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Sample records for acute transplant rejection

  1. Spontaneous restoration of transplantation tolerance after acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Daniels, Melvin D; Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Jianjun; Young, James; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Husain, Aliya N; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chong, Anita S

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a cure for end-stage organ failure but, in the absence of pharmacological immunosuppression, allogeneic organs are acutely rejected. Such rejection invariably results in allosensitization and accelerated rejection of secondary donor-matched grafts. Transplantation tolerance can be induced in animals and a subset of humans, and enables long-term acceptance of allografts without maintenance immunosuppression. However, graft rejection can occur long after a state of transplantation tolerance has been acquired. When such an allograft is rejected, it has been assumed that the same rules of allosensitization apply as to non-tolerant hosts and that immunological tolerance is permanently lost. Using a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, we show that when Listeria monocytogenes infection precipitates acute rejection, thus abrogating transplantation tolerance, the donor-specific tolerant state re-emerges, allowing spontaneous acceptance of a donor-matched second transplant. These data demonstrate a setting in which the memory of allograft tolerance dominates over the memory of transplant rejection.

  2. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection. PMID:27648151

  3. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection. PMID:27648151

  4. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection.

  5. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  6. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Current Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Schinstock, Carrie; Stegall, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is recognized as a major cause of graft loss in renal transplant recipients. Early acute AMR in the first few days after transplantation occurs primarily in sensitized renal transplant recipients with donor-specific alloantibody at the time of transplant and is a relatively “pure” form of acute AMR. Late acute AMR occurs months to years after transplantation and is commonly a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. While there is no consensus regarding optimum treatment, we contend that rational therapeutic approaches are emerging and the acute episode can be managed in most instances. However, new therapies are needed to prevent ongoing chronic injury in these patients.

  7. Cytokine levels in pleural fluid as markers of acute rejection after lung transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Afonso, José Eduardo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliarelli; Antonangelo, Leila; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF, as well as the total and differential cell counts, in the pleural fluid of lung transplant recipients, correlating those levels with the occurrence and severity of rejection. We analyzed pleural fluid samples collected from 18 patients at various time points (up to postoperative day 4). The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF tended to elevate in parallel with increases in the severity of rejection. Our results suggest that these levels are markers of acute graft rejection in lung transplant recipients. PMID:25210966

  8. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  9. Transplant rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wood K, Shankar S, Mittal S. Concepts and challenges in organ transplantation. In: Rich RR, Fleisher TA, Shearer WT, et ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Organ Transplantation Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. The Complex Role of iNOS in Acutely-Rejecting Cardiac Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Galen M.; Roza, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the evidence for a detrimental role of nitric oxide (NO) derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and/or reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite in acutely-rejecting cardiac transplants. In chronic cardiac transplant rejection, iNOS may have an opposing beneficial component. The purpose of this review is primarily to address issues related to acute rejection which is a recognized risk factor for chronic rejection. The evidence for a detrimental role is based upon strategies involving non-selective NOS inhibitors, NO neutralizers, selective iNOS inhibitors and iNOS gene deletion in rodent models of cardiac rejection. The review is discussed in the context of the impact on various components including graft survival, histological rejection and cardiac function which may contribute in toto to the process of graft rejection. Possible limitations of each strategy are discussed in order to understand better the variance in published findings including issues related to the potential importance of cell localization of iNOS expression. Finally, the concept of a dual role of NO and its down-stream product, peroxynitrite, in rejection vs. immune regulation is discussed. PMID:18291116

  11. A common rejection module (CRM) for acute rejection across multiple organs identifies novel therapeutics for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Purvesh; Roedder, Silke; Kimura, Naoyuki; De Vusser, Katrien; Morgan, Alexander A; Gong, Yongquan; Fischbein, Michael P; Robbins, Robert C; Naesens, Maarten; Butte, Atul J; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-10-21

    Using meta-analysis of eight independent transplant datasets (236 graft biopsy samples) from four organs, we identified a common rejection module (CRM) consisting of 11 genes that were significantly overexpressed in acute rejection (AR) across all transplanted organs. The CRM genes could diagnose AR with high specificity and sensitivity in three additional independent cohorts (794 samples). In another two independent cohorts (151 renal transplant biopsies), the CRM genes correlated with the extent of graft injury and predicted future injury to a graft using protocol biopsies. Inferred drug mechanisms from the literature suggested that two FDA-approved drugs (atorvastatin and dasatinib), approved for nontransplant indications, could regulate specific CRM genes and reduce the number of graft-infiltrating cells during AR. We treated mice with HLA-mismatched mouse cardiac transplant with atorvastatin and dasatinib and showed reduction of the CRM genes, significant reduction of graft-infiltrating cells, and extended graft survival. We further validated the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on graft survival by retrospective analysis of electronic medical records of a single-center cohort of 2,515 renal transplant patients followed for up to 22 yr. In conclusion, we identified a CRM in transplantation that provides new opportunities for diagnosis, drug repositioning, and rational drug design.

  12. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maehana, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Hideki; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation. Results Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR) than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft. Conclusions The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients. PMID:27631127

  13. Insights from computational modeling in inflammation and acute rejection in limb transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Dolores; Starzl, Ravi; Hackl, Hubert; Barclay, Derek; Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, W P Andrew; Eberhart, Nadine; Vodovotz, Yoram; Pratschke, Johann; Pierer, Gerhard; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) is the major obstacle for wider adoption in clinical practice. This study utilized computational modeling to identify biomarkers for diagnosis and targets for treatment of skin rejection. Protein levels of 14 inflammatory mediators in skin and muscle biopsies from syngeneic grafts [n = 10], allogeneic transplants without immunosuppression [n = 10] and allografts treated with tacrolimus [n = 10] were assessed by multiplexed analysis technology. Hierarchical Clustering Analysis, Principal Component Analysis, Random Forest Classification and Multinomial Logistic Regression models were used to segregate experimental groups. Based on Random Forest Classification, Multinomial Logistic Regression and Hierarchical Clustering Analysis models, IL-4, TNF-α and IL-12p70 were the best predictors of skin rejection and identified rejection well in advance of histopathological alterations. TNF-α and IL-12p70 were the best predictors of muscle rejection and also preceded histopathological alterations. Principal Component Analysis identified IL-1α, IL-18, IL-1β, and IL-4 as principal drivers of transplant rejection. Thus, inflammatory patterns associated with rejection are specific for the individual tissue and may be superior for early detection and targeted treatment of rejection.

  14. The effect of pravastatin on acute rejection after kidney transplantation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, S; Wilkinson, A H; Kobashigawa, J A; Wang, X M; Chia, D; Ozawa, M; Zhong, H P; Hirata, M; Cohen, A H; Teraski, P I

    1996-05-27

    Hyperlipidemia is an important complication of kidney transplantation affecting up to 74% of recipients. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are reported to provide safe and effective treatment for this problem. A recent study suggests that pravastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, also decreases the incidence of both clinically severe acute rejection episodes and natural killer cell cytotoxicity after orthotopic heart transplantation. We have performed a prospective randomized pilot study of the effect of pravastatin on these same parameters after cadaveric kidney transplantation. Graft recipients were randomized to receive pravastatin after transplantation or no pravastatin (24 patients in each group) in addition to routine cyclosporine and prednisone immunosuppression. Lipid levels, acute rejection episodes and serial natural killer cell cytotoxicities were followed for 4 months after the transplant. At the end of the study period, pravastatin had successfully controlled mean total cholesterol levels (202.6 +/- 9.3 vs. 236.5 +/- 11.9 mg/dl, P < 0.02), LDL levels (107.9 +/- 6.6 vs.149.6 +/- 10.7 mg/dl, P < 0.002), and triglyceride levels (118.8 +/- 14.2 vs. 157.2 +/- 13.8 mg/dl, P < 0.05). In addition, the pravastatin-treated group experienced a reduction in the incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (25% vs. 58%, P = 0.01), the incidence of multiple rejections episodes (P < 0.05), and the use of both pulse methylprednisolone (P = 0.01) and OKT3 (P = 0.02). Mean natural killer cell cytotoxicity was similarly reduced (11.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 20.0 +/- 2.0% lysis of K562 target cells, P < 0.002). These data suggest that pravastatin exerts an additional immunosuppressive effect in kidney transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. PMID:8633373

  15. Combined Detection of Serum IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 Predicts Acute Rejection Following Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Young-In; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Tak, Eunyoung; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of non-invasive diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for acute rejection in liver transplant patients would help to ensure the preservation of liver function in the graft, eventually contributing to improved graft and patient survival. We evaluated selected cytokines and chemokines in the sera from liver transplant patients as potential biomarkers for acute rejection, and found that the combined detection of IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 at 1-2 weeks post-operation could predict acute rejection following adult liver transplantation with 97% specificity and 94% sensitivity. PMID:27498551

  16. Usefulness of liver stiffness measurement during acute cellular rejection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gonzalo; Castro-Narro, Graciela; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Benítez, Carlos; Ruiz, Pablo; Sastre, Lydia; Colmenero, Jordi; Miquel, Rosa; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is a useful method to estimate liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The inflammatory process that takes place in post-liver transplant acute cellular rejection (ACR) may also increase liver stiffness. We aimed to explore the association between liver stiffness and the severity of ACR, as well as to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and response to rejection treatment in a prospective study that included 27 liver recipients with biopsy-proven ACR, 30 stable recipients with normal liver tests, and 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected LT recipients with histologically diagnosed HCV recurrence. Patients with rejection were stratified into 2 groups (mild and moderate/severe) according to the severity of rejection evaluated with the Banff score. Routine biomarkers and LSM with FibroScan were performed at the time of liver biopsy (baseline) and at 7, 30, and 90 days in patients with rejection and at baseline in control patients. Median baseline liver stiffness was 5.9 kPa in the mild rejection group, 11 kPa in the moderate/severe group (P = 0.001), 4.2 kPa in stable recipients (P = 0.02 versus mild rejection), and 13.6 kPa in patients with recurrent HCV (P = 0.17 versus moderate/severe rejection). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM to discriminate mild versus moderate/severe ACR was 0.924, and a LSM value of 8.5 kPa yielded a positive predictive value of 100% to diagnose moderate/severe rejection. Liver stiffness improved in 7%, 21%, and 64% of patients with moderate/severe rejection at 7, 30, and 90 days. In conclusion, according to the results of this exploratory study, LSM is associated with the severity of ACR in liver transplantation and thus may be of help in its assessment. PMID:26609794

  17. Myoglobinuria masquerading as acute rejection in a renal allograft recipient with recurrent post transplant diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Sharma, Amit; Khullar, Dinesh

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis contributes to 7-10% of total AKI cases. Myoglobinuria as a cause of acute renal allograft dysfunction is extremely uncommon. Renal allograft recipient on cyclosporine or tacrolimus can develop myoglobinuria in presence of other precipitating factors. Present case describes an interesting report of myoglobinuria in a patient with post transplant diabetic nephropathy mimicking acute graft rejection. Clinically myoglobinuria presenting as renal allograft dysfunction is diagnosis of exclusion and renal biopsy is extremely important in making a correct diagnosis and planning optimal management in such cases.

  18. Effect of adopting a new histological grading system of acute rejection after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Balk, A.; Zondervan, P.; van der Meer, P.; van Gelder, T.; Mochtar, B.; Simoons, M.; Weimar, W.

    1997-01-01

    Background—Treatment policy of acute rejection after heart transplantation has been changed after adopting the ISHLT endomyocardial biopsy grading system in 1991.
Objective—To determine the effect of this policy change on clinical outcome after transplantation.
Methods—The outcome of 147 patients who had a transplant before (early group, median follow up 96 months) and 114 patients who had a transplant after (late group, median follow up 41 months) the introduction of the ISHLT biopsy grading system was studied retrospectively. Initially "moderate rejection" according to Billingham's conventional criteria was treated. From January 1991 grade 3A and higher was considered to require intensification of immunosuppression.
Results—There were some differences between the two groups: recipients (50 v 44 years) as well as donors (28 v 24 years) were older in the "late group" and more patients of this group received early anti-T cell prophylaxis (92% v 56%). Despite more extensive use of early prophylaxis more rejection episodes were diagnosed (2.4 v 1.4) and considerably more courses of rejection treatment were instituted in the late compared with the early group (3.2 v 1.5). There were no deaths because of rejection in the late group, however, more infections occurred within the first year (mean 1.8 v 1.4) and more non-skin malignancies within the first 41 months were diagnosed (8 of 57 v 6 of 147, 95% CIs of difference includes 0). The incidence of graft vascular disease in the late group has been comparable to the early group until now. 
Conclusion—The interpretation of the ISHLT grading system resulted in lowering of the threshold for the diagnosis of rejection thereby increasing the number of rejections and subsequently the immunosuppressive load and its complications.

 Keywords: transplantation;  biopsy grading system;  rejection PMID:9470880

  19. Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Patients of a Hospital in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, P.; Huerfano, M; Rodríguez, M; Caicedo, A; Berrío, F; Gonzalez, C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal transplantation is the best treatment for end stage renal disease. Acute graft rejection is one of the main complications and may influence graft survival. Objective: To determine the incidence and features of acute cellular rejection (ACR) episodes confirmed by biopsy. Methods: We studied a cohort of 175 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 2004 and 2012 to determine the cumulative incidence of ACR confirmed by biopsy and to identify the associated risk factors using multivariate analysis. Results: The one-year patient survival was 96.6%; the graft survival was 93.7%. The incidence of ACR within one year was 14.3%, of which 46% were observed within 6 months following transplantation. The most frequently observed ACR type was 1B according to the Banff classification system (42%). A relationship between ACR and receipt of a kidney from expanded criteria donors was observed, both in univariate and adjusted multiple log-binomial regression analyses, but only 6.3% of patients received extended criteria donor kidneys. No other relationships between variables were found. Conclusion: ACR frequency in this study was similar to that of other cohorts reported previously. We need a bigger sample of renal transplants from expanded criteria donors, PRA and DSA test to support the results. PMID:27721962

  20. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  1. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  2. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saif A.; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR. PMID:27606122

  3. Aggressive treatment of the first acute rejection episode using first-line anti-lymphocytic preparation reduces further acute rejection episodes after human kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, J; Schneeberger, H; Illner, W D; Stangl, M; Zanker, B; Land, W

    1998-01-01

    The detrimental effect of acute rejection episodes on long-term outcome of renal allografts in cyclosporin-treated patients is well established, although has not been seen by all investigators. To analyse the possibility that aggressive treatment of the first episode may ameliorate this detrimental effect, we performed an open label, randomised prospective trial in cyclosporin-based, immunosuppressed recipients of postmortem renal allografts in order to compare two different treatment protocols during primary acute rejection episodes: (1) group 1 of 25 patients received 3 x 250 mg methylprednisolone (MP) i.v.; (2) group 2 of 25 patients received 7 x anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)-Fresenius i.v. (4 mg/kg body weight). During a period of 4 years, the following clinical observations were made: (1) The incidence of an acute re-rejection episode was significantly reduced in the ATG-treated study group (16%) compared to the MP-treated study group (72%); (2) The severity of the first acute rejection episode (intensity of renal dysfunction measured in terms of 10-day creatinine area under curve) showed no significant difference between the groups (37 mg x 10-d/dl to 58 mg x 10-d/dl); and (3) The half-lives of allografts in both groups have not shown any significant differences so far. In conclusion, aggressive treatment of the first rejection episode of renal allografts with the use of ATG reduced the incidence of re-rejection episodes which, however, are not reflected so far by improvement of the 4-year survival rate of these allografts. Since it could be observed that re-rejection is an even worse predictor for chronic transplant failure, a better long-term outcome of renal allografts in ATG-treated patients may be expected during a longer observation period. The incidence of a third episode was also reduced in the ATG-treated group (0%) compared to the MP-treated group (12%).

  4. Difficulties, guidelines and review of developing an acute rejection model after rat intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andres, Ane Miren; Santamaria, Monica; Hernandez-Oliveros, Francisco; Guerra, Laura; Lopez, Sergio; Stringa, Pablo; Vallejo, Maria Teresa; Largo, Carlota; Encinas, Jose Luis; Garcia de Las Heras, Maria Soledad; Lopez-Santamaria, Manuel; Tovar, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Experimental small bowel transplantation (SBT) in rats has been proven to be a useful tool for the study of ischemia-reperfusion and immunological aspects related to solid organ transplantation. However, the model is not completely refined, specialized literature is scarce and complex technical details are typically omitted or confusing. Most studies related to acute rejection (AR) use the orthotopic standard, with small sample sizes due to its high mortality, whereas those studying chronic rejection (CR) use the heterotopic standard, which allows longer term survival but does not exactly reflect the human clinical scenario. Various animal strains have been used, and the type of rejection and the timing of its analysis differ among authors. The double purpose of this study was to develop an improved unusual AR model of SBT using the heterotopic technique, and to elaborate a guide useful to implement experimental models for studying AR. We analyzed the model's technical details and expected difficulties in overcoming the learning curve for such a complex microsurgical model, identifying the potential problem areas and providing a step-by-step protocol and reference guide for future surgeons interested in the topic. We also discuss the historic and more recent options in the literature. PMID:27102447

  5. Role of the Fyn -93A>G polymorphism (rs706895) in acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thude, Hansjörg; Kramer, Kathrin; Peine, Sven; Sterneck, Martina; Nashan, Björn; Koch, Martina

    2015-09-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn phosphorylates tyrosine residues on key targets involved in early T-cell signal transduction. T-cell signal transduction is one essential step for acute transplant rejection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of Fyn -93A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs706895) with the susceptibility to acute rejection episodes in liver transplantation. In total, 72 liver transplant recipients with one biopsy proven acute rejection (S-BPAR), 56 with multiple BPAR (M-BPAR), 105 without BPAR (No-BPAR), and 145 healthy controls were enrolled in this case-control study. The SNP was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-allele specific restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-ASRA) and was analyzed for a recessive and a dominant model. The Fyn -93G allele exhibits in healthy controls a statistically significant lower frequency than in liver recipients (18% vs. 24%; p=0.046) or in liver recipients with BPAR (18% vs. 27%; p=0.017). However, the genotype and allele frequencies of the Fyn -93A>G SNP demonstrate no significant differences between recipients with acute rejection episodes (S-BPAR and M-BPAR) and No-BPAR recipients. Thus our results provide no evidence that the Fyn -93A>G SNP contributes to the susceptibility to acute liver transplant rejection in a Caucasian population. PMID:26407913

  6. Late acute antibody mediated rejection after nine years of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halim, Medhat Abdel; Al-Otaibi, Torki; Al-Waheeb, Salah; Tawab, Khaled Abdel; El Kholy, Osama; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Narayanan Nampoory, M R

    2010-11-01

    Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is rarely reported as a long-term com-plication of renal transplantation, and it can present on top of another chronic pathology affecting the graft. A 45-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease due to unknown etiology received renal transplantation from his sister with 4 HLA mismatches. He received antithymocte globulin induction therapy and was maintained on steroids, azathioprine (AZA) and cyclosporine A (CsA). Up to eight years post-transplantation he was clinically and biochemically stable. He lost follow-up for about one year, and then presented with nephritic nephrotic syndrome and rise of serum creatinine (SCr.) to 210 μmol/L. Graft biopsy revealed picture suggestive of acute AMR on top of de novo membranoprolipherative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) with focal crescent formation, diffuse immune complex deposition and peritubular capillaries C4d positivity. Anti-HLA donor specific antibodies were highly positive for B and T cells class I and class II. The patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and anti-CD20 (rituximab). AZA was changed to mycophenolate mofetil and CsA to tacrolimus. He had partial response, but SCr. continued at 220 μmol/L.

  7. Acute rejection in the elderly recipient: influence of age in the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Rosa; Ruiz, Juan C; Zubimendi, José A; Cotorruelo, Julio G; de Francisco, Angel L M; Rodrigo, Emilio; Sanz, Saturnino; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Arias, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Since the immune response in older recipients is weaker they should be less likely to reject a transplanted organ and should need less aggressive immunosuppressive treatment. Our aim was to record the incidence and severity of episodes of acute rejection (AR), estimate the influence of these events on graft survival of elderly recipients (> or = 60) and to compare these with that in younger ones. We performed 363 kidney transplants between 1/94 and 12/98, and recorded clinical and immunological data, incidence-severity of AR and cause of graft loss. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the age at transplantation: A (<60, n = 281/77.4%) and B (> 60, n = 82/22.6%). The percentage of aging recipients and mean age of donors and recipients increased throughout the period. Although the incidence of ATN was higher in the older group (29% vs.19%, p < 0.0001) the number of graft biopsies was equal in both groups. The incidence of AR was similar, 33.4% vs. 26.8%, pNS. The number of AR episodes per patient was 0.44 and 0.41 respectively. The severity of AR was: Banff grade I: A (40.3%)/B (45.7%) pNS; grade II: A (44.1%)/B (48.57) pNS; grade III: A (15.5%)/B (5.7%) pNS. Younger recipients presented a higher level of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) (4.3% vs. 2.07%, p = 0.01). One-yearpatient survival was 96%/91% (p < 0.05) and graft survival was 81%/78% (pNS) respectively. The age of recipient does not seem to have influenced the incidence-severity of AR or the graft survival. Thus immunosuppression should be individualized for each patient and should not depend on the age at transplantation.

  8. A Case Report of Acute Cellular Rejection Following Intestinal Transplantation Managed With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Rao, B; Jafri, S-M; Kazimi, M; Mullins, K; Raoufi, M; Segovia, M C

    2016-03-01

    There is a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection (ACR) in small bowel transplantation (SBT) compared with transplantation of other solid organs. Although there are reports on the use of infliximab to successfully treat ACR refractory to other treatments, there are no reports, to our knowledge, regarding the use of adalimumab. We present a case of a female patient with a history of Crohn's disease who underwent an isolated SBT and developed an episode of severe ACR. She was initially treated with methylprednisolone, thymoglobulin, basiliximab, and a dosage adjustment of tacrolimus. Results of repeat endoscopies and biopsies revealed no significant improvement. The patient initiated treatment with adalimumab every 2 weeks for a total of 6 months, in addition to maintenance treatment with prednisone and tacrolimus. Subsequent evaluations showed gradual improvement to normal mucosa and villi without ulceration. A regimen that incorporates adalimumab can thus be used to treat ACR after intestinal transplantation. Larger multicenter studies are needed to show the full efficacy of this therapeutic regimen.

  9. The effect of cold ischemia time on delayed graft function and acute rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ismail; Colak, Hulya; Tugmen, Cem; Dogan, Sait Murat; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of cold ischemia time (CIT) on delayed graft function (DGF) and acute rejection (AR) among deceased donor kidney transplant recipients. The medical records of 111 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from deceased donors between November 1994 and July 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. DGF was observed in 54% of the patients and the prevalence of AR in the first year after transplantation was 9.9%. The incidence of DGF was higher among patients with longer CIT. There was no correlation between CIT and AR episodes. Higher body weight of recipients and donors, history of prior blood transfusion and advanced donor age were related with DGF. Patients with DGF had higher serum creatinine levels at the first, third and fifth years. There was a negative correlation between recipient body weight and creatinine clearance at the first year. CIT has an important role in the development of DGF as a modifiable risk factor. Moreover, donors with advanced age and higher body weight as well as recipients with higher body weight and history of blood transfusions are at risk for the development of DGF. Prevention of DGF may help to improve graft function at the first, third and fifth years and shorten the hospital stay.

  10. Exogenous Lipocalin 2 Ameliorates Acute Rejection in a Mouse Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. I.; Schwelberger, H. G.; Brendel, K. A.; Feurle, J.; Andrassy, J.; Kotsch, K.; Regele, H.; Pratschke, J.; Maier, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is rapidly produced by damaged nephron epithelia and is one of the most promising new markers of renal injury, delayed graft function and acute allograft rejection (AR); however, the functional importance of Lcn2 in renal transplantation is largely unknown. To understand the role of Lcn2 in renal AR, kidneys from Balb/c mice were transplanted into C57Bl/6 mice and vice versa and analyzed for morphological and physiological outcomes of AR at posttransplantation days 3, 5, and 7. The allografts showed a steady increase in intensity of interstitial infiltration, tubulitis and periarterial aggregation of lymphocytes associated with a substantial elevation in serum levels of creatinine, urea and Lcn2. Perioperative administration of recombinant Lcn2:siderophore:Fe complex (rLcn2) to recipients resulted in functional and morphological amelioration of the allograft at day 7 almost as efficiently as daily immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). No significant differences were observed in various donor–recipient combinations (C57Bl/6 wild‐type and Lcn2−/−, Balb/c donors and recipients). Histochemical analyses of the allografts showed reduced cell death in recipients treated with rLcn2 or CsA. These results demonstrate that Lcn2 plays an important role in reducing the extent of kidney AR and indicate the therapeutic potential of Lcn2 in transplantation. PMID:26595644

  11. Efficacy of Anti-Interleukin-2 Receptor Antibody (Daclizumab) in Reducing the Incidence of Acute Rejection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, Hossein; Rahbar, Khosrow; Nobakht Haghighi, Ali; Qoreishi, Mohammad; Safdari, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute rejection remains a major problem in renal transplantation and represents one of the most important causes of chronic allograft dysfunction and late graft loss. Daclizumab is a genetically engineered human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to the α chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, and may thus reduce the risk of rejection after renal transplantation. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the effect of daclizumab induction therapy combined with a triple immunosuppressive protocol including prednisolone,cyclosporine microemulsion (CsA), and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), in reducing the incidence of acute rejection in recipients of living unrelated donor kidneys. Patients and Methods In this historical cohort study, 43 adult recipients of their first kidney allograft received daclizumab (three 1 mg/kg doses administered every 2 weeks) with triple immunosuppressive therapy (steroids, CsA, and MMF). This group was compared to 43 first-time graft recipients who received maintenance triple immunosuppressive therapy comprising steroids, CsA, and MMF. The end point was the incidence of biopsy confirmed acute rejection within 6 months after transplantation. Results At 6 months, 5 (11.6%) of the patients in the daclizumab group had biopsy-proven rejections, as compared to 14 (32.5%) in the control group (P = 0.017). The sex and the age of recipients had no impact on the incidence of acute rejection episodes in the two groups. Conclusions Adding interleukin-2 receptor antibody (daclizumab) to maintenance triple immunosuppressive therapy (prednisolone, CsA, and MMF) reduces the incidence of acute rejection episodes at 6 months in first-time transplant recipients of living unrelated donor. PMID:23573470

  12. Bacterial translocation in acute rejection after small bowel transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y; Hernandez, F; Burgos, E; Martinez, L; Gonzalez-Reyes, S; Fernandez-Dumont, V; Lopez, G; Romero, M; Lopez-Santamaria, M; Tovar, J A

    2005-03-01

    Acute rejection after small bowel transplantation (SBTx) may facilitate bacterial translocation (BT) and subsequent changes in the liver, spleen, and lungs. This study investigated whether BT occurs after acute rejection and whether this is followed by changes in the structure of the intestine and the phagocytic organs interposed between the gut and the general circulation. Orthotopic SBTx was performed in allogeneic (ALLO) rat-strain combinations (BN-Wistar, n=5). For comparison we used syngeneic SBTx (SYN) (BN-BN, n=6) controls. Animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. Mesenteric lymph nodes and portal and caval blood were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction in the blood samples. Intestine, liver, spleen, and lung protein and DNA contents were measured. Histologic changes were graded according to standard criteria of acute rejection. For comparisons we used chi(2) and nonparametric Mann-Whitney test with a threshold of significance of p<0.05. ALLO rats lost more weight after SBTx than SYN rats (-13.02+/-4.39% vs. -8.04+/-5.08% of preoperative weight), although the difference was not significant (ns). A variable degree of graft rejection was histologically demonstrated in all ALLO rats, and DNA/protein content in the graft was significantly higher in this group (0.245+/-0.85 vs. 0.134+/-0.21, p<0.05). Gram-negative enteric bacteria were found in 4/5 ALLO and 4/6 SYN rats (ns), and aerobic Gram-positive bacteria in 2/5 and 3/6 (ns), respectively. Anaerobic growth occurred in mesenteric lymph nodes in one ALLO rat and in the bloodstream in another one. E. coli DNA was isolated in none of the ALLO but in two SYN rats (ns). BT was frequent after SBTx in both syngeneic and allogeneic strain combinations. Contrary to our expectations, BT after SBTx was not higher in ALLO group rats. However, anaerobic germs were isolated only in this group.

  13. A Five-Gene Peripheral Blood Diagnostic Test for Acute Rejection in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Khatri, Purveshkumar; Sigdel, Tara K.; Tran, Tim; Ying, Lihua; Vitalone, Matthew; Chen, Amery; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Meixia; Naesens, Maarten; Zarkhin, Valeriya; Sansanwal, Poonam; Chen, Rong; Mindrinos, Michael; Xiao, Wenzhong; Benfield, Mark; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Brad; Davis, Ron; Butte, Atul J.; Salvatierra, Oscar; Sarwal, Minnie

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of renal graft status through peripheral blood (PB) rather than invasive biopsy is important as it will lessen the risk of infection and other stresses, while reducing the costs of rejection diagnosis. Blood gene biomarker panels were discovered by microarrays at a single center and subsequently validated and cross-validated by QPCR in gthe NIH SNSO1 randomized study from 12 US pediatric transplant programs. A total of 367 unique human PB samples, each paired with a graft biopsy for centralized, blinded phenotype classification, were analyzed (115 acute rejection (AR), 180 stable and 72 other causes of graft injury). Of the differentially expressed genes by microarray, Q-PCR analysis of a five gene-set (DUSP1, PBEF1, PSEN1, MAPK9 and NKTR) classified AR with high accuracy. A logistic regression model was built on independent training-set (n=47) and validated on independent test-set (n=198)samples, discriminating AR from STA with 91% sensitivity and 94% specificity and AR from all other non-AR phenotypes with 91% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The 5-gene set can diagnose AR potentially avoiding the need for invasive renal biopsy. These data support the conduct of a prospective study to validate the clinical predictive utility of this diagnostic tool. PMID:23009139

  14. Gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNA interference inhibits acute rejection in rats with liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Hu, Shuqun; Song, Qingwei; Yu, Shengcai; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yin, Jun; Qin, Lei; Qian, Haixin

    2013-01-01

    The 4-1BB signal pathway plays a key role in organ transplantation tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the effect of gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNA interference (RNAi) on the acute rejection in rats with liver transplantation. The recombination vector of lentivirus that contains shRNA targeting the 4-1BB gene (LV-sh4-1BB) was constructed. The liver transplantation was performed using the two-cuff technique. Brown-Norway (BN) recipient rats were infected by the recombinant LVs. The results showed that gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNAi downregulated the 4-1BB gene expression of the splenic lymphocytes in vitro, and the splenic lymphocytes isolated from the rats with liver transplantation. LV-sh4-1BB decreased the plasma levels of liver injury markers including AST, ALT, and BIL and also decreased the level of plasma IL-2 and IFN- γ in recipient rats with liver transplantation. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of shRNA targeting 4-1BB gene prolonged the survival time of recipient and alleviated the injury of liver morphology in recipient rats with liver transplantation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that gene silencing of 4-1BB by RNA interference inhibits the acute rejection in rats with liver transplantation.

  15. Immunosuppression status of liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C affects biopsy-proven acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Man; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Hae Won; Yi, Nam-Joon; Kwon, ChoonHyuck David; Hwang, Shin; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Joh, Jae-Won; Lee, Suk-Koo; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The relationship between patient survival and biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C remains unclear. The aims of this study were to compare the characteristics of patients with and without BPAR and to identify risk factors for BPAR. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 169 HCV-RNA-positive patients who underwent LT at three centers. Results BPAR occurred in 39 (23.1%) of the HCV-RNA-positive recipients after LT. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 92.1%, 90.3%, and 88.5%, respectively, in patients without BPAR, and 75.7%, 63.4%, and 58.9% in patients with BPAR (P<0.001). Multivariate analyses showed that BPAR was associated with the non-use of basiliximab and tacrolimus and the use of cyclosporin in LT recipients with HCV RNA-positive. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that the immunosuppression status of HCV-RNA-positive LT recipients should be carefully determined in order to prevent BPAR and to improve patient survival. PMID:27729628

  16. Non-viral human IL-10 gene expression reduces acute rejection in heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, In Chul; Mullen, Patricia M; Precht, Andrew F; Khanna, Ajai; Li, Melissa; Behling, Cynthia; Lopez, Valerie F; Chiou, Henry C; Moss, Ronald B; Hart, Marquis E

    2003-01-01

    We studied nonviral delivery, expression, and the effect of the human interleukin-10 (Hu IL-10) gene on the rat model of heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT). Two previous pilot studies showed remarkable expression of the Hu IL-10 gene in donor and recipient rats, and a decreasing effect of acute rejection in certain cases. In this study, we focused on the efficacy of Hu IL-10 gene expression to decrease acute rejection compared with cyclosporine A (CyA) in a HALT model. Three study groups and one control group were designed. Each group consisted of 6 DA donor and 6 Lewis recipient rats, which underwent HALT. In the control group, donors and recipients were not treated at all. In group II, recipients were treated with one dose of CyA. In group III, donors were treated with Hu IL-10 plasmid. In group IV, donors were treated with Hu IL-10 plasmid, and recipients were treated with one dose of CyA. Rejection was established by histopathology: it revealed 100% rejection in control and 33.3% rejection in study groups II, III, and IV. Human IL-10 gene expression prevented acute rejection with the same efficacy as CyA in the HALT model in rats.

  17. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Bronchial Stricture Following Lung Transplantation in Recipients With and Without Early Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Castleberry, Anthony W.; Worni, Mathias; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Lin, Shu S.; Snyder, Laurie D.; Shofer, Scott L.; Palmer, Scott M.; Pietrobon, Ricardo S.; Davis, R. Duane; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk factors and outcomes of bronchial stricture following lung transplantation are not well defined. An association between acute rejection and development of stricture has been suggested in small case series. We evaluated this relationship using a large, national registry. Methods All lung transplants between 04/1994 and 12/2008 per the United Network for Organ Sharing database were analyzed. Generalized linear models were used to determine the association between early rejection and development of stricture after adjusting for potential confounders. The association of stricture with postoperative lung function and overall survival was also evaluated. Results 9,335 patients were included for analysis. The incidence of stricture was 11.5% (=1,077/9,335) with no significant change in incidence during the study period (p=0.13). Early rejection was associated with a significantly greater incidence of stricture [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 - 1.61; p<0.0001]. Male gender, restrictive lung disease, and pre-transplant requirement for hospitalization were also associated with stricture. Those who developed stricture had and a lower postoperative peak percent predicted forced expiratory volume at one second (median 74% vs. 86% for bilateral transplants only, p<0.0001), shorter unadjusted survival (median 6.09 vs. 6.82 years, p<0.001) and increased risk of death after adjusting for potential confounders (adjusted hazard ratio 1.13, CI 1.03 - 1.23, p=0.007). Conclusions Early rejection is associated with an increased incidence of stricture. Recipients with stricture demonstrate worse postoperative lung function and survival. Prospective studies may be warranted to further assess causality and the potential for coordinated rejection and stricture surveillance strategies to improve postoperative outcomes. PMID:23870829

  19. Total body irradiation of donors can alter the course of tolerance and induce acute rejection in a spontaneous tolerance rat liver transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YeWei; Zhao, HeWei; Bo, Lin; Yang, YinXue; Lu, Xiang; Sun, JingFeng; Wen, JianFei; He, Xia; Yin, GuoWen

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is an established therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Graft rejection occurs unless the recipient receives immunosuppression after transplantation. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of acute rejection of liver allografts in rats pre-treated with total body irradiation to eliminate passenger lymphocytes and to define the role of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in the induction of immunotolerance in the recipient. Male Lewis rats were used as donors and male DA rats were recipients. Rats were randomly assigned to the following four groups: control group, homogeneity liver transplantation group, idio-immunotolerance group and acute rejection group. After transplantation, the survival time of each group, serum alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin levels, number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, expression of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor on T cell subgroups, histopathology of the hepatic graft and spleen cytotoxic T lymphocyte lytic activity were measured. In the acute rejection group, where donors were preconditioned with total body irradiation before liver transplantation, all recipients died between day 17 and day 21. On day 14, serum alanine aminotransferase increased significantly to (459.2±76.9) U L(-1), total bilirubin increased to (124.1±33.7) μmol L(-1) (P<0.05) and the ratio of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells decreased significantly to 1.50%±0.50% (P<0.05) compared with the other groups. Analysis of the T cell subpopulations in the acute rejection group varied from the other groups. Histological analysis showed typical changes of acute rejection in the acute rejection group only. Preconditioning of the donors with total body irradiation eliminated passenger lymphocytes of the liver graft, and thus affected the course of tolerance and induced acute rejection after liver transplantation.

  20. Molecular dysfunctions in acute rejection after renal transplantation revealed by integrated analysis of transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Lin, Hua; Peng, Wujian; Huang, Yuanshuai; Chen, Jiejing; Zhang, Yue; Dai, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Acute rejection remains a problem in renal transplantation. To further illustrate the mechanism of rejection, we integrated protein array-based proteomics and RNA microarray-based genomics to investigate the transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA of biopsies of three patients with acute rejections and a control group. 99 transcription factors were identified in acute rejection biopsies compared to normal renal tissue. We correlated transcription factor data with microRNA and long noncoding RNA data sets and reported the expression of 5 transcription factors (AP-1, AP-4, STATx, c-Myc and p53), 12 miRNAs and 32 lncRNAs in acute rejection biopsies. Pathway analysis demonstrated that over-presentation of transcription factor pathway plays a critical role in acute rejection. This is the first study to comprehensively report the acute rejection transcription factor pathway. Integrative analysis of the transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA provided an expansive view of molecular signaling pathways in acute rejection after renal transplantation.

  1. Effect of nifedipine on renal transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, M L; Dennis, M J; Beckingham, I J; Smith, S J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of early nifedipine therapy on acute renal allograft rejection was studied in 170 adult cadaveric transplant recipients. Acute rejection occurring in the first 3 months after transplantation was diagnosed by Tru-cut biopsy and the severity of each rejection episode assessed histologically. The incidence of acute rejection was significantly lower in patients treated with nifedipine (29 of 80; 36 per cent) than in controls (52 of 90; 58 per cent) (P < 0.01) and there was a higher proportion of histologically mild rejection episodes in the former group (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed that nifedipine exerted a significant independent effect on the incidence of early acute rejection. Other factors identified in the multivariate model as influencing rejection were human leucocyte antigen (HLA) matching at the DR locus, blood level of cyclosporin during the first week, HLA matching at the B locus, donor age and donor sex. The 1-year graft survival rate was 88.6 per cent in patients given nifedipine and 63.8 per cent in controls (P < 0.02). These data suggest that nifedipine therapy has a useful role in human renal transplantation.

  2. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in acute rejection reaction following rat orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsong; Yang, Guangshun; Lu, Dewen; Ling, Yang; Chen, Guihua; Zhou, Tianbao

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in acute rejection reaction (ARR) following orthotopic liver transplantation in a rat model. Serum VEGF and bFGF levels were detected using ELISA, and their expression levels in liver and spleen tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF and bFGF were detected by conducting a quantitative polymerase chain reaction during the ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation. The expression levels of VEGF and bFGF in the serum 3 days following liver transplantation were significantly higher compared with those in the other groups (1 and 7 days following transplantation; P<0.01). In addition, the numbers of cells in the liver tissue that were shown to be positive for the expression VEGF and bFGF using immunohistochemistry were significantly higher 3 days following transplantation than at the other time points (P<0.0001). Furthermore, the numbers of cells positive for VEGF and bFGF expression in the spleen detected 3 days following the transplantation surgery were also significantly higher compared with those at the other time points (P<0.01). VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression levels were also increased from 1 day following the surgery and reached a peak at day 3, prior to declining gradually and remaining at a relatively high level. VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression levels changed dynamically, by peaking and then declining, in ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation. These changes may have an important impact on angiogenesis and the inflammatory reaction, and the identification of these changes increases the current understanding of ARR following orthotopic liver transplantation.

  3. Heterotopic transplantation of glycerin-preserved trachea: effect of respiratory epithelium desquamation on acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, M G; Edelweiss, M I A; Souza, F H; Moreschi, A H; Savegnago, F L; Macedo Neto, A V

    2005-07-01

    An effective preservation method and decreased rejection are essential for tracheal transplantation in the reconstruction of large airway defects. Our objective in the present study was to evaluate the antigenic properties of glycerin-preserved tracheal segments. Sixty-one tracheal segments (2.4 to 3.1 cm) were divided into three groups: autograft (N = 21), fresh allograft (N = 18) and glycerin-preserved allograft (N = 22). Two segments from different groups were implanted into the greater omentum of dogs (N = 31). After 28 days, the segments were harvested and analyzed for mononuclear infiltration score and for the presence of respiratory epithelium. The fresh allograft group presented the highest score for mononuclear infiltration (1.78 +/- 0.43, P < or = 0.001) when compared to the autograft and glycerin-preserved allograft groups. In contrast to the regenerated epithelium observed in autograft segments, all fresh allografts and glycerin-preserved allografts had desquamation of the respiratory mucosa. The low antigenicity observed in glycerin segments was probably the result of denudation of the respiratory epithelium and perhaps due to the decrease of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens.

  4. Heterotopic transplantation of glycerin-preserved trachea: effect of respiratory epithelium desquamation on acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, M G; Edelweiss, M I A; Souza, F H; Moreschi, A H; Savegnago, F L; Macedo Neto, A V

    2005-07-01

    An effective preservation method and decreased rejection are essential for tracheal transplantation in the reconstruction of large airway defects. Our objective in the present study was to evaluate the antigenic properties of glycerin-preserved tracheal segments. Sixty-one tracheal segments (2.4 to 3.1 cm) were divided into three groups: autograft (N = 21), fresh allograft (N = 18) and glycerin-preserved allograft (N = 22). Two segments from different groups were implanted into the greater omentum of dogs (N = 31). After 28 days, the segments were harvested and analyzed for mononuclear infiltration score and for the presence of respiratory epithelium. The fresh allograft group presented the highest score for mononuclear infiltration (1.78 +/- 0.43, P < or = 0.001) when compared to the autograft and glycerin-preserved allograft groups. In contrast to the regenerated epithelium observed in autograft segments, all fresh allografts and glycerin-preserved allografts had desquamation of the respiratory mucosa. The low antigenicity observed in glycerin segments was probably the result of denudation of the respiratory epithelium and perhaps due to the decrease of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens. PMID:16007278

  5. Localization of C-X-C and C-C chemokines to renal tubular epithelial cells in human kidney transplants is not confined to acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Sibbring, J S; Sharma, A; McDicken, I W; Sells, R A; Christmas, S E

    1998-12-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of leucocyte chemoattraction to inflammatory sites. Previous work has shown that the expression of some chemokines is upregulated during renal transplant rejection. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether chemokine expression is increased during renal transplant rejection. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize the C-X-C (alpha) chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the C-C (beta) chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) in 30 needle biopsies of human kidney transplants taken for diagnosis of renal dysfunction. Urine samples from transplant patients taken immediately prior to biopsy were assayed for chemokine content using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Results from groups of patients having different clinicopathological diagnoses were then compared. All three chemokines were detected in most renal transplant biopsies showing acute cellular rejection but, although infiltrating leucocytes were often positive, staining was predominantly localized to renal tubular epithelium. Staining for MCP-1 was generally weaker than for the other chemokines, and collecting tubules were usually stained more strongly than proximal convoluted tubules. Tubular epithelial staining was also found in biopsies from patients without signs of acute cellular rejection. There were significantly higher amounts of IL-8 in the urine of patients with acute cellular rejection, even when patients with urinary tract infections were excluded, but mean titres of urinary MIP-1beta did not differ between patient groups. This was also found when titres were normalized for urine volume and creatinine levels. Production of IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1beta is not confined to kidney transplants showing acute cellular rejection, and may be a relatively nonspecific response of tubular epithelial cells to renal damage.

  6. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  7. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  8. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression.

  9. Mixed lymphocyte cultures can predict TCR Vbeta repertoires of T cells infiltrating kidney transplants during acute rejection episodes.

