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Sample records for acute tissue injury

  1. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A.; Ma, Jianjie; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed. PMID:27153058

  2. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A; Ma, Jianjie; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed. PMID:27153058

  3. Prediction of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury using the venous bicarbonate concentration.

    PubMed

    Muckart, D J; Moodley, M; Naidu, A G; Reddy, A D; Meineke, K R

    1992-12-01

    Sixty-four patients with soft-tissue injuries were studied prospectively to determine whether an initial venous bicarbonate concentration (VBC) of less than 17 mmol/L would predict the development of myoglobin-induced acute renal failure. The VBC was > 17 mmol/L in 59 patients, seven of whom had myoglobinuria. All recovered without renal complications. The remaining five patients all had VBC < 17 mmol/L and four had myoglobinuria. Acute renal failure developed in four patients (p < 0.001). The VBC on hospital arrival was the most accurate predictor of these patients' risk for the development of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury. PMID:1474620

  4. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Deficiency Amplifies Acute Lung Injury in Bleomycin-Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Burkhart, Kristin; Chen, Peter; Frevert, Charles W.; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Hackman, Robert C.; Soloway, Paul D.; Madtes, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury triggers a profound and durable increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression, suggesting a potential role for this antiproteinase in the regulation of lung inflammation and fibrosis. TIMP-1 protein induction is spatially restricted to areas of lung injury as determined by immunohistochemistry. Using TIMP-1 null mutation mice, we demonstrate that TIMP-1 deficiency amplifies acute lung injury as determined by exaggerated pulmonary neutrophilia, hemorrhage, and vascular permeability compared with wild-type littermates after bleomycin exposure. The augmented pulmonary neutrophilia observed in TIMP-1–deficient animals was not found in similarly treated TIMP-2–deficient mice. Using TIMP-1 bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice, we observed that the TIMP-1–deficient phenotype was abolished in wild-type recipients of TIMP-1–deficient BM but not in TIMP-1–deficient recipients of wild-type BM. Acute lung injury in TIMP-1–deficient mice was accompanied by exaggerated gelatinase-B activity in the alveolar compartment. TIMP-1 deficiency did not alter neutrophil chemotactic factor accumulation in the injured lung nor neutrophil migration in response to chemotactic stimuli in vivo or in vitro. Moreover, TIMP-1 deficiency did not modify collagen accumulation after bleomycin injury. Our results provide direct evidence that TIMP-1 contributes significantly to the regulation of acute lung injury, functioning to limit inflammation and lung permeability. PMID:15947421

  5. High-strain-rate brain injury model using submerged acute rat brain tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Lee, Sung J; Hong, Yu; King, Michael A; Subhash, Ghatu; Kwon, Jiwoon; Moore, David F

    2012-01-20

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has received increasing attention in recent years due to ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sudden impacts or explosive blasts generate stress and pressure waves that propagate at high velocities and affect sensitive neurological tissues. The immediate soft tissue response to these stress waves is difficult to assess using current in vivo imaging technologies. However, these stress waves and resultant stretching and shearing of tissue within the nano- to microsecond time scale of blast and impact are likely to cause initial injury. To visualize the effects of stress wave loading, we have developed a new ex vivo model in which living tissue slices from rat brain, attached to a ballistic gelatin substrate, were subjected to high-strain-rate loads using a polymer split Hopkinson pressure bar (PSHPB) with real-time high-speed imaging. In this study, average peak fluid pressure within the test chamber reached a value of 1584±63.3 psi. Cavitation due to a trailing underpressure wave was also observed. Time-resolved images of tissue deformation were collected and large maximum eigenstrains (0.03-0.42), minimum eigenstrains (-0.33 to -0.03), maximum shear strains (0.09-0.45), and strain rates (8.4×10³/sec) were estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). Injury at 4 and 6 h was quantified using Fluoro-Jade C. Neuronal injury due to PSHPB testing was found to be significantly greater than injury associated with the tissue slice paradigm alone. While large pressures and strains were encountered for these tests, this system provides a controllable test environment to study injury to submerged brain slices over a range of strain rate, pressure, and strain loads. PMID:21970544

  6. Ultra-rapid manufacturing of engineered epicardial substitute to regenerate cardiac tissue following acute ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Considering the impaired regenerative capacity of adult mammalian heart tissue, cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to create functional substitutes that can restore the structure and function of the damaged cardiac tissue. The success of cardiac regenerative therapies has been limited mainly due to poor control on the structure and properties of the tissue substitute, lack of vascularization, and immunogenicity. In this study we introduce a new approach to rapidly engineer dense biomimetic scaffolds consisting of type I collagen, to protect the heart against severe ischemic injury. Scaffold biomechanical properties are adjusted to mimic embryonic epicardium which is shown to be optimal to support cardiomyocyte contractile work. Moreover, the designed patch can serve as a delivery device for targeted, controlled release of cells or therapeutic macromolecules into the lesion area.

  7. Anti-Human Tissue Factor Antibody Ameliorated Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Human Tissue Factor Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Marco; Li, Li; Cypel, Marcelo; Soderman, Avery; Picha, Kristen; Yang, Jing; Liu, Mingyao

    2008-01-01

    Background Interaction between the coagulation and inflammation systems plays an important role in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Anti-coagulation is an attractive option for ARDS treatment, and this has promoted development of new antibodies. However, preclinical trials for these antibodies are often limited by the high cost and availability of non-human primates. In the present study, we developed a novel alternative method to test the role of a humanized anti-tissue factor mAb in acute lung injury with transgenic mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Human tissue factor knock-in (hTF-KI) transgenic mice and a novel humanized anti-human tissue factor mAb (anti-hTF mAb, CNTO859) were developed. The hTF-KI mice showed a normal and functional expression of hTF. The anti-hTF mAb specifically blocked the pro-coagulation activity of brain extracts from the hTF-KI mice and human, but not from wild type mice. An extrapulmonary ARDS model was used by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Significant lung tissue damage in hTF-KI mice was observed after 2 h reperfusion. Administration of CNTO859 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) attenuated the severity of lung tissue injury, decreased the total cell counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced Evans blue leakage. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced alveolar fibrin deposition, and decreased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity in the serum. This treatment also down-regulated cytokine expression and reduced cell death in the lung. Conclusions This novel anti-hTF antibody showed beneficial effects on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury, which merits further investigation for clinical usage. In addition, the use of knock-in transgenic mice to test the efficacy of antibodies against human-specific proteins is a novel strategy for preclinical studies. PMID:18231608

  8. Acute disposition of neck injuries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leslie

    2005-02-01

    Neck injuries can be some of the most serious and anxiety-producing injuries that occur during sporting events. It is important for the team physician to be prepared for the care of these injuries and be able to identify some of the more serious injuries. Proper care of these injuries can be life saving and prevent further injury and permanent disability. This article reviews the principles of management and latest evidence for acute neck injuries.

  9. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  10. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

  11. Ruscogenin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice: involvement of tissue factor, inducible NO synthase and nuclear factor (NF)-κB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Chen, Ling; Gao, Mengyu; Jiang, Wenwen; Shao, Fangxian; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jun; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is still a significant clinical problem with a high mortality rate and there are few effective therapies in clinic. Here, we studied the inhibitory effect of ruscogenin, an anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic natural product, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice basing on our previous studies. The results showed that a single oral administration of ruscogenin significantly decreased lung wet to dry weight (W/D) ratio at doses of 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg 1 h prior to LPS challenge (30 mg/kg, intravenous injection). Histopathological changes such as pulmonary edema, coagulation and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also attenuated by ruscogenin. In addition, ruscogenin markedly decreased LPS-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and nitrate/nitrite content, and also downregulated expression of tissue factor (TF), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB p-p65 (Ser 536) in the lung tissue at three doses. Furthermore, ruscogenin reduced plasma TF procoagulant activity and nitrate/nitrite content in LPS-induced ALI mice. These findings confirmed that ruscogenin significantly attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury via inhibiting expressions of TF and iNOS and NF-κB p65 activation, indicating it as a potential therapeutic agent for ALI or sepsis.

  12. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS.

  13. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  14. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  15. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  16. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years.

  17. The Effects of Xiangqing Anodyne Spray on Treating Acute Soft-Tissue Injury Mainly Depend on Suppressing Activations of AKT and p38 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shudong; Li, Tao; Qu, Wei; Li, Xin; Ma, Shaoxin; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Wenya; Hou, Shanshan; Fu, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In the present study we try to elucidate the mechanism of Xiangqing anodyne spray (XQAS) effects on acute soft-tissue injury (STI). Methods. Acute STI model was established by hammer blow in the rat hind leg muscle. Within 8 hours, instantly after modeling and per 2-hour interval repeated topical applications with or without XQAS, CP or IH ethanol extracts spray (CPS and IHS) were performed, respectively; muscle swelling rate and inflammation-related biochemical parameters, muscle histological observation, and mRNA and protein expression were then examined. Results. XQAS dose-dependently suppressed STI-caused muscle swelling, proinflammatory mediator productions, and oxidative stress as well as severe pathological changes in the injured muscle tissue. Moreover, CPS mainly by blocking p38 activation while IHS majorly by blocking AKT activation led to cytoplastic IκBα degradation with NF-κB p65 translocated into the nucleus. There are synergistic effects between CP and IH components in the XQAS on preventing from acute STI with suppressing IκBα degradation, NF-κB p65 translocation, and subsequent inflammation and oxidative stress-related abnormality. Conclusion. Marked effects of XQAS on treating acute STI are ascribed to strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidative actions with a reasonable combination of CP active components, blocking p38-NF-κB pathway activated, and IH active components, blocking AKT-NF-κB pathway activated. PMID:27190541

  18. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  19. Perioperative acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goren, O; Matot, I

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is not uncommon and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Recently, several definition systems for AKI were proposed, incorporating both small changes of serum creatinine and urinary output reduction as diagnostic criteria. Novel biomarkers are under investigation as fast and accurate predictors of AKI. Several special considerations regarding the risk of AKI are of note in the surgical patient. Co-morbidities are important risk factors for AKI. The surgery in itself, especially emergency and major surgery in the critically ill, is associated with a high incidence of AKI. Certain types of surgeries, such as cardiac and transplantation surgeries, require special attention because they carry higher risk of AKI. Nephrotoxic drugs, contrast dye, and diuretics are commonly used in the perioperative period and are responsible for a significant amount of in-hospital AKI. Before surgery, the anaesthetist is required to identify patients at risk of AKI, optimize anaemia, and treat hypovolaemia. During surgery, normovolaemia is of utmost importance. Additionally, the surgical and anaesthesia team is advised to use measures to reduce blood loss and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Hypotension should be avoided because even short periods of mean arterial pressure <55-60 mm Hg carry a risk of postoperative AKI. Higher blood pressures are probably required for hypertensive patients. Urine output can be reduced significantly during surgery and is unrelated to perioperative renal function. Thus, fluids should not be given in excess for the sole purpose of avoiding or treating oliguria. Use of hydroxyethyl starch needs to be reconsidered. Recent evidence indicates a beneficial effect of administering low-chloride solutions. PMID:26658199

  20. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Lung Tissue in a Rat Acute Lung Injury Model: Identification of PRDX1 as a Promoter of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongdong; Mao, Pu; Huang, Yongbo; Liu, Yiting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Pang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a high morbidity and mortality disease entity in critically ill patients, despite decades of numerous investigations into its pathogenesis. To obtain global protein expression changes in acute lung injury (ALI) lung tissues, we employed a high-throughput proteomics method to identify key components which may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. In the present study, we analyzed lung tissue proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced ALI rats and identified eighteen proteins whose expression levels changed more than twofold as compared to normal controls. In particular, we found that PRDX1 expression in culture medium was elevated by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of PRDX1 increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas knockdown of PRDX1 led to downregulated expression of cytokines induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings provide a global alteration in the proteome of lung tissues in the ALI rat model and indicate that PRDX1 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ARDS by promoting inflammation and represent a novel strategy for the development of new therapies against ALI. PMID:25024510

  2. The acute effects of hemorrhagic shock on cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen tension, and spreading depolarization following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Shear, Deborah A; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often occurs in conjunction with additional trauma, resulting in secondary complications, such as hypotension as a result of blood loss. This study investigated the combined effects of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on physiological parameters, including acute changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), brain tissue oxygen tension (P(bt)O₂), and cortical spreading depolarizations (CSDs). All recordings were initiated before injury (PBBI/HS/both) and maintained for 2.5 h. Results showed that PBBI alone and combined PBBI and HS produced a sustained impairment of ipsilateral rCBF that decreased by 70% from baseline (p<0.05). Significant and sustained reductions in P(bt)O₂ (50% baseline; p<0.05) were also observed in the injured hemisphere of the animals subjected to both PBBI and HS (PBBI+HS). In contrast, PBBI alone produced smaller, more transient reductions in P(bt)O₂ levels. The lower limit of cerebral autoregulation was significantly higher in the PBBI+HS group (p<0.05, compared to HS alone). Critically, combined injury resulted in twice the number of spontaneous CSDs as in PBBI alone (p<0.05). It also lowered the propagation speed of CSD and the threshold of CSD occurrence [induced CSD at higher mean arterial pressure (MAP)]. However, rCBF and P(bt)O₂ were not responsive to the depolarizations. Our data suggest that PBBI together with HS causes persistent impairment of CBF and brain tissue oxygen tension, increasing the probability of CSDs that likely contribute to secondary neuropathology and compromise neurological recovery. PMID:23461630

  3. The role of the complement system in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McCullough, James W; Renner, Brandon; Thurman, Joshua M

    2013-11-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common and severe clinical problem. Patients who develop acute kidney injury are at increased risk of death despite supportive measures such as hemodialysis. Research in recent years has shown that tissue inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of renal injury, even after nonimmune insults such as ischemia/reperfusion and toxins. Examination of clinical samples and preclinical models has shown that activation of the complement system is a critical cause of acute kidney injury. Furthermore, complement activation within the injured kidney is a proximal trigger of many downstream inflammatory events within the renal parenchyma that exacerbate injury to the kidney. Complement activation also may account for the systemic inflammatory events that contribute to remote organ injury and patient mortality. Complement inhibitory drugs have now entered clinical use and may provide an important new therapeutic approach for patients suffering from, or at high risk of developing, acute kidney injury.

  4. Ischemic tissue injury in the dorsal skinfold chamber of the mouse: a skin flap model to investigate acute persistent ischemia.

    PubMed

    Harder, Yves; Schmauss, Daniel; Wettstein, Reto; Egaña, José T; Weiss, Fabian; Weinzierl, Andrea; Schuldt, Anna; Machens, Hans-Günther; Menger, Michael D; Rezaeian, Farid

    2014-11-17

    Despite profound expertise and advanced surgical techniques, ischemia-induced complications ranging from wound breakdown to extensive tissue necrosis are still occurring, particularly in reconstructive flap surgery. Multiple experimental flap models have been developed to analyze underlying causes and mechanisms and to investigate treatment strategies to prevent ischemic complications. The limiting factor of most models is the lacking possibility to directly and repetitively visualize microvascular architecture and hemodynamics. The goal of the protocol was to present a well-established mouse model affiliating these before mentioned lacking elements. Harder et al. have developed a model of a musculocutaneous flap with a random perfusion pattern that undergoes acute persistent ischemia and results in ~50% necrosis after 10 days if kept untreated. With the aid of intravital epi-fluorescence microscopy, this chamber model allows repetitive visualization of morphology and hemodynamics in different regions of interest over time. Associated processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, microvascular leakage and angiogenesis can be investigated and correlated to immunohistochemical and molecular protein assays. To date, the model has proven feasibility and reproducibility in several published experimental studies investigating the effect of pre-, peri- and postconditioning of ischemically challenged tissue.

  5. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  6. NOD2 regulates CXCR3-dependent CD8+ T cell accumulation in intestinal tissues with acute injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingxin; Lahiri, Amit; Haines, G Kenneth; Flavell, Richard A; Abraham, Clara

    2014-04-01

    Polymorphisms in NOD2 confer risk for Crohn's disease, characterized by intestinal inflammation. How NOD2 regulates both inflammatory and regulatory intestinal T cells, which are critical to intestinal immune homeostasis, is not well understood. Anti-CD3 mAb administration is used as therapy in human autoimmune diseases, as well as a model of transient intestinal injury. The stages of T cell activation, intestinal injury, and subsequent T tolerance are dependent on migration of T cells into the small intestinal (SI) lamina propria. Upon anti-CD3 mAb treatment of mice, we found that NOD2 was required for optimal small intestinal IL-10 production, in particular from CD8(+) T cells. This requirement was associated with a critical role for NOD2 in SI CD8(+) T cell accumulation and induction of the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10, which regulate T cell migration. NOD2 was required in both the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments for optimal expression of CXCR3 ligands in intestinal tissues. NOD2 synergized with IFN-γ to induce CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion in dendritic cells, macrophages, and intestinal stromal cells in vitro. Consistent with the in vitro studies, during anti-CD3 mAb treatment in vivo, CXCR3 blockade, CD8(+) T cell depletion, or IFN-γ neutralization each inhibited SI CD8(+) T cell recruitment, and reduced chemokine expression and IL-10 expression. Thus, NOD2 synergizes with IFN-γ to promote CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression, thereby amplifying CXCR3-dependent SI CD8(+) T cell migration during T cell activation, which, in turn, contributes to induction of both inflammatory and regulatory T cell outcomes in the intestinal environment. PMID:24591373

  7. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  8. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lihua; Cui, Jingkun; Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng; Han, Fujun

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  9. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, and there is a significant need for more effective medicinal chemical agents for use in these severe and lethal lung injury syndromes. To facilitate future chemical-based drug discovery research on new agent development, this paper reviews present pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS in the context of biological and biochemical drug activities. The complex lung injury pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS offers an array of possible targets for drug therapy, including inflammation, cell and tissue injury, vascular dysfunction, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidant injury. Added targets for pharmacotherapy outside the lungs may also be present, since multiorgan or systemic pathology is common in ALI/ARDS. The biological and physiological complexity of ALI/ARDS requires the consideration of combined-agent treatments in addition to single-agent therapies. A number of pharmacologic agents have been studied individually in ALI/ARDS, with limited or minimal success in improving survival. However, many of these agents have complementary biological/biochemical activities with the potential for synergy or additivity in combination therapy as discussed in this article. PMID:18691048

  10. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Frank, Steven J.; Song, Juhee; Ding, Yao; Ger, Rachel; Court, Laurence E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hazle, John D.; Wang, Jihong; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Elshafeey, Nabil; Elbanan, Mohamed; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Chambers, Mark S.; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Max; Gazmuri, Jose Tomás; Marín, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Rovegno, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia, recently termed target temperature management (TTM), is the cornerstone of neuroprotective strategy. Dating to the pioneer works of Fay, nearly 75 years of basic and clinical evidence support its therapeutic value. Although hypothermia decreases the metabolic rate to restore the supply and demand of O₂, it has other tissue-specific effects, such as decreasing excitotoxicity, limiting inflammation, preventing ATP depletion, reducing free radical production and also intracellular calcium overload to avoid apoptosis. Currently, mild hypothermia (33°C) has become a standard in post-resuscitative care and perinatal asphyxia. However, evidence indicates that hypothermia could be useful in neurologic injuries, such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. In this review, we discuss the basic and clinical evidence supporting the use of TTM in critical care for acute brain injury that extends beyond care after cardiac arrest, such as for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. We review the historical perspectives of TTM, provide an overview of the techniques and protocols and the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothermia. In addition, we include our experience of managing patients with acute brain injuries treated using endovascular hypothermia. PMID:26043908

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Max; Gazmuri, Jose Tomás; Marín, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Rovegno, Maximiliano

    2015-06-05

    Therapeutic hypothermia, recently termed target temperature management (TTM), is the cornerstone of neuroprotective strategy. Dating to the pioneer works of Fay, nearly 75 years of basic and clinical evidence support its therapeutic value. Although hypothermia decreases the metabolic rate to restore the supply and demand of O₂, it has other tissue-specific effects, such as decreasing excitotoxicity, limiting inflammation, preventing ATP depletion, reducing free radical production and also intracellular calcium overload to avoid apoptosis. Currently, mild hypothermia (33°C) has become a standard in post-resuscitative care and perinatal asphyxia. However, evidence indicates that hypothermia could be useful in neurologic injuries, such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. In this review, we discuss the basic and clinical evidence supporting the use of TTM in critical care for acute brain injury that extends beyond care after cardiac arrest, such as for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. We review the historical perspectives of TTM, provide an overview of the techniques and protocols and the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothermia. In addition, we include our experience of managing patients with acute brain injuries treated using endovascular hypothermia.

  15. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury.

  16. Acute Kidney Injury in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Palevsky, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The aging kidney undergoes a number of important anatomic and physiologic changes that increase the risk of acute kidney injury (formerly acute renal failure) in the elderly. This article reviews these changes and discusses the diagnoses frequently encountered in the elderly patient with acute kidney injury. The incidence, staging, evaluation, management, and prognosis of acute kidney injury are also examined with special focus given to older adults. PMID:19765485

  17. Epigenetics in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent advances in epigenetics indicate the involvement of several epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this review is to summarize our understanding of recent advances in epigenetic regulation of AKI and provide mechanistic insight into the role of acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression in the pathological processes of AKI. Recent findings Enhancement of protein acetylation by pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) leads to more severe tubular injury and impairment of renal structural and functional recovery. The changes in promoter DNA methylation occur in the kidney with ischemia/reperfusion. microRNA expression is associated with regulation of both renal injury and regeneration after AKI. Summary Recent studies on epigenetic regulation indicate that acetylation, methylation, and microRNA expression are critically implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. Strategies targeting epigenetic processes may hold a therapeutic potential for patients with AKI. PMID:26050122

  18. Apoptosis and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Andrea; Borkan, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Improved mechanistic understanding of renal cell death in acute kidney injury (AKI) has generated new therapeutic targets. Clearly, the classic lesion of acute tubular necrosis is not adequate to describe the consequences of renal ischemia, nephrotoxin exposure, or sepsis on glomerular filtration rate. Experimental evidence supports a pathogenic role for apoptosis in AKI. Interestingly, proximal tubule epithelial cells are highly susceptible to apoptosis, and injury at this site contributes to organ failure. During apoptosis, well-orchestrated events converge at the mitochondrion, the organelle that integrates life and death signals generated by the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein family. Death requires the ‘perfect storm’ for outer mitochondrial membrane injury to release its cellular ‘executioners’. The complexity of this process affords new targets for effective interventions, both before and after renal insults. Inhibiting apoptosis appears to be critical, because circulating factors released by the injured kidney induce apoptosis and inflammation in distant organs including the heart, lung, liver, and brain, potentially contributing to the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI. Manipulation of known stress kinases upstream of mitochondrial injury, induction of endogenous, anti-apoptotic proteins, and improved understanding of the timing and consequences of renal cell apoptosis will inevitably improve the outcome of human AKI. PMID:21562469

  19. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  20. Thrombolytic Therapy in the Acute Management of Frostbite Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christopher; Pannucci, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Frostbite injuries frequently result in devastating ischemic damage to the distal extremities. This ischemia and resultant necrosis have historically been managed expectantly, with amputation of devitalized tissue commonly being the end result after severe injury. Advances in nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, and thrombolytic therapy have contributed to the development of a therapy proving successful in reversing these acute ischemic effects and ameliorating the morbidity of these rare limb-threatening injuries. PMID:21211711

  1. Acute genital injury in the prepubertal girl.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, S F; Pokorny, W J; Kramer, W

    1992-05-01

    In an effort to develop guidelines for the management of acute genital injuries in prepubertal girls, we categorized 32 cases by the object that allegedly caused the injury: straddle injuries, nonpenetrating injuries, penetrating injuries, and torque injuries. Using these categories and the anatomic features of symmetry and/or hymenal transection, we determined that the most dangerous injuries were the penetrating injuries that were symmetric and transected the hymen; in this series these were all the result of sexual assault. Future studies are needed to determine if these unique injuries can be managed with less physical and psychosocial trauma to the young patient. PMID:1595800

  2. Two-dimensional zymography differentiates gelatinase isoforms in stimulated microglial cells and in brain tissues of acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanyan; Meng, Fanjun; Chen, Zhenzhou; Tomlinson, Brittany N; Wesley, Jennifer M; Sun, Grace Y; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive activation of gelatinases (MMP-2/-9) is a key cause of detrimental outcomes in neurodegenerative diseases. A single-dimension zymography has been widely used to determine gelatinase expression and activity, but this method is inadequate in resolving complex enzyme isoforms, because gelatinase expression and activity could be modified at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In this study, we investigated gelatinase isoforms under in vitro and in vivo conditions using two-dimensional (2D) gelatin zymography electrophoresis, a protocol allowing separation of proteins based on isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights. We observed organomercuric chemical 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate-induced activation of MMP-2 isoforms with variant pI values in the conditioned medium of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Studies with murine BV-2 microglial cells indicated a series of proform MMP-9 spots separated by variant pI values due to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The MMP-9 pI values were shifted after treatment with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting presence of phosphorylated isoforms due to the proinflammatory stimulation. Similar MMP-9 isoforms with variant pI values in the same molecular weight were also found in mouse brains after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. In contrast, there was no detectable pI differentiation of MMP-9 in the brains of chronic Zucker obese rats. These results demonstrated effective use of 2D zymography to separate modified MMP isoforms with variant pI values and to detect posttranslational modifications under different pathological conditions.

  3. Rehabilitation of acute hamstring strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Marc A; Johnston, Tyler S; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2015-04-01

    Acute hamstring injuries are responsible for significant time loss for athletes. As there are a multitude of injury mechanisms, thorough evaluation is imperative for determining the appropriate plan of care and adequate rehabilitation is required to reduce the risk of recurrent injuries.

  4. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7) Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Jens H.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Waldherr, Sina; Pöschl, Johannes; Teufel, Ulrike; Westhoff, Timm H.; Fichtner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet. Methods The product of the urinary concentration of TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7]) was assessed by a commercially available immunoassay (NephroCheck™) in a prospective cohort study in 133 subjects aged 0–18 years including 46 patients with established AKI according to pRIFLE criteria, 27 patients without AKI (non-AKI group I) and 60 apparently healthy neonates and children (non-AKI group II). AKI etiologies were: dehydration/hypovolemia (n = 7), hemodynamic instability (n = 7), perinatal asphyxia (n = 9), septic shock (n = 7), typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS; n = 5), interstitial nephritis (n = 5), vasculitis (n = 4), nephrotoxic injury (n = 1) and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). Results When AKI patients were classified into pRIFLE criteria, 6/46 (13%) patients fulfilled the criteria for the category “Risk”, 13/46 (28%) for “Injury”, 26/46 (57%) for “Failure” and 1/46 (2%) for “Loss”. Patients in the “Failure” stage had a median 3.7-fold higher urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] compared to non-AKI subjects (P<0.001). When analyzed for AKI etiology, highest [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values were found in patients with septic shock (P<0.001 vs. non-AKI I+II). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses in the AKI group revealed good performance of [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting 30-day (area under the curve (AUC) 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61–0.97) and 3-month mortality (AUC 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67–0.99) and moderate performance in predicting RRT

  5. Implementation of a Shoulder Soft Tissue Injury Triage Service in a UK NHS Teaching Hospital Improves Time to Surgery for Acute Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Marcus; Davies-Jones, Gareth; Tambe, Amol; Clark, David I

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems account for 2.4% of GP consultations in the United Kingdom and of those 70% are related to the rotator cuff. Many rotator cuff tears are of a degenerate nature but they can occur as a result of trauma in 8% of cases. Evidence suggests that patients with traumatic rotator cuff tears gain a better outcome in terms of pain and function if the tear is repaired early after injury. A specialist shoulder soft tissue injury clinic was set up in a large UK NHS teaching hospital with the primary purpose in the first year to halve the length of time patients with traumatic rotator cuff tears had to wait to consult a specialist and double the number of patients undergoing surgical repair within three months. The secondary purpose was to ensure that the new clinic was utilised to capacity by the end of the first year. The clinic was later expanded to manage patients with acute glenohumeral joint (GHJ) or acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations and identify those patients requiring surgical stabilisation. The new service involved referral of all patients presenting to the Accident & Emergency department with recent shoulder trauma and either an inability to raise the arm over shoulder height with a normal set of radiographs, or a confirmed GHJ or ACJ dislocation; to a specialist clinic run by an experienced upper limb physiotherapist. Patients were reassessed and referred for further imaging if required. Those patients found to have traumatic rotator cuff tears or structural instability lesions were listed for expedited surgery. The clinic ran alongside a consultant-led fracture clinic giving fast access to surgical decision-making. The service was reviewed after 3, 6, and 12 months and findings compared to a sample of 30 consecutive patients having undergone rotator cuff repair surgery via the previous pathway. 144 patients were referred to the clinic in the first year: 62 with rotator cuff symptoms, 38 with GHJ instability, 13 with ACJ instability, and 33

  6. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  7. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. PMID:27085736

  8. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    PubMed

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance.

  9. Acute forefoot and midfoot injuries.

    PubMed

    Laird, R Clinton

    2015-04-01

    Forefoot and midfoot injuries in the athlete are common. Injuries of the digits include subungual hematomas and fractures. Metatarsal fractures occur frequently in sports, and their treatments range greatly. Hyperflexion and extension injuries about the first metatarsophalangeal joint can be very debilitating. Midfoot sprains and fractures require a high index of suspicion for diagnosis.

  10. [Differentiated treatment of acute diffuse brain injuries].

    PubMed

    Pedachenko, E G; Dziak, L A; Sirko, A G

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment results of 57 patients with acute diffuse brain injury have been analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups: first study period 2000-2005; second study period 2006-2010. The main differences between the first and the second study periods were in health condition and brain functions monitoring parameters, therapy approaches and goals. Increasing of axial and lateral dislocation symptoms during progression from the first type of diffuse injury to the fourth one is related to intracranial hypertension (ICH) occurrence rate and significance it's significance. During the second study period, ICH was found in 25% patients with the second type of injury, 57% patients with the third type of injury, and 80%, with the fourth type of injury. Mean ICP in the group of patients with the second type of diffuse injury comprised 14.4 +/- 6.6 mmHg; with the third type of injury, 30 +/- 20.6 mmHg; with the fourth type of injuty, 37.6 +/- 14.1 mmHg. Introduction of differentiated approach to conservative or surgical treatment method application to acute diffuse brain injuries patients based on ICP monitoring data led to 13.8% reduction in mortality in the second study period compared with the first study period.

  11. Acute injuries from mountain biking.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T K; Bracker, M D; Patrick, K

    1993-01-01

    We questioned members of 2 southern California off-road bicycling organizations about injuries associated with the use of all-terrain bicycles. Cyclists were asked about riding and safety habits, the kind(s) of injury sustained with their most recent accident and whether they sought medical treatment, and the circumstances of the accident. Of 459 mailed surveys, 268 (58.4%) were returned. Respondents (82.8% of whom were male) ranged in age from 14 to 68 years. Of these, 225 (84%) had been injured while riding all-terrain bicycles, 51% in the past year. Although most injuries were characterized as minor, 26% required professional medical care, and 4.4% of those injured were admitted to hospital. Extremity injuries--abrasions, lacerations, contusions--occurred in 201 (90%) cyclists with 27 (12%) sustaining a fracture or dislocation. High levels of helmet use (88%) may explain the low occurrence of head and neck trauma (12%). Frequent riding and riding on paved terrain were associated with increased severity of injury, although most accidents--197 (87.6%)--occurred off paved roads. These results suggest that, compared with regular bicyclists, all-terrain cyclists have more, but not necessarily more severe, injuries. Clinicians and emergency medical personnel should be aware that the increasing popularity of off-road cycling may change the frequency and nature of bicycling injuries. PMID:8212679

  12. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  13. Iodide Protects Heart Tissue from Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Akiko; Morrison, Michael L.; Roth, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an elemental nutrient that is essential for mammals. Here we provide evidence for an acute therapeutic role for iodine in ischemia reperfusion injury. Infusion of the reduced form, iodide, but not the oxidized form iodate, reduces heart damage by as much as 75% when delivered intravenously following temporary loss of blood flow but prior to reperfusion of the heart in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. Normal thyroid function may be required because loss of thyroid activity abrogates the iodide benefit. Given the high degree of protection and the high degree of safety, iodide should be explored further as a therapy for reperfusion injury. PMID:25379708

  14. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  15. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Loubon, Christian; Fernández-Molina, Manuel; Carrascal-Hinojal, Yolanda; Fulquet-Carreras, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a well-recognized complication resulting with the higher morbid-mortality after cardiac surgery. In its most severe form, it increases the odds ratio of operative mortality 3–8-fold, length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit and hospital, and costs of care. Early diagnosis is critical for an optimal treatment of this complication. Just as the identification and correction of preoperative risk factors, the use of prophylactic measures during and after surgery to optimize renal function is essential to improve postoperative morbidity and mortality of these patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass produces an increased in tubular damage markers. Their measurement may be the most sensitive means of early detection of AKI because serum creatinine changes occur 48 h to 7 days after the original insult. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 are most promising as an early diagnostic tool. However, the ideal noninvasive, specific, sensitive, reproducible biomarker for the detection of AKI within 24 h is still not found. This article provides a review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI, including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment. We searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE using search terms relevant including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment, in order to provide an exhaustive review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI. PMID:27716701

  16. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents. PMID:25948841

  17. A SCUBA diver with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Patrick James; Kelly, Yvelynne; Ni Sheaghdha, Eadaoin; Lappin, David

    2015-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man was transferred to our hospital after a diving incident. He had made an uncontrolled ascent from 10 m. On arrival he appeared well. No hypotensive episodes occurred during the transfer. He denied having arthralgias, back pain, dyspnoea or neurological symptoms. Laboratory investigations revealed acutely elevated creatinine (170 µmol/L) and creatine kinase (909 U/L). Radiology was consistent with a focus of pulmonary barotrauma and intrinsic renal disease. Creatine kinase is a marker of arterial gas embolism (AGE). We determined that our patient suffered acute kidney injury as a result of gas embolisation to his renal vasculature from an area of pulmonary barotrauma. Creatinine fell the following day in response to aggressive intravenous fluids. This is the first reported case of acute kidney injury secondary to AGE. Biochemical studies should be part of the routine assessment of patients involved in diving incidents.

  18. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diagnosis. He was extubated after 2 days of mechanical ventilation and after pulse dose steroids. His lung biopsy showed pulmonary capillaritis. Our case describes a patient with clinically appearing renopulmonary syndrome, but found to have pulmonary capillaritis, a rare form of lung disease that may also cause acute kidney injury. PMID:25246473

  19. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis-induced acute renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor-κB signal pathway. PMID:27279569

  20. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  1. KIM-1-mediated phagocytosis reduces acute injury to the kidney.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Brooks, Craig R; Xiao, Sheng; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Yeung, Melissa Y; Hsiao, Li-Li; Ichimura, Takaharu; Kuchroo, Vijay; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-04-01

    Kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, also known as TIM-1) is markedly upregulated in the proximal tubule after injury and is maladaptive when chronically expressed. Here, we determined that early in the injury process, however, KIM-1 expression is antiinflammatory due to its mediation of phagocytic processes in tubule cells. Using various models of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mice expressing mutant forms of KIM-1, we demonstrated a mucin domain-dependent protective effect of epithelial KIM-1 expression that involves downregulation of innate immunity. Deletion of the mucin domain markedly impaired KIM-1-mediated phagocytic function, resulting in increased proinflammatory cytokine production, decreased antiinflammatory growth factor secretion by proximal epithelial cells, and a subsequent increase in tissue macrophages. Mice expressing KIM-1Δmucin had greater functional impairment, inflammatory responses, and mortality in response to ischemia- and cisplatin-induced AKI. Compared with primary renal proximal tubule cells isolated from KIM-1Δmucin mice, those from WT mice had reduced proinflammatory cytokine secretion and impaired macrophage activation. The antiinflammatory effect of KIM-1 expression was due to the interaction of KIM-1 with p85 and subsequent PI3K-dependent downmodulation of NF-κB. Hence, KIM-1-mediated epithelial cell phagocytosis of apoptotic cells protects the kidney after acute injury by downregulating innate immunity and inflammation.

  2. Acute finger injuries: part II. Fractures, dislocations, and thumb injuries.

    PubMed

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Family physicians can treat most finger fractures and dislocations, but when necessary, prompt referral to an orthopedic or hand surgeon is important to maximize future function. Examination includes radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views) and physical examination to detect fractures. Dislocation reduction is accomplished with careful traction. If successful, further treatment focuses on the concomitant soft tissue injury. Referral is needed for irreducible dislocations. Distal phalanx fractures are treated conservatively, and middle phalanx fractures can be treated if reduction is stable. Physicians usually can reduce metacarpal bone fractures, even if there is a large degree of angulation. An orthopedic or hand surgeon should treat finger injuries that are unstable or that have rotation. Collateral ligament injuries of the thumb should be examine with radiography before physical examination. Stable joint injuries can be treated with splinting or casting, although an orthopedic or hand surgeon should treat unstable joints.

  3. Contrast-associated Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Contrast-associated acute kidney injury (CAAKI) is a common iatrogenic condition. The principal risk factors for CAAKI are underlying renal impairment; diabetes in the setting of kidney disease; and intravascular volume depletion, effective or absolute. CAAKI is associated with serious adverse short-term and long-term outcomes, including mortality and more rapidly progressive chronic kidney disease, although the causal nature of these associations remains unproved. Patients with chronic kidney disease and other risk factors for CAAKI who present with acute coronary syndrome should undergo indicated angiographic procedures.

  4. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  5. Acute Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation, and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, which also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic. PMID:22701432

  6. Ischaemic Markers in Acute Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Sushanta Kumar; Nanda, Rachita; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Nayak, Parsuram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic injury of varied aetiology may progress to Acute Liver Failure (ALF). Compromised microcirculation is thought to be a deciding factor of hepatic hypoxia may be involved in disease progression that needs early detection. Ischaemia markers like serum Ischaemia- modified albumin (IMA), ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index have been suggested for its detection at early stage. Aim To find out the association of Ischaemia markers like serum IMA, ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index in acute hepatic injury cases. Materials and Methods Forty one diagnosed acute liver injury cases of varied aetiology admitted in Department of Medicine, and Gastroenterology of SCB Medical College, Cuttack were enrolled in the study along with 30 age and sex matched healthy controls. Blood collected at time of admission and at time of discharge (1st day and 7th day) were evaluated for FPG, RFT, LFT, Serum Albumin along with serum LDH, IMA, PT-INR and platelet count. Result Serum bilirubin, hepatic enzymes, IMA, PT-INR was more markedly raised in cases than controls on the 1st day of admission. ALT-LDH ratio and index were significantly low in complicated cases. However, on responding to treatment the ALT-LDH index on 7th day registered a rise in comparison to the 1st day, while serum IMA revealed an insignificant decline showing improvement in hepatic hypoxia. ALT-LDH ratio remains more or less same on response to treatment. Conclusion Serum IMA and ALT-LDH Index reveals association with disease process in Acute Hepatic Injury cases both clinically and biochemically and can be used as supportive parameters for the diagnosis of disease process. PMID:27190791

  7. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI. PMID:26613023

  8. Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Liborio, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2008-09-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome that occurs when skeletal muscle cells disrupt and release creatine phosphokinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and myoglobin into the interstitial space and plasma. The main causes of rhabdomyolysis include direct muscular injury, strenuous exercise, drugs, toxins, infections, hyperthermia, seizures, meta-bolic and/or electrolyte abnormalities, and endocrinopathies. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 33-50% of patients with rhabdomyolysis. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of renal injury are renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation, and direct myoglobin toxicity. Rhabdo-myolysis can be asymptomatic, present with mild symptoms such as elevation of muscular en-zymes, or manifest as a severe syndrome with AKI and high mortality. Serum CK five times higher than the normal value usually confirms rhabdomyolysis. Early diagnosis and saline volume expansion may reduce the risk of AKI. Further studies are necessary to establish the importance of bicarbonate and mannitol in the prevention of AKI due to rhabdomyolysis. PMID:18711286

  9. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Michael; Kredo, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In South Africa, trauma is a major concern, with violence and road traffic accidents being the fifth and seventh leading causes of death, respectively. Antifibrinolytic agents have been used in trauma and major surgery to prevent fibrinolysis and reduce blood loss. We highlight an updated Cochrane review investigating the effect of antifibrinolytic drugs in patients with acute traumatic injury. The review authorsconducted comprehensive literature searches in January 2015 with regard to all randomised controlled trials comparing antifibrinolytic agents after acute traumatic injury. Three randomised controlled trials, of which two (n=20 451) assessed the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA), were included. The authors concluded that TXA safely reduces mortality in trauma with bleeding without increasing the risk ofadverse events. TXA should be administered as early as possible, and within 3 hours of injury. There is still uncertainty with regard to the effect of TXA on patients with traumatic brain injury; however, ongoing randomised controlled trials should shed more light on this. PMID:27499400

  10. Danger Control Programs Cause Tissue Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Jan H.; Haegele, Holger; Müller, Susanna; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Are there common pathways underlying the broad spectrum of tissue pathologies that develop upon injuries and from subsequent tissue remodeling? Here, we explain the pathophysiological impact of a set of evolutionary conserved danger control programs for tissue pathology. These programs date back to the survival benefits of the first multicellular organisms upon traumatic injuries by launching a series of danger control responses, i.e., 1. Haemostasis, or clotting to control bleeding; 2. Host defense, to control pathogen entry and spreading; 3. Re-epithelialisation, to recover barrier functions; and 4. Mesenchymal, to repair to regain tissue stability. Taking kidney pathology as an example, we discuss how clotting, inflammation, epithelial healing, and fibrosis/sclerosis determine the spectrum of kidney pathology, especially when they are insufficiently activated or present in an overshooting and deregulated manner. Understanding the evolutionary benefits of these response programs may refine the search for novel therapeutic targets to limit organ dysfunction in acute injuries and in progressive chronic tissue remodeling. PMID:23759985

  11. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie N.; Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Allan, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection) have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review. PMID:25705177

  12. Acute kidney injury in acute liver failure: a review.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joanna K; Love, Eleanor; Craig, Darren G; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2013-11-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and often devastating condition consequent on massive liver cell necrosis that frequently affects young, previously healthy individuals resulting in altered cognitive function, coagulopathy and peripheral vasodilation. These patients frequently develop concurrent acute kidney injury (AKI). This abrupt and sustained decline in renal function, through a number of pathogenic mechanisms such as renal hypoperfusion, direct drug-induced nephrotoxicity or sepsis/systemic inflammatory response contributes to increased morbidity and is strongly associated with a worse prognosis. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology AKI in the context of acute liver failure may be beneficial in a number of areas; the development of new and sensitive biomarkers of renal dysfunction, refining prognosis and organ allocation, and ultimately leading to the development of novel treatment strategies, these issues are discussed in more detail in this expert review.

  13. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  14. Contributions of tissue-specific pathologies to corneal injuries following exposure to SM vapor.

    PubMed

    McNutt, Patrick M; Tuznik, Kaylie M; Glotfelty, Elliot J; Nelson, Marian R; Lyman, Megan E; Hamilton, Tracey A

    2016-06-01

    Corneal injuries resulting from ocular exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) vapor are the most prevalent chemical warfare injury. Ocular exposures exhibit three distinct, dose-dependent clinical trajectories: complete injury resolution, immediate transition to a chronic injury, or apparent recovery followed by the subsequent development of persistent ocular manifestations. These latter two trajectories include a constellation of corneal symptoms that are collectively known as mustard gas keratopathy (MGK). The etiology of MGK is not understood. Here, we synthesize recent findings from in vivo rabbit SM vapor studies, suggesting that tissue-specific damage during the acute injury can decrement the regenerative capacities of corneal endothelium and limbal stem cells, thereby predisposing the cornea to the chronic or delayed forms of MGK. This hypothesis not only provides a mechanism to explain the acute and MGK injuries but also identifies novel therapeutic modalities to mitigate or eliminate the acute and long-term consequences of ocular exposure to SM vapor.

  15. Contributions of tissue-specific pathologies to corneal injuries following exposure to SM vapor.

    PubMed

    McNutt, Patrick M; Tuznik, Kaylie M; Glotfelty, Elliot J; Nelson, Marian R; Lyman, Megan E; Hamilton, Tracey A

    2016-06-01

    Corneal injuries resulting from ocular exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) vapor are the most prevalent chemical warfare injury. Ocular exposures exhibit three distinct, dose-dependent clinical trajectories: complete injury resolution, immediate transition to a chronic injury, or apparent recovery followed by the subsequent development of persistent ocular manifestations. These latter two trajectories include a constellation of corneal symptoms that are collectively known as mustard gas keratopathy (MGK). The etiology of MGK is not understood. Here, we synthesize recent findings from in vivo rabbit SM vapor studies, suggesting that tissue-specific damage during the acute injury can decrement the regenerative capacities of corneal endothelium and limbal stem cells, thereby predisposing the cornea to the chronic or delayed forms of MGK. This hypothesis not only provides a mechanism to explain the acute and MGK injuries but also identifies novel therapeutic modalities to mitigate or eliminate the acute and long-term consequences of ocular exposure to SM vapor. PMID:27310673

  16. Heterophile Antibodies and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Taichman, Norton S.; Pulver, Wayne H.; Schönbaum, Eduard

    1973-01-01

    Platelets appear to be pathogenetic determinants in the development of lethal Forssman shock, which was provoked in guinea pigs by an intravenous injection of rabbit antiserum to sheep erythrocyte stromata. Within moments, circulating platelets (prelabeled with 14C-serotonin) were removed from the blood stream and impacted in the lungs, where they liberated 14C into the tissues. When animals were depleted of platelets prior to the production of shock, they survived for prolonged periods of time or were protected against death. Pretreatment with antiinflammatory compounds capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and release phenomena had a similar protective influence. It would appear, therefore, that Forssman shock is a convenient and accessible model for investigating the mechanisms whereby platelets mediate immune vascular damage. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4740636

  17. Epidemiology of Overuse and Acute Injuries Among Competitive Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingzhen; Tibbetts, Abigail S.; Covassin, Tracey; Cheng, Gang; Nayar, Saloni; Heiden, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although overuse injuries are gaining attention, epidemiologic studies on overuse injuries in male and female collegiate athletes are lacking. (70.7%) acute injuries were reported. The overall injury rate was Objective: To report the epidemiology of overuse injuries sustained by collegiate athletes and to compare the rates of overuse and acute injuries. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1317 reported injuries sustained by 573 male and female athletes in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005–2008 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): The injury and athlete-exposure (AE) data were obtained from the Sports Injury Monitoring System. An injury was coded as either overuse or acute based on the nature of injury. Injury rate was calculated as the total number of overuse (or acute) injuries during the study period divided by the total number of AEs during the same period. Results: A total of 386 (29.3%) overuse injuries and 931 63.1 per 10000 AEs. The rate ratio (RR) of acute versus overuse injuries was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05, 2.67). Football had the highest RR (RR = 8.35, 95% CI = 5.38, 12.97), and women's rowing had the lowest (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.51, 1.10). Men had a higher acute injury rate than women (49.8 versus 38.6 per 10000 AEs). Female athletes had a higher rate of overuse injury than male athletes (24.6 versus 13.2 per 10000 AEs). More than half of the overuse injuries (50.8%) resulted in no time loss from sport. Conclusions: Additional studies are needed to examine why female athletes are at greater risk for overuse injuries and identify the best practices for prevention and rehabilitation of overuse injuries. PMID:22488286

  18. Programmed necrosis in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; De Zen, Federica; Weinberg, Joel; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) had been widely used synonymously to caspase-mediated apoptosis until caspase-independent cell death was described. Identification of necrosis as a regulated process in ischaemic conditions has recently changed our understanding of PCD. At least three pathways of programmed necrosis (PN) have been identified. First, receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis causes organ failure following stroke, myocardial infarction and renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Necroptosis can be mediated either by a large intracellular caspase-8-containing signalling complex called the ripoptosome or by the RIP1-/RIP3-containing necroptosome and is controlled by a caspase-8/FLICE inhibitory protein(long) heterodimer at least in the latter case. Second, mitochondrial permeability transition mediates apoptotic or necrotic stimuli and depends on the mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D. The third PN pathway involves the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-calpain axis that contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI). Preclinical interference with the PN pathways therefore raises expectations for the future treatment of ischaemic conditions. In this brief review, we aim to summarize the clinically relevant PCD pathways and to transfer the basic science data to settings of AKI. We conclude that pathologists were quite right to refer to ischaemic kidney injury as 'acute tubular necrosis'. PMID:22942173

  19. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  20. Exertion and acute coronary artery injury.

    PubMed

    Black, A; Black, M M; Gensini, G

    1975-12-01

    Twelve cases of myocardial infarction as related to strenuous exertion are presented with the pathological findings in several of these cases. Three cases with coronary arteriography are also presented. The pathology of coronary arteriosclerotic plaques and the vulnerability to acute injury is reviewed and discussed. It is concluded that strenuous exertion can cause acute injury to coronary artery plaques due to the unusual stressful whip-like action to which coronary arteries are subject. These injuries may initiate as cracks in the plaques or subintimal hemorrhages and proceed to coronary occlusion and ultimate myocardial infarction. With this concept in mind we use the term of "crack in the plaque" (Black's Crack in the Plaque) to account for the sudden appearance of clinical coronary artery disease appearing during or shortly after exertion, or other stressful situations in patients without previous existing evidence of clinical coronary artery disease. This could also account for exacerbation of symptoms or death occurring after exertion in previously quiescent asymptomatic known coronary artery disease subjects. This concept may explain some of the puzzling features of coronary disease.

  1. Targeted Lipid Profiling Discovers Plasma Biomarkers of Acute Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sunil A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Liebeskind, David S.; Won, Seok Joon; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior efforts to identify a blood biomarker of brain injury have relied almost exclusively on proteins; however their low levels at early time points and poor correlation with injury severity have been limiting. Lipids, on the other hand, are the most abundant molecules in the brain and readily cross the blood-brain barrier. We previously showed that certain sphingolipid (SL) species are highly specific to the brain. Here we examined the feasibility of using SLs as biomarkers for acute brain injury. A rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a mouse model of stroke were used to identify candidate SL species though our mass-spectrometry based lipid profiling approach. Plasma samples collected after TBI in the rat showed large increases in many circulating SLs following injury, and larger lesions produced proportionately larger increases. Plasma samples collected 24 hours after stroke in mice similarly revealed a large increase in many SLs. We constructed an SL score (sum of the two SL species showing the largest relative increases in the mouse stroke model) and then evaluated the diagnostic value of this score on a small sample of patients (n = 14) who presented with acute stroke symptoms. Patients with true stroke had significantly higher SL scores than patients found to have non-stroke causes of their symptoms. The SL score correlated with the volume of ischemic brain tissue. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using lipid biomarkers to diagnose brain injury. Future studies will be needed to further characterize the diagnostic utility of this approach and to transition to an assay method applicable to clinical settings. PMID:26076478

  2. Targeted Antiscarring Therapy for Tissue Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Significance The healing of injuries, such as those caused by ischemia (myocardial infarction, stroke), trauma, surgery, and inflammation, tends to happen through undesirable and harmful scarring. Current options in reducing scar formation are largely limited to local intervention in accessible tissues. Recent Advances We have designed a systemically administered, injury-targeted decorin for scar prevention. The delivery of decorin to injured tissues is achieved by fusing recombinant decorin to a 9-amino acid peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically recognizes the vessels in injured tissues and extravasates into the tissue, delivering decorin with it. Critical Issues Decorin is known to prevent tissue fibrosis and promote tissue regeneration. This activity of decorin is based on inhibition of TGF-β and some other regulatory activities. In addition to serving as a delivery vehicle, the CAR component endowed decorin with much stronger neutralizing activity against TGF-β1 in vitro than is obtained with nontargeted decorin. The CAR–decorin fusion protein promoted wound healing in a mouse skin wound model and suppressed scar formation at doses at which nontargeted decorin was inactive. These results show that selective targeting enhances specificity and potency of an antiscarring compound. Future Directions Targeted decorin provides a new, systemic option for the treatment of scarring and fibrotic diseases. PMID:24527325

  3. Does orlistat cause acute kidney injury?

    PubMed

    Beyea, Michael M; Garg, Amit X; Weir, Matthew A

    2012-04-01

    Orlistat is an inhibitor of gastric and pancreatic lipase with proven efficacy in the augmentation and maintenance of weight loss. Although its use has been limited by troublesome but benign gastrointestinal side effects, it has more recently been associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). In this review, we summarize orlistat's benefits and drawbacks and discuss the body of evidence supporting its role as a cause of AKI. Although we cannot yet draw an unequivocal causal link between orlistat and AKI, there is enough evidence to include orlistat exposure in the clinical assessment of patients with AKI. PMID:25083225

  4. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Choi, James P; Feghali, Georges A; Schussler, Jeffrey M; Stoler, Robert M; Vallabahn, Ravi C; Mehta, Ankit

    2016-09-27

    Coronary angiography and percutaneous intervention rely on the use of iodinated intravascular contrast for vessel and chamber imaging. Despite advancements in imaging and interventional techniques, iodinated contrast continues to pose a risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) for a subgroup of patients at risk for this complication. There has been a consistent and graded signal of risk for associated outcomes including need for renal replacement therapy, rehospitalization, and death, according to the incidence and severity of CI-AKI. This paper reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prognosis, and management of CI-AKI as it applies to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. PMID:27659469

  5. Does orlistat cause acute kidney injury?

    PubMed Central

    Beyea, Michael M.; Garg, Amit X.

    2012-01-01

    Orlistat is an inhibitor of gastric and pancreatic lipase with proven efficacy in the augmentation and maintenance of weight loss. Although its use has been limited by troublesome but benign gastrointestinal side effects, it has more recently been associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). In this review, we summarize orlistat’s benefits and drawbacks and discuss the body of evidence supporting its role as a cause of AKI. Although we cannot yet draw an unequivocal causal link between orlistat and AKI, there is enough evidence to include orlistat exposure in the clinical assessment of patients with AKI. PMID:25083225

  6. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  7. Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alyssa; Gebhard, Daniel J; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is very common in pediatric medical and surgical cardiac patients. Not only is it an independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the short run, but repeated episodes of AKI lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) especially in the most vulnerable hosts with multiple risk factors, such as heart transplant recipients. The cardiorenal syndrome, a term coined to emphasize the bidirectional nature of simultaneous or sequential cardiac-renal dysfunction both in acute and chronic settings, has been recently described in adults but scarcely reported in children. Despite the common occurrence and clinical and financial impact, AKI in pediatric heart failure outside of cardiac surgery populations remains poorly studied and there are no large-scale pediatric specific preventive or therapeutic studies to date. This article will review pediatric aspects of the cardiorenal syndrome in terms of pathophysiology, clinical impact and treatment options.

  8. Physical Agents for Soft Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The clinical management of soft tissue injuries of the lower limb commonly includes physical agents such as electrotherapy or ultrasound. However, the evidence about the effectiveness of physical agents varies, and their use remains controversial. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, examined the benefits and safety risks of various physical agents for soft tissue injuries of the lower limb. Importantly, the review looked closely at the quality of the RCTs and focused on studies with low risk of bias. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating patients with such musculoskeletal conditions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):555. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0503. PMID:27363571

  9. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Spatio-temporal Based Molecular Kinetics of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Identifies a Time- and Segment-specific Window for Effective Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Stephanie; Cizkova, Dasa; Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Nataf, Serge; Pays, Laurent; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Maass, Peter; Kobarg, Jan H; Kobeissy, Firas; Mériaux, Céline; Wisztorski, Maxence; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Cigankova, Viera; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a major debilitating health issue with a direct socioeconomic burden on the public and private sectors worldwide. Although several studies have been conducted to identify the molecular progression of injury sequel due from the lesion site, still the exact underlying mechanisms and pathways of injury development have not been fully elucidated. In this work, based on OMICs, 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, cytokines arrays, confocal imaging we established for the first time that molecular and cellular processes occurring after SCI are altered between the lesion proximity, i.e. rostral and caudal segments nearby the lesion (R1-C1) whereas segments distant from R1-C1, i.e. R2-C2 and R3-C3 levels coexpressed factors implicated in neurogenesis. Delay in T regulators recruitment between R1 and C1 favor discrepancies between the two segments. This is also reinforced by presence of neurites outgrowth inhibitors in C1, absent in R1. Moreover, the presence of immunoglobulins (IgGs) in neurons at the lesion site at 3 days, validated by mass spectrometry, may present additional factor that contributes to limited regeneration. Treatment in vivo with anti-CD20 one hour after SCI did not improve locomotor function and decrease IgG expression. These results open the door of a novel view of the SCI treatment by considering the C1 as the therapeutic target. PMID:27250205

  11. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  12. The therapeutic challenges of degloving soft-tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Rifat; El-Hennawy, Hany; El-Menyar, Ayman; Peralta, Ruben; Asim, Mohammad; Consunji, Rafael; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Degloving soft-tissue injuries are serious and debilitating conditions. Deciding on the most appropriate treatment is often difficult. However, their impact on patients’ outcomes is frequently underestimated. Objectives: We aimed to study the incidence, clinical presentation, management and outcome of degloving soft-tissue injuries. Materials and Methods: We conducted a narrative traditional review using the key words; degloving injury and soft-tissue injuries through search engines PubMed, Science Direct, and Scopus. Results: There are several therapeutic options for treating degloving soft-tissue injuries; however, no evidence-based guidelines have been published on how to manage degloving soft-tissue injuries, although numerous articles outline the management of such injuries. Conclusion: Degloving soft-tissue injuries are underreported and potentially devastating. They require early recognition, and early management. A multidisciplinary approach is usually needed to ensure the effective rehabilitation of these patients. PMID:25114435

  13. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  14. The reduction of Na/H exchanger-3 protein and transcript expression in acute ischemia–reperfusion injury is mediated by extractable tissue factor(s)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianning; Babich, Victor; Bobulescu, I. Alexandru; Shi, Mingjun; McLeroy, Paul; Rogers, Thomas E.; Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic renal injury is a formidable clinical problem, the pathophysiology of which is incompletely understood. As the Na/H exchanger-3 (NHE3) mediates the bulk of apical sodium transport and a significant fraction of oxygen consumption in the proximal tubule, we examined mechanisms by which ischemia–reperfusion affects the expression of NHE3. Ischemia–reperfusion dramatically decreased NHE3 protein and mRNA (immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, and RNA blot) in rat kidney cortex and medulla. The decrease in NHE3 protein was uniform throughout all tubules, including those appearing morphologically intact. In the kidney cortex, a decrease in NHE3 surface protein preceded that of NHE3 total protein and mRNA. Kidney homogenates from rats exposed to mild renal ischemia-reduced cell surface NHE3 protein expression in opossum kidney cells in vitro, whereas homogenates from animals with moderate-to-severe ischemia reduced both total NHE3 protein and mRNA. The decrease in total NHE3 protein was dependent on the proteasomal degradation associated with NHE3 ubiquitylation measured by coimmunoprecipitation. The transferable factor(s) from the ischemic homogenate that reduce NHE3 expression were found to be heat sensitive and to be associated with a lipid-enriched fraction, and did not include regulatory RNAs. Thus, transferable factor(s) mediate the ischemia–reperfusion injury-induced decrease in NHE3 of the kidney. PMID:21814178

  15. Acute Cholestatic Liver Injury From Hydralazine Intake.

    PubMed

    Harati, Hadi; Rahmani, Maziar; Taghizadeh, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine is a commonly used oral antihypertensive agent. We report a rare case of hydralazine-induced hepatotoxicity in the form of subacute hepatic necrosis. A 75-year-old African American woman presented with jaundice of 7-day duration. She was started on hydralazine 100 mg 3 times a day 10 weeks before presentation. On physical examination, scleral icterus was noted. Workup revealed elevated liver transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, and conjugated bilirubin. She had no history of liver disease, and liver function tests had been normal before starting hydralazine. Other etiologies, including viruses, common toxins, drugs, autoimmune, and copper-induced hepatitis, were excluded. Abdominal imaging studies did not show any evidence of intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation, and no pathologies were seen in the liver and pancreas. The patient's liver biopsy revealed extensive lobular hepatitis, significant necrosis, mixed inflammatory infiltrate, and no significant fibrosis, supporting a diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury. Hydralazine was immediately discontinued. She showed improvement of clinical and laboratory abnormalities within 5 days after discontinuation of hydralazine. To establish the diagnosis of hydralazine-induced liver injury, we used assessment tool outlined by the Council for International Organization of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale that led to "high probable" relationship. Although rare, clinically significant, and potentially life-threatening liver injury can result from use of hydralazine. Both clinical and histological presentations in our patient suggest acute liver injury. The hydralazine-induced hepatitis seems to be reversible as discontinuation of the drug improves clinical outcomes. We highly recommend monitoring of the liver function during hydralazine treatment.

  16. Histone lysine crotonylation during acute kidney injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Andres, Olga; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanz, Ana Belen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a potentially lethal condition for which no therapy is available beyond replacement of renal function. Post-translational histone modifications modulate gene expression and kidney injury. Histone crotonylation is a recently described post-translational modification. We hypothesized that histone crotonylation might modulate kidney injury. Histone crotonylation was studied in cultured murine proximal tubular cells and in kidneys from mice with AKI induced by folic acid or cisplatin. Histone lysine crotonylation was observed in tubular cells from healthy murine and human kidney tissue. Kidney tissue histone crotonylation increased during AKI. This was reproduced by exposure to the protein TWEAK in cultured tubular cells. Specifically, ChIP-seq revealed enrichment of histone crotonylation at the genes encoding the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α and the sirtuin-3 decrotonylase in both TWEAK-stimulated tubular cells and in AKI kidney tissue. To assess the role of crotonylation in kidney injury, crotonate was used to increase histone crotonylation in cultured tubular cells or in the kidneys in vivo. Crotonate increased the expression of PGC-1α and sirtuin-3, and decreased CCL2 expression in cultured tubular cells and healthy kidneys. Systemic crotonate administration protected from experimental AKI, preventing the decrease in renal function and in kidney PGC-1α and sirtuin-3 levels as well as the increase in CCL2 expression. For the first time, we have identified factors such as cell stress and crotonate availability that increase histone crotonylation in vivo. Overall, increasing histone crotonylation might have a beneficial effect on AKI. This is the first observation of the in vivo potential of the therapeutic manipulation of histone crotonylation in a disease state. PMID:27125278

  17. A case of acute kidney injury by near-drowning.

    PubMed

    Amir, A; Lee, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury following immersion or near-drowning is rarely described and no data from Malaysia have been found. We report a case of acute kidney injury following a near-drowning event. A 20-year-old man who recovered from near-drowning in a swimming pool 5 days earlier presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea and polyuria. Dipstick urinalysis showed a trace of blood. The serum creatinine level was 10-fold higher than the normal range. A bedside ultrasound showed features suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. He is then referred to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute kidney injury with the possibility of acute tubular necrosis secondary to near-drowning. We suggest that any patient presenting after immersion or near-drowning to be should assessed for potential acute kidney injury.

  18. Pathophysiology of Acute Exercise-Induced Muscular Injury: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    Acute muscular injury is the most common injury affecting athletes and those participating in exercise. Nearly everyone has experienced soreness after unaccustomed or intense exercise. Clinically, acute strains and delayed-onset muscle soreness are very similar. The purpose of this paper is to review the predisposing factors, mechanisms of injury, structural changes, and biochemical changes associated with these injuries. Laboratory and clinical findings are discussed to help athletic trainers differentiate between the two conditions and to provide a background knowledge for evaluation, prevention, and treatment of exercise-induced muscular injury. PMID:16558305

  19. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arghya

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common sequel of sepsis in the intensive care unit. It is being suggested that sepsis-induced AKI may have a distinct pathophysiology and identity. Availability of biomarkers now enable us to detect AKI as early as four hours after it's inception and may even help us to delineate sepsis-induced AKI. Protective strategies such as preferential use of vasopressin or prevention of intra-abdominal hypertension may help, in addition to the other global management strategies of sepsis. Pharmacologic interventions have had limited success, may be due to their delayed usage. Newer developments in extracorporeal blood purification techniques may proffer effects beyond simple replacement of renal function, such as metabolic functions of the kidney or modulation of the sepsis cascade.

  20. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  1. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  2. Acute renal injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Bredt, Luis Cesar; Cipriani, Raphael Flavio Fachini

    2016-01-01

    Currently, partial hepatectomy is the treatment of choice for a wide variety of liver and biliary conditions. Among the possible complications of partial hepatectomy, acute kidney injury (AKI) should be considered as an important cause of increased morbidity and postoperative mortality. Difficulties in the data analysis related to postoperative AKI after liver resections are mainly due to the multiplicity of factors to be considered in the surgical patients, moreover, there is no consensus of the exact definition of AKI after liver resection in the literature, which hampers comparison and analysis of the scarce data published on the subject. Despite this multiplicity of risk factors for postoperative AKI after partial hepatectomy, there are main factors that clearly contribute to its occurrence. First factor relates to large blood losses with renal hypoperfusion during the operation, second factor relates to the occurrence of post-hepatectomy liver failure with consequent distributive circulatory changes and hepatorenal syndrome. Eventually, patients can have more than one factor contributing to post-operative AKI, and frequently these combinations of acute insults can be aggravated by sepsis or exposure to nephrotoxic drugs. PMID:27478539

  3. Acute renal injury after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Bredt, Luis Cesar; Cipriani, Raphael Flavio Fachini

    2016-07-28

    Currently, partial hepatectomy is the treatment of choice for a wide variety of liver and biliary conditions. Among the possible complications of partial hepatectomy, acute kidney injury (AKI) should be considered as an important cause of increased morbidity and postoperative mortality. Difficulties in the data analysis related to postoperative AKI after liver resections are mainly due to the multiplicity of factors to be considered in the surgical patients, moreover, there is no consensus of the exact definition of AKI after liver resection in the literature, which hampers comparison and analysis of the scarce data published on the subject. Despite this multiplicity of risk factors for postoperative AKI after partial hepatectomy, there are main factors that clearly contribute to its occurrence. First factor relates to large blood losses with renal hypoperfusion during the operation, second factor relates to the occurrence of post-hepatectomy liver failure with consequent distributive circulatory changes and hepatorenal syndrome. Eventually, patients can have more than one factor contributing to post-operative AKI, and frequently these combinations of acute insults can be aggravated by sepsis or exposure to nephrotoxic drugs. PMID:27478539

  4. Therapeutic Strategies for Severe Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Janet. V.; Brower, Roy; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the management of patients with severe Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ALI/ARDS), clinicians are sometimes challenged to maintain acceptable gas exchange while avoiding harmful mechanical ventilation practices. In some of these patients, physicians may consider the use of “rescue therapies” to sustain life. Our goal is to provide a practical, evidence-based review to assist critical care physicians’ care for patients with severe ALI/ARDS. Data Sources and Study Selection We searched the Pub Med database for clinical trials examining the use of the following therapies in ALI/ARDS: recruitment maneuvers, high positive end expiratory pressure, prone position, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, glucocorticoids, inhaled nitric oxide, buffer therapy and extracorporeal life support. Study selection All clinical trials that included patients with severe ALI/ARDS were included in the review. Data Synthesis The primary author reviewed the aforementioned trials in depth and then disputed findings and conclusions with other authors until consensus was achieved. Conclusions This article is designed to: a) provide clinicians with a simple, bedside definition for the diagnosis of severe ARDS; b) describe several therapies that can be used in severe ARDS with an emphasis on the potential risks as well as the indications and benefits; and c) to offer practical guidelines for implementation of these therapies. PMID:20562704

  5. Acute kidney injury in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus–related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation. PMID:21911980

  6. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  7. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  8. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 is protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Bi, Jing; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Jie; Rong, Linyi; Wang, Qin; Xu, Nuo; Zhong, Ming; Zhu, Duming; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2014-09-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) plays a key role in lung development, but its role in acute lung injury has not been well characterized. Lipopolysaccharide instillation caused acute lung injury, which significantly elevated lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inhibited surfactant protein A and C expression in lung tissue, and increased pathological injury. Pretreatment with KGF-2 improved the above lung injury parameters, partially restored surfactant protein A and C expression, and KGF-2 given 2-3 days before LPS challenge showed maximum lung injury improvement. Pretreatment with KGF-2 also markedly reduced the levels of TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 in BALF and the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in lung tissue. Histological analysis showed there was increased proliferation of alveolar type II epithelial cells in lung parenchyma, which reached maximal 2 days after KGF-2 instillation. Intratracheal administration of KGF-2 attenuates lung injury induced by LPS, suggesting KGF-2 may be potent in the intervention of acute lung injury.

  9. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. PMID:27190065

  10. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; Li, Xiaofei; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylineosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues was determined by Western blot analysis. Crocin pretreatment significantly alleviated the severity of lung injury and inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in mice with ALI. After LPS administration, the lung wet/dry weight ratios, as an index of lung edema, and MPO activity were also markedly reduced by crocin pretreatment. Crocin pretreatment also reduced the concentrations of NO in lung tissues. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS was significantly suppressed by crocin pretreatment. Croncin potently protected against LPS-induced ALI and the protective effects of crocin may attribute partly to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:26191176

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, A; Grocott, M P W; Postle, A D; Cusack, R

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with low tidal volumes and moderate positive end expiratory pressure, multi-organ support, and treatment where possible of the underlying cause. Moreover, advances in general supportive measures such as appropriate antimicrobial therapy, early enteral nutrition, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal ulceration are likely contributory reasons for the improved outcomes. Although therapies such as corticosteroids, nitric oxide, prostacyclins, exogenous surfactants, ketoconazole and antioxidants have shown promising clinical effects in animal models, these have failed to translate positively in human studies. Most recently, clinical trials with β2 agonists aiding alveolar fluid clearance and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids have also provided disappointing results. Despite these negative studies, mortality seems to be in decline due to advances in overall patient care. Future directions of research are likely to concentrate on identifying potential

  12. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  13. Acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, S K; Moreau, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct clinical entity; however, there is still debate in the way it is defined in the East as compared to the West, especially with respect to incorporation of kidney dysfunction or failure in the definition of ACLF. Kidney dysfunction is defined as serum creatinine between 1.5 and 1.9 mg/dl and kidney failure as serum creatinine of more than 2 mg/dl or requirement of renal replacement therapy according to the EASL-CLIF Consortium. Kidney dysfunction or failure is universally present in patients with ACLF according to the definition by the EASL-CLIF Consortium while on the contrary the APASL definition of ACLF does not incorporate kidney dysfunction or failure in its definition. Recently, both the diagnosis and management of renal failure in patients with cirrhosis has changed with the advent of the acute kidney injury (AKI) criteria defined as an abrupt decline in renal functions, characterized by an absolute increase in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dl within 48 h or an increase of more than 50 % from baseline, which is known or presumed to have occurred in the previous 7 days. Further, recent studies in patients with cirrhosis have shown the utility of biomarkers for the diagnosis of AKI. The present review covers the pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnosis, prognosis as well as management of AKI in patients with ACLF from both a Western as well as an Eastern perspective. The review identifies an unmet need to diagnose AKI and prevent this ominous complication in patients with ACLF.

  14. The throw: biomechanics and acute injury.

    PubMed

    Gainor, B J; Piotrowski, G; Puhl, J; Allen, W C; Hagen, R

    1980-01-01

    The throw and its modifications are integral components of many sports. This study correlates case histories of acute injuries in throwing with a biomechanical analysis of the throwing mechanism. Comparisons are made with a similar analysis of the kick analyzed by the same film technique and computer program. Just prior to ball release, the pitching arm extends through an arc of about 73 degress in 40 msec, beginning with the elbow flexed at 80 degrees. This produces an axial load on the humerus and coincides with a pulse of external torque at the shoulder. This acts as stress protection to the humerus which is developing an internal torque of 14,000 inch-lb prior to ball release. The change in angular velocity, or the angular acceleration, during the throw is acquired in a much shorter time than in the kick. Torque is directly proportional to angular acceleration. This necessitates the development of substantially higher torques in the humerus during the throw than about the knee during a kick. The kinetic energy in the arm is 27,000 inch-lb during the throw. This is much higher than the kinetic energy in the kicking leg because the kinetic energy varies proportionally with the square of the angular velocity of the extremity. The angular velocity of the arm is about twice that of the leg. Thus, the pitching arm contains about four times as much kinetic energy as the kicking leg. These severe overloading conditions predispose the upper extremity to injury in the throwing mechanism.

  15. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  16. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Protects against Gα12 Activation and Tissue Damage in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ola Z.; Zhang, Xizhong; Wei, Junjun; Haig, Aaron; Denker, Bradley M.; Suri, Rita S.; Sener, Alp; Gunaratnam, Lakshman

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury is a serious untreatable condition. Activation of the G protein α12 (Gα12) subunit by reactive oxygen species is a major cause of tissue damage during renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is highly up-regulated during acute kidney injury, but the physiologic significance of this up-regulation is unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Kim-1 inhibits Gα12 activation and protects mice against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. We reveal that Kim-1 physically interacts with and inhibits cellular Gα12 activation after inflammatory stimuli, including reactive oxygen species, by blocking GTP binding to Gα12. Compared with Kim-1+/+ mice, Kim-1−/− mice exhibited greater Gα12 and downstream Src activation both in primary tubular epithelial cells after in vitro stimulation with H2O2 and in whole kidneys after unilateral renal artery clamping. Finally, we show that Kim-1–deficient mice had more severe kidney dysfunction and tissue damage after bilateral renal artery clamping, compared with wild-type mice. Our results suggest that KIM-1 is an endogenous protective mechanism against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury through inhibition of Gα12. PMID:25759266

  17. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Samuel; Dhakarwal, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Case Presentation Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Conclusion Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries. PMID:24765255

  18. Clinical trial endpoints in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Shaw, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The development and use of consensus criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and the inclusion of recently identified markers of renal parenchymal damage as endpoints in clinical trials have improved the ability of physicians to compare the incidence and severity of AKI across patient populations, provided targets for testing new treatments, and may increase insight into the mechanisms of AKI. To date, these markers have not consistently translated into important clinical outcomes. Is that because these markers of renal injury/dysfunction are measurements of process of care (and not indicative of persistently impaired renal function), or is it because patients do actually recover from AKI? Physicians currently have limited ability to measure renal function reserve, and the ultimate consequence of a case of AKI on long-term morbidity remains unclear. There is little doubt that groups of patients who develop AKI have worse outcomes than groups of patients who do not, but investigators are now realizing the value of measuring clinically meaningful renal endpoints in all subjects enrolled in AKI clinical trials. Important examples of these outcomes include persistently impaired renal function, new hemodialysis, and death. We propose that these major adverse kidney events (MAKE) be included in all effectiveness clinical trials. Adaptation of the MAKE composite assessed 30, 60, or 90 days following AKI (i.e., MAKE30 or MAKE90) will improve our capacity to understand and treat AKI and may also provide a consensus composite to allow comparison of different interventions. Primary endpoints for phase I and II clinical trials, on the other hand, should continue to use continuous markers of renal injury/dysfunction as well as 'hard' clinical outcomes in order to generate meaningful data with limited subject exposure to untested treatments. By doing so, investigators may assess safety without requiring large sample sizes, demonstrate treatment effect of an unknown

  19. Challenges of targeting vascular stability in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P

    2008-08-01

    Acute kidney injury following folate administration is characterized by a vascular remodeling that is initially proliferative but subsequently results in vascular endothelial loss. Interventions directed toward promoting endothelial growth may preserve vascular structure and therefore renal function. However, angiopoietin-1 therapy in the setting of folate-induced acute kidney injury resulted in an expanded fibrotic response despite apparent preservation of the vasculature, indicating that renal repair responses are complex and vascular-directed therapies should be approached with caution.

  20. Acute renal failure complicating muscle crush injury.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Z A; Hoffman, A; Better, O S

    1998-09-01

    Extensive skeletal muscle injury, whether caused by mechanical crush or by extreme physical exertion, is incompatible with life, unless treated early and vigorously. The immediate cause of morbidity is leakiness of the sarcolemmal membrane to cardiotoxic or nephrotoxic cations and metabolites (K, PO4, myoglobin and urate) of the sarcoplasma, and rapid massive uptake by the muscles of extracellular fluid, sodium and calcium, leading to profound hypovolemic and hyocalcemic shock. Casualties who survive the early steep of hyperkalemia and arterial hypotension are susceptible to myoglubinuric acute renal failure owing mainly to the combination of renal vasoconstriction, nephrotoxicity, and tubular obstruction by myoglobin plugs and urate. Management includes immediate (prehospital) intravenous volume replacement followed by mannitol-alkaline diuresis. The alkali regimen ameliorates the acidosis associated with shock and the hyperkalemia, and protects against the nephrotoxicity of myoglobin and urate by alkalinization of the urine. Mannitol, through its impermeant hyperoncotic properties, decompresses and mobilizes muscle edema and promotes renal tubular flow, thus flushing myoglobin plugs and enhancing urinary elimination of nephrotoxic metabolites. With this regimen and when necessary also with the use of dialysis, a substantial salvage of lives, limbs, and kidney function has been achieved recently compared with invariable mortality for casualties who were buried for 3 to 4 hours or more in the early 1940s (World War 2).

  1. MicroRNAs in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important clinical issue that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite research advances over the past decades, the complex pathophysiology of AKI is not fully understood. The regulatory mechanisms underlying post-AKI repair and fibrosis have not been clarified either. Furthermore, there is no definitively effective treatment for AKI. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous single-stranded noncoding RNAs of 19~23 nucleotides that have been shown to be crucial to the post-transcriptional regulation of various cellular biological functions, including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and apoptosis. In addition to being fundamental to normal development and physiology, miRNAs also play important roles in various human diseases. In AKI, some miRNAs appear to act pathogenically by promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis, while others may act protectively by exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, and pro-angiogenic effects. Thus, miRNAs have not only emerged as novel biomarkers for AKI; they also hold promise to be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27608623

  2. Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Acute Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J.; Tri Anggraini, Fika; Taha, Doaa Taha Metwally; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Many clinically relevant forms of acute injury, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and myocardial infarction, have resisted treatments to prevent cell death following injury. The clinical failures can be linked to the currently used inductive models based on biological specifics of the injury system. Here we contrast the application of inductive and deductive models of acute cell injury. Using brain ischemia as a case study, we discuss limitations in inductive inferences, including the inability to unambiguously assign cell death causality and the lack of a systematic quantitative framework. These limitations follow from an overemphasis on qualitative molecular pathways specific to the injured system. Our recently developed nonlinear dynamical theory of cell injury provides a generic, systematic approach to cell injury in which attractor states and system parameters are used to quantitatively characterize acute injury systems. The theoretical, empirical, and therapeutic implications of shifting to a deductive framework are discussed. We illustrate how a deductive mathematical framework offers tangible advantages over qualitative inductive models for the development of therapeutics of acutely injured biological systems. PMID:27437490

  3. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  4. Extracellular histones in tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Kumar, Santhosh V R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophil NETosis is an important element of host defense as it catapults chromatin out of the cell to trap bacteria, which then are killed, e.g., by the chromatin's histone component. Also, during sterile inflammation TNF-alpha and other mediators trigger NETosis, which elicits cytotoxic effects on host cells. The same mechanism should apply to other forms of regulated necrosis including pyroptosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, and cyclophilin D-mediated regulated necrosis. Beyond these toxic effects, extracellular histones also trigger thrombus formation and innate immunity by activating Toll-like receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thereby, extracellular histones contribute to the microvascular complications of sepsis, major trauma, small vessel vasculitis as well as acute liver, kidney, brain, and lung injury. Finally, histones prevent the degradation of extracellular DNA, which promotes autoimmunization, anti-nuclear antibody formation, and autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. Here, we review the current evidence on the pathogenic role of extracellular histones in disease and discuss how to target extracellular histones to improve disease outcomes. PMID:24706102

  5. Extracellular histones in tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Kumar, Santhosh V R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophil NETosis is an important element of host defense as it catapults chromatin out of the cell to trap bacteria, which then are killed, e.g., by the chromatin's histone component. Also, during sterile inflammation TNF-alpha and other mediators trigger NETosis, which elicits cytotoxic effects on host cells. The same mechanism should apply to other forms of regulated necrosis including pyroptosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, and cyclophilin D-mediated regulated necrosis. Beyond these toxic effects, extracellular histones also trigger thrombus formation and innate immunity by activating Toll-like receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thereby, extracellular histones contribute to the microvascular complications of sepsis, major trauma, small vessel vasculitis as well as acute liver, kidney, brain, and lung injury. Finally, histones prevent the degradation of extracellular DNA, which promotes autoimmunization, anti-nuclear antibody formation, and autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. Here, we review the current evidence on the pathogenic role of extracellular histones in disease and discuss how to target extracellular histones to improve disease outcomes.

  6. Hesperetin attenuates ventilator-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of NF-κB-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhong; Feng, Xiaoli; Ding, Suchun

    2015-12-15

    Hesperetin, a major bioflavonoid in sweet oranges and lemons, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of hesperetin on ventilator-induced acute lung injury has not been studied. In present study, we investigated the protective effect of hesperetin on ventilator-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were orally administered hesperetin (10, 20, or 40mg/kg) two hour before acute lung injury was induced by mechanical ventilation. Rats were then randomly divided into six groups: the lung protective ventilation group (n=20, LV group), injurious ventilation group (n=20, HV group), vehicle-treated injurious ventilation group (n=20, LV+vehicle group), hesperetin (10mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (10mg)), hesperetin (20mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (20mg)), and hesperetin (40mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (40mg)). The lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were isolated for subsequent measurements. Treatment with hesperetin dramatically improved the histology of lung tissue, and reduced the wet/dry ratio, myeloperoxidase activity, protein concentration, and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats with ventilator-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, our study indicated that this protective effect of hesperetin results from its ability to increase the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and inhibit the activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. These results suggest that hesperetin may be a potential novel therapeutic candidate for protection against ventilator-induced acute lung injury.

  7. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  8. Recent advances in the understanding of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Tögel, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical entity associated with high morbidity and mortality and clinical costs. The pathophysiology is multifaceted and involves inflammation, tubular injury, and vascular damage. Recently identified components include necroptosis, a special form of cell death, and autophagy. Most of the pathophysiological knowledge is obtained from animal models but these do not directly reflect the reality of the clinical situation. Tubular cells have a remarkable capacity to regenerate, and the role of stem/progenitor cells is discussed. Acute kidney injury is frequently associated with chronic kidney disease, and the implications are widespread. PMID:25343040

  9. Laboratory Test Surveillance following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. Methods We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 L/min/1.73 m2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Results A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Conclusions Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease. PMID:25117447

  10. Molecular determinants of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Husi, Holger; Human, Christin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a condition that leads to a rapid deterioration of renal function associated with impairment to maintain electrolyte and acid balance, and, if left untreated, ultimately irreversible kidney damage and renal necrosis. There are a number of causes that can trigger AKI, ranging from underlying conditions as well as trauma and surgery. Specifically, the global rise in surgical procedures led to a substantial increase of AKI incidence rates, which in turn impacts on mortality rates, quality of life and economic costs to the healthcare system. However, no effective therapy for AKI exists. Current approaches, such as pharmacological intervention, help in alleviating symptoms in slowing down the progression, but do not prevent or reverse AKI-induced organ damage. Methods: An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery involved in and modulated by AKI induction and progression is necessary to specifically pharmacologically target key molecules. A major hurdle to devise a successful strategy is the multifactorial and complex nature of the disorder itself, whereby the activation of a number of seemingly independent molecular pathways in the kidney leads to apoptotic and necrotic events. Results: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) axis appears to be a common element, leading to downstream events such as triggers of immune responses via the NFB pathway. Other pathways intricately linked with AKI-induction and progression are the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF β) signaling cascades, as well as a number of other modulators. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the involvement of the glutamatergic axis, believed to be mainly a component of the neurological system, is also a major contributor. Conclusions: Here we address the current understanding of the molecular pathways evoked in AKI, their interplay, and the potential to pharmacologically intervene in the

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  12. Molecular mediators of favism-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    García-Camín, Rosa María; Goma, Montserrat; Osuna, Rosa García; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Chevarria, Julio Leonel; Gluksmann, María Constanza; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Intolerance to fava beans in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency (favism) may lead to severe hemolytic crises and decreased renal function. Renal biopsy findings exploring the molecular mechanisms of renal damage in favism have not been previously reported. We report a case of favism-associated acute kidney injury in which renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis and massive iron deposits in tubular cells. Interestingly, iron deposit areas were characterized by the presence of oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) and macrophages expressing the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. In addition, iron deposits, NADPH-p22 phox, hemeoxigenase- 1 and CD163 positive cells were observed in some glomeruli. These results identify both glomerular and tubular involvement in favism-associated acute kidney injury and suggest novel therapeutic targets to prevent or accelerate recovery from acute kidney injury.

  13. Molecular mediators of favism-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    García-Camín, Rosa María; Goma, Montserrat; Osuna, Rosa García; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Buendía, Irene; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Manzarbeitia, Félix; Chevarria, Julio Leonel; Gluksmann, María Constanza; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Intolerance to fava beans in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency (favism) may lead to severe hemolytic crises and decreased renal function. Renal biopsy findings exploring the molecular mechanisms of renal damage in favism have not been previously reported. We report a case of favism-associated acute kidney injury in which renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis and massive iron deposits in tubular cells. Interestingly, iron deposit areas were characterized by the presence of oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) and macrophages expressing the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. In addition, iron deposits, NADPH-p22 phox, hemeoxigenase- 1 and CD163 positive cells were observed in some glomeruli. These results identify both glomerular and tubular involvement in favism-associated acute kidney injury and suggest novel therapeutic targets to prevent or accelerate recovery from acute kidney injury. PMID:23006341

  14. The incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Karlson, T A; Klein, B E

    1986-10-01

    Little information is available on the incidence and severity of eye injuries despite the disfigurement and vision loss they cause. From a population-based study in Dane County, Wisconsin, the incidence of acute hospital-treated eye injuries was 423/100,000 residents in 1979. The most common causes of eye injuries were assaults, work-related events, sports and recreational activities, motor vehicle crashes, and falls. Consumer products were involved in almost 70% (9/13) of severe eye injuries classified as severe. Injuries from fireworks were not found at all in this population. Implementing known strategies for eye injury prevention would substantially reduce their incidence. These include requiring certified eye protectors at workplaces and in sports activities whenever possible rather than making their use voluntary. For the preponderance of eye injuries, however, modifying potentially hazardous consumer products, including the interior of passenger cars, will be necessary. PMID:3767676

  15. Properdin in complement activation and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Lesher, Allison M; Nilsson, Bo; Song, Wen-Chao

    2013-12-15

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: (1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, (2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and (3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases.

  16. Neuroimmune Control of Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Okusa, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in identifying pathophysiological mechanisms of acute kidney injury (AKI), no definitive therapeutic or preventive modalities have been developed with the exception of dialysis. One possible approach is the control of inflammation and AKI through activation of the neuro-immune axis. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is thought to contribute to the homeostatic response to inflammation-related disorders and forms the basis for recent approaches to therapeutic intervention. The concept is based on the emerging understanding of the interface between the nervous and immune systems. In the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, the efferent vagus nerve indirectly stimulates the CD4+ T cells in the spleen. The CD4+ T cells produce acetylcholine, which stimulates alpha 7 nicotinic receptors (α7nAch) on macrophages. Activation of the α7nAch receptors on macrophages activates NF-κβ and elicits an anti-inflammatory response. Recently we demonstrated the effect of a non-pharmacologic, noninvasive, ultrasound-based method to prevent renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and sepsis-induced AKI in mice. Our data suggest that ultrasound-induced tissue protection is mediated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. In addition, nicotinic receptor agonists and ghrelin, a neuropeptide, were reported to prevent AKI possibly through a mechanism closely linked with vagus nerve stimulation. Based on the studies focusing on inflammation and the observations regarding kidney injury, we believe that activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway will be a new modality for the prevention and treatment of AKI. PMID:26376049

  17. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury: Evidence or paradigm?

    PubMed

    Lombi, Fernando; Muryan, Alexis; Canzonieri, Romina; Trimarchi, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury in the critically ill represents an independent risk factor of morbidity and mortality in the short and long terms, with significant economic impacts in terms of public health costs. Currently its diagnosis is still based on the presence of oliguria and/or a gradual increase in serum creatinine, which make the diagnosis a delayed event and to detriment of the so-called 'therapeutic window'. The appearance of new biomarkers of acute kidney injury could potentially improve this situation, contributing to the detection of 'subclinical acute kidney injury', which could allow the precocious employment of multiple treatment strategies in order to preserve kidney function. However these new biomarkers display sensitive features that may threaten their full capacity of action, which focus specifically on their additional contribution in the early approach of the situation, given the lack of specific validated treatments for acute kidney injury. This review aims to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these new tools in the early management of acute kidney injury.

  18. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  1. Acute elbow injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Kenter, K; Behr, C T; Warren, R F; O'Brien, S J; Barnes, R

    2000-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review to evaluate acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in professional football players from 1991 to 1996 (5 seasons). There were 5 acute medial collateral ligament injuries in 4 players (1 player with bilateral involvement). All injuries occurred with the hand planted on the playing surface while a valgus or hyperextension force was applied to the elbow. There were 2 centers, both involved with long-snapping situations, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All elbows had valgus instability on physical examination. Despite this instability, all players were able to function without operative reconstruction of the medial collateral ligament. No evidence of valgus instability was seen at the time of follow-up (average, 3.4 years). Next, we reviewed all acute elbow injuries in the National Football League from the same 5-season period. Ninety-one acute elbow injuries were reviewed. Overall, there were 70 (76.9%) elbow sprains, 16 (17.6%) dislocation/subluxation patterns, 4 (4.4%) fractures, and 1 (1.1%) miscellaneous injury. Review of the acute elbow sprains revealed 39 (55.7%) hyperextension injuries, 14 (20%) medial collateral ligament injuries, 2 (2.9%) lateral collateral ligament sprains, and 15 (21.4%) nonspecific sprains. The epidemiology of the 14 medial collateral ligament injuries was studied in more detail. The 2 most common mechanisms of injury were blocking at the line of scrimmage (50%) and the application of a valgus force with the hand planted on the playing surface (29%). There were 8 linemen, 4 receivers, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All injuries were managed with nonoperative treatment. The average time lost was 0.64 games (range, 0 to 4). We report 19 acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in elite football players, 2 of whom are considered overhead throwing athletes, who were able to function at a competitive level without surgical repair or reconstruction, in contrast to baseball

  2. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  3. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization.

  4. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. PMID:24785677

  5. Tissue factor in predicted severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen; Axelsson, Jakob; Eckerwall, Gunilla; Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Roland

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study tissue factor (TF) in acute pancreatitis and evaluate the role of TF as a predictive marker of severity. METHODS: Forty-nine consecutive patients admitted to Lund University Hospital, fulfilling the criteria of predicted severe acute pancreatitis (AP), were recruited prospectively between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples for TF analyses were drawn at inclusion in the study and 12 h, 1 d and 3 d later. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients developed mild AP, and 22 patients severe AP. At inclusion in the study, the groups were comparable with respect to gender, aetiology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and duration of pain. At inclusion in the study and at 12 h, TF was higher in the severe AP group (P = 0.035 and P = 0.049, respectively). After 1 and 3 d, no differences in TF levels were noted. Interleukin (IL)-6 was significantly higher in the severe AP group at all of the studied time points. C-reactive protein (CRP) was significantly higher in the AP group at 1 and 3 d. In receiver operating characteristic-curves, the area under the curve (AUC) for TF was 0.679 (P = 0.035) at inclusion in the study, and a cut off level for TF of 40 pg/mL showed a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 67%, whereas corresponding AUC for IL-6 was 0.775, P = 0.001, and for CRP was 0.653. IL-6 showed better AUC-values than TF at all time points studied. CONCLUSION: TF-levels are raised early in severe AP. TF as an early predictive marker of severe AP is superior to CRP, but inferior to IL-6. PMID:21182229

  6. Sponge-mediated Lentivirus Delivery to Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline M.; Palma, Jaime L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are have are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration. PMID:25724274

  7. Sponge-mediated lentivirus delivery to acute and chronic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aline M; Palma, Jaime L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-04-28

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration.

  8. How to use PRICE treatment for soft tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Norton, Cormac

    2016-08-24

    Rationale and key points This article assists nurses to use the acronym PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation) to guide the treatment of patients with uncomplicated soft tissue injuries to their upper or lower limbs. » Treatment of soft tissue injuries to limbs is important to reduce complications following injury, alleviate pain and ensure normal limb function is restored promptly. » Nurses should have an understanding of the rationale and evidence base supporting PRICE treatment of soft tissue injuries. » Providing accurate information to patients and carers about the management of soft tissue injuries and anticipated recovery time is an important aspect of treatment. » Further research is required to develop best practice in the treatment of soft tissue injuries. Reflective activity 'How to' articles can help you update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article might change your practice when managing patients with soft tissue injuries to upper or lower limbs. 2. Positive elements of your current practice and those that could be enhanced. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio.

  9. How to use PRICE treatment for soft tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Norton, Cormac

    2016-08-24

    Rationale and key points This article assists nurses to use the acronym PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression and elevation) to guide the treatment of patients with uncomplicated soft tissue injuries to their upper or lower limbs. » Treatment of soft tissue injuries to limbs is important to reduce complications following injury, alleviate pain and ensure normal limb function is restored promptly. » Nurses should have an understanding of the rationale and evidence base supporting PRICE treatment of soft tissue injuries. » Providing accurate information to patients and carers about the management of soft tissue injuries and anticipated recovery time is an important aspect of treatment. » Further research is required to develop best practice in the treatment of soft tissue injuries. Reflective activity 'How to' articles can help you update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article might change your practice when managing patients with soft tissue injuries to upper or lower limbs. 2. Positive elements of your current practice and those that could be enhanced. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio. PMID:27641592

  10. Acute kidney injury in dengue fever using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Nikita; Patel, Amish; Abraham, Georgi; Reddy, Yogesh N V; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess incidence and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with dengue fever (DF). A total of 223 patients (males, 130; females, 93; mean age, 26.2 ± 18.2 years) from a tertiary care centre in southern India were retrospectively analysed. Acute renal failure (ARF) developed in 24 (10.8%) patients. Based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria, the results revealed that: 12 (5.4%) had mild AKI; seven (3.1%) had moderate AKI; and five (2.2%) had severe AKI. A further 54 (24%) were diagnosed with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF); 11 (5%) were co-infected with leptospirosis; thrombocytopenia was present in 157 (70%); and 64 (29%) were hypotensive. Patients were divided into either group A (with AKI) or group B (without AKI), and group A was divided into mild (A1), moderate (A2) and severe (A3) subgroups. We recorded: a higher total white count (A = 9824; B = 6706; P = 0.01); serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT; A = 450; B = 144; P = 0.001); alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels (A = 207; B = 42; P = 0.001); lower albumin (A = 2.65; B = 3.09; P < 0.001); and serum bicarbonate (A = 20.57; B = 23.21; P = 0.009). Hypotension (P = 0.01), coexisting viral hepatitis (P < 0.001), sepsis (P < 0.001), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS; P < 0.001) and the need for inotropes (P < 0.001) were associated with DF. Total white count (P = 0.038), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) on discharge (P = 0.034), specific gravity of urine (P = 0.006), ALP (P = 0.013), SGPT (P = 0.042), MODS (P = 0.05) and use of platelet fresh frozen plasma (FFP; P = 0.007) were significantly different between mild, moderate and severe AKI subgroups. Twenty-two (9%) died. AKI is associated with an increased mortality in DF (P = 0.005).

  11. Successful Mitigation of Delayed Intestinal Radiation Injury Using Pravastatin is not Associated with Acute Injury Improvement or Tumor Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Haydont, Valerie; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine |. E-mail: vozenin@igr.fr

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pravastatin mitigates delayed radiation-induced enteropathy in rats, by focusing on the effects of pravastatin on acute cell death and fibrosis according to connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and collagen inhibition. Methods and Materials: Mitigation of delayed radiation-induced enteropathy was investigated in rats using pravastatin administered in drinking water (30 mg/kg/day) 3 days before and 14 days after irradiation. The ileum was irradiated locally after surgical exteriorization (X-rays, 19 Gy). Acute apoptosis, acute and late histologic alterations, and late CTGF and collagen deposition were monitored by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry and colorimetric staining (6 h, 3 days, 14 days, 15 weeks, and 26 weeks after irradiation). Pravastatin antitumor action was studied in HT-29, HeLa, and PC-3 cells by clonogenic cell survival assays and tumor growth delay experiments. Results: Pravastatin improved delayed radiation enteropathy in rats, whereas its benefit in acute and subacute injury remained limited (6 h, 3 days, and 14 days after irradiation). Delayed structural improvement was associated with decreased CTGF and collagen deposition but seemed unrelated to acute damage. Indeed, the early apoptotic index increased, and severe subacute structural damage occurred. Pravastatin elicited a differential effect, protecting normal intestine but not tumors from radiation injury. Conclusion: Pravastatin provides effective protection against delayed radiation enteropathy without interfering with the primary antitumor action of radiotherapy, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible.

  12. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, H.; Gopi, M.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate. PMID:25484533

  13. Involvement of TGF-β1/Smad3 Signaling in Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Liman; Cui, Xueling; Qi, Yan; Xie, Dongxue; Wu, Qian; Chen, Xinxin; Ge, Jingyan; Liu, Zhonghui

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) is a major factor in pathogenesis of chronic hepatic injury. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a liver toxicant, and CCl4-induced liver injury in mouse is a classical animal model of chemical liver injury. However, it is still unclear whether TGF-β1 is involved in the process of CCl4-induced acute chemical liver injury. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of TGF-β1 and its signaling molecule Smad3 in the acute liver injury induce by CCl4. The results showed that CCl4 induced acute liver injury in mice effectively confirmed by H&E staining of liver tissues, and levels of not only liver injury markers serum ALT and AST, but also serum TGF-β1 were elevated significantly in CCl4-treated mice, compared with the control mice treated with olive oil. Our data further revealed that TGF-β1 levels in hepatic tissue homogenate increased significantly, and type II receptor of TGF-β (TβRII) and signaling molecules Smad2, 3, mRNA expressions and Smad3 and phospho-Smad3 protein levels also increased obviously in livers of CCl4-treated mice. To clarify the effect of the elevated TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling on CCl4-induced acute liver injury, Smad3 in mouse liver was overexpressed in vivo by tail vein injection of Smad3-expressing plasmids. Upon CCl4 treatment, Smad3-overexpressing mice showed more severe liver injury identified by H&E staining of liver tissues and higher serum ALT and AST levels. Simultaneously, we found that Smad3-overexpressing mice treated with CCl4 showed more macrophages and neutrophils infiltration in liver and inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 levels increment in serum when compared with those in control mice treated with CCl4. Moreover, the results showed that the apoptosis of hepatocytes increased significantly, and apoptosis-associated proteins Bax, cytochrome C and the cleaved caspase 3 expressions were up-regulated in CCl4-treated Smad3-overexpressing mice as well. These results suggested that TGF

  14. Acute kidney injury in sepsis: transient or intrinsic?

    PubMed

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-11-20

    The negative prediction of intrinsic versus transient acute kidney injury (AKI) in septic patients may be facilitated by combined assessment of fractional excretion of sodium and urea. If both excretions are high this would signal the presence of transient AKI and suggest that successful restoration of diuresis by conservative therapy is likely, thus supporting a wait-and-watch approach regarding the initiation of acute renal replacement therapy.

  15. Acute Scrotal Injuries in Athletes: Evaluation by Diagnostic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Noujaim, S E; Nagle, C E

    1989-10-01

    In brief: Boxers, baseball players, and some other athletes are sometimes at risk of injury to the genitalia. For some injuries, such as testicular rupture or acute torsion, early surgery increases the likelihood of preserving function. Other injuries are more appropriately treated conservatively. When a patient has severe pain, physical examination of the scrotum can be difficult, and information obtained with ultrasound and radionuclide scintigraphy can help in the diagnosis and treatment. The authors compare normal findings with those indicating the presence of hematocele, intratesticular hemorrhage, testicular fracture, torsion, and epididymo-orchitis.

  16. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  17. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  18. Therapeutic modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intraalveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. As such, there have been numerous investigations modulating TF activity in a variety of experimental systems in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for ALI/ARDS. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of TF and other proteins of the coagulation cascade as well the fibrinolysis pathway in the development of ALI/ARDS with an emphasis on the pathways that are potential therapeutic targets. These include the TF inhibitor pathway, the protein C pathway, antithrombin, heparin, and modulation of fibrinolysis through plasminogen activator- 1 (PAI-1) or plasminogen activators (PA). Although experimental studies show promising results, clinical trials to date have proven unsuccessful in improving patient outcomes. Modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis has complex effects on both hemostasis and inflammatory pathways and further studies are needed to develop new treatment strategies for patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:21401517

  19. Characterization of the Leukocyte Response in Acute Vocal Fold Injury

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Guille, Jeremy; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages location in the superficial layer of the vocal fold (VF) is not only at the first line of defense, but in a place of physiologic importance to voice quality. This study characterizes and compares macrophage function in two models of acute injury. Porcine VF injuries were created bilaterally by either surgical biopsy or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1.5μg/kg) injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1- or 5-day post LPS or 3-, 7-, or 23-days post-surgical injury (n = 3/time/ injury). Flow cytometry characterized immunophenotypes and RT-PCR quantified cytokine gene expression. Uninjured VF were used as controls. Post-surgical and LPS injury, SWC9+/SWC3- cells identified as hi SLA-DR+ (p<0.05) compared to controls along with hi CD16+ expression at 1-day and 3-days respectively compared to all other time points (p<0.05). Surgical injuries, SWC9+/SWC3- cells exhibited hi CD163+ (p<0.05) at 3-days along with upregulation in TNFα and TGFβ1 mRNA compared to 23-days (p<0.05). No measurable changes to IL–12, IFNγ, IL–10, IL–4 mRNA post-surgery. LPS injuries induced upregulation of TNFα, IL–12, IFNγ, IL–10, and IL–4 mRNA at 1- and 5-days compared to controls (p<0.05). Higher levels of IL–10 mRNA were found 1-day post-LPS compared to 5-days (p<0.05). No changes to CD163 or CD80/86 post-LPS were measured. Acute VF injuries revealed a paradigm of markers that appear to associate with each injury. LPS induced a regulatory phenotype indicated by prominent IL–10 mRNA expression. Surgical injury elicited a complex phenotype with early TNFα mRNA and CD163+ and persistent TGFβ1 transcript expression. PMID:26430970

  20. Severe progressive periodontal destruction due to radiation tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Z W; Bakri, M M

    1993-12-01

    Cancer radiotherapy to the head and neck region results in short- and long-term radiation tissue injuries. Radiation bone injury is a long-term manifestation which could progress to osteoradionecrosis. A case of radiation tissue injury to the periodontium is presented. The possible pathogenesis of these events is described as they relate to the sequential radiographic changes observed over a period of 6 years until the involved teeth were exfoliated. The post-irradiation management of the teeth with advancing periodontal disease in the path of irradiation was by conservative means, including good personal oral hygiene care, scaling and root planing, periodic chlorhexidine irrigation, and topical fluoride application.

  1. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis by inhibiting ROS and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce (•)OH and ONOO(-) selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  2. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically. PMID:25878401

  3. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Nag, A.; Datta, J.; Das, A.; Agarwal, A. K.; Sinha, D.; Mondal, S.; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a “gravitational” pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  4. Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsillar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical implementation of a thermal therapy requires the ability to predict tissue injury following exposures to specific thermal histories. As part of an effort to develop a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy, the degree of primary hyperthermic tissue injury in human tonsil was characterized. Fifteen fresh pediatric hypertrophic tonsillectomy specimens were sectioned and treated in a NIST-calibrated saline bath at temperatures of 40 to 70°C with hold times of one to seven minutes. The treated tissues were subsequently nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) stained to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation as a marker of cellular injury/death. The NBT stains were quantitatively image analyzed and used to calculate Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsils.

  5. [Clinical manifestation of acute pancreatitis in children with caustic ingestion injury - the role of oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Brankov, O; Shivachev, Kh; Drebov, R; Dumanov, K

    2007-01-01

    For a 10 years period (1996-2005) 66 children with severe caustic injuries of the esophagus and stomach were admitted at the Department of Pediatric Surgery. Subject of this article are 17 children with clinical, laboratory and intraoperative proven acute pancreatitis. The patients were admitted at the clinic 12 hours to 12 days after the ingestion of the corrosive agent. Fifteen of them underwent surgery and different surgical procedures were performed - gastric resection, transhiatal esophagectomy, gastrectomy, gastrostomy. In all patients were found elevated levels of alpha-amilase in blood serum and urine as well as elevated CRP in blood serum. Clinically manifested acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on ultrasound studies and laparotomy. The newest theories about the genesis of acute pancreatitis emphasize on the role of oxidative stress. Experimental models suggest that burn trauma (thermal or chemical) cause critical increase of free oxygen radicals and lipid peroxydation products in the tissue of the damaged organ and the bloodstream. The local tissue damage leads to release of inflammatory mediators which enter the bloodstream and cause distant organs damage of - lung, liver, kidneys and pancreas. In this preliminary report the authors discuss the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in children with acute corrosive ingestion injury of the esophagus and stomach. We call this phenomenon " caustic " oxidative stress. This is the first scientific report on this topic in the reviewed literature.

  6. Promotion of Growth of Tumour Cells in Acutely Inflamed Tissues

    PubMed Central

    van den Brenk, H. A. S.; Stone, M.; Kelly, H.; Orton, C.; Sharpington, C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute inflammatory reactions were induced in rats by the intravenous injection of cellulose sulphate (CS) or an extract of normal rat lung homogenate (LH), or by intraperitoneal injections of Compound 48/80. These treatments greatly increased survival and clonogenic growth in the lungs of rats of intravenously injected allogeneic W-256 and Y-P388 tumour cells. Increase in the dose of intravenously injected CS caused a logarithmic increase in colony forming efficiency (CFE) of tumour cells in the lungs. CFE was not stimulated by the intravenous injection of rats with pharmacological mediators of inflammation (histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and prostaglandins PGE1 and PGF2α) which are released from tissues by agents which induce inflammation. Stimulation of CFE by CS occurred in adrenalectomized rats but was inhibited by treatment of rats with an anti-inflammatory steroid, dexamethasone. CFE was stimulated by CS in tumour immunized rats; the inflammatory state did not prevent the expression of immunity but “rescued” a proportion (approximately 20%) of the injected tumour cells from immunodestruction in the lungs. A higher proportion of tumours grew in the paws of rats when a small number of W-256 cells were injected interdigitally into the acute inflammatory swellings produced by the local injection of paws with LH or CS. CS is a “synthetic heparin” which causes marked prolongation of blood clotting time and also increases fibrinolytic activity of the blood. Anticoagulant treatment of rats with heparin did not affect CFE. Thus, there was no direct correlation between blood clotting time and CFE of blood borne tumour cells in the rat. The mechanisms which may be responsible for the nonspecific growth promoting effects of inflammatory reactions induced by various types of tissue injury on tumour induction and growth are discussed. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4451630

  7. Tissue Engineered Strategies for Skeletal Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are common in athletes, occurring with direct and indirect mechanisms and marked residual effects, such as severe long-term pain and physical disability. Current therapy consists of conservative management including RICE protocol (rest, ice, compression and elevation), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and intramuscular corticosteroids. However, current management of muscle injuries often does not provide optimal restoration to preinjury status. New biological therapies, such as injection of platelet-rich plasma and stem-cell-based therapy, are appealing. Although some studies support PRP application in muscle-injury management, reasons for concern persist, and further research is required for a standardized and safe use of PRP in clinical practice. The role of stem cells needs to be confirmed, as studies are still limited and inconsistent. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms involved in muscle regeneration and in survival, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells. PMID:25098362

  8. The aetiology of deep tissue injury: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Peart, Joanna

    2016-08-11

    Deep tissue injury affects patients of all ages in a variety of healthcare settings. It is therefore essential that nurses are aware of the underlying pathogenesis, in order to accurately assess the pressure ulcer risk of vulnerable patients, and to subsequently reduce patient harm. The majority of pressure ulcers are avoidable, however, a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors can contribute towards the development of deep tissue injury. Understanding the body's internal responses to external pressure will enable nurses to recognise that a visual assessment alone may not necessarily identify patients at risk of deep tissue damage. This article reviews the evidence for the internal causative mechanisms of deep tissue injury, while linking to clinical practice and pressure ulcer prevention. PMID:27523755

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  10. Incidence of acute volleyball injuries: a prospective cohort study of injury mechanisms and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bahr, R; Bahr, I A

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the incidence and mechanisms of acute volleyball injuries, with particular reference to possible risk factors for ankle injuries. Coaches and players in the top two divisions of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation were asked to keep records of exposure time and all acute volleyball injuries causing a player to miss at least one playing day during one season. We found 89 injuries among 272 players during 51588 player hours, 45837 h of training and 5751 h of match play. The total injury incidence was 1.7 +/- 0.2 per 1000 h of play, 1.5 +/- 0.2 during training and 3.5 +/- 0.8 during match play. The ankle (54%) was the most commonly injured region, followed by the lower back (11%), knee (8%), shoulder (8%) and fingers (7%). Of the ankle injuries, 79% were recurrences, and the relative risk of injury was 3.8 (P < 0.0001) for previously injured ankles (38 of 232) vs. non-injured ankles (10 of the 234). Moreover, a reinjury was observed in 21 of the 50 ankles that had suffered an ankle sprain within the last 6 months (42.0 +/- 7.0%; risk ratio: 9.8 vs. uninjured ankles; P < 0.000001). The data indicate that external supports should be worn for 6-12 months after an ankle sprain and that specific injury prevention programs may be developed for ankle sprains in volleyball. PMID:9200321

  11. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  12. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  13. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  14. Acute injury affects lubricin expression in knee menisci: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Cardile, Venera; Leonardi, Rosalia

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate for the first time lubricin expression in intact menisci and in menisci from patients with recent knee joint injury using histology, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and gene expression analysis, to provide insights into pathological processes affecting meniscal tissue. Lubricin expression was studied in vivo in 20 patients (14 males and 6 females) with recent joint injury subjected to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and in vitro in fibroblast-like cells from meniscus tissue to establish whether it is down-regulated following acute traumatic knee injury. The control group consisted of cadaver donors with normal menisci. Histology demonstrated a normal tissue without structural changes in control samples and structural alterations and clefts in injured menisci. Very strong lubricin immunohistochemical staining was observed in intact menisci; in contrast weak staining was seen in injured menisci. Western blot and mRNA expression analysis also demonstrated strong lubricin expression in control cells and a negligible amount of lubricin in injured fibroblast-like cells. Our data provide information concerning the immediate in vivo response to injury of human knee menisci by documenting early changes in the boundary-lubricating ability of synovial fluid and articular cartilage integrity. These findings may provide the biological basis for developing novel medical therapies to be applied before surgical treatment to preserve tissue function and prevent cartilage damage.

  15. Simvastatin reduces VEGF and NO levels in acute stages of experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Hatice; Yavuz, Özlem; Iş, Merih; Çomunoğlu, Nil; Üzüm, Gülay; Akyüz, Feyzullah; Yıldırım, Hayriye Ak

    2013-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of simvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering agent, on vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), nitric oxide (NO) levels and neuroprotection, in rats with experimentally induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty Wistar albino rats were categorized into four groups: sham operated (S), trauma (T), trauma + vehicle (T + V) and trauma + simvastatin (T + S). The T, T + V and T + S groups were subjected to TBI. The T + V group was administered vehicle [ethanol:saline (1/2)] and the T + S group was administered 1 mg/kg of simvastatin 3 h after the injury insult. Blood and brain tissue specimens were obtained 24 h after the trauma to measure VEGFs and NO levels and perform histopathological examinations. The histopathological injury scores of brain tissues were significantly higher in the T group, and simvastatin significantly prevented brain injury in the T + S group. In the T group, significant increases of VEGF levels in serum and brain tissues were noted, which were prevented with simvastatin treatment in the T + S group. The markedly high levels of NO in brain tissues of the T group were decreased by simvastatin treatment in the T + S group. It can be concluded that, as evidenced by histopathological findings, simvastatin treatment improves neuropathology in acute stages of TBI.

  16. Imaging Evaluation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Christopher A; Talbott, Jason F; Gean, Alisa

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, diagnosis, and triage of patients with TBI. Recent studies suggest that it also helps predict patient outcomes. TBI consists of multiple pathoanatomic entities. This article reviews the current state of TBI imaging including its indications, benefits and limitations of the modalities, imaging protocols, and imaging findings for each of these pathoanatomic entities. Also briefly surveyed are advanced imaging techniques, which include several promising areas of TBI research. PMID:27637393

  17. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  18. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  19. Ischemia-reperfusion Model of Acute Kidney Injury and Post Injury Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Skrypnyk, Nataliya I.; Harris, Raymond C.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion induced acute kidney injury (IR-AKI) is widely used as a model of AKI in mice, but results are often quite variable with high, often unreported mortality rates that may confound analyses. Bilateral renal pedicle clamping is commonly used to induce IR-AKI, but differences between effective clamp pressures and/or renal responses to ischemia between kidneys often lead to more variable results. In addition, shorter clamp times are known to induce more variable tubular injury, and while mice undergoing bilateral injury with longer clamp times develop more consistent tubular injury, they often die within the first 3 days after injury due to severe renal insufficiency. To improve post-injury survival and obtain more consistent and predictable results, we have developed two models of unilateral ischemia-reperfusion injury followed by contralateral nephrectomy. Both surgeries are performed using a dorsal approach, reducing surgical stress resulting from ventral laparotomy, commonly used for mouse IR-AKI surgeries. For induction of moderate injury BALB/c mice undergo unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 26 min and also undergo simultaneous contralateral nephrectomy. Using this approach, 50-60% of mice develop moderate AKI 24 hr after injury but 90-100% of mice survive. To induce more severe AKI, BALB/c mice undergo renal pedicle clamping for 30 min followed by contralateral nephrectomy 8 days after injury. This allows functional assessment of renal recovery after injury with 90-100% survival. Early post-injury tubular damage as well as post injury fibrosis are highly consistent using this model. PMID:23963468

  20. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  1. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats.

  2. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  3. Tracheoinnominate fistula: a rare acute complication of penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Kulyapina, Alena; Díaz, Dolores Pérez; Rodríguez, Teresa Sanchez; Fuentes, Fernando Turegano

    2015-05-01

    Penetrating injuries in the base of the neck are considered to be the most dangerous due to the potential combination of vascular and intrathoracic lesions. We describe an extremely rare case of combined injury of the trachea and innominate artery, which resulted in formation of a traumatic acute tracheoinnominate fistula. Previously, these fistulas have been described as an iatrogenic complication of tracheostomy, presenting with massive peristomal bleed or hemoptysis. This case demonstrates that a combination of lesions to vital anatomical structures in the neck can change their clinical presentation, making them extremely difficult to diagnose.

  4. Mechanisms of Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Experimental Lonomia obliqua Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Markus; Santi, Lucélia; Beys-da-Silva, Walter O.; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus Silva; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Yates, John R.; Ribeiro, Maria Aparecida; Guimarães, Jorge Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Background Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be responsible for its deadly actions. This study evaluates the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. Methods To characterize L. obliqua venom effects we subcutaneously injected rats and examined renal functional, morphological and biochemical parameters at several time points. We also performed discovery based proteomic analysis to measure protein expression to identify molecular pathways of renal disease. Results L. obliqua envenomation causes acute tubular necrosis, which is associated with renal inflammation; formation of hematic casts, resulting from intravascular hemolysis; increase in vascular permeability and fibrosis. The dilation of Bowman’s space and glomerular tuft is related to fluid leakage and intra-glomerular fibrin deposition, respectively, since tissue factor procoagulant activity increases in the kidney. Systemic hypotension also contributes to these alterations and to the sudden loss of basic renal functions, including filtration and excretion capacities, urinary concentration and maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In addition, envenomed kidneys increases expression of proteins involved in cell stress, inflammation, tissue injury, heme-induced oxidative stress, coagulation and complement system activation. Finally, the localization of the venom in renal tissue agrees with morphological and functional alterations, suggesting also a direct nephrotoxic activity. Conclusions Mechanisms of L. obliqua-induced AKI are complex involving mainly glomerular and tubular functional impairment and vascular alterations. These results are important to understand the mechanisms of renal injury and may suggest more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the pathology of Lonomia’s envenomation. PMID:24798088

  5. Synthetic marijuana and acute kidney injury: an unforeseen association

    PubMed Central

    Kazory, Amir; Aiyer, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) have emerged as drugs of abuse with increasing popularity among young adults. The potential renal complication related to the abuse of SC was not recognized until recently. Here, we present a case of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) that developed after inhalation of SC in an otherwise healthy young patient. A kidney biopsy revealed severe acute tubular necrosis, and supportive management resulted in the recovery of the kidney function. Herein, we briefly summarize the only two previous reports (a total of 21 cases) on the association between SC abuse and renal dysfunction and identify the common aspects in all observations. PMID:26064495

  6. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  7. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  8. Drug delivery, cell-based therapies, and tissue engineering approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kabu, Shushi; Gao, Yue; Kwon, Brian K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-12-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating neurological and pathological consequences, causing major dysfunction to the motor, sensory, and autonomic systems. The primary traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a cascade of acute and chronic degenerative events, leading to further secondary injury. Many therapeutic strategies have been developed to potentially intervene in these progressive neurodegenerative events and minimize secondary damage to the spinal cord. Additionally, significant efforts have been directed toward regenerative therapies that may facilitate neuronal repair and establish connectivity across the injury site. Despite the promise that these approaches have shown in preclinical animal models of SCI, challenges with respect to successful clinical translation still remain. The factors that could have contributed to failure include important biologic and physiologic differences between the preclinical models and the human condition, study designs that do not mirror clinical reality, discrepancies in dosing and the timing of therapeutic interventions, and dose-limiting toxicity. With a better understanding of the pathobiology of events following acute SCI, developing integrated approaches aimed at preventing secondary damage and also facilitating neuroregenerative recovery is possible and hopefully will lead to effective treatments for this devastating injury. The focus of this review is to highlight the progress that has been made in drug therapies and delivery systems, and also cell-based and tissue engineering approaches for SCI. PMID:26343846

  9. Drug delivery, cell-based therapies, and tissue engineering approaches for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kabu, Shushi; Gao, Yue; Kwon, Brian K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-12-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating neurological and pathological consequences, causing major dysfunction to the motor, sensory, and autonomic systems. The primary traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a cascade of acute and chronic degenerative events, leading to further secondary injury. Many therapeutic strategies have been developed to potentially intervene in these progressive neurodegenerative events and minimize secondary damage to the spinal cord. Additionally, significant efforts have been directed toward regenerative therapies that may facilitate neuronal repair and establish connectivity across the injury site. Despite the promise that these approaches have shown in preclinical animal models of SCI, challenges with respect to successful clinical translation still remain. The factors that could have contributed to failure include important biologic and physiologic differences between the preclinical models and the human condition, study designs that do not mirror clinical reality, discrepancies in dosing and the timing of therapeutic interventions, and dose-limiting toxicity. With a better understanding of the pathobiology of events following acute SCI, developing integrated approaches aimed at preventing secondary damage and also facilitating neuroregenerative recovery is possible and hopefully will lead to effective treatments for this devastating injury. The focus of this review is to highlight the progress that has been made in drug therapies and delivery systems, and also cell-based and tissue engineering approaches for SCI.

  10. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury.

  11. Diagnostic Criteria for Acute Kidney Injury: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute kidney injury in a clinical diagnosis guided by standard criteria based on changes in serum creatinine, urine output or both. Severity of acute kidney injury is determined by the magnitude of increase in serum creatinine or decrease in urine output. Patients manifesting both oliguria and azotemia and those in which these impairments are persistent are more likely to have worse disease and worse outcomes. Both short- and long-term outcomes are worse when patients have some stage of AKI by both criteria. Duration of AKI was also a significant predictor of long-term outcomes irrespective of severity. New biomarkers for AKI may substantially aid in the risk assessment and evaluation of patients at risk for AKI. PMID:26410133

  12. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1β concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1β protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 ± 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 ± 13.89 μmol/L at 6 h, 23.53 ± 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 ± 17.67 μmol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 ± 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 ± 21.09 μmol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1β levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 ± 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 ± 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 ± 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all

  13. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  14. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  15. Paneth cell-mediated multiorgan dysfunction after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Ouellette, André J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently complicated by extra-renal multi-organ injury including intestinal and hepatic dysfunction. In this study, we hypothesized that a discrete intestinal source of pro-inflammatory mediators drives multi-organ injury in response to AKI. After induction of AKI in mice by renal ischemia-reperfusion or bilateral nephrectomy, small intestinal Paneth cells increased the synthesis and release of IL-17A in conjunction with severe intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. We also detected significantly increased IL-17A in portal and systemic circulation after AKI. Intestinal macrophages appear to transport released Paneth cell granule constituents induced by AKI, away from the base of the crypts into the liver. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of Paneth cells decreased small intestinal IL-17A secretion and plasma IL-17A levels significantly and attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury after AKI. Similarly, portal delivery of IL-17A in macrophage depleted mice decreased markedly, and intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following AKI was attenuated without affecting intestinal IL-17A generation. In conclusion, AKI induces IL-17A synthesis and secretion by Paneth cells to initiate intestinal and hepatic injury by hepatic and systemic delivery of IL-17A by macrophages. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from AKI. PMID:23109723

  16. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  17. [Sodium dichloroisocyanurate-induced acute lung injury in a child].

    PubMed

    Wiel, E; Sicot, J; Leteurtre, S; Binoche, A; Nisse, P; Assez, N

    2013-04-01

    Intoxication, by cyanurate and its chlorated derivatives in children, is increasingly reported in the literature due to accidental ingestion compared to accidental inhalation. We report a case in a 5-year-old child who presented with acute lung injury due to accidental inhalation of gas formed after a reaction of sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets with water. Prevention remains the best way to reduce the risk of children being intoxicated by inhalation of the gas formed after contact of tablets with water. PMID:23433843

  18. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury. PMID:24082167

  19. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  20. Deep tissue injury from a bioengineering point of view.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Amit

    2009-04-01

    The phrasing of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel's (NPUAP) definition of deep tissue injury (DTI) was based on case reports, clinical observations, and experience. Although etiological studies of DTI, primarily related to characterizing biomechanical factors affecting onset and progression, support and strengthen parts of the NPUAP's definition, some recent findings suggest a need to re-evaluate the wording and perhaps refine future definitions of DTI. Application of existing bioengineering research to underlying biological, physical, biomechanical, and biochemical mechanisms involved in the definition of DTI suggests the following: 1) changes in skin color - ie, deviation of the local skin color from the surroundings - may indicate a DTI might be present, but color is not useful for quantifying the severity of injury; 2) the pressure and/or shear definition is inaccurate because it creates an artificial distinction between pressure and shear, which are physically coupled, and because it ignores tensional loads; 3) palpating tissue firmness at the wound site provides limited assessment information because tissue firmness will depend on the point in time along the course of DTI development. Damaged tissues might appear stiffer than surrounding tissues if examined when muscle tissue is locally contracted due to local rigor mortis but at a later stage damage might manifest as tissues that are softer than their surroundings when digestive enzymes start decomposing necrotic tissues; 4) skin temperature changes near the DTI site may reflect inflammatory response, causing local heating, or ischemic perfusion, causing local cooling; and 5) rapid deterioration of DTI is likely occurring due to muscle tissue stiffening at the rigor mortis phase; stiffened tissues abnormally deform adjacent tissues and this effect is amplified if muscles are atrophied. The application of interdisciplinary research may help clinicians and researchers move from evolving jargons

  1. Acute lung injury after inhalation of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih Ling; Yap, Eng Soo; Khoo, See Meng; Lim, Tow Keang; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Teo, Sylvia Tzu Li

    2008-12-01

    We report two cases of acute lung injury after the inhalation of nitric acid fumes in an industrial accident. The first patient, who was not using a respirator and standing in close proximity to the site of spillage of concentrated nitric acid, presented within 12 h with worsening dyspnea and required noninvasive ventilation for type 1 respiratory failure. The second case presented 1 day later with similar symptoms, but only required supportive treatment with high-flow oxygen. Both patients' chest radiographs showed widespread bilateral airspace shadows consistent with acute lung injury. Both received treatment with systemic steroids. They were discharged from hospital 5 days postexposure. Initial lung function test showed a restrictive pattern that normalized by 3 weeks postexposure. This case series describes the natural history after acute inhalation of nitric acid fumes, and demonstrates that the severity of lung injury is directly dependent on the exposure level. It also highlights the use of noninvasive ventilatory support in the management of such patients.

  2. Autophagy in acute brain injury: feast, famine, or folly?

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig M; Chen, Yaming; Sullivan, Mara L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B

    2011-07-01

    In the central nervous system, increased autophagy has now been reported after traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and seizures. This increase in autophagy could be physiologic, converting damaged or dysfunctional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles to their amino acid and fatty acid components for recycling. On the other hand, this increase in autophagy could be supraphysiologic, perhaps consuming and eliminating functional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles as well. Whether an increase in autophagy is beneficial (feast) or detrimental (famine) in brain likely depends on both the burden of intracellular substrate targeted for autophagy and the capacity of the cell's autophagic machinery. Of course, increased autophagy observed after brain injury could also simply be an epiphenomenon (folly). These divergent possibilities have clear ramifications for designing therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy after acute brain injury and are the subject of this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Autophagy and protein degradation in neurological diseases."

  3. Pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:25165721

  4. VSL#3 probiotics provide protection against acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Salim, S Y; Young, P Y; Lukowski, C M; Madsen, K L; Sis, B; Churchill, T A; Khadaroo, R G

    2013-12-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury (AII/R) is an adaptive physiologic response during critical illness, involving mesenteric vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion. Prevention of AII/R in high risk patient populations would have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of VSL#3 probiotic treatment in a murine model of AII/R. Adult 129/SvEv mice were subjected to an experimental AII/R model using superior mesenteric artery occlusion. Animals were pre-treated with either three days or two weeks of VSL#3 probiotics. Local tissue injury markers were assessed by levels of myeloperoxidase and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFкB). Systemic and local cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL- 10, TNFα, and interferon gamma were measured by ELISA and multiplex fluorescent detection. VSL#3 probiotics reduced local tissue inflammation and injury due to AII/R. A two-week course of VSL#3 was more effective than a shorter three-day course. The reduction in local inflammation from the two-week course of VSL#3 is correlated to a significant reduction in levels of active IL-1β, and tissue levels of myeloperoxidase. Levels of active NFкB were significantly elevated in the vehicle-fed AII/R mice, corroborating with tissue inflammation, which were attenuated by VSL#3 administrations. VSL#3 did not cause any systemic inflammation or lung injury. VSL#3 probiotics are effective in reducing local tissue injury from AII/R by down-regulating pro-inflammatory mediators and immune cell recruitment. This study highlights a potential role for VSL#3 in management of patients at high risk for AII/R.

  5. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  6. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    SEPEHR, REYHANEH; AUDI, SAID H.; MALEKI, SEPIDEH; STANISZEWSKI, KEVIN; EIS, ANNIE L.; KONDURI, GIRIJA G.; RANJI, MAHSA

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  7. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP. PMID:26823696

  8. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP.

  9. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy.

  10. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  11. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chen, Chin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN) on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control) thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV) of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology), neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory. PMID:25100435

  12. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Ségolène; Dumurgier, Julien; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2014-04-24

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied.

  13. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied. PMID:25029344

  14. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  15. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  16. OCT-based in vivo tissue injury mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Tissue injury mapping (TIM) is developed by using a non-invasive in vivo optical coherence tomography to generate optical attenuation coefficient and microvascular map of the injured tissue. Using TIM, the infarct region development in mouse cerebral cortex during stroke is visualized. Moreover, we demonstrate the in vivo human facial skin structure and microvasculature during an acne lesion development. The results indicate that TIM may help in the study and the treatment of various diseases by providing high resolution images of tissue structural and microvascular changes.

  17. Intrarenal and urinary oxygenation during norepinephrine resuscitation in ovine septic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Simon R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine is the principal vasopressor used to restore blood pressure in sepsis, but its effects on intrarenal oxygenation are unknown. To clarify this, we examined renal cortical, medullary, and urinary oxygenation in ovine septic acute kidney injury and the response to resuscitation with norepinephrine. A renal artery flow probe and fiberoptic probes were placed in the cortex and medulla of sheep to measure tissue perfusion and oxygenation. A probe in the bladder catheter measured urinary oxygenation. Sepsis was induced in conscious sheep by infusion of Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24 to 30 hours of sepsis, either norepinephrine, to restore mean arterial pressure to preseptic levels or vehicle-saline was infused (8 sheep per group). Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by a reduction in blood pressure of ∼12 mm Hg, renal hyperperfusion, and oliguria. Sepsis reduced medullary perfusion (from an average of 1289 to 628 blood perfusion units), medullary oxygenation (from 32 to 16 mm Hg), and urinary oxygenation (from 36 to 24 mm Hg). Restoring blood pressure with norepinephrine further reduced medullary perfusion to an average of 331 blood perfusion units, medullary oxygenation to 8 mm Hg and urinary oxygenation to 18 mm Hg. Cortical perfusion and oxygenation were preserved. Thus, renal medullary hypoxia caused by intrarenal blood flow redistribution may contribute to the development of septic acute kidney injury, and resuscitation of blood pressure with norepinephrine exacerbates medullary hypoxia. The parallel changes in medullary and urinary oxygenation suggest that urinary oxygenation may be a useful real-time biomarker for risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27165831

  18. Thyroid hormones regulate skeletal muscle regeneration after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna Lúcia R C; Albuquerque, João Paulo C; Matos, Marina S; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Rosenthal, Doris; da Costa, Vânia Maria Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroid statuses during the initial phase of skeletal muscle regeneration in rats. To induce hypo- or hyperthyroidism, adult male Wistar rats were treated with methimazole (0.03%) or T4 (10 μg/100 g), respectively, for 10 days. Three days before sacrifice, a crush injury was produced in the solear muscles of one half of the animals, while the other half remained intact. T3, T4, TSH, and leptin serum levels were not affected by the injury. Serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly increased in hyperthyroid and hyper-injury animals. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by the significant increase in serum TSH levels in hypothyroid and hypo-injury animals. Injury increased cell infiltration and macrophage accumulation especially in hyperthyroid animals. Both type 2 and type 3 deiodinases were induced by lesion, and the opposite occurred with the type 1 isoform, at least in the control and hyperthyroid groups. Injury increased both MyoD and myogenin expression in all the studied groups, but only MyoD expression was increased by thyroidal status only at the protein level. We conclude that thyroid hormones modulate skeletal muscle regeneration possibly by regulating the inflammatory process, as well as MyoD and myogenin expression in the injured tissue.

  19. Acute Molecular Changes in Synovial Fluid Following Human Knee Injury: Association With Early Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Erin; Freidin, Andrew; Kenny, Mark; Judge, Andrew; Saklatvala, Jeremy; Williams, Andy; Vincent, Tonia L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether molecules found to be up‐regulated within hours of surgical joint destabilization in the mouse are also elevated in the analogous human setting of acute knee injury, how this molecular response varies between individuals, and whether it is related to patient‐reported outcomes in the 3 months after injury. Methods Seven candidate molecules were analyzed in blood and synovial fluid (SF) from 150 participants with recent structural knee injury at baseline (<8 weeks from injury) and in blood at 14 days and 3 months following baseline. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score 4 (KOOS4) was obtained at baseline and 3 months. Patient and control samples were compared using Meso Scale Discovery platform assays or enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Results Six of the 7 molecules were significantly elevated in human SF immediately after injury: interleukin‐6 (IL‐6), monocyte chemotactic protein 1, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP‐3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP‐1), activin A, and tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene 6 (TSG‐6). There was low‐to‐moderate correlation with blood measurements. Three of the 6 molecules were significantly associated with baseline KOOS4 (those with higher SF IL‐6, TIMP‐1, or TSG‐6 had lower KOOS4). These 3 molecules, MMP‐3, and activin A were all significantly associated with greater improvement in KOOS4 over 3 months, after adjustment for other relevant factors. Of these, IL‐6 alone significantly accounted for the molecular contribution to baseline KOOS4 and change in KOOS4 over 3 months. Conclusion Our findings validate relevant human biomarkers of tissue injury identified in a mouse model. Analysis of SF rather than blood more accurately reflects this response. The response is associated with patient‐reported outcomes over this early period, with SF IL‐6 acting as a single representative marker. Longitudinal outcomes will determine if these molecules are

  20. Waiver of consent in studies of acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Guy L; Knudson, Paula; McDonald, Marilyn

    2002-10-01

    A multicenter trial of hypothermia in patients with acute brain injury, designed to accrue 140 patients per year and randomizing in less than 6 h from injury, enrolled 392 patients. The design was to achieve 33 degrees C within 8 h after injury. For the first 9 months of the trial, the only consent mechanism permitted by federal regulations was prospective, informed consent. In the subsequent 33 months, after a change in federal regulations, waiver of consent could be used when family could not be located. Waiver of consent was used in 62% of patients enrolled. In the first 9 months of the trial, accrual was 65 patients. In the subsequent 3 years, an average yearly accrual was 127 patients. In the first 9 months, time from injury to randomization was 4.5 +/- 1.2 h; time to achievement of target temperature was 11.7 +/- 2.6 h. In years when waiver of consent was permitted, randomization time was 4.1 +/- 1.1 h, and time to target temperature was 7.9 +/- 2.7 h. For all years of the study, waiver of consent was used for 53% of minorities, 47% of unskilled workers, 33% of nonminorities, and 29% of skilled or professional workers. Minorities were underrepresented by 30% in the first 9 months of the study. We conclude that it is impracticable and unjust to perform studies of acute brain injury without use of waiver of consent when the treatment window is less than 6 h. PMID:12427322

  1. Tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice: a key role for superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nesrine S; Mahran, Laila G; Khattab, Mahmoud M

    2011-08-01

    Acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious clinical problem with high mortality. Oxidative stress was found to play a major role in mediating lung injury and antioxidants have been shown to be effective in attenuating acute lung injury. In this study, we determine the effects of tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and the underlying mechanism. Acute lung injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (1mg/kg) and mice were treated with tempol 30min before injection of LPS. One hour later, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and subjected to estimation of total and differential cell counts as well as the proinflammatory cytokines; tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α), interleukin-1beta(IL-1β) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Lung tissue damage was confirmed by histopathological changes and by immunohistochemical analysis of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Moreover, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) were investigated in the lung tissue. Pretreatment with tempol produced significant attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury as well as inhibition of LPS mediated increase in MPO immunostaining, MDA and NO levels in lung tissue. Elevated cytokines levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue homogenates of acute lung injury mice were significantly decreased after administration of tempol. These findings confirmed significant protection by tempol against LPS-induced acute lung injury and that superoxide anion scavenging appears to be a potential target for new potential therapy in pulmonary disorders.

  2. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, David B.; Tosun, Cigdem; Pampori, Adam; Karimy, Jason K.; Caffes, Nicholas M.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2013-01-01

    First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide) is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1)-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel) and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options. PMID:24275850

  3. Acute kidney injury by arsine poisoning: the ultrastructural pathology of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Young; Eom, Minseob; Yang, Jae Won; Han, Byoung Geun; Choi, Seung Ok; Kim, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a terribly poisonous material. There have been many reports of arsine poisoning in workers, and a few have discussed acute kidney injury by arsine. But literatures which investigated the pathologic findings are uncommon, and especially, the ones describing ultrastructural findings are rare. Here, we report an incident of acute arsine poisoning complicated by acute kidney injury and suggest the characteristics of the renal pathology in arsine-induced renal injury, especially the ultrastructural findings.

  4. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  5. Detection of tissue injury after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Brody, J M; Siebert, W F; Cattau, E L; al-Kawas, F; Goldberg, J A; Zeman, R K

    1991-06-01

    We evaluated seven patients undergoing gallstone lithotripsy for evidence of hepatic or renal trauma after each of 10 lithotripsy treatments. Postlithotripsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sonography showed no evidence of hepatic or renal injury as compared with baseline studies. Four treatments resulted in sonographic evidence of gaseous hepatic microbubbles (analogous to "the bends") due to cavitation effects of the shockwaves. Three of these four treatments produced serum glutamicoxaloacetic transaminase and -pyruvic transaminase elevation. One patient had microscopic hematuria. Minimal tissue damage results from gallstone lithotripsy. MRI and ultrasound, performed after lithotripsy, appear to be less sensitive than transaminasemia in detecting this low-grade injury.

  6. Innate danger signals in acute injury: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Mathieu; Lepape, Alain; Piriou, Vincent; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    The description of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as a reaction to numerous insults marked a turning point in the understanding of acute critical states, which are intensive care basic cases. This concept highlighted the final inflammatory response features whichever the injury mechanism is: infectious, or non-infectious such as extensive burns, traumas, major surgery or acute pancreatitis. In these cases of severe non-infectious insult, many endogenous mediators are released. Like infectious agents components, they can activate the immune system (via common signaling pathways) and initiate an inflammatory response. They are danger signals or alarmins. These molecules generally play an intracellular physiological role and acquire new functions when released in extracellular space. Many progresses brought new information on these molecules and on their function in infectious and non-infectious inflammation. These danger signals can be used as biomarkers and provide new pathophysiological and therapeutic approaches, particularly for immune dysfunctions occurring after an acute injury. We present herein the danger model, the main danger signals and the clinical consequences.

  7. Role of liver progenitors in acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Best, Jan; Dollé, Laurent; Manka, Paul; Coombes, Jason; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Syn, Wing-Kin

    2013-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results from the acute and rapid loss of hepatocyte function and frequently exhibits a fulminant course, characterized by high mortality in the absence of immediate state-of-the-art intensive care and/or emergency liver transplantation (ELT). The role of hepatocyte-mediated liver regeneration during acute and chronic liver injury has been extensively investigated, and recent studies suggest that hepatocytes are not exclusively responsible for the regeneration of the injured liver during fulminant liver injury. Liver progenitor cells (LPC) (or resident liver stem cells) are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. This review aims to provide an overview of the role of the LPC population during ALF, and the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens, and hormones in the LPC response. We will highlight the potential interaction among cellular compartments during ALF, and discuss the possible prognostic value of the LPC response on ALF outcomes. PMID:24133449

  8. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  9. Fungal granulomatous interstitial nephritis presenting as acute kidney injury diagnosed by renal histology including PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Makoto; Kagami, Shino; Nakao, Masatsugu; Kono, Midori; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of fungal granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) presenting as acute kidney injury (AKI). Increased serum creatinine was detected in Patient 1 after chemotherapy for pharyngeal cancer and in Patient 2 after steroid pulse therapy for bronchial asthma. Renal histology of both patients revealed GIN. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of fungal DNA sequences from kidney tissue demonstrated Trichosporon laibachii and Candida albicans, respectively. When AKI occurs in an immunocompromised host, differential diagnosis of fungal interstitial nephritis should be considered. Furthermore, PCR-based detection of fungal DNA sequences from renal specimens can be useful for rapid diagnosis. PMID:23936627

  10. Fungal granulomatous interstitial nephritis presenting as acute kidney injury diagnosed by renal histology including PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Makoto; Kagami, Shino; Nakao, Masatsugu; Kono, Midori; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2012-10-01

    We describe two cases of fungal granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) presenting as acute kidney injury (AKI). Increased serum creatinine was detected in Patient 1 after chemotherapy for pharyngeal cancer and in Patient 2 after steroid pulse therapy for bronchial asthma. Renal histology of both patients revealed GIN. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of fungal DNA sequences from kidney tissue demonstrated Trichosporon laibachii and Candida albicans, respectively. When AKI occurs in an immunocompromised host, differential diagnosis of fungal interstitial nephritis should be considered. Furthermore, PCR-based detection of fungal DNA sequences from renal specimens can be useful for rapid diagnosis.

  11. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  12. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  13. THE USE OF ACETIC ACID IONTOPHORESIS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SOFT TISSUE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Ebaugh, David

    2010-01-01

    Background: Contusions are common injuries that occur in athletics. If repeated, complications like myositis ossificans can occur. This case describes the examination and treatment of an athlete with an acute soft tissue injury. Objective: To describe the treatment approach used with a hockey player who sustained a soft tissue injury in his upper extremity. Case Description: A 19 year old male sustained a soft tissue injury to his upper arm while playing hockey. The athlete complained of pain rated a 2-3 out of 10. He had a well circumscribed, firm, 8 by 5 centimeter palpable mass present along the lateral arm, and was able to passively flex his elbow from 56° to 135°, demonstrating a 56° loss of elbow extension. Functionally, he was able to perform most activities of daily living, but he was unable to play hockey. Over 29 days, the athlete was treated one time with pulsed ultrasound and ice and nine times with iontophoresis using a 2% acetic acid solution. Additionally, the athlete performed pain-free active range of motion exercises for the elbow. Outcome: Following treatment, the athlete's pain resolved, the palpable mass disappeared, and his passive range of motion at the elbow was 0° to 135°. Most importantly, the athlete was able to resume playing hockey. Discussion: Acetic acid iontophoresis may be a successful intervention for soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. In this case, it appeared helpful in decreasing the athlete's impairments and contributed to quicker resumption of all functional activities in less time than previously reported in the literature using traditional treatment interventions. PMID:21655380

  14. Evidence for Acute Myocardial and Skeletal Muscle Injury after Serial Transthoracic Shocks in Healthy Swine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Janelle; Nadeshalingam, Gobinath; Fischer, Kady; Shearer, Jane; Friedrich, Matthias G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous serological studies have shown controversial results whether defibrillation or cardioversion can cause myocardial injury. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) can be used to detect myocardial edema, hyperemia and capillary leak as features of acute myocardial injury. The aim of this study was to assess for myocardial and skeletal muscle injury in swine following transthoracic shocks. Methods Seventeen anaesthetized swine were examined, with 11 undergoing five synchronized transthoracic shocks (200J). Myocardial and skeletal muscle injury were assessed at baseline and up to 5h post-shock employing T1 mapping, T2 mapping, early and late gadolinium enhancement. Serologic markers (cFABP, TnI, CK, and CK-MB) and myocardial tissue were assessed by standard histology methods. Results In myocardial regions within the shock path, T1 and T2 were significantly increased compared to remote myocardium in the same animals. The early gadolinium enhancement ratio between the left-ventricular myocardium and the right pectoral muscle was also increased compared to control animals. After the shocks cFABP and CK were significantly elevated. After shock application, the regions identified as abnormal by CMR showed significantly increased interstitial and myocardial cell areas in histological analysis. This increased cell area suggests significant cellular and interstitial edema. Conclusion Our pilot study data indicate that serial defibrillator shocks lead to acute skeletal muscle and myocardial injury. CMR is a useful tool to detect and localize myocardial and skeletal muscle injury early after transthoracic shocks in vivo. In the future the technique could potentially be used as an additional tool for quality control such as verifying insufficient local shock application in non-responders after cardioversion or to develop safer shock forms. PMID:27611090

  15. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  16. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  17. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Acute Adipose Tissue Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Rongisch, Robert; Hager, Stephan; Grieb, Gerrit; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Bucala, Richard; Bernhagen, Juergen; Pallua, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine and has been implicated in inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the regulation of MIF in adipose tissue and its impact on wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate MIF expression in inflamed adipose and determine its role in inflammatory cell recruitment and wound healing. Adipose tissue was harvested from subcutaneous adipose tissue layers of 24 healthy subjects and from adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 21 patients undergoing wound debridement. MIF protein and mRNA expression were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. Cell-specific MIF expression was visualized by immunohistochemistry. The functional role of MIF in cell recruitment was investigated by a chemotaxis assay and by flow cytometry of labeled macrophages that were injected into Mif-/-and wildtype mice. Wound healing was evaluated by an in vitro scratch assay on human fibroblast monolayers. MIF protein levels of native adipose tissue and supernatants from acutely inflamed wounds were significantly elevated when compared to healthy controls. MIF mRNA expression was increased in acutely inflamed adipose tissue indicating the activation of MIF gene transcription in response to adipose tissue inflammation. MIF is expressed in mature adipocytes and in infiltrated macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell migration was significantly increased towards supernatants derived from inflamed adipose tissue. This effect was partially abrogated by MIF-neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, when compared to wildtype mice, Mif-/-mice showed reduced infiltration of labeled macrophages into LPS-stimulated epididymal fat pads in vivo. Finally, MIF antibodies partially neutralized the detrimental effect of MIF on fibroblast wound healing. Our results indicate that increased MIF expression and rapid activation of the MIF gene in fat tissue adjacent to acute wound healing disorders may play a role in cell

  20. Nephrotoxin Microinjection in Zebrafish to Model Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    McKee, Robert A; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are susceptible to harm from exposure to chemicals they filter from the bloodstream. This can lead to organ injury associated with a rapid decline in renal function and development of the clinical syndrome known as acute kidney injury (AKI). Pharmacological agents used to treat medical circumstances ranging from bacterial infection to cancer, when administered individually or in combination with other drugs, can initiate AKI. Zebrafish are a useful animal model to study the chemical effects on renal function in vivo, as they form an embryonic kidney comprised of nephron functional units that are conserved with higher vertebrates, including humans. Further, zebrafish can be utilized to perform genetic and chemical screens, which provide opportunities to elucidate the cellular and molecular facets of AKI and develop therapeutic strategies such as the identification of nephroprotective molecules. Here, we demonstrate how microinjection into the zebrafish embryo can be utilized as a paradigm for nephrotoxin studies. PMID:27500823

  1. Autophagy is activated to protect against endotoxic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Shuqin; Livingston, Man; Hao, Jielu; li, Lin; Mei, Changlin; Dong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxemia in sepsis, characterized by systemic inflammation, is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients, especially in intensive care unit; however the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Autophagy is a conserved, cellular catabolic pathway that plays crucial roles in cellular homeostasis including the maintenance of cellular function and viability. The regulation and role of autophagy in septic or endotoxic AKI remains unclear. Here we show that autophagy was induced in kidney tubular cells in mice by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy with chloroquine enhanced LPS-induced AKI. Moreover, specific ablation of autophagy gene 7 (Atg7) from kidney proximal tubules worsened LPS-induced AKI. Together, the results demonstrate convincing evidence of autophagy activation in endotoxic kidney injury and support a renoprotective role of autophagy in kidney tubules. PMID:26916346

  2. Acute kidney injury: changing lexicography, definitions, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; Ikizler, T A

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous advances in understanding the molecular determinants of functional kidney injury after ischemic and/or toxic exposure. However, translation of successful novel therapies designed to attenuate kidney functional injury from animal models to the clinical sphere has had modest results. This lack of translatability is at least in part due to lack of sufficient standardization in definitions and classification of cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), an incomplete understanding of the natural history of human AKI, and a limited understanding of how kidney injury interacts with other organ system failure in the context of systemic metabolic abnormalities. A concerted effort is now being made by nephrologists and intensivists to arrive at standardized terminology and classification of AKI. There have also been dramatic advances in our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of AKI, particularly in the hospital and intensive care unit setting. Promising strategies are now being developed which may ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients at risk for or who have developed AKI, which should be readily testable in the coming decade.

  3. Management of Acute Lumbar Injuries in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2016-01-01

    Occupational acute lumbar injuries are a common injury. One intervention that is unique to occupational health is the determination of the amount of physical activity that an injured worker can perform without increasing the risk of further injury. Clinical recommendations suggest that workers continue to stay active; however, it is still the clinician's responsibility to determine the level of activity. The level of work activity is determined on a case-to-case basis and is done by evaluating the physical capacity of an injured worker and the job description. Current evidence-based guidelines suggest that staying active may actually reduce pain levels. The purpose of this evidence-based literature review is to outline the proper assessment and management of workers who have sustained a work-related low back injury. The related literature has been reviewed as well as red flags for more severe neurological conditions that require more in-depth evaluation. Determining the safe level of activity and guided return to work have been discussed. PMID:27187219

  4. Acute Gonadotroph and Somatotroph Hormonal Suppression after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Justin; Dusick, Joshua R.; McArthur, David L.; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Boscardin, W. John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hormonal dysfunction is a known consequence of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we determined the incidence, time course, and clinical correlates of acute post-TBI gonadotroph and somatotroph dysfunction. Patients had daily measurement of serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, estradiol, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for up to 10 days post-injury. Values below the fifth percentile of a healthy cohort were considered abnormal, as were non-measurable growth hormone (GH) values. Outcome measures were frequency and time course of hormonal suppression, injury characteristics, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. The cohort consisted of 101 patients (82% males; mean age 35 years; Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8 in 87%). In men, 100% had at least one low testosterone value, and 93% of all values were low; in premenopausal women, 43% had at least one low estradiol value, and 39% of all values were low. Non-measurable GH levels occurred in 38% of patients, while low IGF-1 levels were observed in 77% of patients, but tended to normalize within 10 days. Multivariate analysis revealed associations of younger age with low FSH and low IGF-1, acute anemia with low IGF-1, and older age and higher body mass index (BMI) with low GH. Hormonal suppression was not predictive of GOS score. These results indicate that within 10 days of complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBI, testosterone suppression occurs in all men and estrogen suppression occurs in over 40% of women. Transient somatotroph suppression occurs in over 75% of patients. Although this acute neuroendocrine dysfunction may not be TBI-specific, low gonadal steroids, IGF-1, and GH may be important given their putative neuroprotective functions. PMID:20214417

  5. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Namas, R; Ghuma, A; Hermus, L; Zamora, R; Okonkwo, DO; Billiar, TR; Vodovotz, Y

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partially propagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP's). DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and non-human primates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS and TBI in the near future. PMID:21483522

  6. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  7. Acute injuries and specific problems in adult athletes.

    PubMed

    Barry, N N; McGuire, J L

    1996-08-01

    Special considerations need to be given to specific groups of adult athletes. The most common problems and needs of female and older athletes are discussed in the first section of this article. The second section reviews the diagnosis and management of certain acute injuries most frequently encountered in adult athletes. The last section discusses the differentiation between tarsal tunnel syndrome and plantar fasciitis, chronic compartmental pressure syndrome and medial tibial stress syndrome ("shin splints"), and pelvic stress fractures and osteitis pubis, some commonly encountered difficult diagnoses.

  8. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VIII. Soft Tissue Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on soft tissue injuries is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the skin; (2) patient assessment for soft-tissue injuries; (3) pathophysiology and management of soft tissue injuries;…

  9. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy.

  10. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  11. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2014-10-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron levels in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 h (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1 ± 3.0 vs. 9.9 ± 0.2 mm(3) in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm(3) in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI.

  12. Transgenic expression of proximal tubule peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in mice confers protection during acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenyang; Nagothu, Kiran K; Desai, Varsha; Lee, Taewon; Branham, William; Moland, Carrie; Megyesi, Judit K; Crew, Mark D; Portilla, Didier

    2009-11-01

    Our previous studies suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) plays a critical role in regulating fatty acid beta-oxidation in kidney tissue and this directly correlated with preservation of kidney morphology and function during acute kidney injury. To further study this, we generated transgenic mice expressing PPARalpha in the proximal tubule under the control of the promoter of KAP2 (kidney androgen-regulated protein 2). Segment-specific upregulation of PPARalpha expression by testosterone treatment of female transgenic mice improved kidney function during cisplatin or ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Ischemia-reperfusion injury or treatment with cisplatin in wild-type mice caused inhibition of fatty-acid oxidation, reduction of mitochondrial genes of oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial DNA, fatty-acid metabolism, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Similar injury in testosterone-treated transgenic mice resulted in amelioration of these effects. Similarly, there were increases in the levels of 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal-derived lipid peroxidation products in wild-type mice, which were also reduced in the transgenic mice. Similarly, necrosis of the S3 segment was reduced in the two injury models in transgenic mice compared to wild type. Our results suggest proximal tubule PPARalpha activity serves as a metabolic sensor. Its increased expression without the use of an exogenous PPARalpha ligand in the transgenic mice is sufficient to protect kidney function and morphology, and to prevent abnormalities in lipid metabolism associated with acute kidney injury.

  13. Vascular Immunotargeting of Glucose Oxidase to the Endothelial Antigens Induces Distinct Forms of Oxidant Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Kennel, Stephen; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Pietra, Giuseppe G.; Murciano, Juan-Carlos; Shah, Sayed A.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Albelda, Steven M.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative endothelial stress, leukocyte transmigration, and pulmonary thrombosis are important pathological factors in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Vascular immunotargeting of the H2O2-generating enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX) to the pulmonary endothelium causes an acute oxidative lung injury in mice. 1 In the present study we compared the pulmonary thrombosis and leukocyte transmigration caused by GOX targeting to the endothelial antigens platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) and thrombomodulin (TM). Both anti-PECAM and anti-TM delivered similar amounts of 125I-GOX to the lungs and caused a dose-dependent, tissue-selective lung injury manifested within 2 to 4 hours by high lethality, vascular congestion, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) sequestration in the pulmonary vasculature, severe pulmonary edema, and tissue oxidation, yet at an equal dose, anti-TM/GOX inflicted more severe lung injury than anti-PECAM/GOX. Moreover, anti-TM/GOX-induced injury was accompanied by PMN transmigration in the alveolar space, whereas anti-PECAM/GOX-induced injury was accompanied by PMN degranulation within vascular lumen without PMN transmigration, likely because of PECAM blockage. Anti-TM/GOX caused markedly more severe pulmonary thrombosis than anti-PECAM/GOX, likely because of TM inhibition. These results indicate that blocking of specific endothelial antigens by GOX immunotargeting modulates important pathological features of the lung injury initiated by local generation of H2O2 and that this approach provides specific and robust models of diverse variants of human ALI/ARDS in mice. In particular, anti-TM/GOX causes lung injury combining oxidative, prothrombotic, and inflammatory components characteristic of the complex pathological picture seen in human ALI/ARDS. PMID:11891211

  14. Neutrophils: Between Host Defence, Immune Modulation, and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Philipp; Saffarzadeh, Mona; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Radsak, Markus; von Bernuth, Horst; Benarafa, Charaf; Roos, Dirk; Skokowa, Julia; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant human immune cells, are rapidly recruited to sites of infection, where they fulfill their life-saving antimicrobial functions. While traditionally regarded as short-lived phagocytes, recent findings on long-term survival, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, heterogeneity and plasticity, suppressive functions, and tissue injury have expanded our understanding of their diverse role in infection and inflammation. This review summarises our current understanding of neutrophils in host-pathogen interactions and disease involvement, illustrating the versatility and plasticity of the neutrophil, moving between host defence, immune modulation, and tissue damage. PMID:25764063

  15. Upregulation of PIAS1 protects against sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Liya; Sun, Yunwei; Yuan, Yaozong

    2011-06-01

    The regulator of cytokine signaling known as protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) is increasingly understood to have diverse regulatory functions for inflammation, but its effect in inflammatory conditions such as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upregulation of PIAS1 on SAP associated with acute lung injury (ALI), and its subsequent effect on disease severity. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IV injection of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/F35-PIAS1, Ad5/F35-vector or saline before induction of SAP. The control group received only a sham operation. Lung and pancreas samples were harvested 16h after induction. The protein levels of PIAS1 in tissue were investigated. The severity of pancreatic injury was determined by a histological score of pancreatic injury, serum amylase, and pancreatic water content. The lung injury was evaluated by measurement of pulmonary microvascular permeability, lung myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels. The survival rates of rats were also analyzed. The results found that in Ad5/F35-PIAS1 treated rats, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels were decreased but showed no influence on the levels of IL-10, and the severity of pancreatic tissue injury was less compared with either untreated SAP or Ad5/F35-vector treated rats (P<0.01). The administration of Ad5/F35-PIAS1 in SAP-induced rats downregulated the activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) pathway and the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein in lung. Thus, compared with the untreated SAP rats, the inflammatory response and the severity of ALI decreased, and the survival rates increased (P<0.01). These findings suggest that PIAS1 could augment anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting STAT1, thus attenuating the severity of SAP associated with ALI.

  16. Development of Experimental Tissue Models for Blast Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin; Bo, Chiara; Williams, Alun; Jardine, Andy; Brown, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    There is a pressing need to better understand the relationship between the intensity of a blast wave and the clinical consequences for victims of an explosion. In order to quantitatively study how these factors correlate with one another, blast injury tissue models are being developed. Sections of larynx, trachea and pulmonary tissue were excised from a recently sacrificed pig and maintained on ice prior to testing. The samples were subjected to strain rates of between 0.001 s-1 and 1000 s-1 in the laboratory by using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and quasi-static testing apparatus. During high strain rate testing, samples were housed in a polycarbonate chamber which permitted experimentation on tissue held in fluid. Data were analysed using 1, 2 and 3 wave analysis software in Matlab to yield information about the material properties of both undamaged and damaged tissues. In addition, macroscopic changes in tissue organization were also visualized using histopathological techniques. This work is being extended to cellular and animal models to derive more detailed information about the underlying molecular changes relating to blast-induced damage and repair. The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

  17. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) ameliorates aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury through Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Liu, Xinhui; Fan, Jinjin; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Juan; Zeng, Youjia; Feng, Xiaorang; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) is an antioxidant modulator that acts through induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the role of BARD in protecting kidneys from aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of aristolochic acid I (AAI) (5mg/kg/day) for 5 days to produce acute AA nephropathy (AAN) model. BARD (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 7 consecutive days, starting 2 days prior to AAI administration. The mice in the AA group showed AKI as evidenced by worsening kidney function evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and severe tubulointerstitial injury marked by massive tubule necrosis in kidney tissues. BARD significantly reduced BUN and SCr levels which were elevated by AAI. Additionally, AAI-induced histopathological renal damage was ameliorated by BARD. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 was reduced, and its repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) was increased significantly, whereas heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was upregulated and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) was barely increased in the cytoplasm of tubules in kidneys after treatment with AAI. BARD significantly upregulated renal Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 expression and downregulated Keap1 expression compared with those in the AA group. Moreover, it was found that Nrf2 was expressed both in the cytoplasm and nuclear of glomeruli and tubules, whereas NQO1 and HO-1 were localized in the cytoplasm of tubules only. In conclusion, AA-induced acute renal injury was associated with impaired Nrf2 activation and expression of its downstream target genes in renal tissues. BARD prevented renal damage induced by AAI, and this renoprotective effect may be exerted by activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway and increasing expression of the downstream target genes.

  18. NLRP3 inflammasome mediates contrast media-induced acute kidney injury by regulating cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianxiao; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Na; Mou, Shan; Zhang, Minfang; Gu, Leyi; Shao, Xinghua; Wang, Qin; Qi, Chaojun; Li, Shu; Wang, Wanpeng; Che, Xiajing; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media serves as a direct causative factor of acute kidney injury (AKI) and is involved in the progression of cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. Emerging evidence indicates that NLRP3 inflammasome triggers inflammation, apoptosis and tissue injury during AKI. Nevertheless, the underlying renoprotection mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome against contrast-induced AKI (CI-AKI) was still uncertain. This study investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in CI-AKI both in vitro and in vivo. In HK-2 cells and unilateral nephrectomy model, NLRP3 and NLRP3 inflammasome member ASC were significantly augmented with the treatment of contrast media. Moreover, genetic disruption of NLRP3 notably reversed contrast-induced expression of apoptosis related proteins and secretion of proinflammatory factors, similarly to the effects of ASC deletion. Consistent with above results, absence of NLRP3 in mice undergoing unilateral nephrectomy also protected against contrast media-induced renal cells phenotypic alteration and cell apoptosis via modulating expression level of apoptotic proteins. Collectively, we demonstrated that NLRP3 inflammasome mediated CI-AKI through modulating the apoptotic pathway, which provided a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of contrast media induced acute kidney injury. PMID:27721494

  19. Acid aspiration-induced acute lung injury causes leukocyte-dependent systemic organ injury.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Kindt, G C; Weisbrode, S E; Moore, S A; Dorinsky, P M

    1993-04-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome is a form of acute lung injury (ALI) that is frequently associated with systemic organ injury and often occurs in the setting of wide-spread inflammatory cell activation. However, whether conditions that lead to ALI result in systemic organ injury is unclear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ALI induced by acid aspiration will not result in systemic organ injury. Morphological alterations and lymph-to-plasma protein ratios were measured in autoperfused cat ileum preparations of four control animals and five animals with ALI produced by the endobronchial instillation of 0.1 N HCl (0.5 ml.kg-1.lung-1). After 2 h, the lymph-to-plasma protein ratio (a measure of microvascular permeability) was increased in the ilea of HCl-injured animals compared with control animals (0.234 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.121 +/- 0.005; P = 0.012) and was accompanied by extensive morphological alterations. Four additional HCl-injured animals were pretreated with an antileukocyte adherence antibody (anti-CD18, 2 mg/kg) that blocked the HCl-induced alterations in the ileum. This study provides evidence for significant systemic organ injury after acid aspiration-induced ALI and suggests that the neutrophil may be a key mediator.

  20. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  1. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  2. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  3. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy-current status.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Anjali; Santos, Jolina; Linde, Brian; Anis, Kisra

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (PR-AKI) causes significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Management of PR-AKI warrants a thorough understanding of the physiologic adaptations in the kidney and the urinary tract. Categorization of etiologies of PR-AKI is similar to that of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the nonpregnant population. The causes differ between developed and developing countries, with thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) being common in the former and septic abortion and puerperal sepsis in the latter. The incidence of PR-AKI is reported to be on a decline, but there is no consensus on the exact definition of the condition. The physiologic changes in pregnancy make diagnosis of PR-AKI difficult. Newer biomarkers are being studied extensively but are not yet available for clinical use. Early and accurate diagnosis is necessary to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Timely identification of "at-risk" individuals and treatment of underlying conditions such as sepsis, preeclampsia, and TMAs remain the cornerstone of management. Questions regarding renal replacement therapy such as modality, optimal prescription, and timing of initiation in PR-AKI remain unclear. There is a need to systematically explore these variables to improve care of women with PR-AKI. PMID:23928385

  4. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Durand, François

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates' survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed. PMID:25250330

  5. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  6. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassiano Silveira, Ana Paula; Vento, Daniella Alves; Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rubens de Nadai, Tales; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2016-01-01

    Background In acute lung injury (ALI), rupture of the alveolar-capillary barrier determines the protein-rich fluid influx into alveolar spaces. Previous studies have reported that methylene blue (MB) attenuates such injuries. This investigation was carried out to study the MB effects in pulmonary capillary permeability. Methods Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (I) Sham: saline bolus; (II) MB, MB infusion for 2 h; (III) oleic acid (OA), OA bolus; (IV) MB/OA, MB infusion for 2 h, and at 5 min after from the beginning, concurrently with an OA bolus; and (V) OA/MB, OA bolus, and after 2 h, MB infusion for 2 h. After 4 h, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and lung tissue were collected from all groups for analysis of plasma and tissue nitric oxide, calculation of the wet weight to dry weight ratio (WW/DW), and histological examination of lung tissue. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric test. Results Although favourable trends have been observed for permeability improvement parameters (WW/WD and protein), the results were not statistically significant. However, histological analysis of lung tissue showed reduced lesion areas in both pre- and post-treatment groups. Conclusions The data collected using this experimental model was favourable only through macroscopic and histological analysis. These observations are valid for both MB infusions before or after induction of ALI. PMID:26855944

  7. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients. A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr. The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%–9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770–0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  9. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  10. Very Early Administration of Progesterone for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David W.; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Hertzberg, Vicki S.; Frankel, Michael; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Caveney, Angela F.; Howlett-Smith, Harriet; Bengelink, Erin M.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Merck, Lisa H.; Janis, L. Scott; Barsan, William G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI. METHODS We conducted a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 to 12, on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating a lower level of consciousness) were randomly assigned to intravenous progesterone or placebo, with the study treatment initiated within 4 hours after injury and administered for a total of 96 hours. Efficacy was defined as an increase of 10 percentage points in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome, as determined with the use of the stratified dichotomy of the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after injury. Secondary outcomes included mortality and the Disability Rating Scale score. RESULTS A total of 882 of the planned sample of 1140 patients underwent randomization before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The study groups were similar with regard to baseline characteristics; the median age of the patients was 35 years, 73.7% were men, 15.2% were black, and the mean Injury Severity Score was 24.4 (on a scale from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating greater severity). The most frequent mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle accident. There was no significant difference between the progesterone group and the placebo group in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome (relative benefit of progesterone, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.06; P = 0.35). Phlebitis or thrombophlebitis was more frequent in the progesterone group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 3.03; CI, 1.96 to 4.66). There were no significant differences in the other prespecified safety outcomes. CONCLUSIONS This clinical trial did not show a

  11. The thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Julianna

    Therapeutic ultrasound is used in clinics around the world to treat ailments such as uterine fibroids, kidney stones, and plantar fasciitis. While many of the therapeutic effects of ultrasound are elicited by hyperthermia, bubbles can also interact with tissue to produce beneficial effects. For example, bubbles are used in boiling histotripsy to de-bulk tissue and are used in shock wave lithotripsy to break kidney stones. However, the same bubbles that break the kidney stones also damage the kidney, which is why bubble damage is a concern in every ultrasound application including fetal imaging. Whether the aim is to emulsify a tumor or image a fetus, understanding the thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by bubbles in an ultrasound field is important for all ultrasound applications and was the goal of this dissertation. One specific application of therapeutic ultrasound, known as boiling histotripsy, uses shock wave heating to explosively expand a millimeter-size boiling bubble at the transducer focus and fractionate bulk tissue. Yet it was unclear how the millimeter-size boiling or vapor bubble broke down the tissue into its submicron components. In this dissertation, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of fine droplets from an acoustically excited liquid film, is the mechanism by which the millimeter-size boiling bubble in boiling histotripsy fractionates tissue into its submicron components. Using high speed photography, we showed that tissue can behave as a liquid such that a miniature acoustic fountain forms and atomization occurs within a millimeter-size cavity that approximates the boiling or vapor bubble produced by boiling histotripsy. The end result of tissue atomization was a hole in the tissue surface. After showing that tissue can be eroded by atomization, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the tissue properties that influence atomization. The results indicated that highly

  12. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Mossanen, J C; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The induction of acute hepatic damage by acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol [APAP]), also termed paracetamol, is one of the most commonly used experimental models of acute liver injury in mice. The specific values of this model are the highly reproducible, dose-dependent hepatotoxicity of APAP and its outstanding translational importance, because acetaminophen overdose is one of the most frequent reasons for acute liver failure (ALF) in humans. However, preparation of concentrated APAP working solutions, application routes, fasting period and variability due to sex, genetic background or barrier environment represent important considerations to be taken into account before implementing this model. This standard operating procedure (SOP) provides a detailed protocol for APAP preparation and application in mice, aimed at facilitating comparability between research groups as well as minimizing animal numbers and distress. The mouse model of acetaminophen poisoning therefore helps to unravel the pathogenesis of APAP-induced toxicity or subsequent immune responses in order to explore new therapeutic interventions for improving the prognosis of ALF in patients.

  13. Pathophysiology and Clinical Work-Up of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known in the past as acute renal failure, is a syndrome characterized by the rapid loss of kidney excretory function. It is usually diagnosed by the accumulation of end products of nitrogen metabolism (urea and creatinine) or decreased urine output or both. AKI is the clinical consequence of several disorders that acutely affect the kidney, causing electrolytes and acid-base imbalance, hyperhydration and loss of depurative function. AKI is common in critical care patients in whom it is often secondary to extrarenal events. No specific therapies can attenuate AKI or accelerate renal function recovery; thus, the only treatment is supportive. New diagnostic techniques such as renal biomarkers might improve early diagnosis. Also ultrasonography helps nephrologists in AKI diagnosis, in order to describe and follow kidney alterations and find possible causes of AKI. Renal replacement therapy is a life-saving treatment if AKI is severe. If patients survive to AKI, and did not have previous chronic kidney disease (CKD), they typically recover to dialysis independence. However, evidence suggests that patients who have had AKI are at increased risk of subsequent CKD. PMID:27169469

  14. Effect of ulinastatin on HMGB1 expression in rats with acute lung injury induced by sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Li, Z J; Wang, X; Li, W F; Lin, Z F

    2015-04-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ulinastatin (UTI) on high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression in acute lung injury (ALI) rats with sepsis caused by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery, as well as to examine the underlying biological mechanism. Thirty rats were randomly and evenly divided into sham (control), CLP, and CLP + UTI groups. Thirty minutes after the surgery, the rats in the CLP + UTI group received UTI via the caudal vein, while normal saline was administered to rats in the other groups. Blood, lung tissues, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected at different time points (6, 12, 24, and 48 h) after surgery for determination of related indicators. Compared with the CLP group, rats in the CLP + UTI group exhibited higher seven day survival rates, less lung injury, and decreased HMGB1 expression in the lung tissue, serum, and BALF. In addition, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 at 24 h in the CLP + UTI group were markedly lower than those in the CLP group. These results suggest that by deregulation, UTI might decrease the lung injury and increase the survival time of ALI rats by downregulating HMGB1 expression as well as by inhibiting TNF-α and IL-6 levels in serum and BALF.

  15. Acute shortening and angulation for limb salvage in a paediatric patient with a high-energy blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Pikkel, Yoav Yechezkel; Wilson, Jessica Jeanne; Kassis, Shokrey; Lerner, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of an 8-year-old girl casualty of the Syrian conflict who arrived with open fractures of the right tibia and fibula with extensive bone and soft tissue loss as well as an open fracture of the left calcaneus as the result of a high-energy blast injury. She was successfully treated with repeated debridement procedures, external fixation with acute temporary shortening and angulation of the right leg and skin grafting to both lower limbs. PMID:24654251

  16. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  17. The role of the polyol pathway in acute kidney injury caused by hindlimb ischaemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Yagihashi, Soroku; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ogasawara, Saori; Yamagishi, Shin-Ichiro; Nukada, Hitoshi; Kato, Noriaki; Hibi, Chihiro; Chung, Sookja; Chung, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    The polyol pathway, a collateral glycolytic process, previously considered to be active in high glucose milieu, has recently been proposed to play a crucial role in ischaemia/reperfusion tissue injury. In this study, we explored the role of the polyol pathway in acute kidney injury (AKI), a life-threatening condition, caused by hindlimb ischaemia, and determined if inhibition of the polyol pathway by aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor is beneficial for this serious disorder. Mice 8 weeks of age rendered hindlimb ischaemic for 3 h by the clipping of major supporting arteries revealed marked muscle necrosis with accumulation of sorbitol and fructose in ischaemic muscles. Serum concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), creatinine, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha as well as interleukin (IL)-6 were all elevated in these mice. Treatment with AR inhibitor (ARI) effectively suppressed muscle necrosis and accompanying inflammatory reactions and prevented renal failure. Similar to ARI-treated mice, AR-deficient mice were protected from severe ischaemic limb injury and renal failure, showing only modest muscle necrosis and significant suppression of serum markers of renal failure and inflammation. Thus, these findings suggest that the polyol pathway is implicated in AKI caused by ischaemic limb injury and that AR may be a potential therapeutic target for this condition. PMID:20112370

  18. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  19. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p < 0.001). Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p < 0.001, all comparisons). RTS scores were statistically lower in the alcohol group (p < 0.001), although the clinical significance of this is unclear. Controlling for sex, acute alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p < 0.001). Acute alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients. PMID:27002348

  20. Amelioration of meconium-induced acute lung injury by parecoxib in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Min; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Wen-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays important roles in various inflammatory conditions and is significantly increased in meconium-induced lung injury. We investigated the effects of parecoxib on meconium-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbits. Twenty-four rabbits were randomized into sham, control, and parecoxib groups. Rabbits in the control and parecoxib groups underwent tracheal instillation of meconium, followed by intravenous injection of saline or parecoxib and 4 h of ventilation. The airway pressure, dynamic compliance, and ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio) were recorded at baseline (T0) and 4 h after instillation (T1-T4). The lung tissue wet-to-dry weight ratio; neutrophil percentage; and total protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. The myeloperoxidase activity, COX-2 expression, and degree of histopathologic injury in lung tissue were also analyzed. The airway pressure, compliance, and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were significantly improved by parecoxib after meconium instillation. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, total protein level, and neutrophil percentage in BALF were lowest in the parecoxib group. The TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels in the BALF were lowest in the parecoxib group. The COX-2 expression and myeloperoxidase activity in lung tissue were significantly reduced by parecoxib. The degree of lung injury was also reduced. In conclusions: Parecoxib effectively ameliorates respiratory function and attenuates meconium-induced ALI. These effects are correlated with prostaglandin E2 and COX-2 inhibition. PMID:26221218

  1. Electroencephalographic inverse localization of brain activity in acute traumatic brain injury as a guide to surgery, monitoring and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Goh, S.-Y. Matthew; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Stein, Nathan R.; Chambers, Micah C.; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To inverse-localize epileptiform cortical electrical activity recorded from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients using electroencephalography (EEG). Methods Three acute TBI cases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Semi-automatic segmentation was performed to partition the complete TBI head into 25 distinct tissue types, including 6 tissue types accounting for pathology. Segmentations were employed to generate a finite element method model of the head, and EEG activity generators were modeled as dipolar currents distributed over the cortical surface. Results We demonstrate anatomically faithful localization of EEG generators responsible for epileptiform discharges in severe TBI. By accounting for injury-related tissue conductivity changes, our work offers the most realistic implementation currently available for the inverse estimation of cortical activity in TBI. Conclusion Whereas standard localization techniques are available for electrical activity mapping in uninjured brains, they are rarely applied to acute TBI. Modern models of TBI-induced pathology can inform the localization of epileptogenic foci, improve surgical efficacy, contribute to the improvement of critical care monitoring and provide guidance for patient-tailored treatment. With approaches such as this, neurosurgeons and neurologists can study brain activity in acute TBI and obtain insights regarding injury effects upon brain metabolism and clinical outcome. PMID:24011495

  2. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver. PMID:12270110

  3. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetes mellitus, and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liu; Xie, Hong; Liu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is characterized by the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Unfolded and misfolded protein accumulation interferes with the ER function and triggers ER stress response. Thus, ER stress response, also called unfolded protein response (UPR), is an adaptive process that controls the protein amount in the ER lumen and the downstream protein demand. In normal conditions, the role of ER stress is to maintain ER homeostasis, restore ER function, and protect stressed cells from apoptosis, by coordinating gene expression, protein synthesis, and accelerating protein degradation through several molecular pathways. However, prolonged ER stress response plays a paradoxical role, which leads to cell damage, apoptosis, and concomitant tissue injuries. A number of tissue alterations are involved with diabetes mellitus progress and its comorbidities via ER stress. However, certain pharmacological agents affecting ER stress have been identified. In this review, we summarized the relationship between ER stress and insulin resistance development. Moreover, we aim to explain how ER stress influences type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. In addition, we reviewed the literature on ER stress and UPR in three kinds of tissue injuries induced by T2DM. Finally, a retrospective analysis of the effects of anti-diabetes medications on ER stress is presented.

  5. Ulinastatin Protects against Acute Kidney Injury in Infant Piglets Model Undergoing Surgery on Hypothermic Low-Flow Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaocou; Xue, Qinghua; Yan, Fuxia; Liu, Jinping; Li, Shoujun; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants are more vulnerable to kidney injuries induced by inflammatory response syndrome and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary bypass especially with prolonged hypothermic low-flow (HLF). This study aims to evaluate the protective role of ulinastatin, an anti-inflammatory agent, against acute kidney injuries in infant piglets model undergoing surgery on HLF cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Eighteen general-type infant piglets were randomly separated into the ulinastatin group (Group U, n = 6), the control group (Group C, n = 6), and the sham operation group (Group S, n = 6), and anaesthetized. The groups U and C received following experimental procedure: median thoracotomy, routine CPB and HLF, and finally weaned from CPB. The group S only underwent sham median thoracotomy. Ulinastatin at a dose of 5,000 units/kg body weight and a certain volume of saline were administrated to animals of the groups U and C at the beginning of CPB and at aortic declamping, respectively. Venous blood samples were collected at 3 different time points: after anesthesia induction in all experimental groups, 5 minutes, and 120 minutes after CPB in the Groups U and C. Markers for inflammation and acute kidney injury were tested in the collected plasma. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) from urine, markers of oxidative stress injury and TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues were also detected. Results The expressions of plasma inflammatory markers and acute kidney injury markers increased both in Group U and Group C at 5 min and 120 min after CPB. Also, numbers of TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney rose in both groups. At the time point of 120-min after CPB, compared with the Group C, some plasma inflammatory and acute kidney injury markers as well as TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney were significantly reduced in the Group U. Histologic analyses showed that HLF promoted acute tubular necrosis and dilatation

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid Pretreatment Confers Protection and Functional Improvements after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I.; Walker, Robert L.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  7. [Star fruit as a cause of acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Scaranello, Karilla Lany; Alvares, Valeria Regina de Cristo; Carneiro, Daniely Maria Queiroz; Barros, Flávio Henrique Soares; Gentil, Thais Marques Sanches; Thomaz, Myriam José; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Pereira, Mariana Batista; Leme, Graziella Malzoni; Diz, Mary Carla Esteves; Laranja, Sandra Maria Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The star fruit belongs to the family Oxalidacea, species Averrhoa carambola. It is rich in minerals, vitamin A, C, B complex vitamins and oxalic acid. Recent studies show that the toxicity of the fruit differs between the patients and may be explained by single biological responses, age, and the intake quantity of the neurotoxin in each fruit in addition to glomerular filtration rate given by each patient. Additionally, the nephrotoxicity caused by the fruit is dose-dependent and may lead to the deposition of crystals of calcium oxalate intratubular, as well as by direct injury to the renal tubular epithelium, leading to apoptosis of the same. We report the case of a patient who after ingestion of the juice and fresh fruit, developed acute renal failure requiring dialysis, evolving with favourable outcome and recovery of renal function.

  8. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  9. Acute kidney injury after massive attack of Africanised bees

    PubMed Central

    Bridi, Ramaiane A; Balbi, Andre Luis; Neves, Precil M; Ponce, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of massive attack by Africanised bees and can be observed 48–72 h after the accident. We report a case of Africanised bees attack followed by severe and lethal AKI. A 56-year-old man was admitted to emergency department after a massive attack of Africanised bees (>1000 bee stings). He was unconscious, presenting with hypotension and tachycardia. Mechanical ventilation, volume expansion and care for anaphylaxis were instituted. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and after 48 h he developed rhabdomyolysis, oliguria, increased creatinine levels, hyperkalaemia and refractory acidosis. A diagnosis of AKI secondary to rhabdomyolysis and shock was made. The patient was treated with a prolonged course of haemodialysis. However, he progressed to refractory shock and died 5 days after admission. PMID:24618864

  10. Severe acute kidney injury as presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, Eva; Labarque, Veerle; Tousseyn, Thomas; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of acute kidney injury (AKI) at a very young age caused by primary lymphomatous renal infiltration due to Burkitt's lymphoma and analyse the literature on this rare condition. At presentation, clinical examination showed impressive bilateral nephromegaly and hypertension. Blood analysis indicated severe AKI, mild anaemia and normal serum electrolytes. There were no signs of tumour lysis syndrome. Urine sediment was normal, with neither haematuria nor proteinuria. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral renal enlargement (+12 SD), with increased corticomedullar differentiation. MRI demonstrated the presence of a homogenous renal enlargement with features of an infiltrative lesion. Ultimately, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of the renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma. Early and aggressive therapy is the key to ensure a good outcome. PMID:27118748

  11. Inflammasome-regulated Cytokines Are Critical Mediators of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dolinay, Tamás; Kim, Young Sam; Howrylak, Judie; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Fredenburgh, Laura; Massaro, Anthony F.; Rogers, Angela; Gazourian, Lee; Nakahira, Kiichi; Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Landazury, Roberto; Eppanapally, Sabitha; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christiani, David C.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Despite advances in clinical management, there are currently no reliable diagnostic and therapeutic targets for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The inflammasome/caspase-1 pathway regulates the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-18). IL-18 is associated with injury in animal models of systemic inflammation. Objectives: We sought to determine the contribution of the inflammasome pathway in experimental acute lung injury and human ARDS. Methods: We performed comprehensive gene expression profiling on peripheral blood from patients with critical illness. Gene expression changes were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and IL-18 levels were measured in the plasma of the critically ill patients. Wild-type mice or mice genetically deficient in IL-18 or caspase-1 were mechanically ventilated using moderate tidal volume (12 ml/kg). Lung injury parameters were assessed in lung tissue, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Measurements and Main Results: In mice, mechanical ventilation enhanced IL-18 levels in the lung, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-18–neutralizing antibody treatment, or genetic deletion of IL-18 or caspase-1, reduced lung injury in response to mechanical ventilation. In human patients with ARDS, inflammasome-related mRNA transcripts (CASP1, IL1B, and IL18) were increased in peripheral blood. In samples from four clinical centers, IL-18 was elevated in the plasma of patients with ARDS (sepsis or trauma-induced ARDS) and served as a novel biomarker of intensive care unit morbidity and mortality. Conclusions: The inflammasome pathway and its downstream cytokines play critical roles in ARDS development. PMID:22461369

  12. State of the art. Four easy pieces: interconnections between tissue injury, intermediary metabolism, autoimmunity, and chronic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2006-08-01

    Four questions are posed: (1) Can tissue damage itself provoke autoimmunity? (2) Can genetic mutations of key structures produce tissue pathology and thus provoke autoimmunity? (3) Can acute immune damage produce tissue degeneration without further hallmarks of an immune response? (4) Can intermediary metabolism modulate immune damage to tissues? Four answers are given: (1) Tissue injury itself may lead to autoimmunity. Both innate and adaptive immunity may arise as a response to tissue injury, and the immune attack can further damage tissue. (2) Genetic mutations can lead to an immune response indistinguishable from autoimmunity, exemplified from Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. (3) Chronic immune damage may lead to tissue degeneration, with or without further hallmarks of an immune response. Variations on this theme, including inverse scenarios, are also possible: Inborn errors of metabolism may lead to tissue damage that may provoke an adaptive and or innate immune response. The immune response might further damage tissue. (4) Finally, perturbations of intermediary metabolism may modulate the immune response, controlling the extent of immune-mediated damage. Examples are taken from perturbations in the cholesterol pathway that influence the characteristics of the immune response, and with tryptophan metabolites that modulate autoimmunity and graft rejection. Inflammatory, degenerative, and autoimmune neurological disease will be discussed in terms of their implications for pathogenic mechanisms underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. ); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. ); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. ); Te Velde, K. ); Nordmann, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  14. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  15. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Treatment Following Spinal Cord Injury Improves Mitochondrial Function Correlated with Remarkable Tissue Sparing and Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir P.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Lyttle, Travis S.; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently documented that treatment with the alternative biofuel, acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC, 300 mg/kg), as late as 1 hr after T10 contusion spinal cord injury (SCI), significantly maintained mitochondrial function 24 hrs after injury. Here we report that following more severe contusion SCI centered on the L1/L2 segments that are postulated to contain lamina X neurons critical for locomotion (the “central pattern generator”), ALC treatment resulted in significant improvements in acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and long-term hindlimb function. While control-injured rats were only able to achieve slight movements of hindlimb joints, ALC-treated animals produced consistent weight-supported plantar steps one month after injury. Such landmark behavioral improvements were significantly correlated with increased tissue sparing of both gray and white matter proximal to the injury, as well as preservation of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons in lamina X rostral to the injury site. These findings signify that functional improvements with ALC treatment are mediated, in part, by preserved locomotor circuitry rostral to upper lumbar contusion SCI. Based on beneficial effects of ALC on mitochondrial bioenergetics after injury, our collective evidence demonstrate that preventing mitochondrial dysfunction acutely “promotes” neuroprotection that may be associated with the milestone recovery of plantar, weight-supported stepping. PMID:22445934

  16. The Heat Shock Response and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Derek S.; Wong, Hector R.

    2006-01-01

    All cells respond to stress through the activation of primitive, evolutionarily conserved genetic programs that maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. Stress adaptation, which is known in the literature by a myriad of terms, including tolerance, desensitization, conditioning, and reprogramming, is a common paradigm found throughout nature, in which a primary exposure of a cell or organism to a stressful stimulus (e.g., heat) results in an adaptive response by which a second exposure to the same stimulus produces a minimal response. More interesting is the phenomenon of cross-tolerance, by which a primary exposure to a stressful stimulus results in an adaptive response whereby the cell or organism is resistant to a subsequent stress that is different from the initial stress (i.e. exposure to heat stress leading to resistance to oxidant stress). The heat shock response is one of the more commonly described examples of stress adaptation and is characterized by the rapid expression of a unique group of proteins collectively known as heat shock proteins (also commonly referred to as stress proteins). The expression of heat shock proteins is well described in both whole lungs and in specific lung cells from a variety of species and in response to a variety of stressors. More importantly, in vitro data, as well as data from various animal models of acute lung injury, demonstrate that heat shock proteins, especially Hsp27, Hsp32, Hsp60, and Hsp70 have an important cytoprotective role during lung inflammation and injury. PMID:17157189

  17. Burn-injury affects gut-associated lymphoid tissues derived CD4+ T cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Nadeem; Shelip, Alla; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.

    2013-01-01

    After scald burn-injury, the intestinal immune system responds to maintain immune balance. In this regard CD4+T cells in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues (GALT), like mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) respond to avoid immune suppression following major injury such as burn. Therefore, we hypothesized that the gut CD4+T cells become dysfunctional and turn the immune homeostasis towards depression of CD4+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. In the current study we show down regulation of mucosal CD4+ T cell proliferation, IL-2 production and cell surface marker expression of mucosal CD4+ T cells moving towards suppressive-type. Acute burn-injury lead to up-regulation of regulatory marker (CD25+), down regulation of adhesion (CD62L, CD11a) and homing receptor (CD49d) expression, and up-regulation of negative co-stimulatory (CTLA-4) molecule. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ T cells of intestinal origin showed resistance to spontaneous as well as induced apoptosis that may contribute to suppression of effector CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, gut CD4+CD25+ T cells obtained from burn-injured animals were able to down-regulate naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation following adoptive transfer of burn-injured CD4+CD25+ T cells into sham control animals, without any significant effect on cell surface activation markers. Together, these data demonstrate that the intestinal CD4+ T cells evolve a strategy to promote suppressive CD4+ T cell effector responses, as evidenced by enhanced CD4+CD25+ T cells, up-regulated CTLA-4 expression, reduced IL-2 production, tendency towards diminished apoptosis of suppressive CD4+ T cells, and thus lose their natural ability to regulate immune homeostasis following acute burn-injury and prevent immune paralysis. PMID:24600563

  18. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    White, Laura E; Santora, Rachel J; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A; Hassoun, Heitham T

    2012-09-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1-/- mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets.

  19. Postpartum acute kidney injury: a review of 99 cases.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Mahesh; Madhyastha, P Rakesh; Puri, Sonika; Varma, Vijay; Bhandari, Aneesh; Chennabassappa, Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    Postpartum acute kidney injury (PPAKI) constitutes an important cause of obstetric AKI. It is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality in developing nations. The aim of this study is to survey the etiology and outcomes of PPAKI in a tertiary care Indian hospital. Ninety-nine patients, without prior comorbidities, treated for PPAKI, between 2005-2014 at M.S. Ramaiah Medical College, were included for analysis in this retrospective, observational study. AKI was analyzed in terms of maximal stage of renal injury attained as per RIFLE criteria. Outcomes included requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternal and fetal outcomes. PPAKI constituted 60% of all obstetric AKI cases. Median maternal age was 23 years and 52% of patients were primigravidas. Mean serum creatinine was 4.1 mg/dL. Failure (33%) and injury (31%) were the major categories as per RIFLE criteria. Thirty-nine percent of cases required RRT. Sepsis, particularly puerperal sepsis, was the leading causes of PPAKI (75% of cases) and maternal mortality (94% of deaths). Maternal and fetal mortality were 19% and 22% respectively. The incidence of cortical necrosis was 10.3%. Three patients required long-term RRT. In conclusion, consistent with other Indian literature, we report a high incidence of PPAKI. We found incremental mortality on moving from "Risk" to "Failure" category of RIFLE. PPAKI was associated with high maternal and fetal mortality with sepsis being the leading cause. Our study highlights the need for provision of better quality of maternal care and fetal monitoring to decrease mortality associated with PPAKI in developing countries. PMID:27319810

  20. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  1. Noninvasive ventilation for patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nava, Stefano; Schreiber, Ania; Domenighetti, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Few studies have been performed on noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat hypoxic acute respiratory failure in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The outcomes of these patients, for whom endotracheal intubation is not mandatory, depend on the degree of hypoxia, the presence of comorbidities and complications, and their illness severity. The use of NIV as an alternative to invasive ventilation in severely hypoxemic patients with ARDS (ie, P(aO(2))/F(IO(2)) < 200) is not generally advisable and should be limited to hemodynamically stable patients who can be closely monitored in an intensive care unit by highly skilled staff. Early NIV application may be extremely helpful in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates, in whom intubation dramatically increases the risk of infection, pneumonia, and death. The use of NIV in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome and other airborne diseases has generated debate, despite encouraging clinical results, mainly because of safety issues. Overall, the high rate of NIV failure suggests a cautious approach to NIV use in patients with ALI/ARDS, including early initiation, intensive monitoring, and prompt intubation if signs of NIV failure emerge. PMID:22008399

  2. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ayoob, Rose M.

    2016-01-01

    The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males), mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies. PMID:27642522

  3. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  4. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ayoob, Rose M; Schwaderer, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males), mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies. PMID:27642522

  5. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  6. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ayoob, Rose M.

    2016-01-01

    The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males), mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies.

  7. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  8. Integrating acute lung injury and regulation of alveolar fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Guidot, David M; Folkesson, Hans G; Jain, Lucky; Sznajder, Jacob I; Pittet, Jean-François; Matthay, Michael A

    2006-09-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and flooding of the alveolar air spaces with proteinaceous fluid. ARDS develops in response to inflammatory stresses including sepsis, trauma, and severe pneumonia, and despite aggressive critical care management, it still has a mortality of 30-50%. At the time of its original description in 1967, relatively little was known about the specific mechanisms by which the alveolar epithelium regulated lung fluid balance. Over the last 20 years, substantial advances in our understanding of the alveolar epithelium have provided major new insights into how molecular and cellular mechanisms regulate the active transport of solutes and fluid across the alveolar epithelium under both normal and pathological conditions. Beginning with the elucidation of active sodium transport as a major driving force for the transport of water from the air space to the interstitium, elegant work by multiple investigators has revealed a complex and integrated network of membrane channels and pumps that coordinately regulates sodium, chloride, and water flux in both a cell- and condition-specific manner. At the Experimental Biology Meeting in San Francisco on April 4, 2006, a symposium was held to discuss some of the most recent advances. Although there is still much to learn about the mechanisms that impair normal alveolar fluid clearance under pathological conditions, the compelling experimental findings presented in this symposium raise the prospect that we are now poised to test and develop therapeutic strategies to improve outcome in patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16698856

  9. Potential Reparative Role of Resident Adult Renal Stem/Progenitor Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sallustio, Fabio; Serino, Grazia; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human kidney is particularly susceptible to ischemia and toxins with consequential tubular necrosis and activation of inflammatory processes. This process can lead to the acute renal injury, and even if the kidney has a great capacity for regeneration after tubular damage, in several circumstances, the normal renal repair program may not be sufficient to achieve a successful regeneration. Resident adult renal stem/progenitor cells could participate in this repair process and have the potentiality to enhance the renal regenerative mechanism. This could be achieved both directly, by means of their capacity to differentiate and integrate into the renal tissues, and by means of paracrine factors able to induce or improve the renal repair or regeneration. Recent genetic fate-tracing studies indicated that tubular damage is instead repaired by proliferative duplication of epithelial cells, acquiring a transient progenitor phenotype and by fate-restricted clonal cell progeny emerging from different nephron segments. In this review, we discuss about the properties and the reparative characteristics of high regenerative CD133+/CD24+ cells, with a view to a future application of these cells for the treatment of acute renal injury. PMID:26309808

  10. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  11. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-02-17

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  12. The Protective Effect of Stauntonia Chinensis Polysaccharide on CCl4-induced Acute Liver Injuries in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiaojiao; Xiong, Qingming; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Shirong; Zhu, Lihua; Zhu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of Stauntonia chinensis polysaccharides (SCP) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute liver injuries in mice. Methods: Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups: the control group, the pathological model group, and the SCP group. The SCP group was further divided into three subgroups based on SCP treatment: Low dosage (50 mg/kg), medium dosage (100 mg/kg) and high dosage (200 mg/kg). After being fed for 7 days, mixed-edible-oil solution was intraperitoneally injected into the control group, while the other two groups were injected with 0.15% CCl4 mixed with mixed-edible-oil. Sera were collected from mice 24 h later to determine the activity of serum alanine transaminase (ALT). Mice were then sacrificed to prepare liver homogenate. Levels of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined. Pathological changes in livers were also analyzed. Results: SCP significantly reduced the ALT activity in the serum and inhibited the decrease of serum GSH, GSH-PX and SOD and rose the levels of MDA and NO (P<0.05-0.01). This lessened the pathological damage to the liver tissues. Conclusion: SCP protects against CCl4-induced acute liver injuries in mice. PMID:24711744

  13. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  14. Sirtinol Inhibits Neutrophil Elastase Activity and Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yung-Fong; Yu, Huang-Ping; Chang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Fu-Chao; Huang, Zhen-Cheng; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced activity of neutrophil elastase leads to a protease–antiprotease imbalance, and plays an essential pathogenic role in acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We assayed the pharmacological effects and mechanisms of the action of sirtinol in human neutrophils, and in neutrophil elastase (HNE)-induced paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated ALI in mice. Sirtinol significantly inhibited the activity of HNE from human neutrophils in response to various stimulators. The inhibitory effects on HNE activity were not mediated through protein kinase A, calcium, extracellular-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt, or Src family kinases. Analysis of enzymatic activities showed that sirtinol inhibited HNE activity in a concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that sirtinol does not affect neutrophil function and is an HNE inhibitor. In addition, administration of sirtinol significantly inhibited HNE-induced paw edema, and attenuated the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced pulmonary wet/dry weight ratio in the LPS-induced ALI mouse model. Our study indicates that sirtinol has anti-inflammatory effects through direct inhibition of HNE activity and attenuates HNE-induced and LPS-mediated tissue or organ injury in vivo. Sirtinol is a novel HNE inhibitor and may have the potential for clinical application in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25666548

  15. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 attenuates neutrophil migration and acute lung injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Giangola, Matthew D; Yang, Weng-Lang; Rajayer, Salil R; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Sepsis is an acute inflammatory condition that can result in multiple organ failure and acute lung injury. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) is a broad regulator of the innate immune response involved with the nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. We hypothesized that Gas6 could have a protective role in attenuating the severity of acute lung injury and sepsis. Male mice were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) after which recombinant murine Gas6 (rmGas6; 5 μg/mouse) or normal saline (vehicle) was administered intravenously. Blood and lung tissues were collected at 20 h after CLP for various measurements. Treatment with rmGas6 significantly reduced serum levels of the injury markers aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, as well as proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-17, compared with the vehicle group (P < 0.05). The parenchyma of the lungs damaged by CLP was attenuated by rmGas6 treatment. Lung mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were decreased by 60%, 86%, 82%, 93%, and 82%, respectively, with rmGas6 treatment as determined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (P < 0.05). The degradation of IκB-α induced by CLP in the lungs was inhibited by rmGas6 treatment. The number of neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs were significantly reduced in the rmGas6 group. Moreover, rmGas6 reduced the in vitro migration of differentiated human promyelocytic HL60 cells by 64%. Finally, the 10-day survival rate of mice subjected to CLP was increased from 31% in the vehicle group to 67% in the rmGas6 group (P < 0.05). Thus, Gas6 has potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent to treat patients with sepsis and acute lung injury.

  16. The protective effect of Esculentoside A on experimental acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Xingtong; Qiu, Xiaochen; Wang, Junjie; Fang, He; Wang, Zhihong; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory response and oxidative stress are considered to play an important role in the development of acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Esculentoside A (EsA), isolated from the Chinese herb phytolacca esculenta, has the effect of modulating immune response, cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as anti-inflammatory effects. The present study is to evaluate the protective effect of EsA on CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury. In vitro, CCK-8 assays showed that EsA had no cytotoxicity, while it significantly reduced levels of TNF-α and cell death rate challenged by CCl4. Moreover, EsA treatment up-regulated PPAR-γ expression of LO2 cells and reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenged by CCl4. In vivo, EsA prevented mice from CCl4-induced liver histopathological damage. In addition, levels of AST and ALT were significantly decreased by EsA treatment. Furthermore, the mice treated with EsA had a lower level of TNF-α, Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in mRNA expression. EsA prevented MDA release and increased GSH-Px activity in liver tissues. Immunohistochemical staining showed that over-expression of F4/80 and CD11b were markedly inhibited by EsA. The western bolt results showed that EsA significantly inhibited CCl4-induced phosphonated IkBalpha (P-IκB) and ERK. Furthermore, EsA treatment also alleviated GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury on liver enzyme and histopathological damage. Unfortunately, our results exhibited that EsA had no effects on CCl4-induced hepatocyte apoptosis which were showed by TUNEL staining and Bax, Caspase-3 and cleaved Caspase-3 expression. Our results proved that EsA treatment attenuated CCl4 and GalN/LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and its protective effects might be involved in inhibiting inflammatory response and oxidative stress, but not apoptosis with its underlying mechanism associated with PPAR-γ, NF-κB and ERK signal

  17. Toll‑like receptor 4 contributes to acute kidney injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingsong; Li, Gang; Xu, Li; Li, Qian; Wang, Qianyan; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation mediates renal injury in regional ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) models generated by clamping renal pedicles. However, it remains unclear whether TLR4 is causal in the kidney injury following global I/R induced by cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The present study used wild‑type (C3H/HeN) and TLR4‑mutant (C3H/HeJ) mice to produce the CA/CPR model. CA was induced by injection of cold KCl and left untreated for different time periods. After resuscitation (72 h), the level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr), as well as histological changes in renal tissue were assessed to evaluate the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The expression of TLR4, intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and growth‑regulated oncogene‑β (GRO‑β) in kidney tissues was detected. The results demonstrated that the levels of Scr and BUN increased significantly in C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice after CPR. CPR also resulted in increased expression of TLR4, ICAM‑1, GRO‑β and MPO in a CA‑duration dependent manner. However, there was decreased expression of ICAM‑1, GRO‑β and MPO in C3H/HeJ mice compared with that in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to AKI as demonstrated by the minor changes in renal histology and function following CPR. In conclusion, mice suffered from AKI after successful CPR and severe AKI occurred in mice with prolonged CA duration. TLR4 and its downstream signaling events that promote neutrophil infiltration via ICAM‑1 and GRO‑β may be important in mediating inflammatory responses to renal injury after CPR. PMID:27510583

  18. Toll‑like receptor 4 contributes to acute kidney injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingsong; Li, Gang; Xu, Li; Li, Qian; Wang, Qianyan; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation mediates renal injury in regional ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) models generated by clamping renal pedicles. However, it remains unclear whether TLR4 is causal in the kidney injury following global I/R induced by cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The present study used wild‑type (C3H/HeN) and TLR4‑mutant (C3H/HeJ) mice to produce the CA/CPR model. CA was induced by injection of cold KCl and left untreated for different time periods. After resuscitation (72 h), the level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr), as well as histological changes in renal tissue were assessed to evaluate the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The expression of TLR4, intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and growth‑regulated oncogene‑β (GRO‑β) in kidney tissues was detected. The results demonstrated that the levels of Scr and BUN increased significantly in C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice after CPR. CPR also resulted in increased expression of TLR4, ICAM‑1, GRO‑β and MPO in a CA‑duration dependent manner. However, there was decreased expression of ICAM‑1, GRO‑β and MPO in C3H/HeJ mice compared with that in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to AKI as demonstrated by the minor changes in renal histology and function following CPR. In conclusion, mice suffered from AKI after successful CPR and severe AKI occurred in mice with prolonged CA duration. TLR4 and its downstream signaling events that promote neutrophil infiltration via ICAM‑1 and GRO‑β may be important in mediating inflammatory responses to renal injury after CPR.

  19. Toll-like receptor 4 contributes to acute kidney injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingsong; Li, Gang; Xu, Li; Li, Qian; Wang, Qianyan; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation mediates renal injury in regional ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) models generated by clamping renal pedicles. However, it remains unclear whether TLR4 is causal in the kidney injury following global I/R induced by cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The present study used wild-type (C3H/HeN) and TLR4-mutant (C3H/HeJ) mice to produce the CA/CPR model. CA was induced by injection of cold KCl and left untreated for different time periods. After resuscitation (72 h), the level of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr), as well as histological changes in renal tissue were assessed to evaluate the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The expression of TLR4, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and growth-regulated oncogene-β (GRO-β) in kidney tissues was detected. The results demonstrated that the levels of Scr and BUN increased significantly in C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice after CPR. CPR also resulted in increased expression of TLR4, ICAM-1, GRO-β and MPO in a CA-duration dependent manner. However, there was decreased expression of ICAM-1, GRO-β and MPO in C3H/HeJ mice compared with that in C3H/HeN mice. C3H/HeJ mice were resistant to AKI as demonstrated by the minor changes in renal histology and function following CPR. In conclusion, mice suffered from AKI after successful CPR and severe AKI occurred in mice with prolonged CA duration. TLR4 and its downstream signaling events that promote neutrophil infiltration via ICAM-1 and GRO-β may be important in mediating inflammatory responses to renal injury after CPR. PMID:27510583

  20. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  1. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  2. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aman P; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  3. Neutrophil-dependent, oxygen-radical mediated lung injury associated with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Caty, M G; Johnson, K J; Ward, P A

    1989-01-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with a reversible lung injury that is characterized by alveolar capillary endothelial-cell injury, increased microvascular permeability, interstitial edema formation, and intraalveolar hemorrhage and fibrin deposition. The role of mediators in this injury was analyzed using gravimetric data, microvascular permeability indices, electron microscopy, and a quantitative morphometric analysis. Neutrophil depletion induced by a specific antibody was highly protective against lung injury. Interruption of the complement pathway (using low dose Naja naja cobra venom factor) also protected against lung injury. Catalase and superoxide dismutase were also protective. The iron chelator deferoxamine and the hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethylsulfoxide, were not protective against acute lung injury. These data suggest that complement, neutrophils, and neutrophil-derived (H2O2-dependent) oxygen products mediate lung injury that occurs secondary to cerulein-induced pancreatitis. In contrast to other models of neutrophil-dependent, oxygen-radical-mediated lung injury, this lung injury does not appear to be an iron-dependent and hydroxyl-radical mediated injury. We postulate that the process of acute pancreatitis leads to complement activation followed by neutrophil recruitment, sequestration, and adherence to alveolar capillary endothelial cells. Ultimately lung injury appears to result from local endothelial-cell injury secondary to neutrophil-generated oxygen products that may be myeloperoxidase dependent. Images Figs. 3A-D. PMID:2589887

  4. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  6. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved. METHODS: Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with L-arginine to induce SAP. Recombinant mouse IL-22 was then administered subcutaneously to mice. Serum amylase levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue were measured after the L-arginine administration. Histopathology of the pancreas and lung was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Expression of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung tissue was detected by real-time PCR. Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: Serum amylase levels and MPO activity in the lung tissue in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the animals in the SAP group showed significant pancreatic and lung injuries. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNAs in the SAP group was decreased markedly, while the IL-22RA1 mRNA expression was increased significantly relative to the normal control group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PBS did not significantly affect the serum amylase levels, MPO activity or expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or IL-22RA1 mRNA (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant differences in the degrees of pancreatic and lung injuries were observed between the PBS and SAP groups. However, the serum amylase levels and lung tissue MPO activity in the rIL-22 group were significantly lower than those in the SAP group (P < 0.05), and the injuries in the pancreas and lung were also improved. Compared with the PBS group, rIL-22 stimulated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of p-STAT3 to STAT3 protein in the rIL-22 group was significantly higher than that in the PBS group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION

  7. Acute decrease in alkaline phosphatase after brain injury: A potential mechanism for tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Albert, Stephen Van; Gist, Irene; Wang, Ying; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

    2015-11-16

    Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Tau (pTau) protein, which is essential for the preservation of neuronal microtubule assemblies and for protection against trauma-induced tauopathy and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), is primarily achieved in brain by tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Paired helical filaments (PHFs) and Tau isolated from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains have been shown to form microtubule assemblies with tubulin only after treatment with TNAP or protein phosphatase-2A, 2B and -1, suggesting that Tau protein in the PHFs of neurons in AD brain is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents microtubule assembly. Using blast or weight drop models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats, we observed pTau accumulation in the brain as early as 6h post-injury and further accumulation which varied regionally by 24h post-injury. The pTau accumulation was accompanied by reduced TNAP expression and activity in these brain regions and a significantly decreased plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity after the weight drop. These results reveal that both blast- and impact acceleration-induced head injuries cause an acute decrease in the level/activity of TNAP in the brain, which potentially contributes to trauma-induced accumulation of pTau and the resultant tauopathy. The regional changes in the level/activity of TNAP or accumulation of pTau after these injuries did not correlate with the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying tauopathy in TBI might be distinct from that associated with AD.

  8. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to vascular damage in sustained ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    de Bragança, Ana C; Volpini, Rildo A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Andrade, Lúcia; Basile, David P

    2016-07-01

    Reductions in renal microvasculature density and increased lymphocyte activity may play critical roles in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) following acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis progression following IRI-AKI We evaluated the effect of vitamin D deficiency in sustained IRI-AKI, hypothesizing that such deficiency contributes to the early reduction in renal capillary density or alters the lymphocyte response to IRI Wistar rats were fed vitamin D-free or standard diets for 35 days. On day 28, rats were randomized into four groups: control, vitamin D deficient (VDD), bilateral IRI, and VDD+IRI Indices of renal injury and recovery were evaluated for up to 7 days following the surgical procedures. VDD rats showed reduced capillary density (by cablin staining), even in the absence of renal I/R. In comparison with VDD and IRI rats, VDD+IRI rats manifested a significant exacerbation of capillary rarefaction as well as higher urinary volume, kidney weight/body weight ratio, tissue injury scores, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. VDD+IRI rats also had higher numbers of infiltrating activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells staining for interferon gamma and interleukin-17, with a significant elevation in the Th17/T-regulatory cell ratio. These data suggest that vitamin D deficiency impairs renal repair responses to I/R injury, exacerbates changes in renal capillary density, as well as promoting fibrosis and inflammation, which may contribute to the transition from AKI to CKD.

  9. Nicotinamide treatment provides acute neuroprotection and GFAP regulation following fluid percussion injury.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michael A; Tan, Arlene A; Smith, Douglas C; Hoane, Michael R

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy of nicotinamide (NAM; vitamin B3) treatment following fluid percussion injury (FPI). At a dose of 500 or 50 mg/kg, NAM significantly facilitated recovery of function on a variety of motor and sensorimotor tasks in rodents, and the 500 mg/kg dose improved cognitive performance. The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute neuroprotective ability of NAM following FPI. Rats were given a moderate FPI (1.8 atm) or sham injury. NAM (500 or 50 mg/kg) or saline was administered 15 min and 20 h after FPI. Rats were sacrificed at 24 h or 7 days following injury and prepared for histological analysis. Systematic volumetric measurements were conducted to examine cortical loss in a series of cresyl violet stained slices to examine the development of the injury cavity. To assess the extent of astrocytic activity and neurodegeneration, triple labeling with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Fluoro-Jade B (FJ), and DAPI was performed. GFAP(+) astrocytes and FJ(+) neurons in the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex, and ipsilateral hippocampus and thalamus were assessed. While not significant at 24 h, NAM significantly attenuated cortical tissue loss at 7 days. At 24 h, the number of GFAP(+) astrocytes was significantly reduced by NAM. However, the inverse was observed at 7 days where NAM treatment significantly increased the number of GFAP(+) astrocytes. Both doses of NAM also significantly reduced FJ expression at the 24-h and 7-day time intervals. The results of this study suggest that NAM has strong neuroprotective abilities in the injured brain and may have therapeutic potential for brain injury.

  10. Acute Achilles Paratendinopathy following Major Injury of the Crural Fascia in a Professional Soccer Player: A Possible Correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Turloni, Michele; Baldassi, Pietro Tobia

    2016-01-01

    Background. The anatomy and mechanical properties of the Crural Fascia (CF), the ubiquitous connective tissue of the posterior region of the leg, have recently been investigated. The most important findings are that (i) the CF may suffer structural damage from indirect trauma, (ii) structural changes of the CF may affect the biomechanics of tissues connected to it, causing myofascial pain syndromes, and (iii) the CF is in anatomical continuity with the Achilles paratenon. Consistent with these points, the authors hypothesize that the onset of acute Achilles paratendinopathy may be related to histological and biomechanical changes of the CF. Case Presentation. A professional male football player suffered an isolated injury of the CF, interposed between the soleus and medial gastrocnemius (an atypical site of injury) with structural connective integrity of the muscles. After participating in the first official match, two and a half months after the trauma, he has unexpectedly demonstrated the clinical picture of acute Achilles paratendinopathy in the previously injured limb. Conclusions. Analysis of this case suggests that the acute Achilles paratendinopathy may be a muscle injury complication from indirect trauma of the calf muscle, if a frank and extensive involvement of the CF were to be ascertained. PMID:27242940

  11. Silencing of Paralemmin-3 Protects Mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Lv, Xuejun; Qian, Lanlan; Wang, Qin; Qian, Guisheng; Yao, Wei; Wu, Xueling

    2016-02-01

    Excessive inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Paralemmin-3 (PALM3) is a novel protein that can modulate LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the progression of ALI in vivo. Therefore, we studied the role of PALM3 in the pathogenesis of ALI induced by LPS. ALI was induced by LPS peritoneal injection in C57BL/6J mice. Lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mouse PALM3 gene and a negative control siRNA were intranasally administered to the mice. We found that the expression of PALM3 was up-regulated in the lung tissues obtained from the mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. The LPS-evoked inflammatory response (neutrophils and the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines [IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MIP-2] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF]), histologic lung injury (lung injury score), permeability of the alveolar capillary barrier (lung wet/dry weight ratio and BALF protein concentration) and mortality rates were attenuated in the PALM3 siRNA-treated mice. These results indicate that PALM3 contributes to the development of ALI in mice challenged with LPS. Inhibiting PALM3 through the intranasal application of specific siRNA protected against LPS-induced ALI.

  12. Recent advances in pathophysiology and biomarkers of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Umbro, Ilaria; Gentile, Giuseppe; Tinti, Francesca; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to an infective insult. This process often leads to widespread tissue injury and multiple organ dysfunction. In particular, the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most frequent complications, which increases the complexity and cost of care, and is an independent risk factor for mortality. Previous suggestions highlighting systemic hypotension, renal vasoconstriction and ischaemia-reperfusion injury as the primary pathophysiological mechanisms involved in sepsis-induced AKI have been challenged. Recently it has been shown that sepsis-induced AKI occurs in the setting of microvascular dysfunction with release of microparticles, inflammation and energetic adaptation of highly metabolic organs to cellular stress. The intolerable high mortality rate associated with sepsis-induced AKI is partially explained by an incomplete understanding of its pathophysiology and a delay in diagnosis. The aim of this review is to focus on advances in understanding the sepsis pathophysiology, with particular attention to the fundamental mechanisms of sepsis-induced AKI and the potential diagnostic and prognostic markers involved.

  13. A Systematic Review of Non-Invasive Pharmacologic Neuroprotective Treatments for Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena; Hillyer, Jessica; Mann, Cody; Baptiste, Darryl; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI) are emerging from the laboratory and seeking translation into human clinical trials. Many of these are administered as soon as possible after injury with the hope of attenuating secondary damage and maximizing the extent of spared neurologic tissue. In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical research on such neuroprotective therapies that are administered in a non-invasive manner for acute SCI. Specifically, we review treatments that have a relatively high potential for translation due to the fact that they are already used in human clinical applications, or are available in a form that could be administered to humans. These include: erythropoietin, NSAIDs, anti-CD11d antibodies, minocycline, progesterone, estrogen, magnesium, riluzole, polyethylene glycol, atorvastatin, inosine, and pioglitazone. The literature was systematically reviewed to examine studies in which an in-vivo animal model was utilized to assess the efficacy of the therapy in a traumatic SCI paradigm. Using these criteria, 122 studies were identified and reviewed in detail. Wide variations exist in the animal species, injury models, and experimental designs reported in the pre-clinical literature on the therapies reviewed. The review highlights the extent of investigation that has occurred in these specific therapies, and points out gaps in our knowledge that would be potentially valuable prior to human translation. PMID:20146558

  14. Tramadol Alleviates Myocardial Injury Induced by Acute Hindlimb Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Asl, Adel Haghighi Khiabanian; Shahzamani, Mehran; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Allahverdi, Amin; Khansari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background Organ injury occurs not only during periods of ischemia but also during reperfusion. It is known that ischemia reperfusion (IR) causes both remote organ and local injuries. Objective This study evaluated the effects of tramadol on the heart as a remote organ after acute hindlimb IR. Methods Thirty healthy mature male Wistar rats were allocated randomly into three groups: Group I (sham), Group II (IR), and Group III (IR + tramadol). Ischemia was induced in anesthetized rats by left femoral artery clamping for 3 h, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Tramadol (20 mg/kg, intravenous) was administered immediately prior to reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion, animals were euthanized, and hearts were harvested for histological and biochemical examination. Results The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were higher in Groups I and III than those in Group II (p < 0.05). In comparison with other groups, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in Group II were significantly increased (p < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by tramadol. Histopathological changes, including microscopic bleeding, edema, neutrophil infiltration, and necrosis, were scored. The total injuryscore in Group III was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared with Group II. Conclusion From the histological and biochemical perspectives, treatment with tramadol alleviated the myocardial injuries induced by skeletal muscle IR in this experimental model. PMID:26039663

  15. Recent advances in pathophysiology and biomarkers of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Umbro, Ilaria; Gentile, Giuseppe; Tinti, Francesca; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to an infective insult. This process often leads to widespread tissue injury and multiple organ dysfunction. In particular, the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most frequent complications, which increases the complexity and cost of care, and is an independent risk factor for mortality. Previous suggestions highlighting systemic hypotension, renal vasoconstriction and ischaemia-reperfusion injury as the primary pathophysiological mechanisms involved in sepsis-induced AKI have been challenged. Recently it has been shown that sepsis-induced AKI occurs in the setting of microvascular dysfunction with release of microparticles, inflammation and energetic adaptation of highly metabolic organs to cellular stress. The intolerable high mortality rate associated with sepsis-induced AKI is partially explained by an incomplete understanding of its pathophysiology and a delay in diagnosis. The aim of this review is to focus on advances in understanding the sepsis pathophysiology, with particular attention to the fundamental mechanisms of sepsis-induced AKI and the potential diagnostic and prognostic markers involved. PMID:26702738

  16. Cell-cycle arrest and acute kidney injury: the light and the dark sides

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common consequence of systemic illness or injury and it complicates several forms of major surgery. Two major difficulties have hampered progress in AKI research and clinical management. AKI is difficult to detect early and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. We recently reported results from multi-center studies where two urinary markers of cell-cycle arrest, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) were validated for development of AKI well ahead of clinical manifestations—azotemia and oliguria. Cell-cycle arrest is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of AKI and this ‘dark side’ may also involve progression to chronic kidney disease. However, cell-cycle arrest has a ‘light side’ as well, since this mechanism can protect cells from the disastrous consequences of entering cell division with damaged DNA or insufficient bioenergetic resources during injury or stress. Whether we can use the light side to help prevent AKI remains to be seen, but there is already evidence that cell-cycle arrest biomarkers are indicators of both sides of this complex physiology. PMID:26044835

  17. C1P Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Preventing NF-κB Activation in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Baudiß, Kristin; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Korcan; Hossfeld, Madelon; Ehrat, Nicolas; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Eltzschig, Holger K; Idzko, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has been shown to modulate acute inflammatory events. Acute lung injury (Arnalich et al. 2000. Infect. Immun. 68: 1942-1945) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, lung inflammation, induced cytokine production, neutrophil accumulation, and vascular leakage leading to lung edema. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C1P during LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. To evaluate the effect of C1P, we used a prophylactic and therapeutic LPS-induced ALI model in C57BL/6 male mice. Our studies revealed that intrapulmonary application of C1P before (prophylactic) or 24 h after (therapeutic) LPS instillation decreased neutrophil trafficking to the lung, proinflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and alveolar capillary leakage. Mechanistically, C1P inhibited the LPS-triggered NF-κB levels in lung tissue in vivo. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that C1P also attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and IL-8 production in human neutrophils. These results indicate C1P playing a role in dampening LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and suggest that C1P could be a valuable candidate for treatment of ALI. PMID:26800872

  18. Hematocolpos as a Result of Delayed Treatment of Acute Straddle Injury in an Adolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hae Jin; Lim, Hyun Wook; Han, Young Shin; Choi, Jeong In; Kim, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Accidental genital trauma is most commonly caused by straddle-type injuries and is usually treatable by nonoperative management, and most of the injuries have a good prognosis. When the bleeding occurred due to straddle injury in adolescent girl, experienced gynecological examination and treatment were very important. We experienced a case of straddle injury to the posterior fourchette that caused acute hematocolpos due to delayed adequate treatment with hypotension and acute abdomen in an adolescent girl. This case shows the importance of careful and accurate physical and gynecological examination and adequate and prompt treatment of genital trauma in adolescent girls.

  19. Novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kališnik, Jurij Matija

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is a common and serious complication and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of acute kidney injury is based on the serum creatinine levels which rise several hours to days after the initial injury. Thus, novel biomarkers that will enable faster diagnosis are needed in clinical practice. There are numerous urine and serum proteins that indicate kidney injury and are under extensive research. Despite promising basic research results and assembled data, which indicate superiority of some biomarkers to creatinine, we are still awaiting clinical application. PMID:27212976

  20. Renal cortical pyruvate as a potentially critical mediator of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ali C M; Zager, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in both aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolisms. In addition, a burgeoning body of experimental literature indicates that it can also dramatically impact oxidant, proinflammatory, and cytoprotective pathways. In sum, these actions can confer protection against diverse forms of tissue damage. However, the fate of pyruvate during the evolution of acute kidney injury (AKI) has remained ill defined. Recent experimental studies have indicated that following either ischemic or nephrotoxic renal injury, marked and sustained pyruvate depletion results. While multiple potential mechanisms for this pyruvate loss may be involved, experimental data suggest that a loss of lactate (a dominant pyruvate precursor) and enhanced gluconeogenesis (i.e. pyruvate utilization) are involved. The importance of pyruvate depletion for AKI pathogenesis is underscored by observations that pyruvate therapy can attenuate diverse forms of experimental AKI. This protection may stem from reductions in tissue inflammation, improved anti-inflammatory defenses, and an enhanced cellular energy metabolism. The pieces of information that give rise to these conclusions are discussed in this brief report. PMID:25343836

  1. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Young Adult Presenting as Hepatitis and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Heincelman, Marc; Karakala, Nithin; Rockey, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults is a relatively rare malignancy. The typical presentation includes signs and symptoms associated with bone marrow failure, including fevers, infections, fatigue, and excessive bruising. In this article, we report an unusual systemic presentation of ALL in a previously healthy 18-year-old man. He initially presented with several-day history of nausea and vomiting, 10-pound weight loss, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain with evidence of acute hepatocellular liver injury (elevations in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase) and elevation in serum creatinine. Further history revealed that he just joined the Marine Corp; in preparation, he had been lifting weights and taking protein and creatine supplements. A complete serological evaluation for liver disease was negative and creatine phosphokinase was normal. His aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase declined, and he was discharged with expected improvement. However, he returned one week later with continued symptoms and greater elevation of aminotransferases. Liver biopsy was nondiagnostic, revealing scattered portal and lobular inflammatory cells (primarily lymphocytes) felt to be consistent with drug-induced liver injury or viral hepatitis. Given his elevated creatinine, unresponsive to aggressive volume expansion, a kidney biopsy was performed, revealing normal histology. He subsequently developed an extensive left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Given his deep venous thrombosis, his peripheral blood was sent for flow cytometry, which revealed lymphoblasts. Bone marrow biopsy revealed 78% blasts with markers consistent with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. This report emphasizes that right upper quadrant abdominal pain with liver test abnormalities may be the initial presentation of a systemic illness such as ALL. PMID:27722178

  2. High-throughput proteomics reveal alarmins as amplifiers of tissue pathology and inflammation after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Didangelos, Athanasios; Puglia, Michele; Iberl, Michaela; Sanchez-Bellot, Candela; Roschitzki, Bernd; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is characterized by acute cellular and axonal damage followed by aggressive inflammation and pathological tissue remodelling. The biological mediators underlying these processes are still largely unknown. Here we apply an innovative proteomics approach targeting the enriched extracellular proteome after spinal cord injury for the first time. Proteomics revealed multiple matrix proteins not previously associated with injured spinal tissue, including small proteoglycans involved in cell-matrix adhesion and collagen fibrillogenesis. Network analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics datasets uncovered persistent overexpression of extracellular alarmins that can trigger inflammation via pattern recognition receptors. In mechanistic experiments, inhibition of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) revealed the involvement of alarmins in inflammatory gene expression, which was found to be dominated by IL1 and NFκΒ signalling. Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) was identified as the likely endogenous regulator of IL1 expression after injury. These data reveal a novel tissue remodelling signature and identify endogenous alarmins as amplifiers of the inflammatory response that promotes tissue pathology and impedes neuronal repair after spinal cord injury. PMID:26899371

  3. Protection of normal tissue against late radiation injury by WR-2721. [/sup 60/Co; rats

    SciTech Connect

    Utley, J.F.; Quinn, C.A.; White, F.C.; Seaver, N.A.; Bloor, C.M.

    1981-02-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect against late radiation damage has been studied in skin, muscle, and vascular tissues of rats. Animals treated with and without WR-2721 received irradiation to the left hind limb; representative groups were killed at intervals ranging from 72 h to 6 months. Comparison of all drug-treated and non-drug-treated animals showed significant protection (P = less than or equal to 0.05). The time pattern of injury in non-drug-treated rats was biphasic, with significant damage occurring at 72 h and 1 week, returning to normal between 1 and 3 months, but showing significant late damage at 6 months (P = less than or equal to 0.001). Again, this injury pattern did not appear in WR-2721-treated rats. Thus the ability of WR-2721 to protect against acute and chronic radiation injury in vessels, skin, and muscle indicates that an increased therapeutic gain can be expected when this drug is used in clinical radiation therapy.

  4. Broccoli sprout extract induces detoxification-related gene expression and attenuates acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazutaka; Ushida, Yusuke; Ishijima, Tomoko; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Yajima, Nobuhiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of broccoli sprout extract (BSEx) on liver gene expression and acute liver injury in the rat. METHODS: First, the effects of BSEx on liver gene expression were examined. Male rats were divided into two groups. The Control group was fed the AIN-76 diet, and the BSEx group was fed the AIN-76 diet containing BSEx. After a 10-d feeding period, rats were sacrificed and their livers were used for DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses. Next, the effects of BSEx on acute liver injury were examined. In experiments using acute liver injury models, 1000 mg/kg acetaminophen (APAP) or 350 mg/kg D-galactosamine (D-GalN) was used to induce injury. These male rats were divided into four groups: Control, BSEx, Inducer (APAP or D-GalN), and Inducer+BSEx. The feeding regimens were identical for the two analyses. Twenty-four hours following APAP administration via p.o. or D-GalN administration via i.p., rats were sacrificed to determine serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, hepatic glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances accumulation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. RESULTS: Microarray and real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that BSEx upregulated the expression of genes related to detoxification and glutathione synthesis in normal rat liver. The levels of AST (70.91 ± 15.74 IU/mL vs 5614.41 ± 1997.83 IU/mL, P < 0.05) and ALT (11.78 ± 2.08 IU/mL vs 1297.71 ± 447.33 IU/mL, P < 0.05) were significantly suppressed in the APAP + BSEx group compared with the APAP group. The level of GSH (2.61 ± 0.75 nmol/g tissue vs 1.66 ± 0.59 nmol/g tissue, P < 0.05) and liver GST activity (93.19 ± 16.55 U/g tissue vs 51.90 ± 16.85 U/g tissue, P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the APAP + BSEx group compared with the APAP group. AST (4820.05 ± 3094.93 IU/mL vs 12465.63 ± 3223.97 IU/mL, P < 0.05) and ALT (1808.95 ± 1014.04 IU/mL vs

  5. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  6. Coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in a patient with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Aktoz, Meryem; Tatli, Ersan; Barutcu, Ahmet; Ozkalayci, Flora; Umit, Elif; Altun, Armagan

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute coronary syndrome due to coronary slow flow after spinal cord injury. Data regarding the causes and clinical manifestations of coronary slow flow are inconclusive, but the autonomic nervous system is believed to be at least a contributing factor. The predominant vagal activity causes vasodilation and hemostasis, which can lead to acute coronary syndrome. We hereby call attention to hyperactive parasympathetic tonicity, which can lead to coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in acute spinal cord injury patients. PMID:21841878

  7. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Hao-Tian; Wang, Ji-Quan; Fan, Zhong-Kai; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We recorded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2-24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial fission protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2-24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were increased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the first 8 hours, but fission played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged.

  8. Time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhi-qiang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Li, Hao-tian; Wang, Ji-quan; Fan, Zhong-kai; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in mitochondrial morphology and function play an important role in secondary damage after acute spinal cord injury. We recorded the time representation of mitochondrial morphology and function in rats with acute spinal cord injury. Results showed that mitochondria had an irregular shape, and increased in size. Mitochondrial cristae were disordered and mitochondrial membrane rupture was visible at 2–24 hours after injury. Fusion protein mitofusin 1 expression gradually increased, peaked at 8 hours after injury, and then decreased to its lowest level at 24 hours. Expression of dynamin-related protein 1, amitochondrial fission protein, showed the opposite kinetics. At 2–24 hours after acute spinal cord injury, malondialdehyde content, cytochrome c levels and caspase-3 expression were increased, but glutathione content, adenosine triphosphate content, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and mitochondrial membrane potential were gradually reduced. Furthermore, mitochondrial morphology altered during the acute stage of spinal cord injury. Fusion was important within the first 8 hours, but fission played a key role at 24 hours. Oxidative stress was inhibited, biological productivity was diminished, and mitochondrial membrane potential and permeability were reduced in the acute stage of injury. In summary, mitochondrial apoptosis is activated when the time of spinal cord injury is prolonged. PMID:26981103

  9. A Clinical Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Tropical Acute Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ajay; Prabhu, Mangalore Venkatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tropical Acute Febrile Illness (TAFI) is one of the most common causes of morbidity within the community. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to infective and non infective causes is a major complication. Presence of AKI is a major cause of mortality among patients with TAFI. Aim To study the spectrum of tropical acute febrile illness; the proportion, spectrum and staging of acute kidney injury; Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) initiation and in-hospital mortality. Materials and Methods A total of 600 TAFI patients were prospectively studied at a tertiary care centre in coastal Karnataka between September 2012 and September 2014 for the aetiology of TAFI; the development and staging of AKI based on Kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines; the initiation of RRT and in-hospital mortality. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 with statistical significance calculated using chi-square and Fisher’s exact t-test for which p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results The spectrum of TAFI, in decreasing order, was vivax malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria, mixed malaria, enteric fever, scrub typhus and the most common aetiology was malaria. The proportion of AKI was 54%. The most common cause of AKI, its stages 2 and 3, RRT initiation and in-hospital mortality was leptospirosis; and AKI stage 1 was dengue fever. KDIGO AKI stage 1, 2 and 3 was seen in 46.9%, 31.2% and 21.9% of AKI patients, respectively. RRT initiation was required in 10.2% of AKI patients and in-hospital mortality was 3% among all patients. AKI, RRT initiationand in-hospital mortality were significantly associated with older age, fever duration and other presenting complaints, examination findings, renal function and other parameters, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria. Conclusion The aetiology in about half of TAFI patients in coastal Karnataka was malaria. More than 50% develop AKI with greater than one

  10. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  11. Forward and inverse electroencephalographic modeling in health and in acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Goh, S.Y. Matthew; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Chambers, Micah C.; Kikinis, Ron; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective EEG source localization is demonstrated in three cases of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) with progressive lesion loads using anatomically faithful models of the head which account for pathology. Methods Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes were used to generate head models via the finite element method (FEM). A total of 25 tissue types—including 6 types accounting for pathology— were included. To determine the effects of TBI upon source localization accuracy, a minimum-norm operator was used to perform inverse localization and to determine the accuracy of the latter. Results The importance of using a more comprehensive number of tissue types is confirmed in both health and in TBI. Pathology omission is found to cause substantial inaccuracies in EEG forward matrix calculations, with lead field sensitivity being underestimated by as much as ~200% in (peri-) contusional regions when TBI-related changes are ignored. Failing to account for such conductivity changes is found to misestimate substantial localization error by up to 35 mm. Conclusions Changes in head conductivity profiles should be accounted for when performing EEG modeling in acute TBI. Significance Given the challenges of inverse localization in TBI, this framework can benefit neurotrauma patients by providing useful insights on pathophysiology. PMID:23746499

  12. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D.; Pastuovic, Zeljko

    2013-07-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma.

  13. Treatment of radiation-induced acute intestinal injury with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, KAI; WU, WEIZHEN; YANG, SHUNLIANG; HUANG, LIANGHU; CHEN, JIN; GONG, CHUNGUI; FU, ZHICHAO; LIN, RUOFEI; TAN, JIANMING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to repair radiation-induced acute intestinal injury, and to elucidate the underlying repair mechanism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to whole abdominal irradiation using a single medical linear accelerator (12 Gy) and randomly assigned to two groups. Rats in the BMSC-treated group were injected with 1 ml BMSC suspension (2×106 cells/ml) via the tail vein, while the control group rats were injected with normal saline. BMSCs were identified by detecting the expression of CD29, CD90, CD34 and CD45 using flow cytometry. The expression of the cytokines stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin (IL)-2 was detected using immunohistochemical techniques. Plasma citrulline concentrations were evaluated using an ELISA kit. Rat general conditions, including body weight, and changes in cellular morphology were also recorded. The results suggested that BMSCs exerted a protective effect on radiation-induced acute intestinal injury in rats. The histological damage was rapidly repaired in the BMSC-treated group. In addition, the BMSC-treated group showed significantly reduced radiation injury scores (P<0.01), mildly reduced body weight and plasma citrulline levels, significantly more rapid recovery (P<0.01), significantly reduced expression of the cytokines PGE2 and IL-2 (P<0.05) and significantly increased SDF-1 expression (P<0.01) compared with the control group. In summary, the present results indicate that BMSCs are able to effectively reduce inflammation and promote repair of the structure and function of intestinal tissues damaged by radiation exposure, suggesting that they may provide a promising therapeutic agent. PMID:27284330

  14. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)–mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, including Trp53, Mep1b, Ctr1, and EGFP. A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1b and fCNT/siTrp53 significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  15. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Roberto; Ahluwalia, Tania; Woroniecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children. Methods We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission), and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher glycemia, P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that in critically ill children, hyperglycemia is associated with AKI and longer PICU stays. PMID:27601931

  16. Glucocorticoid signaling in myeloid cells worsens acute CNS injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Shawn F; Caso, Javier R; Munhoz, Carolina D; Hu, Caroline K; Tran, Kevin V; Miguel, Zurine D; Chien, Bonnie Y; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones (GCs) are well known for being anti-inflammatory, but some reports suggest that GCs can also augment aspects of inflammation during acute brain injury. Because the GC receptor (GR) is ubiquitously expressed throughout the brain, it is difficult to know which cell types might mediate these unusual "proinflammatory" GC actions. We examined this with cell type-specific deletion or overexpression of GR in mice experiencing seizure or ischemia. Counter to their classical anti-inflammatory actions, GR signaling in myeloid cells increased Iba-1 and CD68 staining as well as nuclear p65 levels in the injured tissue. GCs also reduced levels of occludin, claudin 5, and caveolin 1, proteins central to blood-brain-barrier integrity; these effects required GR in endothelial cells. Finally, GCs compromised neuron survival, an effect mediated by GR in myeloid and endothelial cells to a greater extent than by neuronal GR. PMID:23637179

  17. Free radicals and related reactive species as mediators of tissue injury and disease: implications for Health.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, James P; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A radical is any molecule that contains one or more unpaired electrons. Radicals are normal products of many metabolic pathways. Some exist in a controlled (caged) form as they perform essential functions. Others exist in a free form and interact with various tissue components. Such interactions can cause both acute and chronic dysfunction, but can also provide essential control of redox regulated signaling pathways. The potential roles of endogenous or xenobiotic-derived free radicals in several human pathologies have stimulated extensive research linking the toxicity of numerous xenobiotics and disease processes to a free radical mechanism. In recent years, improvements in analytical methodologies, as well as the realization that subtle effects induced by free radicals and oxidants are important in modulating cellular signaling, have greatly improved our understanding of the roles of these reactive species in toxic mechanisms and disease processes. However, because free radical-mediated changes are pervasive, and a consequence as well as a cause of injury, whether such species are a major cause of tissue injury and human disease remains unclear. This concern is supported by the fact that the bulk of antioxidant defenses are enzymatic and the findings of numerous studies showing that exogenously administered small molecule antioxidants are unable to affect the course of most toxicities and diseases purported to have a free radical mechanism. This review discusses cellular sources of various radical species and their reactions with vital cellular constituents, and provides examples of selected disease processes that may have a free radical component.

  18. 17β-Estradiol administration attenuates seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qixin; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Jiahuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Yong; Mu, Deguang; Li, Wangping; Sun, Ruilin; Liu, Wei; Nan, Yandong; Zhang, Bo; Jin, Faguang; Li, Zhichao

    2011-12-01

    There is very little evidence on the value of administering estrogen in cases of seawater drowning which can induce acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment can attenuate seawater aspiration-induced ALI in rats. In the experiment, ALI was induced by endotracheal instillation of seawater (4mL/kg) and the rats were then given intraperitoneal injection of E2 (5mg/kg) 20min after seawater instillation. Finally, the changes of arterial blood gases which contained hydrogen ion concentration (pH), arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)) were measured and the measurement of extravascular lung water (EVLW) was observed. The pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin stain. The expression of aquaporins (AQPs) 1, AQP5, and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that compared with normal saline water, seawater aspiration induced more serious ALI in rats which was markedly alleviated by E2 treatment. Meanwhile, the ERβ in lung tissues was activated after E2 administration. The seawater aspiration group also presented with severe pulmonary edema which was paralleled with over expressed AQP1 and AQP5. However, the up-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 was suppressed by the administration of E2, resulting in an attenuation of lung edema. In conclusion, E2 treatment could effectively attenuate seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats by the down-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5.

  19. Challenges of treating a 466-kilogram man with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allon N; Decker, Brian; Seele, Louis; Hellman, Richard N

    2008-07-01

    Caring for super obese patients (body mass index > 50 kg/m(2)) presents a number of complex and unique clinical challenges, particularly when acute kidney injury is present. We describe our experience treating the heaviest individual with acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy reported to date. A 24-year-old black man was admitted to our hospital with fever, vomiting, progressive weakness, shortness of breath, and hemoptysis. Admission weight was 1,024 lbs (466 kg), height was 6 ft 4 in (1.9 m), and body mass index was 125 kg/m(2). During hospitalization, the patient experienced oligoanuric acute kidney injury and required initiation of continuous and subsequently intermittent renal replacement therapy. This clinical scenario identifies the many challenges involved in caring for super obese patients with acute kidney injury and may be a harbinger of what awaits the nephrology community in the obesity pandemic era.

  20. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R. PMID:26974422

  1. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Hypothyroidism and Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Pyoung; Min, Hyun-Jun; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Mu; Choi, Myung-Jin; Yoon, Jong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome involving the breakdown of skeletal muscle that causes myoglobin and other intracellular proteins to leak into the circulatory system, resulting in organ injury including acute kidney injury. We report a case of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury that developed in a 63-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Untreated hypothyroidism may have caused her hypercholesterolemia requiring statin treatment, and it is postulated that statin-induced muscle injury was aggravated by hypothyroidism resulting in her full-blown rhabdomyolysis. Although this patient was successfully treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration and L-thyroxin replacement, rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury is a potentially life-threatening disorder. Physicians must pay special attention to the possible presence of subclinical hypothyroidism when administering statins in patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24396699

  3. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  4. Dyschloremia Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min; Li, Guangxi; Sarvottam, Kumar; Wang, Shengyu; Thongprayoon, Charat; Dong, Yue; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, although its impact has not been well studied. We investigated the epidemiology of dyschloremia and its associations with the incidence of acute kidney injury and other intensive care unit outcomes. Material and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study at Mayo Clinic Hospital—Rochester. All adult patients admitted to intensive care units from January 1st, 2006, through December 30th, 2012 were included. Patients with known acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease stage 5 before intensive care unit admission were excluded. We evaluated the association of dyschloremia with ICU outcomes, after adjustments for the effect of age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index and severity of illness score. Results A total of 6,025 patients were enrolled in the final analysis following the implementation of eligibility criteria. From the cohort, 1,970 patients (33%) developed acute kidney injury. Of the total patients enrolled, 4,174 had a baseline serum chloride. In this group, 1,530 (37%) had hypochloremia, and 257 (6%) were hyperchloremic. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in hypochloremic and hyperchloremic patients compared to those with a normal serum chloride level (43% vs.30% and 34% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001). Baseline serum chloride was lower in the acute kidney injury group vs. the non-acute kidney injury group [100 mmol/L (96–104) vs. 102 mmol/L (98–105), P < .0001]. In a multivariable logistic regression model, baseline serum chloride of ≤94 mmol/L found to be independently associated with the risk of acute kidney injury (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6; P = .01). Discussion Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, and severe hypochloremia is independently associated with an increased risk of development of acute kidney injury. PMID:27490461

  5. A novel strategy to enhance mesenchymal stem cell migration capacity and promote tissue repair in an injury specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, C; Morigi, M; Benedetti, V; Imberti, B; Fabricio, A S; Squarcina, E; Benigni, A; Gagliardini, E; Remuzzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow origin appear to be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapies. However, the major barrier to the effective implementation of MSC-based therapies is the lack of specific homing of exogenously infused cells and overall the inability to drive them to the diseased or damaged tissue. In order to circumvent these limitations, we developed a preconditioning strategy to optimize MSC migration efficiency and potentiate their beneficial effect at the site of injury. Initially, we screened different molecules by using an in vitro injury-migration setting, and subsequently, we evaluated the effectiveness of the different strategies in mice with acute kidney injury (AKI). Our results showed that preconditioning of MSCs with IGF-1 before infusion improved cell migration capacity and restored normal renal function after AKI. The present study demonstrates that promoting migration of MSCs could increase their therapeutic potential and indicates a new therapeutic paradigm for organ repair.

  6. I-FABP as Biomarker for the Early Diagnosis of Acute Mesenteric Ischemia and Resultant Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khadaroo, Rachel G.; Fortis, Spyridon; Salim, Saad Y.; Streutker, Catherine; Churchill, Thomas A.; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury. PMID:25541714

  7. Hyperglycemia and Acute Kidney Injury During the Perioperative Period.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Carlos E; Der Mesropian, Paul J; Mathew, Roy O; Slawski, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are frequently observed during the perioperative period. Substantial evidence indicates that hyperglycemia increases the prevalence of AKI as a surgical complication. Patients who develop hyperglycemia and AKI during the perioperative period are at significantly elevated risk for poor outcomes such as major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality. Early observational and interventional trials demonstrated that the use of intensive insulin therapy to achieve strict glycemic control resulted in remarkable reductions of AKI in surgical populations. However, more recent interventional trials and meta-analyses have produced contradictory evidence questioning the renal benefits of strict glycemic control. Although the exact mechanisms through which hyperglycemia increases the risk of AKI have not been elucidated, multiple pathophysiologic pathways have been proposed. Hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may also play a significant role in the development of AKI. In this literature review, the complex relationship between hyperglycemia and AKI as well as its impact on clinical outcomes during the perioperative period is explored.

  8. Inhibition of Neutrophil Exocytosis Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Merchant, Michael L.; Jin, Shunying; Lentsch, Alex B.; Ward, Richard A.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis of neutrophil granules contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) induced by infection or inflammation, suggesting that inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis in vivo could be a viable therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a cell-permeable fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis (TAT-SNAP-23) on ALI using an immune complex deposition model in rats. The effect of inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis by intravenous administration of TAT-SNAP-23 on ALI was assessed by albumin leakage, neutrophil infiltration, lung histology, and proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf). Administration of TAT-SNAP-23, but not TAT-Control, significantly reduced albumin leakage, total protein levels in the BALf, and intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Evidence that TAT-SNAP-23 inhibits neutrophil exocytosis included a reduction in plasma membrane CD18 expression by BALf neutrophils and a decrease in neutrophil granule proteins in BALf. Similar degree of neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and/or BALf suggests that TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter vascular endothelial cell function. Proteomic analysis of BALf revealed that components of the complement and coagulation pathways were significantly reduced in BALf from TAT-SNAP-23-treated animals. Our results indicate that administration of a TAT-fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis reduces in vivo ALI. Targeting neutrophil exocytosis is a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALI. PMID:23364427

  9. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  10. Enabling innovative translational research in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Zarjou, Abolfazl; Sanders, Paul W; Mehta, Ravindra L; Agarwal, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, heterogeneous and detrimental clinical condition that has significant attributable morbidity and mortality. Despite major advances in understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and outcomes of AKI, preventive measures remain inadequate and therapeutic approaches (except for renal replacement therapy) have largely proven futile so far. Critical to the process of designing rational therapies is translational research, which involves the transition between the basic research discoveries and everyday clinical applications to prevent, diagnose and treat human diseases. Progress in innovative approaches has been hampered due in part to the reliance on functional markers (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen) that are neither sensitive nor specific to diagnose AKI. This limitation has created a great deal of interest and intense investigation to identify a “troponin-like marker” that would facilitate recognition of AKI and allow for timely implementation of the precise therapeutic agent. The other major obstacle in this field is the diverse and complex nature of AKI that involves multiple independent and overlapping pathways, making it difficult to cure AKI with a single approach. In this review, we will summarize the advances, ongoing studies and future perspectives in the field of translational research of AKI. PMID:22376265

  11. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. PMID:23036036

  12. Metabonomics of acute kidney injury in children after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Holland, Ricky D; Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Moore, Page C; Dent, Catherine L; Devarajan, Prasad; Portilla, Didier

    2008-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in children who undergo cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. We performed metabonomic analyses of urine samples obtained from 40 children that underwent cardiac surgery for correction of congenital cardiac defects. Serial urine samples were obtained from each patient prior to surgery and at 4 h and 12 h after surgery. AKI, defined as a 50% or greater rise in baseline level of serum creatinine, was noted in 21 children at 48-72 h after cardiac surgery. The principal component analysis of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) negative ionization data of the urine samples obtained 4 h and 12 h after surgery from patients who develop AKI clustered away from patients who did not develop AKI. The LC/MS peak with mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) 261.01 and retention time (tR) 4.92 min was further analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and identified as homovanillic acid sulfate (HVA-SO4), a dopamine metabolite. By MS single-reaction monitoring, the sensitivity was 0.90 and specificity was 0.95 for a cut-off value of 24 ng/microl for HVA-SO4 at 12 h after surgery. We concluded that urinary HVA-SO4 represents a novel, sensitive, and predictive early biomarker of AKI after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  13. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Felix G.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is commonly defined as a decline in kidney function occurring in a narrow time window after administration of iodinated contrast material. The incidence of AKI after contrast material administration greatly depends on the specific definition and cutoff values used. Although self-limiting in most cases, postcontrast AKI carries a risk of more permanent renal insufficiency, dialysis, and death. The risk of AKI from contrast material, in particular when administered intravenously for contrast-enhanced CT, has been exaggerated by older, noncontrolled studies due to background fluctuations in renal function. More recent evidence from controlled studies suggests that the risk is likely nonexistent in patients with normal renal function, but there may be a risk in patients with renal insufficiency. However, even in this patient population, the risk of CI-AKI is probably much smaller than traditionally assumed. Since volume expansion is the only preventive strategy with a convincing evidence base, liberal hydration should be encouraged to further minimize the risk. The benefits of the diagnostic information gained from contrast-enhanced examinations will still need to be balanced with the potential risk of CI-AKI for the individual patient and clinical scenario. PMID:24734250

  14. Clinical Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury Following Snake Bite Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Dharod, Mrudul V; Patil, Tushar B; Deshpande, Archana S; Gulhane, Ragini V; Patil, Mangesh B; Bansod, Yogendra V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Snake bite envenomation is a major public health concern in developing countries. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is as important cause of mortality in patients with vasculotoxic snake bite. Aims: This study was to evaluate the clinical profile of snake bite patients and to determine the predictors of developing AKI following snake bite. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty-one patients with snake envenomation were included. Eighty-seven patients developed AKI (Group A) and 194 (Group B) did not. History, examination findings and investigations results were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: In group A, 61 (70.11%) patients were male and in group B, 117 (60.30%) patients were male. Out of 281 patients, 232 had cellulitis, 113 had bleeding tendencies, 87 had oliguria, 76 had neuroparalysis, and 23 had hypotension at presentation. After multivariate analysis, bite to hospital time (P = 0.016), hypotension (P = 0.000), albuminuria (P = 0.000), bleeding time (P = 0.000), prothrombin time (P = 0.000), hemoglobin (P = 0.000) and total bilirubin (P = 0.010) were significant independent predictors of AKI. Conclusions: AKI developed in 30.96% of patients with snake bite, leading to mortality in 39.08% patients. Factors associated with AKI are bite to hospital time, hypotension, albuminuria, prolonged bleeding time, prolonged prothrombin time, low hemoglobin and a high total bilirubin. PMID:24350071

  15. Organophosphate Poisoning and Subsequent Acute Kidney Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Feng-You; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Wu, Yung-Shun; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Small numbers of the papers have studied the association between organophosphate (OP) poisoning and the subsequent acute kidney injury (AKI). Therefore, we used the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to study whether patients with OP poisoning are associated with a higher risk to have subsequent AKI. The retrospective cohort study comprised patients aged ≥20 years with OP poisoning and hospitalized diagnosis during 2000–2011 (N = 8924). Each OP poisoning patient was frequency-matched to 4 control patients based on age, sex, index year, and comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, and stroke (N = 35,696). We conducted Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of OP poisoning on AKI risk. The overall incidence of AKI was higher in the patients with OP poisoning than in the controls (4.85 vs 3.47/1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and interaction terms, patients with OP poisoning were associated with a 6.17-fold higher risk of AKI compared with the comparison cohort. Patients with highly severe OP poisoning were associated with a substantially increased risk of AKI. The study found OP poisoning is associated with increased risk of subsequent AKI. Future studies are encouraged to evaluate whether long-term effects exist and the best guideline to prevent the continuously impaired renal function. PMID:26632728

  16. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis.

  17. Plasma FGF23 levels increase rapidly after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Marta; Waikar, Sushrut; Pereira, Renata; Havasi, Andrea; Leaf, David E.; Goltzman, David; Pajevic, Paola Divieti; Wolf, Myles; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). In order to determine how early this increase occurs we used a murine folic acid nephropathy model and found that plasma FGF23 levels increased significantly from baseline already after 1 hour of AKI, with an 18-fold increase at 24 hours. Similar elevations of FGF23 levels were found when AKI was induced in mice with osteocyte-specific parathyroid hormone receptor ablation or the global deletion of parathyroid hormone or vitamin D receptor, indicating that the increase in FGF23 was independent of parathyroid hormone and vitamin D signaling. Furthermore, FGF23 levels increased to a similar extent in wild-type mice maintained on normal or phosphate-depleted diets prior to induction of AKI, indicating that the marked FGF23 elevation is at least partially independent of dietary phosphate. Bone production of FGF23 was significantly increased in AKI. The half-life of intravenously administered recombinant FGF23 was only modestly increased. Consistent with the mouse data, plasma FGF23 levels rose 15.9-fold by 24 hours following cardiac surgery in patients who developed AKI. The levels were significantly higher than in those without postoperative AKI. Thus, circulating FGF23 levels rise rapidly during AKI in rodents and humans. In mice this increase is independent of established modulators of FGF23 secretion. PMID:23657144

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  19. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  20. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  1. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  2. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Paolo; Tonon, Marta; Pilutti, Chiara; Morando, Filippo; Piano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for the diagnosis of AKI have been proposed in patients with cirrhosis by the International Club of Ascites. Almost all types of bacterial infections can induce AKI in patients with cirrhosis representing its most common precipitating event. The bacterial infection-induced AKI usually meets the diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Well in keeping with the "splanchnic arterial vasodilation hypothesis", it has been stated that HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume related to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and to an inadequate cardiac output. Nevertheless, the role of bacterial infections in precipitating organ failures, including renal failure, is enhanced when their course is characterized by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), thus, when sepsis occurs. Sepsis has been shown to be capable to induce "per se" AKI in animals as well as in patients conditioning also the features of renal damage. This observation suggests that when precipitated by sepsis, the pathogenesis and the clinical course of AKI also in patients with cirrhosis may differentiate to a certain extent from AKI with another or no precipitating factor. The purpose of this review is to describe the features of AKI precipitated by bacterial infections and to highlight whether infection and/or the development of SIRS may influence its clinical course, and, in particular, the response to treatment.

  3. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  4. Oral bisphosphonate use in the elderly is not associated with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Shih, Andrew W Y; Weir, Matthew A; Clemens, Kristin K; Yao, Zhan; Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Juurlink, David N; Hird, Amanda; Hodsman, Anthony; Parikh, Chirag R; Wald, Ron; Cadarette, Suzanne M; Garg, Amit X

    2012-10-01

    Intravenous bisphosphonates can cause acute kidney injury; however, this risk was not found with oral bisphosphonates in randomized clinical trials with restrictive eligibility criteria. In order to provide complementary safety data, we studied the risk of acute kidney injury in a population-based cohort of 122,727 patients aged 66 years and older discharged from hospital following a new fragility fracture and no history of bisphosphonate use in the prior year. Bisphosphonate treatment was identified within 120 days after discharge and event rates were measured from 90 days of therapy initiation. The primary outcome was hospitalization with acute kidney injury with secondary outcomes of new nephrology consultation and, in a subset of patients with laboratory values, acute kidney injury was defined as an increase in serum creatinine. We identified 18,286 bisphosphonate users and 104,441 non-users with a mean age of 81 years. Of 5772 patients with laboratory values, 40% had chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). Overall, there was no statistically significant difference in the risk of acute kidney injury among bisphosphonate users compared to non-users (adjusted odds ratio 1.03), and no significant differences in other outcomes or in subgroups of patients with baseline chronic kidney disease. Thus, in this older population-based cohort, oral bisphosphonate use was not associated with acute kidney injury.

  5. CXCR2 knockout mice are protected against DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2013-11-15

    Organ cross talk exists in many diseases of the human and animal models of human diseases. A recent study demonstrated that inflammatory mediators can cause acute kidney injury and neutrophil infiltration in a mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-colitis. However, the chemokines and their receptors that may mediate distant organ effects in colitis are unknown. We hypothesized that keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)/IL-8 receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2) mediates DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type (WT) mice developed severe colitis with DSS treatment, which was associated with inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the colon. DSS-colitis in WT was accompanied by acute kidney injury and enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines in the kidney. However, CXCR2 knockout mice were protected against DSS-colitis as well as acute kidney injury. Moreover, the expression of cytokines and chemokines and neutrophil infiltration was blunted in CXCR2 knockout mice in the colon and kidney. Administration of recombinant KC exacerbated DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury. Our results suggest that KC/IL-8 and its receptor CXCR2 are critical and major mediators of organ cross talk in DSS colitis and neutralization of CXCR2 will help to reduce the incidence of acute kidney injury due to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease in humans.

  6. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  7. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  8. Acute complications and outcomes of acute head injury in adult patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Núñez, Maria A; Borobia, Alberto M; García-Erce, Jose A; Martí de Gracia, Milagros; Pérez-Perilla, Patricia; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, complications and outcome of patients with haemophilia and acute head injury (AHI) at the emergency department (ED), and develop a protocol to prevent early and late complications. This is a retrospective cohort study including all patients with haemophilia and AHI admitted to the ED. We identified 26 patients with AHI. A computed tomography scan was carried out on all patients at admission, and again on two patients (with neurosurgical complications) 48 h later. The discharge diagnosis was as follows: 3.8% subdural haematoma, 3.8% cerebellar epidural haematoma and 92.3% uncomplicated AHI. We propose the following protocol: a computed tomography scan upon arrival and another within 48 h post-AHI, unless there is an absence of clinical symptoms. In addition, all patients must self-administer a clotting factor as soon as possible and be observed in the ED for at least 48 h.

  9. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  10. Tristetraprolin mediates anti-inflammatory effects of carbon monoxide on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Chen, Yingqing; Yang, Jung Wook; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Jeong Woo; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose inhaled carbon monoxide is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). However, the precise mechanism by which carbon monoxide confers protection against ALI is not clear. Tristetraprolin (TTP; official name ZFP36) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by enhancing decay of proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs. With the use of TTP knockout mice, we demonstrate here that the protection by carbon monoxide against LPS-induced ALI is mediated by TTP. Inhalation of carbon monoxide substantially increased the pulmonary expression of TTP. carbon monoxide markedly enhanced the decay of mRNA-encoding inflammatory cytokines, blocked the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased tissue damage in LPS-treated lung tissue. Moreover, knockout of TTP abrogated the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effects of carbon monoxide in LPS-induced ALI. These results suggest that carbon monoxide-induced TTP mediates the protective effect of carbon monoxide against LPS-induced ALI by enhancing the decay of mRNA encoding proinflammatory cytokines.

  11. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-01

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor.

  12. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  13. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment of sports-related severe acute hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guillodo, Yannick; Madouas, Gwénaelle; Simon, Thomas; Le Dauphin, Hermine; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose hamstring injury is the most common musculoskeletal disorder and one of the main causes of missed sporting events. Shortening the time to return to play (TTRTP) is a priority for athletes and sports medicine practitioners. Hypothesis platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection at the site of severe acute hamstring injury increases the healing rate and shortens the TTRTP. Study design Cohort study. Methods all patients with ultrasonography and MRI evidence of severe acute hamstring injury between January 2012 and March 2014 were offered PRP treatment. Those who accepted received a single intramuscular PRP injection within 8 days post-injury; the other patients served as controls. The same standardized rehabilitation program was used in both groups. A physical examination and ultrasonography were performed 10 and 30 days post-injury, then a phone interview 120 days post-injury, to determine the TTRTP at the pre-injury level. Results of 34 patients, 15 received PRP and 19 did not. Mean TTRTP at the pre-injury level was 50.9±10.7 days in the PRP group and 52.8±15.7 days in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion a single intramuscular PRP injection did not shorten the TTRTP in sports people with severe acute hamstring injuries. PMID:26958537

  14. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  15. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respir atory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS. PMID:26261640

  16. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS.

  17. Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Karen J; Lewis, James F

    2007-09-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a life-threatening form of respiratory failure that affects a heterogeneous population of critically ill patients. Although overall mortality appears to be decreasing in recent years due to improvements in supportive care, there are presently no proven, effective pharmacological therapies to treat ARDS and prevent its associated complications. The most common cause of death in ARDS is not hypoxemia or pulmonary failure, but rather multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), suggesting that improving survival in patients with ARDS may be linked to decreasing the incidence or severity of MODS. The key to developing novel treatments depends, in part, on identifying and understanding the mechanisms by which ARDS leads to MODS, although the heterogeneity and complexity of this disorder certainly poses a challenge to investigators. Novel therapies in development for treatment of ALI/ARDS include exogenous surfactant, therapies aimed at modulating neutrophil activity, such as prostaglandin and complement inhibitors, and treatments targeting earlier resolution of ARDS, such as beta-agonists and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. From a clinical perspective, identifying subpopulations of patients most likely to benefit from a particular therapy and recognising the appropriate stage of illness in which to initiate treatment could potentially lead to better outcomes in the short term.

  18. Anuric Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Acute Mountain Sickness Prophylaxis With Acetazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Castle Alvarez-Maza, James; Novak, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Acetazolamide (ACZ) is a sulfonamide derivative that inhibits carbonic anhydrase and is the mainstay for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Acute kidney injury (AKI) is not well recognized as a complication of ACZ ingestion, especially when low doses are used for short periods of time. We report a case of a healthy, middle-aged man who developed severe AKI after the ingestion of ACZ for AMS prophylaxis. The patient presented with bilateral flank pain and anuric AKI without radiographic signs of obstructive uropathy. All blood and urine testing to determine the cause of AKI were negative or normal. The patient required 2 sessions of hemodialysis due to worsening metabolic derangements, which included severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and hyperphosphatemia. Renal function returned to baseline after 96 hours of supportive care. The pathogenesis of AKI in our patient was attributed to ACZ-induced sulfonamide crystalluria causing intratubular obstruction and retrograde urine flow, but not intraureteric precipitation or obstructive uropathy. This classic presentation of anuric AKI and renal colic has been previously described with higher doses of ACZ for prolonged periods of time but never with low doses for AMS prophylaxis such as in our patient (total dose of 1250 mg within 48 hours). Our case highlights the risk of adverse renal outcomes following ACZ ingestion, even in previously healthy individuals, and suggests that increased fluid intake may be advisable for travelers taking ACZ prophylaxis. PMID:25264540

  19. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-oxidative Effects of Dexpanthenol on Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li-Mei, Wan; Jie, Tan; Shan-He, Wan; Dong-Mei, Meng; Peng-Jiu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dexpanthenol in a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Lung injury was induced by exposure to atomized LPS. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group; Dxp (500 mg/kg) group; LPS group; LPS + Dxp (500 mg/kg) group. The effects of dexpanthenol on LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment, cytokine levels, total protein concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) contents were examined. Additionally, lung tissue was examined by histology to investigate the changes in pathology in the presence and absence of dexpanthenol. In LPS-challenged mice, dexpanthenol significantly improved lung edema. Dexpanthenol also markedly inhibited the LPS-induced neutrophiles influx, protein leakage, and release of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Furthermore, dexpanthenol attenuated MPO activity and MDA contents and increased SOD and GSH activity in the LPS-challenged lung tissue. These data suggest that dexpanthenol protects mice from LPS-induced acute lung injury by its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. PMID:27469104

  1. Protective effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIJUN; CANG, JING; XUE, ZHANGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is currently unknown. In the present study, a rabbit acute lung injury model was established to investigate the effects of TEA on inflammatory factors, pulmonary surfactant and ultrastructure. A total of 56 rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups (n=14 per group): Control group (Group C), hypoxia group (Group H), sevoflurane group (Group S) and combined sevoflurane-epidural anesthesia group (Group ES). The ALI model was considered to have been successfully induced when the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen was <300. The correct placement of a catheter for TEA was confirmed using epidurography. ALI was maintained for 3 h. Arterial blood samples were collected from all groups during spontaneous breathing (T0) and at 3 h after ALI induction (T5) in order to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was harvested to determine the total phospholipid, saturated phosphatidylcholine and total protein levels. Furthermore, the dry/wet weight ratio and the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue were determined using ELISA. In addition, light and transmission electron microscopy and histological techniques were used to examine the morphology of alveolar type II cells in the rat lung tissue. The results indicate that changes of serum IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels following ALI were consistent with the changes in the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue. TEA attenuated these changes and thus reduced the severity of the ALI. In addition, TEA improved the alveolar structure, reduced the number of polymorphonuclear cells and mitigated the damage of lamellar bodies. In summary, the results of the present study indicate that TEA reduces lung tissue damage by inhibiting systemic and local inflammation, decreasing the

  2. Acute Peritoneal Dialysis in Neonates with Acute Kidney Injury and Hypernatremic Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Nurdan; Erguven, Müferet; Yildiz, Metin; Ozdogan, Tutku; Turhan, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Objective: We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) and clinical outcomes in neonates with acute kidney injury (AKI) and hypernatremic dehydration. ♦ Methods: The medical records of 15 neonates with AKI and hypernatremic dehydration who were treated with acute PD were reviewed. The diagnoses were AKI with hypernatremic dehydration with or without sepsis in 13 patients and AKI with hypernatremia and congenital nephropathy in 2 patients. The main indications for PD were AKI with some combination of oligoanuria, azotemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic acidosis unresponsive to initial intensive medical treatment. ♦ Results: The mean age of the patients at dialysis initiation was 11.9 ± 9 days, and the mean duration of PD was 6.36 ± 4.8 days. In 7 patients (46.7%), hypotension required the use of vasopressors, and in 6 patients (40%), mechanical ventilation was required. Peritoneal dialysis-related complications occurred in 7 patients (46.7%), the most common being catheter malfunction (n = 6). Four episodes of peritonitis occurred in the 15 patients (26.7%), 2 episodes in patients with congenital renal disease and 2 episodes in patients with sepsis and multiorgan failure, who did not survive. Congenital renal disease, septicemia, and the need for mechanical ventilation were important factors influencing patient survival. All patients with no pre-existing renal disease or sepsis recovered their renal function and survived. ♦ Conclusions: In neonates with AKI and hypernatremic dehydration, PD is safe and successful, and in patients without congenital renal disease or sepsis, the prognosis is good. Peritoneal dialysis should be the treatment of choice in neonates with AKI and hypernatremic dehydration who do not respond to appropriate med ical treatment. PMID:23123669

  3. Preventive effects of dexmedetomidine on the liver in a rat model of acid-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sen, Velat; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Şen, Hadice Selimoğlu; Ece, Aydın; Uluca, Unal; Söker, Sevda; Doğan, Erdal; Kaplan, İbrahim; Deveci, Engin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether dexmedetomidine improves acute liver injury in a rat model. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 300-350 g were allocated randomly to four groups. In group 1, normal saline (NS) was injected into the lungs and rats were allowed to breathe spontaneously. In group 2, rats received standard ventilation (SV) in addition to NS. In group 3, hydrochloric acid was injected into the lungs and rats received SV. In group 4, rats received SV and 100 µg/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine before intratracheal HCl instillation. Blood samples and liver tissue specimens were examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical methods. Acute lung injury (ALI) was found to be associated with increased malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant activity (TOA), oxidative stress index (OSI), and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Significantly decreased MDA, TOA, and OSI levels and significantly increased TAC levels were found with dexmedetomidine injection in group 4 (P < 0.05). The highest histologic injury scores were detected in group 3. Enhanced hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and reduced CD68 expression were found in dexmedetomidine group compared with the group 3. In conclusion, the presented data provide the first evidence that dexmedetomidine has a protective effect on experimental liver injury induced by ALI. PMID:25165710

  4. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  5. Enhanced Resolution of Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury as a result of Aspirin Triggered Resolvin D1 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Arias, Stephen; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), which presents as acute respiratory failure, is a major clinical problem that requires aggressive care, and patients who require prolonged oxygen exposure are at risk of developing this disease. Although molecular determinants of ALI have been reported, the molecules involved in disease catabasis associated with oxygen toxicity have not been well studied. It has been reported that lung mucosa is rich in omega-3 fatty acid dicosahexanoic acid (DHA), which has antiinflammatory properties. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is a potent proresolution metabolite of DHA that can curb the inflammatory effects in various acute injuries, yet the effect of AT-RvD1 on hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) or in the oxygen toxicity setting in general has not been investigated. The effects of AT-RvD1 on HALI were determined for the first time in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥95% O2) for 48 hours. Mice were given AT-RvD1 (100 ng) in saline or a saline vehicle for 24 hours in normoxic (≈21% O2) conditions after hyperoxia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected for analysis associated with proinflammatory signaling and lung inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in reduced oxidative stress, increased glutathione production, and significantly decreased tissue inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment also significantly reduced the lung wet/dry ratio, protein in BAL fluid, and decreased apoptotic and NF-κB signaling. These results show that AT-RvD1 curbs oxygen-induced lung edema, permeability, inflammation, and apoptosis and is thus an effective therapy for prolonged hyperoxia exposure in this murine model. PMID:25647402

  6. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated. PMID:27682899

  7. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  8. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage protein enhances intraluminal debris clearance and ameliorates acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, Satoko; Kitada, Kento; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Takai, Ryosuke; Zhang, Xizhong; Tsugawa, Yoji; Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Mori, Mayumi; Yoshihara, Yasunori; Doi, Kent; Maehara, Natsumi; Kusunoki, Shunsuke; Takahata, Akiko; Noiri, Eisei; Suzuki, Yusuke; Yahagi, Naoki; Nishiyama, Akira; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Takano, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with prolonged hospitalization and high mortality, and it predisposes individuals to chronic kidney disease. To date, no effective AKI treatments have been established. Here we show that the apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) protein on intraluminal debris interacts with kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and promotes recovery from AKI. During AKI, the concentration of AIM increases in the urine, and AIM accumulates on necrotic cell debris within the kidney proximal tubules. The AIM present in this cellular debris binds to KIM-1, which is expressed on injured tubular epithelial cells, and enhances the phagocytic removal of the debris by the epithelial cells, thus contributing to kidney tissue repair. When subjected to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced AKI, AIM-deficient mice exhibited abrogated debris clearance and persistent renal inflammation, resulting in higher mortality than wild-type (WT) mice due to progressive renal dysfunction. Treatment of mice with IR-induced AKI using recombinant AIM resulted in the removal of the debris, thereby ameliorating renal pathology. We observed this effect in both AIM-deficient and WT mice, but not in KIM-1-deficient mice. Our findings provide a basis for the development of potentially novel therapies for AKI. PMID:26726878

  9. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage protein enhances intraluminal debris clearance and ameliorates acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, Satoko; Kitada, Kento; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Takai, Ryosuke; Zhang, Xizhong; Tsugawa, Yoji; Sugisawa, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Mori, Mayumi; Yoshihara, Yasunori; Doi, Kent; Maehara, Natsumi; Kusunoki, Shunsuke; Takahata, Akiko; Noiri, Eisei; Suzuki, Yusuke; Yahagi, Naoki; Nishiyama, Akira; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Takano, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with prolonged hospitalization and high mortality, and it predisposes individuals to chronic kidney disease. To date, no effective AKI treatments have been established. Here we show that the apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) protein on intraluminal debris interacts with kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and promotes recovery from AKI. During AKI, the concentration of AIM increases in the urine, and AIM accumulates on necrotic cell debris within the kidney proximal tubules. The AIM present in this cellular debris binds to KIM-1, which is expressed on injured tubular epithelial cells, and enhances the phagocytic removal of the debris by the epithelial cells, thus contributing to kidney tissue repair. When subjected to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced AKI, AIM-deficient mice exhibited abrogated debris clearance and persistent renal inflammation, resulting in higher mortality than wild-type (WT) mice due to progressive renal dysfunction. Treatment of mice with IR-induced AKI using recombinant AIM resulted in the removal of the debris, thereby ameliorating renal pathology. We observed this effect in both AIM-deficient and WT mice, but not in KIM-1-deficient mice. Our findings provide a basis for the development of potentially novel therapies for AKI.

  10. [New mechanisms and recent insights in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI)].

    PubMed

    Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Quercia, Alessandro Domenico; Dellepiane, Sergio; Figliolini, Federico; Medica, Davide; De Lena, Michela

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients often associated with multiple organ failure, increased mortality and progression toward chronic kidney disease. The identification of new cellular and molecular targets involved in AKI may lead to an improvement of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In recent years, the pathogenetic mechanisms of AKI have been fully elucidated: tubular epithelial cells and endothelial cells present in the microvasculature have been identified as the main targets of ischemia and of nephrotoxic drugs. Indeed, endothelial cell injury is associated with an extension phase of AKI, whereas tubular cells are subjected to an alteration of cell polarity, mislocalization of tight junction proteins and membrane transporters, and finally to the development of necrosis or apotosis. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is also a key component of sepsis-associated AKI in which the mechanisms of tissue damage are associated not only with hypoperfusion but also with a direct detrimental effect of bacterial products and inflammatory mediators on resident kidney cells. Endothelial and tubular epithelial cells also represent the main targets in the immunological mechanisms of AKI in kidney transplantation during cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection. Recent studies evidenced new molecules as early biomarkers of AKI. Among these molecules, NGAL and KIM-1 play a possible role in the progression toward chronic kidney disease. Lastly, the new frontier of AKI therapy is represented by the use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells able to induce a regenerative program in the damaged kidney.

  11. Effects of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu-Qing; Ma, Yong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is suggested as a vital pharmacologic target for inflammation. In this study, we determined whether a sEH inhibitor, AUDA, exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. Methods Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive AUDA or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 4 h after LPS or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intratracheal instillation. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS or PBS administration. Results AUDA administration decreased the pulmonary levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Improvement of oxygenation and lung edema were observed in AUDA treated group. AUDA significantly inhibited sEH activity, and elevated epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels in lung tissues. Moreover, LPS induced the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was markedly dampened in AUDA treated group. Conclusion Administration of AUDA after the onset of LPS-induced ALI increased pulmonary levels of EETs, and ameliorated lung injury. sEH is a potential pharmacologic target for ALI. PMID:27490848

  12. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  13. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  14. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 -), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na+] and decreased [K+] and [Ca2+] (P<0.05). Blood [Na+] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  15. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na(+)] and decreased [K(+)] and [Ca(2+)] (P<0.05). Blood [Na(+)] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  16. Cardiac Biomarkers and Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Whitlock, Richard P.; Zappitelli, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Eikelboom, John; Garg, Amit X.; Philbrook, Heather Thiessen; Devereaux, Philip J.; Krawczeski, Catherine D.; Kavsak, Peter; Shortt, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship of cardiac biomarkers with postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) among pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: Data from TRIBE-AKI, a prospective study of children undergoing cardiac surgery, were used to examine the association of cardiac biomarkers (N-type pro–B-type natriuretic peptide, creatine kinase-MB [CK-MB], heart-type fatty acid binding protein [h-FABP], and troponins I and T) with the development of postoperative AKI. Cardiac biomarkers were collected before and 0 to 6 hours after surgery. AKI was defined as a ≥50% or 0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine, within 7 days of surgery. RESULTS: Of the 106 patients included in this study, 55 (52%) developed AKI after cardiac surgery. Patients who developed AKI had higher median levels of pre- and postoperative cardiac biomarkers compared with patients without AKI (all P < .01). Preoperatively, higher levels of CK-MB and h-FABP were associated with increased odds of developing AKI (CK-MB: adjusted odds ratio 4.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56–13.41; h-FABP: adjusted odds ratio 2.76, 95% CI 1.27–6.03). When combined with clinical models, both preoperative CK-MB and h-FABP provided good discrimination (area under the curve 0.77, 95% CI 0.68–0.87, and 0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.87, respectively) and improved reclassification indices. Cardiac biomarkers collected postoperatively did not significantly improve the prediction of AKI beyond clinical models. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative CK-MB and h-FABP are associated with increased risk of postoperative AKI and provide good discrimination of patients who develop AKI. These biomarkers may be useful for risk stratifying patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25755241

  17. Acute Kidney Injury Increases Risk of ESRD among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Collins, Allan J.

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged ≥67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for ≥2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease. PMID:19020007

  18. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  19. Update in sepsis and acute kidney injury 2014.

    PubMed

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Asfar, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) represent an important burden in intensive care unit clinical practices. The Journal published important contributions in sepsis for novel therapeutic approaches suggesting that combined molecular targets (e.g., dual inhibition of IL-1β and IL-18, and coadministration of endothelial progenitor cells and stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog) could perform better. The clinical effectiveness of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was reported in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Although its experimental properties appeared favorable in the pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine balance, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D failed to improve survival. Strategies for decreasing antimicrobial resistances are of particular importance. Effective (aerosolized antibiotics for ventilator-associated pneumonia) and ineffective (procalcitonin algorithm for antibiotic deescalation) approaches were published. In 2014, several publications raised an important point shared by survivors from sepsis and/or AKI. The increased number of survivors over time brought out long-term sequelae, leading to a poor outcome after hospital discharge. Among them, cardiovascular events and chronic kidney disease may explain the significant increase in the risk of death, which can persist up to 10 years and significantly increases the use of health care. Postdischarge survival represents a new target for future research in sepsis and AKI to find how we can prevent and manage long-term sequelae. A milestone of the year was the Ebola outbreak. The Journal contributed to our better understanding of Ebola virus disease with a paper underlying the crucial role of a large implementation of pragmatic supportive care, including fluid infusion and correction of metabolic abnormalities, to save more lives. PMID:26029837

  20. Acute kidney injury increases risk of ESRD among elderly.

    PubMed

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W; Kimmel, Paul L; Molitoris, Bruce A; Collins, Allan J

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged > or = 67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for > or = 2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease.

  1. Monoacylglycerol Lipase (MAGL) Inhibition Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costola-de-Souza, Carolina; Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Calefi, Atilio Sersun; Aloia, Thiago Pinheiro Arrais; Gimenes-Júnior, João Antonio; de Almeida, Vinicius Izidio; Pinheiro, Milena Lobão; Palermo-Neto, João

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis, a process that, for 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is mediated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The piperidine carbamate, 4-​nitrophenyl- ​4-​(dibenzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-​5-​yl (hydroxy) methyl) piperidine- 1-​carboxylate (JZL184), is a drug that inhibits MAGL and presents high potency and selectivity. Thus, JZL184 increases the levels of 2-AG, an endocannabinoid that acts on the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here, we investigated the effects of MAGL inhibition, with a single dose (16 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of JZL184, in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced acute lung injury (ALI) 6, 24 and 48 hours after the inflammatory insult. Treatment with JZL184 decreased the leukocyte migration into the lungs as well as the vascular permeability measured through the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and histological analysis. JZL184 also reduced the cytokine and chemokine levels in the BAL and adhesion molecule expression in the blood and BAL. The CB1 and CB2 receptors were considered involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of JZL184 because the AM281 selective CB1 receptor antagonist (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-4-morpholinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide) and the AM630 selective CB2 receptor antagonist ([6-​iodo-​2-​methyl-​1-​[2-​(4-​morpholinyl)ethyl]-​1H-​indol-​3-​yl](4-​methoxyphenyl)-​methanone) blocked the anti-inflammatory effects previously described for JZL184. It was concluded that MAGL inhibition, and consequently the increase in 2-AG levels, produced anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of LPS-induced ALI, a finding that was considered a consequence of the activation of the CB1 and CB2 receptors. PMID:24204926

  2. Acute corrosive injuries of the stomach: a single unit experience of thirty years.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, N; Parthasarathy, G; Kate, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The spectrum of gastric injury due to corrosives can vary. This paper presents a single center experience of over 30 years of corrosive gastric injuries of 39 patients with acute gastric injuries from 1977 till 2006. Patients and Methods. Two thirds of the patients in the acute injury group had a concomitant esophageal injury. The age of the patients ranged from 4 years to 65 years with a slight preponderance of males. (M : F ratio 22 : 17). Results. 36 out of 39 acute gastric injuries were due to ingestion of acids. Three patients had history of caustic soda ingestion. Oral hyperemia or ulcers of varying extent were seen in all patients. The stomach showed hyperemia in 10, extensive ulcers in 13, and mucosal necrosis in 10 patients. Fifteen patients (15/39, 38.5%) were managed conservatively. Twenty four patients (24/39, 61.5%) underwent laparotomy: one for frank peritonitis, 10 for gastric mucosal necrosis, and 13 others for extensive gastric ulcerations. Overall the mortality rate was 29.6 %. Conclusion. Although the mortality and morbidity of acute corrosive gastric injuries is high, the key to improve the survival is early identification of perforation, maintenance of nutrition and control of sepsis.

  3. Altered Cerebellar White Matter Integrity in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wu, Wenzhong; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Tianyao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Imaging studies of traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the cerebellum is often affected. We aim to examine fractional anisotropy alteration in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients in cerebellum-related white matter tracts. Materials and Methods This prospective study included 47 mild traumatic brain injury patients in the acute stage and 37 controls. MR imaging and neurocognitive tests were performed in patients within 7 days of injury. White matter integrity was examined by using diffusion tensor imaging. We used three approaches, tract-based spatial statistics, graphical-model-based multivariate analysis, and region-of-interest analysis, to detect altered cerebellar white matter integrity in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Results Results from three analysis methods were in accordance with each other, and suggested fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle and the pontine crossing tract was changed in the acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients, relative to controls (adjusted p-value < 0.05). Higher fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle was associated with worse performance in the fluid cognition composite (r = -0.289, p-value = 0.037). Conclusion Altered cerebellar fractional anisotropy in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients is localized in specific regions and statistically associated with cognitive deficits detectable on neurocognitive testing. PMID:26967320

  4. Acute finger injuries: part I. Tendons and ligaments.

    PubMed

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Improper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries can cause deformity and dysfunction over time. A basic understanding of the complex anatomy of the finger and of common tendon and ligament injury mechanisms can help physicians properly diagnose and treat finger injuries. Evaluation includes a general musculoskeletal examination as well as radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views). Splinting and taping are effective treatments for tendon and ligament injuries. Treatment should restrict the motion of injured structures while allowing uninjured joints to remain mobile. Although family physicians are usually the first to evaluate patients with finger injuries, it is important to recognize when a referral is needed to ensure optimal outcomes.

  5. Translational biomarkers of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yang, Xi; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; James, Laura P

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug that can cause liver injury, liver necrosis and liver failure. APAP-induced liver injury is associated with glutathione depletion, the formation of APAP protein adducts, the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and mitochondrial injury. The systems biology omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) have been used to discover potential translational biomarkers of liver injury. The following review provides a summary of the systems biology discovery process, analytical validation of biomarkers and translation of omics biomarkers from the nonclinical to clinical setting in APAP-induced liver injury.

  6. Hypothermia inhibits the propagation of acute ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ho; Yoon, Eun Jang; Seo, Jeho; Kavoussi, Adriana; Chung, Yong Eun; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol; Kim, Chul Hoon; You, Je Sung

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke causes significant chronic disability worldwide. We designed this study to clarify the mechanism by which hypothermia helps alleviate acute ischemic stroke. In a middle cerebral artery occlusion model (4 h ischemia without reperfusion), hypothermia effectively reduces mean infarct volume. Hypothermia also prevents neurons in the infarct area from releasing high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), the most well-studied damage-associated molecular pattern protein. By preventing its release, hypothermia also prevents the typical middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced increase in serum HMGB1. We also found that both glycyrrhizin-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 and intracerebroventricular neutralizing antibody treatments before middle cerebral artery occlusion onset diminish infarct volume. This suggests a clear neuroprotective effect of HMGB1 inhibition by hypothermia in the brain. We next used real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in peri-infarct regions. Although middle cerebral artery occlusion increases the expression of interleukin-1β and tissue necrosis factor-α, this elevation is suppressed by both hypothermia and glycyrrhizin treatment. We show that hypothermia reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines and helps salvage peri-infarct regions from the propagation of ischemic injury via HMGB1 blockade. In addition to suggesting a potential mechanism for hypothermia's therapeutic effects, our results suggest HMGB1 modulation may lengthen the therapeutic window for stroke treatments. PMID:27544687

  7. Induction of acute brain injury in mice by irradiation with high-LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    The present study was performed to evaluate the induction of acute brain injury in mice after 235 Mev/u carbon ion irradiation. In our study, young outbred Kunming mice were divided into four treatment groups according to the penetration depth of carbon ions. Animals were irradiated with a sublethal dose of carbon ion beams prior to the Bragg curve. An experiment was performed to evaluate the acute alterations in histology, DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) as well as p53and Bax expression in the brain 96 h post-irradiation. The results demonstrated that various histopathological changes, a significant number of DNA DSBs and elevated p53 and Bax protein expression were induced in the brain following exposure to carbon ions. This was particularly true for mice irradiated with ions having a 9.1 cm-pentration depth, indicating that carbon ions can led to deleterious lesions in the brain of young animals within 96 h. Moreover, there was a remarkable increase in DNA DSBs and in the severity of histopathological changes as the penetration depths of ions increased, which may be associated with the complex track structure of heavy ions. These data reveal that carbon ions can promote serious neuropathological degeneration in the cerebral cortex of young mice. Given that damaged neurons cannot regenerate, these findings warrant further investigation of the adverse effects of the space radiation and the passage of a therapeutic heavy ion beam in the plateau region of the Bragg curve through healthy brain tissue.

  8. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI. PMID:26576075

  9. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI.

  10. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI. PMID:26576075

  11. Methylprednisolone exacerbates acute critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Chai, Yan; Dong, Bo; Lei, Ping; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2011-03-25

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that severe illness could induce critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) and cause poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylprednisolone (MP), a synthetic glucocorticoid, promotes post-traumatic apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary, resulting in acute CIRCI and increased mortality in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested this hypothesis by measuring acute CIRCI in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and treated with MP (5-30mg/kg). The corticosteroid response to TBI was evaluated using the corticosterone increase index (CII), where values less than 2.5 were considered indicative of acute CIRCI. The CII of MP treated rats was comparable to that of saline treated control rats before injury but was significantly decreased in injured rats receiving high-dose MP on post-injury day 7. Similarly, the incidence of acute CIRCI was significantly higher in the high-dose MP group on post-injury day 7. Furthermore, the CII of rats that did not survive post-injury was significantly lower compared to that of survival and was indicative of acute CIRCI. We also examined apoptosis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis of the pituitary, using a TUNEL assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in injured rats treated with high-dose MP. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the adenohypophysis across experimental groups at either 7 or 14days after TBI. However, autopsies performed on rats that did not survive post-injury revealed obvious apoptotic cells in the adenohypophysis. Moreover, TEM revealed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in both the PVN and adenohypophysis of high-dose MP treated rats. These data suggest that MP therapy for TBI could increase neuronal apoptosis in both the hypothalamus and pituitary and

  12. Inhibition of caspase-9 aggravates acute liver injury through suppression of cytoprotective autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Lin, Bin; Pan, Jing Fei; Liong, Emily C.; Xu, Ai Min; Youdim, Moussa; Fung, Man Lung; So, Kwok Fai; Tipoe, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver disease is characterized by inflammation, oxidative stress and necrosis, which can greatly influence the long term clinical outcome and lead to liver failure or cancer. Here, we initially demonstrated the beneficial role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in acute liver injury. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor z-LEHD-FMK in HepG2 cells, AML12 cells and C57BL/b6N mice exacerbated CCl4-induced acute hepatocellular damage, and also down-regulated autophagy markers expression levels, indicating that caspase-9 inhibition may aggravate acute liver damage by suppressing cytoprotective autophagy. CCl4 was used as an acute liver injury inducer which caused oxidative stress and apoptosis through up-regulation of HIF-1α, as well as triggered hepatic inflammation and necroptosis via TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Caspase-9 Thr125 site was firstly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 which subsequently activated the cytoprotective autophagy process to attenuate acute CCl4 injury. Caspase-9 inhibition further aggravated hepatic necroptosis through NF-κB expression, leading to increased pro-inflammatory mediators levels, suggesting a protective role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in the inflammatory process as well as its possibility being a new therapeutic target for the treatment of acute liver injury. PMID:27580936

  13. Inhibition of caspase-9 aggravates acute liver injury through suppression of cytoprotective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Lin, Bin; Pan, Jing Fei; Liong, Emily C; Xu, Ai Min; Youdim, Moussa; Fung, Man Lung; So, Kwok Fai; Tipoe, George L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver disease is characterized by inflammation, oxidative stress and necrosis, which can greatly influence the long term clinical outcome and lead to liver failure or cancer. Here, we initially demonstrated the beneficial role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in acute liver injury. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor z-LEHD-FMK in HepG2 cells, AML12 cells and C57BL/b6N mice exacerbated CCl4-induced acute hepatocellular damage, and also down-regulated autophagy markers expression levels, indicating that caspase-9 inhibition may aggravate acute liver damage by suppressing cytoprotective autophagy. CCl4 was used as an acute liver injury inducer which caused oxidative stress and apoptosis through up-regulation of HIF-1α, as well as triggered hepatic inflammation and necroptosis via TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Caspase-9 Thr125 site was firstly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 which subsequently activated the cytoprotective autophagy process to attenuate acute CCl4 injury. Caspase-9 inhibition further aggravated hepatic necroptosis through NF-κB expression, leading to increased pro-inflammatory mediators levels, suggesting a protective role of caspase-9-dependent autophagy in the inflammatory process as well as its possibility being a new therapeutic target for the treatment of acute liver injury. PMID:27580936

  14. Detection of acute nervous system injury with advanced diffusion-weighted MRI: a simulation and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Nathan P; Kurpad, Shekar N; Schmit, Brian D; Budde, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool to investigate the microscopic structure of the central nervous system (CNS). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a common model of the DWI signal, has a demonstrated sensitivity to detect microscopic changes as a result of injury or disease. However, DTI and other similar models have inherent limitations that reduce their specificity for certain pathological features, particularly in tissues with complex fiber arrangements. Methods such as double pulsed field gradient (dPFG) and q-vector magic angle spinning (qMAS) have been proposed to specifically probe the underlying microscopic anisotropy without interference from the macroscopic tissue organization. This is particularly important for the study of acute injury, where abrupt changes in the microscopic morphology of axons and dendrites manifest as focal enlargements known as beading. The purpose of this work was to assess the relative sensitivity of DWI measures to beading in the context of macroscopic fiber organization and edema. Computational simulations of DWI experiments in normal and beaded axons demonstrated that, although DWI models can be highly specific for the simulated pathologies of beading and volume fraction changes in coherent fiber pathways, their sensitivity to a single idealized pathology is considerably reduced in crossing and dispersed fibers. However, dPFG and qMAS have a high sensitivity for beading, even in complex fiber tracts. Moreover, in tissues with coherent arrangements, such as the spinal cord or nerve fibers in which tract orientation is known a priori, a specific dPFG sequence variant decreases the effects of edema and improves specificity for beading. Collectively, the simulation results demonstrate that advanced DWI methods, particularly those which sample diffusion along multiple directions within a single acquisition, have improved sensitivity to acute axonal injury over conventional DTI metrics and hold promise for more

  15. Baseball and softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  16. Molecular Changes in Sub-lesional Muscle Following Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Nakul P; Samantaray, Supriti; Park, Sookyoung; Nozaki, Kenkichi; Smith, Joshua A; Cox, April; Krause, James; Banik, Naren L

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the molecular changes of sublesional muscle in the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI), a moderately severe injury (40 g cm) was induced in the spinal cord (T10 vertebral level) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (injury) and compared with sham (laminectomy only). Rats were sacrificed at 48 h (acute) post injury, and gastrocnemius muscles were excised. Morphological examination revealed no significant changes in the muscle fiber diameter between the sham and injury rats. Western blot analyses performed on the visibly red, central portion of the gastrocnemius muscle showed significantly higher expression of muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases (muscle ring finger-1 and muscle atrophy f-box) and significantly lower expression of phosphorylated Akt-1/2/3 in the injury group compared to the sham group. Cyclooxygenase 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and caspase-1, also had a significantly higher expression in the injury group; although, the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 did not show any significant difference between the sham and injury groups. These results suggest activation of protein degradation, deactivation of protein synthesis, and development of inflammatory reaction occurring in the sublesional muscles in the acute phase of SCI before overt muscle atrophy is seen. PMID:26290268

  17. Angiotensin II is related to the acute aortic dissection complicated with lung injury through mediating the release of MMP9 from macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyong; Ruan, Yongle; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen; Ren, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute aortic dissection (AAD) patients usually show concurrent lung injury mainly featured by hyoxemia. To date, no effective treatment method has been established for the AAD complicated with acute lung injury (ALI). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP2 and MMP9, have been considered to be closely related to the onset of aortic disease including AAD. To investigate the roles of MMP in the pathogenesis of AAD complicated with ALI, we determined the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 in serum and lung tissues of AAD patients. In addition, a new rat model of AAD complicated with ALI was established to investigate the pathogenesis of such complicated conditions. Methods and results: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and MMP9 were up-regulated in the AAD complicated with ALI patients compared to those of the AAD without ALI patients, normal individuals and the patients with non-ruptured aneurysm. Besides, massive macrophages with MMP9 expression was noticed in the lung tissues in the AAD complicated with ALI patients. On this basis, AAD complicated with ALI rat model was established based on BAPN feeding and infusion of Ang II. Obvious lung injury was observed in the BAPN+Ang II group compared to that of the BAPN group, together with macrophage accumulation in lung tissues, as well as over-expression of MMP9 in lung tissues. After interference of MMP antagonist, a large number of macrophages were still accumulated in the lung tissues, but the lung injury was obviously attenuated. After the interference of AT1 receptor, the number of macrophages in the lung tissues was obviously decreased and the lung injury was obviously relieved. Conclusions: Ang II is closely related to the lung injury at the early stage of AAD through mediating the release of MMP9 in the macrophages in the lung tissues. PMID:27186269

  18. A GAP in our knowledge of vascular signaling in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P

    2011-08-01

    Injury resulting from ischemia-reperfusion injury is a multifactorial process involving compromised function in both the tubular and the vascular compartments. Multiple vasoactive compounds have been implicated in the profound vasoconstriction that occurs in response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, and many of these factors signal through common G protein-coupled receptors. The report by Siedlecki et al. highlights the important roles of RGS4, a GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP), in the regulation of vascular tone in the setting of acute kidney injury.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide as a damage signal in tissue injury and inflammation: murderer, mediator, or messenger?

    PubMed

    van der Vliet, Albert; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W

    2014-03-01

    Tissue injury and inflammation are associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have the ability to induce oxidative injury to various biomolecules resulting in protein dysfunction, genetic instability, or cell death. However, recent observations indicate that formation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) during tissue injury is also an essential feature of the ensuing wound healing response, and functions as an early damage signal to control several critical aspects of the wound healing process. Because innate oxidative wound responses must be tightly coordinated to avoid chronic inflammation or tissue injury, a more complete understanding is needed regarding the origins and dynamics of ROS production, and their critical biological targets. This prospect highlights the current experimental evidence implicating H2 O2 in early epithelial wound responses, and summarizes technical advances and approaches that may help distinguish its beneficial actions from its more deleterious actions in conditions of chronic tissue injury or inflammation. PMID:24122865

  20. Acute aortic occlusion in a child secondary to lap-belt injury treated with thromboendarterectomy and primary repair.

    PubMed

    West, Charles A; Johnson, Lester W; Doucet, Linda; Shah, Mitali; Khan, Imtiaz; Heldmann, Maureen

    2011-08-01

    Abdominal aortic injury as a result of blunt trauma is a rare event and has been described in few children. A 6-year-old girl presented with acute bilateral lower extremity ischemia, and a triad of acute aortic occlusion, intra-abdominal visceral injury, and a lumbar chance fracture after sustaining a seat belt injury from a motor vehicle collision. An emergency aortic thromboendarterectomy and primary repair were performed. This represents one of the few reports of acute traumatic aortic thrombosis in a child and highlights the surgical treatment of acute abdominal aortic injury in a pediatric patient.

  1. [Acute Kidney Injury, Type - 3 cardiorenal syndrome, Biomarkers, Renal Replacement Therapy].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Cozzolino, Mario; Russo, Domenico; De Pascalis, Antonio; Santoboni, Francesca; Villani, Annalisa; De Rosa, Silvia; Colafelice, Marco; Russo, Luigi; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and major cardiovascular events represent main cause of death in both acute and chronic kidney disease patients. Kidney and heart failure are common and frequently co-exist This organ-organ interaction, also called organ cross-talk, leads to well-known definition of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Here we will describe cardiovascular involvement in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Also known as Type-3 CRS or acute reno-cardiac CRS, it occurs when AKI contributes and/or precipitates development of acute cardiac injury. AKI may directly or indirectly produces an acute cardiac event and it can be associated with volume overload, metabolic acidosis and electrolytes disorders such as hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia, coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis which has been also described in patients with AKI with the consequence of direct negative effects on cardiac performance. PMID:27374388

  2. Consecutive CT-guided core needle tissue biopsy of lung lesions in the same dog at different phases of radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Deng, Sisi; Liang, Zhiwen; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to set up a Beagle dog model of radiation-induced lung injury in order to supply fresh lung tissue samples in the different injury phases for gene and protein research. Three dogs received 18 Gy X-ray irradiation in one fraction, another three dogs received 8 Gy in each of three fractions at weekly intervals, and one control dog was not irradiated. Acute pneumonitis was observed during the first 3 months after radiation, and chronic lung fibrosis was found during the next 4–12 months in all the dogs exposed to radiation. CT-guided core needle lung lesion biopsies were extracted from each dog five times over the course of 1 year. The dogs remained healthy after each biopsy, and 50–100 mg fresh lung lesion tissues were collected in each operation. The incidence of pneumothorax and hemoptysis was 20% and 2.8%, respectively, in the 35 tissue biopsies. A successful and stable radiation-induced lung injury dog model was established. Lung lesion tissue samples from dogs in acute stage, recovery stage and fibrosis stage were found to be sufficient to support cytology, genomics and proteomics research. This model safely supplied fresh tissue samples that would allow future researchers to more easily explore and develop treatments for radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:27422930

  3. Strategies for prevention of acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Santos, Eduesley; Marcusso, Marila Eduara Fátima; Rodrigues, Amanda Oliveira; de Queiroz, Fernanda Gomes; de Oliveira, Larissa Bertacchini; Rodrigues, Adriano Rogério Baldacin; Palomo, Jurema da Silva Herbas

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after cardiac surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and increased length of stay in the intensive care unit. Considering the high prevalence of acute kidney injury and its association with worsened prognosis, the development of strategies for renal protection in hospitals is essential to reduce the associated high morbidity and mortality, especially for patients at high risk of developing acute kidney injury, such as patients who undergo cardiac surgery. This integrative review sought to assess the evidence available in the literature regarding the most effective interventions for the prevention of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. To select the articles, we used the CINAHL and MedLine databases. The sample of this review consisted of 16 articles. After analyzing the articles included in the review, the results of the studies showed that only hydration with saline has noteworthy results in the prevention of acute kidney injury. The other strategies are controversial and require further research to prove their effectiveness. PMID:25028954

  4. Tangeretin Alleviates Cisplatin-Induced Acute Hepatic Injury in Rats: Targeting MAPKs and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Hany A.; Mohamed, Wafaa R.; Arab, Hany H.; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its broad applications, cisplatin affords considerable nephro- and hepatotoxicity through triggering inflammatory and oxidative stress cascades. The aim of the current investigation was to study the possible protective effects of tangeretin on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. The impact of tangeretin on cisplatin-evoked hepatic dysfunction and histopathologic changes along with oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic biomarkers were investigated compared to silymarin. Tangeretin pre-treatment significantly improved liver function tests (ALT and AST), inhibited cisplatin-induced lipid profile aberrations (total cholesterol and triglycerides) and diminished histopathologic structural damage in liver tissues. Tangeretin also attenuated cisplatin-induced hepatic inflammatory events as indicated by suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and enhancement of interleukin-10 (IL-10). Meanwhile, it lowered malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2) levels with restoration of glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Regarding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, tangeretin attenuated cisplatin-induced increase in phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) in liver tissues. In addition, tangeretin downregulated Bax expression with augmentation of Bcl-2 promoting liver cell survival. Our results highlight the protective effects of tangeretin against cisplatin-induced acute hepatic injury via the concerted modulation of inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPKs and apoptotic pathways. PMID:27031695

  5. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca(2+)- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  6. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  7. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  8. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  9. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  10. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  11. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  12. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  13. Preventive Effects of Eccentric Training on Acute Hamstring Muscle Injury in Professional Baseball

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Richard A.; Perez, Luis; McQueeney, Sean; Toby, E. Bruce; Key, Vincent; Nelson, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hamstring injuries are the second most common injury causing missed days in professional baseball field players. Recent studies have shown the preventive benefit of eccentric conditioning on the hamstring muscle group in injury prevention. Specifically, Nordic-type exercises have been shown to decrease the incidence of acute hamstring injuries in professional athletes. Purpose: This was a prospective study performed in coordination with a single Major League Baseball (MLB) organization (major and minor league teams) that targeted the effects of Nordic exercises on the incidence of acute hamstring injuries in the professional-level baseball player. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: The daily workouts of 283 professional baseball players throughout all levels of a single MLB organization were prospectively recorded. The intervention group participated in the Nordic exercise program and was compared with a randomly selected control group of professional athletes within the organization not participating in the exercise program. The incidence of hamstring injuries in both groups was compared, and the total number of days missed due to injury was compared with the 2 previous seasons. Results: There were 10 hamstring injuries that occurred during the 2012 season among the 283 professional athletes that required removal from play. There were no injuries that occurred in the intervention group (n = 65, 0.00%; P = .0381). The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent 1 hamstring injury was 11.3. The average repetitions per week of the injured group were assessed at multiple time points (2, 4, 6, and total weeks) prior to injury. There were significantly fewer repetitions per week performed in the injured group at all time points compared with overall average repetitions per week in the noninjured group (P = .0459, .0127, .0164, and .0299, respectively). After beginning the Nordic exercise program, there were 136 total days

  14. A case-crossover study of transient risk factors for occupational acute hand injury

    PubMed Central

    Sorock, G; Lombardi, D; Hauser, R; Eisen, E; Herrick, R; Mittleman, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Workers with acute hand injuries account for over 1 000 000 emergency department visits annually in the United States. Aims: To determine potential transient risk factors for occupational acute hand injury. Methods: Subjects were recruited from 23 occupational health clinics in five northeastern states in the USA. In a telephone interview, subjects were asked to report the occurrence of seven potential risk factors within a 90-minute time period before an acute hand injury. Each case also provided control information on exposures during the month before the injury. The self-matched feature of the study design controlled for stable between-person confounders. Results: A total of 1166 subjects were interviewed (891 men, 275 women), with a mean age (SD) of 37.2 years (11.4). The median time interval between injury and interview was 1.3 days. Sixty three per cent of subjects had a laceration. The relative risk of a hand injury was increased when working with equipment, tools, or work pieces not performing as expected (11.0, 95% CI 9.4 to 12.8), or when using a different work method to do a task (10.5, 95% CI 8.7 to 12.7). Other transient factors in decreasing order of relative risk were doing an unusual task, being distracted, and being rushed. Wearing gloves reduced the relative risk by 60% (0.4, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.5). Occupational category, job experience, and safety training were found to alter several of these effects. Conclusion: The results suggest the importance of these transient, potentially modifiable factors in the aetiology of acute hand injury at work. Attempts to modify these exposures by various strategies may reduce the incidence of acute hand injury at work. PMID:15031387

  15. The caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK attenuates acute gastric injury in mice: involvement of silencing NLRP3 inflammasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jun-jie; Luo, Peng-fei; Wang, Xing-tong; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of inhibiting caspase-1 activity or gastric acid secretion on acute gastric injury in mice. AC-YVAD-CMK, omeprazole, or vehicle were administered to mice before cold-restraint stress- or ethanol-induced gastric injury. Survival rates and histological evidence of gastric injury of mice pretreated with AC-YVAD-CMK or omeprazole, and exposed to cold-restraint stress, improved significantly relative to the vehicle group. The increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-18 following cold-stress injury were decreased by AC-YVAD-CMK, but not omeprazole, pretreatment. The increased expression of CD68 in gastric tissues was inhibited significantly by AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment. Inhibiting caspase-1 activity in the NLRP3 inflammasome decreased gastric cell apoptosis, and the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3. AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment significantly inhibited cold-restraint stress-induced increases in the expression of phosphorylated IκB-alpha and P38. General anatomy and histological results showed the protective effect of AC-YVAD-CMK on ethanol-induced acute gastric injury. Overall, our results showed that the caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK protected against acute gastric injury in mice by affecting the NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuating inflammatory processes and apoptosis. This was similar to the mechanism associated with NF-κB and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways. PMID:27053298

  16. The caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK attenuates acute gastric injury in mice: involvement of silencing NLRP3 inflammasome activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Jun-jie; Luo, Peng-fei; Wang, Xing-tong; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2016-04-07

    This study evaluated the protective effects of inhibiting caspase-1 activity or gastric acid secretion on acute gastric injury in mice. AC-YVAD-CMK, omeprazole, or vehicle were administered to mice before cold-restraint stress- or ethanol-induced gastric injury. Survival rates and histological evidence of gastric injury of mice pretreated with AC-YVAD-CMK or omeprazole, and exposed to cold-restraint stress, improved significantly relative to the vehicle group. The increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-18 following cold-stress injury were decreased by AC-YVAD-CMK, but not omeprazole, pretreatment. The increased expression of CD68 in gastric tissues was inhibited significantly by AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment. Inhibiting caspase-1 activity in the NLRP3 inflammasome decreased gastric cell apoptosis, and the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3. AC-YVAD-CMK pretreatment significantly inhibited cold-restraint stress-induced increases in the expression of phosphorylated IκB-alpha and P38. General anatomy and histological results showed the protective effect of AC-YVAD-CMK on ethanol-induced acute gastric injury. Overall, our results showed that the caspase-1 inhibitor AC-YVAD-CMK protected against acute gastric injury in mice by affecting the NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuating inflammatory processes and apoptosis. This was similar to the mechanism associated with NF-κB and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways.

  17. Acute skeletal muscle injury: CCL2 expression by both monocytes and injured muscle is required for repair

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiyan; Huang, Danping; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Zhou, Lan

    2011-01-01

    CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), a ligand of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2), is essential to mount an adequate inflammatory response to repair acute skeletal muscle injury. We studied the mechanisms by which CCL2 regulates muscle inflammation and regeneration. Mobilization of monocytes/macrophages (MOs/MPs) but not lymphocytes or neutrophils was impaired from bone marrow to blood and from blood to injured muscles in Ccl2−/− mice. This was accompanied by poor phagocytosis, reduced up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and impaired muscle regeneration. Bone marrow transfer from wild-type mice to irradiated Ccr2−/− but not Ccl2−/− mice restored muscle inflammation. Intravenously injected CCL2-deficient bone marrow monocytes could not enter wild-type injured muscles as well as wild-type bone marrow monocytes. Intravenously injected wild-type bone marrow monocytes could not enter CCL2-deficient injured muscles as well as wild-type injured muscles. CCL2 stimulated IGF-1 expression by wild-type but not CCR2-deficient intramuscular macrophages. A single intramuscular injection of IGF-1, but not PBS, markedly improved muscle regeneration in Ccl2−/− mice. We conclude that CCL2 is a major ligand of CCR2 to recruit MOs/MPs into injured muscles to conduct phagocytosis and produce IGF-1 for injury repair. CCL2 needs to be expressed by bone marrow cells, circulating monocytes, and injured muscle tissue cells to recruit MOs/MPs into injured muscles. CCL2/CCR2 signaling also up-regulates IGF-1 expression by intramuscular macrophages to promote acute skeletal muscle injury repair.—Lu, H., Huang, D., Ransohoff, R. M., Zhou, L. Acute skeletal muscle injury: CCL2 expression by both monocytes and injured muscle is required for repair. PMID:21697550

  18. Vitamin K3 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Nishiumi, S; Nishida, M; Mizushina, Y; Kobayashi, K; Masuda, A; Fujita, T; Morita, Y; Mizuno, S; Kutsumi, H; Azuma, T; Yoshida, M

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin K is a family of fat-soluble compounds including phylloquinone (vitamin K1), menaquinone (vitamin K2) and menadione (vitamin K3). Recently, it was reported that vitamin K, especially vitamins K1 and K2, exerts a variety of biological effects, and these compounds are expected to be candidates for therapeutic agents against various diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin K3 in in vitro cultured cell experiments and in vivo animal experiments. In human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, vitamin K3 inhibited the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-evoked translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus, although vitamins K1 and K2 did not. Vitamin K3 also suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α in mouse macrophage RAW264·7 cells. Moreover, the addition of vitamin K3 before and after LPS administration attenuated the severity of lung injury in an animal model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs in the setting of acute severe illness complicated by systemic inflammation. In the ARDS model, vitamin K3 also suppressed the LPS-induced increase in the serum TNF-α level and inhibited the LPS-evoked nuclear translocation of NF-κB in lung tissue. Despite marked efforts, little therapeutic progress has been made, and the mortality rate of ARDS remains high. Vitamin K3 may be an effective therapeutic strategy against acute lung injury including ARDS. PMID:20030669

  19. Acute Stress Decreases but Chronic Stress Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemic Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Eric D.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of CVD. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and CVD is well evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Conversely, chronic stress is arrhythmogenic and increases sensitivity to myocardial IRI. Few studies have examined the impact of validated animal models of stress-related psychological disorders on the ischemic heart. This review examines the work that has been completed using rat models to study the effects of stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Utilization of animal models of stress-related psychological disorders is critical in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders in patients experiencing stress-related psychiatric conditions. PMID:27199778

  20. CLOCK modulates survival and acute lung injury in mice with polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Hsieh, I-Chang; Shie, Shian-Sen; Ho, Ming-Yun; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-09-16

    Polymicrobial sepsis is a potentially fatal condition and a significant burden on health care systems. Acute lung injury is the most common complication of sepsis and results in high mortality. However, there has been no recent significant progress in the treatment of sepsis or acute lung injury induced by sepsis. Here we show that mice deficient in the circadian protein CLOCK had better survival than wild-type mice after induction of polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Inflammatory cytokine production was attenuated and bacterial clearance was improved in CLOCK-deficient mice. Moreover, acute lung injury after induction of sepsis was significantly decreased in CLOCK-deficient mice. Genome-wide profiling analysis showed that inhibin signaling was reduced in CLOCK-deficient mice. These data establish the importance of circadian CLOCK-inhibin signaling in sepsis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27520377

  1. Analyses of acute kidney injury biomarkers by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Ali, Badreldin H; ALOthman, Zeid A; Ali, Imran

    2016-01-01

    The newly developed acute kidney injury biomarkers are very important for the early and timely detection of kidney diseases. This review contains details of the analyses of several acute kidney injury biomarkers using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine and plasma samples. In this review we attempt to discuss some aspects of the types of the biomarkers, patents, sample preparation, and the analyses. Besides, efforts were also made to discuss the possible uses of superficially porous (core-shell) columns in traditional and inexpensive high-performance liquid chromatography instruments. Additionally, the challenges and the future prospects are also highlighted. The present review will be useful for the academicians, scientists, and clinicians for the early detection of acute kidney injury biomarkers.

  2. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on inflammatory cytokines in acute myocardial ischemia injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, FANG; LIU, GUANG-JIE; LIU, NA; ZHANG, GANG; ZHANG, JIAN-XIN; LI, LAN-FANG

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is believed to be involved in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes, and now it is recognized as the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide; however, the effects of H2S on inflammatory factors in acute myocardial ischemia injury in rats have not been clarified. In the present study, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) was used as the H2S donor. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: Sham, ischemia, ischemia + low-dose (0.78 mg/kg) NaHS, ischemia + medium-dose (1.56 mg/kg) NaHS, ischemia + high-dose (3.12 mg/kg) NaHS and ischemia + propargylglycine (PPG) (30 mg/kg). The rats in each group were sacrificed 6 h after the surgery for sample collection. Compared with the ischemia group, the cardiac damage in the rats in the ischemia + NaHS groups was significantly reduced, particularly in the high-dose group; in the ischemia + PPG group, the myocardial injury was aggravated compared with that in the ischemia group. Compared with the ischemia group, the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the serum of rats in the ischemia + medium- and high-dose NaHS groups were significantly reduced, and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) protein in the myocardial tissues of rats was significantly reduced. In the ischemia + PPG group, the TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in the serum were significantly increased, the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA was increased, although without a significant difference, and the expression of NF-κB was increased. The findings of the present study provide novel evidence for the dual effects of H2S on acute myocardial ischemia injury via the modulation of inflammatory factors. PMID:25667680

  3. Unusual case of acute tracheal injury complicated by application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP).

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Asif Masroor; Mbarushimana, Simon; Faheem, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can be caused by a variety of injuries such as deceleration, road traffic accidents and crush injuries. The worst scenario is airway rupture. We report an unusual case of acute tracheal injury in a 34-year-old Irish man who presented with a history of strangulation while working with a tractor. On arrival, he had one episode of mild haemoptysis and reported pain around the base of the neck and voice hoarseness. His chest X-ray revealed pneumopericardium and CT of thorax showed airway oedema. After elective intubation, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H2O caused deterioration in his clinical condition with increasing surgical emphysema and rise of carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2), which was completely reversed after stopping PEEP. This case shows how PEEP and intermittent positive pressure ventilation can worsen air leak and compromise stability in patients with acute tracheal injury. PMID:25398917

  4. Targeted activation of CREB in reactive astrocytes is neuroprotective in focal acute cortical injury.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Luis; Schlüter, Agatha; Valor, Luis M; Barco, Angel; Giralt, Mercedes; Golbano, Arantxa; Hidalgo, Juan; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Masgrau, Roser; Pujol, Aurora; Galea, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The clinical challenge in acute injury as in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to halt the delayed neuronal loss that occurs hours and days after the insult. Here we report that the activation of CREB-dependent transcription in reactive astrocytes prevents secondary injury in cerebral cortex after experimental TBI. The study was performed in a novel bitransgenic mouse in which a constitutively active CREB, VP16-CREB, was targeted to astrocytes with the Tet-Off system. Using histochemistry, qPCR, and gene profiling we found less neuronal death and damage, reduced macrophage infiltration, preserved mitochondria, and rescued expression of genes related to mitochondrial metabolism in bitransgenic mice as compared to wild type littermates. Finally, with meta-analyses using publicly available databases we identified a core set of VP16-CREB candidate target genes that may account for the neuroprotective effect. Enhancing CREB activity in astrocytes thus emerges as a novel avenue in acute brain post-injury therapeutics.

  5. Akt2 deficiency as a therapeutic strategy protects against acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gauna, Adrienne E; Cha, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of: Vergadi E, Vaporidi K, Theodorakis EE et al. Akt2 deficiency protects from acute lung injury via alternative macrophage activation and miR-146a induction in mice. J. Immunol. 192, 394-406 (2013). Acute respiratory distress syndrome currently has limited effective treatments; however, recent evidence suggests that modulation of alveolar macrophage responses may be an effective method for protection or repair of lung injury. Vergadi et al. are the first to demonstrate that depletion of Akt2 kinase and microRNA-146a induction in mice resulted in polarization of alveolar macrophages towards an M2 activation phenotype and resulted in less severe injury following acid-induced lung injury. However, this M2 polarization also resulted in increased lung bacterial load following infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to isolated common femoral vessel injury: an unusual etiology.

    PubMed

    Davaine, Jean-Michel; Lintz, François; Cappelli, Marc; Chaillou, Philippe; Gouin, François; Patra, Philippe; Gouëffic, Yann

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh secondary to common femoral vessel injury. The lesion was associated with common femoral artery dissection and common femoral vein rupture. Emergency surgical treatment consisted of resection-anastomosis of the arterial dissection, vein ligature, and fasciotomies. The patient is symptom-free after 15 months of follow-up. Isolated vascular injury is an unusual cause of acute compartment syndrome of the thigh. This case serves to increase awareness that isolated vascular injury, without femoral fracture or multiple injury, can result in thigh compartment syndrome. Early recognition and treatment of vascular involvement contributes to better functional outcome of this rare condition, but treatment modalities remain subject to discussion.

  7. Acute lung injury following exposure to nitric acid

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, T. K.; Shah, Samir; Lobo, Ivona; Uppe, Abhay; Mehta, Ankur

    2009-01-01

    We present a series of three cases of survival following inhalation of nitric acid fumes, which resulted in acute respiratory distress. Inhalation of nitric acid fumes and its decomposition gases such as nitrogen dioxide results in delayed onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Intensive respiratory management, ventilatory support, and steroids can help in survival. PMID:20532002

  8. Protective effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Cao, H J; Yu, D M; Zhang, T Z; Zhou, J; Chen, K Y; Ge, J; Pei, L

    2015-08-10

    We aimed to observe the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in rats and expression of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided randomly (N = 10) into control group (C), LPS group (LPS), low-dose PHC group (L-PHC), and high-dose PHC group (H-PHC). All rats, except C group, received a vena caudalis injection of 5.0 mg/kg LPS; after 30 min, rats in L-PHC and H-PHC groups received a vena caudalis injection of 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg PHC. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, serum creatinine (Scr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were detected. Histopathological changes and expression of ZO-1 and occludin were observed in renal tissues. Versus levels of TNF-α (38.5 ± 9.0), IL-1β (46.3 ± 12.7), Scr (37.2 ± 9.3), and BUN (6.5 ± 1.1) in control group, those in LPS group, TNF-α (159.0 ± 21.3), IL-1β (130.8 ± 18.7), Scr (98.5 ± 18.2), and BUN (12.8 ± 1.8), increased obviously (P < 0.05), with significantly structural changes and decreases of ZO-1 and occludin. However, TNF-α (111.3 ± 11.