administration of this program. Yet, there have been no corresponding changes in payments for nursing services by the National Health Insurance system in Taiwan such as increasing nurse fees for inpatient services. This article examines the roles of nurse aides and family members in providing acute patient care in Taiwan and discusses issues of nursing care quality as related to nurse staffing in acute care hospitals.

  18. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  19. The association between red blood cell distribution width and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Zhang, Zhao-Xia; Cao, Wei; Meng, Cun-Ren; Xu, Shen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) that describes red blood cell volume heterogeneity is a common laboratory test. Our aim was to focus on the association between RDW and acute pancreatitis associated lung injury (APALI). Methodology A total of 152 acute pancreatitis (AP) patients who conformed to the criteria were included in this study. The demographic data, medical histories and laboratory measures was obtained from each patient on admission, further, the medical histories and biological data were analyzed, retrospectively. Results Increased RDW at admission was observed in patients with APALI compared with the non-APALI groups. Our results exhibited that RDW was an independent risk factor for APALI after adjusting leukocyte, neutrophil percentage, random blood glucose (RBG), total bilirubin (TB) and total bile acid (TBA) (Crude model) (OR=2.671;CI 95% 1.145–6.230; P=0.023), further adjustment based on Crude model for sex and age did not attenuate the significantly high risk of APALI in patients with AP, RWD still remained a roles as an independent risk factor for APALI (OR=2.653;CI95 % 1.123–6.138; P=0.026). Conclusions Our study demonstrate that RDW at admission is associated with APALI and should be considered as an underlying risk factor of APALI. PMID:28352692

  20. Update: acute coronary syndromes (VI): treatment of acute coronary syndromes in the elderly and in patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Savonitto, Stefano; Morici, Nuccia; De Servi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Acute coronary syndromes have a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and risk of adverse outcomes. A distinction should be made between treatable (extent of ischemia, severity of coronary disease and acute hemodynamic deterioration) and untreatable risk (advanced age, prior myocardial damage, chronic kidney dysfunction, other comorbidities). Most of the patients with "untreatable" risk have been excluded from the "guideline-generating" clinical trials. In recent years, despite the paucity of specific randomized trials, major advances have been completed in the management of elderly patients and patients with comorbidities: from therapeutic nihilism to careful titration of antithrombotic agents, a shift toward the radial approach to percutaneous coronary interventions, and also to less-invasive cardiac surgery. Further advances should be expected from the development of drug regimens suitable for use in the elderly and in patients with renal dysfunction, from a systematic multidisciplinary approach to the management of patents with diabetes mellitus and anemia, and from the courage to undertake randomized trials involving these high-risk populations.

  1. Patients' age as a determinant of care received following acute stroke: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence-based care should improve acute stroke outcomes with the same magnitude of effect for stroke patients of all ages. However, there is evidence to suggest that, in some instances, older stroke patients may receive poorer quality care than younger patients. Our aim was to systematically review evidence of the quality of care provided to patients with acute stroke related to their age. Quality of care was determined by compliance with recommended care processes. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, ISI Web of Knowledge, Ageline and the Cochrane Library databases to identify publications (1995-2009) that reported data on acute stroke care process indicators by patient age. Data extracted included patient demographics and process indicator compliance. Included publications were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool, and a comparison was made of the risk of bias according to studies' findings. The evidence base for reported process indicators was determined, and meta-analysis was undertaken for studies with sufficient similarity. Results Nine from 163 potential studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the 56 process indicators reported, eleven indicators were evidence-based. Seven of these indicators (64%) showed significantly poorer care for older patients compared to younger ones, while younger patients received comparatively inferior care for only antihypertensive therapy at discharge. Our findings are limited by the variable methodological quality of included studies. Conclusion Patients' age may be a factor in the care they receive after an acute stroke. However, the possible influence of patients' age on clinicians' decision-making must be considered in terms of the many complex issues that surround the provision of optimal care for older patients with acute stroke. PMID:21729329

  2. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret.

  3. Relationship of Circulating CXCR4+ EPC with Prognosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunpeng; Luo, Lan Lan; Sun, Jian; Gao, Weiwei; Tian, Ye; Park, Eugene; Baker, Andrew; Chen, Jieli; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the changes of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)/CXCR4 expression in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the correlation between EPC level and the prognosis of mild TBI. 72 TBI patients (57 mild TBI, 15 moderate TBI patients) and 25 healthy subjects (control) were included. The number of circulating EPCs, CD34+, and CD133+ cells and the percentage of CXCR4+ cells in each cell population at 1,4,7,14,21 days after TBI were counted by flow cytometer. SDF-1α levels in serum were detected by ELISA assay. The patients were divided into poor and good prognosis groups based on Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Activity of Daily Living Scale at 3 months after TBI. Correlation analysis between each detected index and prognosis of mild TBI was performed. Moderate TBI patients have higher levels of SDF-1α and CXCR4 expression than mild TBI patients (P < 0.05). The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 post-TBI was significantly higher in mild TBI patients with poor prognosis than the ones with good prognosis (P < 0.05). HAMA and HAMD scores in mild TBI patients were significantly lower than moderate TBI patients (P < 0.05) in early term. The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 after TBI was significantly correlated with the prognosis outcome at 3 months. The mobilization of circulating EPCs can be induced in mild TBI. The expression of CXCR4+ in EPCs at 7 days after TBI reflects the short-term prognosis of brain injury, and could be a potential biological marker for prognosis prediction of mild TBI. PMID:28203485

  4. Cytoreductive treatment with clofarabine/ara-C combined with reduced-intensity conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk, relapsed, or refractory acute myeloid leukemia and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Stefanie; Dammann, Elke; Stadler, Michael; Krauter, Juergen; Beutel, Gernot; Trummer, Arne; Eder, Matthias; Ganser, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    The combination of cytoreductive chemotherapy with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a highly effective antileukemic therapy. Purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the antileukemic efficacy and toxicity of clofarabine-based chemotherapy followed by RIC and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) for high-risk, relapsed, or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). From May 2007 until October 2009, a total of 27 patients underwent allogeneic SCT after treatment with clofarabine and ara-C for 5d and RIC (4Gy TBI/cyclophosphamide/ATG). Prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Unmanipulated G-CSF mobilized PBSC (n=26) or bone marrow cells (n=1) were transplanted from unrelated (n=21) or matched related (n=6) donors. Non-hematological toxicities of this regimen mainly affected liver and skin and were all reversible. Seven patients relapsed within a median time of 5.7 months. The overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival rates were 56% and 52% at 2 yr, respectively. In this cohort of patients, cytoreduction with clofarabine/ara-C (ClAraC) followed by RIC allogeneic SCT was well tolerated and showed good antileukemic efficacy even in patients with high-risk AML or MDS, with engraftment and GvHD-incidence comparable to other RIC regimens.

  5. Identification of acute self-limited hepatitis B among patients presenting with hepatitis B virus-related acute hepatitis: a hospital-based epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-N

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify acute self-limited hepatitis B (ASL-HB) among patients presenting with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related acute hepatitis. Data were available for 220 patients diagnosed with HBV-related acute hepatitis, of whom 164 had acute hepatitis B (AHB). Of these, 160 were confirmed as ASL-HB: three (1.9%) evolved to chronic hepatitis B and one (0.6%) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Comparisons were also made between AHB and acute infections with hepatitis A (HA) and hepatitis E (HE) viruses. During the study period, the number of patients with AHB exceeded the sum of those with acute HA and acute HE infections. There was no distinct seasonal peak for AHB infection, whereas both acute HA and acute HE infections occurred more frequently in the spring. Clinical symptoms and physical signs were similar for all three types of hepatitis, but significant differences were seen in some biochemical parameters. In conclusion, this study suggests that symptomatic AHB is not rare in China but it seldom evolves to chronic hepatitis B.

  6. Fractal Analysis of Brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) Signals from Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    PubMed Central

    Dona, Olga; DeMatteo, Carol; Connolly, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional imaging techniques are unable to detect abnormalities in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Yet patients with mTBI typically show delayed response on neuropsychological evaluation. Because fractal geometry represents complexity, we explored its utility in measuring temporal fluctuations of brain resting state blood oxygen level dependent (rs-BOLD) signal. We hypothesized that there could be a detectable difference in rs-BOLD signal complexity between healthy subjects and mTBI patients based on previous studies that associated reduction in signal complexity with disease. Methods Fifteen subjects (13.4 ± 2.3 y/o) and 56 age-matched (13.5 ± 2.34 y/o) healthy controls were scanned using a GE Discovery MR750 3T MRI and 32-channel RF-coil. Axial FSPGR-3D images were used to prescribe rs-BOLD (TE/TR = 35/2000ms), acquired over 6 minutes. Motion correction was performed and anatomical and functional images were aligned and spatially warped to the N27 standard atlas. Fractal analysis, performed on grey matter, was done by estimating the Hurst exponent using de-trended fluctuation analysis and signal summation conversion methods. Results and Conclusions Voxel-wise fractal dimension (FD) was calculated for every subject in the control group to generate mean and standard deviation maps for regional Z-score analysis. Voxel-wise validation of FD normality across controls was confirmed, and non-Gaussian voxels (3.05% over the brain) were eliminated from subsequent analysis. For each mTBI patient, regions where Z-score values were at least 2 standard deviations away from the mean (i.e. where |Z| > 2.0) were identified. In individual patients the frequently affected regions were amygdala (p = 0.02), vermis(p = 0.03), caudate head (p = 0.04), hippocampus(p = 0.03), and hypothalamus(p = 0.04), all previously reported as dysfunctional after mTBI, but based on group analysis. It is well known that the brain is best modeled as a complex

  7. [Metabolism of hexobarbital in patients with acute hepatitis and cirrhosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, E; Gallenkamp, H; Keller, B; Brachtel, D; Zilly, W; Breimer, D D

    1977-06-01

    16 patients with acute hepatitis, 18 patients with cirrhosis and a total of 21 volunteers and patients with normal liver function received 7.32 mg/kg hexobarbital by linear intravenous infusion within 60 min. Hexobarbital was determined gaschromatographically in serial blood samples and the hexobarbital-clearance was calculated from the plasma concentration curve versus time. Additional experiments were performed in rats suffering from so called "galactosamine hepatitis". In half of the patients with acute hepatitis a normal hexobarbital clearance could be found. In the other patients this was distinctly reduced but not correlation was found to other liver function tests. Patients with cirrhosis were subdivided into two groups. The patients in group 1 were well compensated. The patients in group 2 had a decompensated state with ascites and oesophageal varices. In nearly all patients with cirrhosis the hexobarbital-clearance was diminished. This was more pronounced in group 2. Ketohexobarbital excretion in healthy subjects was in the range of 40-60% of dose. Patients with acute hepatitis excreted only 10-20% of dose and patients with liver cirrhosis only about 5% of dose. In rats with "galactosamine hepatitis" hexobarbital clearance in vivo was distinctly reduced and this could be explained by diminished microsomal cytochrome p 45- and hexobarbital oxidation rate.

  8. Acute evaluation of conversational discourse skills in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Joanne; de Guise, Elaine; Champoux, Marie-Claude; Couturier, Céline; Lamoureux, Julie; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed; Feyz, Mitra

    2014-12-01

    This study looked at performance on the conversational discourse checklist of the Protocole Montréal d'évaluation de la communication (D-MEC) in 195 adults with TBI of all severity hospitalized in a Level 1 Trauma Centre. To explore validity, results were compared to findings on tests of memory, mental flexibility, confrontation naming, semantic and letter category naming, verbal reasoning, and to scores on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. The relationship to outcome as measured with the Disability Rating Scale (DRS), the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E), length of stay, and discharge destinations was also determined. Patients with severe TBI performed significantly worse than mild and moderate groups (χ(2)(KW2df) = 24.435, p = .0001). The total D-MEC score correlated significantly with all cognitive and language measures (p < .05). It also had a significant moderate correlation with the DRS total score (r = -.6090, p < .0001) and the GOS-E score (r = .539, p < .0001), indicating that better performance on conversational discourse was associated with a lower disability rating and better global outcome. Finally, the total D-MEC score was significantly different between the discharge destination groups (F(3,90) = 20.19, p < .0001). Thus, early identification of conversational discourse impairment in acute care post-TBI was possible with the D-MEC and could allow for early intervention in speech-language pathology.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of digoxin- and beta-methyl-digoxin-12aplha-3 H in patients with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zilly, W; Richter, E; Rietbrock, N

    1975-03-01

    Pharmocokinetics and metabolism of digoxin and beta-methyldigoxin have been studied in patients with acute hepatits after intravenous administration of both H-labeled glycosides. In contrast to digoxin, the rate of decline of radioactivity after administration of beta-methyldigoxin was significantly retarded in patients with acute hepatitis. The increase in plasma concentration after beta-methyldigoxin to patients with acute hepatitis is probably related to decreased demethylation.

  10. TBI-ROC Part One: Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury--An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Scherer, Marcia J.; Elias, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    This article is the first of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Historically, TBI has received very limited national public policy attention and support. However since it has become the signature injury of the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, TBI has gained the attention of elected officials, military leaders,…

  11. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    characteristics, MRI imaging results, EEG and MEG results of the subjects who have pituitary deficiency will be compared to those with normal pituitary...study, the clinical characteristics, MRI imaging results, EEG and MEG results of the patients who have pituitary deficiency will be compared to those

  12. A retrospective research of HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with acute/subacute onset.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Chen, Q; Xie, Z; Wang, D; Li, M; Zhang, X; Man, Y; Lao, J; Chen, N; Zhou, L

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) may present as an acute, subacute, or chronic infection. It manifests as a chronic process in over 75 % of cases, but, sometimes, it presents with a more acute onset, mostly in HIV-associated patients. Until now, there has been no study performed on the clinical features of HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset. We collected 106 HIV-negative patients diagnosed with CM in our hospital during a 15-year period, analyzed their epidemiological and clinical features, as well as the outcomes, and explored the independent prognosis factors and the factors related to the survival time among them. We found that impaired consciousness (23.4 % vs. 3.4 %, p = 0.017) was more common in CM patients with acute/subacute onset, while decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose (51.9 % vs. 75.9 %, p = 0.026) was less common. The ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose [odds ratio (OR) 0.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.004-0.262, p = 0.02], impaired consciousness (OR 5.09, 95 % CI 1.477-17.522, p = 0.01), and hospitalization length (OR 0.98, 95 % CI 0.977-0.999, p = 0.04) were indicated to be not only independent prognosis factors in HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset, but also factors significantly related to the survival time. The results of our study demonstrated that the contact history and potential history risk factors would not affect the onset process of HIV-negative CM patients, and the mortality, hospitalization length, and survival time has not been related to the onset process. However, the ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose, consciousness level, and hospitalization length of the HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset should be of greater focus in the clinical work.

  13. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  14. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  15. Critical care nursing in acute postoperative neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christin

    2015-03-01

    The nursing discipline is vital throughout patients' hospital progression. One of the most critical moments in the hospital stay is the postoperative period. Neurosurgical patients require a high level of nursing care and vigilance and additional postoperative monitoring in intensive care units designed specifically for this demographic. In the postoperative setting, patient care must be transferred from anesthesia to nursing in a manner that is continuous and safe. This article focuses on neurosurgical patients in the postoperative period, the assessment of these patients, and critical care nursing, with emphasis on common issues and interventions for this dynamic patient population.

  16. Hemiarthroplasty versus reverse total shoulder arthroplasty for acute proximal humerus fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, Grant E; Johnston, Peter S; Pepe, Matthew D; Tucker, Bradford S; Ramsey, Matthew L; Austin, Luke S

    2012-05-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are the third most common fracture in elderly patients. Hemiarthroplasty has been the treatment of choice in patients with bone quality and fracture patterns not amenable to open reduction and internal fixation. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a newer option that appears to be less dependent on tuberosity healing than hemiarthroplasty. The authors hypothesized that reverse total shoulder arthroplasty provides improved functional outcomes compared with hemiarthroplasty for fractures in elderly patients.A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated with arthroplasty for acute proximal humerus fractures in an orthopedic practice using a Current Procedural Terminology code search, patient charts, and radiographs. Validated outcome scores were used to assess satisfaction, function, and general well-being. Twenty-three patients were treated for acute proximal humerus fractures (11 reverse total shoulder arthroplasties and 12 hemiarthroplasties). Three patients were lost to follow-up, and 6 patients were deceased. Mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range, 1.3-8 years). Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty outperformed hemiarthroplasty with regard to forward flexion, American Shoulder and Elbow Society score, University of Pennsylvania shoulder score, and Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation score.Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a reliable option for acute, proximal humerus fractures that are not amenable to closed treatment or reconstruction in elderly patients. Improved functional outcomes when compared with hemiarthroplasty must be balanced against the increased cost and limited life expectancy of patients with this injury.

  17. [Acute lumbago due to the manual lifting of patients in wards: prevalence and incidence data].

    PubMed

    Colombini, D; Cianci, E; Panciera, D; Martinelli, M; Venturi, E; Giammartini, P; Ricci, M G; Menoni, O; Battevi, N

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the occurrence (prevalence and incidence) of episodes of acute low back pain (definite effect) in a wide sample of health workers assisting disabled patients. A questionnaire was used for the study both of true acute low back pain and of episodes of ingravescent low back pain controlled pharmacologically at the onset. The questionnaire identified overall acute and pharmacologically controlled episodes occurring in the previous 12 months, both in the course of work and over the whole life of the subject. Appropriately trained operators administered the questionnaire to 551 subjects; 481 valid answer cards were obtained from 372 females and 109 males working in medical, orthopaedic and geriatric departments. 75.4% of the sample had high exposure index levels for patient lifting. The prevalence of true acute low back pain was 9% in males and 11% in females referred to the previous 12 months. Taking acute true and pharmacologically controlled low back pain together the prevalences rose to 13.8% for males and 26.9% in females. Data from the reference populations showed that acute low back pain did not exceed 3% on average in the previous year. Since work seniority in the hospital wards was known, the incidences were calculated, giving 7.9% in females and 5.29% in males for acute low back pain, and 19% in females and 3.49% in males for pharmacologically controlled low back pain. Considering the number of episodes in 100 workers/year, acute low back pain alone reached prevalences of 13-14%. This therefore appears to confirm the positive ratio between episodes of low back pain and duties involving assistance to disabled patients.

  18. Assessment of the patient with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine; Lynch, Antonia; Cugnoni, Helen

    Abdominal pain has many causes, from simple to complex presentations. Patients with abdominal pain may have a number of physiological and psychological needs. Nurses have a key role to play in patient assessment, history talking and management.

  19. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  20. Molecular characteristics of noroviruses genogroup I and genogroup II detected in patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Heejin; Oh, Seah; Seung, Hyunjung; Jo, Sukju

    2015-03-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, including foodborne outbreak, in Korea. The prevalence of human noroviruses was studied in diarrheal stool samples of patients with acute gastroenteritis by conventional duplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Diarrheal stool samples were collected from 1,685 patients from the local hospitals in Seoul. The prevalence of the noroviruses was 22.8% (222/972 patients) in 2012 and 11.2% (80/713 patients) in 2013, with a total of 17.9% (302/1,685 patients). Genotyping was performed on 302 norovirus-positive stool samples to reveal 5.6% prevalence of genogroup I (GI) (17/302) and 94.4% prevalence of genogroup II (GII) (285/302). The patients with norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis mostly showed prevalence of GII norovirus, especially GII.4 (64.6%; 195/302).

  1. Pulmonary function test findings in patients with acute inhalation injury caused by smoke bombs

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Zhang, Xin-Gang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Han-Bin; Chen, Yi-Bing; Zhao, Da-Hui; Shi, Wen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the effects of smoke bomb-induced acute inhalation injury on pulmonary function at different stages of lung injury. Methods We performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in 15 patients with acute inhalation injury from days 3 to 180 after smoke inhalation. We measured the trace element zinc in whole blood on days 4 and 17, and correlations of zinc levels with PFTs were performed. Results In the acute stage of lung injury (day 3), 3 of 11 patients with mild symptoms had normal pulmonary function and 8 patients with restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity. Some patients also had mild obstructive ventilatory dysfunction (5 patients) and a decline in small airway function (6 patients). For patients with severe symptoms, PFT results showed moderate to severe restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity. PaCO2 was significantly higher (P=0.047) in patients with reduced small airway function compared with those with normal small airway function. Whole blood zinc levels in the convalescence stage (day 17) were significantly lower than those in the acute stage (day 4). Zinc in the acute stage was negatively correlated with DLCO/VA on days 3, 10, and 46 (r=−0.633, −0.676, and −0.675 respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions Smoke inhalation injury mainly causes restrictive ventilatory dysfunction and reduced diffusing capacity, and causes mild obstructive ventilatory dysfunction and small airway function decline in some patients. Zinc is negatively correlated with DLCO/VA. Zinc levels may be able to predict prognosis and indicate the degree of lung injury. PMID:28066595

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute fulminant inflammatory cardiomyopathy: Series of six patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goland, Sorel; Czer, Lawrence SC; Siegel, Robert J; Tabak, Steven; Jordan, Stanley; Luthringer, Daniel; Mirocha, James; Coleman, Bernice; Kass, Robert M; Trento, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated for myocarditis and acute-onset inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), immunomodulatory treatment strategies are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The clinical data of six patients with acute inflammatory DCM referred for evaluation for possible heart transplantation were reviewed. All patients were admitted with acute congestive heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function and were treated with high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The diagnosis of acute inflammatory DCM was based on recent onset of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III or IV) with severely depressed LV ejection fraction ([LVEF] 30% or lower) occurring shortly after viral-like illness. All patients had inflammation on endomyocardial biopsy or elevated cardiac enzymes, as well as a normal coronary angiogram. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II at the time of hospital discharge. The mean LVEF improved from 21.7±7.5% at baseline to 50.3±8.6% at discharge (P=0.005). Four patients had complete recovery (LVEF 50% or higher) and two patients had partial LV recovery. Patients were followed for a median 13.2 months (range two to 24 months) and had a mean LVEF of 53±6% (P not significant versus LVEF at discharge). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with intravenous high-dose IVIG may be a potentially useful treatment in selected patients if given early in the course of acute fulminant inflammatory DCM. A randomized, prospective trial is warranted to prove the real benefit of IVIG in this patient population. PMID:18612500

  3. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  4. The value of admission glycosylated hemoglobin level in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mahmut; Cakmak, Nazmiye; Cetemen, Sebnem; Tanriverdi, Halil; Enc, Yavuz; Teskin, Onder; Kilic, I Dogu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level on admission is a prognostic factor for mortality in patients with and without diabetes after myocardial infarction. In the present study, the authors examined the relationship between admission HbA1c level and myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction who were treated with thrombolytic therapy were included in the present prospective study. Blood glucose and HbA1c levels of all patients were measured within 3 h of admission. Patients were divided into three groups according to HbA1c level: 4.5% to 6.4% (n=25), 6.5% to 8.5% (n=28) and higher than 8.5% (n=47). All patients then underwent exercise thallium-201 imaging and coronary angiography to determine ischemic scores and the number of diseased coronary arteries four weeks after admission. RESULTS: Seven patients died within the four-week follow-up period. There was a significant relationship between admission HbA1c level and mortality (P=0.009). Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between HbA1c level and total ischemic scores in patients with acute myocardial infarction (r=0.482; P=0.001). Ischemic scores increased as HbA1c levels increased in patients with acute myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that admission plasma glucose and HbA1c levels are prognostic factors associated with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:18464942

  5. [Peculiarities of treatment of the aged and elderly patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Kuzenko, R T

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 99 elderly and senile patients, suffering an acute pancreatitis in period of 2005 - 2013 yrs, were analyzed. Interstitial acute pancreatitis was diagnoses in 36 (36.3%) patients, focal pancreatic necrosis--in 32 (32.3%), total-subtotal pancreonecrosis--in 31 (31.3%). Miniinvasive interventions were performed in 40 (63.4%) patients, the open--in 24 (38%). The main indication for laparotomy conduction were purulent-septic complications, which is impossible to eliminate while miniinvasive methods application. Due to application of the staged treatment tactics with predominant application of miniinvasive methods, extracorporeal detoxication and improvement of the intensive therapy measures postoperative lethality in necrotic acute pancreatitis have had lowered from 16.7 to 10.3%.

  6. Consensus for improving the comprehensive care of patients with acute heart failure: summarised version.

    PubMed

    Manito Lorite, N; Manzano Espinosa, L; Llorens Soriano, P; Masip Utset, J; Comín Colet, J; Formiga Pérez, F; Herrero Puente, P; Delgado Jiménez, J; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Jacob Rodríguez, J; López de Sá Areses, E; Pérez Calvo, J I; Martín-Sánchez, F J; Miró Andreu, Ò

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this consensus document was to reach an agreement among experts on the multidisciplinary care of patients with acute heart failure. Starting with a narrative review of the care provided to these patients and a critical analysis of the healthcare procedures, we identified potential shortcomings and improvements and formalised a document on recommendations for optimising the clinical and therapeutic approach for acute heart failure. This document was validated through an in-person group session guided using participatory techniques. The process resulted in a set of 36 recommendations formulated by experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiology, the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and the Spanish Society of Urgent and Emergency Care. The recommendations are designed to optimise the healthcare challenge presented by the care of patients with acute heart failure in the context of Spain's current National Health System.

  7. Acute Paraplegia After Lumbar Steroid Injection in Patients With Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are the most common type of spinal vascular malformations. However, SDAVFs are still underdiagnosed entities because their clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, as they include low back pain or radiating pain to the limb. There have been several reports of acute paraplegia after lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with SDAVFs. We present 4 patients with SDAVFs who received lumbar steroid injection. Among the 4 cases, acute paraplegia developed in 2 cases that received a larger volume of injectate than the other cases. Thus, we are suggesting that the volume of injectate may be a contributing factor for acute paraplegia after lumbar steroid injection in patients with SDAVFs. PMID:27847727

  8. Update on the management of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Barber-Millet, Sebastián; Bueno Lledó, José; Granero Castro, Pablo; Gómez Gavara, Immaculada; Ballester Pla, Neus; García Domínguez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    Acute abdomen is a rare entity in the pregnant patient, with an incidence of one in 500-635 patients. Its appearance requires a quick response and an early diagnosis to treat the underlying disease and prevent maternal and fetal morbidity. Imaging tests are essential, due to clinical and laboratory masking in this subgroup. Appendicitis and complicated biliary pathology are the most frequent causes of non-obstetric acute abdomen in the pregnant patient. The decision to operate, the timing, and the surgical approach are essential for a correct management of this pathology. The aim of this paper is to perform a review and update on the diagnosis and treatment of non-obstetric acute abdomen in pregnancy.

  9. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  10. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    ESPíRITO Santo, Ana Espírito; Chacim, Sérgio; Ferreira, Isabel; Leite, Luís; Moreira, Claudia; Pereira, Dulcineia; Dantas Brito, Margarida Dantas; Nunes, Marta; Domingues, Nelson; Oliveira, Isabel; Moreira, Ilídia; Martins, Angelo; Viterbo, Luísa; Mariz, José Mário; Medeiros, Rui

    2016-07-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients.

  11. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    individuals with PTH by neuropsychological , neurophysiological and imaging testing as they relate to functional outcome. At 6 months post injury, patients...W. J. , Mossberg, K. A. , Foreman, J. , Joshipura, K. , Masel, B. E., Sheffield-Moore, M. (2014). Neuropsychological and physiological correlates...very preliminary analysis of our data with the neuropsychological findings by Dr. Levin, and found a small relationship of pituitary dysfunction to

  12. Acute Onset Significant Muscle Weakness in a Patient Awaiting Liver Transplantation: Look for Statins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Narendra S; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Soin, Arvinder S

    2017-03-01

    Statins are commonly used drugs in patients with liver and cardiac disease. Statin-induced severe myopathy is a very uncommon presentation and rhabdomyolysis may occur in extreme cases which leads to renal failure. Patients with comorbidities like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and liver disease have higher chances of development of statin-induced myopathy. We describe a case of Child's C cirrhosis wherein the patient had acute onset significant muscle weakness and improved on statin discontinuation.

  13. Acute renal failure in a patient with Sheehan syndrome and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Parvin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Reza; Pirasteh, Shadi

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of acute renal failure related to rhabdomyolysis in a patient with Sheehan syndrome, while other diseases that could cause rhabdomyolysis were excluded. The patient's kidney function completely recovered with 3 sessions of intermittent hemodialysis. After thyroxine replacement therapy, musculoskeletal symptoms disappeared and creatine kinase concentrations decreased. Steroid replacement therapy was also administered. The present case suggests that rhabdomyolysis could occur in a patient with Sheehan syndrome without other precipitating factors.

  14. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study

    PubMed Central

    Cnossen, Maryse C.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I. R.; Menon, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. Methods We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions. Results All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%), designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68%) and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%). The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57%) had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU), 36 (51%) had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45) of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers. Conclusion Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches. PMID:27571205

  15. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  16. [Pharmacokinetics of digoxin and methyldigoxin in patients with acute hepatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zilly, W; Richter, E; Rietbrock, N

    1978-03-31

    After i.v. application of 3h-digoxin or 3H-methyldigoxin to 5 healthy volunteers and 5 patients with acute hepatitis, respectively (0.75 mg daily for 3 days and 0.375 for the following 2 days) total radioactivity in urine and plasma were determined. Chloroform-soluble and -insoluble glycosides were separated and the chloroform-soluble fraction was determined by TLC. 3 days after methyldigoxin application plasma levels reached toxic values in the patient group (2.73 +/- 0.48 ng/ml), whereas in patients receiving digoxin a mean plasma level of 0.91 +/- 0.21 ng/ml was obtained. During the first 24 hours following administration of digoxin 44 +/- 12% of the dose were recovered in urine of control subjects and 48 +/- 13% in patients with acute hepatitis, after methyldigoxin 34 +/- 5% and 34 +/- 8%, respectively. Metabolism of digoxin in patients with acute hepatitis was unaltered, whereas a diminished demethylation rate of methyldigoxin could be observed. 16 patients with acute hepatitis and 7 healthy volunteers received unlabelled digoxin p.o. as maintenance dose. Plasma glycoside concentrations were studied by radioimmunoassay. The average glycoside plasma concentrations were 0.59 +/- 0.21 ng/ml and 0.63 +/- 0.24 ng/ml, respectively.

  17. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices.

  18. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chalela, Julio A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Nentwich, Lauren M; Luby, Marie; Butman, John A; Demchuk, Andrew M; Hill, Michael D; Patronas, Nicholas; Latour, Lawrence; Warach, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background Although the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of acute stroke is increasing, this method has not proved more effective than computed tomography (CT) in the emergency setting. We aimed to prospectively compare CT and MRI for emergency diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods We did a single-centre, prospective, blind comparison of non-contrast CT and MRI (with diffusion-weighted and susceptibility weighted images) in a consecutive series of patients referred for emergency assessment of suspected acute stroke. Scans were independently interpreted by four experts, who were unaware of clinical information, MRI-CT pairings, and follow-up imaging. Results 356 patients, 217 of whom had a final clinical diagnosis of acute stroke, were assessed. MRI detected acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic), acute ischaemic stroke, and chronic haemorrhage more frequently than did CT (p<0.0001, for all comparisons). MRI was similar to CT for the detection of acute intracranial haemorrhage. MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 164 of 356 patients (46%; 95% CI 41-51%), compared with CT in 35 of 356 patients (10%; 7-14%). In the subset of patients scanned within 3 h of symptom onset, MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 41 of 90 patients (46%; 35-56%); CT in 6 of 90 (7%; 3-14%). Relative to the final clinical diagnosis, MRI had a sensitivity of 83% (181 of 217; 78-88%) and CT of 26% (56 of 217; 20-32%) for the diagnosis of any acute stroke. Interpretation MRI is better than CT for detection of acute ischaemia, and can detect acute and chronic haemorrhage; therefore it should be the preferred test for accurate diagnosis of patients with suspected acute stroke. Because our patient sample encompassed the range of disease that is likely to be encountered in emergency cases of suspected stroke, our results are directly applicable to clinical practice. PMID:17258669

  20. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  1. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  2. "Sagging heart syndrome": a cause of acute lead dislodgment in two patients.

    PubMed

    Iskos, D; Lurie, K G; Shultz, J J; Fabian, W H; Benditt, D G

    1999-02-01

    Acute passive fixation atrial lead dislodgment occurred due to an unexpected and marked postural descent of the heart after permanent pacemaker implantation in two patients. Sagging of the heart in these two individuals may have been related to a history of morbid obesity followed by weight loss of over 100 pounds. Lead replacement with active fixation leads was required in both cases. The term "sagging heart syndrome" is proposed to describe this clinical entity. In certain adult populations, such as in patients with a history of significant weight loss, the "sagging heart syndrome" may represent a previously unrecognized cause of acute lead dislodgment.

  3. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  4. [Acute kidney failure due to kidney cortex necrosis. 2 clinical cases of surviving patients].

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, E

    1991-07-01

    A 22 year old female developed preeclampsia with fetal death in utero. After cesarean section she developed uterine inertia and acute hemorrhagic anemia complicated by sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and total anuria for 4 weeks. She was treated with hemodialysis. The second patient, a 49 year old man developed sepsis and intravascular coagulation after a dog bite. Acute renal failure with a 3 week total anuria followed. He was initially treated with peritoneo dialysis. Renal biopsy showed evidence of renal cortical necrosis in both patients.

  5. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  6. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy without TBI before transplantation facilitates persistent haploidentical donor engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R.; Gooley, Ted A.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Hylarides, Mark D.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Mawad, Raya; O’Donnell, Paul; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with hematologic malignancies cannot tolerate hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), whereas others may not have a compatible human leukocyte antigen–matched donor. To overcome these limitations, we optimized a conditioning regimen employing anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) replacing total body irradiation (TBI) before haploidentical HCT in a murine model. Mice received 200 to 400 μCi 90Y-anti-CD45 antibody (30F11), with or without fludarabine (5 days starting day –8), with cyclophosphamide (CY; days –2 and +2) for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, and 1.5 × 107 haploidentical donor bone marrow cells (day 0). Haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with 300 μCi 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT and CY, without TBI or fludarabine, led to mixed chimeras with 81.3 ± 10.6% mean donor origin CD8+ cells detected 1 month after BMT, and remained stable (85.5 ± 11% mean donor origin CD8+ cells) 6 months after haploidentical BMT. High chimerism levels were induced across multiple hematopoietic lineages 28 days after haploidentical BMT with 69.3 ± 14.1%, 75.6 ± 20.2%, and 88.5 ± 11.8% CD3+ T cells, B220+ B cells, and CD11b+ myeloid cells, respectively. Fifty percent of SJL leukemia-bearing mice treated with 400 μCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11, CY, and haploidentical BMT were cured and lived >200 days. Mice treated with 200 μCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median overall survival of 73 days, while untreated leukemic mice had a median overall survival of 34 days (P < .001, Mantel-Cox test). RIT-mediated haploidentical BMT without TBI may increase treatment options for aggressive hematologic malignancies. PMID:26576864

  8. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    patients who have sustained mild to moderate TBI. After scanning, data is immediately pre-processed and prepared for analysis by skilled staff with...expertise in imaging processing and analysis techniques. Fidelity checks of the data collected are thus evaluated as it is collected given that...Lanni have actively recruited and enrolled participants. They also assist Dr. Delano-Wood in imaging data collection, processing, and analysis

  9. Impaired lipid clearance in patients with previous acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, S; Nervi, F; Llanos, O; León, P; Valdivieso, V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting serum triglycerides were measured in 52 patients who had sustained an attack of pancreatitis (gall stone related 33, alcoholism six) at least six months earlier. Several patients (23%) had raised fasting serum triglycerides, with a type IV phenotype in all but one patient. The 40 patients with normal fasting serum triglycerides received an oral load of 100 g sunflower oil to compare their clearance of dietary triglycerides with that of a control group of 54 subjects. The clearance of ingested triglycerides was significantly impaired in the patients - irrespective of the presumed aetiological factor, or clinical condition associated with pancreatitis - compared with the clearance in controls. A triglyceride tolerance test is the only way to detect those patients in whom a future attack of pancreatitis may be precipitated by a diet rich in fat, or endogenous over production of triglycerides as after an alcoholic debauch. PMID:4029716

  10. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications ("apps") and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity.

  11. [Combined therapy using phytopreparation prostagutt forte in patients with acute prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Pul'bere, S A; Avdoshin, V P

    2012-01-01

    The results of study on evaluation of efficacy of combined treatment of patients with acute prostatitis are presented. The study included 34 patients with acute prostatitis aged 19 to 51 years. 13 patients in Group 1 received only basic therapy: fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, 500 mg 2 times daily for 14 days), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (suppositories voltaren 50 mg at bedtime for 7 days). Along with basic treatments, 21 patients in the Group 2 received phytopreparation prostagutt forte (at a dose 280 mg 2 times a day), which has antiestrogenic, antiproliferative, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory properties. It was shown that patients receiving prostagutt forte experienced pronounced and significant decrease of white blood count in the prostatic secretion, the decrease of prostate volume according to the data of transrectal ultrasound examination, more rapid relief of the inflammatory process, which was manifested by reduction of hyperthermia and reduction of severity of bladder outlet obstruction associated with swelling of the prostate.

  12. Analysis of weekend effect on 30-day mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Noad, Rebecca; Stevenson, Michael; Herity, Niall A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several publications have demonstrated increased 30-day mortality in patients admitted on Saturdays or Sundays compared with weekdays. We sought to determine whether this was true for two different cohorts of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results Thirty-day mortality data were obtained for 3757 patients who had been admitted to the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust with acute MI between 2009 and 2015. They were subdivided into those presenting with ST elevation MI (n=2240) and non-ST elevation MI (n= 1517). We observed no excess 30-day mortality in those admitted over weekends. Conclusion Excess mortality in patients admitted at weekends is not a universal finding. This may mean that that there are patient subgroups with proportionately greater weekend hazard and points to the need for more detailed understanding of the weekend effect.

  13. An unusual adverse effect of sildenafil citrate: acute myocardial infarction in a nitrate-free patient.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Ikitimur, Baris; Karadag, Bilgehan; Ongen, Zeki

    2012-10-19

    Myocardial infarction (MI) associated with sildenafil citrate is seen rarely in patients without any history of coronary artery disease. We report a nitrate-free patient with a history of cardiovascular risk factors who developed acute MI after taking sildenafil. A 44-year-old man diagnosed with acute anterior ST segment elevation MI 120 min after self-administration of 150 mg sildenafil was admitted before attempting any sexual intercourse. The coronary angiography revealed 99% occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and a bare-metal stent was implanted. He was discharged after 5 days without any complication. Sildenafil may cause coronary steal or may lead to vasodilation causing hypotension in patient with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, especially in patients on nitrate therapy. Our patient was nitrate free, with normal blood pressure values. Emotional stimulation associated with anticipated sexual activity may have been a triggering factor for vulnerable coronary plaque rupture.

  14. Characterizing the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages resulting from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ningzhi; Chou, Yi-Yu; Shiee, Navid; Chan, Leighton; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages defined using susceptibility weighted images (SWI) in 46 patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and applying region of interest (ROI) analysis using a brain atlas. SWI and 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 3T clinical Siemens scanner. A neuroradiologist reviewed all SWI images and manually labeled all identified microhemorrhages. To characterize the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages in standard Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) space, the T1-weighted images were nonlinearly registered to the MNI template. This transformation was then applied to the co-registered SWI images and to the microhemorrhage coordinates. The frequencies of microhemorrhages were determined in major structures from ROIs defined in the digital Talairach brain atlas and in white matter tracts defined using a diffusion tensor imaging atlas. A total of 629 microhemorrhages were found with an average of 22±42 (range=1-179) in the 24 positive TBI patients. Microhemorrhages mostly congregated around the periphery of the brain and were fairly symmetrically distributed, although a number were found in the corpus callosum. From Talairach ROI analysis, microhemorrhages were most prevalent in the frontal lobes (65.1%). Restricting the analysis to WM tracts, microhemorrhages were primarily found in the corpus callosum (56.9%).

  15. Discriminative ability of reflex receptive fields to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Monika; Biurrun Manresa, José A; Treichel, Fabienne; Agten, Christoph A; Heini, Paul; Andersen, Ole K; Curatolo, Michele; Jüni, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Low back pain has a life time prevalence of 70% to 85%. Approximately 10% to 20% of all patients experience recurrent episodes or develop chronic low back pain. Sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics explain the transition from acute to chronic low back pain only to a limited extent. Altered central pain processing may be a contributing mechanism. The measurement of reflex receptive fields (RRF) is a novel method to assess altered central pain processing. The RRF area denotes the area of the foot sole from which spinal nociceptive reflexes can be elicited. It was shown to be enlarged in patients with acute and chronic low back pain compared with pain-free individuals. The aim of the study was to explore the discriminative ability of the RRF to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain with the hypothesis that enlarged RRF are associated with chronic low back pain. We included 214 patients with either acute or chronic low back pain and compared RRF between groups in both univariable and multivariable analyses adjusted for different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics possibly associated with the transition to chronic pain. We found a mean difference between patients with acute and chronic low back pain of -0.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.06 to 0.04) in the crude, -0.02 (95% CI, -0.08 to 0.04) in the age and sex adjusted, and -0.02 (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.05) in the fully adjusted model. Our results suggest that the enlargement of RRF area may not be associated with the transition from acute to chronic low back pain.

  16. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Indications, algorithms, and outcomes for coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Yerokun, Babatunde A.; Williams, Judson B.; Gaca, Jeffrey; Smith, Peter K.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with a non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), guideline recommendations and treatment pathways focus on revascularization for definitive treatment if the patient is an appropriate candidate. Despite the widespread use of revascularization for NSTE-ACS, most patients undergo a percutaneous coronary intervention, whereas a minority of patients undergo coronary artery bypass grafting. Focusing specifically on the USA, the contemporary utilization, preoperative and perioperative considerations, and outcomes of NSTE-ACS patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting have not been comprehensively reviewed. PMID:26945187

  18. Pneumothorax in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: pathophysiology, detection, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Chon, Kenneth S; Loran, David B; Tocino, Irena M; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2003-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a frequent and potentially fatal complication of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothoraces is necessary to minimize morbidity and mortality. The radiologic and clinical signs of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients may have unusual and subtle features. Furthermore, small pneumothoraces in these patients can cause severe hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise. Sparse clinical literature exists on when or how to treat pneumothoraces once they develop in patients with ARDS. In this article, the authors review the pathogenesis, radiologic signs, clinical significance, and treatment of pneumothoraces in ARDS patients. Treatment options include traditional tube thoracostomy, open thoracotomy, and image-guided percutaneous catheters.

  19. [Major intestinal resections and short-bowel syndrome in patients with the acute mesenterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Khripun, A I; Shurygin, S N; Priamikov, A D; Mironkov, A B; Urvantseva, O M; Movsesiants, M Iu; Izvekov, A A; Abashin, M V

    2012-01-01

    The study represents the retrospective analysis of major intestinal resections (the length of the left in olace bowel less then 200 sm) and non-major resections in 52 patients operated on the acute mesenterial thrombosis. Major bowel resection was performed in 30 patients (57.7%). 66.7% of those patients (20 of 30) died soon after the operation. Whereas lethality rate among patients with non-major resections was 54.5% (12 of 22). All 10 survived patients demonstrated the short-bowel syndrome during the follow-up period (the median follow-up time was 25 months).

  20. Proinflammatory Modulation of the Surface and Cytokine Phenotype of Monocytes in Patients With Acute Charcot Foot

    PubMed Central

    Uccioli, Luigi; Sinistro, Anna; Almerighi, Cristiana; Ciaprini, Chiara; Cavazza, Antonella; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Spasaro, Francesca; Vainieri, Erika; Rocchi, Giovanni; Bergamini, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite increased information on the importance of an inappropriate inflammatory response in the acute Charcot process, there has been no previous attempt to define the specific pathways that mediate its pathogenesis. Here, the role played by monocytes was analyzed. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The immune phenotype of peripheral monocytes was studied by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis comparing patients with acute Charcot (n = 10) in both the active and recovered phase, diabetic patients with neuropathy (with or without osteomyelitis), and normal control subjects. RESULTS When compared with diabetic control subjects and healthy subjects, monocytes from acute Charcot patients showed a proinflammatory immune phenotype characterized by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, reduced secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, increased expression of surface costimulatory molecules, and increased resistance to serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. In addition, the pattern of circulating cytokines confirmed activation of proinflammatory cytokines. No modulation of the monocyte phenotype was documented in diabetic control subjects and healthy subjects, thus indicating that the proinflammatory alterations of monocytes are specific and causative of acute Charcot. CONCLUSIONS Together, these data provide evidence for the role of proinflammatory changes in the immune phenotype of monocytes in the pathogenesis of acute Charcot. These alterations may explain the abnormally intense and prolonged inflammatory response that characterizes this disorder and may represent a potential therapeutic target for specific pharmacological interventions. PMID:19880584

  1. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p > 0.0014) and indirect (p = 0.001) occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p = 0.001). Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p > 0.000) and indirect (p > 0.000) physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p > 0.000). Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient's first therapy session. PMID:27752389

  2. A Systematic Meta-analysis of Immune Signatures in Patients With Acute Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Terk-Shin; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Wimal, Abeyewickreme; Ng, Lee-Ching; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Individuals infected with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) normally exhibit a variety of clinical manifestations during the acute phase of infection. However, studies in different patient cohorts have revealed that disease manifestations vary in frequency. Methods. Disease profiles between patients with acute CHIKV-infection and febrile patients without CHIKV were compared and examined to determine whether any clinical presentations were associated with the clinical outcome of CHIKV infection. Circulatory immune mediators profiles were then characterized and compared with data from 14 independent patient cohort studies. The particular immune mediator signature that defines acute CHIKV infection was determined. Results. Our findings revealed a specific pattern of clinical presentations of joint-specific arthralgia from this CHIKV cohort. More importantly, we identified an immune mediator signature dominated by proinflammatory cytokines, which include interferon α and γ and interleukin 2, 2R, 6, 7, 12, 15, 17, and 18, across different patient cohorts of CHIKV load associated with arthralgia. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study that associated levels of CHIKV load with arthralgia as an indicator of acute CHIKV infection. Importantly, our findings also revealed specific immune mediator signatures that can be used to better define CHIKV infection. PMID:25635123

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia, Folateo and B12 Vitamin in Iranian Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Hoseinali Qeilichnia; Qabai, Mojdeh; Chaman, Reza; Fard, Hamed Amiri; Qaffarpoor, Majid

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of some factors such as serum levels of homocysteine, folate and B12 vitamin with stroke in acute ischemic stroke patients. METHODS In this case control study, serum levels of homocysteine, folate and B12 vitamin in 93 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital between September 2008 and January 2010, and 93 healthy controls were measured. Cerebrovascular risk factors including age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, coronary artery disease and obesity were recorded. The results were compared between the case and control groups. RESULTS The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of fasting total homocysteine (tHcy) level in acute ischemic stroke patients was 20.58 ± 19.6 µmol/l, which was significantly higher than that of control group being 14.11 ± 9.5 µmol/l (P = 0.002). 39 (41.9%) stroke cases and 25 (26.8%) controls had hyperhomocysteinemia. There were no significant relationships between tHcy, folate and B12 vitamin levels with the above mentioned cerebrovascular risk factors except for smoking (p> 0.05). No significant difference in B12 vitamin and folate levels between patients and healthy controls were detected (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION Hyperhomocysteinemia is common in Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke and might play a role as an independent risk factor in stroke. PMID:22577454

  4. Predictors of suicide in the patient population admitted to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward

    PubMed Central

    Fosse, Roar; Ryberg, Wenche; Carlsson, Merete Kvalsvik; Hammer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective No prior study appears to have focused on predictors of suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. We used a case-control design to investigate the association between suicide risk factors assessed systematically at admission to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward in Norway and subsequent death by suicide. Method From 2008 to 2013, patients were routinely assessed for suicide risk upon admission to the acute ward with a 17-item check list based on recommendations from the Norwegian Directorate of Health and Social Affairs. Among 1976 patients admitted to the ward, 40 patients, 22 men and 18 women, completed suicide within December 2014. Results Compared to a matched control group (n = 120), after correction for multiple tests, suicide completers scored significantly higher on two items on the check list: presence of suicidal thoughts and wishing to be dead. An additional four items were significant in non-corrected tests: previous suicide attempts, continuity of suicidal thoughts, having a suicide plan, and feelings of hopelessness, indifference, and/or aggression. A brief scale based on these six items was the only variable associated with suicide in multivariate regression analysis, but its predictive value was poor. Conclusion Suicide specific ideations may be the most central risk markers for suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. However, a low predictive value may question the utility of assessing suicide risk. PMID:28301590

  5. A patient with acute aortic dissection presenting with bilateral stroke - A rare experience.

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Brozda, Olimpia; Brozda, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a rare, life-threatening condition requiring early recognition and proper treatment. Although chest pain remains the most frequent initial symptom, clinical manifestation of aortic dissection varies. Rarely aortic dissection starts with neurological symptoms such as ischemic stroke, which is usually right-sided. A danger of performing thrombolytic therapy in these patients exists if aortic dissection is overlooked. Herein, we present a case of a patient with acute aortic dissection without typical chest pain whose initial manifestation was bilateral stroke. The uncommon presentation which masked the underlying condition delayed implementation of appropriate management. Moreover, the late admission to hospital prevented the patient from administration of recombined tissue plasminogen activator that would certainly decrease chances of survival. Presented case highlights the need for thorough physical examination at admission to hospital in all patients with acute stroke and points out the necessity of proper clinical work-up including adequate aorta imaging modalities of patients with acute stroke and suggestive findings of aortic dissection.

  6. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the pre-treatment assessment consisting of neuropsychological , mood, and symptom ratings. Thirty-nine participants have undergone the post-treatment...Colorado, Dr. Jak presented “ Neuropsychological performance in treatment seeking OEF/OIF/OND Veterans with a history of mild TBI" as an oral paper...Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology .  Post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Crocker, on behalf of Dr. Jak, was invited to submit an abstract to the

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Studies at Grady Memorial Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    refine goal directed therapy for traumatic brain injury. 2. Evaluate the Novel Screening tool and identifying cognitive impairment for mild...neuropsychological performance/cognitive impairment in real time, such as in the military field. Our study will compare these two novel methods of...portable and may prove to be useful in assessing cognitive impairment in real time, in the military field. Although, diagnosing mTBI is one of the biggest

  8. Epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis and azole resistance in patients with acute leukaemia: the SEPIA Study.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Philipp; Hamprecht, Axel; Bader, Oliver; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Buchheidt, Dieter; Doelken, Gottfried; Elias, Johannes; Haase, Gerhard; Hahn-Ast, Corinna; Karthaus, Meinolf; Kekulé, Alexander; Keller, Peter; Kiehl, Michael; Krause, Stefan W; Krämer, Carolin; Neumann, Silke; Rohde, Holger; La Rosée, Paul; Ruhnke, Markus; Schafhausen, Philippe; Schalk, Enrico; Schulz, Katrin; Schwartz, Stefan; Silling, Gerda; Staib, Peter; Ullmann, Andrew; Vergoulidou, Maria; Weber, Thomas; Cornely, Oliver A; Vehreschild, Maria J G T

    2017-02-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a serious hazard to high-risk haematological patients. There are increasing reports of azole-resistant Aspergillus spp. This study assessed the epidemiology of IA and azole-resistant Aspergillus spp. in patients with acute leukaemia in Germany. A prospective multicentre cohort study was performed in German haematology/oncology centres. The incidence of probable and proven aspergillosis according to the revised EORTC/MSG criteria was assessed for all patients with acute leukaemia [acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)]. Cases were documented into a web-based case report form, and centres provided data on standards regarding prophylactic and diagnostic measures. Clinical isolates were screened centrally for azole resistance and, if applicable, underlying resistance mechanisms were analysed. Between September 2011 and December 2013, 179 cases of IA [6 proven (3.4%) and 173 probable (96.6%)] were diagnosed in 3067 patients with acute leukaemia. The incidence of IA was 6.4% among 2440 AML patients and 3.8% among 627 ALL patients. Mortality at Day 84 was 33.8% (49/145) and attributable mortality was 26.9% (39/145). At Day 84, 53 patients (29.6%) showed a complete response, 25 (14.0%) a partial response and 17 (9.5%) a deterioration or failure. A total of 77 clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates were collected during the study period. Two episodes of azole-resistant IA (1.1%) were caused by a TR/L98H mutation in the cyp51A gene. With only two cases of IA due to azole-resistant A. fumigatus, a change of antifungal treatment practices in Germany does not appear warranted currently.

  9. Impact of scheduled laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with acute cholecystitis, following percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bo-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Frequently encountered in practice, the first-line treatment for acute cholecystitis is early or urgent cholecystectomy, with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) being the preferred method. Percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) is considered as a safe alternative therapeutic option for resolving acute cholecystitis in surgically high-risk patients. We evaluated the surgical outcomes of acute cholecystitis, focusing on the differences between emergent LC without PTGBD, and scheduled LC following PTGBD. Methods Between March 2010 and December 2014, 294 patients with acute cholecystitis who had undergone LC, were retrospectively studied. Group I included 166 patients who underwent emergency LC without PTGBD. Group II included 128 patients who underwent scheduled LC after PTGBD. Clinical outcomes were analyzed according to each group. Results On admission, Group II had a higher mean level of c-reactive protein than Group I. According to the classification of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), group II had a greater number of high-risk patients than group I. There was no significant difference on perioperative outcomes between the two groups, including open conversion rate and complications. Analysis as per the ASA classes revealed no statistically remarkable finding between the groups. Conclusions There are no significant differences in the surgical outcomes of emergency LC group without PTGBD, and scheduled LC group following PTGBD. Comparison between two groups according to ASA classification reflecting the comorbidity and severity of condition of the patients also revealed no significant differences. However, scheduled LC following PTGBD is important for patients having acute cholecystitis with concurrent comorbidity. PMID:28317042

  10. HEV, TTV and GBV-C/HGV markers in patients with acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A C; Pinho, J R R; Silva, L K; Sousa, L; Saraceni, C P; Braga, E L; Pereira, J E; Zarife, M A S; Reis, M G; Lyra, L G C; Silva, L C da; Carrilho, F J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of HEV, TTV and GBV-C/GBV-C/HGV in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. We evaluated sera of 94 patients from a sentinel program who had acute hepatitis A (N = 40), B (N = 42) and non-A-C (N = 12); 71 blood donors served as controls. IgM and anti-HEV IgG antibodies were detected by enzyme immunoassay using commercial kits. TTV and GBV-C/HGV were detected by nested PCR; genotyping was done by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Anti-HEV IgG was present in 38, 10 and 17% of patients with hepatitis A, B and non-A-C. Four patients with hepatitis A and 1 with non-A-C hepatitis also had anti-HEV IgM detected in serum. TTV was detected in 21% of patients with acute hepatitis and in 31% of donors. GBV-C/HGV was detected in 9% of patients with hepatitis, and in 10% of donors. We found TTV isolates of genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 and GBV-C/HGV isolates of genotypes 1 and 2. Mean aminotransferase levels were lower in patients who were TTV or GBV-C/HGV positive. In conclusion, the detection of anti-HEV IgM in some acute hepatitis A cases suggests co-infection with HEV and hepatitis E could be the etiology of a few cases of sporadic non-A-C hepatitis in Salvador, Brazil. TTV genotype 1, 2, 3 and 4 isolates and GBV-C/HGV genotype 1 and 2 strains are frequent in the studied population. TTV and GBV-C/HGV infection does not appear to have a role in the etiology of acute hepatitis.

  11. The Prevalence of Natural Health Product Use in Patients with Acute Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alherbish, Aws; Charrois, Theresa L.; Ackman, Margaret L.; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural health products (NHP) use may have implications with respect to adverse effects, drug interactions and adherence yet the prevalence of NHP use by patients with acute cardiovascular disease and the best method to ascertain this information is unknown. Objective To identify the best method to ascertain information on NHP, and the prevalence of use in a population with acute cardiovascular disease. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of consecutive patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease to the University of Alberta Hospital during January 2009. NHP use was explored using structured and open-ended questions based on Health Canada's definition of NHP. The medical record was reviewed, and documentation of NHP use by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, compared against the gold-standard structured interview. Results 88 patients were interviewed (mean age 62 years, standard deviation [SD 14]; 80% male; 41% admitted for acute coronary syndromes). Common co-morbidities included hypertension (59%), diabetes (26%) and renal impairment (19%). NHP use was common (78% of patients) and 75% of NHP users reported daily use. The category of NHP most commonly used was vitamins and minerals (73%) followed by herbal products (20%), traditional medicines including Chinese medicines (9%), homeopathic preparations (1%) and other products including amino acids, essential fatty acids and probiotics (35%). In a multivariable model, only older age was associated with increased NHP use (OR 1.5 per age decile [95%CI 1.03 to 2.2]). When compared to the interview, the highest rate of NHP documentation was the pharmacist history (41%). NHP were documented in 22% of patients by the physician and 19% by the nurse. Conclusions NHP use is common in patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease. However, health professionals do not commonly identify NHP as part of the medication profile despite its potential importance. Structured

  12. Capsule Expression and Genotypic Differences among Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Chronic or Acute Osteomyelitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Lattar, Santiago M.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Caccuri, Roberto L.; Centrón, Daniela; Becker, Karsten; Alonso, Claudio A.; Barberis, Claudia; Miranda, Graciela; Buzzola, Fernanda R.; von Eiff, Christof; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) promotes virulence. Loss of capsule expression, however, may lead to S. aureus persistence in a chronically infected host. This study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus in patients with chronic and acute osteomyelitis. Only 76/118 (64%) S. aureus isolates from patients with osteomyelitis expressed CP, whereas all 50 isolates from blood cultures of patients with infections other than osteoarticular infections expressed CP (P = 0.0001). A significantly higher prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus was found in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (53%) than in those with acute osteomyelitis (21%) (P = 0.0046). S. aureus isolates obtained from multiple specimens from five of six patients with chronic osteomyelitis exhibited phenotypic (expression of CP, α-hemolysin, β-hemolysin, slime, and the small-colony variant phenotype) and/or genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing) differences. Nonencapsulated S. aureus was recovered from at least one specimen from each chronic osteomyelitis patient. Fourteen isolates obtained from two patients with acute osteomyelitis were indistinguishable from each other within each group, and all produced CP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated that nonencapsulated S. aureus is more frequently isolated from patients with chronic osteomyelitis than from those with acute osteomyelitis, suggesting that loss of CP expression may be advantageous to S. aureus during chronic infection. Our findings on multiple S. aureus isolates from individual patients allow us to suggest that selection of nonencapsulated S. aureus is likely to have occurred in the patient during long-term bone infection. PMID:19273557

  13. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  14. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  15. Outcomes of acute kidney injury patients with and without cancer.

    PubMed

    Juwon, Lee; Jang, Gookhwan; Kim, Sunmin; Kim, Dajung; Lee, Jinwook; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Junyeob; Kim, Sangbin; Kim, Yunkyung; Kim, Soo Young; Yang, Joung Wook; Gwoo, Sangeon; Kim, Ye Na; Shin, Ho Sik; Jung, Yeonsoon; Rim, Hark

    2015-11-01

    Incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients with cancer is increasing, but there have been few studies on AKI in patients with cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a South Korean tertiary care hospital. A total of 2211 consecutive patients (without cancer 61.5%; with cancer 38.5%) were included over a 140-month period. Predictors of all-cause death were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The main contributing factors of AKI were sepsis (31.1%) and ischemia (52.7%). AKI was multifactorial in 78% of patients with cancer and in 71% of patients without cancer. Hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with cancer (42.8%) than in patients without cancer (22.5%) (p = 0.014). In multivariate analyses, diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer diagnosis were associated with hospital mortality. Cancer diagnosis was independently associated with mortality [odds ratio = 3.010 (95% confidence interval, 2.340-3.873), p = 0.001]. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that subjects with DM and cancer (n = 146) had lower survival rates than subjects with DM and without cancer (n = 687) (log rank test, p = 0.001). The presence of DM and cancer was independently associated with mortality in AKI patients both with and without cancer. Studies are warranted to determine whether proactive measures may limit AKI and improve outcomes.

  16. Selling the story: Narratives and charisma in adults with TBI

    PubMed Central

    JONES, CORINNE A.; TURKSTRA, LYN S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine storytelling performance behaviours in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and relate these behaviours to perceived charisma and desirability as a conversation partner. Design and methods Seven adult males with traumatic brain injury (TBI) told their accident narratives to a male confederate. Ten male undergraduate students rated 1-minute video clips from the beginning of each narrative using the Charismatic Leadership Communication Scale (CLCS). Raters also indicated whether or not they would like to engage in conversation with each participant. Results Of the performative behaviours analysed, gestures alone significantly influenced CLCS ratings and reported likelihood of engaging in future conversation with the participant. Post-hoc analysis revealed that speech rate was significantly correlated with all of the preceding measures. There was a significant correlation between self- and other-ratings of charisma. Conclusions The findings suggest that aspects of non-verbal performance, namely gesture use and speech rate, influence how charismatic an individual is perceived to be and how likely someone is to engage in conversation with that person. Variability in these performance behaviours may contribute to the variation in social outcomes seen in the TBI population. PMID:21714624

  17. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  18. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  19. Post-acute home care and hospital readmission of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K

    2004-11-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce hospital readmission during the post-acute period. Using proportional Cox regression analysis, the authors examined the independent and joint effects of post-acute informal and formal services on hospital readmission. No evidence of service impact was found. Rather, hospital readmission was associated with a longer length of CHF history and noncompliance with medication regimes. Research, policy, and practice implications are discussed.

  20. [TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN A PREGNANT PATIENT WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Bolívar, Victoria; González-Molero, Inmaculada; Valdivieso, Pedro; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia secondary to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency in a pregnant patient with gestational diabetes, initially maneged with diet but it was later necessary to carry out artificial nutricional support measures: total parenteral nutrition. LPL deficiency might cause severe hypertriglyceridemia, repetition acute pancreatitis which is an unwieldy and severe situation during pregnancy. Acute familial hypertriglyceridemia pancreatitis accounts for 5% of cases, including LPL deficiency. The goal of treatment is to reach triglycerides levels below 500 mg/dl, being very low fat diet the treatment of choice, drugs or plasmapheresis techniques can also be associated. TPN enriched in ω3 fatty acids and glutamine was safe and effective in our patient with significant decrease in triglyceride levels.

  1. Delay to reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction presenting to acute care hospitals: an international perspective

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Frederick A.; Montalescot, Gilles; Fox, Keith A.A.; Goodman, Shaun G.; Granger, Christopher B.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Oliveira, Gustavo B.F.; Anderson, Frederick A.; Eagle, Kim A.; Fitzgerald, Gordon; Gore, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine the extent of delay from initial hospital presentation to fibrinolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), characteristics associated with prolonged delay, and changes in delay patterns over time in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results We analysed data from 5170 patients with STEMI enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events from 2003 to 2007. The median elapsed time from first hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis was 30 min (interquartile range 18–60) and to primary PCI was 86 min (interquartile range 53–135). Over the years under study, there were no significant changes in delay times to treatment with either strategy. Geographic region was the strongest predictor of delay to initiation of fibrinolysis >30 min. Patient's transfer status and geographic location were strongly associated with delay to primary PCI. Patients treated in Europe were least likely to experience delay to fibrinolysis or primary PCI. Conclusion These data suggest no improvements in delay times from hospital presentation to initiation of fibrinolysis or primary PCI during our study period. Geographic location and patient transfer were the strongest predictors of prolonged delay time, suggesting that improvements in modifiable healthcare system factors can shorten delay to reperfusion therapy even further. PMID:20231154

  2. Assessment of Autonomic Dysfunction in Acute Stroke Patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, Hemachandrika; Gnanamoorthy, Kothai; Rajendran, Kannan; Pavadai, Chitrambalam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In patients who present with acute cerebro-vascular disease, autonomic function testing is usually not given its due importance. This is because of the complex nature of the autonomic function tests and the relative technical difficulty faced in administering the tests to the patients. A simple and non-invasive method to assess the autonomic dysfunction is measurement of resting Heart Rate Variability (HRV). Aim To study the pattern of autonomic dysfunction among patients admitted with acute stroke and to study the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and the morbidity and mortality associated with acute stroke. Materials and Methods The study was carried out on 97 patients who were admitted with diagnosis of acute stroke. Patients with conduction abnormalities on ECG were excluded from the study. Resting ECG tracings were obtained for a period of 5 minutes. The frequency domain analysis of HRV was performed by a Fast Fourier transform of the RR intervals. The High Frequency (HF) was representative of the parasympathetic activity while low frequency is representative of baroreceptor mediated parasympathetic and sympathetic activity and Low Frequency (LF)/HF ratio was a measure of the sympathovagal balance. Statistical analysis was carried out with student’s t-test and chi-square test and p-value ≥ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results The mean age of the patients was 60.84±14.12 years. A total of 41 patients were females and 77 patients had ischemic stroke. Out of the total 97, 60 patients had evidence suggestive of increased sympathetic activity with a mean LF/HF ratio of 2.03±0.88. These patients had significantly higher mean systolic BP, diastolic BP and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) values when compared to patients with reduced LF/HF ratio (166.33±24.81 vs 148.54±19.42, p=0.0003, 100.33±18.73 vs 88.76±12.66, p=0.0013, 15.77±8.22 vs 11.49±6.63, p=0.0088 respectively). These patients also had a

  3. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Yamauchi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled with In-111 oxine were studied in 5 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute premyelocytic leukemia (APL), and kinetics of OKM1 monoclonal antibody-treated leukemic cells were studied in one patient with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL). Recoveries of 33.7 +- 23.3%(range, 22.0 to 48.1%) were achieved at 10min after injection of In-111 oxine labeled leukemic cells in AML and APL patients. However, in a patient with AMoL recovery of 12.3% was only achieved at 10min after injection of OKM1-treated leukemic cells. Clearance of the activity from blood was rapid up to one in all patients. The clearance curve of the activity in 5 AML patients showed a hump or a plateau from one to 5hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. In APL patient and AMoL patient, however, this hump or plateau was not noted. In AML and APL patients the activity over the spleen was higher than that of over the liver at from 30min to 3hr after and showed a plateau or gradual rising thereafter. In a patient with AMoL, the hepatic activity was higher than the splenic activity at 30min after, but thereafter the latter became higher than the former. Liver activity curves showed transient fall at 3hr after and then gradual uprising in all patients. In a patient with APL, high activity was noted over the kidneys. This rose to a maximum after 3hr and then decreased rapidly. Since In-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damage in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics.

  4. Management of adult Jehovah's Witness patients with acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berend, Kenrick; Levi, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working in hospitals should be prepared to manage these patients. Appropriate management of a Jehovah's Witness patient with severe bleeding entails understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved, and meticulous medical management, including treatment of hypovolemic shock, local hemostatic interventions, and administration of prohemostatic agents, when appropriate. In addition, high-dose recombinant erythropoietin in combination with supplemental iron may enhance the speed of hemoglobin synthesis.

  5. Diagnostic imaging in a patient with an acute knee injury.

    PubMed

    Sago, Carrie E; Labuda, Craig S

    2013-01-01

    The patient was a 23-year-old man, currently serving in a military airborne operations unit. During a jump training exercise, the patient's right lower extremity became entangled in his parachute equipment upon exiting the aircraft, which caused hyperextension and valgus forces upon his right knee. Due to concern for a fracture, the patient was transported to an emergency department, where conventional radiographs were completed and interpreted by a radiologist as negative for a fracture. Following further physical examination by a physical therapist, magnetic resonance imaging of the right knee was ordered, revealing ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament.

  6. Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles Using Magnetic Nanoparticles in Blood of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, A. M.; Grivel, J.-Ch.; Shpektor, A. V.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.; Margolis, L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released from various cell types and play an important role in intercellular interactions. In our study, we investigated abundance of individual EVs in patients with acute forms of ischemic heart disease. Previously, we developed an approach for individual analysis of EVs conjugated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which was applied in the current study for analyzing phenotypic composition of EVs (by staining for markers CD31, CD41a, and CD63). EVs were isolated using fluorescently labeled MNPs containing anti-CD31, CD41a, or CD63 antibodies and analyzed by combining fluorescently labeled anti-CD41a and CD63, CD31 and CD63, or CD41a and CD31 antibodies, respectively. EVs were analyzed in 30 individuals: 17 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Six and seven patients with ACS were with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina, respectively. It was found that patients with ACS and healthy volunteers contained a dominant subset of EVs expressing surface CD41a antigen, suggesting that they originated from platelets. In addition, the total number of EVs isolated using either of the surface markers examined in our study was higher in patients with ACS compared to healthy volunteers. The subgroup of patients with acute myocardial infarction was found to contain significantly higher number of blood EVs compared to the control group. Moreover, increased number of EVs in patients with ACS is mainly due to the increased number of EVs in the subset of EVs bearing CD41a. By analyzing individual EVs, we found that plasma of patients with ACS, particularly upon developing of myocardial infarction, contained dominant platelet-derived EVs fraction, which may reflect activation of platelets in such patients. PMID:27293095

  7. GFAP-BDP as an Acute Diagnostic Marker in Traumatic Brain Injury: Results from the Prospective Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Yue, John K.; Puccio, Ava M.; Panczykowski, David M.; Inoue, Tomoo; McMahon, Paul J.; Sorani, Marco D.; Yuh, Esther L.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Valadka, Alex B.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Casey, Scott S.; Cheong, Maxwell; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Hricik, Allison J.; Hochberger, Kerri; Menon, David K.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Schnyer, David M.; Vassar, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reliable diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health need. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is expressed in the central nervous system, and breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are released following parenchymal brain injury. Here, we evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of elevated levels of plasma GFAP-BDP in TBI. Participants were identified as part of the prospective Transforming Research And Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Study. Acute plasma samples (<24 h post-injury) were collected from patients presenting with brain injury who had CT imaging. The ability of GFAP-BDP level to discriminate patients with demonstrable traumatic lesions on CT, and with failure to return to pre-injury baseline at 6 months, was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Of the 215 patients included for analysis, 83% had mild, 4% had moderate, and 13% had severe TBI; 54% had acute