    PubMed

    Paraoan, Marius T; Bakran, Ali; Hammad, Abdul; Sells, Robert A; Christmas, Stephen E

    2005-12-27

    Alloreactive T cell populations can show skewing of T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) Vbeta gene usage. The aims of the experiments were to compare in vivo and in vitro T cell alloresponses against donor alloantigens for TCR Vbeta gene usage. T-cell cultures from renal biopsies taken during acute rejection and pretransplant mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) were established from five renal transplant patients. TCR Vbeta gene usage, assessed with Vbeta family specific antibodies, showed that up to five different Vbeta families were significantly expanded. In four of five cases, there was close concordance between Vbeta families expanded from the biopsy and in MLC. T-cell clones from one renal biopsy were specific for the mismatched donor alloantigen and showed similar TCR Vbeta gene usage to the original T-cell line. The results show very similar patterns of TCR Vbeta gene usage in alloreactive T cells generated ex vivo or in vitro.

  10. Acute allograft rejection following interferon therapy for hepatitis C in recipients who have returned to dialysis after kidney transplant failure: case study.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; D'Ambrosio, Roberta; Pallotti, Francesco; Berardinelli, Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Martin, Paul; Aghemo, Alessio

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-based therapy remains the gold standard for hepatitis C in patients with chronic kidney disease; however, due to the high rate of IFN-induced rejection after transplant, treatment of HCV-infected kidney transplant recipients is recommended only in particular circumstances. We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian female with chronic hepatitis C (genotype 1b) who returned to hemodialysis following the complete functional loss of her kidney transplant. She started combination antiviral therapy with peg-IFN-α2a (135 mcg sc weekly) plus ribavirin (200 mg daily) nine months after the re-initiation of hemodialysis. Antiviral therapy was neither effective nor safe; ribavirin was stopped at week 38 due to hemolytic anemia; on-treatment HCV breakthrough was observed at week 48; and acute rejection occurred after four months of IFN-based therapy. Diagnosis of acute allograft rejection was suspected on the grounds of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory data. Allograft nephrectomy was then performed and histology showed acute-on-chronic rejection. This is an uncommon case of IFN-associated kidney rejection in an allograft recipient who had functional loss of her graft and had returned to hemodialysis. In view of the risk of rejection of renal allograft, and the limited efficacy of IFN-based treatment of hepatitis C, physicians should be aware of effective treatment with oral anti-viral agents and avoid the use of IFN in patients on maintenance dialysis with failed renal allograft.

  11. Differential diagnosis of acute rejection and chronic cyclosporine nephropathy after rat renal transplantation by detection of endothelial microparticles (EMP).

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiewei; Yang, Jing; Cao, Weike; Sun, Yi

    2010-12-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMP) are small vesicles smaller than 1.0μm, released from endothelial cells (EC) during their activation and (or) apoptosis. The assay of the level of elevated EMP is a new approach to evaluate the dysfunction of endothelial cell. EMP can be classified into several types according to their membrane molecular, and the levels of various types of EMP may be different. As the most cost-effective immunodepressant, cyclosporine A (CsA) has been used widely in organ transplantation. But its dose is hard to control, under-medication may cause the acute rejection (AR) and overdose may cause chronic cyclosporine nephropathy (CCN). The cyclosporine A (CsA) caused CCN and the AR caused renal injury after renal transplantation are both vascular diseases related with endothelial dysfunction, and up to now, there is still no effective method to distinguish the two kinds of diseases. Owing to distinct pathogenesis of the two kinds of vascular diseases, the level of each type of EMP originated from vascular endothelial cells may be different. We hypothesize that maybe we can distinguish them by detecting the different levels of some types of EMP which is also related with vascular disease, and we propose to prove our hypothesis through animal experiment. If our hypothesis is proved, it will be more helpful for clinicians to adjust the dose of CsA promptly according to the differential diagnosis of the two kinds of diseases.

  12. A 3’-UTR Polymorphism in Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene Is Associated with Acute Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gervasini, Guillermo; García-Cerrada, Montserrat; Coto, Eliecer; Vergara, Esther; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Fernández-Cavada, Maria Jesús; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Barroso, Sergio; Doblaré, Emilio; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; López-Larrea, Carlos; Cubero, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are arachidonic acid metabolites that play a protective role against damaging processes that may occur after re-oxygenation of the graft. We aimed to investigate whether the presence of functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding soluble epoxy hydrolase (EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to less active compounds, may play a role in the outcome of renal transplantation. Methods In a group of 259 Caucasian renal transplant recipients and 183 deceased donors, we determined the presence of three common EPHX2 SNPs, namely rs41507953 (K55R), rs751141 (R287Q) and rs1042032 A/G. Associations with parameters of graft function and the incidence of acute rejection were retrospectively investigated throughout the first year after grafting by logistic regression adjusting for clinical and demographic variables. Results Carriers of the rs1042032 GG genotype displayed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (38.15 ± 15.57 vs. 45.99 ± 16.05; p = 0.04) and higher serum creatinine values (1.57 ± 0.58 vs. 1.30 ± 0.47 g/dL; p=0.02) one year after grafting, compared to patients carrying the wildtype A-allele. The same GG genotype was also associated to increased risk of acute rejection. Interestingly, this association was observed for the genotype of both recipients [OR =6.34 (1.35-29.90); p = 0.015] and donors [OR = 5.53 (1.10-27.80); p=0.042]. A statistical model including both genotypes along with other meaningful demographic and clinical variables resulted in an increased significance for the association with the recipients’ genotype [OR=8.28 (1.21-74.27); p=0.031]. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variability in the EETs-metabolizing gene, EPHX2, may have a significant impact on the outcome of deceased-donor renal transplantation. PMID:26230946

  13. Clinical usefulness of gene-expression profile to rule out acute rejection after heart transplantation: CARGO II

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Stypmann, Jörg; Schulz, Uwe; Zuckermann, Andreas; Mohacsi, Paul; Bara, Christoph; Ross, Heather; Parameshwar, Jayan; Zakliczyński, Michal; Fiocchi, Roberto; Hoefer, Daniel; Colvin, Monica; Deng, Mario C.; Leprince, Pascal; Elashoff, Barbara; Yee, James P.; Vanhaecke, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aims A non-invasive gene-expression profiling (GEP) test for rejection surveillance of heart transplant recipients originated in the USA. A European-based study, Cardiac Allograft Rejection Gene Expression Observational II Study (CARGO II), was conducted to further clinically validate the GEP test performance. Methods and results Blood samples for GEP testing (AlloMap®, CareDx, Brisbane, CA, USA) were collected during post-transplant surveillance. The reference standard for rejection status was based on histopathology grading of tissue from endomyocardial biopsy. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC), negative (NPVs), and positive predictive values (PPVs) for the GEP scores (range 0–39) were computed. Considering the GEP score of 34 as a cut-off (>6 months post-transplantation), 95.5% (381/399) of GEP tests were true negatives, 4.5% (18/399) were false negatives, 10.2% (6/59) were true positives, and 89.8% (53/59) were false positives. Based on 938 paired biopsies, the GEP test score AUC-ROC for distinguishing ≥3A rejection was 0.70 and 0.69 for ≥2–6 and >6 months post-transplantation, respectively. Depending on the chosen threshold score, the NPV and PPV range from 98.1 to 100% and 2.0 to 4.7%, respectively. Conclusion For ≥2–6 and >6 months post-transplantation, CARGO II GEP score performance (AUC-ROC = 0.70 and 0.69) is similar to the CARGO study results (AUC-ROC = 0.71 and 0.67). The low prevalence of ACR contributes to the high NPV and limited PPV of GEP testing. The choice of threshold score for practical use of GEP testing should consider overall clinical assessment of the patient's baseline risk for rejection. PMID:26746629

  14. Serial measurement of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters for the diagnosis of acute rejection after live donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Koichi; Hirota, Masashi; Takeda, Shin; Kamei, Hideya; Nakamura, Taro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Nakao, Akimasa

    2009-09-01

    To elucidate the role of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters as surrogate markers of acute rejection (AR) after live donor liver transplantation (LDLT), serial Doppler measurements were prospectively performed during the first 2 weeks after LDLT to compare the longitudinal hepatic hemodynamic changes between patients with histologically proven AR and patients without histologically proven AR. Forty-six patients that had undergone adult-to-adult LDLT using a right lobe graft were enrolled in this study. The portal venous maximum velocity (PVV; cm/second), portal venous flow volume, hepatic arterial peak systolic velocity, hepatic arterial pulsatility index, hepatic venous maximum velocity, hepatic venous pulsatility index, and splenic arterial pulsatility index were measured. Fourteen patients were diagnosed by biopsy to have clinically relevant AR. Markedly increased PVV was seen soon after surgery and gradually decreased in both patients with clinically relevant AR and patients without clinically relevant AR. This serial change of decreasing PVV was significantly greater in patients with clinically relevant AR (P < 0.0001). After postoperative day 6, the PVV in patients with clinically relevant AR was significantly lower than that in patients without clinically relevant AR (PVV on postoperative day 6: 35.6 +/- 21.3 versus 58.3 +/- 27.1 cm/second, respectively, P = 0.0080). A PVV cutoff value of 20.2 cm/second demonstrated the best accuracy for predicting clinically relevant AR. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting clinically relevant AR were 92.9% and 87.1%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.94. In conclusion, serial Doppler measurement of hepatic parameters in LDLT is useful for the diagnosis of clinically relevant AR. Clinically relevant AR should therefore be suspected when a marked unexpected decrease in the PVV is observed.

  15. Should IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-2 be considered predictive biomarkers of acute rejection in liver and kidney transplant? Results of a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Millán, O; Rafael-Valdivia, L; San Segundo, D; Boix, F; Castro-Panete, M J; López-Hoyos, M; Muro, M; Valero-Hervás, D; Rimola, A; Navasa, M; Muñoz, P; Miras, M; Andrés, A; Guirado, L; Pascual, J; Brunet, M

    2014-10-01

    Acute rejection (AR) remains a major challenge in organ transplantation, and there is a need for predictive biomarkers. In the present multicenter study, we prospectively examined a series of biomarkers in liver and kidney recipients. Intracellular expression of IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-2 and IL-17 soluble production were evaluated both pre-transplantation and post-transplantation (1st and 2nd week, 1st, 2nd and 3rd month). 142 transplant patients (63 liver/79 kidney) were included in the study. Twenty-eight recipients (14 liver/14 kidney) developed AR. Pre- and post-transplantation intracellular expression of %IFN-γ(+) in CD4(+)CD69(+) and in CD8(+)CD69(+) and soluble IL17 identified liver and kidney transplant patients at high risk of AR. Pre-transplantation, %IL-2(+) in CD8(+)CD69(+) also identified kidney patients at high risk. We constructed pre- and post-transplantation risk prediction models, based on a composite panel of biomarkers, which could provide the basis for future studies and will be a useful tool for the selection and adjustment of immunosuppressive treatments.

  16. High frequency of central memory regulatory T cells allows detection of liver recipients at risk of early acute rejection within the first month after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Giner, Francisco; Millan, Olga; San Segundo, David; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Mancebo, Esther; Llorente, Santiago; Rafael-Valdivia, Lourdes; Rimola, Antoni; Fábrega, Emilio; Mrowiec, Anna; Allende, Luis; Minguela, Alfredo; Bolarín, Jose M; Paz-Artal, Estela; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Brunet, Mercé; Muro, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have analyzed the potential of T regulatory cells (Treg cells) as biomarkers of acute rejection (AR). The aim of the present multicenter study was to correlate the percentage of peripheral Treg cells in liver graft recipients drawn at baseline up to 12 months after transplantation with the presence of AR. The percentage of central memory (cm) Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+)CD62L(+)) was monitored at pre-transplant and at 1 and 2 weeks, and 1, 2, 3 and 6 months and 1 year post-transplantation. The same validation standard operating procedures were used in all participating centers. Fifteen patients developed AR (23.4%). Hepatitis C virus recurrence was observed in 16 recipients, who displayed low peripheral blood cmTreg levels compared with patients who did not. A steady increase of cmTregs was observed during the first month after transplantation with statistically significant differences between AR and non-AR patients. The high frequency of memory Treg cells allowed us to monitor rejection episodes during the first month post-transplantation. On the basis of these data, we developed a prediction model for assessing risk of AR that can provide clinicians with useful information for managing patients individually and customizing immunosuppressive therapies.

  17. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yingzi; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient's MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens.

  18. [Diagnosis of rejection in a transplanted liver].

    PubMed

    Sticová, Eva; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in immunosupressive therapy rejection remains the most common complication of liver transplantation in both the early and the late post-transplant period. Unlike other solid organs, liver graft rejection has some specific characteristics likely attributable to the unique immunobiologic properties and the remarkable regenerative capabilities of liver parenchyma. Acute cellular rejection is the most frequent type of the rejection episode in the liver allograft, whereas chronic (ductopenic) rejection and humoral rejection are uncommon. Since the clinical findings are not entirely characteristic, histopathological evaluation of liver biopsy remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of rejection. However, the close cooperation between the pathologist and the clinician is essential for the correct interpretation of morphologic changes.

  19. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  20. Monitoring Pharmacologically Induced Immunosuppression by Immune Repertoire Sequencing to Detect Acute Allograft Rejection in Heart Transplant Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Penland, Lolita; Luikart, Helen; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation. Methods and Findings In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412) that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without). We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient’s net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = −0.867, 95% CI −0.968 to −0.523, p = 0.0014), as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9%) and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1%) (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard). To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several

  1. RNA Profiling in Human and Murine Transplanted Hearts: Identification and Validation of Therapeutic Targets for Acute Cardiac and Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Van Aelst, L. N. L.; Summer, G.; Li, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Heggermont, W.; De Vusser, K.; Carai, P.; Naesens, M.; Van Cleemput, J.; Van de Werf, F.; Vanhaecke, J.; Thum, T.; Waer, M.; Papageorgiou, A.‐P.; Schroen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is the adverse response of the recipient's immune system against the allogeneic graft. Using human surveillance endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) manifesting ACR and murine allogeneic grafts, we profiled implicated microRNAs (miRs) and mRNAs. MiR profiling showed that miR‐21, ‐142‐3p, ‐142‐5p, ‐146a, ‐146b, ‐155, ‐222, ‐223, and ‐494 increased during ACR in humans and mice, whereas miR‐149‐5p decreased. mRNA profiling revealed 70 common differentially regulated transcripts, all involved in immune signaling and immune‐related diseases. Interestingly, 33 of 70 transcripts function downstream of IL‐6 and its transcription factor spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene (SPI1), an established target of miR‐155, the most upregulated miR in human EMBs manifesting rejection. In a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, miR‐155 absence and pharmacological inhibition attenuated ACR, demonstrating the causal involvement and therapeutic potential of miRs. Finally, we corroborated our miR signature in acute cellular renal allograft rejection, suggesting a nonorgan specific signature of acute rejection. We concluded that miR and mRNA profiling in human and murine ACR revealed the shared significant dysregulation of immune genes. Inflammatory miRs, for example miR‐155, and transcripts, in particular those related to the IL‐6 pathway, are promising therapeutic targets to prevent acute allograft rejection. PMID:26249758

  2. The kSORT Assay to Detect Renal Transplant Patients at High Risk for Acute Rejection: Results of the Multicenter AART Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Sue; Dai, Hong; Bestard, Oriol; Metes, Diana; Zeevi, Andrea; Gritsch, Albin; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Macedo, Camila; Peddy, Ram; Medeiros, Mara; Vincenti, Flavio; Asher, Nancy; Salvatierra, Oscar; Shapiro, Ron; Kirk, Allan; Reed, Elaine; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of noninvasive molecular assays to improve disease diagnosis and patient monitoring is a critical need. In renal transplantation, acute rejection (AR) increases the risk for chronic graft injury and failure. Noninvasive diagnostic assays to improve current late and nonspecific diagnosis of rejection are needed. We sought to develop a test using a simple blood gene expression assay to detect patients at high risk for AR. Methods and Findings We developed a novel correlation-based algorithm by step-wise analysis of gene expression data in 558 blood samples from 436 renal transplant patients collected across eight transplant centers in the US, Mexico, and Spain between 5 February 2005 and 15 December 2012 in the Assessment of Acute Rejection in Renal Transplantation (AART) study. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) in one center. A 17-gene set—the Kidney Solid Organ Response Test (kSORT)—was selected in 143 samples for AR classification using discriminant analysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.94; 95% CI 0.91–0.98), validated in 124 independent samples (AUC = 0.95; 95% CI 0.88–1.0) and evaluated for AR prediction in 191 serial samples, where it predicted AR up to 3 mo prior to detection by the current gold standard (biopsy). A novel reference-based algorithm (using 13 12-gene models) was developed in 100 independent samples to provide a numerical AR risk score, to classify patients as high risk versus low risk for AR. kSORT was able to detect AR in blood independent of age, time post-transplantation, and sample source without additional data normalization; AUC = 0.93 (95% CI 0.86–0.99). Further validation of kSORT is planned in prospective clinical observational and interventional trials. Conclusions The kSORT blood QPCR assay is a noninvasive tool to detect high risk of AR of renal transplants. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID

  3. Is Duplex-Ultrasound a useful tool in defining rejection episodes in composite tissue allograft transplants?

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexander; Kronberger, Irmgard-Elisabeth; Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes

    2015-12-01

    Immunologic reactions in transplanted organs are in more or less all allograft patients detectable: clear parameters exist as e.g. in renal transplants where the clearance power reduces by rejection. On the contrary, in composite tissue allografts clear and objective indicators stating a rejection episode lack. We present the case of a hand-transplanted subject with signs of acute transplant rejection diagnosed by means of Duplex Ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy.

  4. Immuno-histological assessment of sub-clinical acute and borderline rejection in renal allograft recipients: Data from a transplant center in India.

    PubMed

    Badwal, Sonia; Kumar, Arun; Hooda, A K; Varma, P P

    2015-11-01

    This single-center study was carried out on living related and unrelated renal transplant recipients (RTRs) to evaluate the usefulness of surveillance biopsies in monitoring stable renal allografts using immuno-histological markers for immune-activation. This is a prospective, longitudinal study. Protocol biopsies of 60 RTRs with stable graft function were evaluated at three, six and 12 months post-transplant. Immuno-histological evaluation was carried out using immune-activation markers (perforins, granzyme and interleukin-2R), phenotypic markers (CD-3 and CD-20), viral markers and C4d. The demographic and clinical profile was recorded for each patient. All cases of acute sub-clinical rejection (SCR) were treated and borderline SCR cases were followed-up without treatment. SCR at three and six months post-transplant was evident in 16.7% and 3.7% of RTRs, respectively. Positive statistical association of SCR was seen with HLA-DR mismatches, whereas patients receiving induction therapy and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression exhibited a lower incidence of SCR. T cell phenotype with persistent expression of immune-activation markers exhibited positive statistical association with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy at 12-month follow-up biopsy. The mean creatinine levels were significantly lower in the protocol biopsy group than the non-protocol biopsy group. No significant difference was found between the mean creatinine levels of the SCR group after treatment and the non-SCR cases within the protocol biopsy group. Early treatment of sub-clinical acute rejection leads to better functional outcomes. However, persistent immune-activation is associated with chronicity and may have implications on long-term graft survival.

  5. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  6. Optimizing rejection readouts in a corneal allograft transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Antonia; Böhringer, Daniel; Betancor, Paola Kammrath; Schlunck, Günther; Reinhard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of anterior segment spectral domain optic coherence tomography (ASOCT) as rejection readout in a keratoplasty mouse model and to compare ASOCT against the current standard (i.e., a clinical score system). Furthermore, to compare both approaches with respect to intra- and inter-individual observer variability and to calculate a critical point that distinguishes between rejection and non-rejection in ASOCT analysis. Methods Allogeneic penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) were performed using C3H/He donor mice and BALB/c recipient mice; syngeneic transplantations served as controls using BALB/c donors and recipients. Corneal graft rejection was determined with a clinical score. ASOCT was used to determine the central thickness of the corneal grafts in the same animals. The rejection status was corroborated with histopathological examination. Results The median survival time (MST) of the corneal allografts in the wild-type BALB/c mice was 12 days. Allogeneic transplantation led to a 100% rejection rate, whereas signs of rejection after syngeneic transplantation appeared in up to 20% of the mice. Central corneal thickness (CCT) determination via customized software revealed a direct correlation with the clinical score. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis confirmed CCT as a valid surrogate for rejection. Calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) revealed a value of 0.88 with an optimal cut-off at 267 pixels. Conclusions An increase in the CCT during acute allogeneic corneal graft rejection significantly correlated with the clinical surrogate parameter “corneal opacity.” ASOCT not only generates source data, but also analysis of the ASOCT data shows lower readout variability and fewer interpreter variations than the clinical score commonly used to define the time point of graft rejection in mice. PMID:27777504

  7. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  8. Perturbations in the Urinary Exosome in Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; NG, Yolanda; Lee, Sangho; Nicora, Carrie D.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2015-01-05

    Background: Urine exosomes, vesicles exocytosed into urine by all renal epithelial cell types, occur under normal physiologic and disease states. Exosome contents may mirror disease-specific proteome perturbations in kidney injury. Analysis methodologies for the exosomal fraction of the urinary proteome were developed and for comparing the urinary exosomal fraction versus unfractionated proteome for biomarker discovery. Methods: Urine exosomes were isolated by centrifugal filtration from mid-stream, second morning void, urine samples collected from kidney transplant recipients with and without biopsy matched acute rejection. The proteomes of unfractionated whole urine (Uw) and urine exosomes (Uexo) underwent mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics analysis. The proteome data were analyzed for significant differential protein abundances in acute rejection (AR). Results: Identifications of 1018 and 349 proteins, Uw and Uexo fractions, respectively, demonstrated a 279 protein overlap between the two urinary compartments with 25%(70) of overlapping proteins unique to Uexoand represented membrane bound proteins (p=9.31e-7). Of 349 urine exosomal proteins identified in transplant patients 220 were not previously identified in the normal urine exosomal fraction. Uexo proteins (11), functioning in the inflammatory / stress response, were more abundant in patients with biopsy-confirmed acute rejection, 3 of which were exclusive to Uexo. Uexo AR-specific biomarkers (8) were also detected in Uw, but since they were observed at significantly lower abundances in Uw, they were not significant for AR in Uw. Conclusions: A rapid urinary exosome isolation method and quantitative measurement of enriched Uexo proteins was applied. Urine proteins specific to the exosomal fraction were detected either in unfractionated urine (at low abundances) or by Uexo fraction analysis. Perturbed proteins in the exosomal compartment of urine collected from kidney transplant patients were

  9. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  10. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-09-24

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:27683635

  11. Updates on antibody-mediated rejection in intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) has increasingly emerged as an important cause of allograft loss after intestinal transplantation (ITx). Compelling evidence indicates that donor-specific antibodies can mediate and promote acute and chronic rejection after ITx. However, diagnostic criteria for ABMR after ITx have not been established yet and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft injury are not well-known. Effective approaches to prevent and treat ABMR are required to improve long-term outcomes of intestine recipients. Clearly, ABMR after ITx has become an important area for research and clinical investigation.

  12. Apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Aten, J; Rentenaar, R J; Hack, C E; Koopman, G; Weening, J J; ten Berge, I J

    1998-01-01

    Tubular cells are important targets during acute renal allograft rejection and induction of apoptosis might be a mechanism of tubular cell destruction. Susceptibility to induction of apoptosis is regulated by the homologous Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax is regulated by p53, which down-regulates expression of Bcl-2, while simultaneously up-regulating expression of Bax. We studied apoptotic tubular cell death in 10 renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with acute rejection by in situ end-labelling and the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide. Tubular expression of p53, Bcl-2 and Bax was studies by immunohistochemistry. Five renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with uncomplicated clinical course and histologically normal renal tissue present in nephrectomy specimens from 4 patients with renal adenocarcinoma served as control specimens. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies were detected in tubular epithelia and tubular lumina in 9 out of 10 acute rejection biopsies. In control renal tissue, apoptotic cells were detected in 1 biopsy only. Compared to control renal tissue, acute renal allograft rejection was, furthermore, associated with a shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax in tubular epithelia and increased expression of p53 in tubular nuclei. These observations demonstrate that apoptosis contributes in part to tubular cell destruction during acute renal allograft rejection. In accordance, the shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax indicates increased susceptibility of tubular epithelia to induction of apoptosis. The expression of p53 in tubular nuclei during acute renal allograft rejection indicates the presence of damaged DNA, which can be important in initiation of part of the observed apoptosis. These findings elucidate part of the mechanisms controlling apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

  13. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  14. Longitudinal analysis of whole blood transcriptomes to explore molecular signatures associated with acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heesun; Günther, Oliver; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Wilson-McManus, Janet E; Ng, Raymond T; Balshaw, Robert; Keown, Paul A; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M; Isbel, Nicole M; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored a time course of peripheral whole blood transcriptomes from kidney transplantation patients who either experienced an acute rejection episode or did not in order to better delineate the immunological and biological processes measureable in blood leukocytes that are associated with acute renal allograft rejection. Using microarrays, we generated gene expression data from 24 acute rejectors and 24 nonrejectors. We filtered the data to obtain the most unambiguous and robustly expressing probe sets and selected a subset of patients with the clearest phenotype. We then performed a data-driven exploratory analysis using data reduction and differential gene expression analysis tools in order to reveal gene expression signatures associated with acute allograft rejection. Using a template-matching algorithm, we then expanded our analysis to include time course data, identifying genes whose expression is modulated leading up to acute rejection. We have identified molecular phenotypes associated with acute renal allograft rejection, including a significantly upregulated signature of neutrophil activation and accumulation following transplant surgery that is common to both acute rejectors and nonrejectors. Our analysis shows that this expression signature appears to stabilize over time in nonrejectors but persists in patients who go on to reject the transplanted organ. In addition, we describe an expression signature characteristic of lymphocyte activity and proliferation. This lymphocyte signature is significantly downregulated in both acute rejectors and nonrejectors following surgery; however, patients who go on to reject the organ show a persistent downregulation of this signature relative to the neutrophil signature.

  15. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  16. Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys without Anti-Rejection Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160989.html Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys Without Anti-Rejection Drugs Scientists say goal is to create banks of stem cells that could be used for any human patient ...

  17. Nerve Regeneration in Rat Limb Allografts: Evaluation of Acute Rejection Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Farber, Scott; Newton, Piyaraj; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful nerve regeneration is critical to the functional success of composite tissue allografts (CTA). The present study was designed to characterize the effect of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the setting of orthotopic limb transplantation. Methods A rat orthotopic limb transplantation model was used to evaluate the effects of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and motor recovery. Continuous administration of FK506 (Full suppression), administration of FK506 for the first 8 of 12 weeks (Late rejection), or delayed administration of FK506 / dexamethasone following noticeable rejection (Early rejection) was used to preclude or induce rejection following limb transplantation. Twelve weeks postoperatively, nerve regeneration was assessed via histomorphometric analysis of explanted sciatic nerve, and motor recovery was assessed via evoked muscle force measurement in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Results A single episode of acute rejection that occurs immediately or late after reconstruction does not significantly alter the number of regenerating axonal fibers. Acute rejection occurring late after reconstruction adversely affects EDL muscle function in CTA. Conclusion Collected data reinforces that adequate immunosuppressant administration in cases of allogeneic limb transplantation ensures levels of nerve regeneration and motor functional recovery equivalent to that of syngeneic transplants. Prompt rescue following acute rejection was further demonstrated not to significantly affect nerve regeneration and functional recovery post-operatively. However, instances of acute rejection that occur late after reconstruction affect graft function. In total, the present study begins to characterize the effect of immunosuppression regimens on nerve regeneration and motor recovery in the setting of CTA. PMID:23542267

  18. Plasma cell-rich acute rejection of the renal allograft: A distinctive morphologic form of acute rejection?

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Sharma, A; Mahanta, P J; Agarwal, S K; Dinda, A K

    2012-05-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the clinicopathologic features of plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) of renal allograft and comparing them with acute cellular rejection (ACR), non-plasma cell-rich type. During a 2-year period, eight renal allograft biopsies were diagnosed as PCAR (plasma cells >10% of interstitial infiltrate). For comparison, 14 biopsies with ACR were included in the study. Detailed pretransplant data, serum creatinine at presentation, and other clinical features of all these cases were noted. Renal biopsy slides were reviewed and relevant immunohistochemistry performed for characterization of plasma cell infiltrate. The age range and duration of transplantation to diagnosis of acute rejection were comparable in both the groups. Histologically, the proportion of interstitial plasma cells, mean interstitial inflammation, and tubulitis score were higher in the PCAR group compared with cases with ACR. A significant difference was found in the outcome at last follow-up, being worse in patients with PCAR. This study shows that PCAR portends a poor outcome compared with ACR, with comparable Banff grade of rejection. Due to its rarity and recent description, nephrologists and renal pathologists need to be aware of this entity.

  19. Proteomics for rejection diagnosis in renal transplant patients: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Wilfried; Metzger, Jochen; Husi, Holger; Marx, David

    2016-01-01

    Rejection is one of the key factors that determine the long-term allograft function and survival in renal transplant patients. Reliable and timely diagnosis is important to treat rejection as early as possible. Allograft biopsies are not suitable for continuous monitoring of rejection. Thus, there is an unmet need for non-invasive methods to diagnose acute and chronic rejection. Proteomics in urine and blood samples has been explored for this purpose in 29 studies conducted since 2003. This review describes the different proteomic approaches and summarizes the results from the studies that examined proteomics for the rejection diagnoses. The potential limitations and open questions in establishing proteomic markers for rejection are discussed, including ongoing trials and future challenges to this topic. PMID:27011903

  20. Equal overall rejection rate in pre-transplant flow-cytometric cross-match negative and positive adult recipients in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matinlauri, Irma H; Höckerstedt, Krister A; Isoniemi, Helena M

    2005-10-01

    T cell IgG flow-cytometric cross-matches (FCXM) using 48 stored pre-transplant patient serum samples and 40 stored serum samples collected 3 wk after liver transplantation and frozen spleen cells of cadaveric donors in 48 consecutive liver transplantations were performed retrospectively. T cell IgG FCXM using pre-transplant serum samples was compared with 46 complement-dependent lymphocytotoxic cross-matches (CDCXM) performed at the time of transplantation. Clinical relevance of these tests was evaluated in relation to acute rejection, 1-, 3- and 5-yr graft and patient survival. The incidence of positive FCXM was 33% (16 of 48) and 13% (six of 46) by CDCXM. The median time of acute rejection was 29 d after transplantation in FCXM positive group (range 13-101 d) and 22 d in FCXM negative group (range 7-157 d, NS). Rejection rate was similar in 16 pre-transplant FCXM positive patients (eight of 16, 50%) compared with six pre-transplant CDCXM positive patients (three of six, 50%; NS). Recipients having graft rejection tended to be more often pre-transplant FCXM positive (eight of 21, 38%) than CDCXM positive (three of 21, 14%), but the difference was not significant (p > 0.1). No difference was found in the positive predictive value in relation to acute rejection between positive FCXM and CDCXM (69% vs. 50%; NS). Furthermore there was no correlation between post-transplant positive FCXM and acute rejection. No difference was found between pre-transplant T cell IgG FCXM positive and negative recipients in relation to graft or patient survival. Our findings are supportive for little risk associated with preformed donor-specific antibodies in liver transplantation.

  1. Effect of reverse chimerism on rejection in clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bolado, Pedro; Landin, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Chimerism may enable allografts to survive when immunosuppressive therapy is administered at low levels or is even absent. Reverse chimerism (RC) is focused on intragraft chimerism that repopulates the allograft with cells of recipient origin. We aimed to identify and analyze current clinical evidence on RC and the presence of endothelial RC and tissue-specific RC. A total of 33 clinical reports on cardiac, kidney, liver, and lung transplants published between 1972 and 2012 that focused on RC were included in a systematic review. Liver allografts presented with the highest percentage of endothelial RC and lung allografts by far the lowest. Tissue-specific RC was present in most of the recipients, but at very low levels. There were also cardiac and kidney allografts with chimerism, but the functionality of the cells of recipient origin was questionable. We were unable to determine whether RC was a trigger for or a result of acute rejection. Further clinical research should focus on outcomes to evaluate the clinical relevance of this form of chimerism in transplantation.

  2. Perturbations in the Urinary Exosome in Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Ng, Yolanda W.; Lee, Sangho; Nicora, Carrie D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urine exosomes are small vesicles exocytosed into the urine by all renal epithelial cell types under normal physiologic and disease states. Urine exosomal proteins may mirror disease specific proteome perturbations in kidney injury. Analysis methodologies for the exosomal fraction of the urinary proteome were developed for comparing the urinary exosomal fraction versus unfractionated proteome for biomarker discovery. Methods: Urine exosomes were isolated by centrifugal filtration of urine samples collected from kidney transplant patients with and without acute rejection (AR), which were biopsy matched. The proteomes of unfractionated whole urine (Uw) and urine exosomes (Ue) underwent mass spectroscopy-based quantitative proteomics analysis. The proteome data were analyzed for significant differential protein abundances in AR. Results: A total of 1018 proteins were identified in Uw and 349 proteins in Ue. Two hundred seventy-nine overlapped between the two urinary compartments and 70 proteins were unique to the Ue compartment. Of 349 exosomal proteins identified from transplant patients, 220 had not been previously identified in the normal Ue fraction. Eleven Ue proteins, functionally involved in an inflammatory and stress response, were more abundant in urine samples from patients with AR, three of which are exclusive to the Ue fraction. Ue AR-specific biomarkers (1) were also detected in Uw, but since they were observed at significantly lower abundances in Uw, they were not significant for AR in Uw. Conclusion: A rapid urinary exosome isolation method and quantitative measurement of enriched Ue proteins was applied. Perturbed proteins in the exosomal compartment of urine collected from kidney transplant patients were specific to inflammatory responses, and were not observed in the Ue fraction from normal healthy subjects. Ue-specific protein alterations in renal disease provide potential mechanistic insights and offer a unique panel of sensitive

  3. The Polymorphism −308G/A of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Gene Modulates the Effect of Immunosuppressive Treatment in First Kidney Transplant Subjects Who Suffer an Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fructuoso, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Flores, Isabel; Valero, Rosalia; Moreno, Maria Angeles; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Urcelay, Elena; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The −308G/A SNP of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene affects TNF-α production. As its impact on transplant outcome remains open to debate, we decided to genotype it in a cohort of transplant subjects. A retrospective analysis of 439 first kidney recipients randomly divided into two subgroups (discovery and validation cohorts) was performed to identify the best predictors of acute rejection (AR). The effect on transplant outcome was analyzed by an adjusted logistic regression model. Carriers of the A allele, associated with elevated TNF-α production, presented a higher risk of AR (OR = 2.78; 95% CI = 1.40–5.51). Logistic regression analyses for AR showed an interaction between the polymorphism and treatment with thymoglobulin (p-interaction = 0.03). In recipients who did not receive thymoglobulin, carriers of A allele had higher risk of AR (OR = 4.05; 95% CI = 1.76–9.28). Moreover, carriers of A allele not treated with thymoglobulin presented higher risk of AR than those who received thymoglobulin (OR = 13.74; 95% CI = 1.59–118.7). The AUC of the model in the discovery cohort was 0.70 and in the validation cohort was 0.69. Our findings indicate that the −308G/A TNF-α polymorphism is associated with AR risk and it modulates the effectiveness of thymoglobulin treatment. This pharmacogenetic effect lets us propose this SNP as a useful predictor biomarker to tailor immunosuppressive regimens. PMID:27777962

  4. Immunologic basis of graft rejection and tolerance following transplantation of liver or other solid organs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Strom, Terry B

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of organs between genetically different individuals of the same species causes a T cell-mediated immune response that, if left unchecked, results in rejection and graft destruction. The potency of the alloimmune response is determined by the antigenic disparity that usually exists between donors and recipients and by intragraft expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the early period after transplantation. Studies in animal models have identified many molecules that, when targeted, inhibit T-cell activation. In addition, some of these studies have shown that certain immunologic interventions induce transplantation tolerance, a state in which the allograft is specifically accepted without the need for chronic immunosuppression. Tolerance is an important aspect of liver transplantation, because livers have a unique microenvironment that promotes tolerance rather than immunity. In contrast to the progress achieved in inducing tolerance in animal models, patients who receive transplanted organs still require nonspecific immunosuppressant drugs. The development of calcineurin inhibitors has reduced the acute rejection rate and improved short-term, but not long-term, graft survival. However, long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs leads to nephrotoxicity and metabolic disorders, as well as manifestations of overimmunosuppression such as opportunistic infections and cancers. The status of pharmacologic immunosuppression in the clinic is therefore not ideal. We review recently developed therapeutic strategies to promote tolerance to transplanted livers and other organs and diagnostic tools that might be used to identify patients most likely to accept or reject allografts.

  5. [Chronic rejection: Differences and similarities in various solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Suhling, H; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Taubert, R; Jäckel, E; Schiffer, M; Bräsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, chronic rejections after transplantation of the lungs, heart, liver, and kidney are described. Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) plays an important role in all of these transplantations and has a significant influence on patient survival. The pathophysiological reasons for CAD varies greatly in the various organs.Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the most important determinant of survival and quality of life after lung transplantation. Diagnosis is based on lung function, especially forced expiratory flow in 1 s (FEV1) decline. Prevention, early detection, and rapid treatment are extremely important. Azithromycin and extracorporeal photopheresis are commonly used for treatment because they usually positively influence the progression of lung remodeling.The expression for chronic rejection of the heart is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Immunological and nonimmunological factors are important for its development. Due to limited therapeutic options, prevention is of utmost importance (administration of mTOR inhibitors and minimizing cardiovascular risk factors).The mid- and long-term survival rates after liver transplantation have hardly changed in recent decades, which is an indication of the difficulty in diagnosing chronic graft dysfunction. Chronic ductopenic rejection accounts for a small proportion of late graft dysfunction. Idiopathic posttransplant hepatitis and de novo autoimmune hepatitis are important in addition to recurrence of the underlying disease that led to transplantation.Chronic allograft nephropathy is the result of severe rejection which cumulates in increasing fibrosis with remodeling. The earliest possible diagnosis and therapy is currently the only option. Diagnosis is based on evidence of donor-specific antibodies and histological findings.

  6. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs.

  7. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  8. Granzyme expression in fine-needle aspirates from liver allografts is increased during acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Kuijf, M L; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Kuijpers, Marianne A; Willems, Marc; Zondervan, Pieter E; Niesters, Hubert G M; Hop, Wim C J; Hack, C Erik; Paavonen, Timo; Höckerstedt, Krister; Tilanus, Hugo W; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Metselaar, Herold J; Kuijf, Mark M L

    2002-10-01

    We investigated whether determination in fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) specimens of cells expressing granzymes (Grs) and Fas ligand would provide a reliable, easy, and quantitative measure of rejection activity in the transplanted liver. Retrospectively, 13 FNAB specimens obtained during clinical acute rejection, 10 FNAB specimens obtained during subclinical rejection, 12 FNAB specimens obtained during cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, and 26 FNAB specimens obtained in the absence of rejection or infection were included on the study. Cytospin preparations of FNAB and peripheral-blood specimens were immunocytochemically stained for Fas-ligand and Gr, and increments in the liver were calculated by subtracting frequencies of positive cells in blood from those in FNAB specimens. Only sporadically Fas ligand-expressing, but many Gr-expressing, cells were detected in FNAB specimens. Increments in Gr-positive (Gr(+)) cells were significantly greater in FNAB specimens obtained during clinical rejection (median, 70 Gr(+) cells; range, 0 to 312 Gr(+) cells; P = .006) and tended to be greater in FNAB specimens obtained during subclinical rejection (median, 62 Gr(+) cells; range, 5 to 113 Gr(+) cells; P = .09) compared with those obtained in the absence of rejection (median, 16 Gr(+) cells; range, 0 to 103 Gr(+) cells). Increments obtained during clinical or subclinical rejection did not differ from those obtained during CMV infection (median, 27 Gr(+) cells; range, 6 to 212 Gr(+) cells). With the exclusion of specimens obtained during CMV infection, the sensitivity of Gr determination in FNAB specimens for the diagnosis of acute rejection (either clinical or subclinical) was 70%, and specificity, 69%. In FNAB specimens obtained during clinical and subclinical acute rejection episodes after liver transplantation, increased numbers of Gr-expressing cells were present; in the absence of CMV infection, their quantification provides a measure for rejection activity with

  9. The challenge to detect heart transplant rejection and transplant vasculopathy non-invasively - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Engin; Burgstahler, Christof; Aebert, Hermann; Schroeder, Stephen; Helber, Uwe; Kopp, Andreas F; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft rejection and vasculopathy are the main factors limiting long-term survival after heart transplantation. In this pilot study we investigated whether non-invasive methods are beneficial to detect cardiac allograft rejection (Grade 0-3 R) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Thus we compared multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with invasive methods like coronary angiography and left endomyocardial biopsy. Methods 10 asymptomatic long-term survivors after heart transplantation (8 male, 2 female, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years, 73 ± 11 months after transplantation) were included. In a blinded fashion, coronary angiography and multi-slice computed tomography and ventricular endomyocardial biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging were compared against each other. Results Cardiac allograft vasculopathy and atherosclerosis were correctly detected by multi-slice computed tomography and coronary angiography with positive correlation (r = 1). Late contrast enchancement found by magnetic resonance imaging correlated positively (r = 0.92, r2 = 0.85, p < 0.05) with the histological diagnosis of transplant rejection revealed by myocardial biopsy. None of the examined endomyocardial specimen revealed cardiac allograft rejection greater than Grade 1 R. Conclusion A combined non-invasive approach using multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may help to assess cardiac allograft vasculopathy and cardiac allograft rejection after heart transplantation before applying more invasive methods. PMID:19682394

  10. [Immunosuppressives to prevent rejection reactions after allogeneic corneal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lapp, T; Maier, P; Birnbaum, F; Schlunck, G; Reinhard, T

    2014-03-01

    In order to prevent rejection of an allogeneic corneal transplant after perforating (high risk) keratoplasty, active agents from different classes of pharmacological substances are used, as with solid organ transplantation. In addition to glucocorticoids, antiproliferative agents, small molecule inhibitors and antibodies, those belonging to the group of macrolides with their many derivatives represent an interesting class of substances in this context. As a supplement to cyclosporin A (CSA) the most successful macrolide in transplantation medicine, animal experiments are currently being carried out to test newer macrolide derivatives, such as sanglifehrin A (SFA). This overview describes the classes of drugs and modes of action of currently administered standard medications in the clinical routine and new developments are presented.

  11. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis.

  12. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  13. Detection of cytomegalovirus and human herpesvirus-6 DNA in liver biopsy specimens and their correlation with rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guardia-Silva, A C; Stucchi, R S B; Sampaio, A M; Milan, A; Costa, S C B; Boin, I F S F

    2012-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) reactivation after transplantation put patients at an increased risk of graft rejection mainly among those who receive organs that are positive in their donor biopsies. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CMV and HHV-6 DNA in liver biopsy specimens from the donors and from their grafts for correlation with rejection after transplantation. We followed 41 liver transplantation patients whose samples were evaluated using nested-polymerase chain reactions (N-PCR). Twenty-one (51%) of the 41 studied patients experienced rejection; 4/21 (19%) were CMV positive in the donor biopsy specimens and remained positive; another 5 subjects became positive. The patients who received organs from donors with biopsies positive for CMV demonstrated a trend to develop graft rejection after transplantation (Fisher's exact test [P = .0591] with significant results on univariate and multivariate analysis [P = .042]). Eight of the 21 who experienced rejection episodes were HHV-6 positive in the donor biopsy but there was no statistical significance CMV DNA diagnosed in liver donor biopsies remained positive posttransplantation in liver biopsy recipients; it was considered a tendency to develop acute cellular rejection after transplantation.

  14. Liver transplant complications in hepatitis C infected recipients: recurrence versus rejection.

    PubMed

    Gehrau, Ricardo C; Mas, Valeria R; Suh, Jihee L; Maluf, Daniel G

    2014-07-01

    Despite improvement on outcomes post liver transplantation (LT), complications such as HCV recurrence (HCV-rec) and acute cellular rejection (ACR) continue to be a challenge for transplant physicians. Accurate diagnostic tools to better dissect between those complications post-LT are crucial for prompt and correct diagnosis and treatment. It is well known that the overlapping features of clinical and histo-pathological characteristics between these conditions turn difficult the appropriate differential diagnosis. Recently, new technological advances had supported the field of biomarker discovery in many diseases. Disease biomarkers capable to differentiate ACR versus HCV-rec post-LT is a long waited task in the transplant community. This editorial describes and discusses potential biomarkers of disease differentiation including recent reports in the field of genomics, proteomics, immunohistochemistry among other technologies.

  15. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward R.; Bryant, H. C.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Lovato, Debbie; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-04-01

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10 5 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  16. The long-term influence of repetitive cellular cardiac rejections on left ventricular longitudinal myocardial deformation in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Tor Skibsted; Løgstrup, Brian Bridal; Eiskjaer, Hans; Høyer, Søren; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term influence of repeated acute cellular rejections on left ventricular longitudinal deformation in heart transplantation (HTX) patients. One hundred and seventy-eight HTX patients were included in the study. Rejections were classified according to the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) classification (0R-3R). Patients were divided into three groups according to rejection scores (RSs). Group 1: <50% of biopsies with 1R rejection and no ≥2R rejections; Group 2: ≥50% of biopsies with 1R rejection or one biopsy with ≥2R rejection; Group 3: ≥Two biopsies with ≥2R rejections. All patients had a comprehensive echocardiographic examination and coronary angiography. We found significantly decreasing global longitudinal strain (GLS) comparing to rejection groups (GLS group 1: -16.8 ± 2.4 (%); GLS group 2: -15.9 ± 3.3 (%); GLS group 3: -14.5 ± 2.9 (%), P = 0.0003). After excluding patients with LVEF < 50% or vasculopathy, GLS was still significantly reduced according to RS groups (P = 0.0096). Total number of 1R and 2R rejections correlated significant to GLS in a linear regression model. In contrast, we found fractional shortening and LVEF to be unaffected by repeated rejections. In conclusion, repeated cardiac rejections lead to impaired graft function as detected by decreasing magnitude of GLS. In contrast, traditional systolic graft function surveillance by LVEF did not correlate to rejection burden.

  17. Characterization of acute renal allograft rejection by proteomic analysis of renal tissue in rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Huang, Jing-Bin; Mi, Jie; He, Yun-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Hou; Luo, Chun-Li; Liang, Si-Min; Li, Jia-Bing; Tang, Ya-Xiong; Li, Jie

    2012-02-01

    Rapid and reliable biomarkers of renal allograft rejection have not been available. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers in renal allograft tissue using proteomic analysis. Orthotopic kidney transplantations were performed using Fisher (F344) or Lewis rats as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. Syngenic control group (Group I) constituted F344-to-F344 orthotopic kidney allo-transplantations (n = 8); and allogenic group (Group II) consisted of F344-to-Lewis orthotopic kidney allo-transplantations (n = 8). Renal tissues were harvested 7 days after transplantation. Samples were analyzed using 2-D electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. 6 differentially expressed proteins were identified between allogenic group and syngenic control group. A rat model of acute renal allograft rejection was successfully set up. Differentially expressed proteins in renal allograft tissue of rat were detected using proteomic analysis and might serve as novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets in human. Quantitative proteomics, using MALDL-TOF-MS methodology has the potential to provide a profiling and a deeper understanding of acute renal rejection.

  18. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  19. Total lymphoid irradiation in heart transplantation: Adjunctive treatment for recurrent rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Frist, W.H.; Winterland, A.W.; Gerhardt, E.B.; Merrill, W.H.; Atkinson, J.B.; Eastburn, T.E.; Stewart, J.R.; Eisert, D.R. )

    1989-12-01

    In the face of recurrent heart transplant graft rejection refractory to all conventional immunotherapy, retransplantation is customary treatment. The case of a heart transplant recipient unsuitable for retransplantation whose recurrent rejection was successfully treated with postoperative total lymphoid irradiation is described.

  20. Alloreactive T Cells to Identify Risk HLA Alleles for Retransplantation After Acute Accelerated Steroid-Resistant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Leyking, S; Wolf, M; Mihm, J; Schaefer, M; Bohle, R M; Fliser, D; Sester, M; Sester, U

    2015-10-01

    The risk of rejection by cellular alloreactivity to the transplant donor is not routinely assessed. Here we analyzed alloreactive T cells in kidney transplant recipients and report how their detection may have helped to prevent rejection of a second kidney graft in a patient with a history of acute accelerated steroid-resistant nonhumoral rejection. Alloreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells were quantified using a flow-cytometric mixed lymphocyte reaction assay based on interferon-γ induction. A group of 16 nonrejecting transplant recipients did not show any alloreactive T-cell immunity to their respective donors, whereas alloreactivity to third-party controls was detectable. In the patient with rejection, HLA-specific antibodies were not detectable before and shortly after rejection, but after transplantation the patient showed exceptionally high frequencies of alloreactive T cells against 2 of 11 HLA-typed controls (0.604% and 0.791% alloreactive CD4 T cells and 0.792% and 0.978% alloreactive CD8 T cells) who shared HLA alleles (HLA-A*24, -B*44, -C*02, -DQB1*5) with the kidney donor. These HLA alleles were subsequently excluded for allocation of a second graft. No alloreactive T cells were observed toward the second kidney donor, and this transplantation was performed successfully. Thus, shared HLA alleles between the donor and third-party controls may suggest that alloreactive T cells had contributed to rejection of the first graft. The rejecting patient highlights that determination of cellular alloreactivity before transplantation may be applied to identify unacceptable mismatches and to reduce the risk for acute cellular rejection episodes. PMID:26518945

  1. Requirement of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3 for Acute Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Wayne W.; Lu, Bao; Gao, Wei; Csizmadia, Vilmos; Faia, Kerrie; King, Jennifer A.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Ling, Mai; Gerard, Norma P.; Gerard, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines provide signals for activation and recruitment of effector cells into sites of inflammation, acting via specific G protein–coupled receptors. However, in vitro data demonstrating the presence of multiple ligands for a given chemokine receptor, and often multiple receptors for a given chemokine, have led to concerns of biologic redundancy. Here we show that acute cardiac allograft rejection is accompanied by progressive intragraft production of the chemokines interferon (IFN)-γ–inducible protein of 10 kD (IP-10), monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig), and IFN-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC), and by infiltration of activated T cells bearing the corresponding chemokine receptor, CXCR3. We used three in vivo models to demonstrate a role for CXCR3 in the development of transplant rejection. First, CXCR3-deficient (CXCR3−/−) mice showed profound resistance to development of acute allograft rejection. Second, CXCR3−/− allograft recipients treated with a brief, subtherapeutic course of cyclosporin A maintained their allografts permanently and without evidence of chronic rejection. Third, CXCR+/+ mice treated with an anti-CXCR3 monoclonal antibody showed prolongation of allograft survival, even if begun after the onset of rejection. Taken in conjunction with our findings of CXCR3 expression in rejecting human cardiac allografts, we conclude that CXCR3 plays a key role in T cell activation, recruitment, and allograft destruction. PMID:11085753

  2. The role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging as a noninvasive surveillance method of human heart transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, D.; Scibilia, G.; Macchiarelli, A.G.; Cassisi, A.; Tonelli, E.; Papalia, U.; Gallo, P.; Antolini, M.; Pitucco, G.; Reale, A. )

    1989-09-01

    The identification of rejection after heart transplantation in patients receiving cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy requires the endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive method associated with a finite morbidity. To evaluate the role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) scintigraphy as a noninvasive surveillance method of heart transplant rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111 was administered intravenously in 30 scintigraphic studies to 10 consecutive heart transplant recipients. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained 72 hours after each scintigraphic study. Nineteen scintigraphic studies had negative findings; no false negative finding was obtained. Eleven antimyosin scintigraphic studies had positive findings, and in these studies endomyocardial biopsy revealed mild rejection in two cases, moderate acute rejection with myocyte necrosis in two cases, myocyte necrosis as a consequence of ischemic injury in six cases, and possibly cytotoxic damage in one case. Antimyosin scintigraphy may represent a reliable screening method for the surveillance of heart transplant patients. In the presence of a negative finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, it may be possible to avoid endomyocardial biopsy. Conversely, in patients who have a positive finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, the endomyocardial biopsy is mandatory to establish the definitive diagnosis by histologic examination of the myocardium.

  3. PD1-Expressing T Cell Subsets Modify the Rejection Risk in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Rebecca; Thomas, Niclas; Workman, Sarita; Ambrose, Lyn; Guzman, David; Sivakumaran, Shivajanani; Johnson, Margaret; Thorburn, Douglas; Harber, Mark; Chain, Benny; Stauss, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether multi-parameter immune phenotyping before or after renal ­transplantation can predict the risk of rejection episodes. Blood samples collected before and weekly for 3 months after transplantation were analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry to define 52 T cell and 13 innate lymphocyte subsets in each sample, producing more than 11,000 data points that defined the immune status of the 28 patients included in this study. Principle component analysis suggested that the patients with histologically confirmed rejection episodes segregated from those without rejection. Protein death 1 (PD-1)-expressing subpopulations of regulatory and conventional T cells had the greatest influence on the principal component segregation. We constructed a statistical tool to predict rejection using a support vector machine algorithm. The algorithm correctly identified 7 out of 9 patients with rejection, and 14 out of 17 patients without rejection. The immune profile before transplantation was most accurate in determining the risk of rejection, while changes of immune parameters after transplantation were less accurate in discriminating rejection from non-rejection. The data indicate that pretransplant immune subset analysis has the potential to identify patients at risk of developing rejection episodes, and suggests that the proportion of PD1-expressing T cell subsets may be a key indicator of rejection risk. PMID:27148254

  4. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  5. [Emphasizing the prevention and treatment of immune rejection after corneal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-yun; Xie, Li-xin

    2006-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is a major therapeutic method to recover the sight from corneal blindness, however, the immune rejection is still the major impact factor for graft failure. With the improvement of the medical care in our country, corneal transplantation has been increased continually. Therefore, reducing the complications and increasing the long-term transparency rate of the graft is an important mission for ophthalmologists. The key core of the corneal transplantation is to pay more attention to the follow-up and prevent the immune rejection. Three respects, including the current status and problems of corneal transplantation in China, the update immune rejection theory and the means of reducing the immune rejection of the corneal graft, and the methods to reduce the risk of blindness due to immune rejection, will be focused in this paper.

  6. Noninvasive detection of human cardiac transplant rejection with indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frist, W.; Yasuda, T.; Segall, G.; Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Gold, H.; Stinson, E.; Oyer, P.; Baldwin, J.; Billingham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Diagnosis of rejection after cardiac transplantation is currently made by right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. To evaluate antimyosin imaging as a noninvasive means of detecting human cardiac rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies was labeled with indium-111 and given intravenously to 18 patients (age 45 +/- 12 years) in 20 studies 7 days to 9 years after transplantation. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained at the time of each imaging study. Eight patients had positive scans confirmed by biopsy as rejection, and eight patients had negative scans and no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Discordance was observed in four studies, two with positive scans and no rejection on biopsy and two with negative scans and positive biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of the technique were each 80%. Imaging with radiolabeled antimyosin antibody Fab fragments may be of value in the noninvasive identification of rejection in the cardiac transplant recipient.

  7. Expression of granzyme A and B proteins by cytotoxic lymphocytes involved in acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Wever, P C; Kamp, A M; ten Berge, I J; Hack, C E; Weening, J J

    1995-01-01

    Granzymes A and B are serine-proteinases stored in the granules of activated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Expression of granzymes in tissues can be used as an activation marker for cytotoxic cells. Using mAbs specific for human granzyme A or B in immunohistochemical staining techniques we investigated expression of granzyme A and B by lymphocytes infiltrating acutely rejected renal allografts. Twelve core needle biopsies were taken from ten different patients during an episode of acute rejection. Eleven biopsies contained high numbers of granzyme A and B positive lymphocytes infiltrating tubular epithelium, and vascular and glomerular structures. In one patient infiltrating lymphocytes did not express granzyme A and only low amounts of granzyme B. No correlation was found between the number of granzyme positive cells and the severity of the rejection as classified by conventional histological criteria. In one tissue specimen from a patient with a renal allograft without signs of rejection, the number of granzyme positive cells was much lower compared to that of the transplant group. In spite of the presence of a marked inflammatory infiltrate, no granzyme positive cells were detected in renal biopsies from patients with various inflammatory, not transplant-related, renal diseases. Phenotypic analysis showed that granzymes A and B were expressed by CD56+ NK cells and CD3+ cells, representing cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Thus, this study demonstrates that granzyme A and B protein-expressing lymphocytes infiltrate the kidney allografts during an acute cellular rejection but not in several other inflammatory renal diseases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  9. A phase II trial of partially incompatible bone marrow transplantation for high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children: prevention of graft rejection with anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies. Société Française de Greffe de Moelle Osseuse.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Bordigoni, P; Michel, G; Esperou, H; Souillet, G; Leblanc, T; Stephan, J L; Vannier, J P; Mechinaud, F; Reiffers, J; Vilmer, E; Landman-Parker, J; Benkerrou, M; Baruchel, A; Pico, J; Bernaudin, F; Bergeron, C; Plouvier, E; Thomas, C; Wijdenes, J; Lacour, B; Blanche, S; Fischer, A

    1996-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from matched sibling donors has been useful for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children with a poor prognosis but is not available to more than two-thirds of patients who do not have a matched allogeneic donor. This study was undertaken to assess one strategy of marrow graft rejection prevention when alternative marrow sources such as HLA-phenoidentical unrelated volunteers and HLA-partially incompatible relatives were used. Results have been compared with two matched groups of children with the same risks factors and disease status who underwent HLA-genoidentical or autologous BMT. The conditioning regimen was the same for the three groups of patients; in the study group anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies combined with T-cell depletion of the marrow was added to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease. Nineteen patients were included and followed for a median of 25 months (14 months to 3 years). Bone marrow engraftment occurred in 83% of the evaluable patients. Post-transplantation infectious diseases were the most frequent causes of death in the study group, occurring in 31% of patients. No fatal infections occurred in the two control groups. Post-transplantation relapse of leukaemia occurred in 26% of study group's patients, in 58% of autologous BMT control group's patients and 5% of HLA-genoidentical allogeneic group's patients. The event-free survival was 83% in the HLA-genoidentical control group, and 30% and 24% in the study group and in the autologous control group, respectively. In conclusion, a high rate of engraftment was achieved by the use of anti-LFA-1 and anti CD2 antibodies. Occurrence of a long-lasting immunodeficiency, however, led to a high incidence of lethal infections and relapses. Combined approaches are therefore to be investigated accelerating immune reconstitution after transplantations of T-depleted HLA partially incompatible marrow.

  10. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J.; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M.; Hughes, Andrew D.; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Nakao, A.; Shufesky, William J.; Williams, Amanda L.; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  11. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection.

  12. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  13. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-02-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation.

  14. The Nature of Experimental Second-set Kidney Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dempster, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    The second-set reaction can be mimiced from a haemodynamic point of view by pharmacological vasopressors, warm and cold ischaemic factors producing vasocontriction and by the Shwartzman reaction. The second-set kidney transplant reaction is assumed to be due to antibodies which, if so, are not dependent for their cytotoxicity on complement fixation and are uninfluenced by antihistamine drugs, steroids, immunosuppression, incoagulable blood, adequate hydration and rheomacrodex. Once started, the reaction continues until the vasoconstriction is so severe that no blood enters the kidney and complete disorganization of kidney function and structure ensues. The deposition of fibrin in the vessels and glomeruli follows the severe vasomotor upset which evokes afferent vasoconstriction. Fibrin is not prevented from being deposited when the recipient of a second-set kidney is fully Arvinized so that the blood is rendered incoagulable. The second-set kidney reaction is first heralded by vasoconstriction in the outer cortex associated with acute renal failure and, as such, fits into the general phenomenon of acute renal failure associated with underperfusion of the outer cortex. There is no evidence that underperfusion of the outer cortex is due to a hyperreactivity of special vessels with a different structure from the other vessels supplying this area. There is the fact, however, that the outer cortical vessels are highly reactive to stimuli of many kinds besides angiotensin. Certain unexplained features of acute renal failure in general may be reasonably explained by reference to the effects of underperfusion of the outer cortex. Acute renal failure associated with mild signs of tubule necrosis, for example, may be explained by the fact that although there is afferent underperfusion of the outer cortex there is generally maintained a good venular collateral nutrient supply (maintained capacitance) sufficient for the oxygen requirements of tubules which are not pumping

  15. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-05-17

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA.

  16. Biliary epithelial senescence and plasticity in acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Brain, J G; Robertson, H; Thompson, E; Humphreys, E H; Gardner, A; Booth, T A; Jones, D E J; Afford, S C; von Zglinicki, T; Burt, A D; Kirby, J A

    2013-07-01

    Biliary epithelial cells (BEC) are important targets in some liver diseases, including acute allograft rejection. Although some injured BEC die, many can survive in function compromised states of senescence or phenotypic de-differentiation. This study was performed to examine changes in the phenotype of BEC during acute liver allograft rejection and the mechanism driving these changes. Liver allograft sections showed a positive correlation (p < 0.0013) between increasing T cell mediated acute rejection and the number of BEC expressing the senescence marker p21(WAF1/Cip) or the mesenchymal marker S100A4. This was modeled in vitro by examination of primary or immortalized BEC after acute oxidative stress. During the first 48 h, the expression of p21(WAF1/Cip) was increased transiently before returning to baseline. After this time BEC showed increased expression of mesenchymal proteins with a decrease in epithelial markers. Analysis of TGF-β expression at mRNA and protein levels also showed a rapid increase in TGF-β2 (p < 0.006) following oxidative stress. The epithelial de-differentiation observed in vitro was abrogated by pharmacological blockade of the ALK-5 component of the TGF-β receptor. These data suggest that stress induced production of TGF-β2 by BEC can modify liver allograft function by enhancing the de-differentiation of local epithelial cells.

  17. Diagnosis of early pancreas graft failure via antibody-mediated rejection: single-center experience with 256 pancreas transplantations.

    PubMed

    de Kort, H; Mallat, M J K; van Kooten, C; de Heer, E; Brand-Schaaf, S H; van der Wal, A M; Roufosse, C; Roelen, D L; Bruijn, J A; Claas, F H; de Fijter, J W; Bajema, I M

    2014-04-01

    Early pancreas graft loss is usually attributed to technical failure while the possibility of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is generally overlooked. To investigate the role of AMR in early pancreas graft loss, we retrospectively assessed 256 patients with simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK) between 1985 and 2010 at our institute. We included 33 SPK patients who lost their pancreas graft <1 year after transplantation. AMR was diagnosed based on donor-specific antibodies, C4d and histology in 7 cases, 8 cases were suspicious for AMR and 18 pancreas graft losses were not due to AMR. Acute AMR occurred >1 month after transplantation in 6/7 cases, whereas all other causes typically led to loss <1 month after transplantation. Thrombotic lesions occurred equally among the 33 cases. In 12/18 concurrent kidney specimens, the diagnostic results paralleled those of the pancreas graft. All patients with acute AMR of the pancreas graft lost their renal grafts <1 year after transplantation. In the setting of a thrombotic event, histopathological analysis of early pancreas graft loss is advisable to rule out the possibility of AMR, particularly because a diagnosis of acute AMR has important consequences for renal graft outcomes.

  18. Blocking MHC class II on human endothelium mitigates acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Qin, Lingfeng; Chang, William G.; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W. Mark; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is mediated by host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) targeting graft class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In experimental rodent models, rejection requires differentiation of naive CD8+ T cells into alloreactive CTL within secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in humans, CTL may alternatively develop within the graft from circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) that recognize class I MHC molecules on graft endothelial cells (EC). This latter pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that host CD4+ TEM, activated by EC class II MHC molecules, provide critical help for this process. First, blocking HLA-DR on EC lining human artery grafts in immunodeficient mice reduces CD8+ CTL development within and acute rejection of the artery by adoptively transferred allogeneic human lymphocytes. Second, siRNA knockdown or CRISPR/Cas9 ablation of class II MHC molecules on EC prevents CD4+ TEM from helping CD8+ TEM to develop into CTL in vitro. Finally, implanted synthetic microvessels, formed from CRISPR/Cas9-modified EC lacking class II MHC molecules, are significantly protected from CD8+ T cell–mediated destruction in vivo. We conclude that human CD8+ TEM–mediated rejection targeting graft EC class I MHC molecules requires help from CD4+ TEM cells activated by recognition of class II MHC molecules. PMID:26900601

  19. Rejection of Cardiac Xenografts Transplanted from α 1,3-Galactosyltransferase Gene-Knockout (GalT-KO) Pigs to Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Hisashi, Y.; Yamada, K.; Kuwaki, K.; Tseng, Y.-L; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Houser, S. L; Robson, S. C.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Sachs, D. H.; Colvin, R. B.; Shimizu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of α 1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) swine donors in discordant xenotransplantation has extended the survival of cardiac xenografts in baboons following transplantation. Eight baboons received heterotopic cardiac xenografts from GalT-KO swine and were treated with a chronic immunosuppressive regimen. The pathologic features of acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR), acute cellular xenograft rejection (ACXR) and chronic rejection were assessed in the grafts. No hyperacute rejection developed and one graft survived up to 6 months after transplantation. However, all GalT-KO heart grafts underwent graft failure with AHXR, ACXR and/or chronic rejection. AHXR was characterized by interstitial hemorrhage and multiple thrombi in vessels of various sizes. ACXR was characterized by TUNEL+ graft cell injury with the infiltration of T cells (including CD3 and TIA-1+ cytotoxic T cells), CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, macrophages and a small number of B and NK cells. Chronic xenograft vasculopathy, a manifestation of chronic rejection, was characterized by arterial intimal thickening with TUNEL+ dead cells, antibody and complement deposition, and/or cytotoxic T-cell infiltration. In conclusion, despite the absence of the Gal epitope, acute and chronic antibody and cell-mediated rejection developed in grafts, maintained by chronic immunosupression, presumably due to de novo responses to non-Gal antigens. PMID:19032222

  20. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labelled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labelling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111 leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  1. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labeling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111-leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients.

  2. Doppler spectrum analysis to diagnose rejection during posttransplant acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Merkus, J W; Hoitsma, A J; van Asten, W N; Koene, R A; Skotnicki, S H

    1994-09-15

    During posttransplant acute renal failure (ARF), the diagnosis of allograft rejection constitutes a major problem. We evaluated the value of Doppler ultrasonography in identifying grafts at risk of rejection during ARF. In 184 recipients of a renal allograft, Doppler examinations were performed on the first and fifth postoperative day. Doppler spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a user-written computer program. Doppler findings were not used in clinical decision making. ARF was defined as a diuresis < 400 ml/24 hr and/or the necessity for dialysis. Doppler spectra obtained on the first day after transplantation showed a resistance index (RI) of 0.59 +/- 0.09 in recipients with immediately functioning cadaveric grafts (n = 123), while living related donor grafts (n = 20) showed a lower RI (0.55 +/- 0.07; P < 0.05). Grafts with ARF (n = 41) showed a considerably higher RI (0.67 +/- 0.13; P < 0.05). When grafts with a duration of ARF < or = 4 days (n = 17) were compared with ARF > 4 days (n = 24), RI was not significantly different (0.63 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.68 +/- 0.15; NS). However, the acceleration time of the systolic deflection of the spectrum waveform (Tmax) was shorter in grafts with ARF > 4 days (86 +/- 47 msec vs. 128 +/- 39 msec; P < 0.05). On the fifth day after transplantation, Doppler spectra in grafts with ARF > 4 days (n = 24) showed a Tmax < 90 msec in 9 patients, 8 of whom experienced rejection during ARF (positive predictive value, 8/9 = 89%). In the 15 patients with Tmax > or = 90 msec, only 2 rejections occurred (negative predictive value, 13/15 = 87%). For the RI (> 0.85), positive predictive value was 4/5 = 80% and negative predictive value (RI < or = 0.85) was 13/19 = 68%. In conclusion, a short acceleration time of the Doppler waveform on the first day after transplantation is associated with a longer duration of ARF. Quantitative analysis of Doppler spectra can be helpful in the identification of patients at risk for rejection and in the

  3. Doppler tissue imaging for assessing left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in heart transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, S; Allemann, Y; Zimmerli, M; Lipp, E; Kucher, N; Mohacsi, P; Seiler, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that diastolic mitral annular motion velocity, as determined by Doppler tissue imaging and left ventricular diastolic flow propagation velocity, is related to the histological degree of heart transplant rejection according to the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT).
METHODS—In 41 heart transplant recipients undergoing 151 myocardial biopsies, the following Doppler echocardiographic measurements were performed within one hour of biopsy: transmitral and pulmonary vein flow indices; mitral annular motion velocity indices; left ventricular diastolic flow propagation velocity.
RESULTS—Late diastolic mitral annular motion velocity (ADTI) and mitral annular systolic contraction velocity (SCDTI) were higher in patients with ISHLT < IIIA than in those with ISHLT ⩾ IIIA (ADTI, 8.8 cm/s v 7.7 cm/s (p = 0.03); SCDTI, 19.3 cm/s v 9.3 cm/s (p < 0.05)). Sensitivity and specificity of ADTI < 8.7 cm/s (the best cut off value) in predicting significant heart transplant rejection were 82% and 53%, respectively. Early diastolic mitral annular motion velocity (EDTI) and flow propagation velocity were not related to the histological degree of heart transplant rejection.
CONCLUSIONS—Doppler tissue imaging of the mitral annulus is useful in diagnosing heart transplant rejection because a high late diastolic mitral annular motion velocity can reliably exclude severe rejection. However, a reduced late diastolic mitral annular motion velocity cannot predict severe rejection reliably because it is not specific enough.


Keywords: heart transplant rejection; diastolic function; Doppler tissue imaging; echocardiography PMID:11559685

  4. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoyou; Dong, Changgui; Jiang, Zhengyao; Wu, William K.K.; Chan, Matthew T.V.; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haibin; Qin, Ke; Sun, Xuyong

    2015-04-10

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11.

  5. Ferritin as an early marker of graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Feucht, Judith; Queudeville, Manon; Teltschik, Heiko-Manuel; Lang, Peter; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Handgretinger, Rupert; Müller, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of adverse events following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is mainly assigned to clinical symptoms or biopsies and thus rather unspecific and/or invasive. Studies indicate a distinct role of serum ferritin in HSCT and its correlation with adverse events such as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), veno-occlusive disease (VOD), or infections. However, published data on the relevance of ferritin as a prognostic marker for post-transplant adverse events is rare, especially in pediatric patients. The present study analyzes ferritin plasma concentrations of 138 pediatric patients after HSCT between 2007 and 2010 including the control group (n = 21). Given the initial results regarding ferritin as a significant predictor for acute graft rejection after allogeneic HSCT in 9 of the 138 pediatric patients, serum ferritin of all pediatric patients (n = 27) who experienced graft rejection between 2007 and 2014 was analyzed. In addition, laboratory parameters including C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), fibrinogen, and D-dimer as possible differentiation markers for graft rejection were determined. In 24 (88.9 %) of the 27 pediatric patients with graft rejection, a significant increase of ferritin levels was observed 1 to 7 days prior to (P < 0.0001) and at the time of graft rejection (P < 0.0001). Moreover, there was an increase of D-dimer, CRP, LDH, and fibrinogen 1-7 days before graft rejection. Ferritin increased significantly at time of VOD (P = 0.0067), at time of intestinal (P < 0.0001) and skin GvHD (P < 0.0001), and at time of sepsis (P = 0.0005) and bacteremia (P = 0.0029). Ferritin might serve as a readily available identification marker for differentiation and identification of adverse events after HSCT in combination with other laboratory markers. PMID:26611853

  6. Tacrolimus for the prevention and treatment of rejection of solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Scalea, Joseph R; Levi, Shoshana T; Ally, Winston; Brayman, Kenneth L

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction to the antirejection armamentarium in 1994, tacrolimus has become the workhorse of transplant professionals for avoidance of solid organ transplant rejection. Not only does tacrolimus have potent immunosuppressive qualities that prevent rejection, but dosing is straight forward and it is generally well tolerated. However, in the long term, conditions such as calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity can become a problem. A discussion of the compound, the pharmacokinetics, history, and current approved uses for tacrolimus is described. Indeed, tacrolimus is the most important drug for preventing transplant rejection. However, the increased appreciation for significant side effects, particularly in the long term, has led to building interest in new agents with different mechanisms of action and different metabolism.

  7. Acute Cardiac Rejection Requires Directly Cytotoxic CD4 T cells: A Parallel Pathway between Fas and Perforin1

    PubMed Central

    Grazia, Todd J.; Plenter, Robert J.; Weber, Sarah M.; Lepper, Helen M.; Victorino, Francisco; Zamora, Martin R.; Pietra, Biagio A.; Gill, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    Background CD4 T cells can suffice as effector cells to mediate primary acute cardiac allograft rejection. While CD4 T cells can readily kill appropriate target cells in vitro, the corresponding role of such cytolytic activity for mediating allograft rejection in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we determined whether the cytolytic effector molecules perforin and/or FasL (CD95L) were necessary for CD4 T cell-mediated rejection in vivo. Methods Wild type C3H(H-2k) or Fas (CD95)-deficient C3Hlpr (H-2k) hearts were transplanted into immune-deficient C57B6rag−/− (H-2b) mice. Recipients then were reconstituted with naïve purified CD4 T cells from either wild-type, perforin (pfp)-deficient, or FasL (gld)-deficient T cell donors. Results In vitro, alloreactive CD4 T cells were competent to lyse donor MHC class II+ target cells, largely by a Fas-dependent mechanism. In vivo, the individual disruption of either donor Fas expression (lpr) or CD4 T cell-derived perforin had no signifcant impact on acute rejection. However, FasL-deficient (gld) CD4 T cells demonstrated delayed allograft rejection. Importantly, the simultaneous removal of both donor Fas expression and CD4 T cell perforin completely abrograted acute rejection, despite the persistence of CD4 T cells within the graft. Conclusions Results demonstrate that the direct rejection of cardiac allografts by CD4 effector T cells requires the alternative contribution of graft Fas expression and T cell perforin expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that cytolytic activity by CD4 T cells can play an obligate role for primary acute allograft rejection in vivo. PMID:20061916

  8. Role of complement in graft rejection after organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Hack, C Erik

    2002-07-01

    Activation of the complement system may significantly contribute to the inflammatory reaction after solid organ transplantation. In allotransplantation, the complement system may be activated by ischemia/reperfusion and, possibly, by antibodies directed against the graft. In xenotransplantation from nonprimates to primates, the major activators for complement are preexisting antibodies. Studies in animal models have shown that the use of complement inhibitors may significantly prolong graft survival. This review describes the role of the complement system in organ injury after organ transplantation and the use of complement inhibitors to prevent damage to the graft after allo- or xenotransplantation.

  9. Protection against hyperacute xenograft rejection of transgenic rat hearts expressing human decay accelerating factor (DAF) transplanted into primates.

    PubMed Central

    Charreau, B.; Ménoret, S.; Tesson, L.; Azimzadeh, A.; Audet, M.; Wolf, P.; Marquet, R.; Verbakel, C.; Ijzermans, J.; Cowan, P.; Pearse, M.; d'Apice, A.; Soulillou, J. P.; Anegon, I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Production of transgenic pigs for multiple transgenes is part of a potential strategy to prevent immunological events involved in xenograft rejection. Use of a genetically engineerable rodent as a donor in primates could allow testing in vivo of the effects of different transgenes on controlling xenograft rejection. As a first step in the development of a donor containing multiple transgenes, transgenic rats for human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) were used as heart donors to test their resistance against complement (C)-mediated rejection by non-human primates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Transgenic rats were generated by using a construct containing the human DAF cDNA under the transcriptional control of the endothelial cell (EC)-specific human ICAM-2 promoter. DAF expression was evaluated by immunohistology and by FACS analysis of purified ECs. Resistance of transgenic hearts against C-mediated damage was evaluated by ex vivo perfusion with human serum and by transplantation into cynomolgus monkeys. RESULTS: Immunohistological analysis of DAF expression in several organs from two transgenic lines showed uniform expression on the endothelium of all blood vessels. ECs purified from transgenic hearts showed 50% DAF expression compared to human ECs and >70% reduction of C-dependent cell lysis compared to control rat ECs. Hemizygous transgenic hearts perfused with human serum showed normal function for >60 min vs. 11. 2 +/- 1.7 min in controls. Hemi- or homozygous transgenic hearts transplanted into cynomolgus monkeys showed longer survival (15.2 +/- 7 min and >4.5 hr, respectively) than controls (5.5 +/- 1.4 min). In contrast to hyperacutely rejected control hearts, rejected homozygous DAF hearts showed signs of acute vascular rejection (AVR) characterized by edema, hemorrhage, and an intense PMN infiltration. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that endothelial-specific DAF expression increased heart transplant survival in a rat-to-primate model of

  10. Differences in reporting of acute rejections between American and European publications of large immunosuppressive trials impair comparability of study results.

    PubMed

    Fleiner, F; Budde, K; Dragun, D; Hartmann, M; Neumayer, H H; Fritsche, L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the use of different definitions for acute rejection in recent large multicenter trials performed in America and Europe in order to assess whether systematic differences exist between both scientific cultures. We systematically selected recent publications on multicenter randomized controlled trials, investigating immunosuppressive regimens in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Publications included were classified according to the type of acute rejection reported: group 1 reported no or only one type of rejection rate (biopsy-proven or treated); group 2 reported information on both treated and biopsy-proven rates. Other potential factors (journal's impact-factor, study size) were compared within the subgroups. To determine the rates of treated but not biopsy-proven acute rejections, additional analyses were performed within subgroup 2. The reviewed publications were 24/44 (54.5%) European (E) and 20/44 (45.5%) American (A) origin. Eighteen of 44 publications reported no or only one type of rejection rate (group 1); 26 publications reported treated as well as biopsy-proven rates (group 2). Significantly more European publications reported both treated and biopsy-proven rates (E: 18/24 [75.0%] vs A: 8/20 [40.0%]; P = .019). Group 1 American papers were published in higher-ranked journals than European ones. The rate of blindly treated rejections did not differ significantly (A: 6.13% [range 0% to 12.8%] vs E: 8.43% [range 0% to 16.9%]) and the proportion of blindly treated rejections was slightly lower in American studies (A: 18.5% vs E: 26.5%). Our systematic review showed large discrepancies with a trend to report biopsy-proven rejection rates only in recent years.

  11. ACUTE APENDICITIS IN LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    da FONSECA-NETO, Olival Cirilo Lucena; LIMA, Heloise Caroline de Souza; de MELO, Paulo Sérgio Vieira; LEMOS, Roberto; LEITÃO, Laércio; AMORIM, Américo Gusmão; LACERDA, Cláudio Moura

    2016-01-01

    Background : Appendicitis is a common cause of emergency surgery that in the population undergoing organ transplantation presents a rare incidence due to late diagnosis and treatment. Aim : To report the occurrence of acute appendicitis in a cohort of liver transplant recipients. Methods : Retrospective analysis in a period of 12 years among 925 liver transplants, in witch five cases of acute appendicitis were encountered. Results : Appendicitis occurred between three and 46 months after liver transplantation. The age ranged between 15 and 58 years. There were three men and two women. The clinical presentations varied, but not discordant from those found in non-transplanted patients. Pain was a symptom found in all patients, in two cases well located in the right iliac fossa (40%). Two patients had symptoms characteristic of peritoneal irritation (40%) and one patient had abdominal distention (20%). All patients were submitted to laparotomies. In 20% there were no complications. In 80% was performed appendectomy complicated by suppuration (40%) or perforation (40%). Superficial infection of the surgical site occurred in two patients, requiring clinical management. The hospital stay ranged from 48 h to 45 days. Conclusion : Acute appendicitis after liver transplantation is a rare event being associated with a high rate of drilling, due to delays in diagnosis and therapy, and an increase in hospital stay. PMID:27120736

  12. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids.

  13. Rationale and design of the RIACT–study: a multi-center placebo controlled double blind study to test the efficacy of RItuximab in Acute Cellular tubulointerstitial rejection with B-cell infiltrates in renal Transplant patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute kidney allograft rejection is a major cause for declining graft function and has a negative impact on the long-term graft survival. The majority (90%) of acute rejections are T-cell mediated and, therefore, the anti-rejection therapy targets T-cell-mediated mechanisms of the rejection process. However, there is increasing evidence that intragraft B-cells are also important in the T-cell-mediated rejections. First, a significant proportion of patients with acute T-cell-mediated rejection have B-cells present in the infiltrates. Second, the outcome of these patients is inferior, which has been related to an inferior response to the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Third, treatment of these patients with an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) improves the allograft outcome as reported in single case observations and in one small study. Despite the promise of these observations, solid evidence is required before incorporating this treatment option into a general treatment recommendation. Methods/Design The RIACT study is designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group multicenter Phase III study. The study examines whether rituximab, in addition to the standard treatment with steroid-boli, leads to an improved one-year kidney allograft function, compared to the standard treatment alone in patients with acute T-cell mediated tubulointerstitial rejection and significant B-cell infiltrates in their biopsies. A total of 180 patients will be recruited. Discussion It is important to clarify the relevance of anti-B cell targeting in T-cell mediated rejection and answer the question whether this novel concept should be incorporated in the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Trial registration Clinical trials gov. number: NCT01117662 PMID:23101480

  14. [Immunglobulin levels after kidney transplantation and during rejection crisis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oppolzer, R; Schieler, K; Leithner, C; Pinggera, W; Wolf, A; Stummvoll, H; Singer, F

    1975-09-01

    In the first three weeks after kidney transplantation the patients were examined for daily changes in immunoglobulin levels. Only very seldom was a decrease of IgM detected in our patients who had undergone splenectomy. During half of the rejection crisis there were indeed short periods of increase (spikes) in immunoglobulins. These were observed always before or concomitantly with the clinical diagnosis of a rejection reaction. In order to determine the connection between immunoglobulin-spikes and an approaching rejection episode the general one-sided binominal test was used. A significant relation was established between IgM peaks and an approaching rejection crisis. No such relation could be found for the IgA peaks observed. The IgG globulins showed no consistent pattern during a transplantation rejection. A persistent fall of the IgG globulins was noted in the first ten days after renal allograft with the immunosuppressive regimen of an initial gramme of methylprednisolon and high dosage of azothioprine. A good correlation was observed with the simultaneous depression of serum albumin concentrations. As losses of protein in urine are minimal (already confirmed by other authors), it must be assumed that in the first place a high rate of catabolism and a restriction in the protein synthesis is responsible for the decrease in the IgG globulins and the serum albumins.

  15. Acute rejection in low-toxicity regimens: clinical impact and risk factors in the Symphony study.

    PubMed

    Frei, Ulrich; Daloze, Pierre; Vítko, Stefan; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Reyes-Acevedo, Rafael; Titiz, Izzet; Fricke, Lutz; Bernasconi, Corrado; Ekberg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The Symphony study assessed whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)-based regimens containing reduced doses of adjunct immunosuppressants could reduce toxicity while maintaining efficacy. Here, we examined the impact of acute rejection and associated risk factors. The incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection in the low-dose tacrolimus group was approximately half that of the standard-dose cyclosporine and low-dose cyclosporine groups, and a third of that in the low-dose sirolimus group. The low-dose cyclosporine group had more severe rejection episodes (≥grade II) compared with other groups. Acute rejection was associated with a 10 mL/min glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction and a 5.3% absolute increase in graft loss at 12 months. Overall, the highest GFR was found in both rejecters and non-rejecters receiving low-dose tacrolimus, both in an intent-to-treat analysis and in patients successfully treated according to the protocol. In Cox regression models, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches and expanded criteria donors increased the acute rejection risk, while recipient age, living related donor, and MMF dose were associated with a reduced risk. Acute rejection was associated with worse outcome but did not entirely explain the differences among the treatment groups. The 2 g MMF plus low-dose tacrolimus combination appears to be the most efficient of all regimens examined regardless of acute rejection.

  16. Clinical and pathological features of kidney transplant patients with concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy and rejection-associated endarteritis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Stephanie M; Chon, W James; Kim, Lisa; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinicopathologic features of concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy (PVN) and endarteritis due to rejection in renal allografts. METHODS: We searched our electronic records database for cases with transplant kidney biopsies demonstrating features of both PVN and acute rejection (AR). PVN was defined by the presence of typical viral cytopathic effect on routine sections and positive polyomavirus SV40 large-T antigen immunohistochemistry. AR was identified by endarteritis (v1 by Banff criteria). All cases were subjected to chart review in order to determine clinical presentation, treatment course and outcomes. Outcomes were recorded with a length of follow-up of at least one year or time to nephrectomy. RESULTS: Of 94 renal allograft recipients who developed PVN over an 11-year period at our institution, we identified 7 (7.4%) with viral cytopathic changes, SV40 large T antigen staining, and endarteritis in the same biopsy specimen, indicative of concurrent PVN and AR. Four arose after reduction of immunosuppression (IS) (for treatment of PVN in 3 and tuberculosis in 1), and 3 patients had no decrease of IS before developing simultaneous concurrent disease. Treatment consisted of reduced oral IS and leflunomide for PVN, and anti-rejection therapy. Three of 4 patients who developed endarteritis in the setting of reduced IS lost their grafts to rejection. All 3 patients with simultaneous PVN and endarteritis cleared viremia and were stable at 1 year of follow up. Patients with endarteritis and PVN arising in a background of reduced IS had more severe rejection and poorer outcome. CONCLUSION: Concurrent PVN and endarteritis may be more frequent than is currently appreciated and may occur with or without prior reduction of IS. PMID:26722657

  17. Increased BK viremia and progression to BK-virus nephropathy following high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin for acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Boonyapredee, Maytee; Knight, Kendral; Little, Dustin

    2014-06-01

    BK virus nephropathy and cellular rejection are common causes of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. The two can be difficult to distinguish on allograft biopsy and can be present simultaneously. Management of the patient with coexistent BK infection and rejection is complicated by the conflicting ideals of decreasing immunosuppression to treat the former and increasing immunosuppression to treat the latter. The authors present the case of a 57-year-old renal transplant recipient who underwent allograft biopsy 8 weeks post-transplant for evaluation of increased serum creatinine in the setting of BK viremia (BKV). Biopsy revealed Banff classification 1b acute cellular rejection, with insufficient evidence to diagnose BK virus-associated nephropathy. The patient was administered intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), with no other changes in immunosuppressive therapy. Plasma and urine BK increased exponentially following IVIG administration, and allograft function further deteriorated. Repeat biopsy showed overt BK viral nephropathy, and BKV and creatinine decreased only after reduction in immunosuppression and initiation of leflunomide. Although case series have suggested a potential role for IVIG in the setting of BK infection, further study is needed to define the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  18. Treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection using bortezomib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Joong Kyung

    2015-07-01

    Here we report the successful treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with bortezomib. Bortezomib rescue treatment was administered after a 42-year-old woman failed to respond to steroid pulse and plasmapheresis with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The patient underwent a second renal transplantation with a deceased donor kidney. She was treated pre-operatively with rituximab (200 mg/body) and underwent plasmapheresis twice (day-1 and operation day) because ELISA screening revealed that her pre-operative peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) composition was 100% class I and 100% class II and 15 times of cross-match positive history during the waiting period for transplantation. The patients received induction therapy with Simulect (an IL-2-blocking agent). A 1-hour protocol biopsy revealed C4d-positivity and mild peritubular capillary inflammation. This was suggestive of early AMR-associated changes. After transplantation, the patient underwent plasmaphereses (nine times) with low-dose IVIG (2 mg/kg). Despite this treatment regimen, serum creatinine levels increased to 3.4 mg/dL on post-transplant day 15. A second graft biopsy was performed, which showed overt AMR with glomerulitis, peritubular capillary inflammation and no C4d deposition. On post-operative day (POD) 22, treatment with four doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2) ) was initiated with the patient's consent. On POD 55, renal function had recovered and serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL. In summary, bortezomib was administered as a rescue treatment for a patient who developed AMR that was refractory to a combination of plasmaphereses with low-dose IVIG and preemptive administration of rituximab.

  19. Development of chronic allograft rejection and arterial hypertension in Brown Norway rats after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaskonen, T; Mervaala, E; Nevala, R; Soots, A; Krogerus, L; Lähteenmäki, T; Karppanen, H; Vapaatalo, H; Ahonen, J

    2000-01-01

    The cardiovascular and renal pathophysiology associated with chronic renal allograft rejection under triple drug immunosuppressive treatment was studied using a recently developed model (Brown Norway (BN) rats) in a 6-week experiment. Renal transplantation was performed to 10-week-old rats in a rat strain combination of Dark Agouti (DA) --> BN. The right kidney was removed from another group of BN rats (uninephrectomized). A triple drug treatment comprising cyclosporine (10 mg/kg subcutaneously, s.c.), azathioprine (2 mg/kg s.c.) and methylprednisolone (1.6 mg/kg s.c.) was given to each rat daily for 6 weeks. A control group underwent no operations nor drug treatment. After the transplantation, the systolic blood pressure in this group was increased from 116 +/- 2 to 166 +/- 2 mmHg, while in the uninephrectomized group the rise was from 115 +/- 4 to 146 +/- 4 mmHg, and no change was observed in the blood pressures of the control group. The vascular relaxation responses of mesenteric arterial rings in vitro to acetylcholine were inhibited in both the transplantation group and the uninephrectomized group as compared with the control group, but few significant differences were found in the contraction responses to noradrenaline and potassium chloride. Graft histology was examined after 6 weeks, quantified by using the chronic allograft damage index (CADI). Changes specific to a chronic rejection reaction were observed in the allografts (CADI mean 6.0) but no injuries were seen in the rats' own kidneys (CADI mean 1.2). Our findings show that allograft rejection in BN rats after renal transplantation is associated with the development of arterial hypertension. The combination of cyclosporine, methylprednisolone and azathioprine also rises blood pressure in uninephrectomized BN rats. The hypertensive effects of the drug treatment and graft rejection are associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Risk factors for rejection for morphological reasons of heart valves for transplantation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Marja J; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon; Bokhorst, Arlinke G

    2013-03-01

    The study aim was to identify risk factors for morphological rejection of aortic and pulmonary valves for transplantation that could be used to optimize donor selection. The files of all Dutch heart valve donors, donating in a 2.5 years period, whose hearts were processed at Heart Valve Bank Rotterdam, were reviewed for all factors that could be relevant for valve rejection and related to outcome of morphological assessment of the valves. Valves were retrieved from 813 deceased Dutch donors, 24.1% also donating organs. For 797 aortic and 767 pulmonary valves, who met retrieval criteria, morphological assessment was done. 69.5% of aortic and 37.5% of pulmonary valves were considered unsuitable for transplantation at morphological assessment. Backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, showed age, cardiac cause of death, cerebrovascular accident as cause of death or in medical history, and number of cardiovascular risk factors in a donor to be independent risk factors for morphological rejection of aortic valves. Age, sex, weight >100 kg and ruptured aortic aneurysm as cause of death were independent risk factors for morphological rejection of pulmonary valves. Being an organ donor was an independent predictor of morphological approval of aortic and pulmonary valves, while hypertension was an independent predictor for morphological approval of aortic valves. Thus, independent factors were identified that are associated with morphological rejection of aortic and pulmonary valves for transplantation, and that could be used to optimize donor selection by preventing unnecessary retrievals, limiting costs, while improving yield per donor with minimal compromise for availability.

  1. Rejection Triggers Liver Transplant Tolerance: Involvements of Mesenchyme-Mediated Immune Control Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Miwa; Joyce, Daniel; Miller, Charles; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2015-01-01

    Liver tolerance was initially recognized by the spontaneous acceptance of liver allograft in many species. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. We have been inspired by an unexpected phenomenon that the liver transplant tolerance absolutely requires interferon (IFN)-γ, a rejection-associated inflammatory cytokine. In this study, we investigate the rejection of liver allografts deficient in IFN-γ receptor and reveal that the liver graft is equipped with machineries capable of counterattacking the host immune response through a mesenchyme-mediated immune control (MMIC) mechanism. MMIC is triggered by T effectors (Tef) cell-derived IFN-γ to drive the expression of B7-H1 on graft mesenchymal cells leading to Tef cell apoptosis. We describe the negative feedback loop between graft mesenchymal and Tef cells that ultimately results in liver transplant tolerance. Comparable elevations of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are seen in both rejection and tolerance groups, and are not dependent on IFN-γ stimulation, suggesting a critical role of Tef cell elimination in tolerance induction. We identify potent MMIC activity in hepatic stellate cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. MMIC is unlikely exclusive to the liver, as spontaneous acceptance of kidney allografts has been reported, although less commonly, probably reflecting variance in MMIC activity. MMCI may represent an important homeostatic mechanism that supports peripheral tolerance, and could be a target for the prevention and treatment of transplant rejection. This study highlights that the graft is actively participant in the equipoise between tolerance and rejection and warrants more attention in the search for tolerance biomarkers. PMID:25998530

  2. Delayed Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4-Immunoglobulin Treatment Reverses Ongoing Alloantibody Responses and Rescues Allografts From Acute Rejection.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Chen, J; Miller, M L; Vu, V; Tian, C; Moon, J J; Alegre, M-L; Sciammas, R; Chong, A S

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as the leading cause of late graft loss in kidney transplant recipients, and inhibition of donor-specific antibody production should lead to improved transplant outcomes. The fusion protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4-Ig) blocks T cell activation and consequently inhibits T-dependent B cell antibody production, and the current paradigm is that CTLA4-Ig is effective with naïve T cells and less so with activated or memory T cells. In this study, we used a mouse model of allosensitization to investigate the efficacy of continuous CTLA4-Ig treatment, initiated 7 or 14 days after sensitization, for inhibiting ongoing allospecific B cell responses. Delayed treatment with CTLA4-Ig collapsed the allospecific germinal center B cell response and inhibited alloantibody production. Using adoptively transferred T cell receptor transgenic T cells and a novel approach to track endogenous graft-specific T cells, we demonstrate that delayed CTLA4-Ig minimally inhibited graft-specific CD4(+) and T follicular helper responses. Remarkably, delaying CTLA4-Ig until day 6 after transplantation in a fully mismatched heart transplant model inhibited alloantibody production and prevented acute rejection, whereas transferred hyperimmune sera reversed the effects of delayed CTLA4-Ig. Collectively, our studies revealed the unexpected efficacy of CTLA4-Ig for inhibiting ongoing B cell responses even when the graft-specific T cell response was robustly established. PMID:26928966

  3. Prediction of Renal Allograft Acute Rejection Using a Novel Non-Invasive Model Based on Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jin, Yunjie; Wu, Shengdi; Li, Long; Hu, Mushuang; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; He, Wanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse is a novel technology used to quantify tissue stiffness by measuring shear wave speed. A total of 115 kidney transplantation recipients were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were subdivided into two groups using 1 mo post-transplantation as the cutoff time for determining the development of acute rejection (AR). Shear wave speed was significantly higher in the AR group than in the non-AR group. We created a model called SEV, comprising shear wave speed, estimated glomerular filtration rate and kidney volume change, that could successfully discriminate patients with or without AR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SEV was 0.89, which was higher than values for other variables; it was even better in patients within 1 mo post-transplantation (0.954), but was lower than the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients after 1 mo post-transplantation. Therefore, the SEV model may predict AR after renal transplantation with a high degree of accuracy, and it may be more useful in the early post-operative stage after renal transplantation. PMID:27267289

  4. The correlation of intragraft cytokine expression with rejection in rat small intestine transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V; Farmer, D G; Kuniyoshi, J S; Robert, M; Khadavi, A; Shaked, A; Busuttil, R W

    1994-09-27

    Rejection continues to be a major cause of graft loss in small intestine transplantation (SIT). We have studied, by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (rtPCR), the intragraft expression of cytokines relevant to rejection in a rat model. Heterotopic SIT grafts were performed from Lewis x Brown Norway F1 donors into Lewis recipients. The isograft control was Lewis into Lewis. Five animals in each isograft and allograft group were sacrificed on POD 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. mRNA was isolated from portions of the terminal ileum and rtPCR performed to amplify message for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Semiquantitative analysis was performed using 32P radionuclide incorporation and scintillation counting. The results were expressed as percent activity compared with beta-actin. Histologic correlation with cytokine expression was made. On POD 3 after SIT there was no evidence of rejection by histology and all cytokines studied showed no difference between the isograft and the allograft. On POD 5 the first evidence of mild rejection was seen on histology and IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha showed a significant up regulation in the allograft that persisted through POD 14. mRNA for IL-2 was not significantly upregulated until POD 7 and persisted until POD 14. IL-2R was constitutively expressed in both isograft and allograft and was not a reliable predictor of rejection. Histologic rejection was moderately severe by POD 7 and severe between POD 8 and 14 correlating with the increasing expression of IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. In summary, we have shown that increasing expression of mRNA for IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha not only correlated with severity of rejection but that upregulation began early when histologic evidence of rejection first occurred. PMID:7940688

  5. Differentially Expressed RNA from Public Microarray Data Identifies Serum Protein Biomarkers for Cross-Organ Transplant Rejection and Other Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Sigdel, Tara K.; Li, Li; Kambham, Neeraja; Dudley, Joel T.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Klassen, R. Bryan; Chen, Amery; Caohuu, Tuyen; Morgan, Alexander A.; Valantine, Hannah A.; Khush, Kiran K.; Sarwal, Minnie M.; Butte, Atul J.

    2010-01-01

    Serum proteins are routinely used to diagnose diseases, but are hard to find due to low sensitivity in screening the serum proteome. Public repositories of microarray data, such as the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), contain RNA expression profiles for more than 16,000 biological conditions, covering more than 30% of United States mortality. We hypothesized that genes coding for serum- and urine-detectable proteins, and showing differential expression of RNA in disease-damaged tissues would make ideal diagnostic protein biomarkers for those diseases. We showed that predicted protein biomarkers are significantly enriched for known diagnostic protein biomarkers in 22 diseases, with enrichment significantly higher in diseases for which at least three datasets are available. We then used this strategy to search for new biomarkers indicating acute rejection (AR) across different types of transplanted solid organs. We integrated three biopsy-based microarray studies of AR from pediatric renal, adult renal and adult cardiac transplantation and identified 45 genes upregulated in all three. From this set, we chose 10 proteins for serum ELISA assays in 39 renal transplant patients, and discovered three that were significantly higher in AR. Interestingly, all three proteins were also significantly higher during AR in the 63 cardiac transplant recipients studied. Our best marker, serum PECAM1, identified renal AR with 89% sensitivity and 75% specificity, and also showed increased expression in AR by immunohistochemistry in renal, hepatic and cardiac transplant biopsies. Our results demonstrate that integrating gene expression microarray measurements from disease samples and even publicly-available data sets can be a powerful, fast, and cost-effective strategy for the discovery of new diagnostic serum protein biomarkers. PMID:20885780

  6. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Transplantation: Orchestrators of Rejection or Tolerance?

    PubMed

    Harmon, C; Sanchez-Fueyo, A; O'Farrelly, C; Houlihan, D D

    2016-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are highly heterogeneous innate lymphocytes with a diverse repertoire of phenotypes and functions. Their role in organ transplantation has been poorly defined due to conflicting clinical and experimental data. There is evidence that NK cells can contribute to graft rejection and also to tolerance induction. In most solid organ transplantation settings, the role of NK cells is only considered from the perspective of the recipient immune system. In contrast to other organs, the liver contains major resident populations of immune cells, particularly enriched with innate lymphocytes such as NK cells, NKT cells, and gamma-delta T cells. Liver transplantation therefore results in a unique meeting of donor and recipient immune systems. The unusual immune repertoire and tolerogenic environment of the liver may explain why this potentially inflammatory "meeting" often results in attenuated immune responses and reduced requirement for immunosuppression. Recent trials of immunosuppression withdrawal in liver transplant patients have identified NK cell features as possible predictors of tolerance. Here we propose that hepatic NK cells play a key role in the induction of tolerance post-liver transplant and examine potential mechanisms by which these cells influence liver transplant outcome.

  7. Monitoring of kidney and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation rejection by release of donor-specific, soluble HLA class I.

    PubMed

    DeVito-Haynes, L D; Jankowska-Gan, E; Sollinger, H W; Knechtle, S J; Burlingham, W J

    1994-07-01

    Using an HLA-A2-specific ELISA we monitored daily pretransplantation and posttransplantation sera from five kidney and eight simultaneous pancreas-kidney HLA-A2-negative recipients of HLA-A2-positive transplants during hospitalization. We found that, unlike liver transplants, neither kidney nor simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants continuously secreted donor HLA proteins. However, three of four rejection episodes in kidney recipients and seven of seven rejection episodes in simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients were accompanied by elevated serum levels of donor sHLA-A2 (> 5 ng/ml). In only one kidney patient was there a release of donor antigen without evidence of rejection, but in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney group most patients had at least one time point of detectable sHLA-A2 without strong evidence of kidney rejection. While total sHLA levels were also elevated during rejection, the rise in donor-specific sHLA was more dramatic when compared to pretransplantation background levels. We hypothesized that the release of donor sHLA class I proteins by transplanted organs might be a systemic indication of rejection in both pancreas and kidney allografts. The detection of donor sHLA in recipient sera could be an important noninvasive monitor of rejection, especially in the pancreas, which is currently difficult to monitor as a single-organ transplant. PMID:7960963

  8. Infusion of donor spleen cells and rejection in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Scornik, J C; Lauwers, G Y; Reed, A I; Howard, R J; Dickson, R C; Rosen, C B

    2000-02-01

    Intact or inactivated donor lymphoid cells have been found to downregulate the alloimmune response in a number of experimental models. We conducted a randomized, prospective, double blind, and placebo-controlled trial to determine whether heat-treated donor spleen cells would affect early rejection after liver transplantation. Donor spleen was obtained during organ procurement for 40 patients undergoing liver transplantation. All patients were treated with cyclosporine, azathioprine and steroids. The patients were randomized after surgery to receive either heat-treated (45 degrees C for 1 h) spleen cells or placebo. Patients underwent protocol biopsies at 1 wk, 4 and 12 months, or as needed. Biopsies were reviewed in a blind fashion and scored according to the Banff consensus criteria. Randomization resulted in 19 patients in the spleen cell group and 21 in the placebo group. One-yr graft survival was 94 and 100%, respectively. Early rejection was more frequent in the spleen cell group (61 vs. 35%, p, not significant). The histopathological rejection activity index at 7 d was also higher for the patients in the spleen cell group: 39% of spleen cell treated patients had a score of 4 or higher as opposed to 5% in the placebo group (p < 0.01). The mean score was 2.9 +/- 2.8 for the spleen cell group versus 1.3 + 1.7 for the placebo group (p = 0.034). It is concluded that heat-treated donor spleen cells given within 24 h after liver transplantation were not clinically beneficial and increased the intensity of rejection in 7-d protocol liver biopsies.

  9. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  10. Biological mechanism analysis of acute renal allograft rejection: integrated of mRNA and microRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ming; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Renal transplantation is the preferred method for most patients with end-stage renal disease, however, acute renal allograft rejection is still a major risk factor for recipients leading to renal injury. To improve the early diagnosis and treatment of acute rejection, study on the molecular mechanism of it is urgent. Methods: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profile and mRNA expression profile of acute renal allograft rejection and well-functioning allograft downloaded from ArrayExpress database were applied to identify differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs and DE mRNAs. DE miRNAs targets were predicted by combining five algorithm. By overlapping the DE mRNAs and DE miRNAs targets, common genes were obtained. Differentially co-expressed genes (DCGs) were identified by differential co-expression profile (DCp) and differential co-expression enrichment (DCe) methods in Differentially Co-expressed Genes and Links (DCGL) package. Then, co-expression network of DCGs and the cluster analysis were performed. Functional enrichment analysis for DCGs was undergone. Results: A total of 1270 miRNA targets were predicted and 698 DE mRNAs were obtained. While overlapping miRNA targets and DE mRNAs, 59 common genes were gained. We obtained 103 DCGs and 5 transcription factors (TFs) based on regulatory impact factors (RIF), then built the regulation network of miRNA targets and DE mRNAs. By clustering the co-expression network, 5 modules were obtained. Thereinto, module 1 had the highest degree and module 2 showed the most number of DCGs and common genes. TF CEBPB and several common genes, such as RXRA, BASP1 and AKAP10, were mapped on the co-expression network. C1R showed the highest degree in the network. These genes might be associated with human acute renal allograft rejection. Conclusions: We conducted biological analysis on integration of DE mRNA and DE miRNA in acute renal allograft rejection, displayed gene expression patterns and screened out genes and TFs that may

  11. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  12. Acute liver failure and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined by the presence of coagulopathy (International Normalized Ratio ≥ 1.5) and hepatic encephalopathy due to severe liver damage in patients without pre-existing liver disease. Although the mortality due to ALF without liver transplantation is over 80%, the survival rates of patients have considerably improved with the advent of liver transplantation, up to 60% to 90% in the last two decades. Recent large studies in Western countries reported 1, 5, and 10-year patient survival rates after liver transplantation for ALF of approximately 80%, 70%, and 65%, respectively. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which has mainly evolved in Asian countries where organ availability from deceased donors is extremely scarce, has also improved the survival rate of ALF patients in these regions. According to recent reports, the overall survival rate of adult ALF patients who underwent LDLT ranges from 60% to 90%. Although there is still controversy regarding the graft type, optimal graft volume, and ethical issues, LDLT has become an established treatment option for ALF in areas where the use of deceased donor organs is severely restricted. PMID:25343108

  13. Acute Renal Failure - A Serious Complication in Patients After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Bogdanovic, Lj; Radunovic, M; Prostran, M; Naumovic, R; Simic-Ogrizovic, S; Radojevic-Skodric, S

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury releases proinflammatory cytokines and activates innate immunity. It has been suggested that the early innate response and the ischemic tissue damage play roles in the development of adaptive responses, which may lead to acute kidney rejection. Various durations of hypothermic kidney storage before transplantation add to ischemic tissue damage. The final stage of ischemic injury occurs during reperfusion that develops hours or days after the initial insult. Repair and regeneration processes occur together with cellular apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis and a favorable outcome is expected if regeneration prevails. Along the entire transplantation time course, there is a great demand for novel immune and nonimmune injury biomarkers. The use of these markers can be of great help in the monitoring of kidney injury in potential kidney donors, where acute kidney damage can be overlooked, in predicting acute transplant dysfunction during the early post-transplant periods, or in predicting chronic changes in long term followup. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that biomarkers that have the highest predictive value in acute kidney injury include NGAL, Cystatin C, KIM-1, IL-18, and L-FABP. Most investigations show that the ideal biomarker to fulfill all the needs in renal transplant has not been identified yet. Although, in many animal models, new biomarkers are emerging for predicting acute and chronic allograft damage, in human allograft analysis they are still not routinely accepted and renal biopsy still remains the gold standard. PMID:27498898

  14. Diagnosing rejection in renal transplants: a comparison of molecular- and histopathology-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Kayser, N; Kaplan, B; Halloran, P F

    2009-08-01

    The transcriptome has considerable potential for improving biopsy diagnoses. However, to realize this potential the relationship between the molecular phenotype of disease and histopathology must be established. We assessed 186 consecutive clinically indicated kidney transplant biopsies using microarrays, and built a classifier to distinguish rejection from nonrejection using predictive analysis of microarrays (PAM). Most genes selected by PAM were interferon-gamma-inducible or cytotoxic T-cell associated, for example, CXCL9, CXCL11, GBP1 and INDO. We then compared the PAM diagnoses to those from histopathology, which are based on the Banff diagnostic criteria. Disagreement occurred in approximately 20% of diagnoses, principally because of idiosyncratic limitations in the histopathology scoring system. The problematic diagnosis of 'borderline rejection' was resolved by PAM into two distinct classes, rejection and nonrejection. The diagnostic discrepancies between Banff and PAM in these cases were largely due to the Banff system's requirement for a tubulitis threshold in defining rejection. By examining the discrepancies between gene expression and histopathology, we provide external validation of the main features of the histopathology diagnostic criteria (the Banff consensus system), recommend improvements and outline a pathway for introducing molecular measurements.

  15. The perfect storm: HLA antibodies, complement, FcγRs, and endothelium in transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kimberly A; Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multifaceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Abs) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. The histological manifestations of AMR reflect the signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient leukocytic infiltrate, and complement deposition. We review the interconnected mechanisms of HLA-Ab-mediated injury that might synergize in a 'perfect storm' of inflammation. Characterization of antibody features that are critical for effector functions may help to identify HLA-Abs that are more likely to cause rejection. We also highlight recent advances that may pave the way for new, more effective therapies. PMID:25801125

  16. Dose-related reversal of acute lung rejection by aerosolized cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Iacono, A T; Smaldone, G C; Keenan, R J; Diot, P; Dauber, J H; Zeevi, A; Burckart, G J; Griffith, B P

    1997-05-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of aerosolized cyclosporine as rescue therapy for refractory acute rejection in lung-transplant patients that is unresponsive to conventional therapy. Over 2 yr, nine allograft recipients with histologic evidence of persistent acute rejection and worsening pulmonary function were enrolled. Twenty-two patients with similar degrees of unremitting rejection served as historical controls. Aerosolization of cyclosporin A (300 mg in 4.8 ml propylene glycol) using an AeroTech II jet nebulizer was instituted daily for 12 consecutive days followed by a maintenance regimen of 3 d/wk. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus blood and plasma levels were maintained within therapeutic ranges throughout this trial. Efficacy was assessed by histologic grade of rejection, interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA expression by graft bronchoalveolar lavage cells, and pulmonary function testing before and during cyclosporine therapy. In seven patients, results were correlated to deposition of cyclosporine aerosol in the allograft(s) as measured by radioisotopic techniques. At a mean of 37 d after initiation of aerosolized cyclosporine, graft histology improved in eight of the nine patients. Cellular IL-6 mRNA expression decreased significantly in seven patients (mean IL-6/actin +/- SD, 40.96 +/- 118 versus 0.33 +/- 0.57 [p = 0.038]). Pulmonary function (FEV1), which had decreased posttransplant (over a mean of 347 d of observation) from a best value of 1.98 +/- 0.8 L to 1.59 +/- 0.6 L (p = 0.0077), improved over time (152 d) to a posttransplant value of 1.90 +/- 0.8 (p = 0.025). In the control subjects, FEV1 inexorably declined over a comparable period of observation (best posttransplant value 2.36 +/- 0.86 to 1.32 +/- 0.53, p < 0.0001). There was a strong correlation between cyclosporine deposition in the allograft and improvement in FEV1 (r = 0.900, p < 0.01). Fewer cycles of pulsed corticosteroids (1.4 +/- 0.9 versus 0.2 +/- 0.4, p = 0.011) and anti-thymocyte globulin 0

  17. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  18. The role of the graft endothelium in transplant rejection: evidence that endothelial activation may serve as a clinical marker for the development of chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Denton, M D; Davis, S F; Baum, M A; Melter, M; Reinders, M E; Exeni, A; Samsonov, D V; Fang, J; Ganz, P; Briscoe, D M

    2000-11-01

    In this review, we discuss the role of the allograft endothelium in the recruitment and activation of leukocytes during acute and chronic rejection. We discuss associations among endothelial activation responses, the expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors, and rejection; and we propose that endothelial vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may be used as a surrogate marker of acute rejection and allograft vasculopathy. In addition, we describe potential mechanistic interpretations of persistent endothelial cell (EC) expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in allorecognition. The graft endothelium may provide an antigen-specific signal to transmigrating, previously activated, T cells and may induce B7 expression on locally transmigrating leukocytes to promote costimulation. Taken together, these functions of the EC provide it with a potent regulatory role in rejection and in the maintenance of T-cell activation via the direct and/or the indirect pathways of allorecognition.

  19. Chronic transplantation immunity in newts: temperature susceptibility of an effector phase in allo-skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kinefuchi, Kenjiroh; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Johnouchi, Masato; Shimizu, Yuiko; Ohneda, Hikaru; Fujii, Masato; Hosono, Masamichi

    2011-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique due to their greatly reduced immune responsiveness compared to bony fishes, which show acute immune responsiveness. In newts, the mean survival time of allogenic skin grafts in the transplantation immunity was 48.8 ± 8.3 days at 25°C, suggesting that it occurs in a chronic manner. The graft rejection process was categorized into three stages: a latent stage with frequent blood circulation, or the immune induction phase; a vascular stoppage stage with dominant infiltrating cells of T cells; and a rejection stage showing the change of the dominant cells to monocytes/macrophages, probably as effector cells, tetntatively referred to as the immune effector phase. The immune induction phase is susceptible to the cyclophosphamide (CY) mitosis inhibitor, but not to a temperature shift from 18 to 27°C, while the immune effector phase is susceptible to temperature shifts, but not CY-treatment, although the temperature shift failed to shorten the graft survival time to less than 25 days, which nearly equals that of the secondary set of grafts where the lack of complete blood circulation is remarkable and graft rejection is resistant to CY-treatment. In contrast, a very low temperature (5-10°C) completely prevented effector generation in newts; in frogs, however, it is reported that such low temperatures did not prevent the generation of effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic responses in newts are due to effector cells other than cytotoxic T cells; possible effector cells are discussed.

  20. Maximum entropy, fractal dimension and lacunarity in quantification of cellular rejection in myocardial biopsy of patients submitted to heart transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, L. A.; Oliveira, F. R.; Peres, F. A.; Moreira, R. D.; Moriel, A. R.; de Godoy, M. F.; Murta Junior, L. O.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method for the quantification of cellular rejection in endomyocardial biopsies of patients submitted to heart transplant. The model is based on automatic multilevel thresholding, which employs histogram quantification techniques, histogram slope percentage analysis and the calculation of maximum entropy. The structures were quantified with the aid of the multi-scale fractal dimension and lacunarity for the identification of behavior patterns in myocardial cellular rejection in order to determine the most adequate treatment for each case.

  1. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  2. First-in-Human Study of the Safety and Efficacy of TOL101 Induction to Prevent Kidney Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Flechner, S. M.; Mulgoankar, S.; Melton, L. B.; Waid, T. H.; Agarwal, A.; Miller, S. D.; Fokta, F.; Getts, M. T.; Frederick, T. J.; Herrman, J. J.; Puisis, J. P.; O’Toole, L.; Sung, R.; Shihab, F.; Wiseman, A. C.; Getts, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    TOL101 is a murine IgM mAb targeting the αβ TCR. Unlike other T cell targets, the αβ TCR has no known intracellular signaling domains and may provide a nonmitogenic target for T cell inactivation. We report the 6-month Phase 2 trial data testing TOL101 in kidney transplantation. The study was designed to identify a dose that resulted in significant CD3 T cell modulation (<25 T cell/mm3), to examine the safety and tolerability of TOL101 and to obtain preliminary efficacy information. Thirty-six patients were enrolled and given 5–10 daily doses of TOL101; 33 patients completed dosing, while three discontinued after two doses due to a self-limiting urticarial rash. Infusion adjustments, antihistamines, steroids and dose escalation of TOL101 reduced the incidence of the rash. Doses of TOL101 above 28mg resulted in prolonged CD3 modulation, with rapid recovery observed 7 days after therapy cessation. There were no cases of patient or graft loss. Few significant adverse events were reported, with one nosocomial pneumonia. There were five biopsy-confirmed acute cellular rejections (13.9%); however, no donor-specific antibodies were detected. Overall TOL101 was well-tolerated, supporting continued clinical development using the dose escalating 21– 28–42–42–42mg regimen. PMID:24751150

  3. Rejection episodes.

    PubMed

    Koyama, H; Cecka, J M

    1992-01-01

    Based upon analyses of 40,671 kidney transplants reported to the UNOS Scientific Renal Transplant Registry between October 1987 and August 1992: 1. Twenty-four percent of the 21,923 recipients of first cadaver grafts experienced one or more rejection episodes during their transplant hospitalization, 52% during the first 6 months. At 12 months, only 40% of patients remained rejection-free. Patients who experienced any rejection during the first 6 months had a 72% 1-year graft survival rate compared with 95% for those who remained rejection-free (p < 0.001). 2. Recipients of transplants from living donors had a significantly lower incidence of rejection episodes. There was a clear effect of histocompatibility in comparing the incidence of rejection in HLA-identical sibling transplants (8% at discharge and 32% at 1 year) with that in 1-haplotype disparate transplants (22% at discharge and 52% at 1 year, p < 0.01 at each time point). Rejections were reported for 25% of transplants from other living donors at discharge and for 56% at 1 year, similar to the figures for cadaver transplants. 3. Histocompatibility also influenced the incidence of rejection in first cadaver-donor transplants. Only 15% of recipients of 0-HLA-A,B mismatched kidneys had rejection episodes reported at discharge, compared with 26% of those who received kidneys completely mismatched for HLA-A,B antigens (p < 0.01). At 1 year, 56% of HLA-A,B matched patients remained rejection-free, whereas only 35% of those mismatched for 4 antigens had no reported rejection through the first year (p < 0.01). Considering HLA-DR antigen mismatches, 19% of the 0-antigen mismatched group had rejection episodes at discharge, versus 28% for those with 2 HLA-DR mismatches (p < 0.01), and at 1 year, the percentage who were rejection-free decreased from 48% to 40% and 34% with 0, 1, and 2 HLA-DR mismatches, respectively. 4. The incidence of rejection episodes decreased as the recipient's age increased. Patients under age

  4. Evidence for Kidney Rejection after Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation Despite Ongoing Whole-blood Chimerism in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Swetha K; Page, Andrew; Farris, Alton B.; Singh, Karnail; Leopardi, Frank; Hamby, Kelly; Sen, Sharon; Polnett, Aneesah; Deane, Taylor; Song, Mingqing; Stempora, Linda; Strobert, Elizabeth; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is evidence linking hematopoietic chimerism-induction and solid organ transplant tolerance, the mechanistic requirements for chimerism-induced tolerance are not clearly elucidated. To address this, we used an MHC-defined primate model to determine the impact of impermanent, T cell-poor, mixed-chimerism on renal allograft survival. We compared two cohorts: one receiving a bone marrow + renal transplant (“BMT/renal”) and one receiving only a renal transplant. Both cohorts received maintenance immunosuppression with CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus. As previously demonstrated, this transplant strategy consistently induced compartmentalized donor chimerism, (significant whole-blood chimerism, lacking T cell chimerism). This chimerism was not sufficient to prolong renal allograft acceptance: the BMT/renal mean survival time (MST, 76 days) was not significantly different than the renal transplant alone MST (85 days, p= 0. 46), with histopathology documenting T-cell mediated rejection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed significant enrichment for CD28-/CD95+ CD4+ and CD8+ Tem cells in the rejected kidney, suggesting a link between CD28-negative Tem and costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. These results suggest that in some settings, transient T cell-poor chimerism is not sufficient to induce tolerance to a concurrently placed renal allograft and that the presence of this chimerism per se is not an independent biomarker to identify tolerance. PMID:22642491

  5. Expression of hemopexin in acute rejection of rat liver allograft identified by serum proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Tan, Changjun; Hu, Jinwu; Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Yan, Jun; Hu, Jie; Dai, Zhi; Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Huang, Xiaowu

    2014-07-01

    Acute rejection (AR) and acceptance of allograft after liver transplantation (LTx) remain critical issues that need addressing to improve prognosis. We therefore performed rat orthotopic LTx and proteomic analyses to screen for immune response-related biomarkers in sera. Markers identified were validated at the mRNA and/or protein levels, and the molecules of interest were functionally explored. Compared with syngeneic controls, signs of AR as well as spontaneous acceptance were observed in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of liver allografts. In accordance with the severity of AR, 30 protein spots displaying significant changes in abundance were identified using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis. Ultimately, 14 serum proteins were sequenced and five spots of interest were identified as hemopexin (HPX). Expression of HPX was significantly and inversely associated with the severity of AR at both the mRNA and protein levels. In vitro, Mt-1, Ho-1, Fth, Ifn-γ, and Il-17 transcripts were significantly upregulated in lysates of lymphocytes stimulated with HPX, whereas Il-10 markedly was remarkably downregulated. Interferon-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 proteins in the supernatant of HPX-stimulated lymphocytes were significantly altered in keeping with the mRNA level. Our data facilitated the generation of a proteomic profile to enhance the understanding of rat liver AR. In view of finding that the HPX serum level is negatively associated with the severity of AR of rat liver allograft, we propose that in vitro treatment with HPX regulates cytokine expression in rat lymphocytes.

  6. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  7. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  8. The Effect of ABO Blood Incompatibility on Corneal Transplant Failure in Conditions with Low Risk of Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Steven P.; Stark, Walter J.; Doyle Stulting, R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Pavilack, Mark A.; Smith, Patricia W.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Mannis, Mark J.; Holland, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether corneal graft survival over a five-year follow-up period was affected by ABO blood type compatibility in participants in the Cornea Donor Study undergoing corneal transplantation principally for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, conditions at low risk for graft rejection. Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, clinical trial Methods ABO blood group compatibility was determined for 1,002 donors and recipients. During a five-year follow-up period, episodes of graft rejection were documented, and graft failures were classified as to whether or not they were due to immunologic rejection. Endothelial cell density was determined by a central reading center for a subset of subjects. Results ABO donor-recipient incompatibility was not associated with graft failure due to any cause including graft failure due to rejection, or with the occurrence of a rejection episode. The five-year cumulative incidence of graft failure due to rejection was 6% for recipients with ABO recipient-donor compatibility and 4% for those with ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.25, p=0.20). The five-year incidence for a definite rejection episode, irrespective of whether graft failure ultimately occurred, was 12% for ABO compatible compared with 8% for ABO incompatible cases (p=0.09). Among clear grafts at five years, percent loss of endothelial cells was similar in ABO compatible and incompatible cases. Conclusions In patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, ABO matching is not indicated since ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk of transplant failure due to graft rejection. PMID:19056078

  9. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  10. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field.

  11. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. PMID:23462428

  12. Does hematopoietic stem cell transplantation benefit infants with acute leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Edward Allan R.; Brown, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). She has completed induction therapy and is currently in first complete remission (CR1). You are asked by your resident if hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) would benefit infants with acute leukemia. PMID:24319238

  13. Liver transplantation in acute-on-chronic liver failure: lessons learnt from acute liver failure setting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rajalingam, Rajesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a clinical entity with high risk of mortality. These patients can have severe liver dysfunction complicated with multiple organ failure. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for these patients. Literature regarding management of acute liver failure with special emphasis on liver transplantation was reviewed. Lessons learnt from the management of patients with acute liver failure which could be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure are discussed. Significant improvement in outcomes of acute liver failure has been reported across the world. Several aspects in transplantation for acute liver failure were found to be relevant to the management of acute-on-chronic liver failure. These include defining criteria to identify patients needing early liver transplantation, prioritizing patients with acute liver failure on the waiting list, defining when to abandon transplantation in acute liver failure, emphasis on graft quality and the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to manage multiple organ dysfunction. Useful lessons can be learnt from the progress made in the management of acute liver failure and these can be extrapolated to the management of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:25788191

  14. Chronic rejection of a lung transplant is characterized by a profile of specific autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Burton, Christopher M; Carlsen, Jørn; Steinbrüchel, Daniel; Andersen, Claus B; Sahar, Eli; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Iversen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) continues to be the major limitation to long-term survival after lung transplantation. The specific aetiology and pathogenesis of OB are not well understood. To explore the role of autoreactivity in OB, we spotted 751 different self molecules onto glass slides, and used these antigen microarrays to profile 48 human serum samples for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM autoantibodies; 27 patients showed no or mild bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS; a clinical correlate of OB) and 15 patients showed medium to severe BOS. We now report that these BOS grades could be differentiated by a profile of autoantibodies binding to 28 proteins or their peptides. The informative autoantibody profile included down-regulation as well as up-regulation of both IgM and IgG specific reactivities. This profile was evaluated for robustness using a panel of six independent test patients. Analysis of the functions of the 28 informative self antigens showed that eight of them are connected in an interaction network involved in apoptosis and protein metabolism. Thus, a profile of autoantibodies may reflect pathological processes in the lung allograft, suggesting a role for autoimmunity in chronic rejection leading to OB. PMID:20201985

  15. Treatment of steroid-resistant acute renal allograft rejection with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogen, M W F; Hesselink, D A; van Son, W J; Weimar, W; Hilbrands, L B

    2013-01-01

    Steroid-resistant renal allograft rejections are commonly treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (RATG), but alemtuzumab could be an effective, safe and more convenient alternative. Adult patients with steroid-resistant renal allograft rejection treated with alemtuzumab (15-30 mg s.c. on 2 subsequent days) from 2008 to 2012 (n = 11) were compared to patients treated with RATG (2.5-4.0 mg/kg bodyweight i.v. for 10-14 days; n = 20). We assessed treatment-failure (graft loss, lack of improvement of graft function or need for additional anti-rejection treatment), infections during the first 3 months after treatment and infusion-related side effects. In both groups, the median time-interval between rejection and transplantation was 2 weeks, and approximately 75% of rejections were classified as Banff-IIA or higher. Three alemtuzumab-treated patients (27%) experienced treatment failure, compared to eight RATG treated patients (40%, p = 0.70). There was no difference in the incidence of infections. There were mild infusion-related side-effects in three alemtuzumab-treated patients (27%), and more severe infusion-related side effects in 17 RATG-treated patients (85%, p = 0.013). Drug related costs of alemtuzumab-treatment were lower than of RATG-treatment (€1050 vs. €2024; p < 0.01). Alemtuzumab might be an effective therapy for steroid-resistant renal allograft rejections. In contrast to RATG, alemtuzumab is nearly devoid of infusion-related side-effects. These data warrant a prospective trial.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  17. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  19. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients - preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Zakliczyński, Michał; Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-03-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 - 11% vs. 7/15 - 47%; 6/65 - 9% vs. 6/15 - 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ(2) test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  20. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 – 11% vs. 7/15 – 47%; 6/65 – 9% vs. 6/15 – 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ2 test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  1. Immunosuppressive Total Lymphoid Irradiation-Based Reconditioning Regimens Enable Engraftment After Graft Rejection or Graft Failure in Patients Treated With Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Lang, Peter J.; Ottinger, Hellmut; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bamberg, Michael; Belka, Claus

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI)-based reconditioning regimens in patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: The results of 14 patients (7 adults and 7 children) with a variety of hematologic malignant diseases treated with a TLI-based reconditioning regimen with 7-Gy single-dose application plus anti-T-lymphocyte antibody OKT3 (n = 11) and/or antithymocyte globulin (n = 7)/fludarabine (n = 9), followed by an infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (n = 13) or bone marrow stem cells (n = 1) from related or unrelated donors, were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the 14 recipients, the data from 11 were evaluable for engraftment after TLI-based reconditioning because 3 adults died early (at Day 2, 5, and 15) after the second transplantation of infectious complications. Engraftment in 4 adults was seen after a median of 12 days (range, 10-18) and occurred after a median of 10 days (range, 9-32) in the 7 children. TLI-based reconditioning was well-tolerated with no severe toxicity. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for the whole cohort was 140 days (range, 5-1,268). After a median follow-up of 681 days, the disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 85.7% and 85.7%, respectively, in the children. Despite engraftment in the 4 remaining adults, 1 died of fatal graft-vs.-host disease, 1 of infectious complications, 1 of disease relapse, and 1 of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Conclusions: In patients with graft failure or graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, TLI-based reconditioning regimens allow sustained engraftment, paralleled by a favorable toxicity profile, potentially leading to long-term survival.

  2. Spontaneous rejection of intradermally transplanted non-engineered tumor cells by neutrophils and macrophages from syngeneic strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Minenori; Takahashi, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Shogo; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2011-10-01

    It is not surprising that tumors arising spontaneously are rarely rejected by T cells, because in general they lack molecules to elicit a primary T-cell response. In fact, cytokine-engineered tumors can induce granulocyte infiltration leading to tumor rejection. In the present study, we i.d. injected seven kinds of non-engineered tumor cells into syngeneic strains of mice. Three of them (i.e. B16, KLN205, and 3LL cells) continued to grow, whereas four of them (i.e. Meth A, I-10, CL-S1, and FM3A cells) were spontaneously rejected after transient growth or without growth. In contrast to the i.d. injection of B16 cells into C57BL/6 mice, which induces infiltration of TAMs into the tumors, the i.d. injection of Meth A cells into BALB/c mice induced the invasion of cytotoxic inflammatory cells, but not of TAMs, into or around the tumors leading to an IFN-γ-dependent rejection. On day 5, the cytotoxic activity against the tumor cells reached a peak; and the effector cells were found to be neutrophils and macrophages. The i.d. Meth A or I-10 cell-immunized, but not non-immunized, mice rejected i.p.- or i.m.-transplanted Meth A or I-10 cells without growth, respectively. The main effector cells were CTLs; and there was no cross-sensitization between these two kinds of tumor cells, suggesting specific rejection of tumor cells by CTLs from i.d. immunized mice. These results indicate that infiltration of cytotoxic myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and macrophages, but not TAMs) into or around tumors is essential for their IFN-γ-dependent spontaneous rejection.

  3. Endoscopic biopsy of islet transplants in the gastric submucosal space provides evidence of islet graft rejection in diabetic pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Fujita, Minoru; Bottino, Rita; Piganelli, Jon D; McGrath, Kevin; Li, Jiang; Lee, Whayoung; Iwase, Hayato; Wijkstrom, Martin; Bertera, Suzanne; Long, Cassandra; Landsittel, Douglas; Haruma, Ken; Cooper, David K C; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of islets into the gastric submucosal space (GSMS) has several advantages (e.g., avoidance of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory response [IBMIR], ability to biopsy). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoscopic biopsy of islet allografts transplanted into the GSMS in diabetic pigs can provide histopathological and immunohistochemical information that correlates with the clinical course (e.g.,, blood glucose level, insulin requirement). Islet allografts (Group1: 10,000 kIEq /kg [n = 4]; Group2: 15,000 kIEq /kg [n = 2]) were transplanted into the GSMS of diabetic pigs under immunosuppression. In Group2, the anti-oxidant, BMX-001 was applied during preservation, isolation, and culture of the islets, and at the time of transplantation. Endoscopic biopsies of the islet grafts were obtained one or 2 weeks after transplantation, and histopathological features were compared with the clinical course (e.g., blood glucose, insulin requirement). In Group1, in the absence of anti-oxidant therapy, most of the islets became fragmented, and there was no reduction in exogenous insulin requirement. In Group2, with an increased number of transplanted islets in the presence of BMX-001, more healthy insulin-positive islet masses were obtained at biopsy and necropsy (4 weeks), and these correlated with reductions in both blood glucose level and insulin requirement. In all cases, inflammatory cell infiltrates were present. After islet transplantation into the GSMS, endoscopic biopsy can provide information on graft rejection, which would be an immense advantage in clinical islet transplantation. PMID:26857703

  4. Liver transplantation as a cure for acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Soonawalla, Zahir F; Orug, Taner; Badminton, Michael N; Elder, George H; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Bramhall, Simon R; Elias, Elwyn

    2004-02-28

    Acute intermittent porphyria occasionally causes frequent and crippling acute neurovisceral attacks associated with increased hepatic production of porphyrin precursors, resulting in long-term damage, poor quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. There has been no cure for this condition, but replacement of deficient hepatic enzymes might restore excretion of porphyrin precursors to normal and prevent acute attacks. We aimed to treat severe acute intermittent porphyria in a 19-year-old woman by liver transplantation. After the transplant, concentrations of haem precursors in the patient's urine returned to normal, and 1.5 years later her quality of life was good. Our report suggests some hope of cure for selected patients with severe forms of this disease. PMID:15001330

  5. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  6. Haploidentical transplant with posttransplant cyclophosphamide vs matched unrelated donor transplant for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bacigalupo, Andrea A.; Bashey, Asad; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Aljitawi, Omar S.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Chen, Junfang; Devine, Steven M.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Luznik, Leo; Nakamura, Ryotaro; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Pingali, Sai Ravi; Porter, David L.; Riches, Marcie R.; Ringdén, Olle T. H.; Rocha, Vanderson; Vij, Ravi; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We studied adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after haploidentical (n = 192) and 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor (n = 1982) transplantation. Haploidentical recipients received calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), mycophenolate, and posttransplant cyclophosphamide for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis; 104 patients received myeloablative and 88 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Matched unrelated donor transplant recipients received CNI with mycophenolate or methotrexate for GVHD prophylaxis; 1245 patients received myeloablative and 737 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. In the myeloablative setting, day 30 neutrophil recovery was lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants (90% vs 97%, P = .02). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 93% and 96% (P = .25). In the myeloablative setting, 3-month acute grade 2-4 (16% vs 33%, P < .0001) and 3-year chronic GVHD (30% vs 53%, P < .0001) were lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants. Similar differences were observed after reduced intensity conditioning transplants, 19% vs 28% (P = .05) and 34% vs 52% (P = .002). Among patients receiving myeloablative regimens, 3-year probabilities of overall survival were 45% (95% CI, 36-54) and 50% (95% CI, 47-53) after haploidentical and matched unrelated donor transplants (P = .38). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 46% (95% CI, 35-56) and 44% (95% CI, 0.40-47) (P = .71). Although statistical power is limited, these data suggests that survival for patients with AML after haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide is comparable with matched unrelated donor transplantation. PMID:26130705

  7. Prevention of allograft rejection in heart transplantation through concurrent gene silencing of TLR and Kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xusheng; Zheng, Xiufen; Lan, Zhu; Shi, Jun; Jiang, Jifu; Zwiep, Terry; Li, Qing; Quan, Douglas; Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Min, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as initiators and conductors responsible for both innate and adaptive immune responses in organ transplantation. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is one of the most critical signaling kinases that affects broad aspects of cellular functions including metabolism, growth, and survival. Recipients (BALB/c) were treated with MyD88, TRIF and mTOR siRNA vectors, 3 and 7 days prior to heart transplantation and 7, 14 and 21 days after transplantation. After siRNA treatment, recipients received a fully MHC-mismatched C57BL/6 heart. Treatment with mTOR siRNA significantly prolonged allograft survival in heart transplantation. Moreover, the combination of mTOR siRNA with MyD88 and TRIF siRNA further extended the allograft survival; Flow cytometric analysis showed an upregulation of FoxP3 expression in spleen lymphocytes and a concurrent downregulation of CD40, CD86 expression, upregulation of PD-L1 expression in splenic dendritic cells in MyD88, TRIF and mTOR treated mice. There is significantly upregulated T cell exhaustion in T cells isolated from tolerant recipients. This study is the first demonstration of preventing immune rejection of allogeneic heart grafts through concurrent gene silencing of TLR and kinase signaling pathways, highlighting the therapeutic potential of siRNA in clinical transplantation. PMID:27659428

  8. Preformed class II donor-specific antibodies are associated with an increased risk of early rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Kaneku, Hugo; Jennings, Linda W; Bañuelos, Nubia; Susskind, Brian M; Terasaki, Paul I; Klintmalm, Göran B

    2013-09-01

    Preformed donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSAs) are considered a contraindication to the transplantation of most solid organs other than the liver. Conflicting data currently exist on the importance of preformed DSAs in rejection and patient survival after liver transplantation (LT). To evaluate preformed DSAs in LT, we retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected samples from all adult recipients of primary LT without another organ from January 1, 2000 to May 31, 2009 with a pre-LT sample available (95.8% of the patients). Fourteen percent of the patients had preformed class I and/or II DSAs with a mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ≥ 5000. Preformed class I DSAs with an MFI ≥ 5000 remained persistent in only 5% of patients and were not associated with rejection. Preformed class II DSAs with an MFI of 5000 to 10,000 remained persistent in 23% of patients, and this rate increased to 33% for patients whose MFI was ≥10,000 (P < 0.001). Preformed class II DSAs in multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling were associated with an increased risk of early rejection [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.58; p = 0.004]. In addition, multivariate modeling showed that in comparison with no DSAs (MFI < 1000), preformed class I and/or II DSAs with an MFI ≥ 5000 were independently correlated with the risk of death (HR = 1.51; p = 0.02).

  9. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  10. Participation of functionally active plasma cells in acute rejection and response to therapy in renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Zeenat Yousuf; Bostwick, David G; Hossain, Deloar; Zeng, Xu

    2014-07-01

    Acute rejection (AR) includes T-cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection. The inflammatory infiltrate comprised not only T cells but also varying amounts of B cells (CD20(+)) and plasma cells (CD138(+)). The latter are associated with poor clinical outcomes, but their functional status is not clear. The phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6RP) is present in cells that are metabolically active, thus identifying functionally active antibody-secreting plasma cells. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical significance of functionally active p-S6RP plasma cells in AR in renal allografts. Renal allografts with biopsy evidence of AR during 2006-2009 were included. Immunohistochemistry staining for CD20, CD138, and p-S6RP was performed on paraffin-embedded slides and scaled as 0-6. The response to antirejection treatment was assessed by the serum creatinine ratio (CrR) at rejection episode (time 0) and following treatment (4 and 12 weeks). Patients with lower scores (0-2) were compared with a higher scored group (3-6). The T-test was conducted using statistical significance of p<0.05. A total of 28 patients (40.7 ± 14.3 year; M:F=15:13) were diagnosed with acute T-cell-mediated rejection (I and II). The p-S6RP staining in the high-score group had a significantly higher CrR (p<0.05) than the low-score group at the time of biopsy, 4 and 12 weeks following treatment. There was no significant difference in the CrR between groups for CD20 or CD138 staining. Functional antibody-secreting p-S6RP plasma cells are actively participating in AR and associated with poor response to treatment in renal allografts. PMID:24684655

  11. Transplant Outcomes for Children with Hypodiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Eapen, Mary; He, Wensheng; Seber, Adriana; Gibson, Brenda; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Lehmann, Leslie; Vicent, Marta Gonzalez; Diaz Pérez, Miguel A.; Ayas, Mouhab; Qayed, Muna; Carpenter, Paul A.; Jodele, Sonata; Lund, Troy C.; Leung, Wing H.; Davies, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have inferior outcomes despite intensive risk adapted chemotherapy regimens. We describe 78 children with hypodiploid ALL who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between 1990 and 2010. Thirty nine (50%) patients had ≤ 43 chromosomes, 12 (15%) had 44 chromosomes and 27 (35%) had 45 chromosomes. Forty three (55%) patients were transplanted in first remission (CR1) while 35 (45%) were transplanted in ≥CR2. Twenty nine patients (37%) received a graft from a related donor and 49 (63%) from an unrelated donor. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The 5-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), relapse, and treatment related mortality (TRM) for the entire cohort were 51%, 56%, 27% and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that mortality risks were higher for patients transplanted in CR2 (HR 2.16, p=0.05), with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.15, p=0.05) and for those transplanted in the first decade of the study period (HR 2.60, p=0.01). Similarly, treatment failure risks were higher with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.28, p=0.04) and the earlier transplant period (HR 2.51, p=0.01). Although survival is better with advances in donor selection and supportive care, disease-related risk factors significantly influence transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865650

  12. Chimerism analysis in clinical practice and its relevance for the detection of graft rejection and malignant relapse in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Karin; Arvidson, Johan; Toporski, Jacek; Winiarski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism and clinical outcome data from 244 hematopoietic stem cell transplants in 218 children were retrospectively analyzed to assess their relevance for the detection of graft rejection and malignant relapse. Patients transplanted for a non-malignant disease had significantly higher proportions of residual recipient T cells in peripheral blood at one, three, and six months compared with patients transplanted for malignant disease. Recipient T-cell levels were below 50% at one month after transplantation in most patients (129 of 152 transplants). Graft rejection occurred more frequently in the group of patients with high levels of recipient cells at one month (10 graft rejections in the 23 patients with recipient T cells >50% at one month as compared to seven graft rejections occurred in 129 patients with recipient T cells <50% (p < 0.001). Multilineage chimerism data in 87 children with leukemia at one, three, and six months after transplantation were not correlated with subsequent relapse of malignant disease. In conclusion, early analysis of lineage-specific chimerism in peripheral blood can be used to identify patients who are at high risk of graft rejection. However, the efficacy of early chimerism analysis for predicting leukemia relapse was limited.

  13. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  14. Dynamic MRI-based computer aided diagnostic systems for early detection of kidney transplant rejection: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostapha, Mahmoud; Khalifa, Fahmi; Alansary, Amir; Soliman, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Early detection of renal transplant rejection is important to implement appropriate medical and immune therapy in patients with transplanted kidneys. In literature, a large number of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems using different image modalities, such as ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide imaging, have been proposed for early detection of kidney diseases. A typical CAD system for kidney diagnosis consists of a set of processing steps including: motion correction, segmentation of the kidney and/or its internal structures (e.g., cortex, medulla), construction of agent kinetic curves, functional parameter estimation, diagnosis, and assessment of the kidney status. In this paper, we survey the current state-of-the-art CAD systems that have been developed for kidney disease diagnosis using dynamic MRI. In addition, the paper addresses several challenges that researchers face in developing efficient, fast and reliable CAD systems for the early detection of kidney diseases.

  15. β-cell-targeted blockage of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways prevents development of autoimmune diabetes and acute allogeneic islets rejection

    PubMed Central

    El Khatib, Moustafa; Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M.; Mohamed, Magid S.; Holditch, Sara J.; Lu, Brian; Kudva, Yogish C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Protection of beta cells from autoimmune destruction potentially cures type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). During antigen presentation, interactions between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and B7 molecules, or programmed death 1 (PD1) and its ligand PDL1, negatively regulate immune responses in a non-redundant manner. Here, we employed beta cell-targeted adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-based vectors to over-express an artificial PDL1-CTLA4Ig polyprotein or IL10. Beta cell-targeted expression of PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 preserved beta cell mass and protected NOD mice from T1D development. When NOD mice were treated with vectors at early onset of hyperglycemia, PDL1-CTLA4Ig or IL10 alone failed to normalize the early onset of hyperglycemia. When drug-induced diabetic mice received MHC-matched allo-islets, with or without pretreatment of the PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing vector, PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing islets were protected from rejection for at least 120 days. Similarly, transplantation of PDL1-CTLA4Ig-expressing MHC-matched islets into mice with established T1D resulted in protection of allo-islets from acute rejection, although islet grafts were eventually rejected. Thus, the present study demonstrates the potent immuno-suppressive effects of beta cell-targeted PDL1-CTLA4Ig overexpression against T1D development and allo-islet rejection. The gene-based simultaneous inhibition of PD1 and CTLA4 pathways provides a unique strategy for immunosuppression-free tissue/organ transplantation, especially in the setting of no established autoimmunity. PMID:25786871

  16. [Painless anterior acute myocardial infarction in a transplanted heart].

    PubMed

    Poyet, R; Capilla, E; Tortat, A V; Brocq, F X; Pons, F; Kerebel, S; Jego, C; Cellarier, G R

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is the major determinant of long-term survival in patients after heart transplantation. Clinical presentations are congestive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Acute coronary syndrome is a rare presentation of cardiac allograft vasculopathy due to myocardial denervation. We present the case of a 31-year-old patient, who had undergone heart transplantation 6 months earlier and who developed a painless anterior myocardial infarction revealed by syncope. He was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary intervention with drug eluting stent implantation. PMID:26472502

  17. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  18. Acute kidney transplant failure following transurethral bladder polyp fulguration.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Bradley H.; Marroquin, Carlos E.; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Kuo, Paul C.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Butterly, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction and anastomotic leak represent the most common urologic complications of kidney transplantation. Delay in diagnosis or treatment can lead to allograft loss. Obstruction of the ureter occurs in 2% of kidney transplant recipients. Although the majority of cases are immediate technical complications of the operation, subsequent manipulation of the genitourinary system can result in iatrogenic ureteral injury. We report the case of a long-term kidney transplant recipient who developed obstructive uropathy and acute renal failure requiring dialysis after undergoing cystoscopy and bladder polyp fulguration. The etiology was inadvertent thermal injury of the ureteroneocystostomy incurred during the procedure. After attempted percutaneous management, definitive open repair resulted in a return of allograft function to baseline. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15779509

  19. Decreased humoral antibody episodes of acute renal allograft rejection in recipients expressing the HLA-DQβ1*0202 allele.

    PubMed

    Mannam, Venkat K R; Santos, Mark; Lewis, Robert E; Cruse, Julius M

    2012-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to show the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecular allelic specificities in the recipient on the induction of humoral antibody rejection, identified by C4d peritubular capillary staining, as well as specific antibody identified by Luminex technology. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed on dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes and they present antigenic peptides to CD4 positive T lymphocytes. Human renal peritubular and glomerular capillaries express class II MHC molecules upon activation. Expression of class II molecules on renal microvascular endothelial cells exposes them to possible interaction with specific circulating antibodies. We hypothesize that HLA-DQβ1*0202 expression in recipients decreases the likelihood of antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection. We found that 80% (=25) of DQ2 positive haplotype recipients failed to induce humoral antibody renal allograft rejection and 20% (n=25) of DQ2 positive haplotype recipients induced humoral antibody renal allograft rejection (p=0.008). By contrast, 48% (n=46) of DQ2 negative haplotype recipients failed to induce a humoral antibody component of renal allograft rejection and 52% (n=46) of DQ2 negative haplotype recipients induced humoral antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection. Our results suggest that recipients who express the DQβ1*0202 allele are less likely to induce a humoral antibody component of acute renal allograft rejection than are those expressing DQ1, DQ3, or DQ4 alleles. DQβ1*0202 allele expression in recipients could possibly be protective against acute humoral allograft rejection and might serve as a future criterion in recipient selection and in appropriate therapy for acute renal rejection episodes.

  20. Liver Transplantation after Exertional Heatstroke-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exertional heatstroke (EHS) is a life-threatening disease characterized clinically by central nervous system dysfunction and severe hyperthermia. It frequently occurs among athletes, soldiers, and laborers. While cardiopulmonary symptoms are common in patients undergoing EHS, irreversible acute liver failure is a rarely described phenomenon. When managing cases of EHS complicated by acute liver failure, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. However, an urgent liver transplantation can be a therapeutic strategy when patients fail to improve with supportive measures. PMID:27738568

  1. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  2. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  3. Renal and Cardiac Endothelial Heterogeneity Impact Acute Vascular Rejection in Pig-to-Baboon Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Knosalla, C.; Yazawa, K.; Behdad, A.; Bodyak, N.; Shang, H.; Bühler, L.; Houser, S.; Gollackner, B.; Griesemer, A.; Schmitt-Knosalla, I.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Awwad, M.; Sachs, D. H.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Yamada, K.; Usheva, A.; Robson, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Xenograft outcomes are dictated by xenoantigen expression, for example, Gal α 1, 3Gal (Gal), but might also depend on differing vascular responses. We investigated whether differential vascular gene expression in kidney and cardiac xenografts correlate with development of thrombotic microangiopathy (TM) and consumptive coagulation (CC). Immunosuppressed baboons underwent miniswine or hDAF pig kidney (n = 6) or heart (n = 7), or Gal-transferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) (thymo)kidney transplantation (n = 14). Porcine cDNA miniarrays determined donor proinflammatory, apoptosis-related and vascular coagulant/fibrinolytic gene expression at defined time points; validated by mRNA, protein levels and immunopathology. hDAF-transgenic and GalT-KO xenografts, (particularly thymokidneys) exhibited prolonged survival. CC was seen with Gal-expressing porcine kidneys (3 of 6), only 1 of 7 baboons post-cardiac xenotransplantation and was infrequent following GalT-KO grafts (1 of 14). Protective-type genes (heme oxygenase-I, superoxide dismutases and CD39) together with von Willebrand factor and P-selectin were upregulated in all renal grafts. Transcriptional responses in Gal-expressing xenografts were comparable to those seen in the infrequent GalT-KO rejection. In cardiac xenografts, fibrin deposition was associated with increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression establishing that gene expression profiles in renal and cardiac xenografts differ in a quantitative manner. These findings suggest that therapeutic targets may differ for renal and cardiac xenotransplants. PMID:19422330

  4. Controlling immune rejection is a fail-safe system against potential tumorigenicity after human iPSC-derived neural stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Go; Kobayashi, Yoshiomi; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki; Takano, Morito; Iwanami, Akio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work reported functional recovery after transplantation of mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (hiPSC-NS/PCs) into rodent models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although hiPSC-NS/PCs proved useful for the treatment of SCI, the tumorigenicity of the transplanted cells must be resolved before they can be used in clinical applications. The current study sought to determine the feasibility of ablation of the tumors formed after hiPSC-NS/PC transplantation through immunoregulation. Tumorigenic hiPSC-NS/PCs were transplanted into the intact spinal cords of immunocompetent BALB/cA mice with or without immunosuppressant treatment. In vivo bioluminescence imaging was used to evaluate the chronological survival and growth of the transplanted cells. The graft survival rate was 0% in the group without immunosuppressants versus 100% in the group with immunosuppressants. Most of the mice that received immunosuppressants exhibited hind-limb paralysis owing to tumor growth at 3 months after iPSC-NS/PC transplantation. Histological analysis showed that the tumors shared certain characteristics with low-grade gliomas rather than with teratomas. After confirming the progression of the tumors in immunosuppressed mice, the immunosuppressant agents were discontinued, resulting in the complete rejection of iPSC-NS/PC-derived masses within 42 days after drug cessation. In accordance with the tumor rejection, hind-limb motor function was recovered in all of the mice. Moreover, infiltration of microglia and lymphocytes was observed during the course of tumor rejection, along with apoptosis of iPSC-NS/PC-generated cells. Thus, immune rejection can be used as a fail-safe system against potential tumorigenicity after transplantation of iPSC-NS/PCs to treat SCI.

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events.

  6. A systematic review of the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth; Curran, Simon P; John, Rohan; Tricco, Andrea C; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Laupacis, Andreas; Tinckam, Kathryn; Sis, Banu; Beyene, Joseph; Logan, Alexander G; Kim, S Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a systematic review of the literature to re-evaluate the role of C4d in the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts. Electronic databases were searched until September 2013. Eligible studies allowed derivation of diagnostic tables for the performance of C4d by immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry with comparison to histopathological features of acute antibody-mediated rejection and/or donor-specific antibody (DSA) assays. Of 3492 unique abstracts, 29 studies encompassing 3485 indication and 868 surveillance biopsies were identified. Assessment of C4d by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry exhibited slight to moderate agreement with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, solid-phase DSA assays, DSA with glomerulitis, and DSA with peritubular capillaritis. The sensitivity and specificity of C4d varied as a function of C4d and comparator test thresholds. Prognostically, the presence of C4d was associated with inferior allograft survival compared with DSA or histopathology alone. Thus, our findings support the presence of complement-dependent and -independent phenotypes of acute antibody-mediated rejection. Whether the presence of C4d in combination with histopathology or DSA should be considered for the diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection warrants further study. PMID:24827778

  7. Early recipient chimerism testing in the T- and NK-cell lineages for risk assessment of graft rejection in pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Breuer, S; Preuner, S; Fritsch, G; Daxberger, H; Koenig, M; Poetschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Peters, C; Mann, G; Lion, T; Matthes-Martin, S

    2012-03-01

    Timely diagnosis of impending graft rejection is crucial for effective therapeutic intervention after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We have investigated the predictive potential of early leukocyte subset-specific chimerism for graft loss in children undergoing SCT. In total, 192 pediatric patients transplanted for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases after reduced-intensity or myeloablative conditioning were investigated. Surveillance of lineage-specific chimerism was initiated upon first appearance of leukocyte counts amenable to cell sorting. Graft rejection occurred in 23 patients between 24 and 492 days post-transplant (median 63 days). The first chimerism analysis of T and NK cells performed at a median of 20 days after SCT identified three different risk groups that were independent from the conditioning regimen: recipient chimerism (RC) levels in T cells below 50% indicated a very low risk of rejection (1.4%), whereas high levels of RC (>90%) both in T and NK cells heralded graft loss in the majority of patients (90%) despite therapeutic interventions. RC >50% in T cells and ≤90% in NK cells defined an intermediate-risk group in which timely immunotherapy frequently prevented rejection. Early assessment of T- and NK-cell chimerism can therefore be instrumental in the risk assessment and therapeutic management of imminent graft rejection.

  8. Relationship between European Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in Patients with Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-SOUSA, María Angeles; TAMAYO, Eduardo; GUZMÁN-FULGENCIO, María; FERNÁNDEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, Amanda; HEREDIA-RODRIGUEZ, María; GARCÍA-ÁLVAREZ, Mónica; BERMEJO-MARTIN, Jesús F; PINEDA-TENOR, Daniel; RUIZ-GRANADO, Patricia; ALVAREZ-FUENTE, Elisa; GÓMEZ-SANCHEZ, Esther; GÓMEZ-HERRERAS, José I; RESINO, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  9. Relationship between European mitochondrial haplogroups and chronic renal allograft rejection in patients with kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sousa, María Angeles; Tamayo, Eduardo; Guzmán-Fulgencio, María; Fernández-Rodríguez, Amanda; Heredia-Rodriguez, María; García-Álvarez, Mónica; Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F; Pineda-Tenor, Daniel; Ruiz-Granado, Patricia; Alvarez-Fuente, Elisa; Gómez-Sanchez, Esther; Gómez-Herreras, José I; Resino, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  10. Expression of NF-kappaB and cytokines in chronic rejection of transplanted murine heart.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. R.; Seok, C. J.; Kim, J. S.; Chang, J. M.; Seo, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The heart transplantation-associated accelerated graft arteriosclerosis (AGAS) is one of the major causes of cardiac allograft failure. We investigated the early time-course of expresssion patterns of cytokines, transcription factor, and its inhibitor in the intraabdominally transplanted mice hearts that differed only in the D locus of class I histocompatibility antigen. The allograft hearts were harvested at 1-3, 5, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days after the transplantation, and the expressions of NF-kappaB/I-kappaB and cytokines (TNF-alpha, INF-gamma) were examined in these specimens. The expressions of TNF-alpha and INF-gamma were observed on day 1, peaking on day 5 and 7, respectively. Activated NF-kappaB (p65) expression was present on the cytoplasm and perinuclear area in the endothelial cells of coronary arteries on day 1. The peak of translocation of NF-B from cytoplasm to nucleus appeared on day 5 in the endothelial cells, myocytes, and leukocytes within the vessels, and remained elevated until day 42. The I-kappaB expression gradually increased from day 1 until day 5, but a remarkable decrease was detected on day 7. Our data suggest that the increased expressions of NF-kappaB/I-kappaB and cytokines (TNF-alpha, INF-gamma) play an important role in inducing immune responses in the donor allograft heart and hence the blockage of the expressions might be mandatory to avoid a potential graft failure. PMID:11511783

  11. Liver transplantation with deceased ABO-incompatible donors is life-saving but associated with increased risk of rejection and post-transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Trygve; Dahlgren, Ulrika S; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Grzyb, Krzysztof; Karlsen, Tom H; Boberg, Kirsten M; Rydberg, Lennart; Naper, Christian; Foss, Aksel; Bennet, William

    2015-07-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) liver transplantation (LT) with deceased donor organs is performed occasionally when no ABO-compatible (ABOc) graft is available. From 1996 to 2011, 61 ABOi LTs were performed in Oslo and Gothenburg. Median patient age was 51 years (range 13-75); 33 patients were transplanted on urgent indications, 13 had malignancy-related indications, and eight received ABOi grafts for urgent retransplantations. Median donor age was 55 years (range 10-86). Forty-four patients received standard triple immunosuppression with steroids, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, and forty-four patients received induction with IL-2 antagonist or anti-CD20 antibody. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 0-200). The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient survival (PS) and graft survival (GS) were 85/71%, 79/57%, 75/55%, and 59/51%, respectively, compared to 90/87%, 84/79%, 79/73%, and 65/60% for all other LT recipients in the same period. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year GS for A2 grafts were 81%, 67%, 62%, and 57%, respectively. In conclusion, ABOi LT performed with non-A2 grafts is associated with inferior graft survival and increased risk of rejection, vascular and biliary complications. ABOi LT with A2 grafts is associated with acceptable graft survival and can be used safely in urgent cases.

  12. High Risk Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: To Transplant or Not to Transplant?

    PubMed Central

    Pulsipher, Michael A.; Peters, Christina; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Because survival with both chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) approaches to high risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally improves through the years, regular comparisons of outcomes with either approach for a given indication are needed to decide when HSCT is indicated. Improvements in risk classification are allowing clinicians to identify patients at high risk for relapse early in their course of therapy. Whether patients defined as high risk by new methods will benefit from HSCT requires careful testing. Standardization and improvement of transplant approaches has led to equivalent survival outcomes with matched sibling and well-matched unrelated donors, however, survival using mismatched and haploidentical donors is generally worse. Trials comparing chemotherapy and HSCT must obtain sufficient data about therapy and stratify the analysis to assess the outcomes of best-chemotherapy with best-HSCT approaches. PMID:21195303

  13. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  14. Risk factors for relapse after allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J.W.M.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal neoplasm derived from myeloid progenitor cells with a varying outcome. The initial goal of treatment is the achievement of complete remission, defined for over 40 years by morphology. However, without additional post-remission treatment the majority of patients relapse. In many cases of acute myeloid leukemia, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers the best prospects of cure. In 2013, 5608 stem cell transplantations in acute myeloid leukemia were performed in Europe (5228 allogeneic and 380 autologous stem cell transplantations). Most stem cell transplantations are performed in first complete remission. However, despite a considerable reduction in the chance of relapse, in most studies, overall survival benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is modest due to substantial non-relapse mortality. Here we discuss the many factors related to the risk of relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26721801

  15. Two-stage, in silico deconvolution of the lymphocyte compartment of the peripheral whole blood transcriptome in the context of acute kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Casey P; Balshaw, Robert; Ng, Raymond T; Wilson-McManus, Janet E; Keown, Paul; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M; Landsberg, David; Isbel, Nicole M; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major complication of solid organ transplantation that prevents the long-term assimilation of the allograft. Various populations of lymphocytes are principal mediators of this process, infiltrating graft tissues and driving cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Understanding the lymphocyte-specific biology associated with rejection is therefore critical. Measuring genome-wide changes in transcript abundance in peripheral whole blood cells can deliver a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue significantly affects the sensitivity and interpretability of traditional analyses, however. Experimental separation of cell types is an obvious solution, but is often impractical and, more worrying, may affect expression, leading to spurious results. Statistical deconvolution of the cell type-specific signal is an attractive alternative, but existing approaches still present some challenges, particularly in a clinical research setting. Obtaining time-matched sample composition to biologically interesting, phenotypically homogeneous cell sub-populations is costly and adds significant complexity to study design. We used a two-stage, in silico deconvolution approach that first predicts sample composition to biologically meaningful and homogeneous leukocyte sub-populations, and then performs cell type-specific differential expression analysis in these same sub-populations, from peripheral whole blood expression data. We applied this approach to a peripheral whole blood expression study of kidney allograft rejection. The patterns of differential composition uncovered are consistent with previous studies carried out using flow cytometry and provide a relevant biological context when interpreting cell type-specific differential expression results. We identified cell type-specific differential expression in a variety of leukocyte sub-populations at the time of rejection. The tissue-specificity of these differentially

  16. High proportion of CD95(+) and CD38(+) in cultured CD8(+) T cells predicts acute rejection and infection, respectively, in kidney recipients.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Esther; Castro, María José; Allende, Luís M; Talayero, Paloma; Brunet, Mercè; Millán, Olga; Guirado, Luís; López-Hoyos, Marcos; San Segundo, David; Rodrigo, Emilio; Muñoz, Pedro; Boix Giner, Francisco; Llorente Viñas, Santiago; Muro-Amador, Manuel; Paz-Artal, Estela

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find noninvasive T-cell markers able to predict rejection or infection risk after kidney transplantation. We prospectively examined T-lymphocyte subsets after cell culture stimulation (according to CD38, CD69, CD95, CD40L, and CD25 expression) in 79 first graft recipients from four centers, before and after transplantation. Patients were followed up for one year. Patients who rejected within month-1 (n=10) showed high pre-transplantation and week-1 post-transplantation percentages of CD95(+), in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells (P<0.001 for all comparisons). These biomarkers conferred independent risk for early rejection (HR:5.05, P=0.061 and HR:75.31, P=0.004; respectively). The cut-off values were able to accurately discriminate between rejectors and non-rejectors and Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly different free-of-rejection time rates (P<0.005). Patients who rejected after the month-1 (n=4) had a higher percentage of post-transplantation CD69(+) in CD8(+) T-cells than non-rejectors (P=0.002). Finally, patients with infection (n=41) previously showed higher percentage of CD38(+) in CD8(+) T-cells at all post-transplantation times evaluated, being this increase more marked in viral infections. A cut-off of 59% CD38(+) in CD8(+) T-cells at week-1, week-2 and month-2 reached 100% sensitivity for the detection of subsequent viral infections. In conclusion, predictive biomarkers of rejection and infection risk after transplantation were detected that could be useful for the personalized care of kidney recipients.

  17. Lyt phenotype of H-2b CTL effectors and precursors specific for the SV40 transplantation rejection antigen.

    PubMed

    Flyer, D C; Anderson, R W; Tevethia, S S

    1982-12-01

    The immune effector cells mediating the in vitro immune response to the SV40 transplantation rejection antigen were characterized by using monoclonal antibody directed against lymphocyte differentiation (Lyt) antigens. Two distinct T lymphocyte populations were found to be responsible for the in vitro lysis of SV40-transformed cells, and Lyt 1+,2+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) that is present in the spleens of SV40 immunized mice 9 days postimmunization and an Lyt 1-,2+ CTL that is generated by secondary in vitro stimulation of in vivo primed spleen cells. During secondary in vitro stimulation of SV40 immune spleen cells obtained 9 days postimmunization, a shift in the Lyt phenotype of the CTL from Lyt 1+,2+ to Lyt 1-,2+ is observed. Although the Lyt 1-,2+ CTL can be derived from Lyt 1-,2+ noncytotoxic memory cells, it is not known whether the Lyt 1+,2+ CTL differentiates into an Lyt 1-,2+ CTL during in vitro stimulation.

  18. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after renal transplant and filgrastim treatment for neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients has been considered a risk for developing opportunistic infections and malignancies. Acute leukemia is a rare complication. We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (FAB M3) after cadaveric renal transplant for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a 24-year-old woman. Her immunosuppressive therapy included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Approximately 2 years after transplant, she became pancytopenic, prompting administration of filgrastim. A few doses caused a markedly increased blast count, resulting in a diagnosis of APL. She was successfully treated with all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide. Myeloproliferative neoplasms after organ transplant or due to filgrastim are rare. PMID:27695174

  19. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after renal transplant and filgrastim treatment for neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients has been considered a risk for developing opportunistic infections and malignancies. Acute leukemia is a rare complication. We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (FAB M3) after cadaveric renal transplant for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a 24-year-old woman. Her immunosuppressive therapy included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Approximately 2 years after transplant, she became pancytopenic, prompting administration of filgrastim. A few doses caused a markedly increased blast count, resulting in a diagnosis of APL. She was successfully treated with all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide. Myeloproliferative neoplasms after organ transplant or due to filgrastim are rare.

  20. Patterns of myocardial cell adhesion molecule expression in human endomyocardial biopsies after cardiac transplantation. Induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 related to implantation and rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Herskowitz, A.; Mayne, A. E.; Willoughby, S. B.; Kanter, K.; Ansari, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Conflicting patterns of myocardial cell adhesion molecule expression associated with cardiac rejection have emerged from numerous studies of randomly selected cardiac biopsies. We designed a prospective, longitudinal study which reports both qualitative and quantitative levels of myocardial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin expression in sequential human cardiac allograft biopsies. Intense ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 staining was found in all biopsies during the first three weeks after transplant and coincided with elevated serum levels of troponin T, a sensitive marker of ischemic myocyte injury. Baseline ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression returned within three to four weeks, as did serum troponin T levels in all patients who did not develop rejection. All 29 rejection episodes encountered were associated with intense ICAM-1 staining, while 24 of the 29 (83%) had intense VCAM-1 staining. Increased ELAM-1 and CD62 staining was only rarely observed. Persistence of increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 staining after treated rejection episodes predicted a recurrent rejection episode within two months (75% positive and 100% negative predictive value). Objective quantitative measurements by radioimmunoassay (RIA) confirmed these patterns of induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Thus, longitudinal monitoring of serial biopsies for myocardial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression could be useful in the early detection of rejection episodes and monitoring the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy. Images Figure 2 PMID:7977640

  1. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients; Public... prophylaxis and/or treatment of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients. This public workshop is intended to provide information for and gain perspective from health care...

  2. RNAi-mediated silencing of HLA A2 suppressed acute rejection against human fibroblast xenografts in the striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caixia; Xu, Yunzhi; Zheng, Deyu; Sun, Xiaohong; Xu, Qunyuan; Duan, Deyi

    2016-08-15

    Major histocompatibility complex class l (MHC I) molecules play a role in determining whether transplanted cells will be accepted or rejected, and masking of MHC I on donor cells has been found useful for immunoprotection of neural xenografts. In the present study, primary human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF), HELF treated with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA A2, MHC I in humans) (siHELF), and rat embryonic lung fibroblasts (RELF) were stereotaxically grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats to explore whether knockdown of HLA A2 could reduce host immune responses against xenografts. Before lentiviral infection, the cells were transduced with retroviruses harboring tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA. Knockdown of HLA A2 protein was examined by Western blotting. The immune responses (the number of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in the brain and peripheral blood), glial reaction, and survival of human fibroblasts were quantitatively evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry at 4d, 2w, and 6w post-graft. Animal behaviors were assessed by counting apomorphine-induced rotations pre- and post-grafts. It was shown that a lower level of HLA A2 was observed in siHELF grafts than in HELF grafts, and knockdown of HLA A2 decreased rat immune responses, as indicated by less remarkable increases in the number of CD8 and CD4 T-cells in the brain and the ratio of CD4:CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood in rats grafted with siHELF. Rats grafted with siHELF exhibited a significant improvement in motor asymmetry post-transplantation and a better survival of human fibroblasts at 2w. The increasing number of activated microglia and the decreasing number of astrocytes were found in three groups of rats post-implantation. These data suggested that RNAi-mediated knockdown of HLA A2 could suppress acute rejection against xenogeneic human cell transplants in the rat brain. PMID:27397073

  3. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  4. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY) has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects. PMID:27110243

  5. Lineage-specific chimaerism after stem cell transplantation in children following reduced intensity conditioning: potential predictive value of NK cell chimaerism for late graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Matthes-Martin, S; Lion, T; Haas, O A; Frommlet, F; Daxberger, H; König, M; Printz, D; Scharner, D; Eichstill, C; Peters, C; Lawitschka, A; Gadner, H; Fritsch, G

    2003-10-01

    Chimaerism of FACS-sorted leucocyte subsets (CD14+, CD15+, CD3-/56+, CD3+/4+, CD3+/8+, CD19+) was monitored prospectively between days +14 and +100 in 39 children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced intensity-conditioning regimens. Cell subsets exceeding 1% of nucleated cells were subject to cell sorting. Chimaerism was analysed by dual-colour FISH and/or by short tandem repeat-polymerase chain reaction. The chimaerism pattern on day +28 was evaluated with regard to its correlation with graft rejection. Of 39 patients, nine patients had donor chimaerism (DC) in all subsets. Mixed/recipient chimaerism (MC/RC) was detectable within T cells in 62%, within NK cells in 39% and within monocytes and granulocytes in 38% of the patients. The correlation of secondary graft rejection with the chimaerism pattern on day +28 revealed the strongest association between RC in NK-cells (P<0.0001), followed by T cells (P=0.001), and granulocytes and monocytes (P=0.034). Notably, patients with RC in T cells rejected their graft only if MC or RC was also present in the NK-cell subset. By contrast, none of the children with DC in NK cells experienced a graft rejection. These observations suggest that, in the presence of recipient T-cell chimaerism, the chimaerism status in NK-cells on day +28 might be able to identify patients at high risk for late graft rejection. PMID:14513041

  6. Post-transplant lymphocele: an unusual cause of acute urinary retention mimicking urethral injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Kang, Taek Won; Koh, Yang Seok; Kim, Jung Chul; Ma, Seong-Kwon; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung; Ryu, Soo Bang

    2006-04-01

    Retroperitoneal pelvic lymphoceles are one of the most common complications following renal transplantation, and usually present with a palpable mass, ipsilateral leg edema, hydronephrosis caused by ureteral obstruction, decreased renal function and cutaneous lymphatic fistula. However, lymphocele rarely causes acute urinary retention. In this study, we describe a case of a patient who developed acute urinary retention after renal transplantation mimicking urethral injury. When a transplanted patient demonstrates the inability to void, one should consider bladder outlet obstruction resulting from lymphocele as a possible cause.

  7. Issues in solid-organ transplantation in children: translational research from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Chandar, Jayanthi J.; Rusconi, Paolo G.; Fornoni, Alessia; Abitbol, Carolyn L.; Burke III, George W.; Zilleruelo, Gaston E.; Pham, Si M.; Perez, Elena E.; Karnik, Ruchika; Hunter, Juanita A.; Dauphin, Danielle D.; Wilkinson, James D.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we identify important challenges facing physicians responsible for renal and cardiac transplantation in children based on a review of the contemporary medical literature. Regarding pediatric renal transplantation, we discuss the challenge of antibody-mediated rejection, focusing on both acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. We review new diagnostic approaches to antibody-mediated rejection, such as panel-reactive antibodies, donor-specific cross-matching, antibody assays, risk assessment and diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection, the pathology of antibody-mediated rejection, the issue of ABO incompatibility in renal transplantation, new therapies for antibody-mediated rejection, inhibiting of residual antibodies, the suppression or depletion of B-cells, genetic approaches to treating acute antibody-mediated rejection, and identifying future translational research directions in kidney transplantation in children. Regarding pediatric cardiac transplantation, we discuss the mechanisms of cardiac transplant rejection, including the role of endomyocardial biopsy in detecting graft rejection and the role of biomarkers in detecting cardiac graft rejection, including biomarkers of inflammation, cardiomyocyte injury, or stress. We review cardiac allograft vasculopathy. We also address the role of genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies, gene expression profiling using entities such as AlloMap®, and adenosine triphosphate release as a measure of immune function using the Cylex® ImmuKnow™ cell function assay. Finally, we identify future translational research directions in heart transplantation in children. PMID:24860861

  8. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runzhe; Campbell, Jos L; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia remains a major cause of death in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Several factors may affect the concurrence and outcome of relapse, which include graft-versus-host disease, minimal residual disease or intrinsic factors of the disease, and transplantation characteristics. The mainstay of relapse prevention and treatment is donor leukocyte infusions, targeted therapies, second transplantation, and other novel therapies. In this review, we mainly focus on addressing the impact of graft-versus-host disease on relapse and the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We also make recommendations for critical strategies to prevent relapse after transplantation and challenges that must be addressed to ensure success. PMID:25709473

  9. [Serum beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2M) following renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Silva, A; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ramos, O L; Azjen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    Although there was an important improvement in graft and patient survival the last 10 years, graft rejection continues to be a major barrier to the success of renal transplantation. Identification of a laboratory test that could help to diagnose graft rejection would facilitate the management of renal transplanted patients. PURPOSE--To evaluate the utility of monitoring serum beta 2M in recently transplanted patients. METHODS--We daily determined serum beta 2M levels in 20 receptors of renal grafts (10 from living related and 10 from cadaveric donors) and compared them to their clinical and laboratory evolution. RESULTS--Eight patients who presented immediate good renal function following grafting and did not have rejection had a mean serum beta 2M of 3.7 mg/L on the 4th day post transplant. The sensitivity of the test for the diagnosis of acute rejection was 87.5%, but the specificity was only 46%. Patients who presented acute tubular necrosis (ATN) without rejection had a progressive decrease in their serum levels of beta 2M, while their serum creatinine changed as they were dialyzed. In contrast, patients with ATN and concomitance of acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity presented elevated beta 2M and creatinine serum levels. CONCLUSION--Daily monitoring of serum beta 2M does not improve the ability to diagnose acute rejection in patients with good renal function. However, serum beta 2M levels seemed to be useful in diagnosing acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity in patients with ATN.

  10. Eculizumab for the Treatment of Severe Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Anne; Collette, Suzon; Senécal, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In renal transplantation, treatment options for antibody-mediated rejection are limited. Here, we report a case of severe AMR treated with eculizumab. A 50-year-old woman known for end stage kidney disease secondary to IgA nephropathy received a kidney transplant from a 50-year-old deceased donor. At 5 months after transplantation, she presented with acute graft dysfunction and biopsy showed a severe antibody-mediated rejection associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite an aggressive conventional immunosuppressive regimen, signs of rejection persisted and the patient was treated with 3 doses of eculizumab. Following the therapy, markers of TMA improved and graft function stabilized. However, ongoing signs of rejection remained in the repeated biopsy. In kidney transplantation, eculizumab is an expensive treatment and its role in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection remains to be determined. PMID:27478676

  11. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your life to help keep your body from rejecting the new organ.

  12. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  13. Acute prostatitis caused by Raoultella planticola in a renal transplant recipient: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Koukoulaki, M; Bakalis, A; Kalatzis, V; Belesiotou, E; Papastamopoulos, V; Skoutelis, A; Drakopoulos, S

    2014-06-01

    We present a unique case of acute bacterial prostatitis caused by a very rare human pathogen, Raoultella planticola, in a renal allograft recipient 3.5 months post transplantation. Only a few cases of human infection by this pathogen have been reported worldwide. The present study reports the case of a 67-year-old man who was admitted to our transplant unit 3.5 months post transplantation with fever, dysuria, suprapubic pain, symptoms and signs of acute prostatitis, and elevated markers of inflammation and prostate-specific antigen. R. planticola was isolated in the urine culture. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin (based on the antibiogram) and had a full recovery, with satisfactory renal function. To the best of our knowledge, this is not only the first reported case of R. planticola prostatitis, but also the first report of such an infection in a solid organ transplant recipient or in a patient on immunosuppressive medication.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Moreira, Airton Mota; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto

    2006-06-15

    Although operative techniques in hepatic transplantation have reduced the time and mortality on waiting lists, the rate of vascular complications associated with these techniques has increased. Stenosis or thrombosis of the portal vein is an infrequent complication, and if present, surgical treatment is considered the traditional management. This article describes a case of acute portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation from a living donor to a child managed by percutaneous techniques.

  15. Difficulties in diagnosing acute kidney injury post liver transplantation using serum creatinine based diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Renal function in patients with advanced cirrhosis is an important prognostic factor for survival both prior to and following liver transplantation. The importance of renal function is reflected by the introduction of the model for end stage liver disease (MELD) score, which includes serum creatinine. The MELD score has been shown to predict the short term risk of death for transplant wait listed patients and is currently used by many countries to allocate liver transplants on the basis of severity of underlying illness. Changes in serum creatinine are also used to stage acute kidney injury. However prior to liver transplantation the serum creatinine typically over estimates underlying renal function, particularly when a colorimetric Jaffe based assay is used, and paradoxically then under estimates renal function post liver transplantation, particularly when immunophyllins are started early as part of transplant immunosuppression. As acute kidney injury is defined by changes in serum creatinine, this potentially leads to over estimation of the incidence and severity of acute kidney injury in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:25349641

  16. [Primary Central Nervous System Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yoshiko; Nakaya, Aya; Fujita, Shinya; Hotta, Masaaki; Fujita, Yukie; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with acute lymphocytic leukemia, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complained of nausea and blurred vision 288 days after the transplantation. Intracranial tumors were identified on brain MRI. She received whole brain radiation after open biopsy, but she died. The tumors had characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and she was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This disease is rare and has a poor outcome. Therefore, accumulation of cases and establishment of treatments for this condition are urgently needed.

  17. Noninvasive allograft imaging of acute rejection: evaluation of (131)I-anti-CXCL10 mAb.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dayan; Sun, Hukui; Liang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Song, Jing; Hou, Guihua

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of iodine-131-labeled anti-CXCL10 mAb as tracer targeted at CXCL10 to detect acute rejection (AR) with mice model. Expression of CXCL10 was proved by RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunochemistry staining. All groups were submitted to whole-body autoradioimaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies after tail vein injection of (131)I-anti-CXCL10 mAb. The highest concentration/expression of CXCL10 was detected in allograft tissue compared with allograft treated with tacrolimus and isograft control. Tacrolimus could obviously inhibit the rejection of allograft. Allograft could be obviously imaged at all checking points, much clearer than the other two groups. The biodistribution results showed the highest uptake of radiotracer in allograft. T/NT (target/nontarget) ratio was 4.15 ± 0.25 at 72 h, apparently different from allograft treated with tacrolimus (2.29 ± 0.10), P < 0.05. These data suggest that CXCL10 is a promising target for early stage AR imaging and (131)I-CXCL10 mAb can successfully image AR and monitor the effect of immunosuppressant.

  18. Pentostatin and Lymphocyte Infusion in Preventing Graft Rejection in Patients Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-29

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Graft Versus Host Disease; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  20. [Acute gouty arthritis in adolescents with renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Pela, I; Seracini, D; Lavoratti, G; Materassi, M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is a common metabolic abnormality in subjects with renal transplantation: in fact in transplanted adults receiving immunosuppressive and diuretic drugs the frequency of hyperuricemia varied from 30 to 84% according to treatment. Conversely, the gout is an uncommon eventuality, representing less than 10%; predisposing factors are impaired renal function and older age. In the younger patients with renal transplantation hyperuricemia is also frequent, but the gout doesn't considered a possible complication in paediatric age. We reported our observation of 5 patients (3 males and 2 females), 13-18 years old who developed gout 2-84 months after renal transplantation. All the patients were receiving cyclosporine, 4 even with prednisone and azathioprine. Two patients were treated with furosemide because hypertension. The average of uric acid serum levels in the post transplantation follow-up was 7 +/- 2 mg/dl; at the moment of gout attack the uric acid serum levels raised to 12 +/- 1 mg/dl. The arthritis diagnosis were made by clinical, laboratory and instrumental data (Rx and US). In the most severe cases, uricasi therapy resolved clinical picture. The analysis of immunosuppressive and diuretic treatment, renal function and dietary uses induces us to think that the gout episode may be the result of many concomitant factors, in adolescents with renal transplant. PMID:10687163

  1. Usefulness of Diastolic Strain Measurements in Predicting Elevated Left Ventricular Filling Pressure and Risk of Rejection or Coronary Artery Vasculopathy in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jimmy C; Magdo, H Sonali; Yu, Sunkyung; Lowery, Ray; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Zamberlan, Mary; Gajarski, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    In pediatric heart transplant recipients, elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is associated with rejection and coronary artery vasculopathy. This study aimed to evaluate which echocardiographic parameters track changes in PCWP and predict adverse outcomes (rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy). This prospective single-center study enrolled 49 patients (median 11.4 years old, interquartile range 7.4 to 16.5) at time of cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Median follow-up was 2.4 years (range 1.2 to 3.1 years), with serial testing per clinical protocol. Ratio of early mitral inflow to annular velocity (E/E'), left atrial (LA) distensibility, peak LA systolic strain, E/left ventricular (LV) diastolic strain, and E/LV diastolic strain rate were measured from echocardiograms. Increase in PCWP ≥3 mm Hg was associated with changes in LA distensibility, E/E', and E/LV diastolic strain, with highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for E/LV diastolic strain (0.76). In 9 patients who subsequently developed rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy, E/LV diastolic strain rate at baseline differed from patients without events (median 57.0 vs 43.6, p = 0.02). On serial studies, only change in LV ejection fraction differed in patients with events (median -10% vs -1%, p = 0.01); decrease in LV ejection fraction of -19% had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 44%. In conclusion, LV diastolic strain and strain rate measurements can track changes in PCWP and identify patients at risk for subsequent rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy. Further studies are necessary to confirm these data in a larger cohort.

  2. Transplant-related toxicity and mortality: an AIEOP prospective study in 636 pediatric patients transplanted for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Balduzzi, A; Valsecchi, M G; Silvestri, D; Locatelli, F; Manfredini, L; Busca, A; Iori, A P; Messina, C; Prete, A; Andolina, M; Porta, F; Favre, C; Ceppi, S; Giorgiani, G; Lanino, E; Rovelli, A; Fagioli, F; De Fusco, C; Rondelli, R; Uderzo, C

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can cure high-risk acute leukemia (AL), but the occurrence of non-leukemic death is still high. The AIEOP conducted a prospective study in order to assess incidence and relationships of early toxicity and transplant-related mortality (TRM) in a pediatric population. Between 1990 and 1997 toxicities reported in eight organs (central nervous system, heart, lungs, liver, gut, kidneys, bladder, mucosa) were classified into three grades (mild, moderate, severe) and prospectively registered for 636 consecutive children who underwent autologous (216) or allogeneic (420) transplantation, either from an HLA compatible related (294), or alternative (126) donor in 13 AIEOP transplant centers. Overall, 47% of the patients are alive in CR (3-year EFS: 45.2%, s.e.: 2.1), 19% died in CR at a median of 60 days (90-day TRM: 14.3%, s.e.: 1.4), 34% relapsed. Toxicity of any organ, but mucosa and gut, was positively correlated with early death; moderate and severe toxicity to heart, lungs, liver and kidneys significantly increased early TRM, with estimated relative risks of 9.1, 5.5, 2.7 and 2.8, respectively, as compared to absent or mild toxicity. Patients with grade III-IV aGVHD experienced more than double (56% vs. 19%) TRM than patients with grade 0-II aGVHD. A higher cumulative toxicity score, estimating the impact of toxicity on TRM, was significantly associated with transplantation from an alternative donor. Quantitative assessment allowed us to describe the extent to which 'grade' of toxicity and 'type' of involved organs were related to mortality and pre-transplant characteristics and yielded a prognostic score potentially useful to compare different conditioning regimens and predict probability of early death.

  3. Liver Transplantation for Acute Intermittent Porphyria is Complicated by a High Rate of Hepatic Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dowman, Joanna K; Gunson, Bridget K; Mirza, Darius F; Bramhall, Simon R; Badminton, Mike N; Newsome, Philip N

    2012-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant condition resulting from a partial deficiency of the ubiquitously expressed enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. Although its clinical expression is highly variable, a minority of patients suffer recurrent life-threatening neurovisceral attacks despite optimal medical therapy. Because the liver is the major source of excess precursor production, liver transplantation (LT) represents a potentially effective treatment for severely affected patients. Using data from the UK Transplant Registry, we analyzed all transplants performed for AIP in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Between 2002 and 2010, 10 patients underwent LT for AIP. In all cases, the indication for transplantation was recurrent, biochemically proven, medically nonresponsive acute attacks of porphyria resulting in significantly impaired quality of life. Five patients had developed significant neurological morbidities such as paraplegia before transplantation. The median follow-up time was 23.4 months, and there were 2 deaths from multiorgan failure at 98 days and 26 months. Eight recipients were alive for 3.2 to 109 months after transplantation. Complete biochemical and symptomatic resolution was observed in all patients after transplantation. However, there was a high rate of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT; 4/10), with 1 patient requiring regrafting. The effects of previous neuronal damage such as joint contractures were not improved by transplantation. Thus, impaired quality of life in the surviving patients was usually a result of preoperative complications. Refractory AIP is an excellent indication for LT, and long-term outcomes for carefully selected patients are good. There is, however, an increased incidence of HAT in these patients, and we recommend routine antiplatelet therapy after transplantation. Liver Transpl 18:195–200, 2012. © 2011 AASLD. PMID:21618697

  4. Myoglobin cast nephropathy in a kidney transplant patient with normal creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira da Fonseca, Elissa; Jittirat, Arksarapuk; Birdwell, Kelly A; Fogo, Agnes B

    2015-04-01

    Delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients is a known complication associated with increased risk of acute rejection and reduced transplant survival after 1 year. There are multiple risk factors, including prolonged cold ischemia time, donor age, and cause of donor's death. Major causes of delayed graft function are acute kidney injury in the donor, often from prolonged terminal ischemia, reflected by acute tubular injury in the recipient. However, the differential diagnosis of delayed graft function includes acute rejection, recurrence of the primary glomerular diseases, and other less commonly encountered conditions. A transplant kidney biopsy usually is required to elucidate the correct cause and initiate the right treatment, which is crucial for transplant survival. We report a case of a transplant recipient who developed delayed graft function due to an uncommon cause. After correct diagnosis, the patient's transplant function improved.

  5. An acute negative bystander effect of γ-irradiated recipients on transplanted hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Liang, Paulina H.; Cheng, Haizi; XuFeng, Richard; Yuan, Youzhong; Zhang, Peng; Smith, Clayton A.

    2012-01-01

    Ultimate success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) depends not only on donor HSCs themselves but also on the host environment. Total body irradiation is a component in various host conditioning regimens for HSCT. It is known that ionizing radiation exerts “bystander effects” on nontargeted cells and that HSCs transplanted into irradiated recipients undergo proliferative exhaustion. However, whether irradiated recipients pose a proliferation-independent bystander effect on transplanted HSCs is unclear. In this study, we found that irradiated mouse recipients significantly impaired the long-term repopulating ability of transplanted mouse HSCs shortly (∼ 17 hours) after exposure to irradiated hosts and before the cells began to divide. There was an increase of acute cell death associated with accelerated proliferation of the bystander hematopoietic cells. This effect was marked by dramatic down-regulation of c-Kit, apparently because of elevated reactive oxygen species. Administration of an antioxidant chemical, N-acetylcysteine, or ectopically overexpressing a reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme, catalase, improved the function of transplanted HSCs in irradiated hosts. Together, this study provides evidence for an acute negative, yet proliferation-independent, bystander effect of irradiated recipients on transplanted HSCs, thereby having implications for HSCT in both experimental and clinical scenarios in which total body irradiation is involved. PMID:22374698

  6. A fatal case of acute HHV-6 myocarditis following allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Yvonne; Gottlieb, David J; Baewer, David; Blyth, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an ubiquitous virus that can reactivate in immunocompromised hosts, resulting in diverse clinical sequelae. We describe a case of fatal acute HHV-6 myocarditis in a patient who underwent allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of biopsy proven HHV-6 myocarditis post-HSCT.

  7. Role of total artificial heart in the management of heart transplant rejection and retransplantation: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Kalya, Anantharam; Jaroszewski, Dawn; Pajaro, Octavio; Scott, Robert; Gopalan, Radha; Kasper, Diane; Arabia, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection and failure may require mechanical circulatory support as bridge-to-retransplantation. Prognosis in this patient group is poor and implantable ventricular assist devices have had limited success due to organ failure associated with the high dose immunosuppression required to treat ongoing rejection. We present a case from our institution and the world-wide experience utilizing the SynCardia CardioWest Total Artificial Heart (TAH-t; SynCardia Systems, Inc., Tucson, AZ, USA) for replacement of the failing graft, recovery of patient and end-organ failure with ultimate bridge to retransplantation. We present our experience and review of world-wide experience for use of TAH-t in this type patient.

  8. Current status of auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Rela, Mohamed; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Reddy, Mettu Srinivas

    2016-09-01

    Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation (APOLT) is a technique of liver transplantation (LT) where a partial liver graft is implanted in an orthotopic position after leaving behind a part of the native liver. APOLT was previously considered technically challenging with results inferior to orthotopic liver transplantation. Results of this procedure have continued to improve with improving surgical techniques and a better understanding of the natural history of acute liver failure (ALF) and liver regeneration. The procedure is being increasingly accepted as a valid treatment option for ALF-especially in children. This article reviews the historical background to this operation, advances in the technique, and its current place in the management of ALF. Liver Transplantation 22 1265-1274 2016 AASLD. PMID:27357489

  9. Acute renal failure after cardiac transplantation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, D. N.; Perazella, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a relatively frequent complication associated with heart transplantation. It develops in the first few days postoperatively and is characterized by oliguria with laboratory and urinary indices typical of pre-renal azotemia. Cyclosporine, especially with higher doses, is one of the many factors which play an integral part in the nephrotoxicity following cardiac transplant. Poor preoperative renal function and perioperative hemodynamic compromise may also contribute to ARF. The actual incidence of ARF now encountered by transplant centers may be lower than previously reported, the result of lower cyclosporine doses. Currently, management is entirely supportive, but novel therapeutic approaches with atrial natriuretic peptide-like substances are being explored. A case illustrating the typical clinical presentation of ARF after heart transplant will be presented and the clinical features will be reviewed. PMID:9381741

  10. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Munker, Reinhold; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Hai Lin; de Lima, Marcos; Khoury, Hanna J; Gale, Robert Peter; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Weisdorf, Daniel; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Acute biphenotypic leukemias or mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) are rare and considered high risk. The optimal treatment and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) are unclear. Most prior case series include only modest numbers of patients who underwent transplantation. We analyzed the outcome of 95 carefully characterized alloHCT patients with MPAL reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2012. The median age was 20 years (range, 1 to 68). Among the 95 patients, 78 were in first complete remission (CR1) and 17 were in second complete remission (CR2). Three-year overall survival (OS) of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 76), leukemia-free survival of 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66), relapse incidence of 29% (95% CI, 20 to 38), and nonrelapse mortality of 15% (95% CI, 9 to 23) were encouraging. OS was best in younger patients (<20 years), but no significant differences were observed between those 20 to 40 years of age and those who were 40 years or older. A matched-pair analysis showed similar outcomes comparing MPAL cases to 375 acute myelogenous leukemia or 359 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. MPAL patients had more acute and a trend for more chronic graft-versus-host disease. No difference was observed between patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 versus those who underwent transplantation in CR2. AlloHCT is a promising treatment option for pediatric and adult patients with MPAL with encouraging long-term survival. PMID:26903380

  11. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  12. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation.

  13. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  14. [Pediatric renal transplantation in Toulouse (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Juskiewenski, S; Barthe, P; Vaysse, P; Bouissou, F; Guitard, J; Bacque, P; Moscovivi, J; Cao-Van, C

    1980-01-01

    The regional group of renal transplantation in Toulouse includes a medico-surgical team which participates to all the activities of this group. Dialysis and transplantation are covered in a center organized for the care of children. This branch is part of the Regional Hospital. From 15 years old on patients are moved from the pediatric branch to the medico-surgical center taking care of adults. Both teams within the regional hospital share the responsability of taking off kidneys from cadaveric donors and collaborate to France-Transplant and Euro-Transplant. Since the pediatric center in charge of renal failure has opened, 32 children underwent chronic hemodialysis. Some of these patients are presently treated in the center for adults. Fourteen children were grafted and seven are at this moment waiting to receive transplantation. The average number of transplantations per year is from 1 to 4. These fourteen children underwent renal transplantation with kidneys from cadaveric donors. Only one has been provided by Toulouse. Diuresis resumed immediately in 8 cases, later in 5. An extremely acute reject was observed in one case and transplantectomy had to be performed 10 days after transplantation. Eight children presented acute reversible reject which, for 4 of them, evoluated towards chronicle reject. Eight children presented a chronicle reject: 4 of them are again in dialysis. Altogether 8 kidneys are functioning (seven years in the longest case). Five children resumed chronic dialysis. One patient died of acute pancreatitis. He underwent a portocaval shunt for type I glycogenosis which ended in a hyperuricemic nephropathy evoluating towards renal failure forcing a transplantation. The rehabilitation of transplanted children was always satisfactory. PMID:7006837

  15. Constrictive pericarditis after lung transplantation: an under-recognized complication.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Wojtek; Cypel, Marcelo; Chen, Fengshi; Daniel, Lorretta; Chaparro, Cecilia; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2010-05-01

    Primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, and infection account for most of the early morbidity after lung transplantation, with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome accounting for most late morbidity. Mediastinal and pericardial complications, in the form of constriction, are not common. We present 4 patients with constrictive pericarditis after lung transplantation and recommend that constrictive pericarditis be considered in the differential diagnosis in lung transplant recipients who present with signs and symptoms of systemic and pulmonary venous congestion. PMID:20207169

  16. Post-transplant hepatic complications: Imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Drudi, F.M.; Pagliara, E.; Cantisani, V.; Arduini, F.; D'Ambrosio, U.; Alfano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation is considered definitive therapy for acute or chronic irreversible pathologies of the liver, and the increased survival rates are mainly due to improved immunosuppressive therapies and surgical techniques. However, early diagnosis of possible graft dysfunction is crucial to liver graft survival. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of the liver before and after transplant and in the detection of complications such as vascular and biliary diseases, acute and chronic rejection and neoplastic recurrence. Integrated imaging using color-Doppler, CT, MRI and traditional x-ray reach a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the management of transplanted patients. PMID:23395917

  17. Allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hurd, D D

    1987-12-01

    Current results show that 50% of young patients with ANLL who undergo allogeneic BMT experience prolonged DFS and may be cured. Encouraging results with high-dose chemo/radiotherapy and autologous BMT are likewise being reported. In addition, some studies using intensive postremission treatment without BMT have shown results comparable to many transplant series. As better ways of preventing GVHD are found, the morbidity and mortality of allogeneic BMT should be reduced and the benefits of transplantation for curing patients with ANLL should be increased. However, the applicability of allogeneic BMT will remain limited due to the availability of compatible donors whether related or unrelated. Further studies are needed in the use of postremission intensive therapy with and without autologous bone marrow support. However, results to date should engender the same degree of enthusiastic optimism that followed the early reports of improved outcome with allogeneic BMT when applied to first remission patients. PMID:3321445

  18. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with acute pancreatitis in a heart transplant recipient treated with tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Im, Moon-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Kim, Ki-Bong; Lee, Hae-Young

    2013-02-01

    New-onset diabetes mellitus after transplant is a well-recognized complication of tacrolimus immunosuppression and commonly occurs as a form of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, tacrolimus-associated acute pancreatitis causing diabetic ketoacidosis has not been reported in heart transplant patients. We report a 22-year-old women hospitalized owing to diabetic ketoacidosis associated with acute pancreatitis 7 months after a heart transplant. Her immunosuppression included tacrolimus. She was admitted with complaints of polydipsia, anorexia, and abdominal pain of 3 days' duration. Her initial laboratory test revealed a toxic level of tacrolimus (> 30 ng/mL), severe hyperglycemia (39 mmol/L), severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.9), and ketonuria, although diabetes mellitus had never been diagnosed. Serum amylase and lipase levels and abdominal computed tomography suggested the presence of acute pancreatitis. After correcting the diabetic ketoacidosis and getting the tacrolimus level to the normal range, she was discharged home. Three months later, insulin was replaced with oral hypoglycemic agents. Pancreatitis can present with diabetic ketoacidosis in the recipient of a heart transplant treated with tacrolimus. Clinicians should pay more attention to tacrolimus levels and the risk of pancreatitis.

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia: Similar outcomes regardless of donor type

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Erica D.; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Shanley, Ryan; Robin, Marie; Bejanyan, Nelli; Xhaard, Alienor; Brunstein, Claudio; de Fontbrune, Flore Sicre; Ustun, Celalettin; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Socie, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The use of alternative donor transplants is increasing as the transplant eligible population ages and sibling donors are less available. We evaluated the impact of donor source on transplant outcomes for adults with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning transplant. Between January 2000 and December 2010, 414 consecutive adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia in remission received myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplant from either a matched related donor (n=187), unrelated donor (n=76), or umbilical cord blood donor (n=151) at the University of Minnesota or Hôpital St. Louis in Paris. We noted similar 6 year overall survival across donor types: matched related donor 47% (95% CI, 39–54%), umbilical cord blood 36% (95% CI, 28–44%), matched unrelated donor 54% (95% CI, 40–66%), mismatched unrelated donor 51% (95% CI, 28–70%) (p=0.11). Survival differed based on conditioning intensity and age with 6 year survival of 57% (95% CI 47–65%), 39% (95% CI, 28–49%), 23% (95% CI, 6–47%), 47% (95% CI, 36–57%) and 28% (95% CI, 17–41%) for myeloablative age 18–39, myeloablative age 40+, or reduced intensity conditioning ages 18–39, 40–56, and 57–74 respectively (p< 0.01). Relapse was increased with reduced intensity conditioning and lowest in younger patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (HR 1.0 versus 2.5 or above for all RIC age cohorts), p<0.01. Transplant related mortality was similar across donor types. In summary, our data support the use of alternative donors as a graft source with MA or RIC for patients with acute myeloid leukemia when a sibling donor is unavailable. PMID:25452032

  20. Power-Pulse Thrombolysis and Stent Recanalization for Acute Post-Liver Transplant Iliocaval Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baccin, Carlos E.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a potentially lethal complication in a liver transplant recipient. We report the case of a 57-year-old liver transplant recipient, who developed acute, postoperative, markedly symptomatic complete IVC, ilial-femoral-caval, and left renal vein thrombosis. After treatment with power-pulse tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and stent placement, the IVC and iliac veins were successfully recanalized. At 2.5-year imaging and laboratory follow-up, the IVC, iliac, and renal veins remained patent and graft function was preserved.

  1. Risk factors and prognosis of hepatic acute GvHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kanda, J; Nakasone, H; Kondo, T; Uchida, N; Fukuda, T; Ohashi, K; Kaida, K; Iwato, K; Eto, T; Kanda, Y; Nakamae, H; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Morishima, Y; Hirokawa, M; Atsuta, Y; Murata, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic acute GvHD (aGvHD) is associated with high mortality owing to poor response to immunosuppressive therapy. The pathogenesis of hepatic aGvHD differs from that of other lesions, and specific risk factors related to pre-transplant liver conditions should be determined. We conducted a cohort study by using a Japanese transplant registry database (N=8378). Of these subjects, 1.5% had hepatitis C virus Ab (HCV-Ab) and 9.4% had liver dysfunction (elevated transaminase or bilirubin levels) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). After HCT, the cumulative incidence of hepatic aGvHD was 6.7%. On multivariate analyses, HCV-Ab positivity (hazard ratio (HR), 1.93; P=0.02) and pre-transplant liver dysfunction (HR, 1.85; P<0.01), as well as advanced HCT risk, unrelated donors, HLA mismatch and cyclosporine as GvHD prophylaxis, were significant risk factors for hepatic aGvHD, whereas hepatitis B virus surface Ag was not. Hepatic aGvHD was a significant risk factor for low overall survival and high transplant-related mortality in all aGvHD grades (P<0.01). This study is the first to show the relationship between pre-transplant liver conditions and hepatic aGvHD. A prospective study is awaited to validate the results of this study and establish a new strategy especially for high-risk patients. PMID:26367230

  2. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  3. Transplant nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2011-01-01

    About 10% of all renal allografts fail during the first year of transplantation and thereafter approximately 3%-5% yearly. Given that approximately 69 400 renal transplants are performed worldwide annually, the number of patients returning to dialysis following allograft failure is increasing. A failed transplant kidney, whether maintained by low dose immunosuppression or not, elicits an inflammatory response and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The risk for transplant nephrectomy (TN) is increased in patients who experienced multiple acute rejections prior to graft failure, develop chronic graft intolerance, sepsis, vascular complications and early graft failure. TN for late graft failure is associated with greater morbidity and mortality, bleeding being the leading cause of morbidity and infection the main cause of mortality. TN appears to be beneficial for survival on dialysis but detrimental to the outcome of subsequent transplantation by virtue of increased level of antibodies to mismatched antigens, increased rate of primary non function and delayed graft function. Many of the studies are characterized by a retrospective and univariate analysis of small numbers of patients. The lack of randomization in many studies introduced a selection bias and conclusions drawn from such studies should be applied with caution. Pending a randomised controlled trial on the role of TN in the management of transplant failure patients, it is prudent to remove failed symptomatic allografts and all grafts failing within 3 mo of transplantation, monitor inflammatory markers in patients with retained failed allografts and remove the allograft in the event of a significant increase in levels. PMID:24175187

  4. Patterns of hematopoietic chimerism following bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia from volunteer unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Molloy, K; Goulden, N; Lawler, M; Cornish, J; Oakhill, A; Pamphilon, D; Potter, M; Steward, C; Langlands, K; Humphries, P; McCann, S R

    1996-04-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism was analyzed in serial bone marrow samples taken from 28 children following T-cell depleted unrelated donor bone marrow transplants (UD BMT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Chimeric status was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of simple tandem repeat (STR) sequences (maximal sensitivity, 0.1%). At least two serial samples were examined in 23 patients. Of these, two had evidence of complete donor engraftment at all times and eight showed stable low level mixed chimerism (MC) (<1% recipient hematopoiesis). All 10 of these patients remain in remission with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. By contrast, 13 patients demonstrated a progressive return of recipient hematopoiesis. Five of these relapsed (4 to 9 months post BMT), one died of cytomegalovirus pneumonitis and seven remain in remission with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Five children were excluded from serial analysis as two serial samples were not collected before either relapse (3) or graft rejection (2). We conclude that as with sibling transplants, ex vivo T depleted UD BMT in children with ALL is associated with a high incidence of MC. Stable donor engraftment and low level MC always correlated with continued remission. However, detection of a progressive return of recipient cells did not universally correlate with relapse, but highlighted those patients at greatest risk. Serial chimerism analysis by PCR of STRs provides a rapid and simple screening technique for the detection of relapse and the identification of patients with progressive MC who might benefit from detailed molecular analysis for minimal residual disease following matched volunteer UD BMT for childhood ALL.

  5. Immune-Mediated Vascular Injury and Dysfunction in Transplant Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    von Rossum, Anna; Laher, Ismail; Choy, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage organ failure but this life-saving procedure is limited by immune-mediated rejection of most grafts. Blood vessels within transplanted organs are targeted by the immune system and the resultant vascular damage is a main contributor to acute and chronic graft failure. The vasculature is a unique tissue with specific immunological properties. This review discusses the interactions of the immune system with blood vessels in transplanted organs and how these interactions lead to the development of transplant arteriosclerosis, a leading cause of heart transplant failure. PMID:25628623

  6. Management of ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: past and present trends.

    PubMed

    Raut, Vikram; Uemoto, Shinji

    2011-03-01

    Based on the concept that the liver is a "privileged organ," which resists acute rejection, Thomas Starzl introduced liver transplantation across the ABO blood group. However, with improved survival after liver transplantation came reports of an increased incidence of acute rejection, biliary and vascular complications, and decreased survival after ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. As a result, ABO-incompatible liver transplantations are performed only in emergencies when ABO-compatible grafts are unavailable. In living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), donors are restricted to family members; therefore, breaking ABO blood group barriers becomes inevitable. This inevitable situation has forced liver transplant surgeons to exploit many innovative techniques to overcome the challenges of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. This review looks at the history and current practices of ABO-incompatible LDLT to provide insight so that the protocol can be improved further.

  7. A case of Schizophyllum commune sinusitis following unrelated cord blood transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Toya, Takashi; Shinohara, Akihito; Tatsuno, Keita; Seo, Sachiko; Nannya, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Makimura, Koichi; Moriya, Kyoji; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2013-08-01

    Schizophyllum commune is a globally distributed basidiomycete fungus that is known as a rare cause of sinusitis, for which no prompt treatment has been established. We describe the first report of S. commune sinusitis following unrelated cord blood transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Thirteen days after transplantation, a 23-year-old female developed maxillary and ethmoid sinusitis. The sinusitis was antimicrobial-resistant, and the sinus aspirate culture revealed white wooly mold, which was identified as S. commune by nucleotide sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of liposomal amphotericin B for 2 months, followed by oral voriconazole. This report suggests the effectiveness of liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole for S. commune infection in immunocompromised patients. Given the difficulty in distinguishing S. commune infection from aspergillosis by standard culture methods, the incidence of S. commune infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be underestimated. Nucleotide sequencing may be useful in the diagnosis of S. commune infection.

  8. Acute ischemic optic neuropathy with extended prone position ventilation in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Kapoor, Aanchal; Akindipe, Olufemi; Lane, Charles; Krishnan, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Prone position ventilation (PPV) improves mortality in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but outcomes following its use in lung transplant recipients are not known. We report the case of a 42-year-old Caucasian man who presented with severe ARDS from Bordetella pertussis, 5 years after bilateral sequential lung transplant for cystic fibrosis. He was managed with PPV for 22 days and had a prolonged ICU stay complicated by hypoxic ischemic optic neuropathy leading to blindness. Since his discharge from the ICU 6 months ago, his FEV1 has recovered to 47% predicted compared to his pre-ICU peak FEV1 of 85% predicted, suggesting recovery of lung function. This is the first report of optic nerve damage and vision loss in patients undergoing PPV. Our report also suggests that, in appropriately selected lung transplant recipients, severe hypoxemia could potentially be managed with prone ventilation. PMID:27051622

  9. Influence of HMGB1 and MSCs transplantation on rat cardiac angiogenesis with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Youxu; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Xiaodong; Niu, Shaohui; Zhang, Lihua

    2016-07-01

    To observe whether HMGB1could enhance the paracrine effect of MSCs when the Mesenchymal stem cells (Mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs) are pre-proccessed by High Mobility Group Box-1 (High Mobility Group Box-1, HMGB1). And to observe whether it can further increase the quantity of local angiogenesis in myocardial infarcts on the rat model with acute myocardial infarction, HMGB1 was combined with MSCs transplantation. MSCs in rats were cultivated with adherence and centrifugation method. Receptors of TLR4and RAGE in HMGB1 were tested. The MSCs were interfered by HMGB1 with different concentration gradient respectively, then the expression of VEGF was tested with ELISA method. SD male rats were divided into four groups: the model group, the MSCs transplantation group, the HMGB1 injection group, the HMGB1 injection plus MSCs transplantation group (n = 24), preparing rat model with acute myocardial infarction. The serum VEGF concentration levels were detected on the 3rd day, 7th and 28th day with ELISA method. On the 28th day after post operation the density of angiogenesis in infarction area was detected by immunohistochemal. (1) MSCs owned the expression of TLR4 and RAGE. (2) the secretion of VEGF increased significantly after the intervention of HMGB1 with concentration of 12.5 ng/mL, 25 ng/mL, 50 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL and 200ng/ml on MSCs compared with the control group. While the concentration was 400ng/ml or 800ng/ml, the secretion of VEGF decreased compared with the control group (P < 0.05). (3) detection of the serum VEGF on the 3rd or7th day after post operation was arranged: The results showed that: HMGB1 injection plus MSCs transplantation group > MSCs transplantation group >HMGB1 injection group >model group (P < 0.05). (4) the quantity of CD31 stained angiogenesis in HMGB1 injection plus MSCs transplantation group increased obviously. Combining MSCs transplantation, contributed to new angiogenesis of rats with acute myocardial infarction in myocardial infarction

  10. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV.

  11. Indium-111-monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies after the first year of heart transplantation. Identification of risk groups for developing rejection during long-term follow-up and clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, M.; Obrador, D.; Carrio, I.; Auge, J.M.; Moya, C.; Pons-Llado, G.; Caralps-Riera, J.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The long-term clinical course and results of biopsies in 21 patients studied with monoclonal antimyosin antibodies more than 12 months after heart transplantation according to the presence and degree of antimyosin-antibody uptake is described. Eighteen men and three women aged 20-52 years (39 +/- 9 years) were studied with antimyosin antibodies 12-40 months (mean, 22 +/- 9 months) after heart transplantation, and followed for a mean of 18 months (10-28 months). The number of biopsies performed during follow-up was 102. Results showed normal antimyosin-antibody studies in nine patients and abnormal studies in 12 patients. Myocyte damage was identified in 18 of the 102 biopsies (17.6%), one in the normal antimyosin-antibody group of patients and 17 in those patients with myocardial antimyosin-antibody uptake. Patients who developed rejection comprised 11% and 67% of each respective group; the mean number of rejection episodes per patient was 0.11 +/- 0.33 and 1.41 +/- 1.41, respectively (p less than 0.01). A trend was noted by which higher heart-to-lung ratios were associated with greater probability of rejection. Conclusively, (1) antimyosin-antibody studies performed after more than 1 year after heart transplantation indicate the presence and level of rejection activity, (2) groups of patients at risk for developing rejection at biopsy during long-term follow-up may be detected by antimyosin-antibody study, and (3) surveillance for rejection and the degree of immunosuppression should be tailored to meet individual patient needs.

  12. A Critical Analysis of Rejection in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation: Clinical, Cellular and Molecular Aspects, Current Challenges, and Novel Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sarhane, Karim A.; Tuffaha, Sami H.; Broyles, Justin M.; Ibrahim, Amir E.; Khalifian, Saami; Baltodano, Pablo; Santiago, Gabriel F.; Alrakan, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Zuhaib

    2013-01-01

    Advances in microsurgical techniques and immunomodulatory protocols have contributed to the expansion of vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) with very encouraging immunological, functional, and cosmetic results. Rejection remains however a major hurdle that portends serious threats to recipients. Rejection features in VCA have been described in a number of studies, and an international consensus on the classification of rejection was established. Unfortunately, current available diagnostic methods carry many shortcomings that, in certain cases, pose a great diagnostic challenge to physicians especially in borderline rejection cases. In this review, we revisit the features of acute skin rejection in hand and face transplantation at the clinical, cellular, and molecular levels. The multiple challenges in diagnosing rejection and in defining chronic and antibody-mediated rejection in VCA are then presented, and we finish by analyzing current research directions and novel concepts aiming at improving available diagnostic measures. PMID:24324470

  13. Acute liver failure associated with prolonged use of bromfenac leading to liver transplantation. The Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    PubMed

    Fontana, R J; McCashland, T M; Benner, K G; Appelman, H D; Gunartanam, N T; Wisecarver, J L; Rabkin, J M; Lee, W M

    1999-11-01

    Bromfenac, a nonnarcotic analgesic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was associated with reversible, minor elevations in serum aminotransferase levels during clinical trials. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, laboratory, and histological features of 4 patients with severe bromfenac hepatotoxicity identified at 3 tertiary care centers participating in the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Bromfenac was administered for chronic musculoskeletal disorders to 4 women in therapeutic doses of 25 to 100 mg/d for a minimum of 90 days. All patients reported a prodrome of malaise and fatigue and presented with severe, symptomatic hepatocellular injury with associated hypoprothrombinemia. None of the subjects had underlying liver or kidney disease, and there was no evidence of a hypersensitivity reaction. Other identifiable causes of acute liver failure were uniformly excluded. Despite supportive measures, all the subjects developed progressive liver failure over 5 to 37 days, leading to emergency liver transplantation in 3 patients and death in 1 patient while awaiting transplantation. Extensive confluent parenchymal necrosis that appeared to begin in the central zones and was accompanied by a predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate was noted in all the livers examined. Nodular regeneration was seen in the 2 patients with a more protracted clinical course. Administration of therapeutic doses of bromfenac for greater than 90 days was associated with the development of acute liver failure leading to liver transplantation or death in 4 adult women. The poor outcomes observed in this series, coupled with the inability to identify individuals at risk for severe, idiosyncratic bromfenac hepatotoxicity, preclude further use of bromfenac in the medical community.

  14. Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord blood transplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France

    PubMed Central

    Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Gluckman, Eliane; Blaise, Didier; Mannone, Lionel; Milpied, Noel; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Nguyen, Stephanie; Cahn, Jean Yves; de Revel, Thierry; Garnier, Federico; Faucher, Catherine; Taright, Namik; Kenzey, Chantal; Volt, Fernanda; Bertrand, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-01-01

    Double cord blood transplantation extends the use of cord blood to adults for whom a single unit is not available, but the procedure is limited by its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1 year after transplantation. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4 years. The overall survival at 2 years after single and double cord blood transplants was 42% versus 62%, respectively (P=0.03), while the leukemia-free-survival was 33% versus 53%, respectively (P=0.03). The relapse rate was 21% after double transplants and 42% after a single transplant (P=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse mortality or chronic graft-versus-host-disease. The estimated costs up to 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning for single and double cord blood transplantation were € 165,253 and €191,827, respectively. The corresponding costs after myeloablative conditioning were € 192,566 and € 213,050, respectively. Compared to single transplants, double cord blood transplantation was associated with supplementary costs of € 21,302 and € 32,420 up to 4 years, but with increases in quality-adjusted life-years of 0.616 and 0.484, respectively, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of € 34,581 and €66,983 in the myeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in first complete remission in France, double cord transplantation is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted life-years. PMID:24143000

  15. Pretransplant NPM1 MRD levels predict outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, S; Benner, A; Thiede, C; Martens, U; Huber, J; Stadtherr, P; Janssen, J W G; Röllig, C; Uppenkamp, M J; Bochtler, T; Hegenbart, U; Ehninger, G; Ho, A D; Dreger, P; Krämer, A

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prognostic impact of pre-transplant minimal residual disease (MRD) as determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 67 adult NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Twenty-eight of the 67 patients had a FLT3-ITD (42%). Median age at transplantation was 54.7 years, median follow-up for survival from time of allografting was 4.9 years. At transplantation, 31 patients were in first, 20 in second complete remission (CR) and 16 had refractory disease (RD). Pre-transplant NPM1 MRD levels were measured in 39 CR patients. Overall survival (OS) for patients transplanted in CR was significantly longer as compared to patients with RD (P=0.004), irrespective of whether the patients were transplanted in first or second CR (P=0.74). There was a highly significant difference in OS after allogeneic HSCT between pre-transplant MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (estimated 5-year OS rates of 40 vs 89% P=0.007). Multivariable analyses on time to relapse and OS revealed pre-transplant NPM1 MRD levels >1% as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival after allogeneic HSCT, whereas FLT3-ITD had no impact. Notably, outcome of patients with pre-transplant NPM1 MRD positivity >1% was as poor as that of patients transplanted with RD. PMID:27471865

  16. Direct label-free electrical immunodetection of transplant rejection protein biomarker in physiological buffer using floating gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors.

    PubMed

    Tulip, Fahmida S; Eteshola, Edward; Desai, Suchita; Mostafa, Salwa; Roopa, Subramanian; Evans, Boyd; Islam, Syed Kamrul

    2014-06-01

    Monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is used as an immune biomarker for early monitoring of transplant or allograft rejection. This paper demonstrates a direct electrical, label-free detection method of recombinant human MIG with anti-MIG IgG molecules in physiologically relevant buffer environment. The sensor platform used is a biologically modified GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device. Biomolecular recognition capability was provided by using high affinity anti-MIG monoclonal antibody to form molecular affinity interface receptors on short N-hydroxysuccinimide-ester functionalized disulphide (DSP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the gold sensing gate of the HEMT device. A floating gate configuration has been adopted to eliminate the influences of external gate voltage. Preliminary test results with the proposed chemically treated GaN HEMT biosensor show that MIG can be detected for a wide range of concentration varying from 5 ng/mL to 500 ng/mL.

  17. Direct label-free electrical immunodetection of transplant rejection protein biomarker in physiological buffer using floating gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors.

    PubMed

    Tulip, Fahmida S; Eteshola, Edward; Desai, Suchita; Mostafa, Salwa; Roopa, Subramanian; Evans, Boyd; Islam, Syed Kamrul

    2014-06-01

    Monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is used as an immune biomarker for early monitoring of transplant or allograft rejection. This paper demonstrates a direct electrical, label-free detection method of recombinant human MIG with anti-MIG IgG molecules in physiologically relevant buffer environment. The sensor platform used is a biologically modified GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device. Biomolecular recognition capability was provided by using high affinity anti-MIG monoclonal antibody to form molecular affinity interface receptors on short N-hydroxysuccinimide-ester functionalized disulphide (DSP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the gold sensing gate of the HEMT device. A floating gate configuration has been adopted to eliminate the influences of external gate voltage. Preliminary test results with the proposed chemically treated GaN HEMT biosensor show that MIG can be detected for a wide range of concentration varying from 5 ng/mL to 500 ng/mL. PMID:24803243

  18. Haematopoietic cell transplantation for acute leukaemia and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome in Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Richard; Wagner, John E; Hirsch, Betsy; DeFor, Todd E; Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2014-02-01

    Acute leukaemia or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS ≥ 5% blasts) in Fanconi anaemia (FA) patients is associated with a poor prognosis. We report 21 FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS who underwent haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at the University of Minnesota between 1988 and 2011. Six patients had biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Eight patients received pre-transplant cytoreduction, with 3 achieving complete remission. HCT donor source included human leucocyte antigen-matched sibling (n = 2) or alternative donors (n = 19). Neutrophil engraftment was 95% for the entire cohort, and the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease was 19%. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 33%, with a relapse rate of 24%, with similar OS in patients with biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Our study supports the use of HCT in the treatment of FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS, however, the role of chemotherapy prior to HCT remains unclear for this population. FA patients with biallelic BRCA2 are unique and may benefit from higher dose chemotherapy relative to other complementation groups.

  19. Pain in the left ear as the presenting symptom of acute myocardial infarction in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Ivanac, I; Danic-Hadzibegovic, A; Kes, P

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain is the main presenting symptom in patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, many patients present with atypical symptoms, which may delay proper diagnosis and treatment. We present the first documented case of pain in the left ear as an atypical presentation of acute myocardial infarction 5 days after renal transplantation.

  20. Acute renal failure and volume overload syndrome secondary to a femorofemoral arteriovenous fistula angioplasty in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique; Desbuissons, Geoffroy; Pallet, Nicolas; Sartorius, Albane; Legendre, Christophe; Mamzer, Marie-France; Sberro Soussan, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies analyzing the impact of AVF on cardiovascular and renal parameters, as well as outcomes, in kidney transplant recipients are lacking. On the other hand, it is not known whether AVF ligation after transplantation modifies hemodynamic parameters and kidney function. We report a case of a renal transplant recipient who developed an acute congestive heart failure accompanied by renal failure, which were triggered by femorofemoral AVF angioplasty. Prompt AVF ligation rapidly reversed clinical symptoms and normalized cardiac and renal functions. This paper illustrates the potential deleterious consequences of high-output AVF after kidney transplantation and raises considerations regarding the impact of the fistula on cardiac status and kidney function after kidney transplantation and, consequently, the management AVF after transplantation. PMID:23533921

  1. [Serum beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2M) following renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Silva, A; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Ramos, O L; Azjen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    Although there was an important improvement in graft and patient survival the last 10 years, graft rejection continues to be a major barrier to the success of renal transplantation. Identification of a laboratory test that could help to diagnose graft rejection would facilitate the management of renal transplanted patients. PURPOSE--To evaluate the utility of monitoring serum beta 2M in recently transplanted patients. METHODS--We daily determined serum beta 2M levels in 20 receptors of renal grafts (10 from living related and 10 from cadaveric donors) and compared them to their clinical and laboratory evolution. RESULTS--Eight patients who presented immediate good renal function following grafting and did not have rejection had a mean serum beta 2M of 3.7 mg/L on the 4th day post transplant. The sensitivity of the test for the diagnosis of acute rejection was 87.5%, but the specificity was only 46%. Patients who presented acute tubular necrosis (ATN) without rejection had a progressive decrease in their serum levels of beta 2M, while their serum creatinine changed as they were dialyzed. In contrast, patients with ATN and concomitance of acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity presented elevated beta 2M and creatinine serum levels. CONCLUSION--Daily monitoring of serum beta 2M does not improve the ability to diagnose acute rejection in patients with good renal function. However, serum beta 2M levels seemed to be useful in diagnosing acute rejection or CSA nephrotoxicity in patients with ATN. PMID:7787867

  2. Role of anti-vimentin antibodies in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rose, Marlene L

    2013-11-01

    Production of anti-vimentin antibodies (AVA) after solid organ transplantation are common. Although classically thought to be expressed mainly within the cytosol, recent evidence demonstrates that extracellular or cell surface expression of vimentin is not unusual. This review examines the evidence to assess whether AVA contribute to allograft pathology. Clinical studies suggest that AVA are associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy in heart transplant recipients. Studies in non-human primates confirm that production of AVA after renal and heart transplantation are not inhibited by Cyclosporine. Experimental studies have demonstrated that mice pre-immunised with vimentin undergo accelerated acute rejection and vascular intimal occlusion of cardiac allografts. Adoptive transfer of hyperimmune sera containing AVA into B-cell-knock-out mice caused accelerated rejection of allografted hearts, this is clear evidence that antibodies to vimentin accelerate rejection. AVA act in concert with the alloimmune response and AVA do not damage syngeneic or native heart allografts. Confocal microscopy of allografted organs in vimentin immunised mice shows extensive expression of vimentin on endothelial cells, apoptotic leukocytes and platelet/leukocyte conjugates, co-localising with C4d. One explanation for the ability of AVA to accelerate rejection would be fixation of complement within the graft and subsequent pro-inflammatory effects; there may also be interactions with platelets within the vasculature.

  3. Second allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed acute and chronic leukaemias for patients who underwent a first allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: a survey of the Société Française de Greffe de moelle (SFGM).

    PubMed

    Michallet, M; Tanguy, M L; Socié, G; Thiébaut, A; Belhabri, A; Milpied, N; Reiffers, J; Kuentz, M; Cahn, J Y; Blaise, D; Demeocq, F; Jouet, J P; Michallet, A S; Ifrah, N; Vilmer, E; Molina, L; Michel, G; Lioure, B; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Pico, J L; Sadoun, A; Guyotat, D; Attal, M; Curé, H; Bordigoni, P; Sutton, L; Buzyn-Veil, A; Tilly, M; Keoirruer, N; Feguex, N

    2000-02-01

    Although recurrent malignancy is the most frequent indication for second stem cell transplantation (2nd SCT), there are few reports that include sufficiently large numbers of patients to enable prognostic factor analysis. This retrospective study includes 150 patients who underwent a 2nd SCT for relapsed acute myeloblastic leukaemia (n = 61), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 47) or chronic myeloid leukaemia (n = 42) after a first allogeneic transplant (including 26 T-cell-depleted). The median interval between the first transplant and relapse, and between relapse and second transplant was 17 months and 5 months respectively. After the 2nd SCT, engraftment occurred in 93% of cases, 32% of patients developed acute graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) >/= grade II and 38% chronic GVHD. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival were 32 +/- 8% and 30 +/- 8%, respectively, with a risk of relapse of 44 +/- 12% and a transplant-related mortality of 45 +/- 9%. In a multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with a better outcome after 2nd SCT: age < 16 years at second transplant; relapse occurring more than 12 months after the first transplant; transplantation from a female donor; absence of acute GVHD; and the occurrence of chronic GVHD. The best candidates for a second transplant are likely to be patients with acute leukaemia in remission before transplant, in whom the HLA-identical donor was female and who relapsed more than 1 year after the first transplant.

  4. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  5. Successful cord blood transplantation in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Shugo; Fujishima, Yukiteru; Suzuki, Yuzo; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Oyake, Tatsuo; Togawa, Ryou; Oyama, Kotaro; Ikai, Akio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in surgical corrections and supportive care for congenital heart disease have resulted in increasing numbers of adult survivors who may develop hematological malignancies. Treatments including chemotherapy for such patients may cause serious hemodynamic or cardiac complications, especially in those receiving stem cell transplantation. We present a 29-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and congenital heart disease. She had been diagnosed with pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum at birth, and the anomaly was surgically corrected according to the Fontan technique at age 9 years. Her induction chemotherapy required modifications due to poor cardiac status with Fontan circulation. However, after surgical procedures including total cavopulmonary connection and aortic valve replacement at first complete remission, her cardiac status was significantly improved. Subsequently, she underwent cord blood stem cell transplantation at the third complete remission. She required intensive supportive care for circulatory failure as a pre-engraftment immune reaction and stage III acute graft versus host disease of the gut, but recovered from these complications. She was discharged on day 239, and remained in complete remission at 1-year post-transplantation. PMID:27599417

  6. No difference in outcome between children and adolescents transplanted for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission.

    PubMed

    Dini, Giorgio; Zecca, Marco; Balduzzi, Adriana; Messina, Chiara; Masetti, Riccardo; Fagioli, Franca; Favre, Claudio; Rabusin, Marco; Porta, Fulvio; Biral, Erika; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Iori, Anna Paola; Rognoni, Carla; Prete, Arcangelo; Locatelli, Franco

    2011-12-15

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in second complete remission is one of the most common indications for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in pediatric patients. We compared the outcome after HCST of adolescents, aged 14 to 18 years, with that of children (ie, patients < 14 years of age). Enrolled in the study were 395 patients given the allograft between January 1990 and December 2007; both children (334) and adolescents (61) were transplanted in the same pediatric institutions. All patients received a myeloablative regimen that included total body irradiation in the majority of them. The donor was an HLA-identical sibling for 199 patients and an unrelated volunteer in the remaining 196 patients. Children and adolescents had a comparable cumulative incidence of transplantation-related mortality, disease recurrence, and of both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The 10-year probability of overall survival and event-free survival for the whole cohort of patients were 57% (95% confidence interval, 52%-62%) and 54% (95% confidence interval, 49%-59%), respectively, with no difference between children and adolescents. This study documents that adolescents with ALL in second complete remission given HSCT in pediatric centers have an outcome that does not differ from that of patients younger than 14 years of age.

  7. Ovarian reserve in women treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy, but not stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Brooke V; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation.

  8. Ovarian Reserve in Women Treated for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Chemotherapy, but Not Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F.; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation. PMID:23050166

  9. Multiple cotton wool spots following bone marrow transplantation for treatment of acute lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gloor, B; Gratwohl, A; Hahn, H; Kretzschmar, S; Robert, Y; Speck, B; Daicker, B

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia developed visual impairment due to occlusion of small retinal vessels with multiple cotton wool spots after treatment which included whole body and skull irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation and cyclosporin A. Withdrawal of cyclosporin A and treatment with corticosteroids was followed by recovery of visual acuity. This retinopathy and the retinal changes seen in the immunodeficiency syndrome are thought to be closely related. The possible role of cyclosporin A is discussed, though cotton wool spots and retinal haemorrhages have never been described in renal transplant patients during treatment with this drug. Withdrawal of cyclosporin A, which is highly effective in preventing graft-versus-host disease, can be fatal. Irradiation of the skull prior to bone marrow transplantation and intrathecal administration of methotrexate may be the most important factors causing the retinal ischaemic signs described here. The inclusion of an ophthalmologist in the team monitoring transplant patients would lead to increased documentation and a better understanding of this disease. Images PMID:3888252

  10. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups.

  11. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: An Italian position statement

    PubMed Central

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the “6-mo rule”. Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The “Group of Italian Regions” suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  12. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  13. Comparable outcomes between autologous and allogeneic transplant for adult acute myeloid leukemia in first CR.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, M; Hara, M; Fujita, H; Aoki, J; Kanamori, H; Ohashi, K; Usuki, K; Fukuda, T; Chou, T; Tanaka, J; Atsuta, Y; Takami, A

    2016-05-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) is a potentially curative post-remission treatment for adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in their first CR, transplant-related morbidity and mortality remains a major drawback. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of patients who underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT; n=375) with those who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT; n=521) and allo-PBSCT (n=380) from MSDs for adults with AML/CR1, in which propensity score models were used to adjust selection biases among patients, primary physicians and institutions to overcome ambiguity in the patients' background information. Both the multivariate analysis and propensity score models indicated that the leukemia-free survival rate of auto-PBSCT was not significantly different from that of allo-BMT (hazard ratio (HR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92 to 1.66; P=0.16) and allo-PBSCT (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.85-1.51; P=0.40). The current results suggest that auto-PBSCT remains a promising alternative treatment for patients with AML/CR1 in the absence of an available MSD. PMID:26808566

  14. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient’s survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis. PMID:27358791

  15. Acute kidney injury following liver transplantation: a systematic review of published predictive models.

    PubMed

    Caragata, R; Wyssusek, K H; Kruger, P

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent postoperative complication amongst liver transplant recipients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This systematic review analysed the existing predictive models, in order to solidify current understanding. Articles were selected for inclusion if they described the primary development of a clinical prediction model (either an algorithm or risk score) to predict AKI post liver transplantation. The database search yielded a total of seven studies describing the primary development of a prediction model or risk score for the development of AKI following liver transplantation. The models span thirteen years of clinical research and highlight a gradual change in the definitions of AKI, emphasising the need to employ standardised definitions for subsequent studies. Collectively, the models identify a diverse range of predictive factors with several common trends. They emphasise the impact of preoperative renal dysfunction, liver disease severity and aetiology, metabolic risk factors as well as intraoperative variables including measures of haemodynamic instability and graft quality. Although several of the models address postoperative parameters, their utility in predictive modelling seems to be of questionable relevance. The common risk factors identified within this systematic review provide a minimum list of variables, which future studies should address. Research in this area would benefit from prospective, multi-site studies with larger cohorts as well as the subsequent internal and external validation of predictive models. Ultimately, the ability to identify patients at high risk of post-transplant AKI may enable early intervention and perhaps prevention. PMID:27029658

  16. Thiabendazole-induced acute liver failure requiring transplantation and subsequent diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Groh, Matthieu; Blanche, Philippe; Calmus, Yvon; Guillevin, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), a systemic necrotising vasculitis that affects medium- and small-sized arteries, has visceral involvement in 40-60% of the patients. According to the Five-Factor Score (FFS), it is associated with poor outcome. We describe a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for severe ductopenia induced by thiabendazole that was empirically prescribed for chronic hypereosinophilia. Eleven years later, despite immunosuppressive treatment to prevent graft rejection, he developed mononeuritis multiplex; PAN was diagnosed. He also had severe recurrent ischaemic cholangitides because of post-OLT hepatic artery ligation to treat a postoperative severe haematemesis. His outcome was favourable after second OLT, under steroids, cyclophosphamide pulses and tacrolimus. In retrospect, his initial symptoms and hypereosinophilia were probably attributable to PAN.

  17. [Acute conditions after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Bujdák, P; Pribylincová, V; Reznícek, J; Miklosi, M; Breza, J

    2003-05-01

    There is a high risk of severe complications after kidney transplantation. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) the incidence of complications like ischaemic cardiac disease, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, perforation of colonic diverticulosis is especially higher. The authors want to indicate another specific complication, rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Within the group of 658 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1981 and January 2000 there were 54 (8.2%) patients with AD-PKD. Four patients with severe retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney we present in a short case reports. All cases were fatal. Expect morphologic and functional follow up of the graft it is necessary to follow up polycystic kidney and indicate urgent nephrectomy in the case of any change.

  18. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-{alpha}1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Weber, Joseph; Mohanakumar, T.

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. {yields} Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. {yields} Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. {yields} Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-{alpha}1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 {+-} 1.1-, 3.2 {+-} 0.9-, and 3.4 {+-} 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of {beta}-methyl cyclodextran ({beta}MCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 {+-} 0.3, vs {beta}MCD untreated being 6.4 {+-} 1.1-fold

  19. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  20. The role of autologous transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first and second remission.

    PubMed

    Linker, Charles

    2007-03-01

    Since 1986, the University of California San Francisco has developed novel approaches to autologous transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Strategies have included intensive preparative regimens using busulfan and etoposide, and evolving strategies for pre-transplant consolidation and stem cell collection. Treatment-related mortality has been low (<5%), and after problems with slow engraftment and extended mucosal and skin toxicity in initial studies using 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC)-purged bone marrow, peripheral blood autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been well tolerated even in older patients. In particular, careful attention to avoiding neurotoxicity associated with the use of high-dose cytarabine has limited dropout rates. Long-term event-free survival (EFS) has been excellent in first remission (CR1) cytogenetically favorable groups, particularly with post-transplant treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; EFS 88%). ASCT in advanced disease showed overall long-term EFS of 44%; patients with APL in second remission achieved long-term EFS of 64%. Even among those failing primary induction, after remission induction with an alternative regimen, EFS was 61%. ASCT appears to be a treatment of choice for those in APL CR2, and offers some curative potential for AML CR2. The role of ASCT for those in CR1 is less clear, in part because high dropout rates in large randomized studies complicates interpretation of those studies. New directions for ASCT in the treatment of AML should focus on improving therapy, including calibrated intensification of induction regimens using plasma-kinetics targeting of dosages and the development and incorporation of immunotherapies into consolidation regimens. PMID:17336257

  1. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    velocity with no catch-up growth. The quality of life after SBT was reported to be comparable to that of patients on home enteral nutrition. A study found that while the parents of pediatric SBT recipients reported significant limitations in the physical and psychological well being of the children compared with normal school children, the pediatric SBT recipients themselves reported a quality of life similar to other school children. Survival was found to be better in transplants performed since 1991. Patient survival was associated with the type of organ transplanted with better survival in isolated small bowel recipients. Adverse Events Despite improvement in patient and graft survival rates, small bowel transplant is still associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infection with subsequent sepsis is the leading cause of death (51.3%). Bacterial, fungal and viral infections have all been reported. The most common viral infections are cytomegalorvirus (18-40%) and Epstein-Barr virus. The latter often led to ß-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Graft rejection is the second leading cause of death after SBT (10.4%) and is responsible for 57% of graft removal. Acute rejection rates ranged from 51% to 83% in the major programs. Most of the acute rejection episodes were mild and responded to steroids and OKT3. Antilymphocyte therapy was needed in up to 27% of patients. Isolated small bowel allograft and positive lymphocytotoxic cross-match were found to be risk factors for acute rejection. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease occurred in 21% of SBT recipients and accounted for 7% of post-transplant mortality. The frequency was higher in pediatric recipients (31%) and in adults receiving composite visceral allografts (25%). The allograft itself is often involved in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The reported incidence of host versus graft disease varied widely among centers (0% - 14%). Surgical complications were reported to

  2. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  3. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  4. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  5. Key issues in transplant tourism

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-01-01

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  6. Both rejection and tolerance of allografts can occur in the absence of secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Kant, Cavit D; Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Katsunori; Shea, Susan; Yamada, Yohei; Connolly, Sarah E; Marino, Jose; Tocco, Georges; Benichou, Gilles

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we showed that aly/aly mice, which are devoid of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, acutely rejected fully allogeneic skin and heart grafts. They mounted potent inflammatory direct alloresponses but failed to develop indirect alloreactivity after transplantation. Remarkably, skin allografts also were rejected acutely by splenectomized aly/aly (aly/aly-spl(-)) mice devoid of all secondary lymphoid organs. In these recipients, the rejection was mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) T cells presumably primed in the bone marrow. In contrast, cardiac transplants were not rejected by aly/aly-spl(-) mice. Actually, aly/aly-spl(-) mice that spontaneously accepted a heart allotransplant and displayed donor-specific tolerance also accepted skin grafts from the same, but not a third-party, donor via a mechanism involving CD4(+) regulatory T cells producing IL-10 cytokine. Therefore, direct priming of alloreactive T cells, as well as rejection and regulatory tolerance of allogeneic transplants, can occur in recipient mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs.

  7. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Solid organ transplant - lung ... the new lung Have severe disease of other organs Cannot reliably take their medicines Are unable to ... medicines Damage to your kidneys, liver, or other organs from anti-rejection medicines Future risk of certain ...

  8. Solid organ transplants in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Harbell, Jack; Terrault, Norah A; Stock, Peter

    2013-09-01

    There is a growing need for kidney and liver transplants in persons living with HIV. Fortunately, with the significant advances in antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections, HIV infection is no longer an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Data from several large prospective multi-center cohort studies have shown that solid organ transplantation in carefully selected HIV-infected individuals is safe. However, significant challenges have been identified including prevention of acute rejection, management of drug-drug interactions and treatment of recurrent viral hepatitis. This article reviews the selection criteria, outcomes, and special management considerations for HIV-infected patients undergoing liver or kidney transplantation.

  9. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Graft Pancreas Divisum in a Patient with Modified Multi-Visceral Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Slivka, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A patient with modified multivisceral transplant developed recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) 1 year after transplant and was found to have graft pancreas divisum with otherwise negative work-up for identifying the etiology of RAP. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed with minor papilla sphincterotomy and pancreatic duct stent placement of the graft pancreas. The patient's symptoms resolved following endotherapy for a follow-up period of 2 years. This is a unique case of graft pancreatitis secondary to pancreas divisum. PMID:26157839

  10. Expression of granzyme B during primary cytomegalovirus infection after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Spaeny, L H; van der Vliet, H J; Rentenaar, R J; Wolbink, A M; Surachno, J; Wertheim, P M; Schellekens, P T; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1999-03-01

    CD8+ T cells employ granzyme B (GrB) to induce apoptosis in target cells. Increased expression of GrB has been put forward as a diagnostic marker in transplant rejection and viral infection. Three-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytosis during primary cytomegalovirus infection after renal transplantation resulted from expansion of a CD8+GrB+CD62L+ T cell subset that was almost absent during stable transplant function or acute rejection. This expansion coincided with a temporary increase in systemic soluble GrB (sGrB) levels. No such increase was observed during stable transplant function or acute rejection. Thus, the primary immune response to cytomegalovirus infection is accompanied by appearance of CD8+GrB+CD62L+ T cells and increased sGrB levels in the peripheral blood compartment. Determination of the latter may provide a novel approach for monitoring viral infections.

  11. Plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible individuals: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIUHUI; HU, XINGBIN; XIA, AIJUN; YI, JING; AN, QUNXING; ZHANG, XIANQING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO blood type-incompatible patients. A small intestinal transplantation case between ABO-incompatible individuals is hereby presented and analyzed. The main treatment included plasma exchange, splenectomy and immunosuppression. The patient undergoing small intestinal transplantation exhibited stable vital signs. A mild acute rejection reaction developed ~2 weeks after the surgery, which the patient successfully overcame. The subsequent colonoscopy and pathological examination revealed no signs of acute rejection. In conclusion, plasma exchange in combination with anti-immune rejection therapy proved to be an effective scheme for the management of small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible patients. PMID:24649066

  12. First documented case of successful kidney transplantation from a donor with acute renal failure treated with dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bacak-Kocman, Iva; Peric, Mladen; Kastelan, Zeljko; Kes, Petar; Mesar, Ines; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2013-10-01

    There is a widening gap between the needs and possibilities of kidney transplantation. In order to solve the problem of organ shortage, the selection criteria for kidney donors have been less stringent over the last years. Favorable outcome of renal transplantation from deceased donors with acute renal failure requiring dialysis may have an important role in expanding the pool of donors. We present the case of two renal transplantations from a polytraumatized 20-years old donor with acute renal failure requiring dialysis. One recipient established good diuresis from the first post-transplant day and did not require hemodialysis. The second recipient had delayed graft function and was treated with 8 hemodialysis sessions. The patient was discharged with good diuresis and normal serum creatinine. After two years of follow-up, both recipients have normal graft function. According to our experience, kidneys from deceased young donors with acute renal failure requiring dialysis may be transplanted, in order to decrease the number of patients on transplantation waiting lists.

  13. Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction.

  14. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass.

  15. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  16. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Facenda-Lorenzo, María; Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called "sanctuaries," are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  17. B cells assist allograft rejection in the deficiency of protein kinase c-theta.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwei; Xu, Rui; Ma, Lian Li; Han, Wei; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Williams, Phillip E; Sciammas, Roger; Chong, Anita S; Yin, Deng Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have previously shown that mice deficient in protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) have the ability to reject cardiac allografts, but are susceptible to tolerance induction. Here we tested role of B cells in assisting alloimmune responses in the absence of PKCθ. Mouse cardiac allograft transplantations were performed from Balb/c (H-2d) to PKCθ knockout (PKCθ(-/-)), PKCθ and B cell double-knockout (PBDK, H-2b) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. PBDK mice spontaneously accepted the allografts with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in the donor cardiac allograft. Anti-B cell antibody (rituximab) significantly delayed allograft rejection in PKCθ(-/-), but not in WT mice. Co-transfer of PKCθ(-/-) T plus PKCθ(-/-) B cells or primed sera triggered allograft rejection in Rag1(-/-) mice, and only major histocompatibility complex class II-enriched B cells, but not class I-enriched B cells, were able to promote rejection. This, together with the inability of PKCθ(-/-) and CD28(-/-) double-deficient (PCDK) mice to acutely reject allografts, suggested that an effective cognate interaction between PKCθ(-/-) T and B cells for acute rejection is CD28 molecule dependent. We conclude that T-B cell interactions synergize with PKCθ(-/-) T cells to mediate acute allograft rejection.

  18. Living related liver transplantation: histopathologic analysis of graft dysfunction in 304 patients.

    PubMed

    Minamiguchi, S; Sakurai, T; Fujita, S; Okuno, T; Haga, H; Mino, M; Kanehira, K; Matsushiro, H; Nakashima, Y; Inomata, Y; Tanaka, K; Yamabe, H

    1999-12-01

    Between June 1990 and August 1997, 304 mainly pediatric patients underwent a total of 311 orthotopic living related liver transplantations (LRLTs) under tacrolimus immunosuppression at Kyoto University Hospital. Congenital biliary atresia was the most common underlying disease. The donor was a parent, and the left lateral segments were used as grafts in most cases. The average number of loci of HLA-A, -B, and -DR mismatches between the donor and the recipient were 2.1. Forty-three transplants were ABO-incompatible. Liver histology at the time of abnormal liver function after transplantation was analyzed. Preservation injury was rare and mild. Acute cellular rejection (ACR) occurred in 36% of transplants during the first 6 months. Average rejection activity index (the Banff schema) was 4.2 and severe rejection was rarely seen. The number of mismatching HLA loci and immunosuppression regimens affected the incidence of ACR. Chronic rejection (CR) occurred in 2% of transplants. Concerning humoral rejection, no hyperacute rejection was seen. However, hepatic artery thrombosis (delayed hyperacute rejection) was seen in an ABO-incompatible transplant. Acute hepatitis, including those related to cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus, occurred in 17% of transplants. Chronic hepatitis, including hepatitis B and C, developed in 3%. Acute or chronic cholangitis occurred in 16%, and a significantly higher incidence of cholangitis was found in ABO-incompatible transplants. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease developed in 2%. In LRLT, milder preservation injury and less frequent ACR and CR were suggested, probably because of the short cold-ischemia time and the advantages of HLA histocompatibility, respectively. PMID:10667427

  19. Association of HLA-G promoter and 14-bp insertion-deletion variants with acute allograft rejection and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, M K; Prakash, S; Kapoor, R; Pandey, S K; Sharma, R K; Agrawal, S

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the HLA-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, acute allograft rejection (AR) and overall survival after renal transplantation was investigated in 300 ESRD patients and 302 age, sex and ethnicity-matched controls. Sequencing was performed to evaluate the impact of HLA-G promoter region single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whereas semi-quantitative PCR method was used to determine the probable HLA-G expression pattern among ESRD and AR cases. Further, soluble human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G (sHLA-G) expression levels were compared in AR vs non-AR cases in the light of HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism. Increased risk was found for 14-bp D/D (deletion-DD) genotype and 14-bp D allele [DD: odds ratio (OR) = 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-2.06, P value = 0.0358; D: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.03-1.62, P value = 0.0277], respectively for ESRD and CMV infection (DD: OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.45-5.05, P value = 0.0021; D: OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.22-3.08, P value = 0.0052). Nearly fourfold (OR = 3.62, 95%CI = 1.61-8.14, p = 0.0039) risk was observed for 14-bp I/I (insertion-II) genotype for AR. Survival analysis showed increased overall survival (OS) (AR or death) for 14-bp D/D genotype. HLA-G promoter region sequencing was carried out among 60 ESRD patients and 100 normal controls which showed increased risk for -964 G>A, -725 C>G/T and -486 A>C SNPs. -964 G>A and -725 C>G/T SNPs showed risk association for AR patients. High level of HLA-G transcripts was observed among non-AR patients. Further soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) showed increased levels in ESRD patients (mean ± SEM; 62.16 ± 2.43 U/ml) as compared to controls (mean ± SEM; 21.06 ± 3.89 U/ml) (P = <0.0001). The 14-bp I/I, 14-bp I/D and 14-bp D/D genotypes showed significantly higher levels of sHLA-G among non-AR as

  20. Successful kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhishui; Zeng, Fanjun; Ming, Changsheng; Lin, Zhengbin; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-03-01

    Highly sensitized patients experience an increased number of rejection episodes and have poorer graft survival rates; hence, sensitization is a significant barrier to both access to and the success of organ transplantation. This study reports our experience in kidney transplantation in highly sensitized patients. Fourteen patients with sensitization or high levels of panelreactive antibodies (PRA) were studied. All patients were desensitized with pre-transplant intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)/plasmapheresis (PP) with or without rituximab and thymoglobulin induction therapy, combined with a Prograf/MMF/Pred immunosuppressive regimen. Of 14 patients, 10 showed good graft functions without acute rejection (AR) episodes. Acute cellular rejection in two patients was reversed by methylprednisolone. Two patients underwent antibody-mediated rejection; one was treated with PP/IVIG successfully, whereas the other lost graft functions due to the de novo production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA). Graft functions were stable, and there were no AR episodes in other patients. Conclusively, desensitization using PP/IVIG with or without rituximab increases the likelihood of successful live-donor kidney transplantation in sensitized recipients. PMID:21681679

  1. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  2. Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Lee, Stephanie J; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Ballen, Karen K; Buchbinder, David K; Dehn, Jason; Freytes, Cesar O; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lemaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Szwajcer, David; Joffe, Steven; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children. PMID:24607554

  3. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  4. Outcome of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for children with advanced acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek, ER; Gooley, TA; Woolfrey, AE; Carpenter, PA; Matthews, DC; Sanders, JE

    2010-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may offer the only chance of cure for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in second complete remission (CR2) or with relapsed disease, but the outcome of these patients has not been clearly defined. We conducted a retrospective study of 58 children, median age 7.4 years (range 0.8–17.3), who received matched related or unrelated BMT at our institution for AML in CR2 (n = 12), in untreated first relapse (n = 11) or with refractory disease (n = 35), to identify risk factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS). Life threatening to fatal regimen-related toxicity was observed in 22% of patients. Estimates of DFS at 5 years (95% confidence interval) for patients in CR2, with untreated first relapse and refractory disease were 58% (27–80%), 36% (11–63%) and 9% (2–21%), respectively. Non-relapse mortality estimates were 0%, 27% (0–54%) and 17% (5–30%), and relapse estimates were 42% (14–70%), 36% (8–65%) and 74% (60–89%), respectively. Advanced disease phase and cytogenetic abnormalities at the time of transplantation were each associated with decreased DFS and increased relapse in multivariable regression models. Survival for children transplanted in CR2 or untreated first relapse is higher than that previously reported, but relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure regardless of disease stage. PMID:15361903

  5. In vivo infusion of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies prevents graft failure after HLA partially incompatible bone marrow transplantation in children with high risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Jabado, N; Bordigoni, P; Michel, G; Haddad, E; Mechinaud, F; Landman-Parker, J; Leblanc, T; Plouvier, E; Baruchel, A; Stephan, J L; Souillet, G; Vilmer, E; Wijdenes, J; Le Deist, F; Fischer, A

    1997-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from matched sibling donors is the therapy of choice for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children. It is however not available to more than two-thirds of patients who lack a matched donor. Here, we review the outcome of 28 patients with high-risk ALL who were transplanted in France with alternative marrow sources such as HLA-phenoidentical unrelated volunteers and HLA-partially incompatible relatives. For these patients, we tested the possibility to prevent T-depleted marrow graft rejection by infusing in vivo two monoclonal antibodies directed against adhesion receptors i.e., LFA-1 and CD2. Two previous multicenter trials in children transplanted with partially incompatible bone marrow for inborn errors of metabolism showed their efficacy in this setting. Twenty eight patients were enrolled in this study and followed for a median of 4.4 years. Bone marrow engraftment occurred in 81% of the evaluable patients. Post-transplantation leukaemic relapse was the most frequent cause of death in this group of patients, and occurred in 39% of patients. The second most frequent complication was infectious disease, while an EBV-induced B-lymphocyte proliferative disorder occurred in four patients. In conclusion, T-cell-depletion combined with infusion of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies is efficient in preventing graft failure and GVHD in this group of children with high-risk leukaemia undergoing partially incompatible BMT. The overall DFS is not improved in contrast to what has been previously observed in patients with immunodeficiencies transplanted with a similar rejection prophylaxis. Other approaches are therefore needed aiming either at preserving donor T-cell mediated immunity or accelerating immune reconstitution.

  6. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  7. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  8. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  9. Micro and Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems for Preventing Allotransplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James D.; Acharya, Abhinav P.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in transplant immunology, tissue damage caused by acute allograft rejection remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the transplant recipient. Moreover, the long-term sequelae of lifelong immunosuppression leaves patients at risk for developing a host of other deleterious conditions. Controlled drug delivery using micro- and nanoparticles (MNPs) is an effective way to deliver higher local doses of a given drug to specific tissues and cells while mitigating systemic effects. Herein, we review several descriptions of MNP immunotherapies aimed at prolonging allograft survival. We also discuss developments in the field of biomimetic drug delivery that use MNP constructs to induce and recruit our bodies' own suppressive immune cells. Finally, we comment on the regulatory pathway associated with these drug delivery systems. Collectively, it is our hope the studies described in this review will help to usher in a new era of immunotherapy in organ transplantation. PMID:25937032

  10. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  11. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Chung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jang Woon; Ha, Kee Yong

    2016-09-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  12. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  13. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M.; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  14. ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN ALLOGRAFT REJECTION

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Bradley, John R.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    In organ transplantation, blood borne cells and macromolecules (e.g. antibodies) of the host immune system are brought into direct contact with the endothelial cell (EC) lining of graft vessels. In this location, graft ECs play several roles in allograft rejection, including the initiation of rejection responses by presentation of alloantigen to circulating T cells; the development of inflammation and thrombosis; and as targets of injury and agents of repair. PMID:19034000

  15. Low relapse without excessive transplant related mortality following myeloablative cord blood transplantation for acute leukemia in complete remission: a matched cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Jonathan A; Leisenring, Wendy; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Woolfrey, Ann E; Delaney, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of cord blood transplantation (CBT), and the number of CBTs is increasing. Numerous studies confirm the presence of a graft-versus-leukemia effect following CBT, and preliminary data suggests that double unit CBT may be associated with a decreased risk of relapse. We have observed a low relapse rate following CBT among patients with acute leukemias in morphologic CR at the time of myeloablative transplant. To further assess this observation we conducted a matched cohort analysis comparing relapse rates and outcomes for patients receiving CBTs versus patients receiving matched unrelated donor (MURD) and mismatched unrelated donor (MMURD) transplants at our center. Thirty-one consecutive CBT patients (ages 0.6–42, median 22) transplanted between April 2006 and June 2008 were compared to matched subjects selected on the basis of disease type and remission number, cytogenetic risk status, minimal residual disease status (MRD), time from diagnosis to first relapse (for patients beyond CR1), use of imatinib for CML and Philadelphia chromosome positive ALL patients, age, and date of transplant. With a median follow-up among surviving CBT patients of 21.1 months (range 6.6–32.6), there has been one relapse among cord patients versus eight relapses among MURD patients (p=0.018) and seven relapses among MMURD patients (p=0.019). Transplant related mortality (TRM) between cohorts is comparable. Though we have observed a high incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following CBT, the incidence of National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria chronic GVHD has been low. These data support increased investigation of the use of CBT. PMID:19660726

  16. Tailoring tacrolimus-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Harold C

    2003-05-01

    Tacrolimus is a cornerstone immunosuppressive agent in renal transplantation and compared with cyclosporin, its use is associated with a reduced incidence of acute rejection. Optimizing immunosuppressive management in the early post-transplant period is important for achieving long-term graft function and survival. In attempts to improve the long-term outcomes of renal transplantation further, tacrolimus has been combined with two novel immunosuppressive agents, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and sirolimus, with encouraging results in terms of patient and graft survival, acute rejection rates and renal graft function. Tacrolimus in combination with MMF adjunctive therapy showed significantly better graft survival in patients with delayed graft function, fewer episodes of corticosteroid-resistant rejection and better renal function at the 3-year follow-up compared with cyclosporin microemulsion plus MMF immunosuppression. A tacrolimus plus MMF regimen was also effective for renal transplant recipients at our centre in Pennsylvania, resulting in excellent survival and rejection rates at 1 year post-transplantation. The 3-month results of a US multicentre study comparing tacrolimus in combination with either MMF or sirolimus showed these two treatment regimens to be equivalent in terms of patient and graft survival, delayed graft function, the incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection and renal graft function, although differences were apparent in terms of acute tubular necrosis and hyperlipidaemia. In conclusion, the development of a new immunosuppressive regimen in renal transplantation should take account of factors that influence graft function, both in the short and long term, as a way of optimizing individual maintenance therapy. PMID:12738759

  17. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  18. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  19. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  20. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-05-01

    We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  1. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in patients with refractory acute leukemia: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oyekunle, A A; Kröger, N; Zabelina, T; Ayuk, F; Schieder, H; Renges, H; Fehse, N; Waschke, O; Fehse, B; Kabisch, H; Zander, A R

    2006-01-01

    We examined retrospectively 44 patients with refractory acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/acute lymphoblastic leukemia=25/19) who underwent allogeneic transplantation at our center between 11/1990 and 04/2004. The median leukemic blasts was 25% and age 28 years (range, 3-56). Twenty-one patients had untreated relapse, 13 failed reinduction, eight in partial remission and two aplastic. Conditioning was myeloablative using cyclophosphamide, busulfan, total-body irradiation and etoposide (Bu/Cy/VP, n=22; TBI/Cy/VP, n=17; others, n=5) followed by marrow or peripheral blood transplant (n=23/21) from unrelated or related donors (n=28/16). All patients had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with cyclosporin and methotrexate. One patient experienced late graft failure. Severe acute-GVHD and chronic-GVHD appeared in eight and 14 patients, respectively. Thirteen patients (30%) remain alive after a median of 25.3 months (range, 2.4-134.1); with 31 deaths, mostly from relapse (n=15) and infections (n=12). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at 5 years was 28 and 26%, respectively. OS and PFS were significantly better with blasts < or =20% and time to transplant < or =1 year while transplant-related mortality was less with the use of TBI. We conclude that patients with refractory leukemia can benefit from allogeneic BMT, especially with < or =20% marrow blast.

  2. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  3. Heterotopic auxiliary rat liver transplantation with flow-regulated portal vein arterialization in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.(1-3) The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.(4) In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.(5-6) We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor's portal vein was carried out via the recipient's right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient's aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. (7) In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft's weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  4. Event-free survival and cost-effectiveness in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission treated with allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Orsi, C; Bartolozzi, B; Messori, A; Bosi, A

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic transplantation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission (ALL-CR1) has been studied in several clinical trials. However, no pooled survival analysis has yet been done. We conducted a survival meta-analysis to compare allogeneic transplantation vs chemotherapy or autologous transplantation using an intention-to-treat approach. Our study included the controlled clinical trials, wherein allocation to allogeneic transplant was based on donor availability. The event-free individual survival data were reconstructed on the basis of published information and Kaplan-Meier graphs. We then generated the meta-analytic event-free survival curves for the two treatments. The mean survival gain per patient was estimated and a simplified cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. In the allogeneic transplantation group, 293 patients were examined and 479 as controls (four trials). The event-free survival difference was statistically significant (P=0.011). The relative risk for event occurrence was 0.79 for the experimental group vs the controls (95% CI: 0.66-0.96; P=0.017). The mean survival gain was 1 year per patient. The cost per life-year gained was less than the conventional threshold of 50,000 euros. Allogeneic transplantation in ALL-CR1 improves event-free survival as compared to chemotherapy or autologous transplantation. Its cost-effectiveness profile is acceptable. PMID:17660839

  5. Role of MICA antibodies in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Xu, Chuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Mei, Hong

    2014-02-01

    As a potential transplant antigen, major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigen, has attracted increased attention because of its possible role in solid organ transplantation. There are two MICA forms, and MICA antibodies and soluble MICA (sMICA) have been found in the serum of transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for original reports of clinical studies involving the effect of MICA on outcomes of renal, heart, lung, and liver transplantation. In addition to the human leukocyte antigen antigens, which elicit a strong immune response, the polymorphic MICA antigens induce production of MICA antibodies and sMICA. A number of clinical studies have shown that MICA antibodies correlate with an increased incidence of rejection and a decreased allograft survival rate following renal or heart transplantation. Although it is clearly associated with chronic rejection of lung allografts, no such correlation was found for liver transplantation. Moreover, sMICA showed a negative association with acute rejection (AR) and may be a good predictor of heart transplant outcomes. These data suggest MICA expression patterns and regulatory function may be tissue specific and that different transplants have different organ-specific outcomes.

  6. Liver transplantation for children with acute liver failure associated with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Amir, Achiya Z; Ling, Simon C; Naqvi, Ahmed; Weitzman, Sheila; Fecteau, Annie; Grant, David; Ghanekar, Anand; Cattral, Mark; Nalli, Nadya; Cutz, Ernest; Kamath, Binita; Jones, Nicola; De Angelis, Maria; Ng, Vicky; Avitzur, Yaron

    2016-09-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening systemic disease, characterized by overwhelming stimulation of the immune system and categorized as primary or secondary types. Occasionally, acute liver failure (ALF) may dominate the clinical presentation. Given the systemic nature of HLH and risk of recurrence, HLH is considered by many a contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The aim of this study is to review our single-center experience with LT in children with secondary HLH and ALF (HLH-ALF). This is a cross-sectional, retrospective study of children with secondary HLH-ALF that underwent LT in 2005-2014. Of 246 LTs, 9 patients (3 males; median age, 5 years; range, 0.7-15.4 years) underwent LT for secondary HLH-ALF. Disease progression was rapid with median 14 days (range, 6-27 days) between first symptoms and LT. Low fibrinogen/high triglycerides, elevated ferritin, hemophagocytosis on liver biopsy, and soluble interleukin 2 receptor levels were the most commonly fulfilled diagnostic criteria; HLH genetic studies were negative in all patients. Immunosuppressive therapy after LT included corticosteroids adjusted to HLH treatment protocol and tacrolimus. Thymoglobulin (n = 5), etoposide (n = 4), and alemtuzumab (n = 2) were used in cases of recurrence. Five (56%) patients experienced HLH recurrence, 1 requiring repeat LT, and 3 died. Overall graft and patient survival were 60% and 67%, respectively. Six patients are alive and well at a median of 24 months (range, 15-72 months) after transplantation. In conclusion, LT can be beneficial in selected patients with secondary HLH-ALF and can restore good health in an otherwise lethal condition. Liver Transplantation 22 1245-1253 2016 AASLD. PMID:27216884

  7. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  8. Role of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lussana, Federico; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, due to the expression of different biological and clinical risk factors, for which allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is an effective consolidation therapy. The non-relapse mortality of alloHSCT remains significantly higher compared with that of conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, one of the main challenges in the care of ALL is to establish a more precise prognostic definition to select patients who could take advantage from an alloHSCT. Currently, the use of minimal residual disease following induction and early consolidation therapy has improved the prognostic accuracy in defining ALL risk class. In Philadelphia-positive ALL, the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors pre and post alloHSCT appears to improve outcomes significantly and, in the absence of specially designed clinical trials, alloHSCT remains the most effective post-remission therapy. Nowadays, alloHSCT can be performed according to various modalities encompassing the use of different conditioning regimens, as well as distinct donors and stem cell source, with a significant accessibility to transplant. PMID:25408851

  9. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  10. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  11. Donor selection for natural killer cell receptor genes leads to superior survival after unrelated transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Klein, John P.; Wang, Tao; Le, Chap T.; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Geraghty, Daniel; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D.; Ladner, Martha; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Parham, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes form a diverse, immunogenetic system. Group A and B KIR haplotypes have distinctive centromeric (Cen) and telomeric (Tel) gene-content motifs. Aiming to develop a donor selection strategy to improve transplant outcome, we compared the contribution of these motifs to the clinical benefit conferred by B haplotype donors. We KIR genotyped donors from 1409 unrelated transplants for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; n = 1086) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 323). Donor KIR genotype influenced transplantation outcome for AML but not ALL. Compared with A haplotype motifs, centromeric and telomeric B motifs both contributed to relapse protection and improved survival, but Cen-B homozygosity had the strongest independent effect. With Cen-B/B homozygous donors the cumulative incidence of relapse was 15.4% compared with 36.5% for Cen-A/A donors (relative risk of relapse 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.57; P < .001). Overall, significantly reduced relapse was achieved with donors having 2 or more B gene-content motifs (relative risk 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.86; P = .003) for both HLA-matched and mismatched transplants. KIR genotyping of several best HLA-matched potential unrelated donors should substantially increase the frequency of transplants by using grafts with favorable KIR gene content. Adopting this practice could result in superior disease-free survival for patients with AML. PMID:20581313

  12. Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Sanjay; Kalloo, Anthony N.

    2002-04-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after liver transplant is estimated to be 8% to 20%. Post-liver transplant biliary complications may lead to acute and chronic liver injury. The early recognition and prompt treatment of such complications improves the long-term survival of the patient and graft. An understanding of the type of biliary reconstruction, the rationale for creating a particular anastomosis, and the technical difficulties in reconstructing the biliary tract are important in assessing and managing complications after liver transplant. Because the clinical presentation of these patients may be subtle, the physician must be aggressive and thoughtful in ordering and interpreting the diagnostic tests. Important points to remember are 1) that noninvasive examinations may fail to detect small obstructions or leaks, 2) a liver biopsy often is performed prior to cholangiography to exclude rejection and ischemia, and 3) the liver biopsy can miss an extrahepatic obstruction by misinterpreting portal inflammation as rejection. Biliary leaks and strictures are the most common biliary complications following liver transplant. Less common complications include ampullary dysfunction and stone/sludge formation. The effective management of biliary complications following a liver transplant depends on understanding the natural history, the prognosis, and the available therapeutic options for each type of complication.

  13. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  14. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning.

  15. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning. PMID:25840335

  16. Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J; Verneris, Michael R; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Ayas, Mouhab; Brown, Valerie I; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chan, Ka Wah; Diaz Perez, Miguel A; Dvorak, Christopher C; Egeler, R Maarten; Eldjerou, Lamis; Frangoul, Haydar; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Hayashi, Robert J; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Kasow, Kimberly A; Leung, Wing H; Olsson, Richard F; Pulsipher, Michael A; Shah, Niketa; Shah, Nirali N; Thiel, Elizabeth; Talano, Julie-An; Kitko, Carrie L

    2015-12-01

    Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P = .005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted. PMID:26327632

  17. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%–37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  18. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie; Finke, Juergen; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Sengelov, Henrik; Blaise, Didier; Luft, Thomas; Hallek, Michael; Kröger, Nicolaus; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-07-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients received additional donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-six of 157 (25%) assessable patients responded to azacitidine therapy: 24 (15%) achieved a complete remission and 22 a partial remission. Response rates were higher in patients transplanted in complete remission (P=0.04) and those transplanted for myelodysplastic syndromes (P=0.023). In patients who achieved a complete remission, the 2-year overall survival was 48% versus 12% for the whole population. Overall survival was determined by time to relapse post transplant more than six months (P=0.001) and percentage of blasts in the bone marrow at time of relapse (P=0.01). The concurrent administration of donor lymphocyte infusion did not improve either response rates or overall survival in patients treated with azacitidine. An azacitidine relapse prognostic score was developed which predicted 2-year overall survival ranging from 3%-37% (P=0.00001). We conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required. PMID:27081178

  19. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  20. Heparan sulfate, an endogenous TLR4 agonist, promotes acute GVHD after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Todd V.; Lin, Liwen; Huang, Xiaopei; Cardona, Diana M.; Li, Zhiguo; Dredge, Keith; Chao, Nelson J.

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains the most common cause of nonrelapse-related morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although T-cell depletion and intensive immunosuppression are effective in the control of GVHD, they are often associated with higher rates of infection and tumor recurrence. In this study, we showed that heparan sulfate (HS), an extracellular matrix component, can activate Toll-like receptor 4 on dendritic cells in vitro, leading to the enhancement of dendritic cell maturation and alloreactive T-cell responses. We further demonstrated in vivo that serum HS levels were acutely elevated at the onset of clinical GVHD in mice after allo-HSCT. Treatment with the serine protease inhibitor α1-antitrypsin decreased serum levels of HS, leading to a reduction in alloreactive T-cell responses and GVHD severity. Conversely, an HS mimetic that increased serum HS levels accelerated GVHD. In addition, in patients undergoing allo-HSCT for hematologic malignancies, serum HS levels were elevated and correlated with the severity of GVHD. These results identify a critical role for HS in promoting acute GVHD after allo-HSCT, and they suggest that modulation of HS release may have therapeutic potential for the control of clinical GVHD. PMID:22760779

  1. Rejected applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review membership application materials (especially rejected applications) to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) during its formative years (1947–1953). Methods: Detailed study of materials in the AAN Historical Collection. Results: The author identified 73 rejected applications. Rejected applicants (71 male, 2 female) lived in 25 states. The largest number was for the Associate membership category (49). These were individuals “in related fields who have made and are making contributions to the field of neurology.” By contrast, few applicants to Active membership or Fellowship status were rejected. The largest numbers of rejectees were neuropsychiatrists (19), neurosurgeons (16), and psychiatrists (14). Conclusion: The AAN, established in the late 1940s, was a small and politically vulnerable organization. A defining feature of the fledgling society was its inclusiveness; its membership was less restrictive than that of the older American Neurological Association. At the same time, the society needed to preserve its core as a neurologic society rather than one of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Hence, the balance between inclusiveness and exclusive identity was a difficult one to maintain. The Associate membership category, more than any other, was at the heart of this issue of self-definition. Associate members were largely practitioners of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Their membership was a source of consternation and was to be carefully been held in check during these critical formative years. PMID:24944256

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function. PMID:26228743

  4. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  5. [Effects of the statins in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H M; Brennan, S; González, J M; Suki, W N

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to assess the immunosuppressive activity of statins in kidney transplantation, determining their effects on serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels post-transplantation, on the incidence of acute rejection episodes and on renal function. A total of 97 patients who underwent a kidney transplant in a three-year period, had more than one-month graft survival, and a minimum of one year of follow-up, were included. Group A consisted of 38 patients who received statins; this group was subsequently divided into four subgroups, according to the time post-transplant when statins were prescribed. Group B consisted of 59 patients (control Group). Initial and final serum total cholesterol levels in Group A were not different (218 +/- 7.8 mg/dl vs 222 +/- 7.5 mg/dl); however, final levels were higher than initial values in Group B (216 +/- 6.0 mg/dl vs 189 +/- 6.4 mg/dl, P = 0.0021). Initial serum triglyceride levels were higher than final levels in Group A (305 +/- 25.5 mg/dl vs 188 +/- 10.6 mg/dl, P < 0.0001). Group A showed a better allograft survival (P = 0.0350), a reduction in the incidence of acute rejection episodes (1 vs 38 events, P < 0.0001) and a lower serum creatinine level (1.96 +/- 0.21 mg/dl vs 2.77 +/- 0.27 mg/dl, P = 0.0374). In Group A subgroups, kidney function was significantly better in patients who received statins early after transplantation. These data suggest that in kidney transplantation statins exert additional immunosuppressive effects, reduce the number of acute rejection episodes, improve allograft survival and kidney function and are effective in preventing serum cholesterol from rising; these effects correlate with a significant decrease in serum triglyceride but are independent of a hypocholesterolemic action. PMID:11188951

  6. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  7. Intestinal Transplant Inflammation: the Third Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Alexander; Cosentino, Christopher; Kaiser, Jason; Matsumoto, Cal S; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most immunologically complex of all abdominal organ transplants. Understanding the role both humoral and innate and adaptive cellular immunity play in intestinal transplantation is critical to improving outcomes and increasing indications for patients suffering from intestinal failure. Recent findings highlighting the impact of donor-specific antibodies on intestinal allografts, the role of NOD2 as a key regulator of intestinal immunity, the protective effects of innate lymphoid cells, and the role of Th17 in acute cellular rejection are reviewed here. PMID:27645751

  8. Intestinal Transplant Inflammation: the Third Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Alexander; Cosentino, Christopher; Kaiser, Jason; Matsumoto, Cal S; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal transplantation is the most immunologically complex of all abdominal organ transplants. Understanding the role both humoral and innate and adaptive cellular immunity play in intestinal transplantation is critical to improving outcomes and increasing indications for patients suffering from intestinal failure. Recent findings highlighting the impact of donor-specific antibodies on intestinal allografts, the role of NOD2 as a key regulator of intestinal immunity, the protective effects of innate lymphoid cells, and the role of Th17 in acute cellular rejection are reviewed here.

  9. First Case Report of Acute Renal Failure After Mesh-Plug Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Ardita, Vincenzo; Zerbo, Domenico; Caglià, Pietro; Palmucci, Stefano; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute renal failure due to ureter compression after a mesh-plug inguinal repair in a kidney transplant recipient has not been previously reported to our knowledge. A 62-year-old man, who successfully underwent kidney transplantation from a deceased donor 6 years earlier, was admitted for elective repair of a direct inguinal hernia. The patient underwent an open mesh-plug repair of the inguinal hernia with placement of a plug in the preperitoneal space. We did not observe the transplanted ureter and bladder during dissection of the inguinal canal. Immediately after surgery, the patient became anuric, and a graft sonography demonstrated massive hydronephrosis. The serum creatinine level increased rapidly, and the patient underwent an emergency reoperation 8 hours later. During surgery, we did not identify the ureter but, immediately after plug removal, urine output increased progressively. We completed the hernia repair using the standard technique, without plug interposition, and the postoperative course was uneventful with complete resolution of graft dysfunction 3 days later. Furthermore, we reviewed the clinical features of complications related to inguinal hernia surgery. An increased risk of urological complications was reported recently in patients with a previous prosthetic hernia repair undergoing kidney transplantation, mainly due to the mesh adhesion to surrounding structures, making the extraperitoneal dissection during the transplant surgery very challenging. Moreover, older male kidney transplant recipients undergoing an inguinal hernia repair may be at higher risk of graft dysfunction due to inguinal herniation of a transplanted ureter. Mesh-plug inguinal hernia repair is a safe surgical technique, but this unique case suggests that kidney transplant recipients with inguinal hernia may be at higher risk of serious urological complications. Surgeons must be aware of the graft and ureter position before proceeding with hernia repair. A prompt

  10. First Case Report of Acute Renal Failure After Mesh-Plug Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Ardita, Vincenzo; Zerbo, Domenico; Caglià, Pietro; Palmucci, Stefano; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-03-01

    Acute renal failure due to ureter compression after a mesh-plug inguinal repair in a kidney transplant recipient has not been previously reported to our knowledge. A 62-year-old man, who successfully underwent kidney transplantation from a deceased donor 6 years earlier, was admitted for elective repair of a direct inguinal hernia. The patient underwent an open mesh-plug repair of the inguinal hernia with placement of a plug in the preperitoneal space. We did not observe the transplanted ureter and bladder during dissection of the inguinal canal. Immediately after surgery, the patient became anuric, and a graft sonography demonstrated massive hydronephrosis. The serum creatinine level increased rapidly, and the patient underwent an emergency reoperation 8 hours later. During surgery, we did not identify the ureter but, immediately after plug removal, urine output increased progressively. We completed the hernia repair using the standard technique, without plug interposition, and the postoperative course was uneventful with complete resolution of graft dysfunction 3 days later. Furthermore, we reviewed the clinical features of complications related to inguinal hernia surgery. An increased risk of urological complications was reported recently in patients with a previous prosthetic hernia repair undergoing kidney transplantation, mainly due to the mesh adhesion to surrounding structures, making the extraperitoneal dissection during the transplant surgery very challenging. Moreover, older male kidney transplant recipients undergoing an inguinal hernia repair may be at higher risk of graft dysfunction due to inguinal herniation of a transplanted ureter. Mesh-plug inguinal hernia repair is a safe surgical technique, but this unique case suggests that kidney transplant recipients with inguinal hernia may be at higher risk of serious urological complications. Surgeons must be aware of the graft and ureter position before proceeding with hernia repair. A prompt diagnosis

  11. Anti-huCD20 Antibody Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toyofumi; Ishii, Daisuke; Gorbacheva, Victoria; Kohei, Naoki; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Dvorina, Nina; Nonomura, Norio; Takahara, Shiro; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that B6.CCR5−/− mice reject renal allografts with high serum donor-specific antibody (DSA) titers and marked C4d deposition in grafts, features consistent with AMR. B6.huCD20/CCR5−/− mice, where human CD20 expression is restricted to B cells, rejected A/J renal allografts by day 26 post-transplant with DSA first detected in serum on day 5 post-transplant and increased thereafter. Recipient treatment with anti-huCD20 mAb prior to the transplant and weekly up to 7 weeks post-transplant promoted long-term allograft survival (> 100 days) with low DSA titers. To investigate the effect of B cell depletion at the time serum DSA was first detected, recipients were treated with anti-huCD20 mAb on days 5, 8 and 12 post-transplant. This regimen significantly reduced DSA titers and graft inflammation on day 15 post-transplant and prolonged allograft survival > 60 days. However, DSA returned to the titers observed in control treated recipients by day 30 post-transplant and histological analyses on day 60 post-transplant indicated severe interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that anti-huCD20 mAb had the greatest effect as a prophylactic treatment and that the distinct kinetics of DSA responses accounts for acute renal allograft failure versus the development of fibrosis. PMID:25731734

  12. Haploidentical bone marrow transplantation in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Meraz, José Eugenio; Arellano-Galindo, José; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Martínez Avalos, Armando; Velázquez Guadarrama, Norma; Mejía Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation using CD34(+) cells depleted of T lymphocytes by the CliniMACS is a treatment for hematological malignancy. We report on four Mexican children, three with acute lymphocytic leukemia and one with chronic myelocytic leukemia, who was transplanted with 12 × 10(6) CD34(+) stem cells/kg body weight (98% of purity) with a follow-up of 9½ years. The engraftment was successful in three of the four children. All showed cytomegalovirus reactivation, and one died because of graft rejection and infectious complication. The risk of infections was a major problem.

  13. A new method for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong; Liu, Zexian; Pan, Zhicheng; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Linyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Xue, Yu; Wu, Duojiao

    2016-08-01

    For end-stage renal diseases, kidney transplantation is the most efficient treatment. However, the unexpected rejection caused by inflammation usually leads to allograft failure. Thus, a systems-level characterization of inflammation factors can provide potentially diagnostic biomarkers for predicting renal allograft rejection. Serum of kidney transplant patients with different immune status were collected and classified as transplant patients with stable renal function (ST), impaired renal function with negative biopsy pathology (UNST), acute rejection (AR), and chronic rejection (CR). The expression profiles of 40 inflammatory proteins were measured by quantitative protein microarrays and reduced to a lower dimensional space by the partial least squares (PLS) model. The determined principal components (PCs) were then trained by the support vector machines (SVMs) algorithm for classifying different phenotypes of kidney transplantation. There were 30, 16, and 13 inflammation proteins that showed statistically significant differences between CR and ST, CR and AR, and CR and UNST patients. Further analysis revealed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network among 33 inflammatory proteins and proposed a potential role of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in CR. Based on the network analysis and protein expression information, two PCs were determined as the major contributors and trained by the PLS-SVMs method, with a promising accuracy of 77.5 % for classification of chronic rejection after kidney transplantation. For convenience, we also developed software packages of GPS-CKT (Classification phenotype of Kidney Transplantation Predictor) for classifying phenotypes. By confirming a strong correlation between inflammation and kidney transplantation, our results suggested that the network biomarker but not single factors can potentially classify different phenotypes in kidney transplantation. PMID:27278387

  14. Split liver transplant recipients do not have an increased frequency of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Leithead, Joanna A; Armstrong, Matthew J; Corbett, Christopher; Andrew, Mark; Kothari, Chirag; Gunson, Bridget K; Mirza, Darius; Muiesan, Paolo; Ferguson, James W

    2014-11-01

    Small series have suggested that split liver transplantation (SLT) has an increased frequency of peri-operative acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the optimal donor selection in this setting could have a favourable impact on renal outcomes. This was a retrospective single-centre study of 76 adults who underwent SLT (right extended lobe) and 301 adults who underwent elective full-size donation after brain death liver transplantation (FSLT). SLT recipients were less likely than unmatched FSLT recipients to develop AKI (≥stage 1 KDIGO criteria) (40.3% vs. 56.1%, P = 0.016) and had a reduced frequency of renal replacement therapy (11.8% vs. 21.9%, P = 0.049). In 72 pairs of SLT patients and propensity risk score-matched FSLT controls the incidence of AKI was not significantly different (40.3% vs. 47.2%, P = 0.473). However, SLT patients were less likely to require renal replacement therapy (11.1% vs. 23.6%, P = 0.078; adjusted OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.11-0.87, P = 0.026). There was no association between SLT and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) , log rank P = 0.534). In conclusion, SLT is not associated with an increased frequency of AKI. These observations support the postulation that the optimal donor status of SLT may result in less graft injury with renal sparing effects. PMID:24964222

  15. Fatal Cyberlindnera fabianii fungemia in a patient with mixed phenotype acute leukemia after umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Seiichiro; Gotoh, Moritaka; Tone, Kazuya; Akahane, Daigo; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Makimura, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of Cyberlindnera fabianii fungemia after umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT). A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed as having mixed phenotype acute leukemia. The patient received CBT for primary refractory disease. After preconditioning chemotherapy, the patient's condition deteriorated, leading to acute respiratory failure from capillary leak syndrome and consequent admittance to the intensive care unit. The patient recovered temporarily following the administration of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation and continuous hemodiafiltration, but died of fungemia with the presence of yeast-like cells 15 days post-CBT. The yeast-like cells were analyzed by sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit and the internal transcribed spacer domain, and were identified as C. fabianii. This case shows that molecular genetic-based methods may be effective for detecting undetermined invasive fungal infections in stem cell transplantation settings. PMID:26879198

  16. Imaging of cardiac allograft rejection in dogs using indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J.; Michler, R.E.; Marboe, C.; Esser, P.E.; Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Gersony, W.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Rose, E.A.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The acute rejection of cardiac allografts is currently diagnosed by the presence of myocyte necrosis on endomyocardial biopsy. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive scintigraphic imaging with indium-111-labeled anticardiac myosin Fab fragments (indium-111 antimyosin) to detect and quantify cardiac allograft rejection. Six dogs that had intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac allograft transplantation were injected with indium-111 antimyosin and planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images were obtained in various stages of acute and subacute rejection. Four dogs had an allograft older than 8 months and had been on long-term immunosuppressive therapy; two dogs had an allograft less than 2 weeks old and were not on immunosuppressive therapy. Count ratios comparing heterotopic with native hearts were calculated from both SPECT images and in vitro scans of excised and sectioned hearts and were compared with the degree of rejection scored by an independent histopathologic review. Indium-111 antimyosin uptake was not visible in planar or SPECT images of native hearts. Faint diffuse uptake was apparent in cardiac allografts during long-term immunosuppression and intense radioactivity was present in hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of rejection. The heterotopic to native heart count ratios in SPECT images correlated significantly with the count ratios in the excised hearts (r = 0.93) and with the histopathologic rejection score (r = 0.97). The distribution of indium-111 antimyosin activity in right and left ventricles corresponded to areas of histopathologic abnormalities.

  17. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  18. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction, and chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M

    2015-04-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of antichronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development, and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review, we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in the development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for antichronic rejection intervention.

  19. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction and chronic rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z.; Li, Xian C.; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of anti-chronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for anti-chronic rejection intervention. PMID:25793439

  20.  Early initiation of MARS® dialysis in Amanita phalloides-induced acute liver injury prevents liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pillukat, Mike Hendrik; Schomacher, Tina; Baier, Peter; Gabriëls, Gert; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schmidt, Hartmut H J

    2016-01-01

     Amanita phalloides is the most relevant mushroom intoxication leading to acute liver failure. The two principal groups of toxins, the amatoxins and the phallotoxins, are small oligopeptides highly resistant to chemical and physical influences. The amatoxins inhibit eukaryotic RNA polymerase II causing transcription arrest affecting mainly metabolically highly active cells like hepatocytes and renal cells. The clinically most characteristic symptom is a 6-40 h lag phase before onset of gastrointestinal symptoms and the rapid progression of acute liver failure leading to multi-organ failure and death within a week if left untreated. Extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) was reported to improve patient's outcome or facilitate bridging to transplantation. In our tertiary center, out of nine intoxicated individuals from five non-related families six patients presented with acute liver injury; all of them were treated with ECAD using the MARS® system. Four of them were listed on admission for high urgency liver transplantation. In addition to standard medical treatment for Amanita intoxication we initiated ECAD once patients were admitted to our center. Overall 16 dialysis sessions were performed. All patients survived with full native liver recovery without the need for transplantation. ECAD was well tolerated; no severe adverse events were reported during treatment. Coagulopathy resolved within days in all patients, and acute kidney injury in all but one individual. In conclusion, ECAD is highly effective in treating intoxication with Amanita phalloides. Based on these experiences we suggest early initiation and repeated sessions depending on response to ECAD with the chance of avoiding liver transplantation. PMID:27493118

  1. Busulfan and melphalan as conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Nadjanara Dorna; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Amigo Filho, José Ulysses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HLA-identical donors has been established for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia patients for over 30 years with a cure rate of 50% to 60%. Objectives To analyze the overall survival of patients and identify factors that influence the outcomes of this type of transplant in patients in 1st complete remission who received a busulfan and melphalan combination as conditioning regimen. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia were enrolled between 2003 and 2008. The median age was 34 years old (Range: 16 - 57 years). All patients received cyclosporine and methotrexate for prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease. Median neutrophil engraftment time was 16 days (Range: 7 - 22 days) and 17 days (Range: 7 - 46 days) for platelets. Sinusoidal obstructive syndrome was observed in three patients, seven had grade II acute graft-versus-host disease and one extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Results The overall survival by the Kaplan-Meier method was 48% after 36 months with a plateau at 36 months after transplantation. Intensive consolidation with high-dose arabinoside resulted in an improved survival (p-value = 0.0001), as did grade II acute graft-versus-host disease (p-value = 0.0377) and mild chronic graft-versus-host disease (p-value < 0.0001). Thirteen patients died, five due to infection within 100 days of transplant, two due to hemorrhages, one to infection and graftversus-host disease and three relapses followed by renal failure (one) and infection (two). The cause of death could not be determined for two patients. Conclusion The busulfan and melphalan conditioning regimen is as good as other conditioning regimens providing an excellent survival rate. PMID:23049292

  2. Unraveling the Role of Allo-Antibodies and Transplant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoshiko; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2016-01-01

    Alloimmunity driving rejection in the context of solid organ transplantation can be grossly divided into mechanisms predominantly driven by either T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), though the co-existence of both types of rejections can be seen in a variable number of sampled grafts. Acute TCMR can generally be well controlled by the establishment of effective immunosuppression (1, 2). Acute ABMR is a low frequency finding in the current era of blood group and HLA donor/recipient matching and the avoidance of engraftment in the context of high-titer, preformed donor-specific antibodies. However, chronic ABMR remains a major complication resulting in the untimely loss of transplanted organs (3–10). The close relationship between donor-specific antibodies and ABMR has been revealed by the highly sensitive detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (7, 11–15). Injury to transplanted organs by activation of humoral immune reaction in the context of HLA identical transplants and the absence of donor specific antibodies (17–24), strongly suggest the participation of non-HLA (nHLA) antibodies in ABMR (25). In this review, we discuss the genesis of ABMR in the context of HLA and nHLA antibodies and summarize strategies for ABMR management.

  3. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients 2014 Data Report: Intestine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junchao; Wu, Guosheng; Qing, Annie; Everly, Matthew; Cheng, Elaine; Terasaki, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As of September 19, 2014, 2441 cases of intestinal transplantation have been performed in 46 centers (2400 deceased, 41 living). Eight centers did more than 100 transplants. Annual case numbers peaked in 2007 (N = 198) and steadily decreased to 109 cases in 2013. Short gut syndrome (68%) and functional bowel problems (15%) are two major indications for intestinal transplantation. The 3 major types of transplants involving the intestine include: isolated intestine transplant (I); simultaneous intestine, liver, and pancreas transplant (I+L+P); and, combined intestine and liver (I+L) transplant. Graft survival has significantly improved in recent years, mainly due to improved first year graft survival. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year graft survivals were: 74%, 42%,and 26%, respectively (I); 70%, 50%, and 40%, respectively (I+L+P); and 61%, 46%, and 40%, respectively (I+L). The longest graft survivals for I, l+L+P, and l+L were 19 years, 16 years, and 23 years, respectively. Steroids, Thymoglobulin, and rituximab are 3 major induction agents used in recent years. Prograf, steroids, and Cellcept are 3 major maintenance agents. Induction recipients (68% of all patients) had a significantly lower acute rejection rate than nonrecipients before discharge (60% versus 75%, p < 0.001). Most of the patients received 2 (53%) or 3 (25%) maintenance immunosuppressants. Acute rejection episodes were usually treated with one (60%) or two agents (27%). Steroids were most commonly used (50-60%). OKT3 has been replaced with antithymocyte globulin (since 1999) and rituximab (since 2006). During 1990-2000, 94% (N = 445) of patients received ABO identical intestinal transplants, while 6% (N = 29) received ABO compatible transplants. ABO identical transplant recipients had a significantly higher 5-year graft survival rate than ABO compatible recipients (39% versus 21%, p < 0.0001). In recent years (2001- 2012), more patients received ABO compatible (N = 188, 11%) than in the early decade (p < 0

  4. Kidney transplantation in HIV-positive adults: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Gathogo, Esther N; Hamzah, Lisa; Hilton, Rachel; Marshall, Neal; Ashley, Caroline; Harber, Mark; Levy, Jeremy B; Jones, Rachael; Boffito, Marta; Khoo, Saye H; Drage, Martin; Bhagani, Sanjay; Post, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive patients are at increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Kidney transplantation (KT) is an established treatment modality for ESKD in the general population. Recent data have confirmed the feasibility of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients, and kidney transplantation is increasingly offered to ESKD patients with well-controlled HIV infection. We report clinical outcomes in a national cohort study of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients. In all, 35 HIV-positive KT recipients who had undergone KT up to December 2010 (66% male, 74% black ethnicity) were identified; the median CD4 cell count was 366, all had undetectable HIV RNA levels at kidney transplantation, and 44% received a kidney from a live donor. Patient survival at 1 and 3 years was 91.3%, and graft survival 91.3% and 84.7%, respectively. At one-year post-kidney transplantation, the cumulative incidence of acute rejection was 48%, and the median (IQR) eGFR was 64 (46, 78) mL/min/1.73 m(2). Although HIV viraemia and HIV disease progression were uncommon, renal complications were relatively frequent. Our study corroborates the feasibility of kidney transplantation in HIV-positive patients. The high rates of acute rejection suggest that the optimal immune suppression strategy in this population remains to be refined.

  5. Escaping from Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Raymond J.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Those engaged in clinical transplantation and transplantation immunology have always taken as a central objective the elucidation of means to prevent graft rejection by the recipient immune system. Conceptually, such mechanisms stem from the concept of Paul Ehrlich that all organisms can selectively avoid autotoxicity; i.e. they exhibit horror autotoxicus. Some mechanisms of horror autotoxicus now understood. T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes recognize foreign antigens but not some auto-antigens. Clonal deletion generates lacunae in what is otherwise a virtually limitless potential to recognize antigens. We call this mechanism structural tolerance. Where imperfections in structural tolerance allow self-recognition, the full activation of lymphocytes and generation of effector activity depends on delivery of accessory signals generated by infection and/or injury. The absence of accessory signals prevents or even suppresses immunological responses. We call this dichotomy of responsiveness conditional tolerance. When, despite structural and conditional tolerance, effector activity perturbs autologous cells, metabolism changes in ways that protect against injury. We use the term accommodation to refer to this acquired protection against injury. Structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation overlap in such a way that potentially toxic products can be generated to control microorganisms and neutralize toxins without overly damaging adjacent cells. The central challenge in transplantation, then, should be the orchestration of structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation in such a way that toxic products can still be generated for defense while preserving graft function and survival. Since the earliest days of transplantation, immunobiologists have sought means by which to prevent recognition and rejection of foreign tissue. The goal of these strategies is the retention of recipient immune function while selectively avoiding graft injury. While

  6. Genes and beans: pharmacogenomics of renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Hawes, Emily; Lee, Ruth-Ann; Watson, Robert; Roederer, Mary W

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the management of patients after solid organ transplantation have led to dramatic decreases in rates of acute rejection, but long-term graft and patient survival have remained unchanged. Individualized therapy after transplant will ideally provide adequate immunosuppression while limiting the adverse effects of drug therapy that significantly impact graft survival. Therapeutic drug monitoring represents the best approximation of individualized drug therapy in transplant at this time; however, obtaining pharmacogenomic data in transplant patients has the potential to enhance our current practice. Polymorphisms of target genes that impact pharmacokinetics have been identified for most immunosuppressants, including tacrolimus, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, azathioprine and sirolimus. In the future, pre-emptive assessment of a patient's genetic profile may inform drug selection and provide information on specific doses that will improve efficacy and limit toxicity.

  7. Genes and beans: pharmacogenomics of renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Hawes, Emily; Lee, Ruth-Ann; Watson, Robert; Roederer, Mary W

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the management of patients after solid organ transplantation have led to dramatic decreases in rates of acute rejection, but long-term graft and patient survival have remained unchanged. Individualized therapy after transplant will ideally provide adequate immunosuppression while limiting the adverse effects of drug therapy that significantly impact graft survival. Therapeutic drug monitoring represents the best approximation of individualized drug therapy in transplant at this time; however, obtaining pharmacogenomic data in transplant patients has the potential to enhance our current practice. Polymorphisms of target genes that impact pharmacokinetics have been identified for most immunosuppressants, including tacrolimus, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, azathioprine and sirolimus. In the future, pre-emptive assessment of a patient's genetic profile may inform drug selection and provide information on specific doses that will improve efficacy and limit toxicity. PMID:23651025

  8. What Health Educators Should Know about Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duitsman, Dalen

    1996-01-01

    This article provides background information on heart transplantation in general, focusing on pediatric heart transplantation and offering suggestions for teachers regarding the unique concerns of students with heart transplants (exercise, physical appearance, immunosuppressive medications, transplant rejection, infection, and psychological…

  9. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Acute Myeloid Leukemia: No Impact of Pre-transplant Extramedullary Disease on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sagun D.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Wang, Hai-Lin; Akpek, Görgün; Copelan, Edward A.; Freytes, César; Gale, Robert Peter; Hamadani, Mehdi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Reshef, Ran; Ritchie, David S.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Seber, Adriana; Shea, Thomas C.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wirk, Baldeep; Bunjes, Donald W.; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Uy, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of extramedullary disease (EMD) in AML on the outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is unknown. Using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) we compared the outcomes of patients who had EMD of AML at any time prior to transplant to a cohort of AML patients without EMD. We reviewed data AML from 9,797 patients including 814 with EMD from 310 reporting centers and 44 different countries who underwent alloHCT between and 1995–2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) after alloHCT. Secondary outcomes included leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse rate, and treatment-related mortality (TRM). In a multivariate analysis, the presence of EMD did not affect either OS (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.91–1.09), LFS (0.98, 0.89–1.09), TRM (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.16, p=0.23) or relapse (RR =1.03, 95% CI, 0.92–1.16; p=0.62). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with EMD was not influenced by the location, timing of EMD, or intensity of conditioning regimen. The presence of EMD in AML does not affect transplant outcomes and should not be viewed as an independent adverse prognostic feature. PMID:25915806

  10. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  11. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storb, Rainer; Storer, Barry E.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Lange, Thoralf; Shizuru, Judith A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Maris, Michael B.; Agura, Edward; Yeager, Andrew; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after high-dose conditioning regimens imposes prohibitively high risks of morbidity and mortality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older or have comorbid conditions. Here, we examined outcomes after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT in such patients. Patients and Methods Two hundred seventy-four patients (median age, 60 years) with de novo or secondary AML underwent allogeneic HCT from related (n = 118) or unrelated donors (n = 156) after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine. A calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil were used for postgrafting immunosuppression. Results With a median follow-up of 38 months in surviving patients, the estimated overall survival at 5 years was 33%. The estimated 5-year relapse/progression and nonrelapse mortality rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 38%, 9%, and 5%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 5 years was 44%. Patients in first and second complete remission had better survival rates than patients with more advanced disease (37% and 34% v 18%, respectively). Patients with HLA-matched related or unrelated donors had similar survivals. Unfavorable cytogenetic risk status was associated with increased relapse and subsequent mortality. Chronic GVHD was associated with lower relapse risk. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT from related or unrelated donors after conditioning with low-dose TBI and fludarabine, relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-leukemia effects, can result in long-term remissions in older or medically infirm patients with AML. PMID:20439626

  12. Isometric tubular vacuolization in renal transplant recipient: the first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Praechinavong, Weerasak; Paueksakon, Paisit; Satirapoj, Bancha; Supasyndh, Ouppatham; Supaporn, Thanom

    2012-05-01

    Cyclosporine can cause acute and chronic nephrotoxicity. Renal biopsy is a reliable tool for the diagnosis of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity. The authors report a 56-year-old Thai female with a history of end-stage renal disease who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation. A transplanted kidney biopsy was performed on day 9 post-transplant to identify the cause of delayed graft function. Light and electron microscopic findings revealed widespread (> 50% involvement) numerous tubules filled with uniformly-sized vacuoles in cytoplasm (isometric vacuolization). Serum cyclosporine trough level was 534 ng/mL. Neither acute rejection nor acute tubular necrosis was seen. Diagnosis of acute cyclosporine nephrotoxicity was made. Isometric vacuolization in more than 50% involvement of the tubules is rare (3%) in biopsy specimens. The tubular isometric vacuolization might not have the strong impact to the long term graft outcome. This is the first case report of isometric tubular vacuolization due to cyclosporine toxicity in renal transplant recipient in Thailand.

  13. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in a pediatric female liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Porta, Gilda; Miura, Irene K; Pugliese, Renata P S; Danesi, Vera L B; Porta, Adriana; Guimarães, Teresa; Seda, João; Antunes, Eduardo; Granato, Celso F H

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a 13-year-old female liver transplant recipient with recurrent increased aminotransferase levels and acute cellular rejection. This finding demonstrates that chronic HEV infection can occur and should be further investigated in immunocompromised patients in Latin America.

  14. Factors affecting long-term outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukaemia: a retrospective study of 172 adult patients reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Greinix, Hildegard T; Nachbaur, David; Krieger, Otto; Eibl, Margit; Knöbl, Paul; Kalhs, Peter; Lutz, Dieter; Linkesch, Werner; Niederwieser, Dietger; Hinterberger, Wolfgang; Lechner, Klaus; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Gritsch, Beate

    2002-06-01

    Between 1982 and 2000, 172 patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) received haematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCT) from related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 40) donors at four Austrian transplant centres and their results were reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry. Conditioning for SCT consisted of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation in 156 (91%) patients. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was with standard cyclosporine and methotrexate in 95 (55%) patients. Median post-transplant follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 0.2--16.7). Multivariate analysis of transplant-related mortality (TRM) identified four variables associated with a lower risk: disease status of first complete remission (CR) at SCT, patient age of 45 years and younger, transplant performed during or after 1995, and lack of acute GVHD. Variables associated with significantly improved leukaemia-free survival were: bone marrow as the stem cell source, disease status of first CR at SCT, and occurrence of chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, transplantation performed during or after 1995, first CR at SCT, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD and lack of acute GVHD grades III to IV were associated with increased overall survival. Based on these analyses, options for the improvement of results obtained with allogeneic SCT in patients with AML could be defined. PMID:12060131

  15. The impact of pre-transplant minimal residual disease on outcome of intensified myeloablative cord blood transplant for acute myeloid leukemia in first or second complete remission.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changcheng; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Tang, Baolin; Zhang, Lei; Geng, Liangquan; Liu, Huilan; Sun, Zimin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pretransplant minimal residual disease (MRD) on outcome of myeloablative cord blood transplant (CBT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) has not been reported. Seventy-two AML patients were assessed for MRD before CBT, and the majority (84.7%) of these patients received single-unit CBT. All patients received intensified myeloablative conditioning with BUCY2 or TBICY plus high-dose cytarabine, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. The cumulative incidences of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, acute or chronic GVHD were comparable between MRD-negative and MRD-positive groups. The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) and relapse did not differ significantly between the two cohorts (25.6% vs. 32.5%, 16.1% vs. 19.2%; p = 0.52, 0.61). There were no apparent differences in 3-year overall survival (OS) (68.9% in MRD-negative group and 57.9% in MRD-positive group, p = 0.31) and 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) (62.5% in MRD-negative group and 52.7% in MRD-positive group, p = 0.42) between both groups. The current study suggests that AML patients in morphological CR1 or CR2 who have detectable MRD might benefit from unrelated CBT with intensified myeloablative conditioning. PMID:26690538

  16. The impact of pre-transplant minimal residual disease on outcome of intensified myeloablative cord blood transplant for acute myeloid leukemia in first or second complete remission.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changcheng; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Tang, Baolin; Zhang, Lei; Geng, Liangquan; Liu, Huilan; Sun, Zimin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pretransplant minimal residual disease (MRD) on outcome of myeloablative cord blood transplant (CBT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) has not been reported. Seventy-two AML patients were assessed for MRD before CBT, and the majority (84.7%) of these patients received single-unit CBT. All patients received intensified myeloablative conditioning with BUCY2 or TBICY plus high-dose cytarabine, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. The cumulative incidences of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, acute or chronic GVHD were comparable between MRD-negative and MRD-positive groups. The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) and relapse did not differ significantly between the two cohorts (25.6% vs. 32.5%, 16.1% vs. 19.2%; p = 0.52, 0.61). There were no apparent differences in 3-year overall survival (OS) (68.9% in MRD-negative group and 57.9% in MRD-positive group, p = 0.31) and 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) (62.5% in MRD-negative group and 52.7% in MRD-positive group, p = 0.42) between both groups. The current study suggests that AML patients in morphological CR1 or CR2 who have detectable MRD might benefit from unrelated CBT with intensified myeloablative conditioning.

  17. Acute renal failure in patients following bone marrow transplantation: prevalence, risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Gruss, E; Bernis, C; Tomas, J F; Garcia-Canton, C; Figuera, A; Motellón, J L; Paraiso, V; Traver, J A; Fernandez-Rañada, J M

    1995-01-01

    To assess the prevalence, risk factors, clinical causes and outcome of acute renal failure (ARF) following bone marrow transplantation (BMT), a retrospective analysis of 275 patients was undertaken. ARF was diagnosed in 72 patients (26%) and occurred in 81.9% within the first month. The three main clinical causes were multifactorial (36%), nephrotoxic (29%), and veno-occlusive disease of the liver (VOD) 15%. The prevalence was higher in allogeneic BMT (36%) than in autologous BMT (6.5%). Risk factors related to the development of ARF wee preexisting VOD and age older than 25 years. Logistic regression in allogeneic BMT confirmed this association (VOD, odds ratio 3.8; age offer than 25, odds ratio 1.9). Underlying disease, graft-versus-host disease, sepsis, conditioning therapy, and sex were not associated with ARF. Seventeen cases of ARF required hemodialysis (24%) mainly in association with VOD (70.5%). The overall morality from ARF was 45.8%, the dialyzed group having the highest mortality (88%). Survival in the ARF group was continuously worse up to 3 months and the actuarial survival at 10 years was 29.7 versus 53.2%. We conclude that ARF is a common complication mainly in allogeneic BMT and carries a grave prognosis. VOD and age were risk factors for ARF.

  18. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Preferential accumulation of T helper cells but not cytotoxic T cells characterizes benign subclinical rejection of human liver allografts.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Anna K; Schlue, Jerome; Noyan, Fatih; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Lehner, Frank; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Klempnauer, Juergen; Manns, Michael P; Taubert, Richard; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2016-07-01

    Subclinical rejection (SCR) is a common event in protocol biopsies after liver transplantation (LT). So far the interpretation of the underlying histological changes and clinical significance is limited. Previous studies were restricted to SCR manifestations within the first weeks after transplantation with limited follow-up. We analyzed clinical data from our prospective protocol biopsy program and found late SCR (at least 3 months after transplantation) to be a common event (41/94 patients). SCR manifested much later than acute cellular rejection (ACR). In the second year after transplantation, the SCR incidence in protocol biopsies reached a plateau of approximately 25% and remained at this level until the latest observed manifestations more than 5 years after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 32 months after SCR, no acute or chronic rejection, relevant graft fibrosis, graft loss, or liver-related death occurred even without specific therapy for SCR. Immunophenotyping of liver biopsies during SCR showed that similar to ACR, the composition of intrahepatic T cells depended on the severity of histological rejection. However, SCR showed a different pattern of infiltrating T cells with a stronger accumulation of CD4(+) cells, an increasing CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio, and an increasing CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cell (Treg)/CD8(+) ratio, which was not seen in ACR. These intrahepatic T cell patterns were not reflected in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, late SCR after LT has a good clinical prognosis, and it seems safe to leave it untreated. This benign clinical course compared to ACR is associated with intrahepatic T cell infiltration patterns showing less cytotoxic T cells and more CD4(+) FOXP3(+) Tregs. Liver Transplantation 22 943-955 2016 AASLD.

  20. Belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in kidney transplant patients: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hardinger, Karen L; Sunderland, Daniel; Wiederrich, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background Belatacept is a novel immunosuppressive therapy designed to improve clinical outcomes associated with kidney transplant recipients while minimizing use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). Methods We searched for clinical trials related to administration of belatacept to kidney transplant patients compared to various immunosuppression regimens, as well as for studies that utilized data from belatacept trials to validate new surrogate measures. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the published evidence of belatacept’s effectiveness and safety in renal transplant recipients to better elucidate its place in clinical practice. Results Analysis of the results from the Belatacept Evaluation of Nephroprotection and Effi-cacy as First-Line Immunosuppressive Trial (BENEFIT) study, a de novo trial that compared cyclosporine (CsA)-based therapy to belatacept-based therapy in standard criteria donors, found a significant difference in mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 13–15 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 23–27 mL/min/1.73 m2 at 1 year and 7 years, respectively. The BENEFIT-EXT study was similarly designed with the exception that it included extended criteria donors. Renal function improved significantly for the more intensive belatacept group in all years of the BENEFIT-EXT study; however, it was not significant in the less intensive group until 5 years after transplant. Belatacept regimens resulted in lower blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplant compared to CsA-based regimens. Results from conversion of CNIs to belatacept therapy, dual therapy of belatacept with sirolimus, and belatacept with corticosteroid avoidance therapy are also included in this article. Conclusion The evidence reviewed in this article suggests that belatacept is an effective alternative in kidney transplant recipients. Compared to CNI-based therapy, belatacept-based therapy results in superior renal function and similar rates

  1. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  2. Rationale and timeliness for IL-1beta-targeted therapy to reduce allogeneic organ injury at procurement and to diminish risk of rejection after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Alan A

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) involving allograft transplantation and procured organs may in part be induced by stimulation of a newly described innate pro-inflammatory immune system (i.e., NALP-3-inflammasome), which can cause secretion of IL-1beta and subsequent neutrophilic inflammation. Ischemia and/or hypoxia/anoxia can induce anaerobic metabolism with metabolic acidosis and subsequent development of danger signals known to stimulate IL-1beta secretion from the NALP-3 inflammasome. Observations from IRI studies and hereditary auto-inflammatory syndromes with NALP-3 inflammasome mutations suggest that IL-1beta secretion can induce robust neutrophilic inflammation that is responsive to IL-1beta targeted therapy. Based on these observations and data from transplantation studies, it may be timely to consider commercially available IL-1beta targeted biologic therapy to improve allograft tolerance and viability of procured organs. PMID:20394637

  3. Overexpression of protein kinase C ɛ improves retention and survival of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells in rat acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    He, H; Zhao, Z-H; Han, F-S; Liu, X-H; Wang, R; Zeng, Y-J

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effects of protein kinase C ɛ (PKCɛ) for improving stem cell therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were harvested from rat bone marrow. PKCɛ-overexpressed MSCs and control MSCs were transplanted into infarct border zones in a rat AMI model. MSCs and PKCɛ distribution and expression of principal proteins involved in PKCɛ signaling through the stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) axis and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blot 1 day after transplantation. Echocardiographic measurements and histologic studies were performed at 4 weeks after transplantation, and MSC survival, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), von Willebrand factor (vWF), smooth muscle actin (SMA) and factor VIII and apoptosis in infarct border zones were assessed. Rat heart muscles retained more MSCs and SDF-1, CXCR4, PI3K and phosphorylated AKT increased with PKCɛ overexpression 1 day after transplantation. MSC survival and VEGF, bFGF, TGFβ, cTnI, vWF, SMA and factor VIII expression increased in animals with PKCɛ-overexpressed MSCs at 4 weeks after transplantation and cardiac dysfunction and remodeling improved. Infarct size and apoptosis decreased as well. Inhibitory actions of CXCR4 or PI3K partly attenuated the effects of PKCɛ. Activation of PKCɛ may improve retention, survival and differentiation of transplanted MSCs in myocardia. Augmentation of PKCɛ expression may enhance the therapeutic effects of stem cell therapy for AMI. PMID:26775707

  4. Lung Transplantation for Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Koth, Laura; Mooney, Joshua; Golden, Jeff; Hays, Steven; Greenland, John; Wolters, Paul; Ghio, Emily; Jones, Kirk D.; Leard, Lorriana; Kukreja, Jasleen; Blanc, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inhaled antigen-mediated interstitial lung disease (ILD). Advanced disease may necessitate the need for lung transplantation. There are no published studies addressing lung transplant outcomes in HP. We characterized HP outcomes compared with referents undergoing lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). METHODS: To identify HP cases, we reviewed records for all ILD lung transplantation cases at our institution from 2000 to 2013. We compared clinical characteristics, survival, and acute and chronic rejection for lung transplant recipients with HP to referents with IPF. We also reviewed diagnoses of HP discovered only by explant pathology and looked for evidence of recurrent HP after transplant. Survival was compared using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard modeling. RESULTS: We analyzed 31 subjects with HP and 91 with IPF among 183 cases undergoing lung transplantation for ILD. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years after lung transplant in HP compared with IPF was 96%, 89%, and 89% vs 86%, 67%, and 49%, respectively. Subjects with HP manifested a reduced adjusted risk for death compared with subjects with IPF (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08-0.74; P = .013). Of the 31 cases, the diagnosis of HP was unexpectedly made at explant in five (16%). Two subjects developed recurrent HP in their allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, subjects with HP have excellent medium-term survival after lung transplantation and, relative to IPF, a reduced risk for death. HP may be initially discovered only by review of the explant pathology. Notably, HP may recur in the allograft. PMID:25412059

  5. Acute GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation affects early marrow reconstitution and speed of engraftment.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Camuglia, Maria Grazia; Avola, Giuseppe; Di Marco, Annalia; Leotta, Salvatore; Cupri, Alessandra; Spina, Paolo; Romano, Alessandra; Spina, Eleonora; Azzaro, Maria Pia; Berritta, Deja; Parisi, Marina; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Our aim was to study the influence of acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD) on primary engraftment times after allogeneic transplantation. Primary engraftment and frequency of marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units and erythroid burst-forming units, at day +18, were studied in 126 allogeneic transplants. Patients were grouped according to the time when a-GVHD treatment with corticosteroids was started. The no-a-GVHD group are those who, during the first 3 months, had no need for a-GVHD treatment; the early-a-GVHD group are those who needed a-GVHD treatment within 19 days; and the postengraftment-a-GVHD group are those who were not on corticosteroid treatment at the time of engraftment but needed it after day +19. The no-a-GVHD group reached a neutrophil count (N) > 0.5 × 10(9)/L in a median of 17.8 days. The postengraftment-a-GVHD group reached N > 0.5 × 10(9)/L in a median of 21.4 days (p = 0.0003). The early-a-GVHD group had N > 0.5 × 10(9)/L in a median of +17.0 days (p = 0.23). When factors important for engraftment were studied in a multivariate analysis, postengraftment a-GVHD was a significant factor in delayed neutrophil and platelet engraftment. Both the early-a-GVHD and postengraftment-a-GVHD groups showed a significant reduction in frequency of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units and erythroid burst-forming units found in marrow at day +18. In conclusion, a-GVHD may influence early marrow reconstitution and is a relevant factor for primary myeloid and platelet engraftment. PMID:25704053

  6. [Diabetes following kidney transplantation. Report of 35 cases].

    PubMed

    Kaaroud, Hayet; Khiari, Karima; Beji, Soumaya; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Ayed, Khaled; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2004-02-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication of renal transplantation. It has a prevalence rate ranging from 3 to 46%. We undertook a retrospective study of 175 nondiabetic renal transplant recipients to determine the prevalence rate, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of PTDM in kidney transplant recipients in our region. Thirty five patients (20%) developed PTDM, 50% were diagnosed by 3 months post transplantation. Eight patients (22.8%) were insulin recurrent. PTDM was independent of kidney source, family history of diabetes, age, sex, incidence of acute rejection, body weight gain, steroid or cyclosporine dose, use of beta-blockers and cytomegalovirus infection. Acturial 5 years survival was 79.4% in the diabetic compared to 80.5% in the control group. Patient survival was similar in the two groups. We conclude that PTDM is frequent in our patients. No significant risk factors of PTDM were identified in this study.

  7. Effect of recipient age on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Khoury, Mansour; Nawfal, Naji; Shaheen, Joseph; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of recipient age (RA) on kidney transplantation outcome in 107 transplant patients, with a follow-up of 1 year. Patients were divided in 3 groups: Group A (RA<50 years; 72 patients), Group B (RA 50-60 years, 19 patients), and Group C (RA>60 years; 16 patients). The rate and severity of acute rejection, infection rate and type, delayed graft function, hospital stay, creatinine levels (3, 6, 12 months), incidence at 1 year of post-transplant hypertension, cholesterol and triglycerides blood levels, and the rate of post-transplant surgical complications, and 1-year graft and patient survival were comparable between the 3 groups. However, creatinine blood level at 1 month and the 1-year fasting blood sugar were significantly higher in Group B. The RA does not seem to be of a significant predictive value, good selection and pre-transplant patient workout are important factors for a better outcome.

  8. Effect of post remission therapy prior to reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Warlick, Erica D.; Paulson, Kristjan; Brazauskas, