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Sample records for acute thymic atrophy

  1. Thymic atrophy in acute experimental Chagas disease is associated with an imbalance of stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Frias Carvalho, Vinícius; Morrot, Alexandre; Savino, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    Disorders in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are associated with the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. During the acute phase of this disease, increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs) correlate with thymic atrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that this phenomenon is paralleled by a decrease of prolactin (PRL) secretion, another stress hormone that seems to counteract many immunosuppressive effects of GCs. Both GCs and PRL are intrathymically produced and exhibit mutual antagonism through the activation of their respective receptors, GR, and PRLR. Considering that GCs induce apoptosis and inhibit double-positive (DP) thymocyte proliferation and that PRL administration prevents these effects, it seems plausible that a local imbalance of GR-PRLR crosstalk underlies the thymic involution occurring in acute T. cruzi infection. In this respect, preserving PRLR signaling seems to be crucial for protecting DP from GC-induced apoptosis.

  2. Appraisal of experimental and commercial Marek's disease vaccines to induce bursal and thymic atrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, several experimental Marek’s disease (MD) vaccines were developed that appear to protect equally or better than the best commercial vaccines. However, some of the experimental vaccines were reported to induce transient bursal and thymic atrophies. We will report on two promising experiment...

  3. C-Phycocyanin: an effective protective agent against thymic atrophy by tributyltin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Monika; Dwivedi, Upendra Nath; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2011-07-04

    Spirulina platensis, used worldwide as a food supplement, is a natural source of protein, vitamins, carbohydrates and polyunsaturated fatty acids. C-Phycocyanin (C-Pc), its major biliprotein, is known to possess anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and radical scavenging properties. Our present study showed that treatment with C-Pc protects the rats from Tributyltin (TBT) induced thymic atrophy. The results reveal TBT-induced oxidative stress mediated apoptosis in rat thymocytes in vivo and its attenuation by C-Pc. This ameliorative effect could be attributed to antioxidant activity of the biliprotein. C-Pc also increased TBTC reduced thymic weight and cellularity as well. TBTC-induced ROS generation and lowered GSH levels were restored by C-Pc, suggesting its radical scavenging properties. The various apoptotic determinants such as mitochondrial membrane potential, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 activity and apoptotic cell population were effectively modulated by C-Pc treatment. We make this first observation to illustrate the effectiveness of C-Pc in reducing TBTC-induced thymic atrophy. The morphology of thymic tissue was restored to near normal by this biliprotein. The present study, therefore, suggests that C-Pc could serve as an effective natural antioxidant for efficient management of TBTC induced oxidative damage.

  4. Altered bone marrow lymphopoiesis and interleukin-6-dependent inhibition of thymocyte differentiation contribute to thymic atrophy during Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Carbajosa, Sofía; Gea, Susana; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Poveda, Cristina; Maza, Mª Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria

    2017-01-28

    Thymic atrophy occurs during infection being associated with apoptosis of double positive (DP) and premature exit of DP and double negative (DN) thymocytes. We observed for the first time that a significant bone marrow aplasia and a decrease in common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) preceded thymic alterations in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. In addition, depletion of the DN2 stage was previous to the DN1, indicating an alteration in the differentiation from DN1 to DN2 thymocytes. Interestingly, infected mice deficient in IL-6 expression showed higher numbers of DP and CD4+ thymocytes than wild type infected mice, while presenting similar percentages of DN1 thymocytes. Moreover, the drop in late differentiation stages of DN thymocytes was partially abrogated in comparison with wild type littermates. Thus, our results suggest that thymic atrophy involves a drop in CLPs production in bone marrow and IL-6-dependent and independent mechanisms that inhibits the differentiation of DN thymocytes.

  5. Expression of nerve growth factor is upregulated in the rat thymic epithelial cells during thymus regeneration following acute thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Woo; Kim, Sung-Min; Shim, Na-Ri; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Jung, Il-Gun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jae-Bong; Moon, Jeon-Ok; Chung, Joo-Seop; Yoon, Sik

    2007-06-07

    Neuroimmune networks in the thymic microenvironment are thought to be involved in the regulation of T cell development. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is increasingly recognized as a potent immunomodulator, promoting "cross-talk" between various types of immune system cells. The present study describes the expression of NGF during thymus regeneration following acute involution induced by cyclophosphamide in the rat. Immunohistochemical stain demonstrated not only the presence of NGF but also its upregulated expression mainly in the subcapsular, paraseptal, and perivascular epithelial cells, and medullary epithelial cells including Hassall's corpuscles in both the normal and regenerating thymus. Biochemical data obtained using Western blot and RT-PCR supported these results and showed that thymic extracts contain NGF protein and mRNA, at higher levels during thymus regeneration. Thus, our results suggest that NGF expressed in these thymic epithelial cells plays a role in the T lymphopoiesis associated with thymus regeneration during recovery from acute thymic involution.

  6. Leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin M, IL-6, and stem cell factor mRNA expression in human thymus increases with age and is associated with thymic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sempowski, G D; Hale, L P; Sundy, J S; Massey, J M; Koup, R A; Douek, D C; Patel, D D; Haynes, B F

    2000-02-15

    The roles that thymus cytokines might play in regulating thymic atrophy are not known. Reversing thymic atrophy is important for immune reconstitution in adults. We have studied cytokine mRNA steady-state levels in 45 normal human (aged 3 days to 78 years) and 34 myasthenia gravis thymuses (aged 4 to 75 years) during aging, and correlated cytokine mRNA levels with thymic signal joint (sj) TCR delta excision circle (TREC) levels, a molecular marker for active thymopoiesis. LIF, oncostatin M (OSM), IL-6, M-CSF, and stem cell factor (SCF) mRNA were elevated in normal and myasthenia gravis-aged thymuses, and correlated with decreased levels of thymopoiesis, as determined by either decreased keratin-positive thymic epithelial space or decreased thymic sjTRECs. IL-7 is a key cytokine required during the early stages of thymocyte development. Interestingly, IL-7 mRNA expression did not fall with aging in either normal or myasthenia gravis thymuses. In vivo administration of LIF, OSM, IL-6, or SCF, but not M-CSF, i.p. to mice over 3 days induced thymic atrophy with loss of CD4+, CD8+ cortical thymocytes. Taken together, these data suggest a role for thymic cytokines in the process of thymic atrophy.

  7. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  8. Thymic atrophy characteristic in transgenic mice that harbor pX genes of human T-cell leukemia virus type I

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Yasuhide; Aizawa, Shinichi; Suda, Yoko; Ikawa, Yoji , Ibaraki ); Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Tada, Tomio ); Hikikoshi, Atsuko; Yoshida, Mitsuaki; Seiki, Motoharu )

    1989-07-01

    The human T-cell leukemia viruses (HTLV) are associated with T-cell malignancies in humans. The malignant transformation occurs after a long latency in some carriers, and its mechanism appears to be distinct from that of other classes of retroviruses which induce transformation through viral or cellular oncogenes. A widely postulated explanation is that the products of novel pX genes transactivate endogenous cellular genes which lead to tumor development in T cells. To directly examined the pathological effects of pX genes in vivo, the authors produced transgenic mice harboring the HTLV type I pX genes under several regulatory units: HTLV type I long terminal repeat, immunoglobulin enhancer-simian virus 40 promoter, and mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat. Atrophy of the thymus was characteristic in these mice no matter which regulatory unit directed the expression of the genes.

  9. Intestinal lymphangiectasia and thymic hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, R U; Halpin, T C; Abramowsky, C R; Hornick, D L; Miller, K M; Naylor, P; Incefy, G S

    1985-01-01

    We have evaluated the immunological abnormalities present in a 6 year old patient with primary intestinal and generalized lymphangiectasia confirmed by intestinal, lung and lymph node biopsies. Lymphocyte loss through the gut was confirmed by the detection of lymphocytes in her stool. An increased enteric protein loss was suggested by hypoproteinaemia, peripheral oedema, and a very short half-life for i.v. immune serum globulin (3 days). Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis revealed a selective loss of T lymphocytes, with a proportionally increased loss of the OKT4 positive helper/inducer subpopulation. Functionally, there was a decrease in proliferative responses to some mitogens and to allogeneic cells, and a lack of T cell help for in vitro B lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting cells. Natural killer function was normal. In this patient, a concomitant thymic deficiency was documented by failure to identify thymic tissue on a thymus biopsy and by an absence or decrease of the serum thymic factor (thymulin) and thymosin alpha 1. No compensatory lymphopoiesis was detected in the bone marrow. In an attempt to increase T lymphocyte development, the patient was treated with thymosin fraction 5. Daily treatment with this preparation resulted in a transient clinical improvement which could not be sustained on a weekly thymosin treatment schedule. However, lymphocyte numbers did not increase during this treatment. The findings in this patient support the notion that T lymphocytes are needed to stimulate thymic epithelium. In situations of excessive loss of long lived T lymphocytes a secondary thymic atrophy may occur and further contribute to the development of a deficiency in cell-mediated immunity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3971596

  10. The Anti-apoptotic Effect of Ghrelin on Restraint Stress-Induced Thymus Atrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jie Wan; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyuk Soon

    2016-01-01

    Thymic atrophy is a complication that results from exposure to many environmental stressors, disease treatments, and microbial challenges. Such acute stress-associated thymic loss can have a dramatic impact on the host's ability to replenish the necessary naïve T cell output to reconstitute the peripheral T cell numbers and repertoire to respond to new antigenic challenges. We have previously reported that treatment with the orexigenic hormone ghrelin results in an increase in the number and proliferation of thymocytes after dexamethasone challenge, suggesting a role for ghrelin in restraint stress-induced thymic involution and cell apoptosis and its potential use as a thymostimulatory agent. In an effort to understand how ghrelin suppresses thymic T cell apoptosis, we have examined the various signaling pathways induced by receptor-specific ghrelin stimulation using a restraint stress mouse model. In this model, stress-induced apoptosis in thymocytes was effectively blocked by ghrelin. Western blot analysis demonstrated that ghrelin prevents the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bim, Caspase-3, and PARP. In addition, ghrelin stimulation activates the Akt and Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in a time/dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of the FoxO3a pathway in the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Together, these findings suggest that ghrelin inhibits apoptosis by modulating the stress-induced apoptotic signal pathway in the restraint-induced thymic apoptosis. PMID:27574503

  11. Severe Changes in Thymic Microenvironment in a Chronic Experimental Model of Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves da Costa, Thiago; Di Gangi, Rosária; Thomé, Rodolfo; Barreto Felisbino, Marina; Pires Bonfanti, Amanda; Lumi Watanabe Ishikawa, Larissa; Sartori, Alexandrina; Burger, Eva; Verinaud, Liana

    2016-01-01

    T cell maturation takes place within the thymus, a primary lymphoid organ that is commonly targeted during infections. Previous studies showed that acute infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), promotes thymic atrophy that is associated with the presence of yeast cells in the organ. However, as human PCM is a chronic infection, it is imperative to investigate the consequences of Pb infection over the thymic structure and function in chronic infection. In this sense, we developed a new experimental model where Pb yeast cells are injected through the intraperitoneal route and mice are evaluated over 120 days of infection. Thymuses were analyzed in chronically infected mice and we found that the thymus underwent extensive morphological alterations and severe infiltration of P. brasiliensis yeast cells. Further analyses showed an altered phenotype and function of thymocytes that are commonly found in peripheral mature T lymphocytes. We also observed activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the thymus. Our data provide new information on the severe changes observed in the thymic microenvironment in a model of PCM that more closely mimics the human infection. PMID:27736987

  12. Thymic overexpression of Ttg-1 in transgenic mice results in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E A; Rintoul, C E; Sclar, G M; Korsmeyer, S J

    1992-01-01

    T-cell translocation gene 1 (Ttg-1), also called rhombotin, is deregulated upon translocation into the alpha/delta T-cell receptor loci in acute lymphoblastic leukemias bearing the t(11;14)(p15;q11). Ttg-1 encodes a nuclear protein, expressed predominantly in neuronal cells, which belongs to a novel family of transcription factors possessing LIM domains. We utilized the lck proximal promoter to overexpress this candidate oncogene in immature thymocytes of transgenic mice. lckPr Ttg-1 mice develop immature, aggressive T-cell leukemia/lymphomas. Tumor incidence is proportional to the level of Ttg-1 expression. Most tumors contain CD4+8+ cells as well as CD4-8+ cells, which have an immature rather than a mature peripheral phenotype. Ttg-1-induced tumorigenesis preferentially affects a minority population of thymocytes representing an immature CD4-8+ intermediate stage between double-negative CD4-8- cells and double-positive CD4+8+ cells. This model indicates that the aberrant expression of putative transcription factors plays a primary role in the genesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Images PMID:1508213

  13. Visual recovery from optic atrophy following acute optic neuropathy in the fellow eye.

    PubMed

    Ornek, Kemal; Ornek, Nurgül

    2012-06-01

    The left eye of a 65-year-old male was blind due to optic atrophy and only seeing eye had also dry type age-related macular degeneration. An anterior ischemic optic neuropathy developed in the better seeing eye. Vision recovered in the blind eye in a short time after losing the better eye. Gaining some vision in a blind eye may be an adaptation of visual pathway in such patients.

  14. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal atrophy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis) is thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls due to your body having less estrogen. Vaginal atrophy occurs most ...

  15. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting as progressive muscular atrophy in a young black man.

    PubMed

    Albertyn, C H; Sonderup, M; Bryer, A; Corrigall, A; Meissner, P; Heckmann, J M

    2014-04-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria, the most common porphyria affecting the nervous system, typically presents with neurovisceral crises followed by a motor neuropathy. We describe a 23-year-old black South African man presenting with a progressive stuttering, lower motor neuron syndrome developing over months. He had not experienced pain or neuropsychiatric symptoms. One year after symptom onset he was bed-bound with a flaccid quadriparesis. There was marked amyotrophy, but without fasciculations. Sensation was intact apart from a hypo-aesthetic patch over the thigh. Electrophysiological investigations showed an active motor axonopathy. Urinary porphyrins, delta-aminolaevulinic acid and porphobilinogen were elevated. Mutation analysis revealed the c445C>T (R149X) mutation in the porphobilinogen deaminase gene. The patient responded dramatically to haem arginate and could walk with assistance 2 weeks later. We identified the first molecularly confirmed acute intermittent porphyria in a black South African. The clinical presentation mimicked a progressive lower motor neuron syndrome.

  16. Expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in thymic epithelial tumors, thymic hyperplasia and regular thymic morphology.

    PubMed

    Moser, Bernhard; Janik, Stefan; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Müllauer, Leonhard; Bekos, Christine; Scharrer, Anke; Mildner, Michael; Rényi-Vámos, Ferenc; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a role of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in myasthenia gravis was described. RAGE and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) play key roles in autoimmunity and cancer. To test whether these molecules are involved in patients with thymic abnormalities we applied immunohistochemical analysis in 33 cases of thymic epithelial tumors, comprising 27 thymomas and 6 thymic carcinomas, and 21 nonneoplastic thymuses. Both molecules were detected in neoplastic epithelial cells: RAGE staining was most intense in WHO type B2 thymomas and thymic carcinomas (p<0.001). HMGB1 nuclear staining was strongest in A and AB, and gradually less in B1 = B2>B3>thymic carcinoma (p<0.001). Conversely, HMGB1 cytoplasmic staining intensities were as follows: A and AB (none), B1 (strong), B2 (moderate), B3 and thymic carcinoma (weak); (p<0.001). Fetal thymic tissue showed a distinct expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in subcapsular cortical epithelial cells which was found in 50% of myasthenic patients. Furthermore RAGE and HMGB1 were expressed in thymocytes, macrophages, Hassall's corpuscles, thymic medulla, and germinal center cells in myasthenic patients. Immunohistochemistry results were complemented by systemic measurements (immunosorbent assay): serum levels of soluble RAGE were significantly reduced in patients with epithelial tumors (p = 0.008); and in invasive tumors (p = 0.008). Whereas RAGE was equally reduced in thymic hyperplasia and epithelial tumors (p = 0.003), HMGB1 was only elevated in malignancies (p = 0.036). Results were most pronounced in thymic carcinomas. Thus, RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the (patho-)physiology of thymus, as evidenced by differentiated thymic and systemic expression patterns that may act as diagnostic or therapeutic targets in autoimmune disease and cancer.

  17. Expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in Thymic Epithelial Tumors, Thymic Hyperplasia and Regular Thymic Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Bernhard; Janik, Stefan; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Müllauer, Leonhard; Bekos, Christine; Scharrer, Anke; Mildner, Michael; Rényi-Vámos, Ferenc; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a role of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in myasthenia gravis was described. RAGE and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) play key roles in autoimmunity and cancer. To test whether these molecules are involved in patients with thymic abnormalities we applied immunohistochemical analysis in 33 cases of thymic epithelial tumors, comprising 27 thymomas and 6 thymic carcinomas, and 21 nonneoplastic thymuses. Both molecules were detected in neoplastic epithelial cells: RAGE staining was most intense in WHO type B2 thymomas and thymic carcinomas (p<0.001). HMGB1 nuclear staining was strongest in A and AB, and gradually less in B1 = B2>B3>thymic carcinoma (p<0.001). Conversely, HMGB1 cytoplasmic staining intensities were as follows: A and AB (none), B1 (strong), B2 (moderate), B3 and thymic carcinoma (weak); (p<0.001). Fetal thymic tissue showed a distinct expression of RAGE and HMGB1 in subcapsular cortical epithelial cells which was found in 50% of myasthenic patients. Furthermore RAGE and HMGB1 were expressed in thymocytes, macrophages, Hassall's corpuscles, thymic medulla, and germinal center cells in myasthenic patients. Immunohistochemistry results were complemented by systemic measurements (immunosorbent assay): serum levels of soluble RAGE were significantly reduced in patients with epithelial tumors (p = 0.008); and in invasive tumors (p = 0.008). Whereas RAGE was equally reduced in thymic hyperplasia and epithelial tumors (p = 0.003), HMGB1 was only elevated in malignancies (p = 0.036). Results were most pronounced in thymic carcinomas. Thus, RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the (patho-)physiology of thymus, as evidenced by differentiated thymic and systemic expression patterns that may act as diagnostic or therapeutic targets in autoimmune disease and cancer. PMID:24705787

  18. SMN2 copy number predicts acute or chronic spinal muscular atrophy but does not account for intrafamilial variability in siblings.

    PubMed

    Cuscó, I; Barceló, M J; Rojas-García, R; Illa, I; Gámez, J; Cervera, C; Pou, A; Izquierdo, G; Baiget, M; Tizzano, E F

    2006-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects motor neurons. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1). The SMN2 gene, which is the highly homologous SMN1 copy that is present in all the patients, is unable to prevent the disease. An SMN2 dosage method was applied to 45 patients with the three SMA types (I-III) and to four pairs of siblings with chronic SMA (II-III) and different phenotypes. Our results confirm that the SMN2 copy number plays a key role in predicting acute or chronic SMA. However, siblings with different SMA phenotypes show an identical SMN2 copy number and identical markers, indicating that the genetic background around the SMA locus is insufficient to account for the intrafamilial variability. In our results, age of onset appears to be the most important predictor of disease severity in affected members of the same family. Given that SMN2 is regarded as a target for potential pharmacological therapies in SMA, the identification of genetic factors other than the SMN genes is necessary to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease in order to implement additional therapeutic approaches.

  19. [Impact of thymic function in age-related immune deterioration].

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; de la Fuente, Mónica; Guerrero, Juan Miguel; Leal, Manuel; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Age-related biological deterioration also includes immune system deterioration and, in consequence, a rise in the incidence and prevalence of infections and cancers, as well as low responses to vaccination strategies. Out of all immune cell subsets, T-lymphocytes seem to be involved in most of the age-related defects. Since T-lymphocytes mature during their passage through the thymus, and the thymus shows an age-related process of atrophy, thymic regression has been proposed as the triggering event of this immune deterioration in elderly people. Historically, it has been accepted that the young thymus sets the T-lymphocyte repertoire during the childhood, whereupon atrophy begins until the elderly thymus is a non-functional evolutionary trace. However, a rising body of knowledge points toward the thymus functioning during adulthood. In the elderly, higher thymic function is associated with a younger immune system, while thymic function failure is associated with all-cause mortality. Therefore, any new strategy focused on the improvement of the elderly quality of life, especially those trying to influence the immune system, should take into account, together with peripheral homeostasis, thymus function as a key element in slowing down age-related decline.

  20. Thymic gallium-67 localization in pediatric patients on chemotherapy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, D.M.; Leonard, J.C.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Nitschke, R.M.; Hinkle, G.H.; Ice, R.D.; Wilson, D.A.; Tunell, W.P.

    1981-12-01

    Localization of 67Ga in the thymus has been reported to occur in children. In our control group of 87 patients, 15% of children under 5 yr and 11% of children over 5 yr demonstrated thymic localization. In contrast, in our study group of seven children with acute lymphocytic leukemia or malignant lymphoma, lymphocytic diffuse, treated on a modified non-Hodgkin's lymphoma protocol, Sloan-Kettering LSA2-L2, thymic localization occurred during treatment in five of the seven. We conclude that increased thymic gallium localization in children under chemotherapy for a known malignancy may reflect increased activity of thymic medullary epithelial cells and regeneration of thymic lymphocytes during recovery from involution induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Thymic gallium-67 localization in pediatric patients on chemotherapy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, D.M.; Leonard, J.C.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Nitschke, R.M.; Hinkle, G.H.; Ice, R.D.; Wilson, D.A.; Tunell, W.P.

    1981-12-01

    Localization of Ga-67 in the thymus has been reported to occur in children. In our control group of 87 patients, 15% of children under 5 yr and 11% of children over 5 hr demonstrated thymic localization. In contrast, in our study group of seven children with acute lymphocytic leukemia or malignant lymphoma, lymphocytic diffuse, treated on a modified non-Hodgkin's lymphoma protocol, Sloan-Kettering LSA/sub 2/-L/sub 2/, thymic localization occurred during treatment in five of the seven. We conclude that increased thymic gallium localization in children under chemotherapy for a known malignancy may reflect increased activity of thymic medullary epithelial cells and regeneration of thymic lymphocytes during recovery from involution induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation is essential for the maintenance and regeneration of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Sun, Chenming; Liang, Zhanfeng; Li, Hongran; Chen, Lin; Luo, Haiying; Zhang, Hongmei; Ding, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoning; Qin, Zhihai; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) form a 3-dimentional network supporting thymocyte development and maturation. Besides epithelium and thymocytes, heterogeneous fibroblasts are essential components in maintaining thymic microenvironments. However, thymic fibroblast characteristics, development and function remain to be determined. We herein found that thymic non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ cells represent a unique Fibroblast specific protein 1 (FSP1)—fibroblast-derived cell subset. Deletion of these cells in FSP1-TK transgenic mice caused thymus atrophy due to the loss of TECs, especially mature medullary TECs (MHCIIhigh, CD80+ and Aire+). In a cyclophosphamide-induced thymus injury and regeneration model, lack of non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation significantly delayed thymus regeneration. In fact, thymic FSP1+ fibroblasts released more IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1 in the culture medium than their FSP1- counterparts. Further experiments showed that the FSP1 protein could directly enhance the proliferation and maturation of TECs in the in vitro culture systems. FSP1 knockout mice had significantly smaller thymus size and less TECs than their control. Collectively, our studies reveal that thymic CD45-FSP1+ cells are a subpopulation of fibroblasts, which is crucial for the maintenance and regeneration of TECs especially medullary TECs through providing IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1. PMID:26445893

  3. Nature of nontargeted radiation effects observed during fractionated irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hideo; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Shiomi, Naoko; Katsube, Takanori; Mori, Masahiko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Ohno, Mizuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Oka, Sugako; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Muto, Masahiro; Sado, Toshihiko

    2013-05-01

    Changes in the thymic microenvironment lead to radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis, but the phenomena are not fully understood. Here we show that radiation-induced chromosomal instability and bystander effects occur in thymocytes and are involved in lymphomagenesis in C57BL/6 mice that have been irradiated four times with 1.8-Gy γ-rays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in descendants of irradiated thymocytes during recovery from radiation-induced thymic atrophy. Concomitantly, descendants of irradiated thymocytes manifested DNA lesions as revealed by γ-H2AX foci, chromosomal instability, aneuploidy with trisomy 15 and bystander effects on chromosomal aberration induction in co-cultured ROS-sensitive mutant cells, suggesting that the delayed generation of ROS is a primary cause of these phenomena. Abolishing the bystander effect of post-irradiation thymocytes by superoxide dismutase and catalase supports ROS involvement. Chromosomal instability in thymocytes resulted in the generation of abnormal cell clones bearing trisomy 15 and aberrant karyotypes in the thymus. The emergence of thymic lymphomas from the thymocyte population containing abnormal cell clones indicated that clones with trisomy 15 and altered karyotypes were prelymphoma cells with the potential to develop into thymic lymphomas. The oncogene Notch1 was rearranged after the prelymphoma cells were established. Thus, delayed nontargeted radiation effects drive thymic lymphomagenesis through the induction of characteristic changes in intrathymic immature T cells and the generation of prelymphoma cells.

  4. General Information about Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  5. Treatment Options for Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thymoma & Thymic Carcinoma Treatment Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thymoma and ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  6. Thymic deficiency in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levin, S; Schlesinger, M; Handzel, Z; Hahn, T; Altman, Y; Czernobilsky, B; Boss, J

    1979-01-01

    Children with Down's syndrome (DS) often have small and abnormal thymuses, with lymphocyte depletion, diminution of the cortex, and loss of corticomedullary demarcation--a picture resembling thymic involution. Besides this, they have markedly enlarged Hassall's corpuscles, some surrounded by a sheath of lymphocytes. Patients with DS are known to have increased numbers of respiratory infections; they also have a higher incidence of lymphatic leukemia than do individuals who do not have DS. Studies of cell-mediated (thymic-dependent) immunity demonstrate that children with DS have both diminished numbers of T cells as well as functional deficiency of these cells.

  7. Dietary modulation of thymic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Susana, Feliu María; Paula, Perris; Slobodianik, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complex syndrome caused by an inadequate intake of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins which affects the immune system. Nutritional imbalances, present in children with energy-protein malnutrition and infections, make defining the specific effects of each of them on the thymus difficult. For this reason, it is necessary to design an experimental model in animals that could define a single variable. As the thymus atrophy described in humans is similar to that observed in murines, a rat experimental model makes the extrapolation to man possible. Some authors suggest that the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)--involved in purine metabolism--have an influence on T lymphocyte development and the immune system, due to intracellular accumulation of toxic levels of deoxynucleotides. Studies in our group, performed in an experimental model on Wistar growing rats, have demonstrated that protein deficiency or imbalance in the profile of essential amino acids in the diet, produce loss of thymus weight, reduction in the number of thymocytes, a diminished proportion of T cells presenting the W3/13 antigenic determinant and DNA content with concomitant increase in cell size, and the proportion of immature T cells and activity of ADA and PNP, without modifying the activity of 5´Nucleotidase in the thymus. It is important to point out that there were neither differences in energy intake between experimental groups and their controls, nor clinical symptoms of deficiency of other nutrients. The increase in these thymic enzyme activities was an alternative mechanism to avoid the accumulation of high levels of deoxynucleotides, which would be toxic for T lymphocytes. On the other hand, the administration of a recovery diet, with a high amount of high quality protein, was able to reverse the mentioned effects. The quick reply of Adenosine Deaminase to nutritional disorders and the following nutritional recovery, points

  8. Mouse thymic necrosis virus: a novel murine lymphotropic agent.

    PubMed

    Morse, S S

    1987-12-01

    Mouse thymic necrosis virus (TA), one of two naturally occurring herpesviruses in laboratory mice, was first described in 1961. TA has received relatively little attention even though the virus has been isolated independently from various mouse colonies. This neglect is probably due, at least in part, to the lack of suitable cell culture systems. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning thymic necrosis virus, including new results from the author's laboratory. In vivo, TA causes massive thymic necrosis in newborn mice, with temporary ablation of thymocyte precursors for most T lymphocyte classes except T suppressor cells. All strains of laboratory mice appear susceptible. Severe immunosuppression has been demonstrated in acutely infected mice. Most infected animals survive and shed TA chronically from salivary glands and possibly other glandular tissues. In adult mice, primary infection results in persistent salivary gland infection without overt thymic lesions. Infection appears lifelong, with few clinical signs, but possible effects of chronic TA infection on immune function have been studied little. Recent evidence from the author's laboratory suggests that chronic infection may involve T lymphocytes. The name mouse T lymphotropic virus (abbreviation MTLV) is proposed.

  9. DHEA and testosterone therapies in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats are associated with thymic changes.

    PubMed

    Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2010-08-01

    The ability of the gonadal hormones to influence diverse immunological functions during the course of several infections has been extensively studied in the latest decades. Testosterone has a suppressive effect on immune response of vertebrates and increases susceptibility toward numerous parasitic diseases. Dehydroepiandrosterone is an abundant steroid hormone secreted by the human adrenal cortex and it is considered potent immune-activator. In this paper, it was examined the effects of DHEA and testosterone supplementation in the thymic atrophy in rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, by comparing blood parasitism, thymocyte proliferation, TNF-alpha and IL-12 levels. Our data point in the direction that DHEA treatment triggered enhanced thymocyte proliferation as compared to its infected counterparts and reduced production of TNF-alpha during the acute phase of infection. Oppositely, the lowest values for cells proliferation and IL-12 concentrations were reached in testosterone-supplied animals. The combined treatment testosterone and DHEA improves the effectiveness of the host's immune response, reducing blood parasites and the immunosuppressive effects of male androgens besides increasing IL-12 concentrations and decreasing TNF-alpha levels.

  10. Thymic involution and immune reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Heather E.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Chidgey, Ann; Van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Boyd, Richard; Sempowski, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic thymus involution associated with aging results in less efficient T-cell development and decreased emigration of naïve T cells to the periphery. Thymic decline in the aged is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in a wide range of clinical settings. Negative consequences of these effects on global health make it of paramount importance to understand the mechanisms driving thymic involution and homeostatic processes across the lifespan. There is growing evidence that thymus tissue is plastic and that the involution process might be therapeutically halted or reversed. We present here progress on the exploitation of thymosuppressive and thymostimulatory pathways using factors such as keratinocyte growth factor, interleukin 7 or sex steroid ablation for therapeutic thymus restoration and peripheral immune reconstitution in adults. PMID:19540807

  11. Acute onset of brain atrophy and dementia in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asano, Michiko; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Wada, Sae; Ono, Katsuichiro; Ozaki, Shinji; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2011-03-01

    A 59-year-old man who was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), achieved a complete response to the induction chemoradiotherapy and received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) (25 Gy at 250 cGy per fraction) in October 2008. Three months later, he complained of anorexia, weight loss, fatigue, and short-term memory loss and developed dementia and systemic muscle weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging in April and July 2009 revealed the progression of the diffuse brain atrophy without evidence of the metastasis of SCLC. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome was suspected because anti-Hu antibody was detected in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid, but the adverse effects of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were also suspected as the cause of his neurological disorder.

  12. [Surgery of the thymus gland, normal, atrophied or cancerous].

    PubMed

    Limet, R; Rogister, B

    2000-10-01

    Thymoma is the most frequently resected mediastinal tumor. Its malignancy is related more to macroscopical findings than to microscopical analysis. All thymomas should be resected, in order to prevent malignant degeneration. Furthermore, for the treatment of myasthenia, several centers recommend resection of the thymus, either tumoral (thymoma) or atrophied. Although the role of surgery in this regard is controversial, all authors unanimously stress that complete resection of all thymic remnants is essential to achieve adequate results.

  13. Thymic involution in the suspended rat model for weightlessness - Decreased glucocorticoid receptor concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb muscle atrophy, thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy in rats during spaceflight can be simulated using suspension models. Skeletal muscle and thymus are sensitive to gluco-corticoids (GC), and previous studies have demonstrated that muscle atrophy in suspended rats is associated with increased GC receptor concentration. The objectives were to confirm thymic involution during suspension, and determine if involution correlated with increased GC receptor concentration. Seven days of antiorthostatic (AO) suspension of rats produced a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in thymic wet weight not associated with an alteration of percent water content. GC receptor concentration (pmol/mg protein) decreased 20 percent (P less than 0.025) in thymus glands from 7 day AO suspended rats. Suspension, therefore, is associated with involution of the thymus, but this is not dependent upon AO positioning. Thymus GC receptor concentrations were depressed in 7-day suspended rats, in contrast with previous observations on skeletal muscle, suggesting that different mechanisms may underlie these responses.

  14. Marek’s disease virus induced transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although bursal and thymic atrophy associated with Marek’s disease (MD) is well established and characterized, the effect of Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection on lymphoid aggregates within the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is not known. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the two largest lympho...

  15. Marek’s disease virus induces transient atrophy of cecal tonsils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by an immunosupperessive alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include bursal/thymic atrophy and neurological disorders. The cecal tonsils (CT) are the largest lymphoid aggregates of avia...

  16. Images in pediatrics: the thymic sail sign and thymic wave sign.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nuno D; Sousa, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a radiographic image portraying the "thymic sail sign" and the "thymic wave sign," both normal findings in infant radiographs and present a short description of these signs. These are distinguished from pathologic findings such as the "spinnaker-sail sign" in pneumomediastinum.

  17. Graves' Patient with Thymic Expression of Thyrotropin Receptors and Dynamic Changes in Thymic Hyperplasia Proportional to Graves' Disease Activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Shin; Won, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Chung, June-Key; Park, Do Joon; Park, Young Joo

    2016-05-01

    Thymic hyperplasia is frequently observed in Graves' disease. However, detectable massive enlargement of the thymus is rare, and the mechanism of its formation has remained elusive. This case showed dynamic changes in thymic hyperplasia on serial computed tomography images consistent with changes in serum thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R) antibodies and thyroid hormone levels. Furthermore, the patient's thymic tissues underwent immunohistochemical staining for TSH-R, which demonstrated the presence of thymic TSH-R. The correlation between serum TSH-R antibody levels and thymic hyperplasia sizes and the presence of TSH-R in her thymus suggest that TSH-R antibodies could have a pathogenic role in thymic hyperplasia.

  18. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  19. [Thymic abnormalities in patients with myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Nagane, Yuriko

    2011-07-01

    Thymic abnormalities were first noticed at autopsies of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) more than 100 years ago. The thymus is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of MG, an autoimmune disease mediated by antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of skeletal muscles. Production of these antibodies in B cells is T cell dependent. T cells potentially specific for AChR are probably generated in the thymus via nontolerogenic thymopoiesis by an aberrant function of thymic epithelial cells. However, generation of these AChR-specific T cells is not the cause of MG, because these cells are also found in healthy individuals. The pathogenetic step in MG involves the activation of these potentially AChR-specific T cells; this activation is the trigger to develop the disease and a therapeutic target. The intra-thymic activation of AChR-specific T cells is probably limited to particular types of MG patients: those with early-onset MG in whom the thymus exhibits lymphofollicular hyperplasia (TLFH) and a few patients in whom MG is associated with a thymoma. The majority of thymomas and atrophic thymuses of patients with late-onset MG, an increasingly common condition, do not exhibit this T cell-activation process. In this paper, we review the available literature on thymic changes (TLFH, thymoma, and atrophic thymus) and the relationship of these changes to the pathogenesis of MG.

  20. Vanadium toxicity in the thymic development

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hengmin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the toxic effects of vanadium on thymic development in broilers fed on diets supplemented with 0, 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 mg/kg of vanadium for 42 days. We examined the changes of relative weight, cell cycle phase, apoptotic cells, and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in the thymus by the methods of flow cytometry, TUNEL (terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling) and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that dietary high vanadium (30mg/kg, 45mg/kg and 60mg/kg) caused the toxic effects on thymic development, which was characterized by decreasing relative weight, increasing G0/G1 phase (a prolonged nondividing state), reducing S phase (DNA replication) and proliferating index (PI), and increasing percentages of apoptotic thymocytes. Concurrently, the protein expression levels of Bax and caspase-3 were increased, and protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased. The thymic development suppression caused by dietary high vanadium further leads to inhibitive effects on T lymphocyte maturity and activity, and cellular immune function. The above-mentioned results provide new evidences for further understanding the vanadium immunotoxicity. In contrast, dietary 5 mg/kg vanadium promoted the thymic development by increasing relative weight, decreasing G0/G1 phase, increasing S phase and PI, and reducing percentages of apoptotic thymocytes when compared to the control group and high vanadium groups. PMID:26416460

  1. Thymic emigration: conveyor belts or lucky dips?

    PubMed

    Scollay, R; Godfrey, D I

    1995-06-01

    The thymic medulla has always seemed a rather uncomplicated compartment, simply storing mature thymocytes until they are exported to the peripheral lymphoid organs. However, as discussed here by Roland Scollay and Dale Godfrey, a careful look at recent data suggests that events in the medulla may be more complex and protracted than previously thought.

  2. Are zinc-bound metallothionein isoforms (I+II and III) involved in impaired thymulin production and thymic involution during ageing?

    PubMed

    Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Giacconi, Robertina; Cipriano, Catia; Muti, Elisa; Gasparini, Nazzarena; Malavolta, Marco

    2004-11-12

    BACKGROUND: With advancing age, thymic efficiency shows progressive decline due to thymic involution allowing impaired cell-mediated immunity and the appearance of age-related diseases. The intrinsic cause of thymic involution is still undefined. Chronic inflammation and high glucocorticoids (GCs) may be involved. However, transgenic mice, with increased GC sensitivity and over expression of GC receptors, display delayed age-associated thymic involution. This fact suggests that other substances may affect thymic involution. Among them, both isoforms of metallothioneins (MTs) I+II and III are the major candidates because their increments leads to organ atrophy in constant stress and are induced by IL-6, which increases in ageing. Enhanced MTs in ageing allows constant sequester of zinc ions and no subsequent zinc release leading to low zinc ion bioavailability for thymic efficiency. This sequester is very limited in very old age. Thus, we have investigated the MTmRNA (I+II and III) in the thymus from young, old and very old mice. METHODS: MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA (RT-PCR) in the thymus from different donors were tested. Concomitantly, TECs proliferation, zinc ion bioavailability (ratio total thymulin/active thymulin), thymulin activity and corticosterone were tested from different donors. RESULTS: Both isoforms of MTmRNA and IL-6mRNA increase in old thymus coupled with low zinc ion bioavailability, reduced TECs proliferation, impaired thymulin activity and enhanced plasma corticosterone in comparison with young. Conversely, although the thymus is involuted in very old mice because of no changes in thymus weight in comparison to old mice, reduced MTmRNA, especially MT-I+II isoforms, and low IL6mRNA occur. Concomitantly, good zinc ion bioavailability, maintained TECs proliferation, satisfactory thymulin activity and reduced corticosterone are observed in very old mice. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant increments by high IL-6 of both MT isoforms in the thymus from old mice may

  3. Imaging of thymus in myasthenia gravis: from thymic hyperplasia to thymic tumor.

    PubMed

    Priola, A M; Priola, S M

    2014-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder often associated with thymic abnormalities. At onset, thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and thymoma can be found in up to 65% and 15% of patients, respectively. Diagnostic imaging is crucial in this setting in order to detect the presence and type of the thymic abnormality and in the preoperative planning, when indicated. Chest radiography has a minor role due to its low accuracy. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice, although the differentiation between a small thymoma and TLH that appears as a focal soft-tissue mass may be not possible. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not usually employed, but it is useful in equivocal cases, especially in differentiating focal TLH from thymoma by using chemical-shift sequences for defining the proper management. In addition, diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI can differentiate lipid-poor normal/hyperplastic thymus from thymoma and could be useful in differentiating non-advanced from advanced thymomas. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT is not helpful in distinguishing early from advanced thymoma but can be used to differentiate thymic carcinoma from thymoma. Hereby, we discuss the imaging features of thymic abnormalities in MG, even focusing on novel aspects of chemical-shift and DW-MRI.

  4. Feedback inhibition of thymic secretory activity in mice treated by the thymic extract TP-1 (thymostimulin).

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, J; Ben-David, E; Sandbank, U

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes occurring in the medullary epithelium of the thymus of young mice, as a result of repeated injections of thymic extract, TP-1 (thymostimulin) was investigated. After daily injection of TP-1 for 3 weeks, no changes in thymus architecture could be observed by light microscopy. However, by electron microscopy, specific changes were noticed in the epithelial cells. The secretory granules became dilated and engorged; diameter of granules in normal control thymus was approximately 200-250 nm, but reached 1000 nm in treated mice. Degenerative changes appeared in some of these granules, including myelin bodies, distorted configuration and fat droplets. Signs of involution of whole cells and presence of cellular debri within macrophages were observed. Acid phosphatase staining disclosed many lysosomes containing ingested granules. No such findings were observed in control untreated mice, or in mice treated by a heart extract similarly prepared to TP-1. All these findings can be taken as ultrastructural evidence for feedback inhibition of thymic secretory activity, in analogy to the changes occurring other feedback inhibited, peptide hormone secreting glands. The data indicate that (i) the thymus respond to feedback inhibitory stimuli, as other endocrine glands do; (ii)TP-1, the thymic extract under study, contains a physiologically significant thymic hormone, which, when introduced in high doses can exert specific feedback inhibition. This can be taken as an additional, new criterion for the definition of thymic hormones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7056566

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dedhia, Kavita; Chi, David H

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with the sudden onset of a large, painless left neck mass. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy suggest a cystic lesion, most likely of thymic origin. Cervical thymic cysts are a rare form of cervical mass, which are easily overlooked in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with painless neck masses. A combination of CT and MRI investigations can be helpful in differentiating thymic cysts from other congenital and neoplastic masses, but the definitive diagnosis of thymic cyst requires histopathological documentation of thymic tissue. Surgical excision is considered the management of choice for thymic cysts, and no cases of postoperative recurrence have been reported. PMID:28191377

  6. Functional anatomy of the thymic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, M D

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a review of our current understanding of the nature of the thymic microenvironment, after briefly considering the major role of the gland. The epithelial cells and their products are of fundamental importance, and other cells of the macrophage series are implicated in most functional events. The embryological origin of the epithelium is still not clear, although disease conditions would suggest a single origin. Immigration and emigration of thymocytes is considered, and also the passage of antigens into the gland. The events within the thymus are under the control of the CNS acting through the innervation or via hormonal pathways. Both of these areas are considered in detail, especially thymic hormone origins, functions and interactions. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 11 PMID:1769884

  7. Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elizabeth; Hunter-Behrend, Michelle; Leroux, Eric; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient’s known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting. PMID:27625910

  8. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Abhijeet; Risbud, Mukund; Kshar, Avinash; Paranjpe, Arati Oka

    2013-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. PMID:23878573

  9. Thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yağci, Begül; Varan, Ali; Uner, Aysegül; Akyüz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2008-12-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by clonal expansion of antigen presenting Langerhans cells. Different clinical features can be seen according to the involved organs and systems. Multisystem disease with organ dysfunction is more common in infants, whereas single system disease is usually observed in older children. The disease can affect any system or organ throughout the body. Thymus is a rarely involvement site reported in LCH and usually is accompanied by skin, bone or lung disease. Here we report a 12-year-old male with thymic involvement by LCH clinically mimicking lymphoma.

  10. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  11. Thymic remodeling associated with hyperplasia in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Bismuth, Jacky; Cizeron-Clairac, Géraldine; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Cufi, Perrine; Dartevelle, Philippe; De Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2010-08-01

    Acquired myasthenia gravis (MG), a neurological autoimmune disease, is caused by autoantibodies against components of the neuromuscular junction that lead to disabling muscle fatigability. The thymus is clearly involved in the pathogenesis of early-onset MG with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and thymic hyperplasia of lympho-proliferative origin is a hallmark of the disease. In this review, we describe the structural and cellular changes associated with thymic hyperplasia, its main characteristics being the development of ectopic germinal centers (GCs) associated with active neoangiogenic processes, such as development of high endothelial venules and lymphangiogenesis. What triggers such thymic abnormalities in MG is not yet clear. A thymic transcriptome analysis has demonstrated a strong inflammatory signature in MG that could orchestrate the development of thymic hyperplasia. In this context, thymic epithelial cells (TECs) seem to play a central role, either by contributing or responding to the inflammatory environment and up-regulating the autoimmune response. In particular, MG TECs clearly overexpress various cytokines, among which chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of peripheral lymphocytes to the thymus via the newly expanded vessel network, thereby leading to the development of ectopic GCs. Clearly, a better understanding of major events that lead to thymic hyperplasia will help optimize strategies toward more specific therapy for MG.

  12. A Quantitative Trait Locus on chr.4 Regulates Thymic Involution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritu; Avagyan, Serine

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying age-associated thymic involution are unknown. In mice, thymic involution shows mouse strain–dependent genetic variation. Identification of the underlying genes would provide mechanistic insight into this elusive process. We previously showed that responsiveness of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to transforming growth factor-beta 2, a positive regulator of HSPC proliferation, is regulated by a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chr. 4, Tb2r1. Interestingly, Tgfb2+/− mice have delayed thymic involution. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that a QTL on chr. 4 might regulate thymic involution. Aged, but not young, B6.D2-chr.4 congenic mice, where the telomeric region of chr. 4 was introgressed from DBA/2 to C57BL/6 mice, had larger thymi, and better maintenance of early thymic precursors than C57BL/6 control mice. These observations unequivocally demonstrate that the telomeric region of chr. 4 contains a QTL, Ti1 (thymic involution 1) that regulates thymic involution, and suggest the possibility that Ti1 may be identical to Tb2r1. PMID:20371546

  13. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  14. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus.

  15. Is There an Interspecific Diversity of the Thymic Microenvironment?

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Lucia Renata Meireles; Trajano, Valeria

    1993-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) heterogeneity suggests the existence of functional subsets. Anti-cytokeratin (Anti-CK) monoclonal antibodies (MAb), markers of epithelial differentiation, have been used to detect TEC subsets in rodents and humans. These MAb revealed a different topography of CK-defined TEC subsets in mice and humans, leading us to carry out a comparative study of mammalian thymuses. Our study showed that the distribution pattern of cytokeratins in the thymic epithelium is complex and unique, with coexpression of CK typical of simple and stratified epithelia. Moreover, we demonstrated an interspecific diversity of CK expression within the thymic lobules. Interestingly, such diversity was not a general phenomenon for the expression of any thymic microenvironmental proteins, because the location of extracellular matrix components was essentially similar in the mammalian species studied. PMID:7507744

  16. Evaluation of thymic volume by postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shuntaro; Hasegawa, Iwao; Vogel, Hermann; Heinemann, Axel; Suzuki, Koichi; Püschel, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    The thymus is exceedingly sensitive to stress and undergoes abrupt involution as a result of exposure to strong stress in early childhood. Therefore, thymic involution is often utilized to assess the presence of a stressful environment, such as an environment involving child abuse, in forensic medicine. In recent years, computed tomography (CT) has been commonly used in the daily practice of forensic medicine. We have focused on the thymic volume in postmortem CT images to evaluate the presence of a stressful antemortem environment. We calculated the thymus volume from postmortem CT images of children under six years old and demonstrated that the volume showed a positive correlation with the real weight obtained from an autopsy. The evaluation of thymic volume by CT may make it possible for us to identify child maltreatment. The most useful feature of this application of CT is to be able to demonstrate thymic involution less invasively in a surviving victim.

  17. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal ... > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print A A A ...

  18. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  19. Thymic exosomes promote the final maturation of thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Skogberg, Gabriel; Lindgren, Susanne; Lundqvist, Christina; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Thörn, Karolina; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2016-01-01

    Extensive knowledge has been gained the last years concerning mechanisms underlying the selection of single positive thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Less is known regarding other important processes in the thymic medulla such as the regulation of late stage thymocyte maturation. We have previously reported that exosomes are abundant in the thymus with a phenotype that indicates an epithelial cell origin and immunoregulatory properties. In this study we use an in vitro system to investigate the effects of thymic exosomes on the maturation of single positive thymocytes as well as effects on nTreg formation. We show that thymic exosomes promote the maturation of single positive CD4+CD25− cells into mature thymocytes with S1P1+Qa2+ and CCR7+Qa2+ phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that thymic exosomes reduce the formation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ thymocytes and that these exosome effects are independent of dendritic cell co-stimulation but require intact exosomal RNA content and surface proteins. An efficient direct uptake of exosomes by both thymocytes and thymic DC’s is also demonstrated. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exosomes may represent a new route of communication within the thymus. PMID:27824109

  20. Thymoma versus thymic carcinoma: differences in biology impacting treatment.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ronan J

    2013-05-01

    A better understanding of the biology of both thymomas and thymic carcinomas has occurred in recent years thanks to advanced technologies such as comparative genomic hybridization, expression array analysis, and next-generation sequencing. Gene expression profiling and genomic clustering studies have shown that thymic tumors as classified by the 2004 WHO system do have different molecular features. Because of the rarity of these tumors, there is a paucity of high-quality clinical research data, and treatment decisions are often guided by the small amount of prospective trial data, retrospective series, and individual case reports. The literature does report on several advanced thymic tumors that have responded to new targeted agents, indicating that across the spectrum of thymic malignancies there may be clinically relevant molecular subsets. Genomic profiling distinguishes type B3 thymoma and thymic carcinoma from type A and B2 thymomas. Furthermore, type B2 thymomas can be separated from other subgroups in that it has a more distinctly lymphocytic component than the other groups in which epithelial cells predominate. The presence of KIT mutations in thymic carcinomas rather than in thymomas further adds to a growing body of evidence showing that underlying tumor biology may in the future lead to molecular classifications, which may enhance therapies for these rare tumors.

  1. Thymic crosstalk restrains the pool of cortical thymic epithelial cells with progenitor properties.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Catarina; Ribeiro, Ana R; Pinto, Rute D; Leitão, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Alves, Nuno L

    2017-03-20

    Cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) thymic epithelial cells establish key microenvironments for T-cell differentiation and arise from thymic epithelial cell progenitors (TEP). However, the nature of TEPs and the mechanism controlling their stemness in the postnatal thymus remain poorly defined. Using TEC clonogenic assays as a surrogate to survey TEP activity, we found that a fraction of cTECs generates specialized clonal-derived colonies, which contain cells with sustained colony-forming capacity (ClonoTECs). These ClonoTECs are EpCAM+MHCII-Foxn1lo cells that lack traits of mature cTECs or mTECs but co-express stem-cell markers, including CD24 and Sca-1. Supportive of their progenitor identity, ClonoTECs reintegrate within native thymic microenvironments and generate cTECs or mTECs in vivo. Strikingly, the frequency of cTECs with the potential to generate ClonoTECs wanes between the postnatal and young adult immunocompetent thymus, but it is sustained in alymphoid Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- counterparts. Conversely, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- mice and consequent restoration of thymocyte-mediated TEC differentiation diminishes the frequency of colony-forming units within cTECs. Our findings provide evidence that the cortical epithelium contains a reservoir of epithelial progenitors whose abundance is dynamically controlled by continual interactions with developing thymocytes across lifespan. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. MerTK regulates thymic selection of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Flores, Rafael R; Wang, Yaming; Yi, Zuoan; Kroger, Charles J; Mathews, Clayton E; Earp, H Shelton; Matsushima, Glenn; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2009-03-24

    T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D) are believed to be the result in part of inefficient negative selection of self-specific thymocytes. However, the events regulating thymic negative selection are not fully understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking expression of the Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) have reduced inflammation of the pancreatic islets and fail to develop diabetes. Furthermore, NOD mice deficient in MerTK expression (Mer(-/-)) exhibit a reduced frequency of beta cell-specific T cells independent of immunoregulatory effectors. The establishment of bone marrow chimeric mice demonstrated that the block in beta cell autoimmunity required hematopoietic-derived cells lacking MerTK expression. Notably, fetal thymic organ cultures and self-peptide administration showed increased thymic negative selection in Mer(-/-) mice. Finally, thymic dendritic cells (DC) prepared from Mer(-/-) mice exhibited an increased capacity to induce thymocyte apoptosis in a peptide-specific manner in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a unique mechanism involving MerTK-mediated regulation of thymocyte negative selection and thymic DC, and suggest a role for MerTK in contributing to beta cell autoimmunity.

  3. Thymic epithelial cell development and its dysfunction in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Li, Hongran; Luo, Haiying; Zhao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are the key components in thymic microenvironment for T cells development. TECs, composed of cortical and medullary TECs, are derived from a common bipotent progenitor and undergo a stepwise development controlled by multiple levels of signals to be functionally mature for supporting thymocyte development. Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members including the receptor activator for NF κ B (RANK), CD40, and lymphotoxin β receptor (LT β R) cooperatively control the thymic medullary microenvironment and self-tolerance establishment. In addition, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), Wnt, and Notch signals are essential for establishment of functional thymic microenvironment. Transcription factors Foxn1 and autoimmune regulator (Aire) are powerful modulators of TEC development, differentiation, and self-tolerance. Dysfunction in thymic microenvironment including defects of TEC and thymocyte development would cause physiological disorders such as tumor, infectious diseases, and autoimmune diseases. In the present review, we will summarize our current understanding on TEC development and the underlying molecular signals pathways and the involvement of thymus dysfunction in human diseases.

  4. The contribution of thymic stromal abnormalities to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Anne L; Calder, Adrienne; Hince, Melanie N; Boyd, Richard L; Chidgey, Ann P

    2011-01-01

    In essence, normal thymus function involves the production of a broad repertoire of αβT cells capable of responding to foreign antigens with low risk of autoreactivity. Thymic epithelial cells are an essential component of the thymic stromal microenvironment, promoting the growth and export of self-tolerant thymocytes. Autoimmune disease, resulting from a loss of self-tolerance, is clinically and genetically complex, and accordingly has many potential etiological origins. However, it is commonly linked to defects in the thymic epithelial microenvironment. The study of autoimmune-linked thymic stromal dysfunction has indisputably advanced our understanding of T cell tolerance; notably, a field-wide paradigm shift occurred when autoimmune regulator (Aire) was found to drive expression of a multitude of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells. Many other associations with polygenically controlled autoimmune diseases have been reported but are more difficult to definitively dissect. Paradoxically, immunodeficiency and age-related immunosenescence are also linked with increased autoimmunity. Here we discuss the theoretical basis and the evidence gathered thus far to support these associations.

  5. The evolution of thymic lymphomas in p53 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Chan, Chang; Kang, Wenfeng; Sun, Yvonne; Emerson, Ryan; Robins, Harlan

    2014-01-01

    Germline deletion of the p53 gene in mice gives rise to spontaneous thymic (T-cell) lymphomas. In this study, the p53 knockout mouse was employed as a model to study the mutational evolution of tumorigenesis. The clonality of the T-cell repertoire from p53 knockout and wild-type thymic cells was analyzed at various ages employing TCRβ sequencing. These data demonstrate that p53 knockout thymic lymphomas arose in an oligoclonal fashion, with tumors evolving dominant clones over time. Exon sequencing of tumor DNA revealed that all of the independently derived oligoclonal mouse tumors had a deletion in the Pten gene prior to the formation of the TCRβ rearrangement, produced early in development. This was followed in each independent clone of the thymic lymphoma by the amplification or overexpression of cyclin Ds and Cdk6. Alterations in the expression of Ikaros were common and blocked further development of CD-4/CD-8 T cells. While the frequency of point mutations in the genome of these lymphomas was one per megabase, there were a tremendous number of copy number variations producing the tumors’ driver mutations. The initial inherited loss of p53 functions appeared to delineate an order of genetic alterations selected for during the evolution of these thymic lymphomas. PMID:25452272

  6. Invasive atypical thymic carcinoid: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wang, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zong, Shi-Xiang; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atypical thymic carcinoid is an extremely rare thymic neuroendocrine tumor derived from the neuroendocrine system. The aims of this paper were to investigate the clinical features of atypical thymic carcinoid and collate information and experience to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We describe three cases of atypical carcinoid of the thymus; clinical features, pathological data, treatment modalities, and short-term patient outcomes were summarized and analyzed. The initial clinical symptoms and signs of all three patients were nonspecific and an anterior mediastinal mass was found in each patient on chest computed tomography scan. All three patients underwent surgical resection (total thymectomy and complete excision of the tumor), followed by postoperative radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. The diagnoses of three patients were confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. We also present a review of the literature to collate as much information as possible and provide a reference for proper diagnosis and treatment of atypical thyroid carcinoid. PMID:27785065

  7. Treatment of vaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Domoney, Claudine

    2014-03-01

    Vaginal or vulvovaginal atrophy is a widespread but poorly recognized condition of peri- and post-menopausal women. It causes urogenital symptoms of dryness, reduced lubrication, itching, burning, irritable bladder symptoms and painful intercourse. This impacts quality of life and sexual health, but increases with time rather than reduces, as with most other menopausal symptoms. With early identification, treatments can improve these symptoms and reverse the physical changes. However, when embedded, bladder and sexual changes have occurred and these may be more difficult to remedy. Therefore, it is important to educate both healthcare professionals and women about these symptoms and advise on the range of interventions available.

  8. Zika virus causes testicular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Householder, Sarah; Yockey, Laura J.; Hastings, Andrew K.; Homer, Robert J.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has recently been found to cause fetal infection and neonatal abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. ZIKV persists in the semen months after the acute viremic phase in humans. To further understand the consequences of ZIKV persistence in males, we infected Ifnar1−/− mice via subcutaneous injection of a pathogenic but nonlethal ZIKV strain. ZIKV replication persists within the testes even after clearance from the blood, with interstitial, testosterone-producing Leydig cells supporting virus replication. We found high levels of viral RNA and antigen within the epididymal lumen, where sperm is stored, and within surrounding epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, at 21 days post-infection, the testes of the ZIKV-infected mice were significantly smaller compared to those of mock-infected mice, indicating progressive testicular atrophy. ZIKV infection caused a reduction in serum testosterone, suggesting that male fertility can be affected. Our findings have important implications for nonvector-borne vertical transmission, as well as long-term potential reproductive deficiencies, in ZIKV-infected males. PMID:28261663

  9. Zika virus causes testicular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Householder, Sarah; Yockey, Laura J; Hastings, Andrew K; Homer, Robert J; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has recently been found to cause fetal infection and neonatal abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. ZIKV persists in the semen months after the acute viremic phase in humans. To further understand the consequences of ZIKV persistence in males, we infected Ifnar1(-/-) mice via subcutaneous injection of a pathogenic but nonlethal ZIKV strain. ZIKV replication persists within the testes even after clearance from the blood, with interstitial, testosterone-producing Leydig cells supporting virus replication. We found high levels of viral RNA and antigen within the epididymal lumen, where sperm is stored, and within surrounding epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, at 21 days post-infection, the testes of the ZIKV-infected mice were significantly smaller compared to those of mock-infected mice, indicating progressive testicular atrophy. ZIKV infection caused a reduction in serum testosterone, suggesting that male fertility can be affected. Our findings have important implications for nonvector-borne vertical transmission, as well as long-term potential reproductive deficiencies, in ZIKV-infected males.

  10. Fine needle aspiration cytology of thymic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, D Y; Kuo, S H; Chang, D B; Yang, P C; Lee, Y C; Hsu, H C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the thymus are very rare, and their cytologic findings have not been reported previously in English. Retrospective study of fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytologic features in four histopathologically verified thymic carcinoid tumors are described here in detail. The FNA cytology of thymic carcinoids is characterized by predominantly single and some loose clusters of small, round to oval cells with scanty cytoplasm, interspersed with some larger cells with moderate to abundant, granular cytoplasm. The differential diagnosis of the cytologic features between carcinoid tumor and other mediastinal tumors is also discussed.

  11. Thymus organogenesis and development of the thymic stroma.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Farley, Alison M; Blackburn, C Clare

    2007-01-01

    T-cell development occurs principally in the thymus. Here, immature progenitor cells are guided through the differentiation and selection steps required to generate a complex T-cell repertoire that is both self-tolerant and has propensity to bind self major histocompatibility complex. These processes depend on an array of functionally distinct epithelial cell types within the thymic stroma, which have a common developmental origin in the pharyngeal endoderm. Here, we describe the structural and phenotypic attributes of the thymic stroma, and review current cellular and molecular understanding of thymus organogenesis.

  12. Bioprocessing feasibility analysis. [thymic hormone bioassay and electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The biology and pathophysiology of the thymus gland is discussed and a clinical procedure for thymic hormone assay is described. The separation of null lymphocytes from mice spleens and the functional characteristics of the cells after storage and transportation were investigated to develop a clinical procedure for thymic hormone assay, and to determine whether a ground-based approach will provide the desired end-product in sufficient quantities, or whether the microgravity of space should be exploited for more economical preparation of the hormone.

  13. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  14. Role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced thymic tumors.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tracey L; Lynch, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy has an important role in the treatment of advanced thymic tumors. Early stage tumors are successfully treated with surgery. Locally advanced tumors (Masaoka stage III and IVA) are often treated with combined modality treatment including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. For patients with curable thymic tumors, the ability to attain a complete resection is a critical prognostic factor. Locally advanced tumors have a relatively high risk of recurrence and decreased rates of long-term survival. A multimodality approach including induction chemotherapy and postoperative radiation therapy can improve complete resection rates and long-term outcomes. Thymic tumors are chemoresponsive with optimal responses achieved with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Chemotherapy with radiation can result in long-term progression-free survival for patients with locally advanced disease who remain inoperable following induction therapy. Patients with disseminated (stage IVB) thymic tumors can also have significant disease response and palliation of symptoms when treated with chemotherapy. Octreotide and corticosteroids also have shown efficacy. For best results, it is important that thoracic surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists work together to obtain the best local control of tumor and optimal treatment of metastases.

  15. Establishment of a Human Thymic Myoid Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wakkach, Abdel; Poea, Sandrine; Chastre, Eric; Gespach, Christian; Lecerf, Florence; De la Porte, Sabine; Tzartos, Socrates; Coulombe, Alain; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    1999-01-01

    The subset of myoid cells is a normal component of the thymic stroma. To characterize these cells, we immortalized stromal cells from human thymus by using a plasmid vector encoding the SV40 T oncogene. Among the eight cell lines obtained, one had myoid characteristics including desmin and troponin antigens. This new line was designated MITC (myoid immortalized thymic cells). These cells expressed both the fetal and adult forms of muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the mRNA level, as well as the myogenic transcription factor MyoD1. α-Subunit AChR protein expression was detected by flow cytometry and the AChR was functional in patch-clamp studies. In addition, AChR expression was down-modulated by myasthenia gravis sera or by monoclonal antibody anti-AChR on MITC line similarly to TE671 rhabdomyosarcoma cells, making the MITC line an interesting tool for AChR antigenic modulation experiments. Finally, the MITC line expressed LFA-3, produced several cytokines able to act on T cells, and protected total thymocytes from spontaneous apoptosis in vitro. These results are compatible with a role of thymic myoid cells in some steps of thymocyte development. Therefore MITC line appears to be a useful tool to investigate the physiological role of thymic myoid cells. PMID:10514405

  16. Dominant optic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3) encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8) are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7) are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of bilateral, mild

  17. Thymic B cells promote thymus-derived regulatory T cell development and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yin-Hu; Ma, Hong-Di; Tang, Wei; Yang, Jing-Bo; Li, Liang; Ansari, Aftab A; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Thymic CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical for the development of immunological tolerance and immune homeostasis and requires contributions of both thymic dendritic and epithelial cells. Although B cells have been reported to be present within the thymus, there has not hitherto been a definition of their role in immune cell development and, in particular, whether or how they contribute to the Treg cellular thymic compartment. Herein, using both phenotypic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the maintenance of thymic Treg cells and, using an in vitro culture system, demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the size of the thymic Treg compartment via cell-cell MHC II contact and the involvement of two independent co-stimulatory pathways that include interactions between the CD40/CD80/CD86 co-stimulatory molecules. Our data also suggest that thymic B cells promote the generation of thymic Treg cell precursors (pre-Treg cells), but not the conversion of FoxP3(+) Treg cells from pre-Treg cells. In addition, thymic B cells directly promote the proliferation of thymic Treg cells that is MHC II contact dependent with a minimal if any role for co-stimulatory molecules including CD40/CD80/CD86. Both pathways are independent of TGFβ. In conclusion, we rigorously define the critical role of thymic B cells in the development of thymic Treg cells from non-Treg to precursor stage and in the proliferation of mature thymic Treg cells.

  18. Brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Frisoni, G B; Beltramello, A; Geroldi, C; Weiss, C; Bianchetti, A; Trabucchi, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the pattern of regional brain atrophy in patients with frontotemporal dementia by comparing it with that in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls. METHODS--Fourteen patients with frontotemporal dementia, 13 with moderate, and 33 with mild Alzheimer's disease, and 31 controls were studied. Atrophy was evaluated with linear measures in the anterior brain, medial temporal lobe, and hippocampal formation regions using MRI. RESULTS--Patients with frontotemporal dementia had greater atrophy in the anterior brain regions than patients with Alzheimer's disease or controls. Atrophy of the hippocampal formation, which best discriminates Alzheimer's disease from controls, was present also in patients with frontotemporal dementia. By contrast, atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, which is also present in Alzheimer's disease, was absent in frontotemporal dementia. CONCLUSION--A pattern of atrophy in the frontal lobes and hippocampal formation with sparing of the medial temporal lobe might be distinctive of frontotemporal dementia. Hippocampal involvement might not be specific for Alzheimer's disease and specific patterns of atrophy might be distinctive of some forms of degenerative dementia. Images PMID:8708683

  19. The Significance of Bronchial Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, John C.; Silvers, G. Wayne; George, Marlyce S.; Dart, Gladys A.; Petty, Thomas L.; Mitchell, Roger S.

    1972-01-01

    In a 4-year period, 196 lungs from patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were examined postmortem for the presence of atrophy in segmental and subsegmental bronchi. As a result of simultaneous postmortem spirometry, cinefluorobronchography and partitioning of airways resistance, plus later assessment of anatomic emphysema, bronchial atrophy emerges as only one of at least three factors usually cooperating in production of abnormal expiratory airway collapse. In selected cases, bronchial atrophy appears to be an important contributor to expiratory airways obstruction. ImagesFig 1 PMID:5021107

  20. Prolongevity hormone FGF21 protects against immune senescence by delaying age-related thymic involution

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Horvath, Tamas L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2016-01-01

    Age-related thymic degeneration is associated with loss of naïve T cells, restriction of peripheral T-cell diversity, and reduced healthspan due to lower immune competence. The mechanistic basis of age-related thymic demise is unclear, but prior evidence suggests that caloric restriction (CR) can slow thymic aging by maintaining thymic epithelial cell integrity and reducing the generation of intrathymic lipid. Here we show that the prolongevity ketogenic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a member of the endocrine FGF subfamily, is expressed in thymic stromal cells along with FGF receptors and its obligate coreceptor, βKlotho. We found that FGF21 expression in thymus declines with age and is induced by CR. Genetic gain of FGF21 function in mice protects against age-related thymic involution with an increase in earliest thymocyte progenitors and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, FGF21 overexpression reduced intrathymic lipid, increased perithymic brown adipose tissue, and elevated thymic T-cell export and naïve T-cell frequencies in old mice. Conversely, loss of FGF21 function in middle-aged mice accelerated thymic aging, increased lethality, and delayed T-cell reconstitution postirradiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Collectively, FGF21 integrates metabolic and immune systems to prevent thymic injury and may aid in the reestablishment of a diverse T-cell repertoire in cancer patients following HSCT. PMID:26755598

  1. Spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. Estimated incidence is 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 live births and carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60. This disease is characterized by generalized muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in proximal limb muscles, and phenotype is classified into four grades of severity (SMA I, SMAII, SMAIII, SMA IV) based on age of onset and motor function achieved. This disease is caused by homozygous mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and the diagnostic test demonstrates in most patients the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene, generally showing the absence of SMN1 exon 7. The test achieves up to 95% sensitivity and nearly 100% specificity. Differential diagnosis should be considered with other neuromuscular disorders which are not associated with increased CK manifesting as infantile hypotonia or as limb girdle weakness starting later in life. Considering the high carrier frequency, carrier testing is requested by siblings of patients or of parents of SMA children and are aimed at gaining information that may help with reproductive planning. Individuals at risk should be tested first and, in case of testing positive, the partner should be then analyzed. It is recommended that in case of a request on carrier testing on siblings of an affected SMA infant, a detailed neurological examination should be done and consideration given doing the direct test to exclude SMA. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered to couples who have previously had a child affected with SMA (recurrence risk 25%). The role of follow-up coordination has to be managed by an expert in neuromuscular disorders and in SMA who is able to plan a multidisciplinary intervention that includes pulmonary, gastroenterology/nutrition, and orthopedic care. Prognosis depends on the phenotypic

  2. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  3. Thymic hyperplasia after chemotherapy in adults with mature B cell lymphoma and its influence on thymic output and CD4+ T cells repopulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dao-Ping; Jin, Hui; Ding, Chong-Yang; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Wu, Yu-Jie; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the thymic regenerative potential in adults accepting chemotherapy for lymphoma. The dynamics of thymic activity in 54 adults from baseline to 12 mo post-chemotherapy was analyzed by assessing thymic structural changes with serial computed tomography (CT) scans, and correlating these with measurements of thymic output by concurrent analysis of single-joint (sj) T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC) and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants (RTE) in peripheral blood. Furthermore, the consequence of thymic renewal on peripheral CD4+ T cell recovery after chemotherapy was evaluated. Time-dependent changes of thymic size and thymic output assessed by both sjTREC levels and CD31+ RTE counts in peripheral blood were observed during and after chemotherapy. Enlargement of thymus over baseline following chemotherapy regarded as rebound thymic hyperplasia (TH) was identified in 20 patients aged 18−53 y (median 33 y). By general linear models repeated measure analysis, it was found that, patients with TH (n = 20) had a faster recovery of sjTREC levels and CD31+ RTE counts after chemotherapy than patients with comparable age, gender, diagnosis, disease stage, thymic volume and output function at baseline but without TH (n = 18) (p = 0.035, 0.047); besides, patients with TH had a faster repopulation of both naïve CD4+ T cell and natural regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets than those without TH (p = 0.042, 0.038). These data suggested that adult thymus retains the capacity of regeneration after chemotherapy, especially in young adults. The presence of TH could contribute to the renewal of thymopoiesis and the replenishment of peripheral CD4+ T cell pool following chemotherapy in adults. PMID:27467956

  4. Stabilized beta-catenin in thymic epithelial cells blocks thymus development and function.

    PubMed

    Zuklys, Saulius; Gill, Jason; Keller, Marcel P; Hauri-Hohl, Mathias; Zhanybekova, Saule; Balciunaite, Gina; Na, Kyung-Jae; Jeker, Lukas T; Hafen, Katrin; Tsukamoto, Noriyuki; Amagai, Takashi; Taketo, Makoto M; Krenger, Werner; Holländer, Georg A

    2009-03-01

    Thymic T cell development is dependent on a specialized epithelial microenvironment mainly composed of cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs). The molecular programs governing the differentiation and maintenance of TECs remain largely unknown. Wnt signaling is central to the development and maintenance of several organ systems but a specific role of this pathway for thymus organogenesis has not yet been ascertained. In this report, we demonstrate that activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by a stabilizing mutation of beta-catenin targeted exclusively to TECs changes the initial commitment of endodermal epithelia to a thymic cell fate. Consequently, the formation of a correctly composed and organized thymic microenvironment is prevented, thymic immigration of hematopoietic precursors is restricted, and intrathymic T cell differentiation is arrested at a very early developmental stage causing severe immunodeficiency. These results suggest that a precise regulation of canonical Wnt signaling in thymic epithelia is essential for normal thymus development and function.

  5. Thymic involution in the suspended rat - Adrenal hypertrophy and glucocorticoid receptor content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy is studied. The thymus, adrenal glands, and tissue water content are evaluated in male Sprague rats suspended in antiorthostatic (AO) or orthostatic (O) positions. A 50 percent decrease in the wet weight of the thymus and hypertrophy of the adrenal glands are observed during the seven days of AO suspension. After seven days of recovery the thymus weight is increased to control level; however, the hypertrophy of the adrenal glands remains unchanged. Thymic and renal responses in O postioned rats are similar to AO reactions. Thymic glucocorticoid (GC) receptor concentrations in the rats are analyzed; a 20 percent decrease in GC receptor site concentration, which is related to thymic involution, is detected in both AO and O rats. It is concluded that there is a temporal correlation between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy, which is not affected by AO positioning, and thymic involution is not associated with an increased sensitivity to GC.

  6. Thymic Carcinoma Treated by CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro

    2017-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma has not yet been established. Most patients have no symptoms until the advanced stage. Radiation therapy has been used for advanced stage cancer, usually in combination with surgery or chemotherapy; however, the survival rates are 30%-50%. We performed hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) for 10 cases of advanced thymic cancer. All cases reached at least partial remission (PR) in two months with progression-free irradiated lesions and minimal radiation-related toxicity. It took only seven to 12 days for each therapy that did not require admission. CyberKnife is beneficial for patients even at the terminal stage. PMID:28367393

  7. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  8. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  9. Thymic immunopathology and progression of SIVsm infection in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, S L; Kaaya, E E; Ordónez, C; Ekman, M; Feichtinger, H; Putkonen, P; Böttiger, D; Biberfeld, G; Biberfeld, P

    1995-05-01

    Thymuses from 22 cynomolgus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm) developed characteristic cortical and medullary changes including formation of B-cell follicles (8/21) and accumulation of virus immune complexes. Advanced thymic histopathology was correlated with more pronounced immunodeficiency. SIVsm provirus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in most (16/18) thymuses and spliced viral env mRNA in 3 (3/7) thymuses with advanced histopathologic changes indicative of thymic SIVsm replication. By combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry, viral RNA was localized mainly to the follicular dendritic network, macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, and lymphocytes of the medullary regions. Latent infection by an Epstein-Barr-related herpesvirus (HVMF1) was also found by PCR and by ISH in medullary regions of three (3 of 8) thymuses with B-cell follicles, suggestive of an inductive role for B-cell proliferation in these thymuses. In a control group of HIV-2-infected nonimmunosuppressed monkeys, no comparable thymic changes were observed. Our results indicate that SIV, and probably by analogy HIV, can have direct and diverse pathogenic effects on the thymus that are important in the development of simian (human) AIDS.

  10. Novel Prognostic Groups in Thymic Epithelial Tumors: Assessment of Risk and Therapeutic Strategy Selection

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelillo, Rolando M. Trodella, Lucio; Ramella, Sara; Cellini, Numa; Balducci, Mario; Mantini, Giovanna; Cellini, Francesco; Ciresa, Marzia; Fiore, Michele; Evoli, Amelia; Sterzi, Silvia; Russo, Patrizia; Grozio, Alessia; Cesario, Alfredo; Granone, Pierluigi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of multimodality treatment on patients with thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) (i.e., thymomas and thymic squamous cell carcinoma) and to define the prognostic classes according to the Masaoka and World Health Organization histologic classification systems. Methods and Materials: Primary surgery was the mainstay of therapy. Extended thymectomy was performed in all cases. The cases were primarily staged according to the Masaoka system. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given to patients diagnosed with Masaoka Stage II, III, and IVA TET. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in selected cases. Results: We reviewed the records of 120 patients with TETs, with a mean follow-up of 13.8 years. Of the 120 patients, 98 (81.6%) received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these 98 patients, Grade 1-2 pulmonary or esophageal toxicity was acute in 12 (12.2%) and late in 8 (8.2%). The median overall survival was 21.6 years. Of the 120 patients, 106 were rediagnosed and reclassified according to the World Health Organization system, and the survival rate was correlated with it. Three different prognostic classes were defined: favorable, Masaoka Stage I and histologic grade A, AB, B1, B2 or Masaoka Stage II and histologic grade A, AB, B1; unfavorable, Stage IV disease or histologic grade C or Stage III and histologic grade B3; intermediate, all other combinations. The 10- and 20-year survival rate was 95% and 81% for the favorable group, 90% and 65% for the intermediate group, and 50% and 0% for the unfavorable group, respectively. Local recurrence, distant recurrence, and tumor-related deaths were also evaluated. Conclusion: The analysis of our experience singled out three novel prognostic classes and the assessment of risk identified treatment selection criteria.

  11. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  12. Chronic shoulder pain referred from thymic carcinoma: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dee, Shu-Wei; Kao, Mu-Jung; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei; Lew, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of thymic carcinoma presenting as unilateral shoulder pain for 13 months. Before an accurate diagnosis was made, the patient received conservative treatment, cervical discectomies, and myofascial trigger point injection, none of which relieved his pain. When thymic carcinoma was eventually diagnosed, he received total resection of the tumor and the shoulder pain subsided completely. Thymic carcinoma is a rare carcinoma, and our review of the literature did not show shoulder pain as its initial presentation except for one case report. The purpose of this report is to document our clinical experience so that other physiatrists can include thymic carcinoma in their differential diagnosis of shoulder pain.

  13. Thymic hormone-containing cells. Characterization and localization of serum thymic factor in young mouse thymus studied by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The characterization and distribution of cells containing the serum thymic factor (FTS) in the thymus of young mice was studied by immunofluorescence using monoclonal anti-FTS antibodies. FTS+ cells were distributed throughout the thymic parenchyma but were more frequent in the medullary region than in the cortex. FTS-containing cells presented a stellate or globular aspect, and some of them exhibited fluorescent cytoplasmic granules. The epithelial nature of FTS+ cells was confirmed by double-labeling experiments using an anti- keratin antiserum (as an epithelial cell marker). Nevertheless, only a minority of keratin-positive epithelial reticular cells contained FTS. All controls, including the incubation of sections from nonthymic tissues with the anti-FTS antibodies, were negative. Taken together, these results confirm the exclusive localization of FTS-containing cells within the mouse thymus. PMID:7047671

  14. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications

    PubMed Central

    Janik, S.; Schiefer, A. I.; Bekos, C.; Hacker, P.; Haider, T.; Moser, J.; Klepetko, W.; Müllauer, L.; Ankersmit, H. J.; Moser, B.

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated. PMID:27097982

  15. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications.

    PubMed

    Janik, S; Schiefer, A I; Bekos, C; Hacker, P; Haider, T; Moser, J; Klepetko, W; Müllauer, L; Ankersmit, H J; Moser, B

    2016-04-21

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated.

  16. Idiopathic atrophie blanche.

    PubMed

    Amato, Lauretta; Chiarini, Caterina; Berti, Samantha; Massi, Daniela; Fabbri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    clinical, serologic, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings, a diagnosis of idiopathic atrophie blanche was made. The patient was treated with dapsone (50 mg p.o. q.d.) and pentoxifylline (400 mg p.o. t.i.d.) with pain relief and complete resolution of the ulcerations after 6 weeks of therapy.

  17. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  18. Optic atrophy and glaucomatous cupping.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Maumenee, A E

    1978-02-01

    We reviewed 170 eyes of 112 patients with optic atrophy from various causes. Special attention was directed towards measured cup:disk ratios as well as presence of glaucomatous-like cupping of the optic nerve head. We observed a small but significant increase in nerve head cupping in eyes with optic atrophy when compared to contralateral eyes, as well as to eyes of 50 diabetic patients. No characteristic glaucomatous disk changes were documented. We evaluated these findings with respect to possible causes of glaucomatous disk and field changes.

  19. Comparative anatomical studies on the thyroid and thymic arteries. VI. Diprotodont marsupials.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    The thyroid and thymic arteries in 44 specimens from 18 species belonging to the diprotodont marsupials were investigated. The results were compared with those of polyprotodont marsupials, suncuses, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and man. The superior thyroid artery was constant in three superfamily groups. The inferior thyroid artery was extremely rare. The superior thymic artery arising from the thyrocervical trunk was observed in 1 phalangeroid and 2 macropodoids, and that arising from the vertebral artery occurred in 1 macropodoid. The middle thymic artery occurred in 1 phalangeroid, but was abundant in macropodoids. The inferior thymic artery was constant in koalas and phalangeroids, but was absent in half of the macropodoids. The thyroid ima, middle thymothyroid, and the supreme thymic arteries were absent in all diprotodonts. In addition to the usual thymus, diprotodonts have the superficial cervical thymus, which is only shared with guinea pigs. The superior superficial cervical thymic artery was absent in koalas and in half of the macropodoids, but was abundant in the phalangeroids. Conversely, the inferior superficial cervical thymic artery was constant in koalas and was dominant in the macropodoids. These results show that variations in the arterial patterns for both organs were much more prevalent in macropodoids than in phalangeroids, while the arterial patterns in koalas were characteristic. As a whole, the arteries for both organs were more complex in diprotodonts than in polyprotodonts or rats, but more simple than those in rabbits or man. The superior superficial cervical thymic arteries, which showed various patterns, were compared with those in guinea pigs.

  20. Distinct mechanisms of neonatal tolerance induced by dendritic cells and thymic B cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To assess the role of different types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the induction of tolerance, we isolated B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells from thymus and spleen, and injected these into neonatal BALB/c mice across an Mls-1 antigenic barrier. One week after injection of APC from Mls-1-incompatible mice or from control syngeneic mice, we measured the number of thymic, Mls-1a-reactive, V beta 6+ T cells and the capacity of thymocytes to induce a graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction in popliteal lymph nodes of Mls-1a mice. Injection of thymic but not spleen B cells deleted thymic, Mls-1a-reactive V beta 6+ T cells and induced tolerance in the GVH assay. The thymic B cells were primarily of the CD5+ type, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter- purified CD5+ thymic B cells were active. Injection of dendritic cells from spleen or thymus also induced tolerance, but the V beta 6 cells were anergized rather than deleted. Macrophages from thymus did not induce tolerance. Dendritic cells and thymic B cells were also effective in inducing tolerance even when injected into Mls-, major histocompatibility complex-incompatible, I-E- mice, but only thymic B cells depleted V beta 6-expressing T cells. Therefore, different types of bone marrow-derived APC have different capacities for inducing tolerance, and the active cell types (dendritic cells and CD5+ thymic B cells) can act by distinct mechanisms. PMID:1900075

  1. Coexisiting adenoma and granuloma involving the right inferior parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mayank; Kandasamy, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions, particularly granulomas, involving adenoma of the parathyroid gland are rare. Ectopic thymic tissue is commonly associated with the thyroid and/or parathyroid gland due to their close embryonic relationship. We report a rare case of coexisting adenoma and granuloma of the parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue. PMID:24957592

  2. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes the disorder. Top of page NHGRI Clinical Research on Spinal Muscular Atrophy Currently, NHGRI is not conducting studies on SMA. The National Institutes of Health is conducting clinical trials identified as enrolling individuals with SMA: Quantitative Analysis of SMN1 and SMN2 Gene Based on ...

  3. Interleukin-1 stimulates zinc uptake by human thymic epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Coto, J.A.; Hadden, J.W. )

    1991-03-15

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are known to secrete peptides which influence the differentiation and maturation of T-lymphocytes. These peptides include the thymic hormones thymulin, thymosin-{alpha}1, and thymopoietin. The biological activity of thymulin is dependent on the presence of zinc in an equimolar ratio. The authors have shown that both interleukin-1{alpha}(IL-1{alpha}) and interleukin-1{beta}(IL-1{beta}), which stimulate proliferation of TEC, stimulate the uptake of Zn-65 in-vitro independent of this proliferation. Mitomycin-C was used to inhibit the proliferation of TEC. Two other stimulators of proliferation of TEC, bovine pituitary extract (BPE) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), did not stimulate zinc uptake by the TEC independent of proliferation. They have also shown, utilizing in-situ hybridization, that IL-1 and zinc induce metallothionein(MT) mRNA expression in human thymic epithelial cells. The exact role of metallothionein is not clear, but it is thought to be involved in regulation of trace metal metabolism, especially in maintenance of zinc homeostasis. Their current hypothesis is that IL-1 stimulates uptake of zinc into the TEC, followed by its complexing with metallothionein. Zinc is then thought to be transferred from metallothionein to thymulin. Immunostaining, utilizing an antithymulin antibody and a fluoresceinated goat anti-rabbit second antibody, confirms the presence of thymulin in TEC and its dependence on zinc. Upon stimulation, thymulin is then secreted. Known stimulants for thymulin include progesterone, dexamethasone, estradiol, testosterone, and prolactin. None of these secretagogues increase zinc uptake, suggesting the priming of the zinc-thymulin complex is unrelated to the regulation of its secretion.

  4. Direct analysis of thymic function in children with Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Nicole; Nasi, Milena; Troiano, Leonarda; Roat, Erika; Pinti, Marcello; Nemes, Elisa; Lugli, Enrico; Ferraresi, Roberta; Ciacci, Luigi; Bertoni, Davide; Biagioni, Ornella; Gibertoni, Milena; Cornia, Cristina; Meschiari, Liviana; Gramazio, Elisabetta; Mariotti, Mauro; Consolo, Ugo; Balli, Fiorella; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Background Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by several immunological defects, especially regarding T cell compartment. DS is considered the best example of accelerated ageing in humans. Direct observations of the thymus have shown that in DS this organ undergoes severe histological and morphological changes. However, no data on its capacity to generate T cells are present in the literature. Here, using a new technology based upon real time PCR, we have investigated the capacity of the thymus to produce and release newly generated T lymphocytes (the so called "recent thymic emigrants", RTE) in children with DS. Methods We studied 8 children affected by DS, aged 2–7 years, compared with 8 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used to determine different lymphocytes subsets. Real time PCR with the Taqman system was used to quantify the amount of RTE, i.e. peripheral blood lymphocytes that express the T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (TREC). Results In comparison with control children, those with DS had a significant lower number of TREC+ peripheral blood cells. Moreover, in DS children but not in controls, a strong negative correlation between age and the levels of TREC+ cells was found. Conclusions The direct measure of thymic output indicates that the impairment of the organ results in a reduced production of newly generated T cells. This observation could suggest that cytokines able to modulate thymic function, such as interleukins, could be useful to improve the functionality of the organ and to treat the immunodeficiency present in DS subjects. PMID:15715912

  5. Prognostic value of preoperative serum lactate dehydrogenase in thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zu-Yang; Gao, Shu-Geng; Mu, Ju-Wei; Xue, Qi; Mao, You-Sheng; Wang, Da-Li; Zhao, Jun; Gao, Yu-Shun; Huang, Jin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been demonstrated in various solid tumors. We attempted to determine whether serum LDH was predictive of survival in thymic carcinoma after surgical resection. Methods Ninety-five patients with thymic carcinoma treated in our hospital between January 2005 and December 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. Serum LDH was measured before surgery and categorized as low or high relative to the upper limit of normal (ULN) (225 U/L). The relationships of serum LDH level and other clinical variables with survival were estimated by Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Serum LDH levels were found to be significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of these patients. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year PFS were 76%, 51%, and 38%, and the 1-, 3- and 5-year OS were 97%, 75%, and 46%, respectively. Univariate analysis found that high serum LDH (>225 U/L) was associated with both lower OS [hazard ratio (HR) =2.710; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.363–1.5.391; P=0.004] and PFS (HR =3.365; 95% CI: 1.776–6.374; P<0.001). Multivariate analysis found that high serum LDH was associated with lower PFS (HR =2.122; 95% CI: 1.056–4.267; P=0.035). Moreover, high LDH was significantly associated with advanced Masaoka stage (P=0.001). Conclusions High serum LDH (>225 U/L) was an independent predictor of decreased PFS in thymic carcinoma patients. It was also significantly associated with reduced OS, but was not an independent predictor of death in those patients. PMID:27746998

  6. Reassessing the role of growth hormone and sex steroids in thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyeyoung; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    The concomitant decline in growth hormone (GH) and increase in sex steroid production with age is thought to be responsible for thymic involution. If changes in the production of these hormones trigger or sustain thymic involution, that process should be accelerated in little mice, which have a genetic deficiency resulting in reduced production of thymopoietic GH, and delayed in the hypogonadal strain, which fails to produce thymocytotoxic sex steroids. The results indicated that thymic involution in both strains progressed in a manner similar to their normal littermates. That blocking sex steroid production did not delay thymic involution was surprising since castration reportedly increases thymus cellularity. Re-examination of that phenomenon revealed that, while gonadectomy results in increased thymus size, its effects are transient, and the thymus ultimately undergoes involution. Taken together, these data suggest that age-related changes in the endocrine system do not underlie thymic involution.

  7. Human thymic epithelial primary cells produce exosomes carrying tissue-restricted antigens

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Telemo, Esbjörn; Lindgren, Susanne; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space and have been shown to be present in thymic tissue both in mice and in humans. The source of thymic exosomes is however still an enigma and hence it is not known whether thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are able to produce exosomes. In this work, we have cultured human TECs and isolated exosomes. These exosomes carry tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), for example, myelin basic protein and desmoglein 3. The presence of TRAs indicates a possible role for thymic epithelium-derived exosomes in the selection process of thymocytes. The key contribution of these exosomes could be to disseminate self-antigens from the thymic epithelia, thus making them more accessible to the pool of maturing thymocytes. This would increase the coverage of TRAs within the thymus, and facilitate the process of positive and negative selection. PMID:25776846

  8. The Role of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) in Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Steven F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The importance of the epithelium in initiating and controlling immune responses is becoming more appreciated. For example, allergens contact first occurs at mucosal sites in exposed to the external environment such as the skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. This exposure leads to the production of a variety of cytokines and chemokines that are involved in driving allergic inflammatory responses. One such product is thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Recent studies, in both humans and mouse models, have implicated TSLP in the development and progression of atopy and atopic diseases. This review will discuss this work and place TSLP in the inflammatory cascade that leads to allergic disease. PMID:21109412

  9. Thymic cysts following radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Sagel, S.S.; Baglan, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    In 3 patients, benign thymic cycsts developed following radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease. Autopsy or surgical specimens provided a diagnosis in all 3 cases; computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained in two of the patients provided a preoperative diagnosis. The etiology of these cysts is uncertain; they may arise following successful radiation treatment of Hodgkin disease involving the thymus. When an anterior mediastinal mass develops in a patient with Hodgkin disease following radiation therapy, careful evaluation to exclude a benign process is indicated prior to initiating additional therapy.

  10. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  11. Temporal increase in thymocyte negative selection parallels enhanced thymic SIRPα(+) DC function.

    PubMed

    Kroger, Charles J; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of negative selection contributes to T-cell-mediated autoimmunity, such as type 1 diabetes. The events regulating thymic negative selection, however, are ill defined. Work by our group and others suggest that negative selection is inefficient early in ontogeny and increases with age. This study examines temporal changes in negative selection and the thymic DC compartment. Peptide-induced thymocyte deletion in vivo was reduced in newborn versus 4-week-old NOD mice, despite a similar sensitivity of the respective thymocytes to apoptosis induction. The temporal increase in negative selection corresponded with an elevated capacity of thymic antigen-presenting cells to stimulate T cells, along with altered subset composition and function of resident DC. The frequency of signal regulatory protein α(+) (SIRPα(+) ) and plasmacytoid DCs was increased concomitant with a decrease in CD8α(+) DC in 4-week-old NOD thymi. Importantly, 4-week-old versus newborn thymic SIRPα(+) DC exhibited increased antigen processing and presentation via the MHC class II but not class I pathway, coupled with an enhanced T-cell stimulatory capacity not seen in thymic plasmacytoid DC and CD8α(+) DC. These findings indicate that the efficiency of thymic DC-mediated negative selection is limited early after birth, and increases with age paralleling expansion of functionally superior thymic SIRPα(+) DC.

  12. The effect of thymic inoculation to induce tolerance of allogeneic thyroid grafts in the outbred rabbit.

    PubMed

    Torchia, M G; Aitken, R M; Thliveris, A

    1998-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that allograft tolerance can be achieved in inbred rats and mice following intrathymic injection of donor cells or antigen and treatment with antilymphocyte serum (ALS). In outbred dogs, xenografts, and inbred rat strains with major MHC antigen difference, tolerance has not similarly been induced. The focus of this study was to determine whether allogeneic thyroid graft tolerance could be achieved in outbred rabbits. In the experimental group (n = 5), recipients received an intrathymic injection of donor lymphocytes and a single treatment of ALS. Controls (n = 5) received intrathymic cell culture medium and ALS treatment. Donor-recipient allogenicity was monitored with mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) over 18 weeks. Donor thyroid tissue was placed into recipient gluteal muscle fibres one week following the last MLC measurement. A third group of rabbits (n = 4) received thyroid autografts without any other treatment. There were no differences in MLC stimulation indices (SI) between the control and experimental group nor did MLC (SI) change within groups. All thyroid autografts survived the two week monitoring period and demonstrated normal appearing thyroid follicles on histologic examination. All thyroid allografts showed severe acute rejection reactions on biopsy within one week. Further studies using outbred animals to examine the role of thymic inoculation are required to determine whether similar techniques might be successful in the human.

  13. Histologic characteristics of thymic adenocarcinomas: Clinicopathologic study of a nine-case series and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ah-Young; Han, Joungho; Chu, Jinah; Choi, Yong Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2017-02-01

    Primary thymic adenocarcinoma is an extraordinarily rare malignancy; only 49 cases have been reported in the medical literature to date. Because of its rarity, clinical and pathologic characteristics of thymic adenocarcinoma are unclear. We present nine cases of primary thymic adenocarcinoma and discuss clinicopathologic findings in the context of the existing literature. Two-hundred twenty-six thymic carcinoma cases were diagnosed at Samsung Medical Center in Korea, from January, 2001 to July, 2016. Nine of these 226 cases were primary thymic adenocarcinomas. The mean age of primary thymic adenocarcinoma patients was 53.6 years, slightly younger than the mean age of patients with thymic squamous cell carcinomas. The male to female ratio was 2:1. Symptoms, if present, were usually due to compression by the tumor. Tumors showed an extra- or intra-cellular mucin and tubular growth pattern, with CK20- and CDX2-immunoreactivity, similar to adenocarcinomas of the lower intestinal tract. Twenty-five previously reported cases, classified as mucinous adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified, also had similar characteristics to enteric-type adenocarcinoma and generally expressed CK20, CDX2, CEA, and/or MUC2. Some of these cases had a thymic cyst. These characteristics are different from those of papillary thymic carcinomas, which are morphologically similar to papillary thyroid carcinomas, express CK7 but not CK20, and are often associated with thymoma. The prognosis of thymic adenocarcinoma, enteric type appeared to be worse than the prognosis of papillary thymic carcinoma or carcinoma with adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. In summary, we demonstrated that common primary thymic adenocarcinomas show enteric-type differentiation with mucin. This tumor type has distinct clinical, pathological, immunohistochemical and prognostic characteristics and is different from other subtypes of thymic adenocarcinoma, papillary thymic carcinoma, and carcinoma with

  14. Thymic emigration patterns in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin

    PubMed Central

    Dworacki, Grzegorz; Urazayev, Olzhas; Bekmukhambetov, Yerbol; Iskakova, Saule; Frycz, Bartosz A; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Dworacka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that thymic output, which provides the naive T cells necessary for the normal functioning of T-cell-dependent immunosurveillance cellular immunity including anti-cancer protection, can be disturbed in the course of type 2 diabetes. Metformin, an anti-diabetic drug commonly confirmed as an agent with many potential anti-cancer activities, might be helpful in this immune correction. The profile of thymic output was evaluated in the current study on the basis of the signal-joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) concentration in peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and thymic emigrant content in peripheral blood evaluated from CD127 and/or CD132 antigen expression. It was revealed that recent thymic emigrants and more differentiated CD127+ CD132+ cell populations were decreased among naive T cells and CD8+ T cells, whereas RTE count was increased in CD4+ T cells, and the CD127+ CD132+ cell population was less numerous than in non-diabetic participants. Terminally differentiated thymic emigrants, i.e. CD127− CD132+ cells, were increased in naive T cells and in CD8+ T cells. Metformin affects mainly the early phases of thymic export, increasing CD127+ CD132− and CD127+ CD132+ cell populations in naive T cells and the CD127+ CD132− population in CD4+ T lymphocytes. It could be concluded that type 2 diabetes deteriorates thymic immunostasis. The decreased thymic output could be compensated by metformin, especially with regard to CD4+ naive T cells. It is the first time that therapy with metformin has been documented by us as particularly useful in the control and normalization of thymus function, regarding correction of early populations of thymic emigrants. PMID:26271466

  15. Established thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cell-like cell lines differentiate into mature thymic epithelial cells and support T cell development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhan, Yu; Su, Juanjuan; Du, Yarui; Xu, Guoliang; Shi, Yufang; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Zhang, Xiaoren

    2013-01-01

    Common thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cells (TEPCs) differentiate into cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs), which are required for the development and selection of thymocytes. Mature TEC lines have been widely established. However, the establishment of TEPC lines is rarely reported. Here we describe the establishment of thymic epithelial stomal cell lines, named TSCs, from fetal thymus. TSCs express some of the markers present on tissue progenitor/stem cells such as Sca-1. Gene expression profiling verifies the thymic identity of TSCs. RANK stimulation of these cells induces expression of autoimmune regulator (Aire) and Aire-dependent tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in TSCs in vitro. TSCs could be differentiated into medullary thymic epithelial cell-like cells with exogenously expressed NF-κB subunits RelB and p52. Importantly, upon transplantation under the kidney capsules of nude mice, TSCs are able to differentiate into mature TEC-like cells that can support some limited development of T cells in vivo. These findings suggest that the TSC lines we established bear some characteristics of TEPC cells and are able to differentiate into functional TEC-like cells in vitro and in vivo. The cloned TEPC-like cell lines may provide useful tools to study the differentiation of mature TEC cells from precursors.

  16. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS.

  17. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  18. [Posterior cortical atrophy (Benson-syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Anikó; Szilvássy, Ildikó; Kovács, Krisztina; Boór, Krisztina; Gács, Gyula

    2010-01-30

    We present the characteristics of posterior cortical atrophy--a very rare cortical dementia--in a 69 year old woman's case. Our patient's symptoms began with a visual problem which was initially explained by ophthalmological disorder. After neurological exam visual agnosia was diagnosed apart from other cognitive disorder (alexia without agraphia, acalculia, prosopagnosia, constructional disorder, clock-time recognition disorder, dressing apraxia, visuospatial disorientation). The brain MRI showed bilateral asymmetric parieto-occipital atrophy which is characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

  19. Iris atrophy in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, R W; Ford, S M; Maude, G H; Lyness, R W; Serjeant, G R

    1986-01-01

    Iris atrophy, of unknown origin and believed to be secondary to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease, has been observed in 25 eyes of 22 patients (two SS disease, 20 SC disease). The crude prevalence was highest in males with SC disease, in whom 14.7% of patients were affected. Iris atrophy was closely associated with proliferative sickle retinopathy in the same eye. Analysis of haematological indices failed to reveal any significant differences between patients with and without iris atrophy. The characteristics and distribution of iris atrophy are described as well as the histopathology in one 68-year-old male patient with SS disease. Images PMID:3718915

  20. A Rare Tumor with a Very Rare Initial Presentation: Thymic Carcinoma as Bone Marrow Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Leelavathi

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of thymus gland are rare and account for 0.2% to 1.5% of all the neoplasms. They constitute a heterogeneous group that has an unknown etiology and a complex as well as varied biology. This has led to difficulty in their histological classification and in predicting their prognostic and survival markers. Among them, thymic carcinoma is the most aggressive thymic epithelial tumor exhibiting cytological malignant features and a diversity of clinicopathological characteristics that can cause diagnostic dilemmas, misdiagnosis, and therapeutic challenge. We herein describe a case of a 60-year-old man who while undergoing evaluation for the cause of pancytopenia was discovered having bone marrow metastasis from an asymptomatic thymic carcinoma. Bone marrow metastasis is an extremely rare initial presentation of thymic carcinoma with only few cases reported in the literature. PMID:28116199

  1. Thymic neuroblastoma with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Fumihiro; Amano, Hideki; Iyoda, Akira; Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2009-11-01

    We describe a rare case of thymic neuroblastoma with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). A 60-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for further examination and treatment of anterior mediastinal tumor found at a regular health check-up. On examination there was hyponatremia, decrease in plasma osmolarity and elevation of plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH) level. Thus, he underwent total thymectomy under the diagnosis of thymoma with SIADH. The tumor was located in the right lobe of the thymus and the final diagnosis was thymic neuroblastoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thymic neuroblastoma in which production of ADH by tumor cells is demonstrated immunohistochemically. This case highlights the need to consider functional activity of thymic neuroblastoma and complete resection of the tumor is warranted for treatment.

  2. Investigating Factors Associated with Thymic Regeneration after Chemotherapy in Patients with Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dao-Ping; Wang, Li; Ding, Chong-Yang; Liang, Jin-Hua; Zhu, Hua-Yuan; Wu, Yu-Jie; Fan, Lei; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The factors involved in thymus regeneration after chemotherapy has not been sufficiently explored. This study was aimed to identify the clinical characteristics and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene (IL7R) encoding IL-7Rα associated with thymus renewal after chemotherapy in Chinese Han individuals with lymphoma. The dynamics of thymic activity in 134 adults with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and B cell lymphoma from baseline to 12 months post-chemotherapy were analyzed by assessing thymic structural changes using serial computed tomography scans and correlating these with measurements of thymic output by concurrent analysis of single-joint T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC) and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants (RTE) in peripheral blood. The association of clinical variables and IL7R polymorphisms with the occurrence of rebound thymic hyperplasia (TH) and the recovery of thymic output following chemotherapy were evaluated. Thymic regeneration was observed, with the evidence that TH occurred in 38/134 (28.4%) cases, and thymic output, assessed by CD31+ RTE numbers and sjTREC content, recovered to baseline levels within 1 year after the end of therapy. The frequencies of the T allele and TT + GT genotype of rs7718919 located in the promoter of IL7R were significantly higher in patients with TH compared with those without TH (P = 0.031 and 0.027, respectively). In contrast, no significant difference was found between two groups with respect to the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies of rs6897932. By general linear models repeated-measure analysis, rs7718919 and rs6897932 were determined to exert no significant effects on the recovery of thymic output after therapy. Univariate analysis revealed host age under 30, the diagnosis of HL, baseline thymic index and CD31+ RTE counts, and rs7718919 genotype as potential predictors for TH after chemotherapy (P < 0.05); after multivariate adjustment, only host age was independently associated

  3. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  4. Thymic involution perturbs negative selection leading to autoreactive T cells that induce chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Coder, Brandon D; Wang, Hongjun; Ruan, Linhui; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Thymic involution and the subsequent amplified release of autoreactive T cells increase the susceptibility toward developing autoimmunity, but whether they induce chronic inflammation with advanced age remains unclear. The presence of chronic low-level proinflammatory factors in elderly individuals (termed inflammaging) is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality in virtually every chronic age-related disease. To determine how thymic involution leads to the persistent release and activation of autoreactive T cells capable of inducing inflammaging, we used a Foxn1 conditional knockout mouse model that induces accelerated thymic involution while maintaining a young periphery. We found that thymic involution leads to T cell activation shortly after thymic egress, which is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory phenotype consisting of cellular infiltration into non-lymphoid tissues, increased TNF-α production, and elevated serum IL-6. Autoreactive T cell clones were detected in the periphery of Foxn1 conditional knockout mice. A failure of negative selection, facilitated by decreased expression of Aire rather than impaired regulatory T cell generation, led to autoreactive T cell generation. Furthermore, the young environment can reverse age-related regulatory T cell accumulation in naturally aged mice, but not inflammatory infiltration. Taken together, these findings identify thymic involution and the persistent activation of autoreactive T cells as a contributing source of chronic inflammation (inflammaging).

  5. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  6. Bone and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vai, Silvia; Bianchi, Maria Luisa; Moroni, Isabella; Mastella, Chiara; Broggi, Francesca; Morandi, Lucia; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Bussolino, Chiara; Baranello, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, leading to progressive denervation atrophy in the involved skeletal muscles. Bone status has been poorly studied. We assessed bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures in 30 children (age range 15-171 months) affected by SMA types 2 and 3. Eighteen children (60%) had higher than normal levels of CTx (bone resorption marker); 25-OH vitamin D was in the lower range of normal (below 20 ng/ml in 9 children and below 12 ng/ml in 2). Lumbar spine BMAD (bone mineral apparent density) Z-score was below -1.5 in 50% of children. According to clinical records, four children had sustained four peripheral fractures; on spine X-rays, we observed 9 previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in 7 children. There was a significant inverse regression between PTH and 25-OH D levels, and a significant regression between BMC and BMAD values and the scores of motor-functional tests. Even if this study could not establish the pathogenesis of bone derangements in SMA, its main findings - reduced bone density, low 25OH vitamin D levels, increased bone resorption markers and asymptomatic vertebral fractures also in very young patients - strongly suggest that even young subjects affected by SMA should be considered at risk of osteopenia and even osteoporosis and fractures.

  7. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Cardozo, Christopher; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels (HCs) formed by connexins (Cxs) and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), and transient receptor potential, sub-family V, member 2 (TRPV2) channels was demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically reduced in denervated muscles deficient in Cxs 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned non-selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), agrin/LDL receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4)/muscle-specific receptor kinase (MuSK) and acetylcholine (Ach) are among the possible signals for repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  8. Critical role of SP thymocyte motility in regulation of thymic output in neonatal Aire−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Aili, Abudureyimujiang; Wang, Yuqing; Wu, Jia; Sun, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Yu; Ge, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) is essential in the perinatal period to prevent the multiorgan autoimmunity. Here we show that Aire-regulated single positive thymocyte trafficking in neonatal period is critical for thymic egress. Reduced thymic emigration was found in Aire−/− mice during neonatal period, leading to enhanced homeostatic expansion of peripheral T cells as early as 2 weeks of age. In neonatal Aire−/− mice, thymic expression of CCR7 ligands were dramatically reduced, resulting in decreased thymocyte motility and thymocyte emigration. This reduction of thymic egress in Aire−/− mice was alleviated beyond 3 weeks of age by an early upregulation of S1P1 signaling. As the numbers and quality of thymic emigrants are essential for the establishment and maintenance of peripheral tolerance, the reduced thymic emigration during neonatal period may deteriorate autoimmunity caused by the emigration of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27965471

  9. Crustacean muscles: atrophy and regeneration during molting

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural basis of atrophy of claw closer muscle of the land crab and the organization of myofibrils and sacroplasmic reticulum during the hydrolysis of protein that occurs during proecdysis was examined. The changes that occur in contractile proteins during claw muscle atrophy and the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteinases (CDP) in myofilament degradation were investigated. (ACR)

  10. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy. PMID:27803820

  11. Selection of antibodies to cell surface determinants on mouse thymic epithelial cells using a phage display library.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, D B; George, A J; Ritter, M A

    1997-01-01

    The network of thymic epithelium contributes significantly to the thymic stromal cell environment, which plays a vital role in the generation and maturation of thymocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have revealed considerable heterogeneity within this epithelial component of the mouse thymic microenvironment, but many of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are located inside the cell and so cannot be used in functional studies. As an alternative approach to isolate antibodies specific to thymic epithelium, we used a phage display library expressing single chain Fv antibodies. For selection, a thymic cell suspension was incubated with the phage display library, and major histocompatibility complex class II positive cells, the majority of which are epithelial, were then specifically selected. Phage bound to these cells were eluted and the selection procedure was repeated for a further five rounds. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these phage antibodies show differential staining of thymic epithelial subsets. Flow cytometric analysis of a thymic epithelial cell line using a panel of these antibodies demonstrated that they recognize epitopes on the cell surface. Furthermore, some of these antibodies also labelled human thymic epithelium, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are conserved between human and rodent thymus. Our approach therefore provides a rapid method to select antibodies specific for thymic epithelial cell surface determinants in their native configuration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9301539

  12. Inflammation, atrophy, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic inflammation and cancer is now well established. This association has recently received renewed interest with the recognition that microbial pathogens can be responsible for the chronic inflammation observed in many cancers, particularly those originating in the gastrointestinal system. A prime example is Helicobacter pylori, which infects 50% of the world’s population and is now known to be responsible for inducing chronic gastric inflammation that progresses to atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. This Review provides an overview of recent progress in elucidating the bacterial properties responsible for colonization of the stomach, persistence in the stomach, and triggering of inflammation, as well as the host factors that have a role in determining whether gastritis progresses to gastric cancer. We also discuss how the increased understanding of the relationship between inflammation and gastric cancer still leaves many questions unanswered regarding recommendations for prevention and treatment. PMID:17200707

  13. Is hippocampal atrophy a future drug target?

    PubMed

    Dhikav, Vikas; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampus is the brain structure, vital for episodic and declarative memory. Atrophy of the human hippocampus is seen in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders e.g. recurrent depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, epilepsy, head injury, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Importantly, aging hippocampus also undergoes atrophy. In many instances, for example, AD, the atrophy precedes the development of symptoms while in others, there is a temporal relationship between atrophy and symptomatology. The presence of atrophied hippocampus is one of the most consistent features of many common psychiatric disorders. Several factors contribute to this atrophy. Stress is one of the most profound factors implicated and the mechanisms involve glucocorticoids, serotonin, excitatory amino acids etc. Hippocampal formation as a whole can undergo atrophy or its individual structural components e.g. apical dendrities can exhibit atrophy. Several drugs of unrelated classes have been shown to prevent atrophy indicating heterogenous manner in which hippocampal atrophy is produced. These include, tianeptine (affects structural plasticity in hippocampus and is an effective antidepressant); phenytoin (antiseizure and neuroprotective); fluoxetine (downregulates neurodegenerative enzyme and increases neuroprotective hippocampal S100 beta); lithium (neuroprotective and antiapoptotic); tricyclic antidepressants (increase hippocampal neurogenesis); antipsychotics (reduce hippocampal neuronal suppression); sodium valproate (increases neurogenesis) and mifepristone (antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-glucocorticoid). Now the most important question is: to what extent does the hippocampal atrophy play a role in the genesis of symptoms of diseases or their progression? And if it does, can we achieve the same degree of prevention or reversal seen in experimental animals, in humans also. An even more important question is: whether the prevention of

  14. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  15. Thymic Selection of T Cells as Diffusion with Intermittent Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej

    2011-04-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses by recognizing short peptides derived from pathogens, and by distinguishing them from self-peptides. To ensure the latter, immature T cells (thymocytes) diffuse within the thymus gland, where they encounter an ensemble of self-peptides presented on (immobile) antigen presenting cells. Potentially autoimmune T cells are eliminated if the thymocyte binds sufficiently strongly with any such antigen presenting cell. We model thymic selection of T cells as a random walker diffusing in a field of immobile traps that intermittently turn "on" and "off". The escape probability of potentially autoimmune T cells is equivalent to the survival probability of such a random walker. In this paper we describe the survival probability of a random walker on a d-dimensional cubic lattice with randomly placed immobile intermittent traps, and relate it to the result of a well-studied problem where traps are always "on". Additionally, when switching between the trap states is slow, we find a peculiar caging effect for the survival probability.

  16. Surgical Approaches for Stage IVA Thymic Epithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Mark; Korst, Robert J

    2014-01-14

    Thymic epithelial tumors (TET) are rare mediastinal neoplasms that can metastasize to the pleural space (stage IVA). Complete surgical resection remains the backbone of therapy for patients with early stage TET, however, the role of surgery in the management of patients with stage IVA disease is not fully defined. Published reports in this regard are mainly small, retrospective, and uncontrolled, with unclear inclusion criteria. Surgical options to manage pleural disease include metastasectomy, extrapleural pneumonectomy, and metastasectomy/pleurectomy combined with heated intrapleural chemotherapy. The choice of the most appropriate surgical strategy needs to be individualized according to the quantity and location of disease, the patient's overall condition, as well as operator and institutional expertise. In the majority of cases, metastasectomy of pleural implants will be sufficient to achieve a complete resection. The available literature suggests that in selected patients with stage IVA TET, delivery of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by complete resection is a viable treatment option that can be associated with long-term survival.

  17. Cell-surface marker analysis of rat thymic dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bañuls, M P; Alvarez, A; Ferrero, I; Zapata, A; Ardavin, C

    1993-01-01

    Rat thymic dendritic cells have been isolated by collagenase digestion, separation of the low-density cell fraction by centrifugation on metrizamide, and differential adherence. The resulting dendritic cell preparation had a purity of > 90%, and has been analysed by flow cytometry (FCM) using a large panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and class II molecules, the leucocyte common antigen CD45, the rat leucocyte antigen OX44, the rat macrophage marker ED1, and the adhesion molecules Mac-1, LFA-1 and ICAM-1. They were negative for the T- and B-cell-specific forms of CD45, CD45R and B220, and the B-cell marker OX12. Concerning T-cell marker expression, they were negative for T-cell receptor (TcR) and OX40, but they expressed CD2, CD4 and CD8, and interestingly, 50% of DC were CD5+, 50% expressed the alpha-chain of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), and 80% were positive for the T-cell activation antigen recognized by the mAb OX48. Moreover, 60% of DC expressed high levels of Thy-1, whereas 40% displayed intermediate levels of this T-cell marker. PMID:8102122

  18. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. II. Cytokine activities in murine thymic epithelial and mesenchymal cell culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Eshel, I; Savion, N; Shoham, J

    1990-03-01

    Two morphologically distinct primary cultures of murine thymic stroma were established and found to be of epithelial (MTEC) and mesenchymal (MTMC) origin. These cultures were generated by selective conditions of tissue disruption and were maintained on extracellular matrix in defined medium. Culture supernatants (CS) from these cultures (EC-CS and MC-CS respectively), were tested for cytokine production and for effects on thymocyte maturation. Both supernatants displayed the activities of IL-3 and of granulocyte/macrophage-CSF and not of IL-1, -2, -4, or IFN. In addition they were found to be mitogenic to murine thymocytes in a "spontaneous" [3H]TdR incorporation assay. The two supernatants differed, however, in their effect on Con A stimulation. EC-CS had a strong enhancing effect, both when used for preincubation (18 h) before Con A stimulation or when present simultaneously with it. MC-CS had a small inconsistent effect under these conditions. Also EC-CS enhanced IL-2 and IL-3 production by thymocytes. The responsive thymocyte subpopulation was the one that does not bind peanut agglutinin. CS of an established thymic epithelial cell line displayed only part of these activities at a considerably lower level. CS from primary kidney cell culture was completely devoid of activity. The results suggest that primary thymic stromal cell cultures, cultivated under the defined conditions described here, may better preserve physiologic secretory activities, and probably also other cell functions, compared with established cell lines. Furthermore, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the soluble factors, secreted by thymic stromal cells, are active on either very early or late stages of thymic differentiation, whereas the main intrathymic stages of differentiation are conceivable dependent primarily on direct contact with stromal cells.

  19. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of facioscapulohumeral type.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1976-01-01

    Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type affecting a mother and her son and daughter is reported. The relevant literature is reviewed and the relation between this conditon and Kugelberg-Welander (K-W) disease is discussed. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type is considered to be a different entity from the eponymous K-W disease. Each type of muscular dystrophy, e.g. limb-girdle, FSH, distal, ocular, or oculopharyngeal type, has its counterpart of nuclear origin. A classification of the chronic spinal muscular atrophies is suggested following the classification of muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:957378

  20. Sequential mutations in Notch1, Fbxw7, and Tp53 in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Jen, Kuang-Yu; Song, Ihn Young; Banta, Karl Luke; Wu, Di; Mao, Jian-Hua; Balmain, Allan

    2012-01-19

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphomas commonly demonstrate activating Notch1 mutations as well as mutations or deletions in Fbxw7. However, because Fbxw7 targets Notch1 for degradation, genetic alterations in these genes are expected to be mutually exclusive events in lymphomagenesis. Previously, by using a radiation-induced Tp53-deficient mouse model for T-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma, we reported that loss of heterozygosity at the Fbxw7 locus occurs frequently in a Tp53-dependent manner. In the current study, we show that these thymic lymphomas also commonly exhibit activating Notch1 mutations in the proline-glutamic acid-serine-threonine (PEST) domain. Moreover, concurrent activating Notch1 PEST domain mutations and single-copy deletions at the Fbxw7 locus occur with high frequency in the same individual tumors, indicating that these changes are not mutually exclusive events. We further demonstrate that although Notch1 PEST domain mutations are independent of Tp53 status, they are completely abolished in mice with germline Fbxw7 haploinsufficiency. Therefore, Notch1 PEST domain mutations only occur when Fbxw7 expression levels are intact. These data suggest a temporal sequence of mutational events involving these important cancer-related genes, with Notch1 PEST domain mutations occurring first, followed by Fbxw7 deletion, and eventually by complete loss of Tp53.

  1. [Thymic epithelial neoplasms: updates on diagnosis, staging, biology and management in France].

    PubMed

    Hadoux, Julien; Girard, Nicolas; Besse, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    Thymic epithelial neoplasms are rare malignancies with about 250 new incident cases in France every year. The WHO histologic classification distinguishes thymoma and thymic carcinoma which are tumors with different biological and clinical behaviors and outcomes. The Masaoka-Koga staging system is considered as a reference and is also of prognosis value. Diagnosis, multimodal treatment and follow-up of thymic epithelial neoplasms require a multidisciplinary approach where surgery is the cornerstone treatment. A national expert center coordinates thymic epithelial neoplasms management with 12 other regional expert centers through the French organization named RYTHMIC (www.rythmic.org). Patient's files have to be discussed at regional or national multidisciplinary staff. A group of expert pathologists will centrally review tumors when the diagnosis or classification is a matter of controversy. Among its objectives, RYHTMIC has to promote medical education, patient's information and research. This review focuses on RYTHMIC guidelines and data regarding multimodal management and targeted therapies in epithelial thymic neoplasms.

  2. Thymic influence on the T-lymphocyte self MHC repertoire. II. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Jenski, L J; Miller, B A

    1988-01-01

    We measured the frequency and specificity of thymic alloantigen-reactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in spleens of allogeneic thymus-grafted nude mice tolerant to thymic alloantigens. Under our conditions of limiting dilution analysis we found no selective loss of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in allogeneic thymus-grafted mice. Upon analysis of individual cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones, we found that lysis of specific and third party targets was mediated by distinct clones specific for H-2 antigens. Precursors from allogeneic thymus-grafted nudes stimulated at limiting dilutions with thymic alloantigens tended to lyse fewer targets than were lysed by normal cytotoxic T-lymphocytes or allogeneic thymus-grafted nude precursors stimulated with third party alloantigens, but the reduction in lytic activity was not statistically significant. Specific suppression was not demonstrated, but could not be ruled out unequivocally. We conclude that intrathymic deletion of thymic alloantigen-reactive pCTL is not necessary to achieve specific tolerance to thymic alloantigens.

  3. Thymic influence on the T-lymphocyte self MHC repertoire. I. Helper T-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Jenski, L J; Belloni, M L; Miller, B A

    1988-01-01

    We measured the frequencies of helper T-cell precursors in spleens of allogeneic thymus-grafted nude mice to determine whether allogeneic thymus engraftment resulted in clonal deletion of helper T-cells reactive to thymic major histocompatibility complex alloantigens, thereby producing tolerance to the thymic alloantigens. C3H thymus-grafted nudes had nearly normal numbers of C3H-reactive helper T-cell precursors, whereas C57BL/6 thymus-grafted nudes had significantly reduced numbers of C57BL/6-reactive helper T-cell precursors. Additional evidence suggested that tolerance was not due to a paucity of helper T-cell precursors: a) there was no correlation between the helper T-cell precursor frequency and the ability to mount cytotoxic responses against the thymic alloantigens, and b) exogenous helper factors did not break cytotoxic T-lymphocyte tolerance to thymic alloantigens. Thus, we conclude that immune tolerance resulting from engraftment of allogeneic thymic tissue is not necessarily due to clonal deletion of specific helper T-cell precursors.

  4. Neuromodulatory loop mediated by nerve growth factor and interleukin 6 in thymic stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Screpanti, I; Meco, D; Scarpa, S; Morrone, S; Frati, L; Gulino, A; Modesti, A

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cell derivatives have been suggested to be involved in thymus development. We established nonlymphoid thymic stromal cell cultures capable of supporting T-cell differentiation. In these nonlymphoid cell cultures, we identified cells with phenotypic and biochemical markers specific for neuronal cells. Neurofilament mRNA and 68- and 160-kDa neurofilament proteins, as well as 74-kDa synapsin I isoform, were expressed in many of the cultured cells. For example, neurofilament immunoreactivity was detected in 20-30% of the cells. To see whether thymic neuronal-like cells were involved in a neural differentiation pathway, we investigated the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two known neurotrophic factors. The expression of the above-described neural markers was enhanced by NGF and IL-6, which we report to be produced in an autocrine way by thymic stromal cell cultures. Finally, we found that IL-6 gene expression in these cell cultures was enhanced by NGF. Evidence is thus offered of a neuromodulatory loop within the thymic stromal cell population supported by local production of NGF and IL-6 and involving neural cell elements. Interestingly, IL-6, which is known to be implicated in thymocyte differentiation, also displays a neuromodulatory activity on thymic stromal cells, suggesting a multivalent role for this cytokine within the thymus. Images PMID:1373490

  5. Increased P16 DNA Methylation in Mouse Thymic Lymphoma Induced by Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wengang; Liu, Yongzhe; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Cong; Yuan, Bao; Zhang, Lianbo; Sun, Shilong

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important part of epigenetics. In this study, we examined the methylation state of two CpG islands in the promoter of the p16 gene in radiation-induced thymic lymphoma samples. The mRNA and protein levels of P16 were significantly reduced in radiation-induced thymic lymphoma tissue samples. Twenty-three CpG sites of the CpG islands in the p16 promoter region were detected, and the methylation percentages of −71, −63, −239, −29, −38, −40, −23, 46 CpG sites were significantly higher in radiation-induced thymic lymphoma tissue samples than those in matched non-irradiated thymus tissue samples. This study provides new evidence for the methylation state of p16 in the radiation-induced thymic lymphoma samples, which suggests that the methylation of these CpG sites in the p16 promoter may reduce its expression in the thymic lymphoma after irradiation. PMID:24747802

  6. Promoter analysis of TCDD-inducible genes in a thymic epithelial cell line indicates the potential for cell-specific transcription factor crosstalk in the AhR response

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Esser, Charlotte

    2008-10-15

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR{sup 1}) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits severe immunosuppression accompanied by thymic atrophy. Previous evidence suggests that TCDD targets both thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells. The AhR induces cell-specific changes in gene transcription via binding to the dioxin response element DRE; however, the underlying specificity-mechanisms, in particular with regard to the role of promoter element context, and possible transcription factor crosstalk remain poorly understood. Global gene expression in the cortical thymic epithelial cell line ET at 2, 4, and 6 h following 5 nM TCDD exposure resulted in differential regulation of 201 genes. JASPAR and TRANSFAC mapped the statistically over-represented promoter elements in the regulated genes to specific transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role in AhR signaling. Over-represented elements included the xenobiotic response element XRE, NF{kappa}B-Rel, HRE, PPAR{gamma}, GR, PAX-4 and estrogen receptor binding sites. Co-treatment experiments with TCDD and CoCl{sub 2}, to induce hypoxia, or TCDD and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) indicated crosstalk between AhR and Hif or ER, in agreement with other experimental models. The computational identification of TFBS and the demonstration of interaction confirm their interactions with AhR signaling and suggest that the other over-represented elements may also be important in the immunosuppressive effects elicited by TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated the importance of promoter element cooperation in the shaping of a cell-specific AhR response. Our findings regarding the transcriptional changes in cortical epithelial cells are congruent with the well-known thymotoxic TCDD-phenotype, and useful in new hypothesis generation of the role of cortical TECs in TCDD toxicity.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... trinucleotide repeat often increases in size. Larger repeat expansions are usually associated with an earlier onset of ... pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA): close correlation of CAG repeat expansions with the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and ...

  8. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons , in the spinal cord and the part ... the spinal cord ( the brainstem ). The loss of motor neurons leads to weakness and wasting ( atrophy ) of ...

  10. Hippocampal atrophy rates in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, W J.P.; Sluimer, J D.; Barnes, J; van der Flier, W M.; Sluimer, I C.; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Vrenken, H; Barkhof, F

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the added value of hippocampal atrophy rates over whole brain volume measurements on MRI in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls. Methods: We included 64 patients with AD (67 ± 9 years; F/M 38/26), 44 patients with MCI (71 ± 6 years; 21/23), and 34 controls (67 ± 9 years; 16/18). Two MR scans were performed (scan interval: 1.8 ± 0.7 years; 1.0 T), using a coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. At follow-up, 3 controls and 23 patients with MCI had progressed to AD. Hippocampi were manually delineated at baseline. Hippocampal atrophy rates were calculated using regional, nonlinear fluid registration. Whole brain baseline volumes and atrophy rates were determined using automated segmentation and registration tools. Results: All MRI measures differed between groups (p < 0.005). For the distinction of MCI from controls, larger effect sizes of hippocampal measures were found compared to whole brain measures. Between MCI and AD, only whole brain atrophy rate differed significantly. Cox proportional hazards models (variables dichotomized by median) showed that within all patients without dementia, hippocampal baseline volume (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.7 [95% confidence interval: 1.5–22.2]), hippocampal atrophy rate (5.2 [1.9–14.3]), and whole brain atrophy rate (2.8 [1.1–7.2]) independently predicted progression to AD; the combination of low hippocampal volume and high atrophy rate yielded a HR of 61.1 (6.1–606.8). Within patients with MCI, only hippocampal baseline volume and atrophy rate predicted progression. Conclusion: Hippocampal measures, especially hippocampal atrophy rate, best discriminate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls. Whole brain atrophy rate discriminates Alzheimer disease (AD) from MCI. Regional measures of hippocampal atrophy are the strongest predictors of progression to AD. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; BET = brain

  11. Correlation between acetylcholine receptor antibody levels and thymic pathology in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, G Z; Lo, Y L

    2013-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the most common chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease. Anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are found in at least 80% of patients with generalized myasthenia and have been implicated in disease pathogenesis. Thymic abnormalities are frequently found in seropositive patients, and the thymus is thought to be involved in generation of autoimmunity. This article reviews existing literature on the role of AChR antibodies in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, and the correlation between AChR antibody titers and thymic pathology. Most studies found that highest titers are seen in thymic hyperplasia, followed by intermediate titers in thymoma, and lowest titers in atrophic or normal thymus. One publication found no difference between titers in thymoma and normal thymus.

  12. Thymic hyperplasia associated with primary Sjogren’s syndrome cured by thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Li, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Thymus hyperplasia associated with Sjogren’s syndrome is a rare morbid state. The present study described a 55-year-old woman who presented with a dryness of the oral cavity, and itchy eyes. Chest computed tomography identified a mass, measuring 4×2.5×2.5 cm, located at the anterior mediastinum. The mass was suspected as thymoma, thymic cyst, or teratoma, and resected by thymectomy. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was thymic lymphoid hyperplasia. After 1-year follow-up period, her sicca syndrome has been resolved. The present study records a successful case for thymectomy to treat the patients with thymic hyperplasia associated with primary Sjogren’s syndrome (pSS). PMID:28275496

  13. Models of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fellner, Lisa; Wenning, Gregor K.; Stefanova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a predominantly sporadic, adult-onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of unknown etiology. MSA is characterized by autonomic failure, levodopa-unresponsive parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs in any combination. MSA belongs to a group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies, which also include Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Their common pathological feature is the occurrence of abnormal α-synuclein positive inclusions in neurons or glial cells. In MSA, the main cell type presenting aggregates composed of α-synuclein are oligodendroglial cells. This pathological hallmark, also called glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs), is associated with progressive and profound neuronal loss in various regions of the brain. The development of animal models of MSA is justified by the limited understanding of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and GCIs formation, which is paralleled by a lack of therapeutic strategies. Two main types of rodent models have been generated to replicate different features of MSA neuropathology. On one hand, neurotoxin-based models have been produced to reproduce neuronal loss in substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. On the other hand, transgenic mouse models with overexpression of α-synuclein in oligodendroglia have been used to reproduce GCIs-related pathology. This chapter gives an overview of the atypical Parkinson’s syndrome MSA and summarizes the currently available MSA animal models and their relevance for pre-clinical testing of disease-modifying therapies. PMID:24338664

  14. TSCOT+ thymic epithelial cell-mediated sensitive CD4 tolerance by direct presentation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Lee, Gwanghee; Yang, Soo Jung; Lee, Deokjae; Lee, Seunghyuk; Shin, Hyo Sun; Kim, Min Cheol; Lee, Kee Nyung; Palmer, Douglas C; Theoret, Marc R; Jenkinson, Eric J; Anderson, Graham; Restifo, Nicholas P; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2008-08-05

    Although much effort has been directed at dissecting the mechanisms of central tolerance, the role of thymic stromal cells remains elusive. In order to further characterize this event, we developed a mouse model restricting LacZ to thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT)-expressing thymic stromal cells (TDLacZ). The thymus of this mouse contains approximately 4,300 TSCOT+ cells, each expressing several thousand molecules of the LacZ antigen. TSCOT+ cells express the cortical marker CDR1, CD40, CD80, CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). When examining endogenous responses directed against LacZ, we observed significant tolerance. This was evidenced in a diverse T cell repertoire as measured by both a CD4 T cell proliferation assay and an antigen-specific antibody isotype analysis. This tolerance process was at least partially independent of Autoimmune Regulatory Element gene expression. When TDLacZ mice were crossed to a novel CD4 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic reactive against LacZ (BgII), there was a complete deletion of double-positive thymocytes. Fetal thymic reaggregate culture of CD45- and UEA-depleted thymic stromal cells from TDLacZ and sorted TCR-bearing thymocytes excluded the possibility of cross presentation by thymic dendritic cells and medullary epithelial cells for the deletion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of a neoantigen into TSCOT-expressing cells can efficiently establish complete tolerance and suggest a possible application for the deletion of antigen-specific T cells by antigen introduction into TSCOT+ cells.

  15. SJSZ glycoprotein (38kDa) prevents thymus atrophy and enhances expression of IL-2 and IL-12 in diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a typical inflammation-associated cancer, but has also been shown to provoke antitumor immune responses. Polarized T helper type 2 (Th2) responses down-regulate antitumor immunity to link with HCC. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effect of the Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini (SJSZ) glycoprotein on thymus atrophy and differential response of Th1/Th2 cells induced by diethlynitrosamine (DEN). To evaluate the modulatory effect of the SJSZ glycoprotein on thymic atrophy and imbalanced Th1/Th2 cells, we examined the weight of the thymus, [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and activities of protein kinase C (PKC)/intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 MAPK, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3), cytokines [interleukin (IL)-4, -10, -2, -12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] using radioactivity, immunoblot analysis, and qRT-PCR. The SJSZ glycoprotein (10mg/kg, BW) was shown to increase the weight of the thymus, [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and PCNA in thymocytes induced by DEN. Also, it increased expression levels of T-bet and Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12). However, the activity of PKC/intracellular Ca(2+), phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, expression levels of GATA-3 and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that the SJSZ glycoprotein can prevent thymic atrophy and Th2 cytokines induced by DEN.

  16. Isolation and identification of a new thymic peptide from calf thymus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xi-Ming; Duan, Ming-Xing; Deng, Bin; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Liu, Zheng; He, Hong-Xuan

    2004-08-01

    Various thymic peptides (including thymulin, thymic humoral factor, thymopoietin, etc.) play important roles in the process of T cell maturation and development. We isolated a new peptide from calf thymus and named it thymus activity factor II (TAF-II). A yield of 0.92 mg of TAF-II was purified from 500 g calf thymus. Analysis by LC/MSD-Trap showed the amino acid sequence of this hexapeptide to be Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-OH with molecular weight 618.5 daltons. We have also begun to investigate the influence of TAF-II.

  17. [Thymic ectopia and parathyroid tissue in the pangolin (Manis tricuspis Rafinesque)].

    PubMed

    Bureau, J P; Senelar, R; Serrou, B; Kreher, P

    1975-09-01

    Thymic ectopies are under study in 45 Pangolin's thyroids (Manis tricuspis Rafinesque). Their frequency seems to be independent of the sex of the animal but this frequency also appears to be in relation to the age of the animal. The topographic and morphological studies suggest a close relationship between these inclusions made out of thymic tissue and the presence of parathyroid islets included into the thyroid capsule. Some pictures, showing a connection between parathyroid cells and thymis parenchym elements, plead in favour of a functional interelation between these different structures as the Mc Manus experiments suggest it.

  18. A pediatric case of life-threatening airway obstruction caused by a cervicomediastinal thymic cyst.

    PubMed

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2010-09-01

    Most patients with thymic cysts complain of a slowly enlarging, asymptomatic cervical mass. Only 6-10% suffer dysphagia, dyspnoea, stridor, cervical pain or vocal paralysis. In some rare cases sudden onset of severe dyspnoea or asphyxia is the first symptom, especially in neonates and small infants. We report a unique case of a 20-month-old child, who required emergency tracheal intubation due to asphyxia. Cervicomediastinal thymic cyst might need to be included in causes of life-threatening airway obstruction in young children.

  19. Rapid diaphragm atrophy following cervical spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gill, L C; Ross, H H; Lee, K Z; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Dougherty, B J; Judge, A R; Fuller, D D

    2014-02-01

    A cervical (C2) hemilesion (C2Hx), which disrupts ipsilateral bulbospinal inputs to the phrenic nucleus, was used to study diaphragm plasticity after acute spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that C2Hx would result in rapid atrophy of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm and increases in mRNA expression of proteolytic biomarkers. Diaphragm tissue was harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats at 1 or 7 days following C2Hx. Histological analysis demonstrated reduction in cross-sectional area (CSA) of type I and IIa fibers in the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm at 1 but not 7 days. Type IIb/x fibers, however, had reduced CSA at 1 and 7 days. A targeted gene array was used to screen mRNA changes for genes associated with skeletal muscle myopathy and myogenesis; this was followed by qRT-PCR validation. Changes in diaphragm gene expression suggested that profound myoplasticity is initiated immediately following C2Hx including activation of both proteolytic and myogenic pathways. We conclude that an immediate myoplastic response occurs in the diaphragm after C2Hx with atrophy occurring in ipsilateral myofibers within 1 day.

  20. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. I. Growth conditions and morphology of murine thymic epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Eshel, I; Savion, N; Shoham, J

    1990-03-01

    We report here the successful selective cultivation of murine thymic mesenchymal reticular cells (MTMC) and murine thymic epithelial cells (MTEC) grown on extracellular matrix in the presence of defined medium. The selective growth of these two cell types was based on 1) conditions of tissue disruption and 2) differential growth requirements. Both cell types were dependent on transferrin, high density lipoproteins, insulin, hydrocortisone, and epidermal growth factor, whereas MTMC was dependent also on selenium and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine. The elimination of single factors or extracellular matrix resulted in specific and different changes in the growth pattern of each cell subpopulation. Cells of both types exhibited the ultrastructural features of high metabolic activity. The epithelial nature of MTEC cultures was defined by bundles of tonofilaments and desmosomes and by positive staining to keratins and negative to vimentin. In addition MTEC were positively stained with mAb to thymic medullary epithelial cells and by Ulex europeus agglutinin, and were able to form Hassall's corpuscles, suggesting their medullary origin. MTEC were also H-2 and Ia positive. In contrast MTMC were positive for vimentin and periodic acid-Schiff, low positive for H-2, and negative for keratin and Ia. Both cells did not contain nonspecific esterase, nor did they phagocytize latex beads. With the use of all these criteria we classified MTEC as epithelial cells from the medullary compartment of the thymus and MTMC as reticular cells of mesenchymal origin.

  1. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-06-05

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  2. Alterations of Thymic Epithelial Cells in Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neonatal Thymus Involution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Jie; Peng, Hua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Ya-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the thymus was mainly produced by the thymic epithelial cells (TECs), the predominant component of the thymic microenvironment. The progression of TECs and the roles of VEGF in the neonatal thymus during sepsis have not been reported. This study aimed to explore the alterations of TECs and VEGF level in the neonatal thymus involution and to explore the possible mechanisms at the cellular level. Methods: By establishing a model of clinical sepsis, the changes of TECs were measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. Moreover, the levels of VEGF in serum and thymus were assessed based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Results: The number of thymocytes and TECs was significantly decreased 24 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, (2.40 ± 0.46)×107 vs. (3.93 ± 0.66)×107 and (1.16 ± 0.14)×105 vs. (2.20 ± 0.19)×105, P < 0.05, respectively. Cortical TECs and medullary TECs in the LPS-treated mice were decreased 1.5-fold and 3.9-fold, P < 0.05, respectively, lower than those in the controls. The number of thymic epithelial progenitors was also decreased. VEGF expression in TECs was down-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Conclusion: VEGF in thymic cells subsets might contribute to the development of TECs in neonatal sepsis. PMID:26712434

  3. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy with CyberKnife for advanced thymic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fan, C Y; Huang, W Y; Jen, Y M; Lin, M J; Lin, K T

    2015-10-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare but lethal mediastinal cancer. The optimal treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma is not yet established. This report is the first known of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (sabr) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, U.S.A.) as definitive therapy for thymic carcinoma. The patient, a 70-year-old woman with thymic carcinoma, invasion into neighboring organs, and pleural metastases-underwent CyberKnife sabr at 40 Gy in 5 fractions for two lesions, one in the thymus and one in the right paraspinal pleura. After 61 months of observation, a partial response was observed in the irradiated fields. However, disease progression in the non-irradiated pleura was noted. The patient underwent salvage CyberKnife sabr for the four initially nonirradiated pleural lesions. Computed tomography images obtained 10 months after the salvage therapy revealed a partial response. The patient is living, with progression-free irradiated lesions and no radiation-related toxicity. CyberKnife sabr is feasible for patients who are unable to undergo either surgery or conventionally fractionated radiation therapy.

  4. Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C inhibition suppresses Th17 cells and induces thymic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Guntermann, Christine; Piaia, Alessandro; Hamel, Marie-Laure; Theil, Diethilde; Rubic-Schneider, Tina; del Rio-Espinola, Alberto; Dong, Linda; Billich, Andreas; Kaupmann, Klemens; Dawson, Janet; Hoegenauer, Klemens; Orain, David; Hintermann, Samuel; Stringer, Rowan; Patel, Dhavalkumar D.; Doelemeyer, Arno; Deurinck, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic-acid-orphan-receptor-C (RORC) is a master regulator of Th17 cells, which are pathogenic in several autoimmune diseases. Genetic Rorc deficiency in mice, while preventing autoimmunity, causes early lethality due to metastatic thymic T cell lymphomas. We sought to determine whether pharmacological RORC inhibition could be an effective and safe therapy for autoimmune diseases by evaluating its effects on Th17 cell functions and intrathymic T cell development. RORC inhibitors effectively inhibited Th17 differentiation and IL-17A production, and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. In vitro, RORC inhibitors induced apoptosis, as well as Bcl2l1 and BCL2L1 mRNA downregulation, in mouse and nonhuman primate thymocytes, respectively. Chronic, 13-week RORC inhibitor treatment in rats caused progressive thymic alterations in all analyzed rats similar to those in Rorc-deficient mice prior to T cell lymphoma development. One rat developed thymic cortical hyperplasia with neoplastic features, including increased mitosis and reduced IKAROS expression, albeit without skewed T cell clonality. In summary, pharmacological inhibition of RORC not only blocks Th17 cell development and related cytokine production, but also recapitulates thymic aberrations seen in Rorc-deficient mice. While RORC inhibition may offer an effective therapeutic principle for Th17-mediated diseases, T cell lymphoma with chronic therapy remains an apparent risk. PMID:28289717

  5. Differential sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    de Theije, C C; Langen, R C J; Lamers, W H; Gosker, H R; Schols, A M W J; Köhler, S E

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia as a consequence of acute and chronic respiratory disease has been associated with muscle atrophy. This study investigated the sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy. Male mice were exposed to 8% normobaric oxygen for up to 21 days. Oxidative soleus and glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were isolated, weighed, and assayed for expression profiles of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) signaling. Fiber-type composition and the capillary network were investigated. Hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy was more prominent in the EDL than the soleus muscle. Although increased expression of HIF1α target genes showed that both muscle types sensed hypoxia, their adaptive responses differed. Atrophy consistently involved a hypoxia-specific effect (i.e., not attributable to a hypoxia-mediated reduction of food intake) in the EDL only. Hypoxia-specific activation of the UPS and ALP and increased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and its target genes were also mainly observed in the EDL. In the soleus, stimulation of gene expression of those pathways could be mimicked to a large extent by food restriction alone. Hypoxia increased the number of capillary contacts per fiber cross-sectional area in both muscles. In the EDL, this was due to type II fiber atrophy, whereas in the soleus the absolute number of capillary contacts increased. These responses represent two distinct modes to improve oxygen supply to muscle fibers, but may aggravate muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients who have a predominance of type II fibers.

  6. Thymic Germinal Centers and Corticosteroids in Myasthenia Gravis: an Immunopathological Study in 1035 Cases and a Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Truffault, Frédérique; de Montpreville, Vincent; Eymard, Bruno; Sharshar, Tarek; Le Panse, Rozen; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-02-01

    The most common form of Myasthenia gravis (MG) is due to anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and is frequently associated with thymic pathology. In this review, we discuss the immunopathological characteristics and molecular mechanisms of thymic follicular hyperplasia, the effects of corticosteroids on this thymic pathology, and the role of thymic epithelial cells (TEC), a key player in the inflammatory thymic mechanisms. This review is based not only on the literature data but also on thymic transcriptome results and analyses of pathological and immunological correlations in a vast cohort of 1035 MG patients without thymoma. We show that among patients presenting a thymic hyperplasia with germinal centers (GC), 80 % are females, indicating that thymic follicular hyperplasia is mainly a disease of women. The presence of anti-AChR antibodies is correlated with the degree of follicular hyperplasia, suggesting that the thymus is a source of anti-AChR antibodies. The degree of hyperplasia is not dependent upon the time from the onset, implying that either the antigen is chronically expressed and/or that the mechanisms of the resolution of the GC are not efficiently controlled. Glucocorticoids, a conventional therapy in MG, induce a significant reduction in the GC number, together with changes in the expression of chemokines and angiogenesis. These changes are likely related to the acetylation molecular process, overrepresented in corticosteroid-treated patients, and essential for gene regulation. Altogether, based on the pathological and molecular thymic abnormalities found in MG patients, this review provides some explanations for the benefit of thymectomy in early-onset MG patients.

  7. Testicular atrophy as a risk inguinal hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Wantz, G E

    1982-04-01

    In my experience, the complication of testicular atrophy after primary hernioplasty occurred only in patients in whom a complete indirect inguinal hernia sac was dissected from the spermatic cord. Avoiding this dissection by leaving the distal part of the sac in place reduces the incidence of the complication. All patients with scrotal inguinal hernias and all patients with recurrent inguinal hernias should have the complications of ischemic orchitis and testicular atrophy explained to them in depth because of the litigious nature of some of the men in whom this condition occurs. Patients who had undergone two or more operations for inguinal hernia should give prior written permission for orchiectomy even though this procedure is rarely necessary. In these patients, the performance of preperitoneal inguinal hernioplasty will permit the surgeon to avoid dissecting previously mobilized spermatic cords and should reduce the incidence of testicular atrophy in men fearful of this complication.

  8. [Iridoschisis, a special form of iris atrophy].

    PubMed

    Agard, E; Malcles, A; El Chehab, H; Ract-Madoux, G; Swalduz, B; Aptel, F; Denis, P; Dot, C

    2013-04-01

    Iridoschisis is a rare degenerative disease characterized by the separation of the anterior iris stroma from the posterior layer. The anterior layer splits into strands, and the free ends float freely in the anterior chamber. We report the case of a 57-year-old man, in whom we incidentally discovered isolated unilateral iris atrophy. The patient had no history of the common causes of atrophy (herpes, pigment dispersion, ocular trauma, etc.). During follow-up, the atrophy gradually worsened, with an increase in the number and bilaterality of the lesions. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of anterior chamber showed thinning of the anterior iris and cleavage of the iris into two layers, an imaging result which, to our knowledge, has not yet been reported in the literature. Familiarity with iridoschisis is important, due to its frequent association with glaucoma, so that appropriate screening can be carried out at the time of diagnosis and on follow-up.

  9. Utility of Electrocardiography (ECG)-Gated Computed Tomography (CT) for Preoperative Evaluations of Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Masaki; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative evaluation of invasion to the adjacent organs is important for the thymic epithelial tumors on CT. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated CT for assessing thymic epithelial tumors with regard to the motion artifacts produced and the preoperative diagnostic accuracy of the technique. Material/Methods Forty thymic epithelial tumors (36 thymomas and 4 thymic carcinomas) were examined with ECG-gated contrast-enhanced CT using a dual source scanner. The scan delay after the contrast media injection was 30 s for the non-ECG-gated CT and 100 s for the ECG-gated CT. Two radiologists blindly evaluated both the non-ECG-gated and ECG-gated CT images for motion artifacts and determined whether the tumors had invaded adjacent structures (mediastinal fat, superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins, aorta, pulmonary artery, pericardium, or lungs) on each image. Motion artifacts were evaluated using a 3-grade scale. Surgical and pathological findings were used as a reference standard for tumor invasion. Results Motion artifacts were significantly reduced for all structures by ECG gating (p=0.0089 for the lungs and p<0.0001 for the other structures). Non-ECG-gated CT and ECG-gated CT demonstrated 79% and 95% accuracy, respectively, during assessments of pericardial invasion (p=0.03). Conclusions ECG-gated CT reduced the severity of motion artifacts and might be useful for preoperative assessment whether thymic epithelial tumors have invaded adjacent structures. PMID:27920842

  10. Differential induction of muscle atrophy pathways in two mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Boyer, Justin G.; McFall, Emily R.; Yazdani, Armin; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron loss and neurogenic atrophy are hallmarks of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant deaths. Previous studies have focused on deciphering disease pathogenesis in motor neurons. However, a systematic evaluation of atrophy pathways in muscles is lacking. Here, we show that these pathways are differentially activated depending on severity of disease in two different SMA model mice. Although proteasomal degradation is induced in skeletal muscle of both models, autophagosomal degradation is present only in Smn2B/− mice but not in the more severe Smn−/−; SMN2 mice. Expression of FoxO transcription factors, which regulate both proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation, is elevated in Smn2B/− muscle. Remarkably, administration of trichostatin A reversed all molecular changes associated with atrophy. Cardiac muscle also exhibits differential induction of atrophy between Smn2B/− and Smn−/−; SMN2 mice, albeit in the opposite direction to that of skeletal muscle. Altogether, our work highlights the importance of cautious analysis of different mouse models of SMA as distinct patterns of atrophy induction are at play depending on disease severity. We also revealed that one of the beneficial impacts of trichostatin A on SMA model mice is via attenuation of muscle atrophy through reduction of FoxO expression to normal levels. PMID:27349908

  11. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  12. Posterior cortical atrophy: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Howard S; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2006-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a striking clinical syndrome in which a dementing illness begins with visual symptoms. Initially, the problem may seem to be loss of elementary vision, but over time the patient develops features of visual agnosia, topographical difficulty, optic ataxia, simultanagnosia, ocular apraxia (Balint's syndrome), alexia, acalculia, right-left confusion, and agraphia (Gerstmann's syndrome), and later a more generalized dementia. Occasional patients have visual hallucinations and signs of Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. A number of different neuropathologic disorders are associated with posterior cortical atrophy.

  13. [Geographic atrophy imaging using fundus autofluorescence method].

    PubMed

    Dolar-Szczasny, Joanna; Święch-Zubilewicz, Anna; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Geographic atrophy is a manifestation of the advanced age-related macular degeneration and form of irreversible atrophy of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor layer. Early detection of changes and the ability to evaluate disease progression accurately constitute a key problem in diagnosis and treatment planning. Fundus autofluorescence is a relatively new imaging method considered nowadays to be the best in diagnosis and observing the natural or treatment-altered course of disease. High resolution images showing the 3D distribution of retinal pigment epithelium autofluorescence as lipofuscin index can be obtained owing to the launch of the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

  14. A thymic carcinoid in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Powe, Joshua; Castleman, William; Fiorello, Christine

    2005-09-01

    An 18-yr-old Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with acute onset hind limb paresis. Radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging revealed a caudal abdominal aortic thrombus and a cranial mediastinal mass. Necropsy confirmed aortic thrombosis. Necrotizing enteritis and multifocal renal thrombosis were also noted. The cranial mediastinum contained a bilobed mass that histologically and ultrastructurally was consistent with a carcinoid.

  15. Grey matter atrophy in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás; Tóth, Eszter; Bankó, Nóra; Veréb, Dániel; Szabó, Nikoletta; Csete, Gergő; Faragó, Péter; Király, András; Bencsik, Krisztina; Vécsei, László

    2014-09-30

    White matter lesions are defining characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas grey matter involvement is a less recognised attribute. Recent investigations using dedicated imaging approaches have made it possible to depict cortical lesions. Additionally, grey matter atrophy may be estimated using various methods. Several studies have suggested that grey matter atrophy closely correlates to clinical disability. In this review we have collected information on grey matter atrophy in MS and the effect of disease modifying therapies upon brain atrophy.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of mouse skeletal muscle to measure denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Zhang, Gang; Morrison, Brett; Mori, Susumu; Sheikh, Kazim A.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the potential of different MRI measures to detect and quantify skeletal muscle changes with denervation in two mouse models of denervation/neurogenic atrophy. Acute complete denervation and chronic partial denervation were examined in calf muscles after sciatic nerve axotomy and in transgenic SOD1G93A mice, respectively. Serial T2, diffusion tensor, and high resolution anatomical images were acquired, and compared to behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological data. Increase in muscle T2 signal was first detected after sciatic nerve axotomy. Progressive muscle atrophy could be monitored with MRI-based volume measurements, which correlated strongly with postmortem muscle mass measurements. Significant increase in muscle fractional anisotropy and decreases in secondary and tertiary eigenvalues obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were observed after denervation. In SOD1G93A animals, muscle denervation was detected by elevated muscle T2 and atrophy in the medial gastrocnemius at 10 weeks. Changes in T2 and muscle volume were first observed in medial gastrocnemius and later in other calf muscles. Alterations in secondary and tertiary eigenvalues obtained from DTI were first observed in tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles at age 12 weeks. We propose that MRI of skeletal muscle is a sensitive surrogate outcome measure of denervation atrophy in animal models of neuromuscular disorders, with potential applicability in preclinical therapeutic screening studies in rodents. PMID:18571650

  17. [Atrophy of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex in patients with nonlymphoblastic leukemia treated with cytosine arabinoside].

    PubMed

    Nowacki, P; Dolińska, D; Honczarenko, K; Zyluk, B

    1992-01-01

    The reported analysis comprised 81 patients dying of acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia type M1, M2, M4 and blastic crises in chronic myelocytic leukaemia. It was observed that the number of cases of cerebellar granular layer atrophy rose markedly in the years 1984-1990 as compared with 1976-1983 (45.4% vs 16.2%). It is suggested that this was due to the introduction of cytostatic treatment schedules with higher doses of cytosine arabinoside (ARAC), especially TAD (6-thioguanine, ARAC, daunorubicin). Cerebellar granular layer atrophy seems to be dependent rather on the cumulative dose of ARAC and not on a single high dose of that drug.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: multiple system atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inability to hold the body upright and balanced (postural instability). The other type of multiple system atrophy , known as MSA-C, is characterized by cerebellar ataxia , which causes problems with coordination and balance. This form of the condition can also include ...

  19. Anabolic Steroid Reversal of Denervation Atrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    10-1-0932 TITLE: Anabolic Steroid Reversal of Denervation Atrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Jonathan E. Isaacs...certainly “denervation atrophy” plays a significant role. Anabolic steroids , which have been shown to cause hypertrophy of muscle fibers, increase net...of satellite cells to muscle fibers. In conclusion, there did not seem to be a functional benefit for anabolic steroid treatment following

  20. Thymic epithelial cell expansion through matricellular protein CYR61 boosts progenitor homing and T-cell output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre, Yalin; Irla, Magali; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Ballet, Romain; Meguenani, Mehdi; Jemelin, Stephane; Vesin, Christian; Reith, Walter; Imhof, Beat A.

    2013-11-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are heterogeneous stromal cells that generate microenvironments required for the formation of T cells within the thymus. Defects in TEC lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Here we identify TEC as the major source of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), a matricellular protein implicated in cell proliferation and migration. Binding of CYR61 to LFA-1, ICAM-1 and integrin α6 supports the adhesion of TEC and thymocytes as well as their interaction. Treatment of thymic lobes with recombinant CYR61 expands the stromal compartment by inducing the proliferation of TEC and activates Akt signalling. Engraftment of CYR61-overexpressing thymic lobes into athymic nude mice drastically boosts the yield of thymic output via expansion of TEC. This increases the space for the recruitment of circulating hematopoietic progenitors and the development of T cells. Our discovery paves the way for therapeutic interventions designed to restore thymus stroma and T-cell generation.

  1. Central role of interferon-beta in thymic events leading to myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Cufi, Perrine; Dragin, Nadine; Ruhlmann, Nathalie; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Fadel, Elie; Serraf, Alain; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Le Panse, Rozen

    2014-08-01

    The thymus plays a primary role in early-onset Myasthenia Gravis (MG) mediated by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. As we recently showed an inflammatory and anti-viral signature in MG thymuses, we investigated in detail the contribution of interferon (IFN)-I and IFN-III subtypes in thymic changes associated with MG. We showed that IFN-I and IFN-III subtypes, but especially IFN-β, induced specifically α-AChR expression in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). We also demonstrated that IFN-β increased TEC death and the uptake of TEC proteins by dendritic cells. In parallel, we showed that IFN-β increased the expression of the chemokines CXCL13 and CCL21 by TECs and lymphatic endothelial cells, respectively. These two chemokines are involved in germinal center (GC) development and overexpressed in MG thymus with follicular hyperplasia. We also demonstrated that the B-cell activating factor (BAFF), which favors autoreactive B-cells, was overexpressed by TECs in MG thymus and was also induced by IFN-β in TEC cultures. Some of IFN-β effects were down-regulated when cell cultures were treated with glucocorticoids, a treatment widely used in MG patients that decreases the number of thymic GCs. Similar changes were observed in vivo. The injections of Poly(I:C) to C57BL/6 mice triggered a thymic overexpression of IFN-β and IFN-α2 associated with increased expressions of CXCL13, CCL21, BAFF, and favored the recruitment of B cells. These changes were not observed in the thymus of IFN-I receptor KO mice injected with Poly(I:C), even if IFN-β and IFN-α2 were overexpressed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that IFN-β could play a central role in thymic events leading to MG by triggering the overexpression of α-AChR probably leading to thymic DC autosensitization, the abnormal recruitment of peripheral cells and GC formation.

  2. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  3. Pre-transplant thymic function is associated with the risk of cytomegalovirus disease after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ahufinger, I; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Montejo, M; Muñoz-Villanueva, M C; Cantisán, S; Rivero, A; Solana, R; Leal, M; Torre-Cisneros, J

    2015-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is an important complication in solid organ transplant recipients. Thymic function in adults is associated with specific T-cell immunity. Pre-transplant thymic function was analysed in 75 solid organ transplant patients by the use of nested PCR. The primary outcome was the incidence of CMV disease 12 months after transplantation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we studied whether pre-transplant thymic function is an independent risk factor for CMV disease after transplantation. Thymic function was related to the risk of CMV disease in CMV-seropositive recipients. In these recipients, pre-transplant thymic function of <9.5 (OR 11.27, 95% CI 1.11-114.43, p 0.040) and the use of thymoglobulin (OR 8.21, 95% CI 1.09-61.84, p 0.041) were independent risk factors for CMV disease at 12 months after transplantation. Patients with pre-transplant thymic function values of <9.5 had a higher subsequent incidence of CMV disease (24%) than patients with values of ≥ 9.5 (3%) (log-rank test: 5.727; p 0.017). The positive and negative predictive values of these pre-transplant thymic function cut-offs were 0.24 (95% CI 0.10-0.45) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.82-1.00), respectively. Pre-transplant thymic function in CMV-seropositive candidates could be useful in determining the risk of post-transplant CMV disease in solid organ transplant patients, selecting a group of low-risk candidates.

  4. Characteristic Retinal Atrophy with Secondary “Inverse” Optic Atrophy Identifies Vigabatrin Toxicity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Buncic, J. Raymond; Westall, Carol A.; Panton, Carole M.; Munn, J. Robert; MacKeen, Leslie D.; Logan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical pattern of retinal atrophy in children caused by the anticonvulsant vigabatrin. Design An interventional case series report. Participants One hundred thirty-eight patients, mainly infants, were evaluated regularly for evidence of possible vigabatrin toxicity in the Eye and Neurology clinics at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. Method Sequential clinical and electroretinographic (International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision standards) evaluations every 6 months. Main Outcome Measures Presence of recognizable retinal and optic atrophy in the presence of abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) and other clinical findings. Results Three children being treated for seizures with vigabatrin showed definite clinical findings of peripheral retinal nerve fiber layer atrophy, with relative sparing of the central or macular portion of the retina and relative nasal optic nerve atrophic changes. Some macular wrinkling was evident in 1 case. Progressive ERG changes showing decreased responses, especially the 30-Hz flicker response, supported the presence of decreased retinal function. Conclusions A recognizable and characteristic form of peripheral retinal atrophy and nasal or “inverse” optic disc atrophy can occur in a small number of children being treated with vigabatrin. The changes in superficial light reflexes of the retina in children facilitate the clinical recognition of nerve fiber layer atrophy. The macula is relatively spared, although superficial retinal light reflexes indicating wrinkling of the innermost retina suggest early macular toxicity as well. Because these changes are accompanied by electrophysiologic evidence of retinal dysfunction, discontinuation of vigabatrin should be strongly considered. PMID:15465561

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the thymus, enteric type: report of 2 cases, and proposal for a novel subtype of thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Bernhard; Schiefer, Ana Iris; Janik, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Prosch, Helmut; Pohl, Wolfgang; Neudert, Barbara; Scharrer, Anke; Klepetko, Walter; Müllauer, Leonhard

    2015-04-01

    We report 2 cases of primary thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation. One carcinoma occurred in a 41-year-old man as a 7-cm-diameter cystic tumor and the other one in a 39-year-old woman as a 6-cm-diameter solid mass. Both tumors were located in the anterior mediastinum. Clinical staging did not reveal any extrathymic tumor. Histologically, the tumors were classified as adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified, and a mucinous (colloid) carcinoma, respectively. Immunohistochemically, both tumors were positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20), CDX2, and carcinoembryonic antigen, reflecting enteric differentiation. A review of the literature on 43 other cases of primary thymic adenocarcinomas suggested 11 further cases with enteric differentiation, as assessed by CK20 and/or CDX2 expression. We propose that thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation represents a novel subtype of thymic carcinoma. It is mostly of mucinous morphology and frequently associated with thymic cysts. The clinical outcome is variable. Recognition of primary thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is helpful for the differentiation from metastatic disease, mainly from the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Thymic epithelial neoplasms: a review of current concepts using an evidence-based pathology approach.

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, Alberto M; McKenna, Robert J; Gupta, Ruta

    2008-06-01

    Evidence-based pathology promotes the critical evaluation of current clinical information and the development of evidence-based diagnostic and prognostic guidelines. No randomized clinical trials of patients who have thymomas or thymic carcinomas are available to evaluate the validity of the current World Health Organization (WHO) histologic classification or the widely used Masaoka staging system. A meta-analysis of over 2000 thymoma patients estimated that only three WHO histologic types of thymomas are associated with significant survival differences. Prospective randomized clinical trials and an international registry of patients who have Thymic epithelial neoplasms are needed to stratify patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy, postoperative radiation therapy, and other nonsurgical modalities.

  7. Inferior Vena Cava and Renal Vein Thrombosis Associated with Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paraschiv, Marina; Sorohan, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Thymic tumors are rare mediastinal tumors that can present with a wide variety of symptoms. They can cause distant manifestations and are frequently associated with paraneoplastic syndromes. In our case, we describe the evolution of a 68-year-old male whose first manifestation was thrombosis of the inferior vena cava and renal veins. Thrombosis of large abdominal veins is rare, especially without being associated with any other comorbidity or risk factors. PMID:28163719

  8. Rare frequency of gene variation and survival analysis in thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Zhang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thymic epithelial tumor (TET) is a rare mediastinal neoplasm and little is known about its genetic variability and prognostic factors. This study investigated the genetic variability and prognostic factors of TET. Patients and methods We sequenced 22 cancer-related hotspot genes in TET tissues and matched normal tissues using Ampliseq Ion Torrent next-generation technology. Overall survival was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier methods and compared with log-rank tests. Results A histological analysis of 52 patients with a median age of 52 years showed 15 patients (28.8%) with thymic carcinoma, five with type A thymoma (9.6%), eight with type AB (15.4%), six with type B1 (11.5%), nine with type B2 (17.3%), and nine with type B3 thymoma (17.3%). Three gene mutations were identified, including two with PIK3CA mutation and one with EGFR mutation. The three patients with mutant genes included two cases of thymoma (one with EGFR and the other with PIK3CA mutation) in addition to a case of thymic carcinoma (PIK3CA mutation). The 5-year survival rates were 77.7% in all patients. The 5-year survival rates were 93.3%, 90.0%, 76.9%, and 22.9% corresponding to Masaoka stages I, II, III, and IV (P<0.001). The 5-year survival rates were 100%, 100%, 83.3%, 88.9%, 65.6%, and 60.9% in the histological subtypes of A, AB, B1, B2, and B3 thymomas, and thymic carcinoma, respectively (P=0.012). Conclusion Hotspot gene mutations are rare in TET. PIK3CA and EGFR mutations represent candidate driver genes and treatment targets in TET. Masaoka stage and histological subtypes predict the survival of TET. PMID:27789964

  9. Neonatal Hypoxia, Hippocampal Atrophy, and Memory Impairment: Evidence of a Causal Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Janine M.; Gadian, David G.; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W. Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life. PMID:24343890

  10. Neonatal hypoxia, hippocampal atrophy, and memory impairment: evidence of a causal sequence.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Janine M; Gadian, David G; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-06-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life.

  11. Thymic epithelial cells of human patients affected by myasthenia gravis overexpress IGF-I immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Tsvetana T; Kuerten, Stefanie; Petrov, Danail B; Angelov, Doychin N

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that several kinds of thymic cells express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which is known to play an important role in T cell ontogeny under both physiological and pathological conditions. Still, little is known about the mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in the pathological transformation of the thymocyte microenvironment. The present study focuses on a comparative analysis of the IGF-I immunoreactivity of thymic epithelial cells (EC) from human patients with hyperplasia-associated myasthenia gravis (MG) versus physiological thymic tissue from healthy controls using immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. We show that myasthenic EC overexpress IGF-I in comparison to EC from control subjects. The IGF-I immunoreactivity in the medullary and cortical EC from MG patients was stronger than in the normal gland. The increased expression of IGF-I and more frequent distribution of IGF-I and IGF-I-receptor (IGF-IR) immunopositive EC correlated with modulation in the immunoreactivity of double (IGF-I/IGF-IR) positive EC. Our data provide new immunocytochemial evidence for alterations of IGF-I and IGF-IR immunoreactivity in EC from pathological thymi. The persisting expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR most likely indicates that the myasthenic thymus is still capable of governing IGF-I signaling pathways, which are involved in the local regulation of T cell development and plasticity.

  12. nab-Paclitaxel in Combination with Carboplatin for a Previously Treated Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Makimoto, Go; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Watanabe, Hiromi; Kameyama, Nobuhisa; Matsushita, Mizuho; Rai, Kammei; Sato, Ken; Yonei, Toshiro; Sato, Toshio; Shibayama, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old man with previously treated thymic carcinoma, complaining of gradually worsening back pain. Computed tomography scans of the chest showed multiple pleural disseminated nodules with a pleural effusion in the right thorax. The patient was treated with carboplatin on day 1 plus nab-paclitaxel on day 1 and 8 in cycles repeated every 4 weeks. Objective tumor shrinkage was observed after 4 cycles of this regimen. In addition, the elevated serum cytokeratin 19 fragment level decreased, and the patient's back pain was relieved without any analgesics. Although he experienced grade 4 neutropenia and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection, the severity of thrombocytopenia and nonhematological toxicities such as reversible neuropathy did not exceed grade 1 during the treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel against thymic carcinoma. This case report suggests that nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin can be a favorable chemotherapy regimen for advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:24575009

  13. Neuropeptides Exert Direct Effects on Rat Thymic Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Head, Gail M.; Mentlein, R.; Patay, Birte Von; Downing, J. E.G.

    1998-01-01

    To determine if major thymic neuropeptides and neurotransmitters can directly influence the functional activity of cultured rat thymic epithelium, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters were applied, and intercellular communication, proliferation, and thymulin secretion assessed. After injections of a mixture of lucifer yellow dextran (too large to pass gap junctions) and cascade blue (which does) into single cells, some neuropeptides decrease dye coupling: 0.1 mM GABA (P < 0.0001), 100 nM NPY (P < 0.0001), 100 nM VIP (P < 0.001), 100 nM CGRP (P < 0.001), 100 nM SP (P < 0.01), and 0.1 mM histamine (P < 0.01), whereas 0.1 mM 5-HT, mM acetylcholine, and 1 μM isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist) had no effect. Proliferation (incorporation of tritiated thymidine) was increased by CGRP (P = 0.004) and histamine (P < 0.02), but decreased by isoproterenol (P = 0.002), 5-HT (P = 0.003), and acetylcholine (P < 0.05). The percentage of multinucleate cells was decreased after isoproterenol (2.5%), and increased after 5-HT (21.3%), GABA (15%), and histamine (15.1%). Compared to controls, thymulin in the supernatant was decreased after challenge with acetylcholine (52%), isoproterenol (71%), 5-HT (73%), and histamine (84%). This study demonstrates direct effects of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters on functional aspects of cultured thymic epithelial cells. PMID:9716910

  14. An Age-Associated Decline in Thymic Output Differs in Dog Breeds According to Their Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Angela; Mella, Stephanie; Palmer, Donald B.; Aspinall, Richard; Catchpole, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The age associated decline in immune function is preceded in mammals by a reduction in thymic output. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence of a link between immune competence and lifespan. One approach to determining thymic output is to quantify signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (sj-TRECs), a method which has been developed and used in several mammalian species. Life expectancy and the rate of aging vary in dogs depending upon their breed. In this study, we quantified sj-TRECs in blood samples from dogs of selected breeds to determine whether there was a relationship between longevity and thymic output. In Labrador retrievers, a breed with a median expected lifespan of 11 years, there was an age-associated decline in sj-TREC values, with the greatest decline occurring before 5 years of age, but with sj-TREC still detectable in some geriatric animals, over 13 years of age. In large short-lived breeds (Burnese mountain dogs, Great Danes and Dogue de Bordeaux), the decline in sj-TREC values began earlier in life, compared with small long-lived breeds (Jack Russell terriers and Yorkshire terriers), and the presence of animals with undetectable sj-TRECs occurred at a younger age in the short-lived breeds. The study findings suggest that age-associated changes in canine sj-TRECs are related to breed differences in longevity, and this research highlights the use of dogs as a potential model of immunosenescence. PMID:27824893

  15. Characterization of CD34+ thymic stromal cells located in the subcapsular cortex of the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cáceres, E; Jaleco, A C; Res, P; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we report that suspensions of human fetal thymocytes contain cells that express high levels of CD34 and Thy-1. These cells were characterized with regard to location within the thymus, phenotype, and function. Confocal laser scan analysis of frozen sections of fetal thymus with anti-CD34 and Thy-1 antibodies revealed that the double-labeled cells were located in the pericortical area. In addition, it was found that the CD34+Thy-1+ cells lacked CD45 and CD50, indicating that these cells are not of hematopoietic origin; this was confirmed by the finding that these cells could be cultured as adherent cells in a medium with cholera toxin and dexamethasone, but failed to grow in mixtures of hematopoietic growth factors. Further analysis indicated that most cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 14 but lacked CK 13, suggesting that these cells are immature epithelial cells. Cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells were able to induce differentiation of CD1-CD34+CD3-CD4-CD8- thymic precursors into CD4+CD8+ cells in a reaggregate culture in the absence of exogenous cytokines. The CD4+CD8+ cells that developed in these cultures did not express CD3, indicating that CD34+Thy-1+ thymic stromal cells are not capable of completing full T cell differentiation of thymic hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  16. Evaluation of bovine thymic function by measurement of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles.

    PubMed

    Hisazumi, Rinnosuke; Kayumi, Miya; Zhang, Weidong; Kikukawa, Ryuji; Nasu, Tetuo; Yasuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A signal joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) is a circular DNA produced by T-cell receptor α gene rearrangement in the thymus. Measurements of sjTREC values have been used to evaluate thymic function. We recently established a quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay of bovine sjTREC. In the present study, we used this QPCR assay to measure the sjTREC value in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and we then evaluated the relationships between sjTREC values and peripheral blood T-cell number, growth stage, gender, and meteorological season. The sjTREC value was highest at the neonatal stage, and its value subsequently decreased with age. On the other hand, the peripheral T-cell number increased with age. The sjTREC value in calves up to 50-days old was significantly higher for males than for females, suggesting that thymic function might differ by gender. In addition, the sjTREC value and the peripheral T-cell number were significantly higher in calves in the summer season than in calves in the winter season. These data suggest that bovine thymic function is highly variable and varies according to the growth stage, gender, and environmental factors such as air temperature or the UV index.

  17. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  18. Heterogeneity of thymic epithelial cells in promoting T-lymphocyte differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, J C; Palacios, R

    1991-01-01

    To study in vivo the contribution of different thymic epithelial cells to T-lymphocyte differentiation, we have established several nontransformed thymic epithelial cell lines and developed an in vivo assay, not involving exposure to drugs or radiation, that permitted us to study the capacity of these epithelial lines to support T-cell differentiation. We found that cell lines EA2 and ET, which express markers of cortical epithelial cells, produce interleukin 7 mRNA and after being injected into the spleens of young athymic nude mice support in vivo generation of CD4+CD8- T-cell receptor alpha beta+ T lymphocytes (ET line) or both CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ T-cell receptor alpha beta+ T cells (EA2 line). Both cell lines also supported generation of T-cell receptor gamma delta+ T cells but appear not to support development of double-positive (CD4+CD8+) cells. One cell line, EB3, which expresses markers of medullary epithelial cells, produces interleukin 1 alpha RNA transcripts but does not support T-lymphocyte differentiation. The results provide direct evidence for functional heterogeneity of thymic epithelial cells in vivo and show the involvement of different cortical epithelial cells in the differentiation of T-cell progenitors into distinct thymocyte subsets. Images PMID:1988959

  19. Efficacy of computed tomography features in predicting stage III thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Ye, Jianding; Fang, Wentao; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xiaodan; Ma, Yonghong; Chen, Libo; Li, Minghua

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the invasion of intrathoracic structures by stage III thymic tumors assists their appropriate management. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) features for the prediction of stage III thymoma invasion. The pre-operative CT images of 66 patients with confirmed stage III thymic tumors were reviewed retrospectively. The CT features of invasion into the mediastinal pleura, lungs, pericardium and great vessels were analyzed, and their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. For mediastinal pleural and pericardial invasion, an absence of space between the tumor and the mediastinal pleura/pericardium with mediastinal pleural/pericardial thickening and pleural/pericardial effusion exhibited a specificity and PPV of 100%, respectively. For lung invasion, a multi-lobular tumor convex to the lung with adjacent lung abnormalities exhibited a specificity and PPV of 91.2 and 81.3%, respectively. For vessel invasion, the specificity and PPV were each 100% for tumors abutting ≥50% of the vessel circumference, and for tumor oppression, deformation and occlusion of the vessel. In conclusion, recognition of the appropriate CT features can serve as a guide to invasion by stage III thymic tumors, and can facilitate the selection of appropriate pre-operative treatment. PMID:28123518

  20. Association between thymic function and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outcome: results of a pediatric study.

    PubMed

    Saglio, Francesco; Cena, Silvia; Berger, Massimo; Quarello, Paola; Boccasavia, Viola; Ferrando, Federica; Pittana, Laura; Bruno, Benedetto; Fagioli, Franca

    2015-06-01

    Robust T cell function recovery has been shown to be crucial in determining allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) outcome, and there is growing evidence that the thymus plays a central role in regulating this process. We performed a long-term analysis of the role of thymic activity recovery in a population of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT by signal joint T cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) quantification. In this study, characterized by a long-term follow-up (median, 72 months), we found patients with higher levels of sjTRECs before transplantation had a statistically significant reduced risk of death compared with patients with lower values (relative risk, .31; 95% confidence interval, .30 to .32; P = .02), showing this different outcome was mainly related to a reduction of relapse incidence (14% versus 43%, P = .02). Unlike previous reports, we observed no correlation between sjTREC levels and lymphocyte recovery. Moreover, we confirmed that only graft-versus-host disease influenced thymic activity after transplantation. In conclusion, our results suggest an association between pretransplantation thymic activity and the long-term outcome of pediatric patients undergoing HSCT, mainly through a reduction of relapse opportunities.

  1. Treatment of dyspareunia secondary to vulvovaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2014-01-01

    Declining estrogen levels associated with menopause can result in vulvovaginal atrophy and some degree of dyspareunia for more than half of all women in menopause. In 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved ospemifene, a nonhormonal oral medication for the treatment of dyspareunia in menopause. This article will provide an overview of ospemifene and its indications, side effects and implications for nurses.

  2. Progressive visual agnosia with posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M; Sartori, G; Liccione, D; Battelli, L; Campo, R

    1996-05-01

    A patient of posterior cortical atrophy characterized by early signs of progressive visual agnosia documented by repeated neuropsychological tests, is reported. SPECT and MRI findings showed left unilateral parieto-occipital involvement in the earlier stage. A PET study executed eight months later showed bilateral parieto-occipital hypometabolism, but predominantly in the left hemisphere. This suggests that the degeneration may have developed asymmetrically, progressing from left unilateral to bilateral.

  3. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy (Type 0).

    PubMed

    Al Dakhoul, Suleiman

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a rare phenotype of very severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a newborn who presented with reduced fetal movements in utero and significant respiratory distress at birth. The patient was homozygously deleted for exon 7 and exon 8 of the survival motor neuron gene 1. Very severe SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth, and more research should be dedicated to investigate the genetic determinants of its widely variable phenotypes.

  4. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy (Type 0)

    PubMed Central

    Al Dakhoul, Suleiman

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a rare phenotype of very severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a newborn who presented with reduced fetal movements in utero and significant respiratory distress at birth. The patient was homozygously deleted for exon 7 and exon 8 of the survival motor neuron gene 1. Very severe SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth, and more research should be dedicated to investigate the genetic determinants of its widely variable phenotypes. PMID:28182029

  5. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vandenburgh, H; Chromiak, J; Shansky, J; Del Tatto, M; Lemaire, J

    1999-06-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  6. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  7. Evolution of geographic atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sarks, J P; Sarks, S H; Killingsworth, M C

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to trace the evolution of geographic atrophy (GA) by clinical documentation and by clinico-morphological correlation in representative eyes. Geographic atrophy commonly commenced within a parafoveal band of incipient atrophy of varying width, characterised by semisolid drusen and a microreticular pigment pattern. Progression of atrophy mostly skirted fixation and visual acuity was a poor guide to the functional impact, an estimate of the percentage of fovea involved proving a more useful clinical parameter. The rate of progression slowed once GA had involved all the retina affected by incipient atrophy and the risk of choroidal neovascularization appeared to decline. An earlier histological classification of the evolution of GA is revised according to the ultrastructural findings. Membranous debris was not previously recognised and its contribution to the findings in incipient atrophy and to dot-like drusen is described.

  8. Thymic Nurse Cells Exhibit Epithelial Progenitor Phenotype and Create Unique Extra-Cytoplasmic Membrane Space for Thymocyte Selection

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Tonya M.; Chilukuri, Rajendra V.E.; Martinez, Marcia; Olushoga, Zachariah; Blake, Andrew; Brohi, Moazzam; Walker, Christopher; Samms, Michael; Guyden, Jerry C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) are epithelial cells in the thymic cortex that contain as many as fifty thymocytes within specialized cytoplasmic vacuoles. The function of this cell-in-cell interaction has created controversy since their discovery in 1980. Further, some skepticism exists about the idea that apoptotic thymocytes within the TNC complex result from negative selection, a process believed to occur exclusively within the medulla. In this report, we have microscopic evidence that defines a unique membranous environment wherein lipid raft aggregates around the αβTCR expressed on captured thymocytes and class II MHC molecules expressed on TNCs. Further, immunohistological examination of thymic sections show TNCs located within the cortico-medullary junction to express cytokeratins five and eight (K5 and K8), and the transcription factor Trp-63, the phenotype defined elsewhere as the thymic epithelial progenitor subset. Our results suggest that the microenvironment provided by TNCs plays an important role in thymocyte selection as well as the potential for TNCs to be involved in the maintenance of thymic epithelia. PMID:20035931

  9. Abnormalities of Thymic Stroma may Contribute to Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Leaky Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Caraffi, Stefano; Paganini, Tiziana; Fontana, Elena; Giliani, Silvia; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Lymphostromal cross-talk in the thymus is essential to allow generation of a diversified repertoire of T lymphocytes and to prevent autoimmunity by self-reactive T cells. Hypomorphic mutations in genes that control T cell development have been associated with immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation both in humans and in mice. We have studied T cell development and thymic stroma architecture and maturation in two mouse models of leaky severe combined immune deficiency, carrying hypomorphic mutations in rag1 and lig4 genes. Defective T cell development was associated with abnormalities of thymic architecture that predominantly affect the thymic medulla, with reduction of the pool of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the ability of mTECs to express autoimmune regulator (Aire) is preserved in mutant mice, the frequency of mature mTECs expressing Aire and tissue-specific antigens is severely reduced. Similarly, the ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells is preserved in rag1 and lig4 mutant mice, but their number is greatly reduced. These data indicate that hypomorphic defects in T cell development may cause defective lymphostromal cross-talk and impinge on thymic stromal cells maturation, and thus favor immune dysregulation. PMID:21822418

  10. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  11. Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: potential model for thymic education.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Wilkinson, J E; Rinchik, E M; Russell, L B

    1991-07-01

    Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu; sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. We conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

  12. Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: Potential model for thymic education

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1991-07-01

    Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu;sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. The authors conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

  13. Ephrin-B-dependent thymic epithelial cell-thymocyte interactions are necessary for correct T cell differentiation and thymus histology organization: relevance for thymic cortex development.

    PubMed

    Cejalvo, Teresa; Munoz, Juan J; Tobajas, Esther; Fanlo, Lucía; Alfaro, David; García-Ceca, Javier; Zapata, Agustín

    2013-03-15

    Previous analysis on the thymus of erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte kinases (Eph) B knockout mice and chimeras revealed that Eph-Eph receptor-interacting proteins (ephrins) are expressed both on T cells and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and play a role in defining the thymus microenvironments. In the current study, we have used the Cre-LoxP system to selectively delete ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 in either thymocytes (EfnB1(thy/thy), EfnB2(thy/thy), and EfnB1(thy/thy)EfnB2(thy/thy) mice) or TECs (EfnB1(tec/tec), EfnB2(tec/tec), and EfnB1(tec/tec)EfnB2(tec/tec) mice) and determine the relevance of these Eph ligands in T cell differentiation and thymus histology. Our results indicate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 expressed on thymocytes play an autonomous role in T cell development and, expressed on TECs, their nonautonomous roles are partially overlapping. The effects of the lack of ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 on either thymocytes or TECs are more severe and specific on thymic epithelium, contribute to the cell intermingling necessary for thymus organization, and affect cortical TEC subpopulation phenotype and location. Moreover, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 seem to be involved in the temporal appearance of distinct cortical TECs subsets defined by different Ly51 levels of expression on the ontogeny.

  14. Acceleration of hippocampal atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, K Abigail; Frost, Chris; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Rowe, Chris C; Villemagne, Victor; Fox, Nick C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of brain atrophy measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging precede symptom onset in Alzheimer's disease and may be useful outcome measures for prodromal clinical trials. Appropriate trial design requires a detailed understanding of the relationships between β-amyloid load and accumulation, and rate of brain change at this stage of the disease. Fifty-two healthy individuals (72.3 ± 6.9 years) from Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Aging had serial (0, 18 m, 36 m) magnetic resonance imaging, (0, 18 m) Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography, and clinical assessments. We calculated rates of whole brain and hippocampal atrophy, ventricular enlargement, amyloid accumulation, and cognitive decline. Over 3 years, rates of whole brain atrophy (p < 0.001), left and right hippocampal atrophy (p = 0.001, p = 0.023), and ventricular expansion (p < 0.001) were associated with baseline β-amyloid load. Whole brain atrophy rates were also independently associated with β-amyloid accumulation over the first 18 months (p = 0.003). Acceleration of left hippocampal atrophy rate was associated with baseline β-amyloid load across the cohort (p < 0.02). We provide evidence that rates of atrophy are associated with both baseline β-amyloid load and accumulation, and that there is presymptomatic, amyloid-mediated acceleration of hippocampal atrophy. Clinical trials using rate of hippocampal atrophy as an outcome measure should not assume linear decline in the presymptomatic phase.

  15. The Impact of Gastric Atrophy on the Incidence of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tse-Ya; Wei, Jung-Nan; Kuo, Chun-Heng; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Mao-Shin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hua, Cyue-Huei; Hsein, Yenh-Chen; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Lee, Mei-Kuei; Hsiao, Ching-Hsiang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Li, Hung-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Gastric atrophy results in lower plasma ghrelin, higher gastrin secretion, a change in gut microbiota, and altered dietary nutrient absorption, which may be associated with the incidence of diabetes. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major cause of gastric atrophy and is associated with diabetes in some reports. Since there is no study which investigates the impact of gastric atrophy on diabetes, we conduct a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between H. pylori infection, gastric atrophy, and incident diabetes. In this study, subjects with gastric atrophy had a lower risk of incident diabetes, compared to those without gastric atrophy. The extent of gastric atrophy, measured by serum pepsinogen (PG) I/II ratio, was correlated with age, H. pylori IgG titer, HOMA2-IR, and HOMA2%B. When gastric atrophy is more extensive, presented as a lower serum PG I/II ratio, the risk of incident diabetes is lower. On the other hand, there was no significant association between H. pylori infection and the incidence of diabetes. In conclusion, the presence and the extent of gastric atrophy, but not H. pylori infection, are associated with incident diabetes. Further studies are needed to investigate the detailed mechanisms and the potential applications of the findings to guide diabetes screening and treatment strategies. PMID:28045079

  16. CLADA: cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for the assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for the measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm(3) isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post-mortem tissue. CLADA's sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation=0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images.

  17. CLADA: Cortical Longitudinal Atrophy Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower-resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5mm3 voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm3 isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm3 voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post- mortem tissue. CLADA’s sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1 mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation = 0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images. PMID:20674750

  18. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  19. Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by an expanded repeat in the androgen receptor gene. The mutant protein is toxic to motor neurons and muscle. The toxicity is ligand-dependent and likely involves aberrant interaction of the mutant androgen receptor with other nuclear factors leading to transcriptional dysregulation. Various therapeutic strategies have been effective in transgenic animal models, and the challenge now is to translate these strategies into safe and effective treatment in patients. PMID:26547319

  20. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress.

  1. Geographic atrophy: clinical features and potential therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Holz, Frank G; Strauss, Erich C; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno

    2014-05-01

    In contrast to wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), where loss of vision is typically acute and treatment leads to a relatively rapid reduction in retinal fluid and subsequent improvements in visual acuity (VA), disease progression and vision loss in geographic atrophy (GA) owing to AMD are gradual processes. Although GA can result in significant visual function deficits in reading, night vision, and dark adaptation, and produce dense, irreversible scotomas in the visual field, the initial decline in VA may be relatively minor if the fovea is spared. Because best-corrected VA does not correlate well with GA lesions or progression, alternative clinical endpoints are being sought. These include reduction in drusen burden, slowing the enlargement rate of GA lesion area, and slowing or eliminating the progression of intermediate to advanced AMD. Among these considerations, slowing the expansion of the GA lesion area seems to be a clinically suitable primary efficacy endpoint. Because GA lesion growth is characterized by loss of photoreceptors, it is considered a surrogate endpoint for vision loss. Detection of GA can be achieved with a number of different imaging techniques, including color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), near-infrared reflectance, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Previous studies have identified predictive characteristics for progression rates including abnormal patterns of FAF in the perilesional retina. Although there is currently no approved or effective treatment to prevent the onset and progression of GA, potential therapies are being evaluated in clinical studies.

  2. Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cell Differentiation, Thymocyte Emigration, and the Control of Autoimmunity Require Lympho–Epithelial Cross Talk via LTβR

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Thomas; Scheu, Stefanie; Pfeffer, Klaus; Bleul, Conrad C.

    2003-01-01

    Thymocytes depend on the interaction with thymic epithelial cells for the generation of a diverse, nonautoreactive T cell repertoire. In turn, thymic epithelial cells acquire their three-dimensional cellular organization via instructive signals from developing thymocytes. The nature of these signals has been elusive so far. We show that thymocytes and medullary epithelial cells (MECs) communicate via the lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) signaling axis. Normal differentiation of thymic MECs requires LTβR ligand on thymocytes and LTβR together with nuclear factor–κB-inducing kinase (Nik) in thymic epithelial cells. Impaired lympho–epithelial cross talk in the absence of the LTβR causes aberrant differentiation and reduced numbers of thymic MECs, leads to the retention of mature T lymphocytes, and is associated with autoimmune phenomena, suggesting an unexpected role for LTβR signaling in central tolerance induction. PMID:12953095

  3. The application of postoperative chemotherapy in thymic tumors and its prognostic effect

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the role of postoperative chemotherapy and its prognostic effect in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV thymic tumors. Methods Between 1994 and 2012, 1,700 patients with thymic tumors who underwent surgery without neoadjuvant therapy were enrolled for the study. Among them, 665 patients in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV were further analyzed to evaluate the clinical value of postoperative chemotherapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain the survival curve of the patients divided into different subgroups, and the Cox regression analysis was used to make multivariate analysis on the factors affecting prognosis. A Propensity-Matched Study was used to evaluate the clinical value of chemotherapy. Results Two-hundred and twenty-one patients were treated with postoperative chemotherapy, while the rest 444 cases were not. The two groups showed significant differences (P<0.05) regarding the incidence of myasthenia gravis, World Health Organization (WHO) histological subtypes, pathological staging, resection status and the use of postoperative radiotherapy. WHO type C tumors, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were significantly related to increased recurrence and worse survival (P<0.05). Five-year and 10-year disease free survivals (DFS) and recurrence rates in patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative chemotherapy were 51% and 30%, 46% and 68%, comparing with 73% and 58%, 26% and 40% in patients who had no adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery (P=0.001, P=0.001, respectively). In propensity-matched study, 158 pairs of patients with or without postoperative chemotherapy (316 patients in total) were selected and compared accordingly. Similar 5-year survival rates were detected between the two groups (P=0.332). Conclusions Pathologically higher grade histology, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were found to be associated with worse outcomes in advanced stage thymic tumors. At present, there is no evidence

  4. Advanced thymic cancer treated with carboplatin and paclitaxel in a patient undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Miura, Satoru; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takehito; Nozaki, Koichiro; Asakawa, Katsuaki; Moro, Hiroshi; Okajima, Masaaki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Iino, Noriaki; Goto, Shin; Kazama, Junichiro James; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with an asymptomatic anterior mediastinal tumor undergoing hemodialysis was referred to our institution. He was diagnosed with thymic basaloid carcinoma based on the findings of a chest tomography-guided biopsy and successfully treated with carboplatin (300 mg/m(2)/day) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m(2)/day) on day 1 for six three-week cycles. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the efficiency of a carboplatin dose-definition method based on the body surface area with paclitaxel in a hemodialysis patient. This report may therefore be useful for treating hemodialysis patients who are candidates for carboplatin and paclitaxel therapy.

  5. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-08-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T-cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T-cell receptors on their surface to short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility gene products (displayed on antigen-presenting cells). A diverse and self-tolerant T-cell repertoire is selected in the thymus. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide an analytic expression for the amino acid compositions of selected T-cell receptors (which enable its recognition functions).

  6. Morvan Syndrome Secondary to Thymic Carcinoma in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koussa, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Morvan syndrome (MoS) is a rare paraneoplastic autoimmune disorder characterized by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders. Systemic lupus erythmatosus (SLE) cooccurs in 6–10% of patients with thymoma. It may occur before, concurrently with, or after thymoma diagnosis. This paper reports the first case of cooccurrence of SLE, thymic carcinoma, and MoS. The cooccurrence of SLE, thymoma, and MoS delineates the generalized autoimmunity process. Symptoms of both MoS and SLE abated upon tumor resection. PMID:27247812

  7. Current evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction and thymic stromal lymphopoietin in the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei

    2014-09-01

    It has long been observed that the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy are frequently preceded by atopic dermatitis, a phenomenon known as the "atopic march". Clinical, genetic and experimental studies have supported the fact that atopic dermatitis could be the initial step of the atopic march, leading to the subsequent development of other atopic diseases. This brief review will focus on the current evidence showing that epidermal barrier dysfunction and the keratinocyte-derived cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin play critical roles in the onset of the atopic march.

  8. A case of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Huang, Xiaochun; Qiu, Yuan; Chen, Hanzhang; Fu, Yingyu; Li, Xinchun

    2013-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an idiopathic group of reactive proliferative diseases linked to aberrant immunity, pathologically characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. LCH rarely involves the thymus. We report a case of thymic LCH with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation, without evidence of myasthenia gravis and without evidenced involvement of the skin, liver, spleen, bones, lungs and superficial lymph nodes. This present case may have important clinical implications. In screening for LCH lesions, attention should be attached to rarely involved sites in addition to commonly involved organs. Follow-up and imageological examination are very important to a final diagnosis.

  9. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-01-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon γ were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon γ mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs. PMID:14570737

  10. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  11. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-11-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon gamma were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon gamma mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs.

  12. S1P lyase in thymic perivascular spaces promotes egress of mature thymocytes via up-regulation of S1P receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Hideki; Takemoto, Kana; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Fukunari, Atsushi; Sugahara, Kunio; Masuko, Takashi; Chiba, Kenji

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) play an important role in the egress of mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes from the thymus. Fingolimod hydrochloride (FTY720), an S1P1 functional antagonist, induced significant accumulation of CD62L(high)CD69(low) mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Immunohistochemical staining using anti-S1P1 antibody revealed that S1P1 is predominantly expressed on thymocytes in the thymic medulla and is strongly down-regulated even at 3h after FTY720 administration. 2-Acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, also induced accumulation of mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla with an enlargement of the perivascular spaces (PVS). At 6h after THI administration, S1P1-expressing thymocytes reduced partially as if to form clusters and hardly existed in the proximity of CD31-expressing blood vessels in the thymic medulla, suggesting S1P lyase expression in the cells constructing thymic medullary PVS. To determine the cells expressing S1P lyase in the thymus, we newly established a mAb (YK19-2) specific for mouse S1P lyase. Immunohistochemical staining with YK19-2 revealed that S1P lyase is predominantly expressed in non-lymphoid thymic stromal cells in the thymic medulla. In the thymic medullary PVS, S1P lyase was expressed in ER-TR7-positive cells (reticular fibroblasts and pericytes) and CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that S1P lyase expressed in the thymic medullary PVS keeps the tissue S1P concentration low around the vessels and promotes thymic egress via up-regulation of S1P1.

  13. Molecular events in skeletal muscle during disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandarian, Susan C.; Stevenson, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular processes underlying skeletal muscle atrophy due to disuse. Because the processes involved with muscle wasting due to illness are similar to disuse, this literature is used for comparison. Areas that are ripe for further study and that will advance our understanding of muscle atrophy are suggested.

  14. Indices of Regional Brain Atrophy: Formulae and Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of brain atrophy helps to discriminate normal age-related changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Albeit indices of regional brain atrophy have proven to be a parameter useful in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of some neurodegenerative diseases, indices of absolute regional atrophy still have some important limitations. We propose using indices of relative atrophy for representing how the volume of a given region of interest (ROI) changes over time in comparison to changes in global brain measures over the same time. A second problem in morphometric studies is terminology. There is a lack of systematization naming indices and the same measure can be named with different terms by different research groups or imaging softwares. This limits the understanding and discussion of studies. In this technological report, we provide a general description on how to compute indices of absolute and relative regional brain atrophy and propose a standardized nomenclature. PMID:26261753

  15. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  16. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  17. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy in Thymic Carcinoma: Evolving Mechanisms of Hypercalcemia and Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first case where an evolution of mechanisms responsible for hypercalcemia occurred in undifferentiated thymic carcinoma and discuss specific management strategies for hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM). Case Description. We report a 26-year-old male with newly diagnosed undifferentiated thymic carcinoma associated with HCM. Osteolytic metastasis-related hypercalcemia was presumed to be the etiology of hypercalcemia that responded to intravenous hydration and bisphosphonate therapy. Subsequently, refractory hypercalcemia persisted despite the administration of bisphosphonates and denosumab indicative of refractory hypercalcemia. Elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was noted from the second admission with hypercalcemia responding to glucocorticoid administration. A subsequent PTHrP was also elevated, further supporting multiple mechanistic evolution of HCM. The different mechanisms of HCM are summarized with the role of tailoring therapies based on the particular mechanism underlying hypercalcemia discussed. Conclusion. Our case illustrates the importance of a comprehensive initial evaluation and reevaluation of all identifiable mechanisms of HCM, especially in the setting of recurrent and refractory hypercalcemia. Knowledge of the known and possible evolution of the underlying mechanisms for HCM is important for application of specific therapies that target those mechanisms. Specific targeting therapies to the underlying mechanisms for HCM could positively affect patient outcomes. PMID:28168064

  18. Murine thymic selection quantified using a unique method to capture deleted T cells.

    PubMed

    Stritesky, Gretta L; Xing, Yan; Erickson, Jami R; Kalekar, Lokesh A; Wang, Xiaodan; Mueller, Daniel L; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2013-03-19

    Thymic positive and negative selection events generate a T-cell repertoire that is MHC restricted and self-tolerant. The number of T cells undergoing positive and negative selection in normal mice has never been firmly established. We generated mice that lack the proapoptotic molecule Bim (bcl2l11) together with a Nur77(GFP) transgene, which allowed the identification and enumeration of T cells that would normally undergo clonal deletion. Using this method, we report the striking observation that six times more cells undergo negative selection than complete positive selection. Seventy-five percent of the negatively selected cells are deleted at the double positive stage in the thymic cortex, compared with 25% at the single positive stage in the medulla. The fact that more thymocytes are highly reactive to MHC than are weakly reactive is inconsistent with a random model of recognition and suggests that T-cell recognition is MHC biased. Furthermore, Bim(-/-) mice had an increased number of GFP(hi) cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and a corresponding increase in antigen experienced or anergic cell phenotype. Our data also show that the CD4+ T cells that are clonally deleted experienced only slightly stronger T-cell receptor signaling than those that developed into regulatory T cells.

  19. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy in Thymic Carcinoma: Evolving Mechanisms of Hypercalcemia and Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kuzhively, Jose; Baim, Sanford

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first case where an evolution of mechanisms responsible for hypercalcemia occurred in undifferentiated thymic carcinoma and discuss specific management strategies for hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM). Case Description. We report a 26-year-old male with newly diagnosed undifferentiated thymic carcinoma associated with HCM. Osteolytic metastasis-related hypercalcemia was presumed to be the etiology of hypercalcemia that responded to intravenous hydration and bisphosphonate therapy. Subsequently, refractory hypercalcemia persisted despite the administration of bisphosphonates and denosumab indicative of refractory hypercalcemia. Elevated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was noted from the second admission with hypercalcemia responding to glucocorticoid administration. A subsequent PTHrP was also elevated, further supporting multiple mechanistic evolution of HCM. The different mechanisms of HCM are summarized with the role of tailoring therapies based on the particular mechanism underlying hypercalcemia discussed. Conclusion. Our case illustrates the importance of a comprehensive initial evaluation and reevaluation of all identifiable mechanisms of HCM, especially in the setting of recurrent and refractory hypercalcemia. Knowledge of the known and possible evolution of the underlying mechanisms for HCM is important for application of specific therapies that target those mechanisms. Specific targeting therapies to the underlying mechanisms for HCM could positively affect patient outcomes.

  20. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Yasuda, Hisataka; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire+ mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire+ mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire+ mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire+ mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire+ mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire+ mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire+ mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire+ mTECs. PMID:27401343

  1. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yagi, Shintaro; Wu, Guoying; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Penninger, Josef M; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Akiyama, Taishin

    2016-07-25

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire(+) mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire(+) mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire(+) mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire(+) mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire(+) mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire(+) mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire(+) mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire(+) mTECs.

  2. Thymic Epithelial Cells Are a Nonredundant Source of Wnt Ligands for Thymus Development.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Fabian; Augustin, Iris; Meister, Michael; Boutros, Michael; Kyewski, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in T cell development. However, it remained unclear which cell type is the major source of Wnt ligands and to what extent thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development is dependent on Wnt signaling. In this study, we analyzed the role of Wnt ligands provided by TECs for the development of T cells and TECs without manipulating the intracellular Wnt signaling machinery in either cell type. To this end, we used conditional knockout mice (FoxN1-Gpr177) in which TECs are unable to secrete Wnt ligands. Gpr177 (Evi/Wls) is a Wnt-specific cargo receptor that is required for the secretion of Wnt ligands. We found that TECs are the main source of Wnt ligands in the thymus, which serves a nonredundant role, and lack of TEC-provided Wnt ligands led to thymic hypotrophy, as well as a reduced peripheral T cell pool. Despite being reduced in numbers, T cells that developed in the absence of TEC-secreted Wnt ligands were functionally competent, and the subset composition of the peripheral T cell pool was not affected. Thus, our data suggest that T cell development is not directly dependent on TEC-provided Wnt ligands. Rather, TEC-secreted Wnt ligands are essential for normal thymus development and normal peripheral T cell frequencies but are dispensable for T cell function in the periphery.

  3. Thymic localization of gallium-67 in pediatric patients with lymphoid and nonlymphoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, S.; Todo, S.; Imashuku, S.

    1987-03-01

    To determine the significance of /sup 67/Ga localization in the thymus of children, 142 /sup 67/Ga photoscans from 45 children with various tumors were studied. Sixty-nine photoscans were taken for 17 cases of lymphoma, 73 photoscans were made for 28 cases of nonlymphoid tumors. Thymic localization of /sup 67/Ga was positive in 16 (36%) of the 45 patients and in 30 (21%) of the 142 photoscans. Positive thymus scans were seen in five (29%) of the 17 cases of lymphoma and 11 (39%) of the 28 solid tumors. The positive incidence was highest (90%) in ages 1-2 yr old. Of the eight grade 2 (strong positive) patients, the thymus in one case of Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed as malignant and the other seven solid tumor cases were nonmalignant. Most of the latter seven cases became positive after beginning of treatment (surgery and/or chemotherapy). Although the precise mechanism is not well understood, thymic localization of /sup 67/Ga may represent immunologic response to tumors, especially in infants with nonlymphoid neoplasms.

  4. Controlled trial of a thymic hormone extract (Thymostimulin) in 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Nouri Aria, K T; Eddleston, A L; Williams, R

    1984-01-01

    A randomised controlled trial of thymic hormone extracts (Thymostimulin) (1 mg/kg/day for seven days; 1 mg/kg/weekly thereafter) was undertaken in 30 patients (21 women, nine men) with treated, apparently inactive 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis during withdrawal of maintenance corticosteroid and azathioprine therapy. Reactivation of disease occurred in 26 patients (86%) during or after treatment withdrawal and was as frequent in the Thymostimulin treated (11 of 13; 84%) and untreated (15 of 17; 88%; p greater than 0.05) groups. Reactivation of disease was accompanied by a severe defect in concanavalin A induced suppressor cell activity, the magnitude of which was similar in the Thymostimulin treated and untreated groups (mean % suppression = 16.4 and 3.2 respectively; p greater than 0.05 vs 84.4 in control subjects). Further studies assessing the optimal dose, duration of treatment, and mode of administration are required to establish a therapeutic role for thymic hormone extracts in 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis. PMID:6230296

  5. Effectiveness of Cortical Atrophy Scale and Indirect Indices of Brain Atrophy to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eun-Oh; Lim, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether baseline cerebral atrophy can predict the rate of future chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head trauma and compare indirect markers of brain atrophy with volumetric analysis of computed tomography (CT). Methods Single institution case-control study involving 1,476 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 2009 to December 2014. Forty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified and age, gender matched 41 patients were selected as control group. Both volumetric analyze on CT and Evans index, frontal horn index, bicaudate ratio, sylvian fissure ratio and cortical atrophy scale of 82 patients were estimated by different raters and relationship of those factors with CSDH was analyzed. Results Every indirect indices except cortical atrophy scale were not enough to give a good estimate of CSDH. Brain atrophy and cortical atrophy scale were predisposing factors of CSDH on multivariate analysis with statistical significance. Conclusion Brain atrophy was a potential prognostic factor of CSDH after trauma. In practice, patients with a value of cortical atrophy scale over moderate grade needed more attention for CSDH. PMID:27857918

  6. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cash, David M.; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O.; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Collins, D. Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K.; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Malone, Ian B.; Fox, Nick C.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated “direct” measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  7. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge.

    PubMed

    Cash, David M; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Jack, Clifford R; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Collins, D Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R; Yushkevich, Paul A; Malone, Ian B; Fox, Nick C; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-12-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated "direct" measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  8. In vitro models of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, Nadia; Reindl, Markus; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K

    2005-08-01

    alpha-Synuclein represents the major constituent of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions, the hallmark lesion of multiple system atrophy (MSA), a progressive disorder that is associated with selective degenerative cell loss in basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. The role of abnormal alpha-synuclein aggregation in oligodendroglial cells is still obscure, in particular, whether alpha-synuclein might impair oligodendroglial and, secondarily, neuronal integrity of those cells in the diseased brain. In an attempt to answer some of these questions, we have developed an "in vitro model of MSA" by expressing the wild-type or C-terminally truncated form of alpha-synuclein in glial cell cultures. With this simplified system, we have demonstrated that alpha-synuclein significantly affects the survival of glia and its vulnerability to environmental stress, which might represent a major step in the pathogenesis of MSA.

  9. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Y I; Wang, P W; Gado, M H; Csernansky, J G; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal volumes of subjects with a history of major depressive episodes but currently in remission and with no known medical comorbidity were compared to matched normal controls by using volumetric magnetic resonance images. Subjects with a history of major depression had significantly smaller left and right hippocampal volumes with no differences in total cerebral volumes. The degree of hippocampal volume reduction correlated with total duration of major depression. In addition, large (diameter > or = 4.5 mm)-hippocampal low signal foci (LSF) were found within the hippocampus, and their number also correlated with the total number of days depressed. These results suggest that depression is associated with hippocampal atrophy, perhaps due to a progressive process mediated by glucocorticoid neurotoxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8632988

  10. Modeling Spinal Muscular Atrophy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ashim; Kankel, Mark W.; Sen, Anindya; Sridhar, Vasanthi; Fulga, Tudor A.; Hart, Anne C.; Van Vactor, David; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2008-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), a recessive hereditary neurodegenerative disease in humans, has been linked to mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene. SMA patients display early onset lethality coupled with motor neuron loss and skeletal muscle atrophy. We used Drosophila, which encodes a single SMN ortholog, survival motor neuron (Smn), to model SMA, since reduction of Smn function leads to defects that mimic the SMA pathology in humans. Here we show that a normal neuromuscular junction (NMJ) structure depends on SMN expression and that SMN concentrates in the post-synaptic NMJ regions. We conducted a screen for genetic modifiers of an Smn phenotype using the Exelixis collection of transposon-induced mutations, which affects approximately 50% of the Drosophila genome. This screen resulted in the recovery of 27 modifiers, thereby expanding the genetic circuitry of Smn to include several genes not previously known to be associated with this locus. Among the identified modifiers was wishful thinking (wit), a type II BMP receptor, which was shown to alter the Smn NMJ phenotype. Further characterization of two additional members of the BMP signaling pathway, Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Daughters against dpp (Dad), also modify the Smn NMJ phenotype. The NMJ defects caused by loss of Smn function can be ameliorated by increasing BMP signals, suggesting that increased BMP activity in SMA patients may help to alleviate symptoms of the disease. These results confirm that our genetic approach is likely to identify bona fide modulators of SMN activity, especially regarding its role at the neuromuscular junction, and as a consequence, may identify putative SMA therapeutic targets. PMID:18791638

  11. Choroidal Round Hyporeflectivities in Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    De Vitis, Luigi Antonio; Carnevali, Adriano; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In geographic atrophy (GA), choroidal vessels typically appear on structural optical coherence tomography (OCT) as hyperreflective round areas with highly reflective borders. We observed that some GA eyes show choroidal round hyporeflectivities with highly reflective borders beneath the atrophy, and futher investigated the charcteristcs by comparing structural OCT, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and OCT angiography (OCT-A). Methods Round hyporeflectivities were individuated from a pool of patients with GA secondary to non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration consecutively presenting between October 2015 and March 2016 at the Medical Retina & Imaging Unit of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including ICGA, structural OCT and OCT-A. The correspondence between choroidal round hyporeflectivities beneath GA on structural OCT and ICGA and OCT-A imaging were analyzed. Results Fifty eyes of 26 consecutive patients (17 females and 9 males; mean age 76.8±6.2 years) with GA were included. Twenty-nine round hyporeflectivities have been found by OCT in choroidal layers in 21 eyes of 21 patients (42.0%; estimated prevalence of 57.7%). All 29 round hyporeflectivities showed constantly a hyperreflective border and a backscattering on structural OCT, and appeared as hypofluorescent in late phase ICGA and as dark foci with non detectable flow in the choroidal segmentation of OCT-A. Interestingly, the GA area was greater in eyes with compared to eyes without round hyporeflectivities (9.30±5.74 and 5.57±4.48mm2, respectively; p = 0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that most round hyporeflectivities beneath GA may represent non-perfused or hypo-perfused choroidal vessels with non-detectable flow. PMID:27880806

  12. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  13. Radiologic correlates of reaction time measurements in olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Botez, M I; Pedraza, O L; Botez-Marquard, T; Vézina, J L; Elie, R

    1993-01-01

    We measured simple visual and auditory reaction time (RT) and movement time (MT) in 32 patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) in comparison to 32 control subjects. In addition, we followed 2 approaches to radiologic assessment by computed tomographic scans: subjective (by inspection of films) and objective (by measurement of 4 radiologic ratios at the level of the posterior fossa and 1 ratio at the supratentorial level). All OPCA patients had various degrees of cerebellar atrophy and lengthened RT and MT in comparison to their controls. There were no significant differences in RT and MT performances in patients with mild-moderate versus those with severe cerebellar atrophy as assessed by inspection of their films. OPCA patients with severe versus mild-moderate atrophy evaluated by 3 measures, i.e., brainstem, brachium pontis and fourth ventricle ratios, presented few significantly lengthened RT and MT performances. In contrast, patients with severe atrophy revealed by the midbrain ratio had significantly lengthened RT and MT performances compared to those with mild-moderate atrophy assessed by this ratio on 7 of 8 measures; the 8th measure showed a borderline significant difference. This could be explained by the fact that atrophy at the midbrain level is the only one which involves dopaminergic, noradrenergic and glutamatergic structures and pathways.

  14. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Emily N.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Cash, David M.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sudre, Carole H.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T.; Fox, Nick C.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5‐T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27933676

  15. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fiford, Cassidy M; Manning, Emily N; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Cash, David M; Malone, Ian B; Ridgway, Gerard R; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K; Sudre, Carole H; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T; Fox, Nick C; Cardoso, M Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Donor lymphocyte count and thymic activity predict lymphocyte recovery and outcomes after matched-sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Wu, Colin; Grim, Andrew; Ito, Sawa; Cho, Irene; Hensel, Nancy; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin John

    2013-03-01

    Delayed immune recovery is a characteristic feature of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult recipients. Although recipient thymic T-cell neogenesis contributes to T-cell regeneration after transplantation, thymic recovery in the transplant recipient decreases with increasing age, and is diminished by intensive preconditioning regimens and graft-versus-host disease. In adult recipients, most events that determine transplant success or failure occur during the period when the majority of circulating T cells is derived from the donor's post thymic T-cell repertoire. As a result, the make-up of the donor lymphocyte compartment may strongly influence immune recovery and transplant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine donor lymphocyte counts in a series of patients undergoing an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant to identify the potential contribution of donor regulatory and conventional T lymphocyte populations to immune recovery and transplant outcomes. We examined donor lymphocyte subset counts in relation to post-transplant lymphocyte recovery and transplant events in 220 consecutive myeloablative, T-cell-depleted, HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies. In a multivariate analysis, absolute numbers of donor CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants were associated with overall survival (P=0.032). The donors' absolute lymphocyte count and thymic production of regulatory T cells were both associated with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (P=0.002 and P=0.022, respectively). In conclusion, these results identify donor immune characteristics that are associated with lymphocyte recovery, extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease, and survival in the recipient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reported here was performed using peripheral blood samples drawn from donors and patients enrolled in the ClinicalTrials.gov-registered trials

  17. Thymic development of autoreactive T cells in NOD mice is regulated in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuming; Morillon, Y Maurice; Spidale, Nicholas A; Kroger, Charles J; Liu, Bo; Sartor, R Balfour; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2013-12-15

    Inefficient thymic negative selection of self-specific T cells is associated with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. The factors that influence the efficacy of thymic negative selection, as well as the kinetics of thymic output of autoreactive T cells remain ill-defined. We investigated thymic production of β cell-specific T cells using a thymus-transplantation model. Thymi from different aged NOD mice, representing distinct stages of type 1 diabetes, were implanted into NOD.scid recipients, and the diabetogenicity of the resulting T cell pool was examined. Strikingly, the development of diabetes-inducing β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was regulated in an age-dependent manner. NOD.scid recipients of newborn NOD thymi developed diabetes. However, recipients of thymi from 7- and 10-d-old NOD donor mice remained diabetes-free and exhibited a progressive decline in islet infiltration and β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. A similar temporal decrease in autoimmune infiltration was detected in some, but not all, tissues of recipient mice implanted with thymi from NOD mice lacking expression of the autoimmune regulator transcription factor, which develop multiorgan T cell-mediated autoimmunity. In contrast, recipients of 10 d or older thymi lacked diabetogenic T cells but developed severe colitis marked by increased effector T cells reactive to intestinal microbiota. These results demonstrate that thymic development of autoreactive T cells is limited to a narrow time window and occurs in a reciprocal manner compared with colonic microbiota-responsive T cells in NOD mice.

  18. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    PubMed

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter.

  19. Pretreatment biopsy for histological diagnosis and induction therapy in thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jie; Gu, Zhitao; Zhang, Hongdian; Ma, Zhao; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to investigate the value of pretreatment biopsy for histological diagnosis and induction therapies in the management of locally advanced thymic malignancies. Methods The clinical pathological data of patients with thymic tumors in the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) who underwent biopsy before treatment from 1994 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The application trend of preoperative histological diagnosis and its influence on treatment outcome were analyzed. Results Of 1,902 cases of thymic tumors, 336 (17.1%) had undergone biopsy for histological diagnosis before therapeutic decision was decided. In recent years, percentage of pretreatment histological diagnosis significantly increased in the later ten years than the former during the study period (P=0.008). There was also a significant increase in thoracoscopy/mediastinoscopy/E-BUS biopsy as compared to open biopsy (P=0.029). Survival in Patients with preoperative biopsy for histology had significantly higher stage lesions (P=0.000) and higher grade malignancy (P=0.000), thus a significantly lower complete resection rate (P=0.000) and therefore a significantly worse survival than those without preoperative biopsy (P=0.000). In the biopsied 336 patients, those who received upfront surgery had significantly better survival than those received surgery after induction therapy (P=0.000). In stage III and IVa diseases, the R0 resection rate after induction therapies increased significantly as compared to the surgery upfront cases (65.5% vs. 46.2%, P=0.025). Tumors downstaged after induction had similar outcomes as those having upfront surgery (92.3% vs. 84.2%, P=0.51). However, tumors not downstaged by induction had significantly worse prognosis than those downstaged (P=0.004), and fared even worse than those having definitive chemoradiation without surgery (37.2% vs. 62.4%, P=0.216). Conclusions It is crucial to get histological diagnosis for thymoma before

  20. Testicular atrophy as a consequence of inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reid, I; Devlin, H B

    1994-01-01

    Testicular atrophy is an uncommon but well recognized complication of inguinal hernia repair and one that frequently results in litigation. A series of ten cases of testicular atrophy occurring after hernia repair in nine patients is presented. Identifiable risk factors were present in eight instances. Surgeons should make careful enquiries as to previous groin or scrotal surgery and, when indicated, warn the patient before surgery of the increased risk of testicular atrophy. Overzealous dissection of a distal hernia sac, dislocation of the testis from the scrotum into the wound and concomitant scrotal surgery should all be avoided.

  1. Prodromal Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Clinical, Neuropsychological and Radiological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lung Tat Andrew; Lynch, Whitney; De May, Mary; Horton, Jonathan C.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    We present longitudinal clinical, cognitive and neuroimaging data from a 63-year-old woman who enrolled in research as a normal control and evolved posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) over five year follow-up. At baseline she reported only subtle difficulty driving and performed normally on cognitive tests, but already demonstrated atrophy in left visual association cortex. With follow-up she developed insidiously progressive visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, correlating with progressive atrophy in bilateral visual areas. Amyloid PET was positive. This case tracks the evolution of PCA from the prodromal stage, and illustrates challenges to early diagnosis as well as the utility of imaging biomarkers. PMID:24308559

  2. Posterior cortical atrophy: an atypical variant of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Aida; Henley, Susie M; Walton, Jill; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-06-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by striking progressive visual impairment and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving posterior cortices. PCA is the most frequent atypical presentation of Alzheimer disease. The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of PCA's neuropsychiatric manifestations. Emotional and psychotic symptoms are discussed in the context of signal characteristic features of the PCA syndrome (the early onset, focal loss of visual perception, focal posterior brain atrophy) and the underlying cause of the disease. The authors' experience with psychotherapeutic intervention and PCA support groups is shared in detail.

  3. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2010-03-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses that clear pathogens from infected hosts. T cells recognize short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen- presenting cells). Recognition occurs when T cell receptor (TCR) proteins expressed on T cells bind sufficiently strongly to antigen- derived pMHC complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. A diverse repertoire of self-tolerant TCR sequences is shaped during development of T cells in the thymus by processes called positive and negative selection. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide analytic expression for the amino acid composition of selected TCR sequences (which enable its recognition functions).

  4. BDNF and its receptors in human myasthenic thymus: implications for cell fate in thymic pathology.

    PubMed

    Berzi, Angela; Ayata, C Korcan; Cavalcante, Paola; Falcone, Chiara; Candiago, Elisabetta; Motta, Teresio; Bernasconi, Pia; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Mantegazza, Renato; Meinl, Edgar; Farina, Cinthia

    2008-07-15

    Here we show that in myasthenic thymus several cell types, including thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and immune cells, were the source and the target of the neurotrophic factor brain-derived growth factor (BDNF). Interestingly, many actively proliferating medullary thymocytes expressed the receptor TrkB in vivo in involuted thymus, while this population was lost in hyperplastic or neoplastic thymuses. Furthermore, in hyperplastic thymuses the robust coordinated expression of BDNF in the germinal centers together with the receptor p75NTR on all proliferating B cells strongly suggests that this factor regulates germinal center reaction. Finally, all TEC dying of apoptosis expressed BDNF receptors, indicating that this neurotrophin is involved in TEC turnover. In thymomas both BDNF production and receptor expression in TEC were strongly hindered. This may represent an attempt of tumour escape from cell death.

  5. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice, and thus suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism, but is bookmarked and stable through mTEC divisions, ensuring more effective presentation of self-antigens, and favoring diversity of self-tolerance between individuals. PMID:26237550

  6. Effects of steroids on the secretion of immunoregulatory factors by thymic epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Stimson, W H; Crilly, P J

    1981-01-01

    Rat thymic epithelial cells were cultured for 39 days in the presence of various concentrations of oestradiol, testosterone, progesterone and corticosterone and the supernatants assessed for effects on the stimulation of cells from the thymus, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen, with several agents. All the steroids, except progesterone, were found to significantly regulate the secretion of immunoregulatory factors by the epithelial cells at physiological levels but the effects were dose dependent. Fractionation of active supernatants indicated that the capacity to enhance or depress cellular proliferation was mainly associated with substances having molecular weights greater than 30,000 or less than 1000, respectively. This study supports the idea that certain steroids can influence the immune response indirectly through the thymus. PMID:7298074

  7. Elevated Epidermal Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Levels Establish an Anti-Tumor Environment in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Shadmehr; Turkoz, Ahu; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Yockey, Laura J.; Turkoz, Mustafa; Kopan, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine implicated in induction of T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergic inflammation, has recently been shown to stimulate solid tumor growth and metastasis. Conversely, studying mice with clonal loss of Notch signaling in their skin revealed that high levels of TSLP released by barrier-defective skin caused a severe inflammation, resulting in gradual elimination of Notch-deficient epidermal clones and resistance to skin tumorigenesis. We found CD4+ T cells to be both required and sufficient to mediate these effects of TSLP. Importantly, TSLP overexpression in wild-type skin also caused resistance to tumorigenesis, confirming that TSLP functions as a tumor suppressor in the skin. PMID:23079659

  8. Churg-Strauss syndrome presented as paraneoplastic syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cai, Baiqiang; Feng, Ruie

    2012-11-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is rarely presented as paraneoplastic syndrome. We reported here a 47-year-old man with refractory asthma for 3 years, and his CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass, pulmonary reticular opacities and bilateral maxillary sinusitis. He also presented with elevated peripheral blood eosinophils (EOS). Thoracoscopic resection of the mediastinal mass and a lung biopsy were performed, and thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma (TNC) and pulmonary eosinophilic vasculitis were pathologically diagnosed. The laboratory and clinical findings fulfilled the criteria of the diagnosis of CSS (Masi et al. in Arthritis Rheum 33(8):1094-1100, 1990). Asthma was improved, and elevated EOS was recovered to normal range after surgery and four courses of chemotherapy. This was the first report of CSS manifested as a paraneoplastic syndrome of TNC.

  9. A Common Stem Cell for Murine Cortical and Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Van Soest, Peter; Platenburg, Peter Paul; Van Ewijk, Willem

    1995-01-01

    We have addressed the question whether the epithelial stroma in the thymus is derived from a common stem cell or whether cortical and medullary epithelial cells are derived from different embryonic stem cells emerging, for example, from endoderm and ectoderm. By the use of rapidly expanding cultures of thymic epithelial cells (TEC) from 14 to 16 day-old murine fetuses and by specific antibodies against cortical and medullary epithelium, respectively, we were able to demonstrate a small subpopulation of double-labeled TEC in the cultures. These cells were not present in TEC cultures initiated from thymuses of neonatal mice. Double-labeled TEC were also found in tissue sections from fetal thymuses. These findings may indicate that TEC populations of the cortex and the medulla are derived from a common stem cell, with potential for differentiation toward both cortical and medullary TEC. PMID:9700364

  10. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  11. Thymic TFH cells involved in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhou, Yongan; Guo, Jun; Li, Hongzeng; Tian, Feng; Gong, Li; Wang, Xianni; Lan, Miao; Li, Zhuyi; Zhang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    Follicular helper CD4+ T (TFH) cells are the specialized providers of B cell help in germinal centers (GCs). Formation of GCs in thymi is the primary thymi characteristic in MG patients. TFH cells are involved in the pathogenic process of many autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune thyroid disease. The role thymic TFH cells played in MG with thymoma has not been elucidated. Here, we analyzed surface markers CXCR5, Bcl-6, ICOS and IL-21 on TFH cells in thymus derived from thymoma patients with ocular MG (OMG), generalized MG (GMG) or without MG using immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR analysis. We show that clinical severity of MG is correlated with higher mRNA expression of the four markers. Indeed, results show higher expression of all four markers in thymoma with GMG patients compared with both OMG and non-MG patients. We found no significant difference in the expression of CXCR5, Bcl-6 and ICOS in OMG compared with non-MG patients. Regression analysis shows a positive correlation between thymic CXCR5, BCL-6, ICOS and IL-21 levels and quantitative MG score (QMGS) in GMG patients. In addition, we found no significant correlation between TFH cell expression and QMGS in OMG patients. Our findings show that higher expression of TFH cells in the thymoma is related to the clinical severity of MG and suggests a role in the pathogenesis of MG. However, the real source of these TFH cells is still uncertain and needs further study.

  12. Serum thymic factor, FTS, attenuates cisplatin nephrotoxicity by suppressing cisplatin-induced ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Yuka; Kawai, Yoshiko; Iwamoto, Noriaki; Matsunaga, Yoshiko; Aiga, Hiromi; Awaya, Akira; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-11-01

    Serum thymic factor (FTS), a thymic peptide hormone, has been reported to attenuate the bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury and also experimental pancreatitis and diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of FTS on cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin)-induced nephrotoxicity. We have already demonstrated that cephaloridine, a nephrotoxic antibiotic, leads to extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the rat kidney, which probably contributes to cephaloridine-induced renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cisplatin on ERK activation in the rat kidney and also the effect of FTS on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. In vitro treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with FTS significantly ameliorated cisplatin-induced cell injury. Treatment of rats with intravenous cisplatin for 3 days markedly induced renal dysfunction and increased platinum contents in the kidney cortex. An increase in pERK was detected in the nuclear fraction prepared from the rat kidney cortex from days 1 to 3 after injection of cisplatin. FTS suppressed cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and ERK activation in the kidney. FTS did not influence any Pt contents in the kidney after cisplatin administration. FTS has been shown to enhance the in vivo expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 in the kidney cortex. The beneficial role of FTS against cisplatin nephrotoxicity may be mediated in part by HSP70, as suggested by its up-regulation in the kidney cortex treated with FTS alone. Our results suggest that FTS participates in protection from cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by suppressing ERK activation caused by cisplatin.

  13. Protective effect of serum thymic factor, FTS, on cephaloridine-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Yuka; Matsunaga, Yoshiko; Yonogi, Katsuya; Kawai, Yoshiko; Awaya, Akira; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-11-01

    Serum thymic factor (FTS), a thymic peptide hormone, has been reported to increase superoxide disumutase (SOD) levels in senescence-accelerated mice. In the present study, we examined the effect of FTS on cephaloridine (CER)-induced nephrotoxicity in vivo and in vitro. We previously reported that CER led to extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the rat kidney. So, we also investigated whether FTS has an effect on ERK activation induced by CER. Treatment of male Sprague-Dawley rats with intravenous CER (1.2 g/kg) for 24 h markedly increased BUN and plasma creatinine levels and urinary excretion of glucose and protein, decreased creatinine clearance and also led to marked pathological changes in the proximal tubules, as revealed by electron micrographs. An increase in phosphorylated ERK (pERK) was detected in the nuclear fraction prepared from the rat kidney cortex 24 h after CER injection. Pretreatment of rats with FTS (50 microg/kg, i.v.) attenuated the CER-induced renal dysfunction and pathological damage. FTS also suppressed CER-induced ERK activation in the kidney. In vitro treatment of the established cell line, LLC-PK1 cells, with FTS significantly ameliorated CER-induced cell injury, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Our results, taken together with our previous report that MEK inhibitors ameliorated CER-induced renal cell injury and ERK activation induced by CER, suggest that FTS participates in protection from CER-induced nephrotoxicity by suppressing ERK activation induced by CER.

  14. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  15. Impaired thymic output in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartling, H J; Gaardbo, J C; Ronit, A; Salem, M; Laye, M; Clausen, M R; Skogstrand, K; Gerstoft, J; Ullum, H; Nielsen, S D

    2013-10-01

    Altered T cell homeostasis in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been demonstrated. However, it is unknown whether fibrosis is associated with more perturbed T cell homeostasis in chronic HCV infection. The aim of this study was to examine and compare T cell subsets including recent thymic emigrants (RTE), naive, memory, senescent, apoptotic and IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expressing CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells as well as telomere length and interferon-γ production in HCV-infected patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 26) fibrosis as well as in healthy controls (n = 24). Decreased proportions of CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ RTE were found in HCV-infected patients, especially in HCV-infected patients with fibrosis (14.3% (9.7-23.0) and 28.8% (16.1-40.5), respectively) compared with healthy controls (24.2% (16.3-32.1), P = 0.004 and 39.1% (31.6-55.0), P = 0.010, respectively). Furthermore, HCV-infected patients with fibrosis presented with a higher proportion of CD4⁺ T cells expressing CD127 compared with HCV-infected patients without fibrosis [88.4% (84.5-91.0) versus 83.8% (79.9-86.8), P = 0.016]. Thus, impaired thymic output in HCV infection was found, and high proportion of CD127⁺ T cells may illustrate a compensatory mechanism to preserve T cell counts.

  16. Influence of age on the proliferation and peripheralization of thymic T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, K.; Utsuyama, M.; Katsura, Y.; Sado, T.

    1988-01-01

    Bone marrow cells obtained from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1) were injected directly into the thymus of C57BL/6 mice (H-2b,Thy 1.2) of various ages. Thymocyte precursors in the injected donor-bone marrow cells could proliferate in the thymic microenvironment in the following manner: first, preferentially proliferating into the subcapsular cortex; and second, spreading to the whole layer of the cortex, a portion of them gradually moving into the medulla. The proliferation of donor-type thymocytes was most pronounced when intrathymic injection of bone marrow cells (ITB) was performed in newborn mice and especially prominent in week-old mice; it took approximately ten weeks for donor-type thymocytes to finish the whole course of proliferation, differentiation, and emigration to the periphery. When ITB was performed in mice 4 weeks of age and older, the proliferation of donor-type thymocytes was retarded at onset, less pronounced in magnitude, and disappeared earlier. Emigration of donor-type T cells from the thymus to the peripheral lymphoid tissues occurred most rapidly when ITB was performed in newborn mice, and these T cells continued to reside thereafter in the peripheral lymphoid tissues. However, when ITB was performed in mice 4 weeks of age and older, the number of emigrated T cells in the spleen decreased (about a tenth of that in newborn mice) and, moreover, these T cells resided only transiently in the spleen. It was suggested that T cells emigrating from the thymus of mice from newborn to 2 weeks of age are long-lived, whereas those from the thymus in mice 4 weeks of age and older are short-lived. However, when 4-week-old young adult mice were treated by irradiation or hydrocortisone, the thymic capacity was enhanced in terms of proliferation and peripheralization of thymocytes, and emigrated T cells became long-lived.

  17. Thymic education curtailed: defective immune responses in nude rats reconstituted with immature thymocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Yang, C P; Bell, E B

    1994-04-01

    We have studied the ability of thymocyte subsets from allotype marked donors to populate athymic nude rats with T cells and to restore immune responsiveness. Following adoptive transfer, CD4-CD8- double-negative (DN) thymocytes (lymphoid precursor cells) or the CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) subset (intermediate thymocytes) or CD4+CD8- single-positive (CD4 SP) cells (mature thymocytes) each generated a permanent population of CD4+ progeny in syngeneic nude recipients. DN and DP thymocytes also produced small numbers of CD8+ cells; there was no evidence of a CD4-CD8- or CD4+CD8+ donor cell population. CD4 SP thymocytes conferred T cell functions [graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, allograft rejection and thymus-dependent antibody responses] on nude rats that were almost indistinguishable from those conferred by mature peripheral recirculating CD4 T cells. Transfer of DP thymocytes extended the life-span of the immunoincompetent nudes and produced CD4+ progeny with near normal GVH responsiveness. However, DP-derived CD4+ cells were deficient at inducing allograft rejection and provided little or no help for antibody synthesis. The CD4+ progeny of DN thymocytes did not prolong the survival of nude recipients, gave reduced GVH reactivity, showed almost no capacity to initiate skin allograft rejection and failed to help B cells produce antibody. The results suggest that intrathymic development proceeds stepwise; each stage is accompanied by acquisition of additional properties that are reflected by T cell responses in the periphery. Thymic education does not become complete until the SP stage is reached when thymocytes become fully independent of the thymic microenvironment.

  18. Cerebral atrophy in myotonic dystrophy: a voxel based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Antonini, G; Mainero, C; Romano, A; Giubilei, F; Ceschin, V; Gragnani, F; Morino, S; Fiorelli, M; Soscia, F; Di Pasquale, A; Caramia, F

    2004-11-01

    Brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is characterised by cortical atrophy and white matter lesions. We compared the magnetic resonance imaging derived grey matter maps of 22 DM1 patients with those of matched, healthy controls using voxel based morphometry to evaluate the extension of global and regional cortical atrophy in DM1, as well as its relationships with clinical and genetic features. Patients had significantly reduced brain tissue volumes. Grey matter volume was inversely correlated with age; this inverse correlation was significantly stronger in DM1 than in controls. Neither the clinical and genetic characteristics nor white matter lesions were correlated with cortical atrophy. Grey matter atrophy was located mainly in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, in the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and in the left superior temporal and occipital gyrus.

  19. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  20. The Journey of "Geographic Atrophy" through Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    "Geographic atrophy" is a concise term that has been firmly established for the description of the end-stage manifestation of nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). "Geographic lesions" resembling sharply demarcated continents on a map have been originally described in the German literature in 1854 (landkartenartiger/inselförmiger Zungenfratt) for a manifestation later called "geographic tongue" in English. In 1970, Gass was the first to describe "geographic areas of atrophy" in "senile macular choroidal degeneration." Within a decade, the disease itself was named "geographic atrophy." Today, various meanings of the term are used in parallel both in research and in routine clinical care. Currently, we are on the verge of better understanding the different forms of atrophy development, manifestation, and progression in AMD, which will pave the way for a more rational approach to their nomenclature and classification.

  1. Age effects on atrophy rates of entorhinal cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Chao, Linda L.; Kornak, John; Jagust, William J.; Kramer, Joel H.; Reed, Bruce R.; Miller, Bruce L.; Norman, David; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of age, subcortical vascular disease, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele and hypertension on entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampal atrophy rates were explored in a longitudinal MRI study with 42 cognitively normal (CN) elderly subjects from 58 to 87 years old. The volumes of the ERC, hippocampus, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and the presence of lacunes were assessed on MR images. Age was significantly associated with increased atrophy rates of 0.04 ± 0.02% per year for ERC and 0.05 ± 0.02% per year for hippocampus. Atrophy rates of hippocampus, but not that of ERC increased with presence of lacunes, in addition to age. WMH, APOE ɛ4 and hypertension had no significant effect on atrophy rates. In conclusion, age and presence of lacunes should be taken into consideration in imaging studies of CN subjects and AD patients to predict AD progression and assess the response to treatment trials. PMID:15961190

  2. Circulating micrornas as potential biomarkers of muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive biomarkers with diagnostic value and prognostic applications have long been desired to replace muscle biopsy for muscle atrophy patients. Growing evidence indicates that circulating microRNAs are biomarkers to assess pathophysiological status. Here, we show that the medium levels of six muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1/23a/206/133/499/208b, also known as myomiRs) were all elevated in the medium of starved C2C12 cell (P < 0.01). And, the level of miR-1 and miR-23a were all elevated in the serum of hindlimb unloaded mice (P < 0.01). miR-23a levels were negatively correlated with both muscle mass and muscle fiber cross section area in muscle atrophy patients, indicating that they might represent the degree of muscle atrophy. Collectively, our data indicated that circulating myomiRs could serve as promising biomarkers for muscle atrophy.

  3. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  4. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X. X.; Paterson, Ross W.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Ryan, Natalie S.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal ‘visual dementia’ and most common atypical Alzheimer’s disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients’ (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer’s disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer’s disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with ‘sticky fixation’. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large

  5. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, p<0.01 2-tailed). A quadratic model (y=0.06-0.001x+2.56x10-5x2 ; where y=CSF/ICC and x=age) was a better fit to data (r=0.716, p < 0.01). This is in agreement with MRI literature. For example, Smith et al. found annual CSF/ICC increase in 58 - 94.5 y.o. individuals to be 0.2%/year, whereas our data, restricted to the same age group yield 0.3%/year(0.2-0.4%/yrs. 95%C.I.). Slightly increased atrophy among elderly VA patients is attributable to the presence of other comorbidities. Conclusion: Brain atrophy can be reliably calculated using automated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  6. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  7. Towards translational therapies for multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Stefanova, Nadia; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Seppi, Klaus; Schlossmacher, Michael G.; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder of uncertain etiopathogenesis manifesting with autonomic failure, parkinsonism, and ataxia in any combination. The underlying neuropathology affects central autonomic, striatonigral and olivopontocerebellar pathways and it is associated with distinctive glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs, Papp-Lantos bodies) that contain aggregates of α-synuclein. Current treatment options are very limited and mainly focused on symptomatic relief, whereas disease modifying options are lacking. Despite extensive testing, no neuroprotective drug treatment has been identified up to now; however, a neurorestorative approach utilizing autologous mesenchymal stem cells has shown remarkable beneficial effects in the cerebellar variant of MSA. Here, we review the progress made over the last decade in defining pathogenic targets in MSA and summarize insights gained from candidate disease-modifying interventions that have utilized a variety of well-established preclinical MSA models. We also discuss the current limitations that our field faces and suggest solutions for possible approaches in cause-directed therapies of MSA. PMID:24598411

  8. Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic, adult onset, relentlessly, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by autonomic abnormalities associated with parkinsonism, cerebellar dysfunction, pyramidal signs, or combinations thereof. Treatments that can halt or reverse the progression of MSA have not yet been identified. MSA is neuropathologically defined by the presence of α-synuclein–containing inclusions, particularly in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes (glial cytoplasmic inclusions, GCIs), which are associated with neurodegeneration. The mechanisms by which oligodendrocytic α-synuclein inclusions cause neuronal death in MSA are not completely understood. The MSA neurodegenerative process likely comprise cell-to-cell transmission of α-synuclein in a prion-like manner, α-synuclein aggregation, increased oxidative stress, abnormal expression of tubulin proteins, decreased expression of neurotrophic factors, excitotoxicity and microglial activation, and neuroinflammation. In an attempt to block each of these pathogenic mechanisms, several pharmacologic approaches have been tried and shown to exert neuroprotective effects in transgenic mouse or cellular models of MSA. These include sertraline, paroxetine, and lithium, which hamper arrival of α-synuclein to oligodendroglia; rifampicin, lithium, and non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs, which inhibit α-synuclein aggregation in oligodendrocytes; riluzole, rasagiline, fluoxetine and mesenchimal stem cells, which exert neuroprotective actions; and minocycline and intravenous immunoglobulins, which reduce neuroinflammation and microglial activation. These and other potential therapeutic strategies for MSA are summarized in this review. PMID:24928797

  9. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  10. De novo expression of connexin hemichannels in denervated fast skeletal muscles leads to atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Puebla, Carlos; Frank, Marina; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cardozo, Christopher; Willecke, Klaus; Latorre, Ramón; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscles induces atrophy, preceded by changes in sarcolemma permeability of causes not yet completely understood. Here, we show that denervation-induced Evans blue dye uptake in vivo of fast, but not slow, myofibers was acutely inhibited by connexin (Cx) hemichannel/pannexin1 (Panx1) channel and purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) blockers. Denervated myofibers showed up-regulation of Panx1 and de novo expression of Cx39, Cx43, and Cx45 hemichannels as well as P2X7Rs and transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels, all of which are permeable to small molecules. The sarcolemma of freshly isolated WT myofibers from denervated muscles also showed high hemichannel-mediated permeability that was slightly reduced by blockade of Panx1 channels or the lack of Panx1 expression, but was completely inhibited by Cx hemichannel or P2X7R blockers, as well as by degradation of extracellular ATP. However, inhibition of transient receptor potential subfamily V, member 2, channels had no significant effect on membrane permeability. Moreover, activation of the transcription factor NFκB and higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) were found in denervated WT but not Cx43/Cx45-deficient muscles. The atrophy observed after 7 d of denervation was drastically reduced in Cx43/Cx45-deficient but not Panx1-deficient muscles. Therefore, expression of Cx hemichannels and P2X7R promotes a feed-forward mechanism activated by extracellular ATP, most likely released through hemichannels, that activates the inflammasome. Consequently, Cx hemichannels are potential targets for new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce muscle atrophy induced by denervation of diverse etiologies.

  11. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  12. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  13. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. III. Growth conditions of human thymic epithelial cells and immunomodulatory activities in their culture supernatant.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, L; Eshel, I; Meilin, A; Sharabi, Y; Shoham, J

    1991-01-01

    We report here on a new approach to the cultivation of human thymic epithelial (HTE) cells, which apparently allows more faithful preservation of cell function. This approach, previously developed by us for mouse thymic epithelial (MTE) cells, is based on the use of culture plates coated with extracellular matrix (ECM), and on the use of serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium. The nutritional requirements of HTE and MTE are somewhat different. Although both are critically dependent on ECM and insulin, they differ in their dependency on other growth factors: selenium and transferrin are much more important for HTE cells, whereas epidermal growth factor and hydrocortisone play a more essential role in MTE cultures. The epithelial nature of the cultured cells is indicated by positive staining with anti-keratin antibodies and by the presence of desmosomes and tonofilaments. The ultrastructural appearance of the cells further suggests high metabolic and secretory activities, not usually found in corresponding cell lines. The culture supernatant (CS) of HTE cells exhibited a strong enhancing effect on thymocyte response to Con A stimulation, as measured by cell proliferation and lymphokine production. The effect was observed on both human and mouse thymocytes, but was much stronger in the homologous combination. Thymic factors tested in parallel did not have such a differential effect. The dose-effect relationships were in the form of a bell-shaped curve, with fivefold enhancement of response at the peak and a measurable effect even with 1:1000 dilution, when human thymocytes were used. The responding thymocytes were those which do not bind peanut agglutinin and are resistant to hydrocortisone. The culture system described here may have advantages for the in vitro study of thymic stromal cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1783421

  14. The language profile of Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J.; Lehmann, Manja; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is typically considered to be a visual syndrome, primarily characterised by progressive impairment of visuoperceptual and visuospatial skills. However patients commonly describe early difficulties with word retrieval. This paper details the first systematic analysis of linguistic function in PCA. Characterising and quantifying the aphasia associated with PCA is important for clarifying diagnostic and selection criteria for clinical and research studies. Methods Fifteen patients with PCA, 7 patients with logopenic/phonological aphasia (LPA) and 18 age-matched healthy participants completed a detailed battery of linguistic tests evaluating auditory input processing, repetition and working memory, lexical and grammatical comprehension, single word retrieval and fluency, and spontaneous speech. Results Relative to healthy controls, PCA patients exhibited language impairments across all the domains examined, but with anomia, reduced phonemic fluency and slowed speech rate the most prominent deficits. PCA performance most closely resembled that of LPA patients on tests of auditory input processing, repetition and digit span, but was relatively stronger on tasks of comprehension and spontaneous speech. Conclusions The study demonstrates that in addition to the well-reported degradation of vision, literacy and numeracy, PCA is characterised by a progressive oral language dysfunction with prominent word retrieval difficulties. Overlap in the linguistic profiles of PCA and LPA, which are both most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s disease, further emphasises the notion of a phenotypic continuum between typical and atypical manifestations of the disease. Clarifying the boundaries between AD phenotypes has important implications for diagnosis, clinical trial recruitment and investigations into biological factors driving phenotypic heterogeneity in AD. Rehabilitation strategies to ameliorate the phonological deficit in PCA are required

  15. Neural correlates of cognitive impairment in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kas, Aurélie; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Samri, Dalila; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Lacomblez, Lucette; Kalafat, Michel; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Dubois, Bruno; Habert, Marie-Odile; Sarazin, Marie

    2011-05-01

    With the prospect of disease-modifying drugs that will target the physiopathological process of Alzheimer's disease, it is now crucial to increase the understanding of the atypical focal presentations of Alzheimer's disease, such as posterior cortical atrophy. This study aimed to (i) characterize the brain perfusion profile in posterior cortical atrophy using regions of interest and a voxel-based approach; (ii) study the influence of the disease duration on the clinical and imaging profiles; and (iii) explore the correlations between brain perfusion and cognitive deficits. Thirty-nine patients with posterior cortical atrophy underwent a specific battery of neuropsychological tests, mainly targeting visuospatial functions, and a brain perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer. The imaging analysis included a comparison with a group of 24 patients with Alzheimer's disease, matched for age, disease duration and Mini-Mental State Examination, and 24 healthy controls. The single-photon emission computed tomography profile in patients with posterior cortical atrophy was characterized by extensive and severe hypoperfusion in the occipital, parietal, posterior temporal cortices and in a smaller cortical area corresponding to the frontal eye fields (Brodmann areas 6/8). Compared with patients with Alzheimer's disease, the group with posterior cortical atrophy showed more severe occipitoparietal hypoperfusion and higher perfusion in the frontal, anterior cingulate and mesiotemporal regions. When considering the disease duration, the functional changes began and remained centred on the posterior lobes, even in the late stage. Correlation analyses of brain perfusion and neuropsychological scores in posterior cortical atrophy highlighted the prominent role of left inferior parietal damage in acalculia, Gerstmann's syndrome, left-right indistinction and limb apraxia, whereas damage to the bilateral dorsal occipitoparietal regions appeared to be involved in B

  16. Treatment Modalities and Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Invasive Thymoma or Thymic Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas; Allen, Pamela K.; Greenfield, Brad; Marom, Edith M.; Rice, David; Huang, James; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated relationships between treatment characteristics and long-term outcomes in patients with locally advanced thymoma or thymic carcinoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 146 patients treated in 1980–2011 at two tertiary cancer care centers, 110 with Masaoka-Koga stage III–IVa invasive thymoma and 36 with stage I–IVa thymic carcinoma. Survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors related to survival were identified by univariate and multivariate competing risk analysis, with overall survival (OS) as the competing risk. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for OS. Results Median follow-up time for all patients was 64 months. At 5/10 years, rates of OS and freedom from recurrence (FFR) were 81/58% and 81/65%, respectively. Of patients who underwent surgery, trimodality treatment produced better survival compared to less aggressive treatment among patients with stage III disease (p=0.03). Among patients who underwent trimodality treatment, patients with stage III disease had better OS (p=0.03) and FFR (p<0.001) than those with stage IVA disease. On Cox regression analysis, decreased OS was associated with thymic carcinoma (hazard ratio [HR]=7.36, 95% CI=2.38–22.77, p=0.001), R2/unresectable disease (HR=8.45, 95% CI=1.44–49.42, p=0.02) and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 1 (HR=8.14, 95% CI=1.55–42.75, p=0.01) or 2–3 (HR=29.60, 95% CI=4.0–218.98, p=0.001) versus 0. Conclusion Aggressive treatment with chemotherapy, surgical resection, and postoperative radiation therapy can produce long-term survival for patients with invasive thymic malignanices. PMID:24390276

  17. IL-7-Induced Proliferation of Human Naive CD4 T-Cells Relies on Continued Thymic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Susana L.; Albuquerque, Adriana S.; Matoso, Paula; Charmeteau-de-Muylder, Bénédicte; Cheynier, Rémi; Ligeiro, Dário; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Barata, João T.; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2017-01-01

    Naive CD4 T-cell maintenance is critical for immune competence. We investigated here the fine-tuning of homeostatic mechanisms of the naive compartment to counteract the loss of de novo CD4 T-cell generation. Adults thymectomized in early childhood during corrective cardiac surgery were grouped based on presence or absence of thymopoiesis and compared with age-matched controls. We found that the preservation of the CD31− subset was independent of the thymus and that its size is tightly controlled by peripheral mechanisms, including prolonged cell survival as attested by Bcl-2 levels. Conversely, a significant contraction of the CD31+ naive subset was observed in the absence of thymic activity. This was associated with impaired responses of purified naive CD4 T-cells to IL-7, namely, in vitro proliferation and upregulation of CD31 expression, which likely potentiated the decline in recent thymic emigrants. Additionally, we found no apparent constraint in the differentiation of naive cells into the memory compartment in individuals completely lacking thymic activity despite upregulation of DUSP6, a phosphatase associated with increased TCR threshold. Of note, thymectomized individuals featuring some degree of thymopoiesis were able to preserve the size and diversity of the naive CD4 compartment, further arguing against complete thymectomy in infancy. Overall, our data suggest that robust peripheral mechanisms ensure the homeostasis of CD31− naive CD4 pool and point to the requirement of continuous thymic activity to the maintenance of IL-7-driven homeostatic proliferation of CD31+ naive CD4 T-cells, which is essential to secure T-cell diversity throughout life. PMID:28154568

  18. IL-7-Induced Proliferation of Human Naive CD4 T-Cells Relies on Continued Thymic Activity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana L; Albuquerque, Adriana S; Matoso, Paula; Charmeteau-de-Muylder, Bénédicte; Cheynier, Rémi; Ligeiro, Dário; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Barata, João T; Victorino, Rui M M; Sousa, Ana E

    2017-01-01

    Naive CD4 T-cell maintenance is critical for immune competence. We investigated here the fine-tuning of homeostatic mechanisms of the naive compartment to counteract the loss of de novo CD4 T-cell generation. Adults thymectomized in early childhood during corrective cardiac surgery were grouped based on presence or absence of thymopoiesis and compared with age-matched controls. We found that the preservation of the CD31(-) subset was independent of the thymus and that its size is tightly controlled by peripheral mechanisms, including prolonged cell survival as attested by Bcl-2 levels. Conversely, a significant contraction of the CD31(+) naive subset was observed in the absence of thymic activity. This was associated with impaired responses of purified naive CD4 T-cells to IL-7, namely, in vitro proliferation and upregulation of CD31 expression, which likely potentiated the decline in recent thymic emigrants. Additionally, we found no apparent constraint in the differentiation of naive cells into the memory compartment in individuals completely lacking thymic activity despite upregulation of DUSP6, a phosphatase associated with increased TCR threshold. Of note, thymectomized individuals featuring some degree of thymopoiesis were able to preserve the size and diversity of the naive CD4 compartment, further arguing against complete thymectomy in infancy. Overall, our data suggest that robust peripheral mechanisms ensure the homeostasis of CD31(-) naive CD4 pool and point to the requirement of continuous thymic activity to the maintenance of IL-7-driven homeostatic proliferation of CD31(+) naive CD4 T-cells, which is essential to secure T-cell diversity throughout life.

  19. CD4+ Recent Thymic Emigrants Are Recruited into Granulomas during Leishmania donovani Infection but Have Limited Capacity for Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John W. J.; Beattie, Lynette; Osman, Mohamed; Owens, Benjamin M. J.; Brown, Najmeeyah; Dalton, Jane E.; Maroof, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) represent a source of antigen-naïve T cells that enter the periphery throughout life. However, whether RTEs contribute to the control of chronic parasitic infection and how their potential might be harnessed by therapeutic intervention is currently unclear. Here, we show that CD4+ recent thymic emigrants emerging into the periphery of mice with ongoing Leishmania donovani infection undergo partial activation and are recruited to sites of granulomatous inflammation. However, CD4+ RTEs displayed severely restricted differentiation either into IFNγ+ or IFNγ+TNFα+ effectors, or into IL-10-producing regulatory T cells. Effector cell differentiation in the chronically infected host was not promoted by adoptive transfer of activated dendritic cells or by allowing extended periods of post-thymic differentiation in the periphery. Nevertheless, CD4+ RTEs from infected mice retained the capacity to transfer protection into lymphopenic RAG2-/- mice. Taken together, our data indicate that RTEs emerging into a chronically inflamed environment are not recruited into the effector pool, but retain the capacity for subsequent differentiation into host protective T cells when placed in a disease-free environment. PMID:27658046

  20. Human natural regulatory T cell development, suppressive function and post-thymic maturation in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Chittenden, Meredith; Zhao, Guiling; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control adaptive immune responses and promote self-tolerance. Various humanized mouse models have been developed in efforts to reproduce and study a human immune system. However, in models that require T cell differentiation in the recipient murine thymus, only low numbers of T cells populate the peripheral immune systems. T cells are positively selected by mouse MHC and therefore do not function well in an HLA-restricted manner. In contrast, cotransplantation of human fetal thymus/liver and i.v. injection of CD34+ cells from the same donor achieves multilineage human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution, including dendritic cells (DCs) and formation of secondary lymphoid organs, in NOD/SCID mice. Strong antigen-specific immune responses and homeostatic expansion of human T cells that is dependent on peripheral human APCs occurs. We now demonstrate that FoxP3+ Helios+ “natural” Tregs develop normally in human fetal thymic grafts and are present in peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes of these humanized mice. Humanized mice exhibit normal reversal of CD45 isoform expression in association with thymic egress, post-thymic “naïve” to “activated” phenotypic conversion, and suppressive function. These studies demonstrate the utility of this humanized mouse model for the study of human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology and therapy. PMID:21876039

  1. Thymic B lymphocyte clones from patients with myasthenia gravis secrete monoclonal striational autoantibodies reacting with myosin, alpha actinin, or actin

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Striational autoantibodies (StrAb), which react with elements of skeletal muscle cross-striations, occur frequently in patients with thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Dissociated thymic lymphocytes from 22 of 72 MG patients secreted StrAb when cultured with PWM. A high yield of EBV-transformed B cell lines was established from thymus, thymoma, and peripheral blood of seven patients with MG, but clones secreting StrAb arose only from the three patients who had StrAb in their sera. The monoclonal StrAb bound to A bands or I bands in skeletal muscle of human, rat, and frog. One bound to mitochondria in addition to myofibrillar I bands. None bound to nuclei, smooth muscle, or gastric mucosal cells. In immunoblot analyses and ELISAs the monoclonal StrAb bound to muscle and nonmuscle isotypes of myosin, alpha actinin, and/or actin. All bound to contractile proteins common to thymus and muscle, and one selectively immunostained epithelial cells of the thymic medulla. From these antigenic specificities we suggest that StrAb might arise as an immune response directed against the cytoskeletal anchoring proteins associated with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in thymic epithelial cells undergoing neoplastic transformation to thymoma. PMID:3020150

  2. Response of mouse thymic cells to radiation after transfusion of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Ling; Guo, Chunlong; Tong, Zhimin; Liu, Yue; Meng, Xiangkuan; Feng, Hu; Chen, Yubing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Thymic lymphoma is a highly invasive and even metastatic cancer. This study investigated the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfusion on cell cycle, cell proliferation, CD3 expression, mutation frequency of T cell receptor using mouse model of thymic lymphoma. C57BL/6J young mouse models of thymoma were injected with MSCs. Six months later, the thymus was taken for pathological examination and flow cytometry studies. The cells were labeled with anti-CD4, CD8, CD3, propidium iodide, or CFDA-SE, cell cycle, proliferation kinetics, and mutation frequency of T cell receptor, respectively. Pathologic results showed that control had clear corticomedular structure with regularly shaped lymphocytes. After radiation, the thymus structure was completely destroyed, with lymphoid tumor cells diffusely distributed and heavily stained, and large nuclei. Transfusion of MSCs resulted in normal thymus structure. Cytometry studies showed that there were more CD4-/CD8- T cells in the thymus of irradiated mice than in control; transfusion of MSCs led to reduced CD4-/CD8- T cells. In irradiated mice, there were less CD4+/CD8+ T cells than in control and MSCs transfusion groups. It was observed that there were more cells arrested in G1 phase in the thymus cells and CD4-/CD8- T cells in irradiated mice than in other 2 groups, whereas there were more cells arrested in S phase in CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+/CD8- T cells in irradiated mice than in the other mice. In the thymus cells, and CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+/CD8- T cells, irradiated mice group had significantly less parent, G2, G3, and G4 cells, and more cells at higher generations, and also higher proliferation index. In CD4-/CD8- T cells, irradiated mice had significantly more parent, G2, and G3 cells, and less G4, G5, G6, and propidium iodide, as compared with the other 2 groups. The expression of CD3 in CD4/CD8 T cells was significantly higher than in control. MSCs transfusion improved CD3 expression, but was still less than

  3. Response of mouse thymic cells to radiation after transfusion of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Ling; Guo, Chunlong; Tong, Zhimin; Liu, Yue; Meng, Xiangkuan; Feng, Hu; Chen, Yubing

    2016-12-01

    Thymic lymphoma is a highly invasive and even metastatic cancer. This study investigated the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfusion on cell cycle, cell proliferation, CD3 expression, mutation frequency of T cell receptor using mouse model of thymic lymphoma.C57BL/6J young mouse models of thymoma were injected with MSCs. Six months later, the thymus was taken for pathological examination and flow cytometry studies. The cells were labeled with anti-CD4, CD8, CD3, propidium iodide, or CFDA-SE, cell cycle, proliferation kinetics, and mutation frequency of T cell receptor, respectively.Pathologic results showed that control had clear corticomedular structure with regularly shaped lymphocytes. After radiation, the thymus structure was completely destroyed, with lymphoid tumor cells diffusely distributed and heavily stained, and large nuclei. Transfusion of MSCs resulted in normal thymus structure. Cytometry studies showed that there were more CD4-/CD8- T cells in the thymus of irradiated mice than in control; transfusion of MSCs led to reduced CD4-/CD8- T cells. In irradiated mice, there were less CD4+/CD8+ T cells than in control and MSCs transfusion groups. It was observed that there were more cells arrested in G1 phase in the thymus cells and CD4-/CD8- T cells in irradiated mice than in other 2 groups, whereas there were more cells arrested in S phase in CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+/CD8- T cells in irradiated mice than in the other mice. In the thymus cells, and CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+/CD8- T cells, irradiated mice group had significantly less parent, G2, G3, and G4 cells, and more cells at higher generations, and also higher proliferation index. In CD4-/CD8- T cells, irradiated mice had significantly more parent, G2, and G3 cells, and less G4, G5, G6, and propidium iodide, as compared with the other 2 groups. The expression of CD3 in CD4/CD8 T cells was significantly higher than in control. MSCs transfusion improved CD3 expression, but was still less than the control

  4. Predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for brain atrophy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xintao; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Kaiming; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an approach of predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for the detection of brain atrophy based on cross-sectional MRI image. The underlying premise of applying predictive modeling for atrophy detection is that brain atrophy is defined as significant deviation of part of the anatomy from what the remaining normal anatomy predicts for that part. The steps of predictive modeling are as follows. The central cortical surface under consideration is reconstructed from brain tissue map and Regions of Interests (ROI) on it are predicted from other reliable anatomies. The vertex pair-wise distance between the predicted vertex and the true one within the abnormal region is expected to be larger than that of the vertex in normal brain region. Change of white matter/gray matter ratio within a spherical region is used to identify the direction of vertex displacement. In this way, the severity of brain atrophy can be defined quantitatively by the displacements of those vertices. The proposed predictive modeling method has been evaluated by using both simulated atrophies and MRI images of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Intrathecal Injections in Children With Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sethna, Navil; Farrow-Gillespie, Alan; Khandji, Alexander; Xia, Shuting; Bishop, Kathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nusinersen (ISIS-SMNRx or ISIS 396443) is an antisense oligonucleotide drug administered intrathecally to treat spinal muscular atrophy. We summarize lumbar puncture experience in children with spinal muscular atrophy during a phase 1 open-label study of nusinersen and its extension. During the studies, 73 lumbar punctures were performed in 28 patients 2 to 14 years of age with type 2/3 spinal muscular atrophy. No complications occurred in 50 (68%) lumbar punctures; in 23 (32%) procedures, adverse events were attributed to lumbar puncture. Most common adverse events were headache (n = 9), back pain (n = 9), and post–lumbar puncture syndrome (n = 8). In a subgroup analysis, adverse events were more frequent in older children, children with type 3 spinal muscular atrophy, and with a 21- or 22-gauge needle compared to a 24-gauge needle or smaller. Lumbar punctures were successfully performed in children with spinal muscular atrophy; lumbar puncture–related adverse event frequency was similar to that previously reported in children. PMID:26823478

  6. Early and Degressive Putamen Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Julia; Meuth, Sven G; Tenberge, Jan-Gerd; Schiffler, Patrick; Wiendl, Heinz; Deppe, Michael

    2015-09-25

    Putamen atrophy and its long-term progress during disease course were recently shown in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we investigated retrospectively the time point of atrophy onset in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). 68 patients with RRMS and 26 healthy controls (HC) were admitted to 3T MRI in a cross-sectional study. We quantitatively analyzed the putamen volume of individual patients in relation to disease duration by correcting for age and intracranial volume (ICV). Patient's relative putamen volume (RPV), expressed in percent of ICV, was significantly reduced compared to HC. Based on the correlation between RPV and age, we computed the age-corrected RPV deviation (ΔRPV) from HC. Patients showed significantly negative ΔRPV. Interestingly, the age-corrected ΔRPV depended logarithmically on disease duration: Directly after first symptom manifestation, patients already showed a reduced RPV followed by a further degressive volumetric decline. This means that atrophy progression was stronger in the first than in later years of disease. Putamen atrophy starts directly after initial symptom manifestation or even years before, and progresses in a degressive manner. Due to its important role in neurological functions, early detection of putamen atrophy seems necessary. High-resolution structural MRI allows monitoring of disease course.

  7. Congenital segmental spinal muscular atrophy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are genetic disorders in which anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor nuclei of the brainstem are progressively lost. We present a patient with arthrogryposis due to congenital spinal muscular atrophy predominantly affecting the upper limbs. Spinal muscular atrophies with onset at birth may be a cause of arthrogryposis. Localized forms of neurogenic arthrogryposis have been divided into cervical and caudal forms. Our case is similar to the cases described by Hageman et al (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1993;56:365-368): severe symmetric lower motor neuron deficit in the upper extremities at the time of birth, no history of injury to the cervical spinal cord or the brachial plexus during delivery, and severe muscle wasting suggesting chronic denervation in utero. Because there was improvement of our patient's situation, her disease was also possibly nonprogressive and sporadic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Turkish patient with congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy affecting predominantly the upper limbs is a relatively rare form of motor neuron disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants with congenital contractures and severe muscle weakness by wasting mainly confined to the upper limbs.

  8. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  9. Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Correlates with Preinjury Brain Atrophy, but Not with Antithrombotic Agent Use: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C. Michael; Hoffman, David A.; Huang, Gregory S.; Omert, Laurel A.; Gemmel, David J.; Merrell, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of antithrombotic agents (warfarin, clopidogrel, ASA) on traumatic brain injury outcomes is highly controversial. Although cerebral atrophy is speculated as a risk for acute intracranial hemorrhage, there is no objective literature evidence. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective, consecutive investigation of patients with signs of external head trauma and age ≥60 years. Outcomes were correlated with antithrombotic-agent status, coagulation test results, admission neurologic function, and CT-based cerebral atrophy dimensions. Results Of 198 consecutive patients, 36% were antithrombotic-negative and 64% antithrombotic-positive. ASA patients had higher arachidonic acid inhibition (p = 0.04) and warfarin patients had higher INR (p<0.001), compared to antithrombotic-negative patients. Antithrombotic-positive intracranial hemorrhage rate (38.9%) was similar to the antithrombotic-negative rate (31.9%; p = 0.3285). Coagulopathy was not present on the ten standard coagulation, thromboelastography, and platelet mapping tests with intracranial hemorrhage and results were similar to those without hemorrhage (p≥0.1354). Hemorrhagic-neurologic complication (intracranial hemorrhage progression, need for craniotomy, neurologic deterioration, or death) rates were similar for antithrombotic-negative (6.9%) and antithrombotic-positive (8.7%; p = 0.6574) patients. The hemorrhagic-neurologic complication rate was increased when admission major neurologic dysfunction was present (63.2% versus 2.2%; RR = 28.3; p<0.001). Age correlated inversely with brain parenchymal width (p<0.001) and positively with lateral ventricular width (p = 0.047) and cortical atrophy (p<0.001). Intracranial hemorrhage correlated with cortical atrophy (p<0.001) and ventricular width (p<0.001). Conclusions Intracranial hemorrhage is not associated with antithrombotic agent use. Intracranial hemorrhage patients have no demonstrable coagulopathy. The association

  10. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy With Contralateral Uveitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Ayyildiz, Simel; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Sobaci, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progressive hemifacial atrophy, known as Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS), was first described by Parry in 1825. There is a progressive atrophy of facial tissues including skin, bones and muscles. Ophthalmic disorders are common and include keratitis, uveitis, cataract, ipsilateral enophthalmos, optic neuritis, retinal vasculitis and scleral melting. Case Presentation: We describe a patient with progressive hemifacial atrophy at right facial side who developed granulomatous uveitis and periferic retinal vasculitis in his left eye. We started topical and systemic steroid therapy. Uveitic reaction had regressed almost entirely after a 3-month steroid treatment. Conclusions: The individuals should have multidisciplinary approach for the variety of disorders to maintain the appropriate treatment for a better appearance of the patients. PMID:26473067

  11. Primary ileal villous atrophy is often associated with microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Marteau, P; Lavergne-Slove, A; Lemann, M; Bouhnik, Y; Bertheau, P; Becheur, H; Galian, A; Rambaud, J

    1997-01-01

    Three cases of apparent primary villous atrophy of the terminal ileum in women with chronic diarrhoea are reported. Eight cases have previously been reported in the literature. Clinical characteristics are the presence of severe chronic secretory diarrhoea with episodes of hypokalaemia combined with signs of ileal malabsorption and/or efficacy of cholestyramine. Diagnosis is based on ileoscopy and histology. An association with microscopic colitis was present in the three patients and in four cases in the literature. The pathogenesis of primary ileal villous atrophy remains unknown and may involve dysimmunity. Its association with microscopic colitis may indicate a common pathogenesis or support the hypothesis that the faecal stream or bile salts play a role in the pathogenesis of microscopic colitis. 

 Keywords: intestinal villous atrophy; ileum; secretory diarrhoea; bile acid malabsorption; microscopic colitis PMID:9391260

  12. Hypocupremia: A Possible Association with Late Cortical Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Machado, Duarte G.

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a patient, diagnosed with late cortical cerebellar atrophy, who had persistent low serum copper levels. Case report A 48-year-old male developed progressive difficulty with balance, frequent falls, and dysarthric speech, which worsened over a short time span. He had an extensive ataxia work-up, which was unremarkable except for persistent low serum copper levels despite adequate supplementation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed marked cerebellar atrophy. The patient experienced progressive worsening of symptoms, which did not improve with either oral or parenteral copper supplementation. Discussion To our knowledge, ours is the first case report of late cortical cerebellar atrophy in the setting of low serum copper levels. The current report should trigger further research in mechanisms leading to copper deficiency and its possible role in cerebellar disease. PMID:25247109

  13. Soluble toll-like receptor 4 reversed attenuating effect of Chinese herbal Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang on allergen induced nerve growth factor and thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, REN-SHIU; WANG, YU-CHIN; KAO, SHUNG-TE

    2013-01-01

    Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang (XQLT) is known to regulate allergic immune reactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of XQLT on allergen-induced cytokines and associated signaling pathways. An acute allergic mouse model was used to investigate the effects of XQLT on nerve growth factor (NGF) during an allergic reaction, while human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiCs) were used to investigate the effects of XQLT on Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (Der p 2)-induced NGF, p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) expression. XQLT was demonstrated to inhibit NGF- and p75NTR-related allergic reactions in the mouse model. XQLT also reduced the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the lungs of the model mice. XQLT inhibited Der p 2-induced NGF, TSLP and p75NTR expression in the HPAEpiC cell line. The use of recombinant soluble TLR4 (sTLR4) in a competitive assay partially attenuated the inhibitory effect of XQLT on NGF, TSLP and p75NTR expression in HPAEpiC cells. The inhibitory effect of XQLT on the Ser536 phosphorylation of p65 (nuclear factor-κB; NF-κB), a TLR4-induced factor, was also attenuated by sTLR4. In conclusion, XQLT inhibited Der p allergen-induced NGF, p75NTR and TSLP expression. This inhibition was attenuated by sTLR4. The mechanism of action of XQLT may be correlated with TLR4, a primary receptor in the innate immune system. The findings of this study may focus the search for pharmacological targets of XQLT onto TLR4, which is important in the allergen presentation pathway. PMID:24223644

  14. Risk of extrathyroid tumors following radiation treatment in infancy for thymic enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, N.G.; Shore, R.E.; Hempelmann, L.M.; Rosenstein, M.

    1985-06-01

    Two thousand eight hundred and fifty-six individuals who received X-ray treatments in infancy for an enlarged thymus gland and their 5053 nonirradiated siblings have been followed prospectively since 1953 to evaluate the risk of radiation-induced neoplastic disease. Based on the cumulative experience of five surveys of this cohort, the irradiated group has a statistically significant increased risk for both benign and malignant extrathyroid tumors, the age-adjusted relative risks being 2.0 and 2.2, respectively. Benign tumors of the bone, nervous system, salivary gland, skin, and breast (females only) and malignant tumors of the skin and breast (females only) account for the excess incidence of extrathyroid tumors among the thymic-irradiated individuals. Although a radiation-induced excess of extrathyroid tumors was suggested in an earlier survey of this cohort, small numbers restricted attribution of this excess to specific sites. The implications of these findings are discussed. Thyroid tumors are addressed in a separate paper.

  15. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP)

    PubMed Central

    Bjerkan, Louise; Sonesson, Andreas; Schenck, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP) that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP), that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs). lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR) and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34) that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes. PMID:27399723

  16. TCR signal strength controls thymic differentiation of discrete proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Ruiz, Miguel; Ribot, Julie C.; Grosso, Ana R.; Gonçalves-Sousa, Natacha; Pamplona, Ana; Pennington, Daniel J.; Regueiro, José R.

    2016-01-01

    The murine thymus produces discrete γδ T cell subsets making either interferon-γ (IFN--γ) or interleukin 17 (IL-17), but the role of the TCR in this developmental process remains controversial. Here we show that mice haploinsufficient for both Cd3g and Cd3d (CD3DH, for CD3 double haploinsufficient) have reduced TCR expression and signaling strength selectively on γδ T cells. CD3DH mice had normal numbers and phenotype of αβ thymocyte subsets but impaired differentiation of fetal Vγ6+ (but not Vγ4+) IL-17-producing γδ T cells and a marked depletion of IFN-γ-producing CD122+ NK1.1+ γδ T cells throughout ontogeny. Adult CD3DH mice showed reduced peripheral IFN-γ+ γδ T cells and were resistant to experimental cerebral malaria. Thus, TCR signal strength within specific thymic developmental windows is a major determinant of the generation of proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets and their impact on pathophysiology. PMID:27043412

  17. Murine thymic NK cells are distinct from ILC1s and have unique transcription factor requirements.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Sara; Sun, Mengxi; Bell, April; Zook, Erin C; de Pooter, Renee F; Zamai, Loris; Kee, Barbara L

    2017-03-09

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells include natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s, which mediate the response to intracellular pathogens. Thymic NK (tNK) cells were described with hybrid features of immature NK cells and ILC1 but whether these cells are related to NK cells or ILC1 has not been fully investigated. We report that murine tNK cells expressed the NK-cell associated transcription factor EOMES and developed independent of the essential ILC1 factor TBET, confirming their placement within the NK lineage. Moreover, tNK cells resemble NK cells rather than ILC1 in their requirements for the E protein transcription factor inhibitor ID2. We provide further insight into the mechanisms governing tNK-cell development by showing that the transcription factor ETS1 prevented tNK cell acquisition of the conventional NK-cell maturation markers CD11b and KLRG1. Our data reveal few ILC1 in the thymus and clarify the identity and developmental requirements of tNK cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of thymic tolerance as possibility in prevention of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Bubanovic, I V

    2003-04-01

    A major process through which the immune system becomes tolerant to self-proteins involves the deletion of self-reactive cells in the thymus and/or inhibition of specific Th(1) cells clones. Deletion process includes two selection mechanisms in which the thymus eliminates unwanted thymocytes are known as positive selection and negative selection. The thymus is an antigenically privileged site, mainly for it is discrete by blood-thymus barrier. Many researches were shown that intrathymic inoculation of any antigen resulted in specific tolerance induction. The embryo/fetus and placenta are an allograft to which the mother must remain immunologically tolerant in order for the fetus to survive. Today, there is much interest focused on the immunology of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Up to 50% of RSA may be mediated by the immune system via inadequate maternal anti-paternal response. Nature of this maternal-fetal disturbance represents disbalance in Th(1)/Th(2) activity. Contra-shift in Th(1)/Th(2) activity is the basis for immunotherapy with paternal leukocyte immunization (PLI). PLI induce some kind of peripheral tolerance on embryonic/fetal/trophoblast antigens, but problems of central tolerance are still open. Intrathymic inoculation of fetal or paternal cells (like leukocyte, thymic dendritic cells, trophoblast cells) or paternal set of MHC molecules may cause central specific tolerance and may be a new possibility for immunotherapy in RSA patients.

  19. Inhibitory effects of nicotine derived from cigarette smoke on thymic stromal lymphopoietin production in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiangxu; Segawa, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-04-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is regarded as the main factor responsible for the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). Cigarette smoke is an aggravating factor for allergies, but has been reported to decrease the risk of AD. In the present study, we evaluated the role of nicotine, the main constituent in cigarette smoke extract, and its underlying mechanism of action in the regulation of TSLP expression. We found that nicotine significantly inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced TSLP expression in BALB/c mice and the mouse keratinocyte cell line PAM212. Nicotine inhibition of TSLP production was abolished by pretreatments with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) antagonists, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors. The same inhibitors abolished inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by nicotine. These results suggest that nicotine inhibits the expression of TSLP by suppressing the activation of NF-κB through the α7 nAChR-PI3K-AMPK signaling pathway.

  20. Spinal cord gray matter atrophy correlates with multiple sclerosis disability

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeger, Regina; Papinutto, Nico; Panara, Valentina; Bevan, Carolyn; Lobach, Iryna V.; Bucci, Monica; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Green, Ari J.; Jordan, Kesshi M.; Stern, William A.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zhu, Alyssa H.; Goodin, Douglas S.; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Henry, Roland G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS) cerebral gray matter (GM) atrophy correlates more strongly than white matter (WM) atrophy with disability. The corresponding relationships in the spinal cord (SC) are unknown due to technical limitations in assessing SCGM atrophy. Using phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) MRI, we determined the association of the SCGM and SCWM areas with MS disability and disease type. Methods 113 MS patients and 20 healthy controls were examined at 3T with a PSIR sequence acquired at the C2/C3 disc level. Two independent, clinically-masked readers measured the cord WM and GM areas. Correlations between cord areas and Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS) were determined. Differences in areas between groups were assessed with age and sex as covariates. Results Relapsing (R) MS patients showed smaller SCGM areas than age and sex matched controls (p=0.008) without significant differences in SCWM areas. Progressive MS patients showed smaller SCGM and SCWM areas compared to RMS patients (all p≤0.004). SCGM, SCWM, and whole cord areas inversely correlated with EDSS (rho: −0.60, −0.32, −0.42, respectively; all p≤0.001). SCGM area was the strongest correlate of disability in multivariate models including brain GM and WM volumes, FLAIR lesion load, T1-lesion load, SCWM area, number of spinal cord T2 lesions, age, sex, disease duration. Brain and spinal GM independently contributed to EDSS. Interpretation SCGM atrophy is detectable in-vivo in absence of WM atrophy in RMS. It is more pronounced in progressive than RMS and contributes more to patient disability than spinal cord WM or brain GM atrophy. PMID:25087920

  1. Progressive Retinal Structure Abnormalities in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Santiesteban, Carlos E.; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Martinez, Jose; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Hedges, Thomas R.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Objective measures of disease progression that can be used as end-points in clinical trials of multiple system atrophy are necessary. We studied retinal thickness in patients with multiple system atrophy, and assessed changes over time to determine its usefulness as imaging biomarker of disease progression. Methods Cross sectional study including 24 patients with multiple system atrophy, 20 patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and 35 controls; followed by a longitudinal study of 13 multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients. Patients were evaluated with high definition-optical coherence tomography and the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at consecutive follow-up visits for up to 26 months. Results MSA subjects had normal visual acuity and color discrimination. Compared to controls, retinal nerve fiber layer (p=0.008 and p=0.001) and ganglion cell complex (p=0.013 and p=0.001) thicknesses were reduced in multiple system atrophy and in PD. No significant differences between MSA and PD were found. Over time, in patients with MSA, there was a significant reduction of the retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thicknesses, with estimated annual average losses of 3.7 μm and 1.8 μm respectively. Conclusions Visually asymptomatic MSA patients exhibit progressive reductions in the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer and, to a lesser extent, in the macular ganglion cell complex, which can be quantified by high-definition optical coherence tomography. Specific patterns of retinal nerve fiber damage could be a useful imaging biomarker of disease progression in future clinical trials. PMID:26359930

  2. Muscle atrophy and metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Reshid; Khoo, Michael; Cook, Erica; Guppy, Andrew; Hua, Jia; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Muscle atrophy is seen in patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants, probably because of inflammatory destruction of the musculo-tendon junction. However, like pseudotumors, it is unclear when atrophy occurs and whether it progresses with time. Our objective was to determine whether muscle atrophy associated with MOM hip implants progresses with time. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 74 hips in 56 patients (32 of them women) using serial MRI. Median age was 59 (23–83) years. The median time post-implantation was 83 (35–142) months, and the median interval between scans was 11 months. Hip muscles were scored using the Pfirrmann system. The mean scores for muscle atrophy were compared between the first and second MRI scans. Blood cobalt and chromium concentrations were determined. Results The median blood cobalt was 6.84 (0.24–90) ppb and median chromium level was 4.42 (0.20–45) ppb. The median Oxford hip score was 34 (5–48). The change in the gluteus minimus mean atrophy score between first and second MRI was 0.12 (p = 0.002). Mean change in the gluteus medius posterior portion (unaffected by surgical approach) was 0.08 (p = 0.01) and mean change in the inferior portion was 0.10 (p = 0.05). Mean pseudotumor grade increased by 0.18 (p = 0.02). Interpretation Worsening muscle atrophy and worsening pseudotumor grade occur over a 1-year period in a substantial proportion of patients with MOM hip implants. Serial MRI helps to identify those patients who are at risk of developing worsening soft-tissue pathology. These patients should be considered for revision surgery before irreversible muscle destruction occurs. PMID:25588091

  3. Rates of cerebral atrophy differ in different degenerative pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Jack, Clifford R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Knopman, David S.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurodegenerative disorders are pathologically characterized by the deposition of abnormal proteins in the brain. It is likely that future treatment trials will target the underlying protein biochemistry and it is therefore increasingly important to be able to distinguish between different pathologies during life. The aim of this study was to determine whether rates of brain atrophy differ in neurodegenerative dementias that vary by pathological diagnoses and characteristic protein biochemistry. Fifty-six autopsied subjects were identified with a clinical diagnosis of dementia and two serial head MRI. Subjects were subdivided based on pathological diagnoses into Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), mixed AD/DLB, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-only-immunoreactive changes (FTLD-U), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Twenty-five controls were matched by age, gender, and scan interval, to the study cohort. The boundary-shift integral was used to calculate change over time in whole brain (BBSI) and ventricular volume (VBSI). All BSI results were annualized by adjusting for scan interval. The rates of whole brain atrophy and ventricular expansion were significantly increased compared to controls in the AD, mixed AD/DLB, FTLD-U, CBD and PSP groups. However, atrophy rates in the DLB group were not significantly different from control rates of atrophy. The largest rates of atrophy were observed in the CBD group which had a BBSI of 2.3% and VBSI of 16.2%. The CBD group had significantly greater rates of BBSI and VBSI than the DLB, mixed AD/DLB, AD and PSP groups, with a similar trend observed when compared to the FTLD-U group. The FTLD-U group showed the next largest rates with a BBSI of 1.7% and VBSI of 9.6% which were both significantly greater than the DLB group. There was no significant difference in the rates of atrophy between the AD, mixed AD/DLB and PSP groups, which all showed

  4. Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy: Physiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy is a common condition associated with decreased estrogenization of the vaginal tissue. Symptoms include vaginal dryness, irritation, itching, soreness, burning, dyspareunia, discharge, urinary frequency, and urgency. It can occur at any time in a woman's life cycle, although more commonly in the postmenopausal phase, during which the prevalence is approximately 50%. Despite the high prevalence and the substantial effect on quality of life, vulvovaginal atrophy often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the physiology, clinical presentation, assessment, and current recommendations for treatment, including aspects of effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies.

  5. From alveolar diffuse atrophy to aggressive periodontitis: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Toygar, Hilal Uslu

    2006-01-01

    Technologic advances in mechanics, electronics, physics, chemistry, and computer science have contributed to advances in dental medicine. Periodontology is not only a clinical science but is also directly related to the basic sciences. Research is conducted in laboratories rather than in clinics now. During the last century, aggressive periodontitis has received attention from numerous researchers because of its multifactorial features. This paper explores the long scientific journey of aggressive periodontitis, beginning with its first definition as alveolar diffuse atrophy. Perhaps in the future, "alveolar diffuse atrophy" will be referred to by another name or term. However, this journey will never end.

  6. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  7. Effects of hypophyseal or thymic allograft on thymus development in partially decerebrate chicken embryos: expression of PCNA and CD3 markers.

    PubMed

    Aita, M; Benedetti, F; Carafelli, E; Caccia, E; Romano, N

    2010-08-30

    Changes in chicken embryo thymus after partial decerebration (including the hypophysis) and after hypophyseal or thymic allograft were investigated. Chicken embryos were partially decerebrated at 36-40 hr of incubation and on day 12 received a hypophysis or a thymus allograft from 18-day-old donor embryos. The thymuses of normal, sham-operated and partially decerebrate embryos were collected on day 12 and 18. The thymuses of the grafted embryos were collected on day 18. The samples were examined with histological method and tested for the anti-PCNA and anti-CD3 immune-reactions. After partial decerebration, the thymic cortical and medullary compartments diminished markedly in size. Anti-PCNA and anti-CD3 revealed a reduced immune-reaction, verified also by statistical analysis. In hypophyseal or grafted embryos, the thymic morphological compartments improved, the anti-PCNA and anti-CD3 immune-reactions recovered much better after the thymic graft, probably due to the thymic growth factors and also by an emigration of thymocytes from the same grafted thymus.

  8. Ectopic Cushing syndrome associated with thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of MEN1 syndrome-report of a family with MEN1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Rahmanian, Masoud; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Soltani, Akbar; Soltanzade, Akbar; Mahrampour, Elnaz; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2014-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1(MEN1) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. Although thymic carcinoid tumor is recognized as a part of MEN1 syndrome but functioning thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of the MEN1 seems to be very rare. In this report, we present a 29-year-old male who developed ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to thymic carcinoid tumor and was diagnosed as MEN1 syndrome 2 years later. Further evaluation revealed the presence of carcinoid tumor and other MEN 1 manifestations in several other member of family. Genetic evaluation showed presence of a previously reported mutation in exon 10(R527X) of MEN1 gene in these patients. This presentation showed that thymic neuroendocrine tumor could be the first manifestation of the MEN1 syndrome and it might be diagnosed as a dominant manifestation of this syndrome in a family. We suggest biochemical or genetic screening for MEN-1 syndrome for patients with thymic carcinoid.

  9. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-06-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31(+) endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1(+) fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation.

  10. Progressive biparietal atrophy: an atypical presentation of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S J; Graham, N; Stuart-Green, L; Prins, M; Xuereb, J; Patterson, K; Hodges, J R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define the clinical, neuropsychological, and radiological features of bilateral parietal lobe atrophy. METHODS: Four patients underwent a comprehensive longitudinal neuropsychological assessment, as well as MRI and HMPAO-SPECT. RESULTS: The consistent findings in the patients were early visuospatial problems, agraphia of a predominantly peripheral (or apraxic) type, and difficulty with bimanual tasks, all of which outweighted deficits in memory and language until later in the course of the illness. As the disease progressed, impairments in the phonological aspects of language and in auditory-verbal short term memory were often striking, perhaps reflecting spread from the parietal lobe to perisylvian language areas. Three patients went on to develop a global dementia and fulfilled the criteria for a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease; the fourth patient has only recently been identified. Neuroimaging disclosed bilateral parietal lobe atrophy (MRI) and hypoperfusion (SPECT), which was out of proportion to that seen elsewhere in the brain. One patient has died and had pathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease with particular concentration in both superior parietal lobes. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral biparietal atrophy is a recognisable clinical syndrome which can be the presenting feature of Alzheimer's disease. Although the label "posterior cortical atrophy" has been applied to such cases, review of the medical literature suggests that this broad rubric actually consists of two main clinical syndromes with features reflecting involvement of the occipitotemporal (ventral) and biparietal (dorsal) cortical areas respectively. Images PMID:8890778

  11. Benefits of Laser Therapy in Postmenopausal Vaginal Atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brînzan, Daniela; Pǎiuşan, Lucian; Daşcǎu, Voicu; Furǎu, Gheorghe

    2011-08-01

    Maybe the worst aspect of menopause is the decline of the quality of the sexual life. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser therapy in comparison with topical application of estrogen preparations, for the treatment of vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions induced by menopause. A total of 50 menopausal patients were examined during a one year period. The methods used for objectifying vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions were history taking, local clinical exam and PAP smear. From this group, 40 patients had vaginal atrophy with sexual dysfunctions. They have been treated differently, being included in four groups: patients treated with local estrogens, patients treated with intravaginal laser therapy, patients treated with both laser therapy and estrogens, patients treated with estrogens and placebo laser therapy. Therapeutic benefit, improvement of vaginal atrophy and quality of sexual life, were objectified by anamnesis (questionnaire), local and general clinical examination and PAP smear. The best results have been obtained, by far, in the 3rd group, followed by the women treated only with laser. In conclusion, we can say that laser therapy is the best way for solving the sexual inconveniences of menopause.

  12. Atrophy of the Parietal Lobe in Preclinical Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Verhey, Frans R.; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults…

  13. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  14. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  15. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases.

  16. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  17. Ectopic TBX1 suppresses thymic epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation during thymus organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reeh, Kaitlin A G; Cardenas, Kim T; Bain, Virginia E; Liu, Zhijie; Laurent, Micheline; Manley, Nancy R; Richie, Ellen R

    2014-08-01

    The thymus and parathyroid glands arise from a shared endodermal primordium in the third pharyngeal pouch (3rd pp). Thymus fate is specified in the ventral 3rd pp between E9.5 and E11, whereas parathyroid fate is specified in the dorsal domain. The molecular mechanisms that specify fate and regulate thymus and parathyroid development are not fully delineated. Previous reports suggested that Tbx1 is required for thymus organogenesis because loss of Tbx1 in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome and in experimental Tbx1 deletion mutants is associated with thymus aplasia or hypoplasia. However, the thymus phenotype is likely to be secondary to defects in pharyngeal pouch formation. Furthermore, the absence of Tbx1 expression in the thymus-fated domain of the wild-type 3rd pp suggested that Tbx1 is instead a negative regulator of thymus organogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated a novel mouse strain in which expression of a conditional Tbx1 allele was ectopically activated in the thymus-fated domain of the 3rd pp. Ectopic Tbx1 expression severely repressed expression of Foxn1, a transcription factor that marks the thymus-fated domain and is required for differentiation and proliferation of thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitors. By contrast, ectopic Tbx1 did not alter the expression pattern of Gcm2, a transcription factor restricted to the parathyroid-fated domain and required for parathyroid development. Ectopic Tbx1 expression impaired TEC proliferation and arrested TEC differentiation at an early progenitor stage. The results support the hypothesis that Tbx1 negatively regulates TEC growth and differentiation, and that extinction of Tbx1 expression in 3rd pp endoderm is a prerequisite for thymus organogenesis.

  18. Biology of Mouse Thymic Virus, a Herpesvirus of Mice, and the Antigenic Relationship to Mouse Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S. S.; Parker, J. C.; Rowe, W. P.; Robbins, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse thymic virus (TA) is a herpesvirus which produces extensive necrosis of the thymus of newborn mice 7 to 14 days after infection. Infectious virus can be recovered from the thymus for only 10 days after infection, with highest titers occurring between days 5 and 7. In mice 5 days old or less, TA infects thymus cells and produces massive necrosis. TA also infects the salivary glands and persists as a chronic infection. Newborn mice infected with TA have no detectable humoral immune response. Infected adult mice respond, and humoral antibody is detected 7 days after infection. Titers are maintained for months thereafter. Regardless of the age of the mice inoculated with TA, persistent infection was established in the salivary glands, but no evidence for thymus involvement was observed when adults were infected. TA does not cross-react serologically by immunofluorescent, complement fixation, or virus neutralization tests with mouse cytomegalovirus; however, interestingly, the epidemiology of the two herpesviruses are similar. Both mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were isolated from the same animals in populations of laboratory and wild mice. Evidence of infection with mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were most apparent by virus isolations, since humoral antibody responses are rarely observed. All strains of mice tested were susceptible to TA infection. However, in some strains maximum necrosis occurred at 7 days, compared with 10 to 14 days for other strains. The difference in age susceptibility and the target tissue of thymus in newborn mice suggests that TA is a model herpesvirus for studying the effects of viral infections on humoral and cell-mediated immunological functions. Images PMID:231008

  19. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  20. Regulation of AP-1 and NFAT transcription factors during thymic selection of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, M; Flavell, R A

    1996-01-01

    The ability of thymocytes to express cytokine genes changes during the different stages of thymic development. Although CD4- CD8- thymocytes are able to produce a wide spectrum of cytokines in response to a T-cell receptor (TcR)-independent stimulus, as they approach the double-positive (DP) CD4+ CD8+ stage, they lose the ability to produce cytokine. After the DP stage, thymocytes become single-positive CD4+ or CD8+ thymocytes which reacquire the ability to secrete cytokines. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of this specific regulatin, we use AP-1-luciferase and newly generated NFAT-luciferase transgenic mice to analyze the transcriptional and DNA-binding activities of these two transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of cytokine gene expression. Here, we show that both AP-1 and NFAT transcriptional activities are not inducible in the majority of DP cells but that during the differentiation of DP cells to the mature single-positive stage, thymocytes regain this inducibility. Subpopulation analysis demonstrates that this inducibility is reacquired at the DP stage before the down-modulation of one of the coreceptors. Indeed AP-1 inducibility, just like the ability to express the interleukin-2 gene, is reacquired during the differentiation of DP TcRlow CD69low heat-stable antigen (HSA)high thymocytes to DP TcRhigh CD69high HSAhigh cells, which is considered to be the consequence of the first signal that initiates positive selection. We therefore propose that the inability of DP thymocytes to induce AP-1 and NFAT activities is one of the causes for the lack of cytokine gene expression at this stage and that this inducibility is reacquired at the latest stage of DP differentiation as a consequence of positive selection. This could be a mechanism to prevent the activation of DP thymocytes before selection has taken place. PMID:8622652

  1. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin activity is increased in nasal polyps of chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Poposki, Julie A.; Tan, Bruce K.; Comeau, Michael R.; Peters, Anju T.; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Norton, James; Harris, Kathleen E.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is associated with Th2-dominant inflammation. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine that triggers dendritic cell-mediated Th2 inflammatory responses and that enhances IL-1-dependent Th2 cytokine production in mast cells. Although elevated levels of TSLP mRNA have been found in nasal polyps (NPs), expression of TSLP protein and its function in CRS have not been fully explored. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the role of TSLP in CRS. Methods We investigated the presence and stability of TSLP protein in NPs by ELISA and western blot, and the function of TSLP in nasal tissue extracts with a bioassay based upon activation of human mast cells. Results Although TSLP mRNA was significantly increased in NP tissue from patients with CRSwNP compared to uncinate tissue from patients with CRS or control subjects, TSLP protein was significantly decreased in NP tissue as detected by the commercial ELISA kit. We found that recombinant TSLP was time-dependently degraded by NP extracts and this degradation was completely inhibited by a protease inhibitor cocktail, suggesting that TSLP is sensitive to tissue proteases. Interestingly, NP extract-treated TSLP had higher activity in mast cells, although the amount of full length TSLP was reduced up to 85%. NP extracts significantly enhanced IL-1β-dependent IL-5 production in mast cells compared with uncinate tissue homogenates, and responses were significantly inhibited by anti-TSLP, suggesting that NP contain biologically relevant levels of TSLP activity. Conclusion TSLP and its metabolic products may play an important role in the inflammation in CRSwNP. PMID:23688414

  2. Age- and sex-dependent thymic abnormalities in NZB × SJL F1 hybrid mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, F.; Robert, F.

    1980-01-01

    The cellular organization of the thymus was investigated in 3- and 12-month-old NZB × SJL F1 hybrid (NS) mice. Age-dependent alterations were demonstrated which differed strikingly according to the sex of the animals. In female mice, marked abnormalities of the thymus developed during ageing. They consisted of a more or less pronounced hypertrophy accompanied by histological changes and modifications in the nature of the lymphocyte populations. Three types of qualitative changes were found at 12 months of age: (1) depletion of cortical thymocytes as evidenced by histology, by the evaluation of peanut-agglutinin (PNA) binding and by cell electrophoresis; (2) hyperplasia of the medullary lymphoid tissue, probably reflecting the expansion of a population of mature T lymphocytes. This was further suggested by a rise (up to 60%) in the frequency of lymphocytes lacking both PNA receptor and B cell markers, by an increased proportion (57%) of high electrophoretic mobility (EPM) lymphocytes and by an augmentation of in vitro reactivities to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and, although to a lesser extent, to concanavalin A (Con A). (3) The appearance of significant numbers of B lymphocytes (up to 20%) as assessed by surface immunoglobulin (sIg) and complement receptor (CR) detection which was accompanied by a vigorous responsiveness of thymus cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). None of these abnormalities was seen in the male mice. Instead, the thymus of NS males displayed a nearly normal age-related involution without major change in the proportions of its lymphocyte subpopulations. NS mice thus provide an interesting model of thymic disease influenced by sex-linked factors. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:7438550

  3. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving {>=}10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  4. Isolated thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Turpin, Sophie; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Dubois, Josée; Buteau, Chantal; Patey, Natalie

    2015-11-01

    The thymic infiltration in young patients with multisystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis and its radiologic features are well known. However, isolated thymic disease has seldom been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 10-month-old child admitted for fever of unknown origin. Whole-body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) was performed to identify a focus of infection. It demonstrated an unusual aspect of the thymus, which led to further investigation and revealed isolated infiltration of the thymus by Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated accordingly and is now disease free. As evaluation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis patients with F-18 FDG PET/CT is becoming more frequent, it is important to be aware of the scintigraphical characteristics of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  5. Normalization of the peripheral blood T cell receptor V beta repertoire after cultured postnatal human thymic transplantation in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, C M; McLaughlin, T M; Watson, T J; Buckley, R H; Schiff, S E; Hale, L P; Haynes, B F; Markert, M L

    1997-03-01

    Complete DiGeorge syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease characterized by thymic aplasia and the absence of functioning peripheral T cells. A patient with this syndrome was transplanted with cultured postnatal human thymic tissue. Within 5 weeks of transplantation, flow cytometry, T cell receptor V beta sequence analysis, and cell function studies showed the presence of oligoclonal populations of nonfunctional clonally expanded peripheral T cells that were derived from pretransplantation T cells present in the skin. However, at 3 months posttransplantation, a biopsy of the transplanted thymus showed normal intrathymic T cell maturation of host T cells with normal TCR V beta expression on thymocytes. By 9 months postransplantation, peripheral T cell function was restored and the TCR V beta repertoire became polyclonal, coincident with the appearance of normal T cell function. These data suggest that the transplanted thymus was responsible for the establishment of a new T cell repertoire via thymopoiesis in the chimeric thymic graft.

  6. Assessment of thymic output in common variable immunodeficiency patients by evaluation of T cell receptor excision circles

    PubMed Central

    GUAZZI, V; AIUTI, F; MEZZAROMA, I; MAZZETTA, F; ANDOLFI, G; Mortellaro, A; Pierdominici, M; FANTINI, R; MARZIALI, M; AIUTI, A

    2002-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous syndrome characterized by repeated infections and hypogammaglobulinaemia. Additionally, T-cell abnormalities including lymphopenia, decreased proliferation to mitogens and antigens, and the reduced production and expression of cytokines, have also been observed. In this study we have investigated the expression of naive, memory and activation markers in T-cell subpopulations in 17 CVID patients in comparison to age-matched normal controls. The numbers of CD4+ T cells, including CD45RA+CD62L+ and, to a lesser extent, CD45RA−CD62L+/RA+CD62L− were significantly reduced in patients, whereas CD8+ T cells were within normal range. In contrast, HLA-DR+ cells were increased both in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. To assess the thymic output, we analysed the presence of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by quantitative PCR. TRECs were decreased significantly in patients and the rate of TREC loss was higher with increasing age. TRECs correlated with naive CD4+ T cells, whereas there was an inverse relationship between TRECs and CD8+HLA−DR+ and CD8+CD45RA−CD62L+/RA+CD62L− T cells. Our results suggest the presence of a defect in the naive T cell compartment with origin at the thymic level in CVID, and indicate that TREC may be a useful marker to monitor thymic function in this primary immunodeficiency. PMID:12165093

  7. The ageing and myasthenic thymus: a morphometric study validating a standard procedure in the histological workup of thymic specimens.

    PubMed

    Ströbel, Philipp; Moritz, Regina; Leite, Maria Isabel; Willcox, Nick; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Gold, Ralf; Nix, Wilfred; Schalke, Berthold; Kiefer, Reinhard; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Jaretzki Iii, Alfred; Newsom-Davis, John; Marx, Alexander

    2008-09-15

    The thymus is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis (MG). The 80% of MG patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies fall into three clinical subgroups: 1) thymoma; 2) early-onset MG (thymic histology. We here describe the validated, standardized histological workup and reporting system used in this trial.

  8. Thymic Nurse Cells Participate in Heterotypic Internalization and Repertoire Selection of Immature Thymocytes; Their Removal from the Thymus of Autoimmune Animals May be Important to Disease Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Guyden, J.C.; Martinez, M.; Chilukuri, R.V.E.; Reid, V.; Kelly, F.; Samms, M.-O.D.

    2016-01-01

    Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) are specialized epithelial cells that reside in the thymic cortex. The initial report of their discovery in 1980 showed TNCs to contain up to 200 thymocytes within specialized vacuoles in their cytoplasm. Much has been reported since that time to determine the function of this heterotypic internalization event that exists between TNCs and developing thymocytes. In this review, we discuss the literature reported that describes the internalization event and the role TNCs play during T cell development in the thymus as well as why these multicellular complexes may be important in inhibiting the development of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Wolfram Syndrome presenting with optic atrophy and diabetes mellitus: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Rashidi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Seyed Mohammad

    2009-12-19

    Wolfram syndrome is the constellation of juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness).Patients demonstrate diabetes mellitus followed by optic atrophy in the first decade, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, dilated renal outflow tracts early in the third decade, and multiple neurological abnormalities early in the fourth decade.This study reports two siblings with late diagnosed wolfram syndrome with diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness and severe urological abnormalities.In conclusion, cases having early onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy together need to be evaluated with respect to Wolfram.

  10. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  11. Dynamic Foot Pressure as a Countermeasure to Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyparos, A.; Layne, C. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Clarke, M. S. F.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle (SKM) as a consequence of space flight or ground-based analogues, such as human bedrest and rodent hindlimb suspension (HLS) models, induces SKM atrophy particularly affecting the anti-gravity musculature of the lower limbs. In the context of manned space flight, the subsequent loss of muscle strength and functionality will pose operational implications jeopardizing mission success. Exercise, currently the primary muscle degradation countermeasure, has not proven completely effective in preventing muscle atrophy. It is therefore imperative that some other forms of in- flight countermeasure be also developed to supplement the prescribed exercise regimen the astronauts follow during spaceflight. Previous work in both humans and rats has shown that mechanical stimulation of the soles of the feet increases neuromuscular activation in the lower limb musculature and that such stimulation results in the limited prevention of atrophy in the soleus muscle of unloaded rats. This study was designed to investigate the effect of cutaneous mechanoreceptor stimulation on hindlimb unloading- induced SKM atrophy in rats. It was hypothesized that mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the rat foot during hindlimb suspension (HLS), utilizing a novel stimulation paradigm known as Dynamic Foot Pressure (DFP), would attenuate unloading-induced SKM atrophy. Mature adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 rats each as follows: sedentary controls (Ctrl), hindlimb suspended only (HLS), hindlimb suspended wearing an inflatable boot (HLS-IFL) and hindlimb suspended rats wearing a non-inflatable boot (HLS-NIFL). The stimulation of mechanoreceptors was achieved by applying pressure to the plantar surface of the foot during the 10-day period of HLS using a custom-built boot. The anti-atrophic effects of DFP application was quantified directly by morphological (muscle wet weight, myofiber cross-sectional area

  12. Expanding the spectrum of neuronal pathology in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Coon, Elizabeth A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Jenkins, Sarah M; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Low, Phillip A; Schmeichel, Ann M; Parisi, Joseph E

    2015-08-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a sporadic alpha-synucleinopathy that typically affects patients in their sixth decade of life and beyond. The defining clinical features of the disease include progressive autonomic failure, parkinsonism, and cerebellar ataxia leading to significant disability. Pathologically, multiple system atrophy is characterized by glial cytoplasmic inclusions containing filamentous alpha-synuclein. Neuronal inclusions also have been reported but remain less well defined. This study aimed to further define the spectrum of neuronal pathology in 35 patients with multiple system atrophy (20 male, 15 female; mean age at death 64.7 years; median disease duration 6.5 years, range 2.2 to 15.6 years). The morphologic type, topography, and frequencies of neuronal inclusions, including globular cytoplasmic (Lewy body-like) neuronal inclusions, were determined across a wide spectrum of brain regions. A correlation matrix of pathologic severity also was calculated between distinct anatomic regions of involvement (striatum, substantia nigra, olivary and pontine nuclei, hippocampus, forebrain and thalamus, anterior cingulate and neocortex, and white matter of cerebrum, cerebellum, and corpus callosum). The major finding was the identification of widespread neuronal inclusions in the majority of patients, not only in typical disease-associated regions (striatum, substantia nigra), but also within anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, basal forebrain and hypothalamus. Neuronal inclusion pathology appeared to follow a hierarchy of region-specific susceptibility, independent of the clinical phenotype, and the severity of pathology was duration-dependent. Neuronal inclusions also were identified in regions not previously implicated in the disease, such as within cerebellar roof nuclei. Lewy body-like inclusions in multiple system atrophy followed the stepwise anatomic progression of Lewy body-spectrum disease inclusion pathology in 25.7% of patients

  13. Pharmacological Inhibitors of the Proteosome in Atrophying Muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Alfred

    1999-01-01

    It is now clear that the marked loss of muscle mass that occurs with disuse, denervation or in many systemic diseases (cancer cachexia, sepsis, acidosis, various endocrine disorders) is due primarily to accelerated degradation of muscle proteins, especially myofibrillar components. Recent work primarily in Dr. Goldberg's laboratory had suggested that in these diverse conditions, the enhancement of muscle proteolysis results mainly from activation of the Ub-proteasome degradative pathway. In various experimental models of atrophy, rat muscles show a common series of changes indicative of activation of this pathway, including increases in MRNA for Ub and proteasome subunits, content of ubiquitinated proteins, and sensitivity to inhibitors of the proteasome. In order to understand the muscle atrophy seen in weightlessness, Dr. Goldberg's laboratory is collaborating with Dr. Baldwin in studies to define the changes in these parameters upon hind-limb suspension. Related experiments will explore the effects on this degradative system of exercise regimens and also of glucocorticoids, which are known to rise in space personnel and to promote muscle, especially in inactive muscles. The main goals will be: (A) to define the enzymatic changes leading to enhanced activity of the Ub-proteasome pathway in inactive muscles upon hind-limb suspension, and the effects on this system of exposure to glucocorticoids or exercise; and (B) to learn whether inhibitors of the Ub-proteasome pathway may be useful in retarding the excessive proteolysis in atrophying muscles. Using muscle extracts, Dr. Goldberg's group hopes to define the rate-limiting, enzymatic changes that lead to the accelerated Ub-conjugation and protein degradation. They have recently developed cell-free preparations from atrophying rat muscles, in which Ub-conjugation to muscle proteins is increased above control levels. Because these new preparations seem to reproduce the changes occurring in vivo, they will analyze in

  14. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Dodd, D E; Stuart, B O; Rothenberg, S J; Kershaw, M; Mann, P C; James, J T; Lam, C W

    1994-01-01

    . Microscopic lesions included degeneration of the seminiferous tubular cells, pyknosis or absence of germ cells, and hypospermia in the epididymis. Rats of the 600 ppm group had a slight decrease in thymic weight and a transient decrease in body weight. Results of the acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation studies indicate DMES concentrations of 1000 ppm and higher produce narcosis that rapidly disappears following exposure. Repeated exposure of rats to DMES at either 3000 ppm for 2 wk or 2000 ppm for 13 wk caused testicular atrophy and hypospermia in male rats. Female rats exposed to 2000 ppm for 13 wk had delayed estrous cycles. Toxicological effects in rats of the 600 ppm group were minimal and equivocal. The 160 ppm concentration was a no-observable-effect level (NOEL) for 13 wk of exposure to DMES.

  15. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, D. E.; Stuart, B. O.; Rothenberg, S. J.; Kershaw, M.; Mann, P. C.; James, J. T.; Lam, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    . Microscopic lesions included degeneration of the seminiferous tubular cells, pyknosis or absence of germ cells, and hypospermia in the epididymis. Rats of the 600 ppm group had a slight decrease in thymic weight and a transient decrease in body weight. Results of the acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation studies indicate DMES concentrations of 1000 ppm and higher produce narcosis that rapidly disappears following exposure. Repeated exposure of rats to DMES at either 3000 ppm for 2 wk or 2000 ppm for 13 wk caused testicular atrophy and hypospermia in male rats. Female rats exposed to 2000 ppm for 13 wk had delayed estrous cycles. Toxicological effects in rats of the 600 ppm group were minimal and equivocal. The 160 ppm concentration was a no-observable-effect level (NOEL) for 13 wk of exposure to DMES.

  16. Circulating and thymic CD4 CD25 T regulatory cells in myasthenia gravis: effect of immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Fattorossi, Andrea; Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Ciaraffa, Francesca; Scambia, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia

    2005-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an immunosuppressive role of the thymus-derived CD4+ T-cell population constitutively expressing high level of CD25, T regulatory (Treg) cells, in autoimmune diseases. Here we show that the number of Treg cells in the blood is significantly lower in untreated myasthenia gravis patients than in age-matched healthy subjects, whereas it is normal or elevated in patients on immunosuppressive therapy (prednisone frequently associated with azathioprine). Therapeutic thymectomy (Tx) for either the thymoma or non-neoplastic thymic alterations that are often associated with myasthenia gravis provided unique material for studying intrathymic Treg cells and correlating them with their peripheral counterparts. We observed that Tx prevents the increase of Treg cells in the circulation that follows immunosuppressive therapy (particularly evident if the thymus is not neoplastic), indicating that the thymus contributes to Treg-cell normalization. However, thymic Treg cells are not modulated by immunosuppressive therapy and even in thymectomized patients Treg-cell numbers in the blood eventually recover. The present findings suggest that a deficiency in Treg cells favours the development of myasthenia gravis and that their normalization is an important clinical benefit of immunosuppressive therapy. Treg normalization appears to be largely thymus independent and possibly reflects the reported capacity of corticosteroids to promote Treg-cell development.

  17. Epoc-1: a POU-domain gene expressed in murine epidermal basal cells and thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, K; Yasui, T; Yamamoto, A; Shiku, H; Kishimoto, T; Kikutani, H

    1993-11-15

    POU-domain transcription factors are known as developmental regulators which control organ development and cell phenotypes. In order to clarify the roles of POU-domain transcription factors in cell differentiation, we cloned a novel POU family gene, Epoc-1, from a murine thymus cDNA library. The amino acid (aa) sequence of the POU-specific domain of Epoc-1 is almost identical to those of Oct-1 and Oct-2. However, within the POU-homeodomain, 13 out of 60 aa differ between Epoc-1 and Oct-2. Recombinant Epoc-1 products were found to bind specifically to the octamer sequence. Epoc-1 was found to be expressed in skin, thymus, stomach and testis. In situ hybridization experiments and RNase protection assays indicated that Epoc-1 is expressed in the epidermal basal cells of the skin, which contain stem cells unipotent for keratinocyte differentiation and in thymic stromal elements. These results suggest that Epoc-1 might be one of the developmental regulators which controls epidermal development and thymic organogenesis.

  18. Epithelial LTβR signaling controls the population size of the progenitors of medullary thymic epithelial cells in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weiwei; Shi, Yaoyao; Xia, Huan; Chai, Qian; Jin, Caiwei; Ren, Boyang; Zhu, Mingzhao

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of T cell central tolerance critically relies on the development and maintenance of the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Disrupted signaling of lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR) results in dramatically reduced mTEC population. However, whether LTβR directly or indirectly control mTECs remains undetermined; how LTβR controls this process also remain unclear. In this study, by utilizing K14-Cre × Ltbrfl/fl conditional knockout (cKO) mice, we show that epithelial intrinsic LTβR was essential for the mTEC development postnatally. Mechanistically, LTβR did not directly impact the proliferation or survival of mTECs; the maturation of mTECs from MHC-IIlo to MHC-IIhi stage was also unaltered in the absence of LTβR; interestingly, the number of mTEC progenitors (Cld3,4hiSSEA-1+) was found significantly reduced in LTβR cKO mice at the neonatal stage, but not at E18.5. Consequently, epithelial deficiency of LTβR resulted in significant defect of thymic negative selection as demonstrated using OT-I and RIP-OVA transgenic mouse system. In summary, our study clarifies the epithelial intrinsic role of LTβR on mTEC development and function; more importantly, it reveals a previously unrecognized function of LTβR on the control of the size of mTEC progenitor population. PMID:28290551

  19. Identification of a novel common proviral integration site, flit-1, in feline leukemia virus induced thymic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Liao, Chun-Peng; Zhao, Yan Shi; Pan, Judong; Mathes, Lawrence E; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    2009-03-30

    A new proviral integration site for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), termed flit-1, was identified from feline thymic lymphoma. Among 35 FeLV-related tumors examined, 5 of 25 thymic lymphomas demonstrated proviral insertion within flit-1 locus whereas none of four alimentary and five multicentric lymphomas and one T-lymphoid leukemia examined had rearrangement in this region. Extensive sequence analysis has shown that flit-1, which is noncoding, is conserved on human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15. The human and murine homologs of flit-1 are positioned approximately 30-kb upstream to activin-A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) gene. Expression of ACVRL1 mRNA was examined in two of five lymphomas with flit-1 rearrangement and detected in both of the two whereas normal thymuses and seven lymphoid tumors without flit-1 rearrangement had no detectable expression. Therefore, flit-1 appears to represent a novel FeLV proviral common integration domain that may influence lymphomagenesis as insertional mutagenesis.

  20. Effects of thymic selection of the T cell repertoire on HLA-class I associated control of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Read, Elizabeth L.; Qi, Ying; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Deeks, Steven G.; Pereyra, Florencia; Carrington, Mary; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2011-01-01

    Without therapy, most persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ultimately progress to AIDS. Rare individuals (“elite controllers”) maintain very low levels of HIV RNA without therapy, thereby making disease progression and transmission unlikely. Certain HLA Class I alleles are markedly enriched in elite controllers, with the highest association observed for HLA-B571. Since HLA molecules present viral peptides that activate CD8+ T cells, an immune mediated mechanism is likely responsible for superior control of HIV. We report that the peptide binding characteristics of HLA-B57 molecules impact thymic development such that, compared to other HLA-restricted T cells, a larger fraction of the naïve repertoire of B57-restricted clones recognizes a viral epitope and these T cells are more cross-reactive to mutants of targeted epitopes. Our calculations predict that such a T cell repertoire imposes strong immune pressure on immunodominant HIV epitopes and emergent mutants, thereby promoting efficient control of virus. Supporting these predictions, in a large cohort of HLA-typed individuals, our experiments show that the relative ability of HLA-B alleles to control HIV correlates with their peptide binding characteristics that impact thymic development. Our results provide a conceptual framework that unifies diverse empirical observations, with implications for vaccination strategies. PMID:20445539

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation leads to transient depletion of the mouse thymic medulla and persistent abnormalities among medullary stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.; Gandour, D.; Strober, S.; Weissman, I.

    1988-05-15

    Mice given multiple doses of sublethal irradiation to both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid tissues showed major transient, and some persistent disruptions in general thymic architecture and in thymic stromal components. At 2 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), the thymus lacked identifiable medullary regions by immunohistochemical analyses. Medullary stromal cells expression MHC Ag or a medullary epithelial cell Ag, as well as medullary macrophages, were undetectable. Instead, the processes of cortical epithelial cells were observed throughout the entire thymus. Strikingly, thymocyte subsets with mature phenotypes (CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+) were present in the apparent absence of a medulla. This early, gross effect was rapidly reversed such that by 1 to 2 mo after TLI, medullary areas with MHC Ag-positive cells were evident. However, abnormalities in a subset of medullary stromal cells appeared to be more persistent. Medullary epithelial cells, identified by the MD1 mAb, were greatly reduced in number and abnormally organized for at least 4 mo after TLI. In addition, macrophages containing endogenous peroxidase activity, normally abundant in medullary regions, were undetectable at all times examined after TLI. Therefore, this irradiation regimen induced both transient and long term effects in the thymus, primarily in medullary regions. These results suggest that TLI may be used as an experimental tool for studying the impact of selective depletion of medullary stromal cells on the development of specific T cell functions.

  2. Crustaceans as a model for microgravity-induced muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mykles, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Atrophy of skeletal muscles is a serious problem in a microgravity environment. It is hypothesized that the unloading of postural muscles, which no longer must resist gravity force, causes an accelerated breakdown of contractile proteins, resulting in reduction in muscle mass and strength. A crustacean model using the land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, to assess the effects of spaceflight on protein meatabolism is presented. The model is compared to a developmentally-regulated atrophy in which a premolt reduction in muscle mass allows the withdrawal of the large claws at molt. The biochemical mechanisms underlying protein breakdown involves both Ca2(+) -dependent and multicatalytic proteolytic enzymes. Crustacean claw muscle can be used to determine the interactions between shortening and unloading at the molecular level.

  3. Age effects on rat hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Joseph M.; Fell, Ronald D.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Ringel, Lisa C.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hindlimb unloading on muscle mass and biochemical responses were examined and compared in adult (450-g) and juvenile (200-g) rats after 1, 7, or 14 days of whole-body suspension. Quantitatively and qualitatively the soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the hindlimb exhibited a differential sensitivity to suspension and weightlessness unloading in both adults and juveniles. The red slow-twitch soleus exhibited the most pronounced atrophy under both conditions, with juvenile responses being greater than adult. In contrast, the fast-twitch EDL hypertrophied during suspension and atrophied during weightlessness, with no significant difference between adults and juveniles. Determination of biochemical parameters (total protein, RNA, and DNA) indicates a less rapid rate of response in adult muscles.

  4. [Effectiveness of magnetotherapy in optic nerve atrophy. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zobina, L V; Orlovskaia, L S; Sokov, S L; Sabaeva, G F; Kondé, L A; Iakovlev, A A

    1990-01-01

    Magnetotherapy effects on visual functions (vision acuity and field), on retinal bioelectric activity, on conductive vision system, and on intraocular circulation were studied in 88 patients (160 eyes) with optic nerve atrophy. A Soviet Polyus-1 low-frequency magnetotherapy apparatus was employed with magnetic induction of about 10 mT, exposure 7-10 min, 10-15 sessions per course. Vision acuity of patients with its low (below 0.04 diopters) values improved in 50 percent of cases. The number of patients with vision acuity of 0.2 diopters has increased from 46 before treatment to 75. Magnetotherapy improved ocular hemodynamics in patients with optic nerve atrophy, it reduced the time of stimulation conduction along the vision routes and stimulated the retinal ganglia cells. The maximal effect was achieved after 10 magnetotherapy sessions. A repeated course carried out in 6-8 months promoted a stabilization of the process.

  5. Spinal muscular atrophy: development and implementation of potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2013-09-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, effective treatments are urgently needed, along with methods to determine whether treatment worked. In this review, we discuss the rapid progress in the understanding of recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy and how this is leading to exciting potential treatments of the disease. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and reduced levels of SMN protein. The critical downstream targets of SMN deficiency that result in motor neuron loss are not known. However, increasing SMN levels has a marked impact in mouse models, and these therapeutics are rapidly moving toward clinical trials. Promising preclinical therapies, the varying degree of impact on the mouse models, and potential measures of treatment effect are reviewed. One key issue discussed is the variable outcome of increasing SMN at different stages of disease progression.

  6. Cocaine Reduces Thymic Endocrine Function: Another Mechanism for Accelerated HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Adriana; Smith, Sylvia; Huffman, Fatma; Newman, Fred; Baum, Marianna K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Thymulin is a thymic peptide important for the maturation and differentiation of immature thymocytes, which have been found to be depressed in patients with low-level CD4+ cell recovery despite viral control. Substance use is associated with faster progression of HIV disease, which has been ascribed to poor adherence to antiretroviral medication. Recent findings of an association between cocaine use and decline in CD4+ cell counts independent of antiretroviral adherence indicate alternative mechanisms for disease progression. We evaluated the relationship between thymulin activity, CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and the covariate effects of substance use cross-sectionally in 80 HIV+ active substance users and over 12 months in 40 participants. Thymulin activity was analyzed in plasma using a modification of the sheep rosette bioassay. Thymulin activity was negatively associated with cocaine use (β = −0.908,95% CI: −1.704, −0.112; p = 0.026). Compared to those who do not use cocaine, cocaine users were 37% less likely to have detectable thymulin activity (RR = 0.634, 95% CI: 0.406, 0.989 p = 0.045) and were 75 times more likely to show a decrease in thymulin activity (OR = 74.7, 95% CI: 1.59, 3519.74; p = 0.028) over time. CD4+ cell count was positively associated with thymulin activity (β = 0.127, 95% CI: 0.048,0.205; p = 0.002), detectable thymulin activity was 2.32 times more likely in those with a CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/μl (RR = 2.324, 95% CI: 1.196, 4.513, p = 0.013), and those with an increase in CD4 cell counts were more likely to show an increase in thymulin activity (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.034; p = 0.041) over time. Thymulin activity is predictive of HIV disease progression and is depressed in cocaine users independent of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral load. Understanding the mechanisms for accelerated HIV disease progression provides

  7. Hydrogen sulfide diminishes the levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin in activated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Moon, Phil-Dong; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2016-03-01

    Bamboo salt (BS) is a Korean traditional type of salt and has been reported to have therapeutic effects on allergic inflammation. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) aggravates inflammation in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions, such as allergic rhinitis (AR). To confirm an active compound of BS, we investigated the effect of sulfur, a compound of BS, on the levels of TSLP in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells and a mouse model of AR using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaSH). We treated NaSH or BS in HMC-1 cells and activated the HMC-1 cells with phorbol myristate acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI). ELISA for the production measurement of TSLP, PCR for the mRNA expression measurement of TSLP, and western blot analysis for the expression measurement of upstream mediators were performed. Mice were treated with NaSH and sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). The levels of TSLP were measured in serum and nasal mucosa tissue in an OVA-induced AR mouse model. NaSH or BS diminished the production and mRNA expression of TSLP as well as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the PMACI-activated HMC-1 cells. NaSH or BS diminished the level of intracellular calcium in the PMACI-activated HMC-1 cells. NaSH or BS reduced the expression and activity of caspase-1 in the PMACI-activated HMC-1 cells. And NaSH or BS inhibited the expression of receptor interacting protein-2 and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the PMACI-activated HMC-1 cells. The translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus as well as the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm were diminished by NaSH or BS in the PMACI-activated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, NaSH inhibited the production of TSLP, IL-6, and IL-8 in TNF-α-activated HMC-1 cells. Finally, the administration of NaSH showed a decrease in number of rubs on mice with OVA-induced AR. And the levels of immunoglobulin E and TSLP in the serum and the level of TSLP in the

  8. Cocaine reduces thymic endocrine function: another mechanism for accelerated HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Rafie, Carlin; Campa, Adriana; Smith, Sylvia; Huffman, Fatma; Newman, Fred; Baum, Marianna K

    2011-08-01

    Thymulin is a thymic peptide important for the maturation and differentiation of immature thymocytes, which have been found to be depressed in patients with low-level CD4(+) cell recovery despite viral control. Substance use is associated with faster progression of HIV disease, which has been ascribed to poor adherence to antiretroviral medication. Recent findings of an association between cocaine use and decline in CD4(+) cell counts independent of antiretroviral adherence indicate alternative mechanisms for disease progression. We evaluated the relationship between thymulin activity, CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell counts and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, and the covariate effects of substance use cross-sectionally in 80 HIV(+) active substance users and over 12 months in 40 participants. Thymulin activity was analyzed in plasma using a modification of the sheep rosette bioassay. Thymulin activity was negatively associated with cocaine use (β = -0.908,95% CI: -1.704, -0.112; p = 0.026). Compared to those who do not use cocaine, cocaine users were 37% less likely to have detectable thymulin activity (RR = 0.634, 95% CI: 0.406, 0.989 p = 0.045) and were 75 times more likely to show a decrease in thymulin activity (OR = 74.7, 95% CI: 1.59, 3519.74; p = 0.028) over time. CD4(+) cell count was positively associated with thymulin activity (β = 0.127, 95% CI: 0.048,0.205; p = 0.002), detectable thymulin activity was 2.32 times more likely in those with a CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/μl (RR = 2.324, 95% CI: 1.196, 4.513, p = 0.013), and those with an increase in CD4 cell counts were more likely to show an increase in thymulin activity (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.034; p = 0.041) over time. Thymulin activity is predictive of HIV disease progression and is depressed in cocaine users independent of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and HIV viral load. Understanding the mechanisms for accelerated HIV disease progression provides opportunities to find alternative strategies to counteract

  9. [Laryngeal paralysis and olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Segura, A; Ramos Pérez, P L; Rodríguez Sánchez, A; Aguirre Sánchez, J J; Gutiérrez Díez, J A; Alvarez Domínguez, J

    1990-01-01

    We display the study performed to a female patient affected of laryngeal paralysis to become, based in clinical and radiologic criteria, to diagnose her cerebellar atrophy. We justify our work because of how infrequently this illness heredodegenerative of the central nervous system begins with cranial pairs paralysis. We emphasize the importance that the new methods of explorations specially TAC and IRM, have to guess the possible etiologies of central originated paralysis.

  10. MR imaging of psychosurgery: rostral atrophy following stereotacic subcaudate tractotomy.

    PubMed

    Cauley, K A; Waheed, W; Salmela, M; Filippi, C G

    2010-11-01

    There are few reports of MR imaging findings following psychosurgery. Here, we report the findings of 3T MR imaging of the sequelae of stereotactic subcaudate tractotomy (SST). Rostral atrophy is noted on conventional imaging. Diffusion tensor (DT) tractography demonstrated no communicating white matter tracts between the inferior frontal lobes, which appeared normally as thick fibre bundles in age-matched controls. DT tractography provides a unique tool for the evaluation of sequelae of ablative psychosurgical procedures.

  11. Intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to soleus muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Robinson, Ronald R.; Smith, Gregory S.; Thomason, Donald B.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of using intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to muscle atrophy was investigated in rats subjected to 7 days of hindlimb suspension interrupted by daily periods of 1.2 g acceleration, for 15-min periods evenly spaced over 12-hr interval. It was found that this regimen, when repeated for 7 days, failed to completely maintain the mass of soleus muscle, which was 84 percent of control.

  12. Differentiation between cortical atrophy and hydrocephalus using 1H MRS.

    PubMed

    Bluml, S; McComb, J G; Ross, B D

    1997-03-01

    Quantitative 1H MRS to determine cerebral metabolite patterns and MRI to determine CSF flow were applied to 12 patients with ventricular dilation-Group A, cortical atrophy (N = 5); or Group B, hydrocephalus (N = 7)- and in 9 normal controls. While mean brain water (Group A = 80% +/- 6; Group B = 86% +/- 5; normal = 85% +/- 4) did not differ between the two groups of patients and controls, 1H MRS distinguished those patients with cortical atrophy (Group A) (N-acetylaspartate/ creatine (NAA/Cr) = 0.69 +/- 0.17, versus normal = 1.06 +/- 0.16; P < 0.002; [NAA] = 5.9 +/- 1.3 mmoles/kg, versus normal 8.0 +/- 1.4; P < 0.02) from those with hydrocephalus (Group B) (NAA/Cr = 1.16 +/- 0.11; [NAA] = 9.2 +/- 1.2; P > 0.13 and P > 0.07). Lactate levels were elevated in 3/5 patients with cortical atrophy, but in 0/7 of those with hydrocephalus. Mean absolute concentrations (mmoles/kg) of the five major cerebral osmolytes were 41 +/- 4 (Group A), 43 +/- 6 (Group B), and 42 +/- 4 (normal), so that despite massive brain deformation, constant osmolality was maintained. 1H MRS may directly benefit surgical planning in hydrocephalus infants by clearly identifying those with cortical atrophy who do not require CSF diversion. Thinning of the cortical mantle in hydrocephalus may result from osmotically driven reduction in individual cell volumes, (shrinkage), rather than brain-compression.

  13. Subretinal Glial Membranes in Eyes With Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Malia M.; McLeod, D. Scott; Bhutto, Imran A.; Grebe, Rhonda; Duffy, Maeve; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Müller cells create the external limiting membrane (ELM) by forming junctions with photoreceptor cells. This study evaluated the relationship between focal photoreceptors and RPE loss in geographic atrophy (GA) and Müller cell extension into the subretinal space. Methods Human donor eyes with no retinal disease or geographic atrophy (GA) were fixed and the eye cups imaged. The retinal posterior pole was stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocytes and activated Müller cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) while the submacular choroids were labeled with Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin lectin (blood vessels). Choroids and retinas were imaged using a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Additional eyes were cryopreserved or processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to better visualize the Müller cells. Results Vimentin staining of aged control retinas (n = 4) revealed a panretinal cobblestone-like ELM. While this pattern was also observed in the GA retinas (n = 7), each also had a distinct area in which vimentin+ and vimentin+/GFAP+ processes created a subretinal membrane. Subretinal glial membranes closely matched areas of RPE atrophy in the gross photos. Choroidal vascular loss was also evident in these atrophic areas. Smaller glial projections were noted, which correlated with drusen in gross photos. The presence of glia in the subretinal space was confirmed by TEM and cross cross-section immunohistochemistry. Conclusions In eyes with GA, subretinal Müller cell membranes present in areas of RPE atrophy may be a Müller cell attempt to replace the ELM. These membranes could interfere with treatments such as stem cell therapy. PMID:28249091

  14. [Association of post-radiation focal muscular atrophy and hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Serratrice, G; Sangla, I; Pouget, J; Azulay, J P

    1993-01-01

    We report a 48 year old woman who had radiotherapy for uterine carcinoma and who developed amyotrophy and muscle hypertrophy in one lower limb. Very few cases of post-radiation monomelic amyotrophy have been reported. On the other hand denervation hypertrophy was presumed to be well known. The seat of the lesions was presumed to be radicular and spinal. The mechanism of atrophy and hypertrophy is discussed.

  15. Regulation of muscle atrophy in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Musaro, Antonio; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    Muscle aging is characterized by a decline in functional performance and restriction of adaptability, due to progressive loss of muscle tissue coupled with a decrease in strength and force output. Together with selective activation ofapoptotic pathways, a hallmark of age-related muscle loss or sarcopenia is the progressive incapacity of regeneration machinery to replace damaged muscle. These characteristics are shared by pathologies involving muscle wasting, such as muscular dystrophies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cancer and AIDS, all characterized by alterations in metabolic and physiological parameters, progressive weakness in specific muscle groups. Modulation ofextracellular agonists, receptors, protein kinases, intermediate molecules, transcription factors and tissue-specific gene expression collectively compromise the functionality of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to muscle degeneration and persistent protein degradation through activation ofproteolytic systems, such as calpain, ubiquitin-proteasome and caspase. Additional decrements in muscle growth factors compromise skeletal muscle growth, differentiation, survival and regeneration. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy and wasting associated with different diseases has been the objective of numerous studies and represents an important first step for the development of therapeutic approaches. Among these, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has emerged as a growth factor with a remarkably wide range of actions and a tremendous potential as a therapeutic in attenuating the atrophy and frailty associated with muscle aging and diseases. In this chapter we provide an overview of current concepts in muscle atrophy, focusing specifically on the molecular basis of IGF-1 action and survey current gene and cell therapeutic approaches to rescue muscle atrophy in aging and disease.

  16. A Case of Solitary Kidney Atrophy Due to Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is asymptomatic in most patients, its main clinical manifestation is nephrolithiasis. In general, hypercalcemia would lead to unilateral renal stones, which may become bilateral over time. We present a rare case of a large unilateral asymptomatic ureteral stone in a patient with hypercalcemia secondary to PHPT, which eventually led to renal atrophy. The diagnosis of PHPT should be considered in patients with hypercalcemia and renal stones, as asymptomatic PHPT may result in a devastating renal outcome. PMID:26765435

  17. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space

    PubMed Central

    Philippou, Anastassios; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Lucas R.; Lei, Hanqin; Rassier, Dilson E.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle loading is important for maintaining muscle mass; when load is removed, atrophy is inevitable. However, in clinical situations such as critical care myopathy, masticatory muscles do not lose mass. Thus, their properties may be harnessed to preserve mass. We compared masticatory and appendicular muscles responses to microgravity, using mice aboard the space shuttle Space Transportation System-135. Age- and sex-matched controls remained on the ground. After 13 days of space flight, 1 masseter (MA) and tibialis anterior (TA) were frozen rapidly for biochemical and functional measurements, and the contralateral MA was processed for morphologic measurements. Flight TA muscles exhibited 20 ± 3% decreased muscle mass, 2-fold decreased phosphorylated (P)-Akt, and 4- to 12-fold increased atrogene expression. In contrast, MAs had no significant change in mass but a 3-fold increase in P-focal adhesion kinase, 1.5-fold increase in P-Akt, and 50–90% lower atrogene expression compared with limb muscles, which were unaltered in microgravity. Myofibril force measurements revealed that microgravity caused a 3-fold decrease in specific force and maximal shortening velocity in TA muscles. It is surprising that myofibril-specific force from both control and flight MAs were similar to flight TA muscles, yet power was compromised by 40% following flight. Continued loading in microgravity prevents atrophy, but masticatory muscles have a different set point that mimics disuse atrophy in the appendicular muscle.—Philippou, A., Minozzo, F. C., Spinazzola, J. M., Smith, L. R., Lei, H., Rassier, D. E., Barton, E. R. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space. PMID:25795455

  18. Motor features in posterior cortical atrophy and their imaging correlates☆

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Natalie S.; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Lehmann, Manja; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Fox, Nick C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by impaired higher visual processing skills; however, motor features more commonly associated with corticobasal syndrome may also occur. We investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of motor features in 44 PCA patients and, with 30 controls, conducted voxel-based morphometry, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumetric analyses of their magnetic resonance imaging. Prominent limb rigidity was used to define a PCA-motor subgroup. A total of 30% (13) had PCA-motor; all demonstrating asymmetrical left upper limb rigidity. Limb apraxia was more frequent and asymmetrical in PCA-motor, as was myoclonus. Tremor and alien limb phenomena only occurred in this subgroup. The subgroups did not differ in neuropsychological test performance or apolipoprotein E4 allele frequency. Greater asymmetry of atrophy occurred in PCA-motor, particularly involving right frontoparietal and peri-rolandic cortices, putamen, and thalamus. The 9 patients (including 4 PCA-motor) with pathology or cerebrospinal fluid all showed evidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our data suggest that PCA patients with motor features have greater atrophy of contralateral sensorimotor areas but are still likely to have underlying Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25086839

  19. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  20. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Anastassios; Minozzo, Fabio C; Spinazzola, Janelle M; Smith, Lucas R; Lei, Hanqin; Rassier, Dilson E; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2015-07-01

    Muscle loading is important for maintaining muscle mass; when load is removed, atrophy is inevitable. However, in clinical situations such as critical care myopathy, masticatory muscles do not lose mass. Thus, their properties may be harnessed to preserve mass. We compared masticatory and appendicular muscles responses to microgravity, using mice aboard the space shuttle Space Transportation System-135. Age- and sex-matched controls remained on the ground. After 13 days of space flight, 1 masseter (MA) and tibialis anterior (TA) were frozen rapidly for biochemical and functional measurements, and the contralateral MA was processed for morphologic measurements. Flight TA muscles exhibited 20 ± 3% decreased muscle mass, 2-fold decreased phosphorylated (P)-Akt, and 4- to 12-fold increased atrogene expression. In contrast, MAs had no significant change in mass but a 3-fold increase in P-focal adhesion kinase, 1.5-fold increase in P-Akt, and 50-90% lower atrogene expression compared with limb muscles, which were unaltered in microgravity. Myofibril force measurements revealed that microgravity caused a 3-fold decrease in specific force and maximal shortening velocity in TA muscles. It is surprising that myofibril-specific force from both control and flight MAs were similar to flight TA muscles, yet power was compromised by 40% following flight. Continued loading in microgravity prevents atrophy, but masticatory muscles have a different set point that mimics disuse atrophy in the appendicular muscle.

  1. RB inactivation in keratin 18 positive thymic epithelial cells promotes non-cell autonomous T cell hyperproliferation in genetically engineered mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yurong; Sullivan, Teresa; Klarmann, Kimberly; Gilbert, Debra; O’Sullivan, T. Norene; Lu, Lucy; Wang, Sophie; Haines, Diana C.; Van Dyke, Terry; Keller, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as part of thymic stroma, provide essential growth factors/cytokines and self-antigens to support T cell development and selection. Deletion of Rb family proteins in adult thymic stroma leads to T cell hyperplasia in vivo. To determine whether deletion of Rb specifically in keratin (K) 18 positive TEC was sufficient for thymocyte hyperplasia, we conditionally inactivated Rb and its family members p107 and p130 in K18+ TEC in genetically engineered mice (TgK18GT121; K18 mice). We found that thymocyte hyperproliferation was induced in mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC, while normal T cell development was maintained; suggesting that inactivation of Rb specifically in K18+ TEC was sufficient and responsible for the phenotype. Transplantation of wild type bone marrow cells into mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC resulted in donor T lymphocyte hyperplasia confirming the non-cell autonomous requirement for Rb proteins in K18+ TEC in regulating T cell proliferation. Our data suggests that thymic epithelial cells play an important role in regulating lymphoid proliferation and thymus size. PMID:28158249

  2. The graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. I. T helper cell immunodeficiency associated with graft-versus-host-induced thymic epithelial cell damage

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1984-03-01

    The injection of parental A strain lymphoid cells into adrenalectomized CBAxA F1 (BAF1) mice induced a chronic graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction resulting in T cell and B cell immunosuppression as well as thymic epithelial cell injury, but not stress-related thymic involution. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice undergoing a GVH reaction were studied for their ability to reconstitute T helper cell (TH) function and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogen responses in thymectomized, irradiated, BAF1 mice reconstituted with normal syngeneic bone marrow (ATxBM). Thymocytes from BAF1 mice early after the induction of a GVH reaction (days 10-12) were as effective as normal thymocytes in reconstituting TH and mitogen responses. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice 40 or more days after the induction of a GVH reaction did not reconstitute either the TH function or PHA and Con A responses in ATxBM mice. The inability to reconstitute ATxBM mice was not due to the presence of suppressor cells contained in the thymocyte inoculum. It is proposed that GVH-induced thymic epithelial cell injury blocks or arrests normal T cell differentiation, resulting in a population of thymocytes that lack the potential to become competent T helper cells or mitogen-responsive cells when transferred into ATxBM mice. This thymic functional defect results in a permanent TH immunodeficiency in mice experiencing a chronic GVH reaction.

  3. RB inactivation in keratin 18 positive thymic epithelial cells promotes non-cell autonomous T cell hyperproliferation in genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Yurong; Sullivan, Teresa; Klarmann, Kimberly; Gilbert, Debra; O'Sullivan, T Norene; Lu, Lucy; Wang, Sophie; Haines, Diana C; Van Dyke, Terry; Keller, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC), as part of thymic stroma, provide essential growth factors/cytokines and self-antigens to support T cell development and selection. Deletion of Rb family proteins in adult thymic stroma leads to T cell hyperplasia in vivo. To determine whether deletion of Rb specifically in keratin (K) 18 positive TEC was sufficient for thymocyte hyperplasia, we conditionally inactivated Rb and its family members p107 and p130 in K18+ TEC in genetically engineered mice (TgK18GT121; K18 mice). We found that thymocyte hyperproliferation was induced in mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC, while normal T cell development was maintained; suggesting that inactivation of Rb specifically in K18+ TEC was sufficient and responsible for the phenotype. Transplantation of wild type bone marrow cells into mice with Rb inactivation in K18+ TEC resulted in donor T lymphocyte hyperplasia confirming the non-cell autonomous requirement for Rb proteins in K18+ TEC in regulating T cell proliferation. Our data suggests that thymic epithelial cells play an important role in regulating lymphoid proliferation and thymus size.

  4. NF-κB2 is required for the control of autoimmunity by regulating the development of medullary thymic epithelial cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baochun; Wang, Zhe; Ding, Jane; Peterson, Pärt; Gunning, William T.; Ding, Han-Fei

    2007-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells function as antigen-presenting cells in negative selection of self-reactive T cell clones, a process essential for the establishment of central self-tolerance. These cells mirror peripheral tissues through promiscuous expression of a diverse set of tissue-restricted self-antigens. The genes and signaling pathways that regulate the development of medullary thymic epithelial cells are not fully understood. Here we show that mice deficient in NF-κB2, a member of the NF-κB family, display a marked reduction in the number of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells that express CD80 and bind the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1, leading to a significant decrease in the extent of promiscuous gene expression in the thymus of NF-κB2−/− mice. Moreover, NF-κB2−/− mice manifest autoimmunity characterized by multiorgan infiltration of activated T cells and high levels of autoantibodies to multiple organs. A subpopulation of the mice also develops immune-complex glomerulonephritis. These findings identify a physiological function of NF-κB2 in the development of medullary thymic epithelial cells and, thus, the control of self-tolerance induction. PMID:17046818

  5. Thymic medullary epithelium and thymocyte self tolerance require cooperation between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Jeon, Hyein; Nitta, Takeshi; Ohigashi, Izumi; Klug, David; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Choudhury, Baishakhi; Sharrow, Susan O.; Granger, Larry; Adams, Anthony; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Jenkinson, S. Rhiannon; Richie, Ellen R.; Gress, Ronald E.; Takahama, Yousuke; Hodes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical process during thymic development of the T cell repertoire is the induction of self-tolerance. Tolerance in developing T cells is highly dependent on medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and mTEC development in turn requires signals from mature single positive (SP) thymocytes, a bidirectional relationship termed thymus crosstalk. We show that CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory interactions, which mediate negative selection and self-tolerance, upregulate expression of LTα, LTβ and RANK in the thymus and are necessary for medullary development. Combined absence of CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L results in profound deficiency in mTEC development comparable to that observed in the absence of SP thymocytes. This requirement for costimulatory signaling is maintained even in a TCR transgenic model of high affinity TCR-ligand interactions. CD4 thymocytes maturing in the altered thymic epithelial environment of CD40/CD80/86 KO mice are highly autoreactive in vitro and are lethal in congenic adoptive transfer in vivo, demonstrating a critical role for these costimulatory pathways in self-tolerance as well as thymic epithelial development. These findings demonstrate that cooperativity between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L pathways is required for normal medullary epithelium and for maintenance of self-tolerance in thymocyte development. PMID:24337745

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy and tumor recurrence after complete resection of stage II/III thymic tumor: a meta-analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jietao; Sun, Xin; Huang, Letian; Xiong, Zhicheng; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Shuling; Han, Cheng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) is effective for reducing the recurrence risk in patients who received complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors has not been determined. A meta-analysis was performed by combining the results of all available controlled trials. Methods PubMed, Cochrane’s Library, and the Embase databases were searched for studies which compared the recurrence data for patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors assigned to an observing group, or a PORT group. A random effect model was applied to combine the results. Results Nineteen studies, all designed as retrospective cohort studies were included. These studies included 663 patients of PORT group and 617 patients of observing group. The recurrence rate for the patients in PORT group and observing group were 12.4% and 11.5%, respectively. Results of our study indicated that PORT has no significant influence on recurrent risk in patients with stage II or III thymic tumor after complete resection (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.55–1.90, P=0.96). When stratified by stages, our meta-analyses did not indicate any significant effects of PORT on recurrent outcomes in either the stage II or the stage III patients. Moreover, subsequent analysis limited to studies only including patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma also did not support the benefits of PORT on recurrent outcomes. Conclusion Although derived from retrospective cohort studies, current evidence did not support any benefit of PORT on recurrent risk in patients with complete resection of the stage II or III thymic tumors. PMID:27524907

  7. CD40 expressed on thymic epithelial cells provides costimulation for proliferation but not for apoptosis of human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, G; Martinez Cáceres, E; Voordouw, A; Noteboom, E; Graf, D; Kroczek, R A; Spits, H

    1996-05-15

    Human thymic epithelial cells express CD40, so we examined the possible role of CD40 in activation of thymocytes. We observed that both CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ thymocytes proliferate after stimulation by anti-CD3 mAb in the presence of cultured thymic epithelial cells. Costimulation of CD4+ thymocytes by thymic epithelial cells is partly inhibited by an anti-CD40 mAb, but this mAb has no effect on costimulation of CD8+ thymocytes. The selective costimulatory ability of CD40 for CD4+ thymocytes was confirmed in experiments in which thymocytes were stimulated with anti-CD3 in the presence of murine P815 cells transfected with CD40 cDNA. The level of costimulation induced by P815-CD40 was comparable with that induced by P815 cells expressing CD80 (B7.1). Treatment of thymocytes with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and the phorbol ester PMA or with anti-CD3 mAb resulted in up-regulation of the CD40 ligand, suggesting that this molecule is involved in CD40-mediated costimulation of human thymocytes. Costimulation of thymocytes by CD80 strongly increased anti-CD3-induced death of fetal thymocytes. In contrast, costimulation by CD40 did not increase anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis of these thymocytes. To confirm that CD40 does not affect anti-CD3-induced cell death, we established a variant of the Jurkat T leukemic cell line that constitutively expresses CD40L and analyzed the sensitivity of this cell line for activation-induced apoptosis. In contrast to CD80, CD40 failed to increase anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis in CD40L+ Jurkat cells, whereas both CD40 and CD80 strongly increased IL-2 production induced by anti-CD3. These findings suggest that costimulation by CD40 is involved in clonal expansion of CD4+ thymocytes but not in activation-induced cell death.

  8. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy.

  9. β-amyloid, hippocampal atrophy and their relation to longitudinal brain change in cognitively normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Evan; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Maillard, Pauline; Harvey, Danielle; Reed, Bruce; Jagust, William; DeCarli, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature has examined baseline hippocampal volume and extent of brain amyloidosis to test potential synergistic effects on worsening cognition and extent of brain atrophy. Use of hippocampal volume in prior studies was based on the notion that limbic circuit degeneration is an early manifestation of the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathophysiology. To clarify these interactions early in the AD process, we tested the effects of amyloid and baseline normalized hippocampal volume on longitudinal brain atrophy rates in a group of cognitively normal individuals. Results showed that the combination of elevated β-amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy is associated with increased rates specific to the limbic circuit and splenium. Importantly, this atrophy pattern emerged from a voxelwise analysis, corroborated by regression models over ROIs in native space. The results are broadly consistent with previous studies of the effects of amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy in normals, while pointing to accelerated atrophy of AD-vulnerable regions detectable at the preclinical stage. PMID:26973117

  10. Systems-based Discovery of Tomatidine as a Natural Small Molecule Inhibitor of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Dyle, Michael C.; Ebert, Scott M.; Cook, Daniel P.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  11. Cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy correlated by xenon contrast CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Y.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Rogers, R.L.; Tachibana, H.; Kandula, P.; Dowell, R.E.; Mortel, K.F.

    1985-11-01

    Correlations between cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured during stable xenon contrast CT scanning and standard CT indices of brain atrophy were investigated in the patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type, multi-infarct dementia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Compared to age-matched normal volunteers, significant correlations were found in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease between cortical and subcortical gray matter blood flow and brain atrophy estimated by the ventricular body ratio, and mild to moderate brain atrophy were correlated with stepwise CBF reductions. However, in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia, brain atrophy was not associated with stepwise CBF reductions. Overall correlations between brain atrophy and reduced CBF were weak. Mild degrees of brain atrophy are not always associated with reduced CBF.

  12. Nosology of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity: From Monomelic Amyotrophy to Hirayama Disease—Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Sahni, Hirdesh

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, “juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity” has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy. PMID:24063005

  13. Nosology of juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity: from monomelic amyotrophy to Hirayama disease--Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Sahni, Hirdesh

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, "juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity" has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  14. Stem cell-based treatment in geographic atrophy: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kvanta, Anders; Grudzinska, Monika K

    2014-02-01

    Geographic atrophy is a common and untreatable form of advanced age-related macular degeneration. The degeneration primarily affects the retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors of the retina and their restoration by cell transplantation seems attractive. Recently, a patient with geographic atrophy was the first human to receive cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. In this short review, the rationale, potential and obstacles for stem cell-derived therapy in geographic atrophy are discussed.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  16. Hydroxyhydroquinone, a by-product of coffee bean roasting, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in rat thymic lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kamae, Risa; Nojima, Shoko; Akiyoshi, Kenji; Setsu, Shoki; Honda, Sari; Masuda, Toshiya; Oyama, Yasuo

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyhydroquinone (HHQ) is generated during coffee bean roasting. A cup of coffee contains 0.1-1.7 mg of HHQ. The actions of HHQ on mammalian DNA were examined because HHQ is a metabolite of benzene, which causes leukemia. Currently, information on the cellular actions of HHQ is limited. We examined the effects of sublethal levels of HHQ on the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) in rat thymic lymphocytes by using a flow cytometric technique with fluorescent probes. HHQ at 10 μM or more significantly elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels by increasing the membrane permeability of divalent cations, resulting in hyperpolarization via the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. HHQ-induced changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and membrane potential may affect the cell functions of lymphocytes. HHQ-reduced coffee may be preferable in order to avoid the possible adverse effects of HHQ.

  17. Morphometric analysis of peritumoral lymph nodes in patients operated on for uterine cancer, locally treated with a thymic extract.

    PubMed

    Corradi, G; Cappellari, A; Pomari, R; Cappello, F

    1989-01-01

    By means of a morphometric analysis, the authors have evaluated the structure and dimensions of the lymph node functional areas (cortical, medullary, paracortical, histiocytosis of the sinuses, germinal centres) in regional nodes of women with carcinoma of the uterus in the 1st and 2nd stages. Twenty patients were treated 8 days before surgery with a dose of 1.5 mg kg-1 body weight of thymic hormone directly into the uterine portio. Ten patients, on the other hand, were injected with physiological saline solution. The quantitative and qualitative results show that in peritumoral lymph nodes of women treated with thymostimolin there is a marked increase, statistically significant (P less than 0.001), of the paracortical zone and of the number of germinal centres.

  18. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji-Hyung; Kabayama, Kazuya; Opitz, Joerg; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy. PMID:25945103

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Launches Dexamethasone-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy via AMPK/FOXO3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Peng, Yunhua; Wang, Xun; Fan, Yingying; Qin, Chuan; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Cao, Ke; Li, Hua; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-01-04

    Muscle atrophy occurs in several pathologic conditions such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as after long-term clinical administration of synthesized glucocorticoid, where increased circulating glucocorticoid accounts for the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy. Others and we previously reported mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle atrophy-related conditions and that mitochondria-targeting nutrients efficiently prevent kinds of muscle atrophy. However, whether and how mitochondrial dysfunction involves glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we measured mitochondrial function in dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro, and we found that mitochondrial respiration was compromised on the 3rd day following after dexamethasone administration, earlier than the increases of MuRF1 and Fbx32, and dexamethasone-induced loss of mitochondrial components and key mitochondrial dynamics proteins. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment caused intracellular ATP deprivation and robust AMPK activation, which further activated the FOXO3/Atrogenes pathway. By directly impairing mitochondrial respiration, FCCP leads to similar readouts in C2C12 myotubes as dexamethasone does. On the contrary, resveratrol, a mitochondrial nutrient, efficiently reversed dexamethasone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and muscle atrophy in both C2C12 myotubes and mice, by improving mitochondrial function and blocking AMPK/FOXO3 signaling. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction acts as a central role in dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and that nutrients or drugs targeting mitochondria might be beneficial in preventing or curing muscle atrophy.

  20. Neuroblastoma in a Patient With Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type I: Is It Just a Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Sag, Erdal; Sen, Hilal Susam; Haliloglu, Goknur; Yalcin, Bilgehan; Kutluk, Tezer

    2015-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord resulting in hypotonia, skeletal muscle atrophy, and weakness. Herein, we report a 4-month-old male infant who presented to our hospital with an abdominal mass that was diagnosed as neuroblastoma and spinal muscular atrophy type I. We would like to discuss the course and differential diagnosis with an algorithm leading to the diagnosis in this peculiar patient. To our knowledge, coexistence of spinal muscular atrophy type I and neuroblastoma is defined for the first time in the literature.

  1. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-03

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes.

  2. A case of extensive left-sided facial atrophy of Romberg

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Ram, Hari; Gupta, Mani; Vidhate, Mukund R

    2013-01-01

    Progressive facial atrophy or Parry-Romberg syndrome is characterized by slowly progressive facial atrophy involving skin, subcutaneous tissue, cartilage and bony structures. Apart from facial atrophy, it can be associated with diverse clinical manifestations including headache, partial seizures, trigeminal neuralgia, cerebral hemiatrophy and ocular abnormalities. The exact etiology is unknown although sympathetic system dysfunction, autoimmune disorders, focal scleroderma, trauma and genetic factors have been postulated. We hereby report a patient having marked left-sided facial atrophy and wasting of the tongue. Such an extensive wasting is not previously reported in the literature. PMID:24163557

  3. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with agenesis of the head of the caudate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Leäo, M; da Silva, M L

    1994-01-01

    We describe a woman with right hemifacial atrophy, a high palate, partial left motor seizures, and mild atrophy of the left arm. CT scan showed asymmetrical lateral ventricles and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) showed atrophy of the right cerebral hemisphere and agenesis of the head of the right caudate nucleus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Parry-Romberg syndrome associated with structural abnormalities of the basal nuclei documented by MRI. We suggest that a neurovascular aetiology can explain the spectrum of segmental defects associated with hemifacial atrophy. Images PMID:7891383

  4. Expression of cyclin D1 in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice results in epidermal hyperproliferation and severe thymic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Robles, A I; Larcher, F; Whalin, R B; Murillas, R; Richie, E; Gimenez-Conti, I B; Jorcano, J L; Conti, C J

    1996-01-01

    To study the involvement of cyclin D1 in epithelial growth and differentiation and its putative role as an oncogene in skin, transgenic mice were developed carrying the human cyclin D1 gene driven by a bovine keratin 5 promoter. As expected, all squamous epithelia including skin, oral mucosa, trachea, vaginal epithelium, and the epithelial compartment of the thymus expressed aberrant levels of cyclin D1. The rate of epidermal proliferation increased dramatically in transgenic mice, which also showed basal cell hyperplasia. However, epidermal differentiation was unaffected, as shown by normal growth arrest of newborn primary keratinocytes in response to high extracellular calcium. Moreover, an unexpected phenotype was observed in the thymus. Transgenic mice developed a severe thymic hyperplasia that caused premature death due to cardio-respiratory failure within 4 months of age. By 14 weeks, the thymi of transgenic mice increased in weight up to 40-fold, representing 10% of total body weight. The hyperplastic thymi had normal histology revealing a well-differentiated cortex and medulla, which supported an apparently normal T-cell developmental program based on the distribution of thymocyte subsets. These results suggest that proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells are under independent genetic controls in these organs and that cyclin D1 can modulate epithelial proliferation without altering the initiation of differentiation programs. No spontaneous development of epithelial tumors or thymic lymphomas was perceived in transgenic mice during their first 8 months of life, although they continue under observation. This model provides in vivo evidence of the action of cyclin D1 as a pure mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755527

  5. Identification and characterization of a 100-kD ligand for CD6 on human thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    CD6 is a 130-kD glycoprotein expressed on the surface of thymocytes and peripheral blood T cells that is involved in TCR-mediated T cell activation. In thymus, CD6 mediates interactions between thymocytes and thymic epithelial (TE) cells. In indirect immunofluorescence assays, a recombinant CD6-immunoglobulin fusion protein (CD6-Rg) bound to cultured human TE cells and to thymic fibroblasts. CD6-Rg binding to TF and TE cells was trypsin sensitive, and 54 +/- 4% of binding was divalent cation dependent. By screening the blind panel of 479 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the 5th International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens for expression on human TE cells and for the ability to block CD6-Rg binding to TE cells, we found one mAb (J4-81) that significantly inhibited the binding of CD6-Rg to TE cells (60 +/- 7% inhibition). A second mAb to the surface antigen identified by mAb J4-81, J3-119, enhanced the binding of CD6-Rg to TE cells by 48 +/- 5%. Using covalent cross-linking and trypsin digestion, we found that mAb J4-81 and CD6-Rg both bound to the same 100-kD glycoprotein (CD6L-100) on the surface of TE cells. These data demonstrate that a 100-kD glycoprotein on TE cells detected by mAb J4- 81 is a ligand for CD6. PMID:7535342

  6. Fibrosis, adipogenesis, and muscle atrophy in congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Xiong; Tang, Sheng-Ping; Gao, Fu-Tang; Xu, Jiang-Long; Jiang, Xian-Ping; Cao, Juan; Fu, Gui-Bing; Sun, Ke; Liu, Shi-Zhe; Shi, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the traditional view, muscle atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were regarded as the basic pathological features of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). But in the ultrastructure study, the mesenchyme-like cells, myoblasts, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts were found in the proliferation of interstitium of CMT. To investigate the characteristics of pathological features and the mechanisms of muscle atrophy in CMT, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 185 CMT patients from July 2009 to July 2011 in Shenzhen Children's Hospital in China and performed pathological studies. According to age, the 185 CMT patients were divided into 4 groups. All resected surgical specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichromic staining. Sudan III staining was used for frozen sections, whereas immunohistochemical staining for S-100, calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome was carried out on 40 CMT specimens. Eight adductor muscle specimens from 8 patients with development dysplasia of the hip were taken as control group in the immunohistochemical staining. By Masson trichromic staining, the differences in the percent area of fibrous tissue in each CMT groups were significant. In Sudan III staining and immunostaining for S-100, adipocyte hyperplasia was the pathological feature of CMT. Moreover, compared with controls, most atrophic muscle fibers in CMT specimens were found to show strong immunoreactivity for calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome. With increasing age, fibrosis peaked at both sides and it was low in middle age group. Adipocytes increased with age. The characteristics of pathological features in CMT are changeable with age. The calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system may play a role in muscle atrophy of CMT. In the CMT, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis, and myogenesis may be the results of mesenchyme-like cells in SCM (sternocleidomastoid muscle). In conclusion, the present study furthermore supports maldevelopment of the

  7. Lifespan Mental Activity Predicts Diminished Rate of Hippocampal Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Michael J.; Sachdev, Perminder; Wen, Wei; Chen, Xiaohua; Brodaty, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological studies suggest that complex mental activity may reduce the risk for dementia, however an underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our objective was to determine whether individual differences in lifespan complex mental activity are linked to altered rates of hippocampal atrophy independent of global measures of neurodegeneration. Methods Thirty seven healthy older individuals had their complex mental activity levels estimated using the Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ) and completed serial MRI investigations at baseline and three years follow-up. Hippocampal volume and semi-automatic quantitation of whole brain volume (WBV) and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were compared at both time points. Results Higher LEQ scores were correlated with hippocampal volume independent of covariates at the three year follow-up stage (r = 0.43, p = 0.012). Moreover, those with higher LEQ scores experienced less hippocampal atrophy over the follow-up period (r = 0.41, p = 0.02). High LEQ individuals had less than half the hippocampal volume decline of low LEQ individuals in a multivariate analysis (F = 4.47, p = 0.042). No parallel changes were found in measures of WBV and WMHs. Conclusions High level of complex mental activity across the lifespan was correlated with a reduced rate of hippocampal atrophy. This finding could not be explained by general differences in intracranial volume, larger hippocampi at baseline, presence of hypertensive disease, gender or low mood. Our results suggest that neuroprotection in medial temporal lobe may be one mechanism underlying the link between mental activity and lower rates of dementia observed in population-based studies. Additional studies are required to further explore this novel finding. PMID:18612379

  8. Disability, atrophy and cortical reorganization following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Freund, Patrick; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ward, Nick S; Hutton, Chloe; Gall, Angela; Ciccarelli, Olga; Craggs, Michael; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan J

    2011-06-01

    The impact of traumatic spinal cord injury on structural integrity, cortical reorganization and ensuing disability is variable and may depend on a dynamic interaction between the severity of local damage and the capacity of the brain for plastic reorganization. We investigated trauma-induced anatomical changes in the spinal cord and brain, and explored their relationship to functional changes in sensorimotor cortex. Structural changes were assessed using cross-sectional cord area, voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness of T1-weighted images in 10 subjects with cervical spinal cord injury and 16 controls. Cortical activation in response to right-sided (i) handgrip; and (ii) median and tibial nerve stimulation were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Regression analyses explored associations between cord area, grey and white matter volume, cortical activations and thickness, and disability. Subjects with spinal cord injury had impaired upper and lower limb function bilaterally, a 30% reduced cord area, smaller white matter volume in the pyramids and left cerebellar peduncle, and smaller grey matter volume and cortical thinning in the leg area of the primary motor and sensory cortex compared with controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased activation in the left primary motor cortex leg area during handgrip and the left primary sensory cortex face area during median nerve stimulation in subjects with spinal cord injury compared with controls, but no increased activation following tibial nerve stimulation. A smaller cervical cord area was associated with impaired upper limb function and increased activations with handgrip and median nerve stimulation, but reduced activations with tibial nerve stimulation. Increased sensory deficits were associated with increased activations in the left primary sensory cortex face area due to median nerve stimulation. In conclusion, spinal cord injury leads to cord atrophy

  9. [Obese woman presenting as vocal cord abductor paralysis and floppy arytenoid associated with early signs of multiple system atrophy].

    PubMed

    Sakuta, Hideki; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Itsuo; Nakamura, Toshiki; Hirata, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    In multiple system atrophy (MSA), sleep-related breathing disorders are commonly observed, including vocal cord abductor paralysis (VCAP), which can cause sudden death. In its early stage, VCAP occurs only during sleep, but as the disease progresses, it appears when both awake and asleep. We encountered a 59-year-old obese woman who had been under continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) for approximately one year but later developed acute respiratory failure because of VCAP. VCAP was the predominant finding that led to the diagnosis of MSA in our patient. On laryngoscopic examination, the movement of the patient's larynx was normal during wakefulness, but VCAP, paradoxical movements of the vocal cord and a floppy arytenoid were observed during drug-induced sleep. We suggest that detection of VCAP and laryngopharyngeal abnormalities such as floppy arytenoid in the early stage of MSA is important for determining treatment options.

  10. Involvement of medullary serotonergic groups in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2004-03-01

    We sought to determine whether medullary serotonergic neurons were affected in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Immunostaining for tryptophan hydroxylase was performed on serial 50 microm sections of the medulla of brains obtained at autopsy from six control subjects, eight subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA, and four with Parkinson's disease. There was a severe depletion of serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, raphe obscurus, raphe pallidus, and ventrolateral medulla in MSA. Depletion of serotonergic neurons may contribute to impaired control of sympathetic outflow and other abnormalities in MSA.

  11. [Clinical characteristics, progression and risk factors of geographic atrophy].

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, C K; Adrion, C; Mansmann, U; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S; Holz, F G

    2010-11-01

    Geographic atrophy (GA) as the late stage manifestation of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease process afflicting the retinal pigment epithelium, choriocapillaris and the outer neurosensory retina. GA represents a complex, multifactorial disease governed by the interdependence of genetic, endogenous and exogenous factors. Diagnosis and monitoring of GA progression is largely based on various retinal imaging modalities. After the breakthrough in the treatment of wet AMD GA represents a large clinical challenge. Recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways, natural history and predictive markers for progression.

  12. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  13. Fasciculations masquerading as minipolymyoclonus in bulbospinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sushanth; Ma, Wei; Kozochonok, Elena; Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-01-01

    Minipolymyoclonus has been described in both anterior horn cell disorders and central nervous system degenerative conditions. While its etiology remains unclear and speculative, a central generator has been previously proposed. We describe a case of bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease), where minipolymyoclonus-like movements corresponded to fasciculations in neurophysiological studies. Our novel finding suggests that the etiologies of minipolymyoclonus in central and peripheral nervous system disorders are distinct, despite outward clinical similarity. The term “minipolyfasciculations” may be more reflective of the underlying process causing minipolymyoclonus-like movements in lower motor neuron disorders. PMID:26019432

  14. Evaluation of the endogenous glucocorticoid hypothesis of denervation atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Max, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects are studied of the oral administration of RU38486, a potent selective glucocorticoid antagonist, on muscle weight, non-collagen protein content, and selected enzyme activities (choline acetyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamine synthetase) following denervation of rat skeletal muscle. Neither decreases in muscle weight, protein content, and choline acetyltransferase activity, nor increases in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogernase and glutamine synthetase were affected by RU38486. These data do not support the hypothesis that denervation atrophy results from enhanced sensitivity of muscle to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  15. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized.

  16. Familial bulbospinal neuronopathy with optic atrophy: a distinct entity.

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, G; Micheli, F; Taratuto, A L; Parera, I C

    1996-01-01

    A 61 year old woman and her 58 year old brother presented with the clinical picture of late onset progressive bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy with family history of involvement in successive generations. The sister also had optic neuropathy and the brother developed diabetes mellitus and sex hormone abnormalities. Neurophysiological and histopathological studies showed a pattern of motor and sensory neuronopathy. There was no abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene. This family seems to have a previously unrecognised entity with the bulbospinal neuronopathy phenotype. Images PMID:8708690

  17. Spinal muscular atrophy during human development: where are the early pathogenic findings?

    PubMed

    Tizzano, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects motor neurons. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1). The SMN2 gene, which is the highly homologous SMN1 copy that is present in all patients, is unable to prevent the disease. SMA patients can be classified into four groups based on age at onset and acquired milestones (type I or severe acute disease, with onset before 6 months; type II, before 18 months; type III, after 18 months and type IV, in adult life). The human developmental period is believed to play an essential role in SMA pathogenesis. However, the neuropathologic study of SMA comes largely from postnatal necropsy samples, which describe the end-stage of the disease. With the exception of severe congenital SMA (or Type 0 SMA), type I patients tend to present a short but variable presymptomatic period after birth. Our main interest lies in studying SMA during human development so as to gain insight into the mechanism of the disease in the prenatal-presymptomatic stage. In fetuses of 12-15 weeks' gestational age we systematically studied histology, cell death and gene expression in spinal cord and muscle, the key tissues involved in the disease. Furthermore, ultrasound parameters were investigated at these stages. These studies may help to delineate an early intervention in SMA, in particular during the potential therapeutic window.

  18. The organotin-induced thymus atrophy, characterized by depletion of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes, is preceded by a reduction of the immature CD4- CD8+ TcR alpha beta-/low CD2high thymoblast subset.

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, R H; Bol, M; Lam, B W; Seinen, W; Penninks, A H

    1992-01-01

    Thymic changes in the rat induced by the thymus atrophy-inducing organotin compound di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) were examined using FACS analyses. The number of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes was reduced by DBTC treatment from Day 2 onwards and reached minimum level on Days 4 and 5 after dosing. On these days the CD4-CD8- and both the CD4-CD8+ and CD4+CD8- subsets were not affected. On Day 2 we observed a reduced proportion of transferrin receptor (CD71)-positive CD4-OX44- cells, representing the cycling immature CD4-CD8+ cells, and of CD71+OX44- cells, representing the cycling CD4+CD8+ cells, but not of CD71+CD4-CD8- cells. When compared to controls, the FSChigh cell population of DBTC-treated rats contained less CD4-OX44- and OX44- cells, which were further characterized as CD2high and T-cell receptor (TcR)alpha beta- low. Moreover, fewer TcR alpha beta high cells were detected in the OX44- thymoblast subset of DBTC-treated rats. The number of CD4-CD8- thymoblasts appeared marginally decreased while the numbers of CD4+OX44+ cells, representing mature CD4+ cells, were not affected. These data indicate that DBTC causes a preferential initial depletion of immature CD4-CD8+CD2high TcR alpha beta-low thymoblasts. This initial event may result in a decreased formation of CD4+CD8+ thymoblasts and of small CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. These characteristics of the initially depleted subset indicate a specific anti-proliferative effect of DBTC and may give clues for the mechanism involved in the induction of thymus atrophy. PMID:1353062

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  20. What is the role of lymph nodal metastases and lymphadenectomy in the surgical treatment and prognosis of thymic carcinomas and carcinoids?

    PubMed

    Viti, Andrea; Bertolaccini, Luca; Terzi, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We looked at the clinical relevance of lymph node involvement and nodal (N) stage, in thymomas, thymic carcinomas and carcinoids. The possible role of lymphadenectomy in addition to thymectomy was also evaluated. A total of 605 papers were found, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. In the Yamakawa-Masaoka classification, based on 226 patients, lymph nodes were classified as anterior mediastinal (N1), defined as nodes surrounding the thymus gland; intrathoracic (N2), all nodes within the thorax excluding N1; and extrathoracic nodes (N3). Kondo validated the Yamakawa-Masaoka classification in a multicentric cohort of 1320 patients. Thymomas presented nodal involvement in 1.8% of cases, carcinomas in 27% of cases, and carcinoids in 28% of cases. The role of nodal status in defining the stage was even more emphasized in the staging system developed by Tsuchiya for thymic carcinomas. In the Istituto Nazionale Tumori classification, thymomas with N1 or N2 were considered as locally advanced disease with a 95-month disease-free survival rate for locally advanced disease of 46.9 vs 98.6% for locally restricted disease (absence of nodal involvement). Weissferdt and Moran, on a series of 65 thymic carcinomas, underlined the clinical relevance of nodal involvement. Positive lymph nodes were associated with significantly worse survival (P = 0.01070). Okuma, in a series of 68 advanced stage thymic carcinomas, showed that curative-intent surgical treatment was related to prolonged survival (P = 0.03). In particular, IVb tumours due to node-only involvement had better survival when radical resection was achieved when compared with IVb due to distant metastases (P = 0.03). Sung et al. showed the

  1. Agent-based computational model investigates muscle-specific responses to disuse-induced atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly responsive to use. In particular, muscle atrophy attributable to decreased activity is a common problem among the elderly and injured/immobile. However, each muscle does not respond the same way. We developed an agent-based model that generates a tissue-level skeletal muscle response to disuse/immobilization. The model incorporates tissue-specific muscle fiber architecture parameters and simulates changes in muscle fiber size as a result of disuse-induced atrophy that are consistent with published experiments. We created simulations of 49 forelimb and hindlimb muscles of the rat by incorporating eight fiber-type and size parameters to explore how these parameters, which vary widely across muscles, influence sensitivity to disuse-induced atrophy. Of the 49 muscles modeled, the soleus exhibited the greatest atrophy after 14 days of simulated immobilization (51% decrease in fiber size), whereas the extensor digitorum communis atrophied the least (32%). Analysis of these simulations revealed that both fiber-type distribution and fiber-size distribution influence the sensitivity to disuse atrophy even though no single tissue architecture parameter correlated with atrophy rate. Additionally, software agents representing fibroblasts were incorporated into the model to investigate cellular interactions during atrophy. Sensitivity analyses revealed that fibroblast agents have the potential to affect disuse-induced atrophy, albeit with a lesser effect than fiber type and size. In particular, muscle atrophy elevated slightly with increased initial fibroblast population and increased production of TNF-α. Overall, the agent-based model provides a novel framework for investigating both tissue adaptations and cellular interactions in skeletal muscle during atrophy. PMID:25722379

  2. Autophagy-Associated Atrophy and Metabolic Remodeling of the Mouse Diaphragm after Short-Term Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Li, Tong; Kimoff, R. John; Petrof, Basil J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term intermittent hypoxia (IH) is common in patients with acute respiratory disorders. Although prolonged exposure to hypoxia induces atrophy and increased fatigability of skeletal muscle, the response to short-term IH is less well known. We hypothesized that the diaphragm and limb muscles would adapt differently to short-term IH given that hypoxia stimulates ventilation and triggers a superimposed exercise stimulus in the diaphragm. Methods We determined the structural, metabolic, and contractile properties of the mouse diaphragm after 4 days of IH (8 hours per day, 30 episodes per hour to a FiO2 nadir=6%), and compared responses in the diaphragm to a commonly studied reference limb muscle, the tibialis anterior. Outcome measures included muscle fiber size, assays of muscle proteolysis (calpain, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy pathways), markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, quantification of intramyocellular lipid and lipid metabolism genes, type I myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and in vitro contractile properties. Results After 4 days of IH, the diaphragm alone demonstrated significant atrophy (30% decrease of myofiber size) together with increased LC3B-II protein (2.4-fold) and mRNA markers of the autophagy pathway (LC3B, Gabarapl1, Bnip3), whereas active calpain and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1, atrogin-1) were unaffected in both muscles. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly reduced by IH in both muscles. However, only the diaphragm exhibited increased intramyocellular lipid droplets (2.5-fold) after IH, along with upregulation of genes linked to activated lipid metabolism. In addition, although the diaphragm showed evidence for acute fatigue immediately following IH, it underwent an adaptive fiber type switch toward slow type I MyHC-expressing fibers, associated with greater intrinsic endurance of the muscle during repetitive stimulation in vitro. Conclusions Short-term IH induces preferential atrophy

  3. [Ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis after semax administration].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu V

    2000-01-01

    Semax favorably affects ultrastructural changes in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis (AP): a single introduction of semax (0.1 mg/kg) into the pancreatic duct of rats with AP model prevents increased necrosis of the acinar tissues and inhibits purulent inflammation of the necrotised lobules by inducing their sclerosis and atrophy, thus retaining large areas of the pancreas intact.

  4. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Posterior Cortical Atrophy and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J.; Franco-Macías, Emilio; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by early progressive visual dysfunction in the context of relative preservation of memory and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving the posterior cortex. The aim of the present study is to characterize the neuropsychiatric profile of PCA. Methods: The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to assess 12 neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in 28 patients with PCA and 34 patients with typical Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, disease duration, and illness severity. Results: The most commonly reported NPS in both groups were depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability. However, aside from a trend toward lower rates of apathy in patients with PCA, there were no differences in the percentage of NPS presented in each group. All those patients presenting visual hallucinations in the PCA group also met diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Auditory hallucinations were only present in patients meeting diagnosis criteria for DLB. Conclusion: Prevalence of the 12 NPS examined was similar between patients with PCA and AD. Hallucinations in PCA may be helpful in the differential diagnosis between PCA-AD and PCA-DLB. PMID:26404166

  5. Longitudinal association between hippocampus atrophy and episodic-memory decline.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Tetiana; Pudas, Sara; Lundquist, Anders; Orädd, Greger; Josefsson, Maria; Salami, Alireza; de Luna, Xavier; Nyberg, Lars

    2017-03-01

    There is marked variability in both onset and rate of episodic-memory decline in aging. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed that the extent of age-related brain changes varies markedly across individuals. Past studies of whether regional atrophy accounts for episodic-memory decline in aging have yielded inconclusive findings. Here we related 15-year changes in episodic memory to 4-year changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter volume and in white-matter connectivity and lesions. In addition, changes in word fluency, fluid IQ (Block Design), and processing speed were estimated and related to structural brain changes. Significant negative change over time was observed for all cognitive and brain measures. A robust brain-cognition change-change association was observed for episodic-memory decline and atrophy in the hippocampus. This association was significant for older (65-80 years) but not middle-aged (55-60 years) participants and not sensitive to the assumption of ignorable attrition. Thus, these longitudinal findings highlight medial-temporal lobe system integrity as particularly crucial for maintaining episodic-memory functioning in older age.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Obesity-Induced Osteoporosis and Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bipradas; Curtis, Mary E.; Fears, Letimicia S.; Nahashon, Samuel N.; Fentress, Hugh M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis are two alarming health disorders prominent among middle and old age populations, and the numbers of those affected by these two disorders are increasing. It is estimated that more than 600 million adults are obese and over 200 million people have osteoporosis worldwide. Interestingly, both of these abnormalities share some common features including a genetic predisposition, and a common origin: bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. Obesity is characterized by the expression of leptin, adiponectin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), growth hormone (GH), parathyroid hormone (PTH), angiotensin II (Ang II), 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT), Advance glycation end products (AGE), and myostatin, which exert their effects by modulating the signaling pathways within bone and muscle. Chemical messengers (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, AGE, leptins) that are upregulated or downregulated as a result of obesity have been shown to act as negative regulators of osteoblasts, osteocytes and muscles, as well as positive regulators of osteoclasts. These additive effects of obesity ultimately increase the risk for osteoporosis and muscle atrophy. The aim of this review is to identify the potential cellular mechanisms through which obesity may facilitate osteoporosis, muscle atrophy and bone fractures. PMID:27746742

  7. Disease mechanisms and therapeutic approaches in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, Sarah; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2015-06-10

    Motor neuron diseases are neurological disorders characterized primarily by the degeneration of spinal motor neurons, skeletal muscle atrophy, and debilitating and often fatal motor dysfunction. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive motor neuron disease of high incidence and severity and the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by homozygous mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and retention of at least one copy of the hypomorphic gene paralog SMN2. Early studies established a loss-of-function disease mechanism involving ubiquitous SMN deficiency and suggested SMN upregulation as a possible therapeutic approach. In recent years, greater knowledge of the central role of SMN in RNA processing combined with deep characterization of animal models of SMA has significantly advanced our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of the disease. SMA is emerging as an RNA disease not limited to motor neurons, but one that involves dysfunction of motor circuits that comprise multiple neuronal subpopulations and possibly other cell types. Advances in SMA research have also led to the development of several potential therapeutics shown to be effective in animal models of SMA that are now in clinical trials. These agents offer unprecedented promise for the treatment of this still incurable neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Pathogenesis and therapy of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2012-12-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. During the last two decades, basic and clinical research has provided important insights into the disease phenotype and pathophysiology. The cause of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA exclusively affects adult males, whereas females homozygous for the AR mutation do not manifest neurological symptoms. The ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of the polyglutamine-expanded AR protein is central to the gender-specific pathogenesis of SBMA, although additional steps, e.g., DNA binding, inter-domain interactions, and post-translational modification of AR, modify toxicity. The interactions with co-regulators are another requisite for the toxic properties of the polyglutamine-expanded AR. It is also shown that the polyglutamine-expanded AR induces diverse molecular events, such as transcriptional dysregulation, axonal transport disruption, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which play causative roles in the neurodegeneration in SBMA. The pathogenic AR-induced myopathy also contributes to the non-cell autonomous degeneration of motor neurons. Pre-clinical studies using animal models show that the pathogenic AR-mediated neurodegeneration is suppressed by androgen inactivation, the efficacy of which has been tested in clinical trials. Pharmacological activation of cellular defense machineries, such as molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy, also exerts neuroprotective effects in experimental models of SBMA.

  9. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  10. Mitochondrial implications in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy disease).

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Mishra, Anushree; Wakil, Salma; Pennuto, Maria; Soraru, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial functions are secondarily disturbed in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA). This review focuses on the relation between BSMA and the effect of the expanded polyglutamine (poly-Q) androgen receptor (AR) on mitochondrial functions. Mitochondrial functions in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (SBMA) are affected on the molecular, clinical, and therapeutic level. On the molecular level there is down-regulation of various nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins by mutant androgen receptor (mAR), colocalization of the mAR with various mitochondrial proteins, association of mAR aggregates with mitochondria resulting in abnormal distribution of mitochondria, mtDNA depletion or multiple mtDNA deletions, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increase in reactive oxidative species, and activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. On the clinical level various mitochondrial disorders mimic SBMA, and on the therapeutic level pioglitazone expresses PPAR-γ, cyclosporine-A restores mitochondrial membrane potentials, coenzyme-Q and idebenone reduce oxidative stress, and geldanamycin up-regulates protective mitochondrial heat shock proteins. In conclusion, in BSMA mitochondrial dysfunction results from various interactions of elongated poly-Q AR with mitochondria, mitochondrial proteins, nuclear or mitochondrial DNA, causing oxidative stress, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, or activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. Additionally, mitochondrial disease may mimic BSMA and therapeutic approaches may depend on modifications of mitochondrial pathways.

  11. Spinal muscular atrophy: from tissue specificity to therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Iascone, Daniel M.; Lee, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most frequent genetic cause of death in infants and toddlers. All cases of spinal muscular atrophy result from reductions in levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, and so SMN upregulation is a focus of many preclinical and clinical studies. We examine four issues that may be important in planning for therapeutic success. First, neuromuscular phenotypes in the SMNΔ7 mouse model closely match those in human patients but peripheral disease manifestations differ, suggesting that endpoints other than mouse lifespan may be more useful in predicting clinical outcome. Second, SMN plays important roles in multiple central and peripheral cell types, not just motor neurons, and it remains unclear which of these cell types need to be targeted therapeutically. Third, should SMN-restoration therapy not be effective in all patients, blocking molecular changes downstream of SMN reduction may confer significant benefit, making it important to evaluate therapeutic targets other than SMN. Lastly, for patients whose disease progression is slowed, but who retain significant motor dysfunction, additional approaches used to enhance regeneration of the neuromuscular system may be of value. PMID:25705387

  12. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12-21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of pathological images still remains an unsolved problem. In this paper we leverage the watershed transform and generalized non-linear gradient operators for interactive segmentation and present an intuitive and simple approach for geographic atrophy segmentation. We compare our approach with the state of the art random walker [5] algorithm for interactive segmentation using ROC statistics. Quantitative evaluation experiments on 100 FAF images show a mean sensitivity/specificity of 98.3/97.7% for our approach and a mean sensitivity/specificity of 88.2/96.6% for the random walker algorithm.

  13. Establishing a standardized therapeutic testing protocol for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Shung; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Li, Hung

    2006-11-01

    Several mice models have been created for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); however, there is still no standard preclinical testing system for the disease. We previously generated type III-specific SMA model mice, which might be suitable for use as a preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA. To establish such a system and test its applicability, we first created a testing protocol and then applied it as a means to investigate the use of valproic acid (VPA) as a possible treatment for SMA. These SMA mice revealed tail/ear/foot deformity, muscle atrophy, poorer motor performances, smaller compound muscle action potential and lower spinal motoneuron density at the age of 9 to 12 months in comparison with age-matched wild-type littermate mice. In addition, VPA attenuates motoneuron death, increases spinal SMN protein level and partially normalizes motor function in SMA mice. These results suggest that the testing protocol developed here is well suited for use as a standardized preclinical therapeutic testing system for SMA.

  14. Genetic inhibition of JNK3 ameliorates spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Genabai, Naresh K.; Ahmad, Saif; Zhang, Zhanying; Jiang, Xiaoting; Gabaldon, Cynthia A.; Gangwani, Laxman

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that occurs in early childhood. Degeneration of spinal motor neurons caused by SMN deficiency results in progressive muscle atrophy and death in SMA. The molecular mechanism underlying neurodegeneration in SMA is unknown. No treatment is available to prevent neurodegeneration and reduce the burden of illness in SMA. We report that the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway mediates neurodegeneration in SMA. The neuron-specific isoform JNK3 is required for neuron degeneration caused by SMN deficiency. JNK3 deficiency reduces degeneration of cultured neurons caused by low levels of SMN. Genetic inhibition of JNK pathway in vivo by Jnk3 knockout results in amelioration of SMA phenotype. JNK3 deficiency prevents the loss of spinal cord motor neurons, reduces muscle degeneration, improves muscle fiber thickness and muscle growth, improves motor function and overall growth and increases lifespan of mice with SMA that shows a systemic rescue of phenotype by a SMN-independent mechanism. JNK3 represents a potential (non-SMN) therapeutic target for the treatment of SMA. PMID:26423457

  15. MRI derived brain atrophy in PSP and MSA-P. Determining sample size to detect treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Paviour, Dominic C; Price, Shona L; Lees, Andrew J; Fox, Nick C

    2007-04-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system (MSA) atrophy are associated with progressive brain atrophy. Serial MRI can be applied in order to measure this change in brain volume and to calculate atrophy rates. We evaluated MRI derived whole brain and regional atrophy rates as potential markers of progression in PSP and the Parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P). 17 patients with PSP, 9 with MSA-P and 18 healthy controls underwent two MRI brain scans. MRI scans were registered, and brain and regional atrophy rates (midbrain, pons, cerebellum, third and lateral ventricles) measured. Sample sizes required to detect the effect of a proposed disease-modifying treatment were estimated. The effect of scan interval on the variance of the atrophy rates and sample size was assessed. Based on the calculated yearly rates of atrophy, for a drug effect equivalent to a 30% reduction in atrophy, fewer PSP subjects are required in each treatment arm when using midbrain rather than whole brain atrophy rates (183 cf. 499). Fewer MSA-P subjects are required, using pontine/cerebellar, rather than whole brain atrophy rates (164/129 cf. 794). A reduction in the variance of measured atrophy rates was observed with a longer scan interval. Regional rather than whole brain atrophy rates calculated from volumetric serial MRI brain scans in PSP and MSA-P provide a more practical and powerful means of monitoring disease progression in clinical trials.

  16. Multiple system atrophy presenting as parkinsonism: clinical features and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, A; Colosimo, C; Bentivoglio, A R; Fenici, R; Melillo, G; Colosimo, C; Tonali, P

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility that parkinsonian signs may be the only presenting feature of multiple system atrophy (MSA), parkinsonian patients were studied who had no atypical clinical signs and had no symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, but who reported that they had not experienced the anticipated good response to dopaminergic treatment. These stringent criteria identified 20 patients from a series of 298 consecutive parkinsonian outpatients. The following clinical pointers were analysed: (a) rate of disease progression; (b) symmetry of parkinsonian symptoms and signs; (c) occurrence of resting tremor during the first three years from onset. In addition, all patients underwent (d) acute and chronic challenge with dopaminergic drugs; (e) cardiovascular reflex autonomic function tests; (f) high field MRI. Rapid progression of disease was seen in 45% of patients, onset was symmetric in 25%, tremor was absent at onset in 70%, response to dopaminergic drug challenges was inadequate in 40%, abnormal cardiovascular reflexes occurred in 50%, and some abnormal MRI finding occurred in 35% of cases. Each of these features was equally weighted by giving to each patient a 0 to 6 point score corresponding to the number of abnormal findings. Fifteen patients scoring higher than 1 were considered at risk for having MSA: five of them were classified as clinically possible (score 2), six as clinically probable (score 3-4), and four patients were classified as clinically definite multiple system atrophy (score 5). The six pointers considered were variably combined in each patient, none of them being universally abnormal in patients with high scores. The patients were followed up for a mean 2.1 (SEM 0.65) years. All but one of the 10 patients prospectively classified as probable or definite MSA developed unequivocal clinical signs of fully symptomatic MSA. A receiver operator characteristic cure was plotted for the prospective score based on follow up diagnosis. The best compromise

  17. Acute resistance exercise reduces increased gene expression in muscle atrophy of ovariectomised arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Roberto; de Paula Souza, Aletéia; de Oliveira, Anselmo Alves; Nunes, Paulo Ricardo Prado; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2017-01-01

    Objective We studied the effect of resistance exercise (RE) on mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin in the gastrocnemius muscle of arthritic rats after loss of ovarian function (LOF). Material and methods Thirty female Wistar rats (nine weeks old, 195.3 ±17.4 grams) were randomly allocated into five groups: control group (CT-Sham; n = 6); group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 6); group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAEX; n = 6); ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis (RAOV; n = 6); and an ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAOVEX; n = 6). After 15 days of intra-articular injections with Met-BSA the animals were subjected to RE and six hours after workout were euthanised. Results The rheumatoid arthritis provoked reduction in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibres, but the CSA was lower in the RAOV when compared to the RA groups. Skeletal muscle atrogin-1 mRNA level was increased in arthritic rats (RA and RAOV), but the atrogin-1 level was higher in RAOV group when compared to other arthritic groups. The Muscle MuRF-1 mRNA level was also increased in the RAOV group. The increased atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 mRNA levels were lower in the RAOVEX group than in the RAOV group. The myostatin mRNA level was similar in all groups, except for the RAOVEX group, in which it was lower than the other groups. Conclusions LOF results in increased loss of skeletal muscle-related ubiquitin ligases (atrogin-1 and MuRF-1). However, the RE reduces the atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin mRNA levels in muscle of arthritic rats affected by LOF. PMID:28250722

  18. Medicare Expenditure Correlates of Atrophy and Cerebrovascular Disease in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Last, Briana S; García Rubio, Maria-José; Zhu, Carolyn W; Cosentino, Stephanie; Manly, Jennifer J; DeCarli, Charles; Stern, Yaakov; Brickman, Adam M

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of cerebrovascular disease and atrophy are common in older adults and are associated with cognitive and medical burden. However, the extent to which they are related to health care expenditures has not been examined. We studied whether increased Medicare expenditures were associated with brain markers of atrophy and cerebrovascular disease in older adults.

  19. Evaluating Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Using Rate of Regional Hippocampal Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Frankó, Edit; Joly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangle and neuropil thread deposition, which ultimately results in neuronal loss. A large number of magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported a smaller hippocampus in AD patients as compared to healthy elderlies. Even though this difference is often interpreted as atrophy, it is only an indirect measurement. A more direct way of measuring the atrophy is to use repeated MRIs within the same individual. Even though several groups have used this appropriate approach, the pattern of hippocampal atrophy still remains unclear and difficult to relate to underlying pathophysiology. Here, in this longitudinal study, we aimed to map hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and elderly controls. Data consisted of two MRI scans for each subject. The symmetric deformation field between the first and the second MRI was computed and mapped onto the three-dimensional hippocampal surface. The pattern of atrophy rate was similar in all three groups, but the rate was significantly higher in patients with AD than in control subjects. We also found higher atrophy rates in progressive MCI patients as compared to stable MCI, particularly in the antero-lateral portion of the right hippocampus. Importantly, the regions showing the highest atrophy rate correspond to those that were described to have the highest burden of tau deposition. Our results show that local hippocampal atrophy rate is a reliable biomarker of disease stage and progression and could also be considered as a method to objectively evaluate treatment effects. PMID:23951142

  20. Bayesian model reveals latent atrophy factors with dissociable cognitive trajectories in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuming; Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Sun, Nanbo; Sperling, Reisa A.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We used a data-driven Bayesian model to automatically identify distinct latent factors of overlapping atrophy patterns from voxelwise structural MRIs of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia patients. Our approach estimated the extent to which multiple distinct atrophy patterns were expressed within each participant rather than assuming that each participant expressed a single atrophy factor. The model revealed a temporal atrophy factor (medial temporal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala), a subcortical atrophy factor (striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum), and a cortical atrophy factor (frontal, parietal, lateral temporal, and lateral occipital cortices). To explore the influence of each factor in early AD, atrophy factor compositions were inferred in beta-amyloid–positive (Aβ+) mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and cognitively normal (CN) participants. All three factors were associated with memory decline across the entire clinical spectrum, whereas the cortical factor was associated with executive function decline in Aβ+ MCI participants and AD dementia patients. Direct comparison between factors revealed that the temporal factor showed the strongest association with memory, whereas the cortical factor showed the strongest association with executive function. The subcortical factor was associated with the slowest decline for both memory and executive function compared with temporal and cortical factors. These results suggest that distinct patterns of atrophy influence decline across different cognitive domains. Quantification of this heterogeneity may enable the computation of individual-level predictions relevant for disease monitoring and customized therapies. Factor compositions of participants and code used in this article are publicly available for future research. PMID:27702899

  1. In vivo MRI and histological evaluation of brain atrophy in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Delatour, Benoît; Guégan, Maryvonne; Volk, Andreas; Dhenain, Marc

    2006-06-01

    Regional cerebral atrophy was evaluated in APP/PS1 mice harboring mutated transgenes linked to familial Alzheimer's disease, using complementary methods. In vivo high resolution MRI was selected for measurements of brain atrophy and associated cerebrospinal fluid dilation; histological analysis was performed to reveal localized atrophies and to evaluate amyloid burden. Young APP/PS1 mice examined at a pre-amyloid stage (10 weeks) showed disruption in development (reduced intracranial and brain volumes). Comparison of young and old (24 months) mice, indicated that both APP/PS1 and control brains endure growth during adulthood. Aged APP/PS1 animals showed a moderate although significant global brain atrophy and a dilation of CSF space in posterior brain regions. The locus of this atrophy was identified in the midbrain area and not, as expected, at isocortical/hippocampal levels. Atrophy was also detected in fiber tracts. The severity of brain atrophy in old APP/PS1 mice was not correlated with the extent of cerebral amyloidosis. The relevance of current transgenic mouse models for the study of brain atrophy related to Alzheimer's disease is discussed.

  2. Relating Cortical Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Graph Diffusion-Based Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, Farras; Mueller, Susanne; Raj, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by stereotyped origination and spread pattern of epileptogenic activity, which is reflected in stereotyped topographic distribution of neuronal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both epileptogenic activity and atrophy spread appear to follow white matter connections. We model the networked spread of activity and atrophy in TLE from first principles via two simple first order network diffusion models. Atrophy distribution is modeled as a simple consequence of the propagation of epileptogenic activity in one model, and as a progressive degenerative process in the other. We show that the network models closely reproduce the regional volumetric gray matter atrophy distribution of two epilepsy cohorts: 29 TLE subjects with medial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS), and 50 TLE subjects with normal appearance on MRI (TLE-no). Statistical validation at the group level suggests high correlation with measured atrophy (R = 0.586 for TLE-MTS, R = 0.283 for TLE-no). We conclude that atrophy spread model out-performs the hyperactivity spread model. These results pave the way for future clinical application of the proposed model on individual patients, including estimating future spread of atrophy, identification of seizure onset zones and surgical planning. PMID:26513579

  3. Parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA): retinal imaging tool for assessment of the optic disc and parapapillary atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Kai; Tang, Tong Boon; Laude, Augustinus; Dhillon, Baljean; Murray, Alan F.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a computer-aided measuring tool, named parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA), for automated detection and quantification of both the parapapillary atrophy (PPA) and the optic disc (OD) regions in two-dimensional color retinal fundus images. The OD region is segmented using a combination of edge detection and ellipse fitting methods. The PPA region is identified by the presence of bright pixels in the temporal zone of the OD, and it is segmented using a sequence of techniques, including a modified Chan-Vese approach, thresholding, scanning filter, and multiseed region growing. PANDORA has been tested with 133 color retinal images (82 with PPA; 51 without PPA) drawn randomly from the Lothian Birth Cohort (LBC) database, together with a "ground truth" estimate from an ophthalmologist. The PPA detection rate is 89.47% with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 1. The mean accuracy in defining the OD region is 81.31% (SD=10.45) when PPA is present and 95.32% (SD=4.36) when PPA is absent. The mean accuracy in defining the PPA region is 73.57% (SD=11.62). PANDORA demonstrates for the first time how to quantify the OD and PPA regions using two-dimensional fundus images, enabling ophthalmologists to study ocular diseases related to PPA using a standard fundus camera.

  4. Clinical and genetic diversity of SMN1-negative proximal spinal muscular atrophies

    PubMed Central

    Jordanova, Albena

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spinal muscular atrophy is a motor neuron disorder characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy due to degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. Initially, the disease was considered purely as an autosomal recessive condition caused by loss-of-function SMN1 mutations on 5q13. Recent developments in next generation sequencing technologies, however, have unveiled a growing number of clinical conditions designated as non-5q forms of spinal muscular atrophy. At present, 16 different genes and one unresolved locus are associated with proximal non-5q forms, having high phenotypic variability and diverse inheritance patterns. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the phenotypes, causative genes, and disease mechanisms associated with proximal SMN1-negative spinal muscular atrophies. We describe the molecular and cellular functions enriched among causative genes, and discuss the challenges in the post-genomics era of spinal muscular atrophy research. PMID:24970098

  5. Diagnostic Approach to Childhood-onset Cerebellar Atrophy: A 10-Year Retrospective Study of 300 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; Yoon, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias associated with cerebellar atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders. Selection of appropriate clinical and genetic tests for patients with cerebellar atrophy poses a diagnostic challenge. Neuroimaging is a crucial initial investigation in the diagnostic evaluation of ataxia in childhood, and the presence of cerebellar atrophy helps guide further investigations. We performed a detailed review of 300 patients with confirmed cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging over a 10-year period. A diagnosis was established in 47% of patients: Mitochondrial disorders were most common, followed by the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, ataxia telangectasia, and late GM2-gangliosidosis. We review the common causes of cerebellar atrophy in childhood and propose a diagnostic approach based on correlating specific neuroimaging patterns with clinical and genetic diagnoses. PMID:22764178

  6. Ultrawide field fluorescein angiogram in a family with gyrate atrophy and foveoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Koushik; Chawla, Rohan; Sharma, Yog Raj; Gogia, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by peripheral multiple sharp areas of chorioretinal atrophy which become confluent with age. Macula and central vision is typically involved late in the disease. Macular involvements such as cystoid macular edema, epimacular membrane, and choroidal neovascularization have been reported in gyrate atrophy. In this report, we present a family with diminished central vision presenting within 8 years of age. All of three siblings had typical peripheral chorioretinal atrophic lesions of gyrate atrophy and hyperornithinemia. On spectral domain optical coherence tomography, two of elder siblings showed macular edema. Hyporeflective spaces appeared to extend from outer nuclear layer to the inner nuclear layer level separated by multiple linear bridging elements in both eyes. Ultrawide field fluorescein angiogram (UWFI) even in late phase did not show any leak at macula suggesting foveoschisis. Foveoschisis in gyrate atrophy has not been reported before. PMID:27433038

  7. Atrophy of submandibular gland by the duct ligation and a blockade of SP receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Sumiyo; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Honda, Takashi; Shigetomi, Toshio; Ueda, Minoru; Hibi, Hideharu; Sugiura, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    To clarify the mechanisms underlying the submandibular gland atrophies associated with ptyalolithiasis, morphological changes were examined in the rat submandibular gland following either surgical intervention of the duct or functional blockade at substance P receptors (SPRs). Progressive acinar atrophy was observed after duct ligation or avulsion of periductal tissues. This suggested that damage to periductal tissue involving nerve fibers might contribute to ligation-associated acinar atrophy. Immunohistochemically labeled-substance P positive nerve fibers (SPFs) coursed in parallel with the main duct and were distributed around the interlobular, striated, granular and intercalated duct, and glandular acini. Strong SPR immunoreactivity was observed in the duct. Injection into the submandibular gland of a SPR antagonist induced marked acinar atrophy. The results revealed that disturbance of SPFs and SPRs might be involved in the atrophy of the submandibular gland associated with ptyalolithiasis.

  8. Atrophy of submandibular gland by the duct ligation and a blockade of SP receptor in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hishida, Sumiyo; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Honda, Takashi; Shigetomi, Toshio; Ueda, Minoru; Hibi, Hideharu; Sugiura, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To clarify the mechanisms underlying the submandibular gland atrophies associated with ptyalolithiasis, morphological changes were examined in the rat submandibular gland following either surgical intervention of the duct or functional blockade at substance P receptors (SPRs). Progressive acinar atrophy was observed after duct ligation or avulsion of periductal tissues. This suggested that damage to periductal tissue involving nerve fibers might contribute to ligation-associated acinar atrophy. Immunohistochemically labeled-substance P positive nerve fibers (SPFs) coursed in parallel with the main duct and were distributed around the interlobular, striated, granular and intercalated duct, and glandular acini. Strong SPR immunoreactivity was observed in the duct. Injection into the submandibular gland of a SPR antagonist induced marked acinar atrophy. The results revealed that disturbance of SPFs and SPRs might be involved in the atrophy of the submandibular gland associated with ptyalolithiasis. PMID:27303108

  9. Late-onset myasthenia gravis - CTLA4(low) genotype association and low-for-age thymic output of naïve T cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ströbel, Philipp; Bohlender-Willke, Anna-Lena; Rieckmann, Peter; Nix, Wilfred; Schalke, Berthold; Gold, Ralf; Opitz, Andreas; Klinker, Erdwine; Inoue, Masayoshi; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Bugert, Peter; Willcox, Nick; Marx, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Late-onset myasthenia gravis (LOMG) has become the largest MG subgroup, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms remain mysterious. Among the few etiological clues are the almost unique serologic parallels between LOMG and thymoma-associated MG (TAMG), notably autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptors, titin, ryanodine receptor, type I interferons or IL-12. This is why we checked LOMG patients for two further peculiar features of TAMG - its associations with the CTLA4(high/gain-of-function) +49A/A genotype and with increased thymic export of naïve T cells into the blood, possibly after defective negative selection in AIRE-deficient thymomas. We analyzed genomic DNA from 116 Caucasian LOMG patients for CTLA4 alleles by PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism, and blood mononuclear cells for recent thymic emigrants by quantitative PCR for T cell receptor excision circles. In sharp contrast with TAMG, we now find that: i) CTLA4(low) +49G(+) genotypes were more frequent (p = 0.0029) among the 69 LOMG patients with age at onset ≥60 years compared with 172 healthy controls; ii) thymic export of naïve T cells from the non-neoplastic thymuses of 36 LOMG patients was lower (p = 0.0058) at diagnosis than in 77 age-matched controls. These new findings are important because they suggest distinct initiating mechanisms in TAMG and LOMG and hint at aberrant immuno-regulation in the periphery in LOMG. We therefore propose alternate defects in central thymic or peripheral tolerance induction in TAMG and LOMG converging on similar final outcomes. In addition, our data support a 60-year-threshold for onset of 'true LOMG' and an LOMG/early-onset MG overlapping group of patients between 40 and 60.

  10. Characterization of Murine Thymic Stromal-Cell Lines Immortalized by Temperature-Sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T or Adenovirus 5 E1a

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Lena; Timms, Emma; Blight, Kenneth; Restall, Deborah E.; Jat, Parmjit S.; Fisher, Amanda G.

    1991-01-01

    The heterogeneity of thymic stromal cells is probably related to their role in providing different microenvironments where T cells can develop. We have immortalized thymic stromal elements using recombinant retroviral constructs containing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 (SV40tsA58) large-T antigen gene or the adenovirus 5 E1a region linked to the gene coding for resistance to G418. Cell lines containing the thermolabile large T antigen encoded by SV40 proliferate at the permissive temperature of 33°C and arrest growth when transferred to the nonpermissive temperature of 39°C. At the nonpermissive temperature, ts-derived cell lines are shown to alter their phenotype but remain metabolically active, as indicated by the inducible expression of class I and class II MHC antigens. Here we describe the generation of a total of 84 thymic stromal-cell lines, many of which show distinct morphologic, phenotypic, and functional properties consistent with fibroblastoid, epithelial, or monocytoid origins. Several E1a and SV40tsA58-derived cell lines generated exhibit the epithelial characteristic of desmosome formation and, in addition, two of these lines (15.5 and 15.18) form multicellular complexes (rosettes) when incubated with unfractionated thymocytes from syngeneic mice. A single line (14.5) displays very strong nonspecific esterase activity, suggesting it may represent a macrophagelike cell type. We describe the generation of stromal cell lines with different properties, which is consistent with the heterogeneity found in the thymic microenvironment. In addition to documenting this diversity, these cell lines may be useful tools for studying T-cell development in vitro and give access to model systems in which stromal-thymocyte interactions can be examined. PMID:1668372

  11. Addition of a UL5 helicase-primase subunit point mutation eliminates bursal-thymic atrophy of Marek’s disease virus delta-Meq recombinant virus but reduces vaccinal protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus and the causative agent of Marek’s disease (MD), a T-cell lymphoma of chickens. Despite widespread usage of vaccines since the 1970’s to control MD, more virulent field strains of MDV have emerged that overcome vaccinal protection, necessi...

  12. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During the last phase of NAG 2-386 we completed three studies. The effects of 14 days of weightlessness; the vastus medialis (VM) from flight rats in COSMOS 2044 was compared with the VM from tail suspended rats and other controls. The type I and II fibers in the mixed fiber portion of the VM were significantly reduced in flight rats and capillary densities paralleled the fiber density changes. The results of this project compared favorably with those in the extensor digitorum longus following seven days of flight in SL 3. The cardiovascular projects focused on the blood pressure changes in head down tilted rats (HDT) and non-head down tilted (N-HDT) rats. Blood pressures (MAP, SP and DP) were significantly elevated through seven days of HDT and rapidly returned to control levels within one day after removal from the HDT position. The N-HDT showed some slight rise in blood pressure but these were not as great and they were not as rapid. The HDT rats were characterized as exhibiting transient hypertension. These results led to some of the microvascular and vascular graduate student projects of Dr. Bernhard Stepke. Also our results refute or, at least, do not agree with previous reports from other laboratories. Each animal, in our blood pressure projects, served as its own control thereby providing more accurate results. Also, our experiments focused on recovery studies which can, in and of themselves, provide guidelines for flight experiments concerned with blood pressure changes. Another experiment was conducted to examine the role of testicular atrophy in whole body suspended (WBS) and tail suspended (TS) rats. We worked in conjunction with Dr. D.R. Deaver's laboratory at Pennsylvania State University and Dr. R. P. Amann at Colorado State University. In the TS rats the testes are retracted into the abdominal cavity, unless a ligature is placed to maintain them in the external scrotal sac. The cryptorchid condition in TS rats results in atrophy of the testes and

  13. Defective expression of Notch1 and Notch2 in connection to alterations of c-Myc and Ikaros in gamma-radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas.

    PubMed

    López-Nieva, P; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2004-07-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced thymic lymphomas constitute a heterogeneous group of T-cell lymphomas. Some tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes have been shown to be defective in a fraction of such lymphomas, yet a considerable number of these remain elusive in terms of gene alterations. In the present work we present evidence that gamma-radiation-induced thymic lymphomas in (C57BL/6 J x BALB/c) F1 hybrid mice often exhibit increased levels of Notch1 expression, but, contrary to what was expected, they also exhibit a clearly reduced Notch2 mRNA expression, suggesting a cooperative antagonism of these genes. These results represent the first reported instance for the involvement of Notch2 inactivation in the development of thymic primary tumours while confirming the role of Notch1 as an activated oncogene. Additional analyses revealed that c-Myc over-expression and partial inactivation of Znfn1a1/Ikaros appear to be relevant events some how coupled to alterations in Notch genes inducing these kinds of tumours.

  14. Immuno- and Enzyme-histochemistry of HRP for Demonstration of Blood Vessel Permeability in Mouse Thymic Tissues by "In Vivo Cryotechnique".

    PubMed

    Wu, Bao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Yurika; Bai, Yuqin; Huang, Zheng; Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to understand the in vivo permeability of thymic blood vessels, but "in vivo cryotechnique" (IVCT) is useful to capture dynamic blood flow conditions. We injected various concentrations of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with or without quantum dots into anesthetized mice via left ventricles to examine architectures of thymic blood vessels and their permeability at different time intervals. At 30 sec after HRP (100 mg/ml) injection, enzyme reaction products were weakly detected in interstitium around some thick blood vessels of corticomedullary boundary areas, but within capillaries of cortical areas. At 1 and 3 min, they were more widely detected in interstitium around all thick blood vessels of the boundary areas. At 10 min, they were diffusely detected throughout interstitium of cortical areas, and more densely seen in medullary areas. At 15 min, however, they were uniformly detected throughout interstitium outside blood vessels. At 30 min, phagocytosis of HRP by macrophages was scattered throughout the interstitium, which was accompanied by decrease of HRP reaction intensity in interstitial matrices. Thus, time-dependent HRP distributions in living mice indicate that molecular permeability and diffusion depend on different areas of thymic tissues, resulting from topographic variations of local interstitial flow starting from corticomedullary areas.

  15. Inhibitory effects of a polypeptide thymic factor on the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthragene-induced mammary adenocarcinoma in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.; Danetskaya, E.V.; Morozov, V.G.; Khavinson, V.Kh.

    1980-01-01

    It has come to be recognized that tumor growth is accompanied by inhibition of cellular immunity and the function of the T lymphocytes. Restitution of T lymphocyte function by means of several pharmacologic agents such as levamisole, phenformin, or epithalamin (an epiphyseal factor) has, in a number of cases, been accompanied by growth inhibition of both spontaneous and induced tumors. In addition, the importance of the thymus in the regulation of T lymphocytes and in antitumor immunity has been recognized. Several indicators point to the fact that the thymus contains physiologically active substances which stimulate T cell-dependent immunity and prevent the occurrence of neoplasms. These considerations have led to attempts at isolation of active thymic factors and studies on their effects on the appearance and growth of tumors. Previously, a thymic factor - thymarin - had been isolated which imparted immunocompetence to the T lymphocytes. This factor differs from other thymic preparations, including thymosine, in terms of a number of physicochemical characteristics and is a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 5000. This study is concerned with its effects on tumor development - mammary gland adenocarcinoma induced in animals with a chemical carcinogen.

  16. Promoting 3-D Aggregation of FACS Purified Thymic Epithelial Cells with EAK 16-II/EAKIIH6 Self-assembling Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Asako; Liu, Wen; Pradhan, Isha; Bertera, Suzanne; Lakomy, Robert A; Rudert, William A; Trucco, Massimo; Meng, Wilson S; Fan, Yong

    2016-06-27

    Thymus involution, associated with aging or pathological insults, results in diminished output of mature T-cells. Restoring the function of a failing thymus is crucial to maintain effective T cell-mediated acquired immune response against invading pathogens. However, thymus regeneration and revitalization proved to be challenging, largely due to the difficulties of reproducing the unique 3D microenvironment of the thymic stroma that is critical for the survival and function of thymic epithelial cells (TECs). We developed a novel hydrogel system to promote the formation of TEC aggregates, based on the self-assembling property of the amphiphilic EAK16-II oligopeptides and its histidinylated analogue EAKIIH6. TECs were enriched from isolated thymic cells with density-gradient, sorted with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and labeled with anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies that were anchored, together with anti-His IgGs, on the protein A/G adaptor complexes. Formation of cell aggregates was promoted by incubating TECs with EAKIIH6 and EAK16-II oligopeptides, and then by increasing the ionic concentration of the medium to initiate gelation. TEC aggregates embedded in EAK hydrogel can effectively promote the development of functional T cells in vivo when transplanted into the athymic nude mice.

  17. Hypergravity Provokes a Temporary Reduction in CD4+CD8+ Thymocyte Number and a Persistent Decrease in Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cell Frequency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Maki; Yoshinaga, Riko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Kudo, Takashi; Shimbo, Miki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Obata, Koji; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Shirakawa, Masaki; Shiba, Dai; Asahara, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Satoru; Morita, Hironobu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2015-01-01

    Gravity change affects many immunological systems. We investigated the effects of hypergravity (2G) on murine thymic cells. Exposure of mice to 2G for three days reduced the frequency of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes (DP) and mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), accompanied by an increment of keratin-5 and keratin-8 double-positive (K5+K8+) TECs that reportedly contain TEC progenitors. Whereas the reduction of DP was recovered by a 14-day exposure to 2G, the reduction of mature mTECs and the increment of K5+K8+ TEC persisted. Interestingly, a surgical lesion of the inner ear’s vestibular apparatus inhibited these hypergravity effects. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the gene expression of Aire and RANK that are critical for mTEC function and development were up-regulated by the 3-day exposure and subsequently down-regulated by the 14-day exposure to 2G. Unexpectedly, this dynamic change in mTEC gene expression was independent of the vestibular apparatus. Overall, data suggest that 2G causes a temporary reduction of DP and a persistent reduction of mature mTECs in a vestibular system-dependent manner, and also dysregulates mTEC gene expression without involving the vestibular system. These data might provide insight on the impact of gravity change on thymic functions during spaceflight and living. PMID:26513242

  18. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse.

    PubMed

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse.

  19. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Immuno- and Enzyme-histochemistry of HRP for Demonstration of Blood Vessel Permeability in Mouse Thymic Tissues by “In Vivo Cryotechnique”

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Yurika; Bai, Yuqin; Huang, Zheng; Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to understand the in vivo permeability of thymic blood vessels, but “in vivo cryotechnique” (IVCT) is useful to capture dynamic blood flow conditions. We injected various concentrations of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with or without quantum dots into anesthetized mice via left ventricles to examine architectures of thymic blood vessels and their permeability at different time intervals. At 30 sec after HRP (100 mg/ml) injection, enzyme reaction products were weakly detected in interstitium around some thick blood vessels of corticomedullary boundary areas, but within capillaries of cortical areas. At 1 and 3 min, they were more widely detected in interstitium around all thick blood vessels of the boundary areas. At 10 min, they were diffusely detected throughout interstitium of cortical areas, and more densely seen in medullary areas. At 15 min, however, they were uniformly detected throughout interstitium outside blood vessels. At 30 min, phagocytosis of HRP by macrophages was scattered throughout the interstitium, which was accompanied by decrease of HRP reaction intensity in interstitial matrices. Thus, time-dependent HRP distributions in living mice indicate that molecular permeability and diffusion depend on different areas of thymic tissues, resulting from topographic variations of local interstitial flow starting from corticomedullary areas. PMID:25859061

  1. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  2. [Recovery of the atrophied muscle: from protein degradation to synthesis].

    PubMed

    Shenkman, B S

    2012-12-01

    The enhancement of atrophied muscle recovery after coming back to normal motor activities (landing of the spacecraft, withdrawal of the cast etc) is very important problem of rehabilitation as well as space medicine. Along with the recovery of the gravity-dependent motor control system the regrowth of the muscle mass seems to be the key event. This regrowth cause recovery of the muscle performance. The present review is dedicated to the structural and functional events, observed during 7 days after exposure of an animal to gravitational unloading (mainly in experiments with the hindlimb suspension model). The state of the main signaling pathways in muscle fibers is also considered. The data presented in the review allow to imagine how the destructive and synthetic events do interact in the initial period of recovery. The work hypotheses on the key triggering signaling mechanisms are also put forward.

  3. [Implant rehabilitation of distal mandibular atrophy using a blade implant].

    PubMed

    Veron, C; Chanavaz, M

    1997-11-01

    After a brief revision of the anatomy of the posterior mandible and its natural resorption pattern, the ramus plate-form implant would be the implant of choice for the rehabilitation of this region. This "site specific" implant is inserted on the top of the crest and superficially impacted within the residual alveolar bone at the distal segment of the horizontal branch and guided to climb parallel to the anterior aspect of the ascending ramus. Its form and specific dimensions are perfectly compatible with the frequently limited quantity of available bone above the nerve canal in patients with advanced atrophy of the posterior mandible. It provides a predictable abutment for the implant-supported or dento-implant-supported prostheses of the posterior mandible.

  4. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G.; Cooper, Janine M.; Dzieciol, Anna M.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition. PMID:26417089

  5. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    PubMed

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  6. Multiple system atrophy--the nature of the beast.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, N

    1989-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is generally considered a rare disease, but may account for up to 10% of patients with Parkinsonism. The profusion of names for this disease, which may present to general physicians, psychiatrists, cardiologists, autonomic specialists, general neurologists and those with a special interest in Parkinsonism (this author's own perspective) or cerebellar disorders, together with ignorance of its protean manifestations, may account for its underrecognition and misdiagnosis. In this article, the history and nosology of the condition are considered, and provisional diagnostic criteria are advanced. The usefulness (or otherwise) of ancillary investigations is addressed, and the shortcomings of current methods of treatment are stressed. As with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, the ultimate goal of eradicating the disease entails better diagnosis in order to establish the cause, and thence to develop a radical treatment capable of preventing or arresting the disease process. PMID:2666581

  7. Multiple system atrophy: current and future approaches to management

    PubMed Central

    Flabeau, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Tison, François

    2010-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder without any effective treatment in slowing or stopping disease progression. It is characterized by poor levodopa responsive Parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal signs and autonomic failure in any combination. Current therapeutic strategies are primarily based on dopamine replacement and improvement of autonomic failure. However, symptomatic management remains disappointing and no curative treatment is yet available. Recent experimental evidence has confirmed the key role of alpha-synuclein aggregation in the pathogenesis of MSA. Referring to this hypothesis, transgenic and toxic animal models have been developed to assess candidate drugs for MSA. The standardization of diagnosis criteria and assessment procedures will allow large multicentre clinical trials to be conducted. In this article we review the available symptomatic treatment, recent results of studies investigating potential neuroprotective drugs, and future approaches for the management in MSA. PMID:21179616

  8. Spinal muscular atrophy: Factors that modulate motor neurone vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wen-Yo; Simpson, Julie E; Highley, J Robin; Heath, Paul R

    2017-02-02

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death, is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by the selective loss of particular groups of motor neurones in the anterior horn of the spinal cord with concomitant muscle weakness. To date, no effective treatment is available, however, there are ongoing clinical trials are in place which promise much for the future. However, there remains an ongoing problem in trying to link a single gene loss to motor neurone degeneration. Fortunately, given successful disease models that have been established and intensive studies on SMN functions in the past ten years, we are fast approaching the stage of identifying the underlying mechanisms of SMA pathogenesis Here we discuss potential disease modifying factors on motor neurone vulnerability, in the belief that these factors give insight into the pathological mechanisms of SMA and therefore possible therapeutic targets.

  9. [Tissue stereological analysis of myocardial atrophy during hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Nepomniashchikh, G I; Tumanov, V P; Kolesnikova, L V; Nepomniashchikh, L M

    1984-06-01

    The myocardium of Wistar rats which were in a state of hypokinesia for 5, 15 and 30 days was assayed morphologically. Morphometric and stereological methods were used to measure the diameter of cardiomyocytes, the volume and surface densities of muscle fibers and interstitial connective tissue. Myocardial atrophy (absolute heart weight loss, reduction in the cardiomyocyte diameter) was shown to develop in the course of hypokinesia. Informational analysis revealed the increased enthropy and relative enthropy as well as reduction of excess myocardial tissue. Long-term immobilization also resulted in an increase of the relative volume density of the stroma, collagenization of the interstitial connective tissue, and marked tendency toward diminution of the surface-volume ratio of the capillaries.

  10. Anhidrosis in multiple system atrophy: a preganglionic sudomotor dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Donadio, Vincenzo; Nolano, Maria; Elam, Mikael; Montagna, Pasquale; Provitera, Vincenzo; Bugiardini, Enrico; Baruzzi, Agostino; Santoro, Lucio; Liguori, Rocco

    2008-04-30

    Anhidrosis occurs in the majority of multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients but the underlying site of lesion is not well established. We describe three patients with long-standing MSA and anhidrosis diagnosed on the basis of a thermoregulatory sweating test. In biopsies of anhidrotic skin, immunofluorescence analysis disclosed a well preserved postganglionic sudomotor innervation in all three patients supporting the hypothesis of a preganglionic nerve fiber lesion underlying their anhidrosis. Postganglionic sudomotor fiber integrity was also confirmed by normal electrodermal responses in one patient, whereas such responses and microneurographically detectable skin sympathetic nerve activity were absent in the other two MSA patients, suggesting a functional inactivity of structurally intact postganglionic sympathetic skin fibers.

  11. [Development of therapeutics for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    PubMed

    Sobue, Gen

    2003-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is a hereditary motor neuron disease that affects males, caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in androgen receptor (AR). Female carriers are usually asymptomatic. The transgenic mouse (Tg) model carrying a full-length human AR with expanded polyQ has significant gender-related motor impairment. This phenotype is inhibited by castration, which prevents nuclear translocation of mutant AR. Leuprorelin, an LHRH agonist that reduces testosterone release from the testis, also rescues motor dysfunction and nuclear accumulation of mutant AR in the male Tg. Over-expression of a molecular chaperone HSP70, which renatures misfolded mutant AR, ameliorates neuromuscular phenotypes of the Tg by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR. HSP70 appears to enhance the degradation of mutant AR via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These experimental approaches indicate the possibility of clinical application of drugs, such as leuprorelin, for SBMA patients.

  12. Multiple System Atrophy: A Clinical and Neuropathological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubhi, Kiren; Low, Phillip; Masliah, Eliezer

    2011-01-01

    Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease presenting with motor abnormalities including akinesia, rigidity and postural instability. Whilst improved diagnostic criteria have aided accurate diagnosis of MSA, understanding of neuropathological aspects underlying MSA was bolstered by the identification of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) as the primary constituent of the abnormal protein aggregations observed in the brains of MSA patients. The generation of transgenic animal models of MSA coupled with an increasing understanding of the biochemical structure and function of α-syn has highlighted a number of key pathological pathways thought to underlie the neurodegeneration observed in MSA. This review will summarize key findings in the field, discuss current areas of debate and describe current experimental approaches towards disease-modifying therapies. PMID:21962754

  13. RASCH ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES IN SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY

    PubMed Central

    CANO, STEFAN J.; MAYHEW, ANNA; GLANZMAN, ALLAN M.; KROSSCHELL, KRISTIN J.; SWOBODA, KATHRYN J.; MAIN, MARION; STEFFENSEN, BIRGIT F.; BÉRARD, CAROLE; GIRARDOT, FRANÇOISE; PAYAN, CHRISTINE A.M.; MERCURI, EUGENIO; MAZZONE, ELENA; ELSHEIKH, BAKRI; FLORENCE, JULAINE; HYNAN, LINDA S.; IANNACCONE, SUSAN T.; NELSON, LESLIE L.; PANDYA, SHREE; ROSE, MICHAEL; SCOTT, CHARLES; SADJADI, REZA; YORE, MACKENSIE A.; JOYCE, CYNTHIA; KISSEL, JOHN T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trial design for SMA depends on meaningful rating scales to assess outcomes. In this study Rasch methodology was applied to 9 motor scales in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Methods Data from all 3 SMA types were provided by research groups for 9 commonly used scales. Rasch methodology assessed the ordering of response option thresholds, tests of fit, spread of item locations, residual correlations, and person separation index. Results Each scale had good reliability. However, several issues impacting scale validity were identified, including the extent that items defined clinically meaningful constructs and how well each scale measured performance across the SMA spectrum. Conclusions The sensitivity and potential utility of each SMA scale as outcome measures for trials could be improved by establishing clear definitions of what is measured, reconsidering items that misfit and items whose response categories have reversed thresholds, and adding new items at the extremes of scale ranges. PMID:23836324

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of spinal muscular atrophy type I in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Vaidla, Eve; Talvik, Inga; Kulla, Andres; Kahre, Tiina; Hamarik, Malle; Napa, Aita; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Piirsoo, Andres; Talvik, Tiina

    2006-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is the second most frequent autosomal-recessive disorder in Europeans. There are no published epidemiological data on SMA in Estonia and other Baltic countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of SMA I in Estonia. All patients with SMA I diagnosed between January 1994 and December 2003 were included in the study. The diagnosis was established on the basis of neurological evaluation, ENMG findings, molecular studies and muscle biopsy. PCR and restriction enzyme analysis was used to detect the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene. A total of 9 cases of SMA I were identified during this 10-year period. The incidence of SMA I in Estonia is 1 in 14,400 live births, which is similar to the result from Hungary but lower than average incidence in the world. Only one of the patients was female. Typical SMN1 gene deletion was found in all cases.

  15. Update on geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biarnés, Marc; Monés, Jordi; Alonso, Jordi; Arias, Luis

    2011-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of legal blindness in older patients in developed countries, and geographic atrophy (GA) represents the advanced form of dry AMD. Although it accounts for one third of the cases of late AMD and is responsible for 20% of the cases of severe visual loss due to the disorder. GA currently lacks effective treatment, whereas antiangiogenic therapies have been shown to be successful in managing choroidal neovascularization, the other form of late AMD. Recent advances in GA epidemiology, etiology, genetics, and imaging techniques have renewed the interest in this entity, which is a cause of progressive visual loss even in treated patients with neovascular AMD. This knowledge has triggered many clinical trials targeting different molecules shown to be associated with the disease, and it is hoped that this research will translate into effective drugs for GA in the near future.

  16. The nature of the autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Samir M.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    The concept that multiple system atrophy (MSA, Shy-Drager syndrome) is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system is several decades old. While there has been renewed interest in the movement disorder associated with MSA, two recent consensus statements confirm the centrality of the autonomic disorder to the diagnosis. Here, we reexamine the autonomic pathophysiology in MSA. Whereas MSA is often thought of as "autonomic failure", new evidence indicates substantial persistence of functioning sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves even in clinically advanced disease. These findings help explain some of the previously poorly understood features of MSA. Recognition that MSA entails persistent, constitutive autonomic tone requires a significant revision of our concepts of its diagnosis and therapy. We will review recent evidence bearing on autonomic tone in MSA and discuss their therapeutic implications, particularly in terms of the possible development of a bionic baroreflex for better control of blood pressure.

  17. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  18. Cyclical acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Akçay, A; Altun, B; Usalan, C; Ulusoy, S; Erdem, Y; Yasavul, U; Turgan, C; Caglar, S

    1999-09-01

    Endometriosis is a common disease but ureteral involvement is relatively rare. Ureteric endometriosis is mostly unilateral. Endometriotic ureteral obstruction is a serious event commonly diagnosed late and therefore associated with a major risk of hydronephrotic renal atrophy. We present the cyclical acute renal failure associated with menstruation in a patient who developed severe bilateral ureteral obstruction due to endometriosis. Physicians should be aware of this uncommon but serious manifestation of endometriosis, especially if the clinical presentation is cyclical acute renal dysfunction in a premenopausal woman.

  19. OCT Minimum Intensity as a Predictor of Geographic Atrophy Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Stetson, Paul F.; Yehoshua, Zohar; Garcia Filho, Carlos Alexandre A.; Portella Nunes, Renata; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined whether the minimum intensity (MI) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-scans within the retina can predict locations of growth at the margin of geographic atrophy (GA) and the growth rate outside the margin. Methods. The OCT scans were analyzed at baseline and 52 weeks. Expert graders manually segmented OCT images of GA. The 52-week follow-up scans were registered to the baseline scan coordinates for comparison. The OCT MI values were studied within a 180-μm margin around the boundary of GA at baseline. Baseline MI values were compared in areas of progression and nonprogression of the GA, and sensitivity and specificity were assessed for prediction of growth at the margin. Average MI values in the margins were compared to overall growth rates to evaluate the prediction of growth outside the margins. Results. A statistically significant increase in MI (P < 0.05) was seen in areas of growth in 21/24 cases (88%), and 22/24 cases (92%) when the foveal subfield was excluded. Locations of growth within the margins at 52 weeks were predicted with 61% sensitivity and 61% specificity. The MI values correlated significantly with overall growth rate, and high and low growth rate subjects were identified with 80% sensitivity and 64% specificity. Conclusions. The MI may be increased at the margins of GA lesions before enlargement, which may indicate disruption or atrophy of the photoreceptors in these areas before GA becomes apparent. Increased MI may help predict areas of enlargement of GA, and may relate to overall growth rate and be a useful screening tool for GA. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00935883.) PMID:24408973

  20. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N

    2010-12-01

    Unlike hot flushes and night sweats which resolve spontaneously in time, atrophic symptoms affecting the vagina and lower urinary tract are often progressive and frequently require treatment. The prevalence of vaginal dryness increases as a woman advances through the postmenopausal years, causing itching, burning and dyspareunia, and sexual activity is often compromised. But, despite the various safe and effective options, only a minority (about 25% in the Western world and probably considerably less in other areas) will seek medical help. Some of this reluctance is due to the adverse publicity for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons for the continued suffering in silence may be cultural and an understandable reluctance to discuss such matters, particularly with a male doctor, but the medical profession must also take much of the blame for failing to enquire of all postmenopausal women about the possibility of vaginal atrophic symptoms. Vaginal dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help to highlight this major cause of distress and reduced quality of life and will encourage women and their medical advisers all over the world to seek and provide help.

  1. Memory Impairment at Initial Clinical Presentation in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Husain, Masud; Thompson, Sian; Kipps, Christopher; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-04-23

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by core visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, and predominant atrophy in the parieto-occipital cortex. The most common underlying pathology is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Existing diagnostic criteria suggest that episodic memory is relatively preserved. The aim of this study was to examine memory performance at initial clinical presentation in PCA, compared to early-onset AD patients (EOAD). 15 PCA patients and 32 EOAD patients, and 34 healthy controls were entered into the study. Patients were tested on the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), consisting of subscales in memory and visuospatial skills. PCA and EOAD patients were significantly impaired compared to controls on the ACE total score (p < 0.001), visuospatial skills (p < 0.001), and memory (p < 0.001). Consistent with the salient diagnostic deficits, PCA patients were significantly more impaired on visuospatial skills compared to EOAD patients (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between patient groups in memory. Further analysis of learning, recall, and recognition components of the memory subscale showed that EOAD and PCA patients were significantly impaired compared to controls on all three components (p < 0.001), however, there was no significant difference between EOAD and PCA patients. The results of this study show that memory is impaired in the majority of PCA patients at clinical presentation. The findings suggest that memory impairment must be considered in assessment and management of PCA. Further study into memory in PCA is warranted, since the ACE-R is a brief screening tool and is likely to underestimate the presence of memory impairment.

  2. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson’s R = −0.69, P < 1 × 10−7), and significant grey matter loss and whole brain atrophy occurs annually (P < 0.05). Additionally, the rate of white matter hyperintensity growth was heterogeneous, occurring more rapidly within long association fasciculi. Using voxel-based quantification (family-wise error corrected P < 0.05), we show the rate of white matter hyperintensity

  3. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Christian; Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson's R = -0.69, P < 1 × 10(-7)), and significant grey matter loss and whole brain atrophy occurs annually (P < 0.05). Additionally, the rate of white matter hyperintensity growth was heterogeneous, occurring more rapidly within long association fasciculi. Using voxel-based quantification (family-wise error corrected P < 0.05), we show the rate of white matter hyperintensity

  4. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal nerve fibre layer thinning following optic neuritis: evidence that axonal loss is a substrate of MRI-detected atrophy.

    PubMed

    Trip, S Anand; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Jones, Stephen J; Li, Wai-Yung; Garway-Heath, David F; Thompson, Alan J; Plant, Gordon T; Miller, David H

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of brain atrophy are often considered to be a marker of axonal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) but evidence is limited. Optic neuritis is a common manifestation of MS and results in optic nerve atrophy. Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) imaging is a non-invasive way of detecting axonal loss following optic neuritis. We hypothesise that if the optic nerve atrophy that develops following optic neuritis is contributed to by axonal loss, it will correlate with thinning of the RNFL. Twenty-five patients were studied at least 1 year after a single unilateral attack of optic neuritis without recurrence, with a selection bias towards incomplete recovery. They had MR quantification of optic nerve cross-sectional area and optic nerve lesion length, as well as optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement of mean RNFL thickness and macular volume, quantitative visual testing, and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Fifteen controls were also studied. Significant optic nerve atrophy (mean decrease 30% versus controls), RNFL thinning (mean decrease 33% versus controls), and macular volume loss occurred in patients' affected eyes when compared with patients' unaffected eyes and healthy controls. The optic nerve atrophy was correlated with the RNFL thinning, macular volume loss, visual acuity, visual field mean deviation, and whole field VEP amplitude but not latency. These findings suggest that axonal loss contributes to optic nerve atrophy following a single attack of optic neuritis. By inference, axonal loss due to other post-inflammatory brain lesions is likely to contribute to the global MRI measure of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

  5. MAPPING THE PROGRESSION OF ATROPHY IN EARLY AND LATE ONSET ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, R; Agosta, F; Possin, KL; Canu, E; Filippi, M; Rabinovici, GD; Rosen, HJ; Miller, BL; Gorno-Tempini, ML

    2015-01-01

    The term early age-of-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) identifies patients who meet criteria for AD, but show onset of symptoms before the age of 65. We map progression of gray matter (GM) atrophy in EOAD patients compared to late onset AD (LOAD). T1-weighted MRI scans were obtained at diagnosis and one-year follow-up from 15 EOAD, 10 LOAD, and 38 age-matched controls. Voxel-based and tensor-based morphometry were used, respectively, to assess the baseline and progression of atrophy. At baseline, EOAD patients already showed a widespread atrophy in temporal, parietal, occipital and frontal cortices. After one year, EOAD had atrophy progression in medial temporal and medial parietal cortices. At baseline, LOAD patients showed atrophy in the medial temporal regions only, and, after one year, an extensive pattern of atrophy progression in the same neocortical cortices of EOAD. Although atrophy mainly involved different lateral neocortical or medial temporal hubs at baseline, it eventually progressed along the same brain default-network regions in both groups. The cortical region showing a significant progression in both groups was the medial precuneus/posterior cingulate. PMID:25737041

  6. Multidisciplinary Overview of Vaginal Atrophy and Associated Genitourinary Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Irwin; Dicks, Brian; Kim, Noel N; Hartzell, Rose

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal atrophy, which may affect up to 45% of postmenopausal women, is often associated with one or more urinary symptoms, including urgency, increased frequency, nocturia, dysuria, incontinence, and recurrent urinary tract infection. Aims To provide an overview of the current literature regarding cellular and clinical aspects of vaginal atrophy and response to treatment with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Methods PubMed searches through February 2012 were conducted using the terms “vaginal atrophy,” “atrophic vaginitis,” and “vulvovaginal atrophy.” Expert opinion was based on review of the relevant scientific and medical literature. Main Outcome Measure Genitourinary symptoms and treatment of vaginal atrophy from peer-reviewed published literature. Results Typically, a diagnosis of vaginal atrophy is made based on patient-reported symptoms, including genitourinary symptoms, and an examination that reveals signs of the disorder; however, many women are hesitant to report vaginal-related symptoms, primarily because of embarrassment. Conclusions Physicians in various disciplines are encouraged to initiate open discussions about vulvovaginal health with postmenopausal women, including recommended treatment options. Goldstein I, Dicks B, Kim NN, and Hartzell R. Multidisciplinary overview of vaginal atrophy and associated genitourinary symptoms in postmenopausal women. Sex Med 2013;1:44–53. PMID:25356287

  7. Poor sleep quality is associated with increased cortical atrophy in community-dwelling adults

    PubMed Central

    Storsve, Andreas B.; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Fjell, Anders M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between sleep quality and cortical and hippocampal volume and atrophy within a community-based sample, explore the influence of age on results, and assess the possible confounding effects of physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure. Methods: In 147 community-dwelling adults (92 female; age 53.9 ± 15.5 years), sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and correlated with cross-sectional measures of volume and longitudinal measures of atrophy derived from MRI scans separated by an average of 3.5 years. Exploratory post hoc analysis compared correlations between different age groups and included physical activity, BMI, and blood pressure as additional covariates. Results: Poor sleep quality was associated with reduced volume within the right superior frontal cortex in cross-sectional analyses, and an increased rate of atrophy within widespread frontal, temporal, and parietal regions in longitudinal analyses. Results were largely driven by correlations within adults over the age of 60, and could not be explained by variation in physical activity, BMI, or blood pressure. Sleep quality was not associated with hippocampal volume or atrophy. Conclusions: We found that longitudinal measures of cortical atrophy were widely correlated with sleep quality. Poor sleep quality may be a cause or a consequence of brain atrophy, and future studies examining the effect of interventions that improve sleep quality on rates of atrophy may hold key insights into the direction of this relationship. PMID:25186857

  8. Reduced sample sizes for atrophy outcomes in Alzheimer's disease trials: baseline adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Schott, J.M.; Bartlett, J.W.; Barnes, J.; Leung, K.K.; Ourselin, S.; Fox, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy rate is increasingly used as an outcome measure for Alzheimer's disease (AD) trials. We used the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) dataset to assess if adjusting for baseline characteristics can reduce sample sizes. Controls (n = 199), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 334) and AD (n = 144) had two MRI scans, 1-year apart; ~ 55% had baseline CSF tau, p-tau, and Aβ1-42. Whole brain (KN–BSI) and hippocampal (HMAPS-HBSI) atrophy rate, and ventricular expansion (VBSI) were calculated for each group; numbers required to power a placebo-controlled trial were estimated. Sample sizes per arm (80% power, 25% absolute rate reduction) for AD were (95% CI): brain atrophy = 81 (64,109), hippocampal atrophy = 88 (68,119), ventricular expansion = 118 (92,157); and for MCI: brain atrophy = 149 (122,188), hippocampal atrophy = 201 (160,262), ventricular expansion = 234 (191,295). To detect a 25% reduction relative to normal aging required increased sample sizes ~ 3-fold (AD), and ~ 5-fold (MCI). Disease severity and Aβ1-42 contributed significantly to atrophy rate variability. Adjusting for 11 predefined covariates reduced sample sizes by up to 30%. Treatment trials in AD should consider the effects of normal aging; adjusting for baseline characteristics can significantly reduce required sample sizes. PMID:20620665

  9. Injury to skeletal muscle of mice following acute and sub-acute pregabalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Saberi, Zahra; Etemad, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Pregabalin (PGB) is a new antiepileptic drug that has received FDA approval for patient who suffers from central neuropathic pain, partial seizures, generalized anxiety disorder, fibromyalgia and sleep disorders. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible adverse effects of PGB on the muscular system of mice. Materials and Methods: To evaluate the effect of PGB on skeletal muscle, the animals were exposed to a single dose of 1, 2 or 5 g /kg or daily doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg for 21 days, intraperitoneally (IP). Twaenty-four hr after the last drug administration, all animals were sacrificed. The level of fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin I and CK-MM activity were evaluated in blood as an indicator of muscle injury. Skeletal muscle pathological findings were also reported as scores ranging from 1 to 3 based on the observed lesion. Results: In the acute and sub-acute toxicity assay IP injection of PGB significantly increased the activity and levels of CK-MM and fsTnI compared to the control group. Sub-acute exposure to PGB caused damages that include muscle atrophy, infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. Conclusion: PGB administration especially in long term care causes muscle atrophy with infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. The fsTnI and CK-MM are reliable markers in PGB-related muscle injury. The exact mechanisms behind the muscular damage are unclear and necessitate further investigations. PMID:28392896

  10. Degeneration and atrophy of the thymus of lethally irradiated dogs, rescued by transfusion of cryopreserved autologous blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.W.; Huegl, E.B.; Boedey, B.

    1987-12-01

    Dogs exposed to a fatal radiation dose of 12 Gy were rescued by transfusion of autologous blood leukocytes. A severe acute and long-lasting damage to the thymus was observed. The acute damage, as observed on the tenth day, consisted of a marked reduction in the number of lymphocytes, degeneration of Hassall's bodies, and hemorrhage. Long-term effects, observed several months after irradiation, were partial to total atrophy of the thymus. Regeneration, when it occurred, was limited to a few small isolated areas in which lymphopoiesis was supported by epithelial reticular cells. In contrast, the lymph nodes of all dogs had abundant cortical lymphopoiesis. The abundant hemopoiesis present in the marrow from the tenth day after irradiation until the end of the observation period should have provided sufficient circulating precursor cells to seed the thymus and regenerate the organ to the same extent as that observed in the other blood-forming organs. The impairment of lymphopoietic regeneration in the thymus seems to be due, therefore, to damage caused by irradiation on the specific stroma of the organ, which is not able to support such activity.

  11. Matriptase/MT-SP1 is required for postnatal survival, epidermal barrier function, hair follicle development, and thymic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    List, Karin; Haudenschild, Christian C; Szabo, Roman; Chen, WanJun; Wahl, Sharon M; Swaim, William; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Bugge, Thomas H

    2002-05-23

    Matriptase/MT-SP1 is a novel tumor-associated type II transmembrane serine protease that is highly expressed in the epidermis, thymic stroma, and other epithelia. A null mutation was introduced into the Matriptase/MT-SP1 gene of mice to determine the role of Matriptase/MT-SP1 in epidermal development and neoplasia. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient mice developed to term but uniformly died within 48 h of birth. All epidermal surfaces of newborn mice were grossly abnormal with a dry, red, shiny, and wrinkled appearance. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency caused striking malformations of the stratum corneum, characterized by dysmorphic and pleomorphic corneocytes and the absence of vesicular bodies in transitional layer cells. This aberrant skin development seriously compromised both inward and outward epidermal barrier function, leading to the rapid and fatal dehydration of Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient pups. Loss of Matriptase/MT-SP1 also seriously affected hair follicle development resulting in generalized follicular hypoplasia, absence of erupted vibrissae, lack of vibrissal hair canal formation, ingrown vibrissae, and wholesale abortion of vibrissal follicles. Furthermore, Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency resulted in dramatically increased thymocyte apoptosis, and depletion of thymocytes. This study demonstrates that Matriptase/MT-SP1 has pleiotropic functions in the development of the epidermis, hair follicles, and cellular immune system.

  12. The resistance of activated T-cells from SLE patients to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Budagyan, V M; Bulanova, E G; Sharova, N I; Nikonova, M F; Stanislav, M L; Yarylin, A A

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show the differential sensitivity of phytohemagglutinine (PHA) activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cell line of epithelial origin. T-cells from SLE patients were mainly resistant to the apoptotic action of the stromal cells, while normal T-lymphocytes readily died via apoptosis. Gel electrophoresis revealed a DNA fragmentation pattern characteristic of apoptosis after 18 h of coculture. The simultaneous measurement of [3H]-thymidine uptake showed that the proliferative response of T-cells from SLE patients was significantly decreased compared to their normal counterparts. Such difference may account for the distinct result of interactions between the stromal and lymphoid cells, leading to the subsequent survival of T-lymphocytes from SLE patients. Nevertheless pretreatment of normal activated T-lymphocytes with anti-Fas mAbs, which have the capacity to substantially inhibit signaling through this receptor resulted in abolition of this form of programmed cell death. Thus, the precise role of Fas receptor and its ligand in this in vitro test system needs further investigation.

  13. IL-1beta induces thymic stromal lymphopoietin and an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype in reconstructed healthy human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marine; Carrasco, Cédric; Laoubi, Léo; Guiraud, Béatrice; Rozières, Aurore; Goujon, Catherine; Duplan, Hélène; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Nicolas, Jean-François; Vocanson, Marc; Galliano, Marie-Florence

    2017-02-13

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin inflammatory disease characterized by the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and a marked TH 2 polarization. Recent studies suggest that IL-1β contributes to the development of AD skin inflammation. Here, we have investigated the impact of IL-1β signalling on the epidermal homeostasis of both healthy subjects and AD patient [with functional filaggrin (FLG) alleles] with particular attention to TSLP production and keratinocyte differentiation. In healthy reconstructed human epidermis (RHE), IL-1β promoted: (i) a robust secretion of TSLP in an NFkB-dependant manner and (ii) a significant decrease in the expression of filaggrin and other proteins of the epidermal differentiation complex. These effects were prevented by treatment of RHE with the anti-IL-1β mAb canakinumab and by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. Interestingly, RHE generated from AD donors behaved like that of healthy individuals and showed comparable responses to IL-1β signals. Collectively, our results suggest that IL-1β may be an early key mediator for the acquisition of an AD phenotype through induction of TSLP and alteration of the epidermal homeostasis.

  14. Intermediate expression of CCRL1 reveals novel subpopulations of medullary thymic epithelial cells that emerge in the postnatal thymus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Meireles, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Alves, Nuno L

    2014-10-01

    Cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs and mTECs, respectively) provide inductive microenvironments for T-cell development and selection. The differentiation pathway of cTEC/mTEC lineages downstream of common bipotent progenitors at discrete stages of development remains unresolved. Using IL-7/CCRL1 dual reporter mice that identify specialized TEC subsets, we show that the stepwise acquisition of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) is a late determinant of cTEC differentiation. Although cTECs expressing high CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(hi) ) develop normally in immunocompetent and Rag2(-/-) thymi, their differentiation is partially blocked in Rag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) counterparts. These results unravel a novel checkpoint in cTEC maturation that is regulated by the cross-talk between TECs and immature thymocytes. Additionally, we identify new Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (UEA)(+) mTEC subtypes expressing intermediate CCRL1 levels (CCRL1(int) ) that conspicuously emerge in the postnatal thymus and differentially express Tnfrsf11a, Ccl21, and Aire. While rare in fetal and in Rag2(-/-) thymi, CCRL1(int) mTECs are restored in Rag2(-/-) Marilyn TCR-Tg mice, indicating that the appearance of postnatal-restricted mTECs is closely linked with T-cell selection. Our findings suggest that alternative temporally restricted routes of new mTEC differentiation contribute to the establishment of the medullary niche in the postnatal thymus.

  15. UEA-I-binding to thymic medullary epithelial cells selectively reduces numbers of cortical TCRalphabeta+ thymocytes in FTOCs.

    PubMed

    Graziano, M; St-Pierre, Y; Potworowski, E F

    2001-07-02

    Thymic medullary epithelial cells (TMECs) constitute a major stromal cell type, the function of which is incompletely understood. Some TMECs express L-fucose-glycosylated proteins on their plasma membrane; these have been shown to specifically bind the lectin UEA-I. We exploited this observation to investigate the consequences of in situ blockage of TMECs in FTOCs by UEA-I. In UEA-I-treated FTOCs, we noted a decreased cellularity among TCRalphabeta+ but not TCRgammadelta+ cells. In fact, CD3- and CD3lo cortical cells were markedly depleted, while CD3hi cells were unaffected. Since the affected cell subsets are in a different compartment from that where UEA-I binding occurs, it is likely that the effect is mediated through a soluble factor. Two possible mechanisms are proposed: a reduced activation of either TMECs or of medullary thymocytes which normally bind to them, results in lowered production of soluble factors responsible for cortical thymocyte proliferation. Alternately, the binding of UEA-I to TMECs could activate the latter to produce signals inhibitory to cortical thymocytes.

  16. Human blood BDCA-1 dendritic cells differentiate into Langerhans-like cells with thymic stromal lymphopoietin and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cingolani, Carolina; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Jouve, Mabel; Zollinger, Raphaël; Soumelis, Vassili

    2014-10-09

    The ontogeny of human Langerhans cells (LCs) remains poorly characterized, in particular the nature of LC precursors and the factors that may drive LC differentiation. Here we report that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a keratinocyte-derived cytokine involved in epithelial inflammation, cooperates with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β for the generation of LCs. We show that primary human blood BDCA-1(+), but not BDCA-3(+), dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated with TSLP and TGF-β harbor a typical CD1a(+)Langerin(+) LC phenotype. Electron microscopy established the presence of Birbeck granules, an intracellular organelle specific to LCs. LC differentiation was not observed from tonsil BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) subsets. TSLP + TGF-β LCs had a mature phenotype with high surface levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40. They induced a potent CD4(+) T-helper (Th) cell expansion and differentiation into Th2 cells with increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 compared with CD34-derived LCs. Our findings establish a novel LC differentiation pathway from BDCA-1(+) blood DCs with potential implications in epithelial inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TSLP may interfere with tissue LC repopulation from circulating precursors.

  17. Thymic and Bronchial Carcinoid Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: The Mayo Clinic Experience from 1977 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Thompson, Geoffrey B; C Nichols, Francis; Cassivi, Stephen D; Young, William F

    2015-12-01

    The clinical features of thymic carcinoid (TC) and bronchial carcinoid (BC) tumors as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) have been rarely described and their importance in clinical practice is debated. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcome of this uncommon manifestation of MEN1 in a tertiary care center setting. We present the clinical features of patients with MEN1 and either TC or BC evaluated at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2013. A total of 348 patients with MEN1 were evaluated and the prevalence of TC was 2.0% (n = 7) and of BC 4.9% (n = 17). The majority of the patients with BC were men (61%) diagnosed on routine screening (77%) and BC was not the confirmed cause of death in any patient. In contrast, TC patients were all men and during follow-up 43% died due to TC complications. We conclude that TC and BC tumors are uncommon, but important components of MEN1. BC were most commonly diagnosed during routine screening and associated with an indolent course. TC were predominantly seen in men and associated with a more aggressive behavior.

  18. Positive and Negative Regulatory Mechanisms for Fine-Tuning Cellularity and Functions of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Taishin; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Nobuko; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-tolerant T cells and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus. A wide variety of cell–cell interactions in the thymus is required for the differentiation, proliferation, and repertoire selection of T cells. Various secreted and cell surface molecules expressed in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) mediate these processes. Moreover, cytokines expressed by cells of hematopoietic origin regulate the cellularity of TECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family RANK ligand, lymphotoxin, and CD40 ligand, expressed in T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promote the differentiation and proliferation of medullary TECs (mTECs) that play critical roles in the induction of immune tolerance. A recent study suggests that interleukin-22 (IL-22) produced by ILCs promotes regeneration of TECs after irradiation. Intriguingly, tumor growth factor-β and osteoprotegerin limit cellularity of mTECs, thereby attenuating regulatory T cell generation. We will review recent insights into the molecular basis for cell–cell interactions regulating differentiation and proliferation of mTECs and also discuss about a perspective on use of mathematical models for understanding this complicated system. PMID:26441966

  19. Myeloid dendritic cells stimulated by thymic stromal lymphopoietin promote Th2 immune responses and the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Maehara, Takashi; Ishiguro, Noriko; Kubota, Keigo; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Tanaka, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by subepithelial T-cell infiltration. Recent studies reported that specific T helper (Th) subsets, especially Th2 cells, are involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is mainly secreted by epithelial cells and potently activates myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) to induce Th2-mediated inflammation. Here, we investigated the expression of TSLP and related molecules in OLP. Buccal mucosa specimens from patients with OLP, hyperkeratosis, and ulcer were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of TSLP, its receptor (TSLPR), and inflammatory cells. TSLP was detected in/around the epithelium of patients with OLP and hyperkeratosis, whereas TSLPR, CD11c (m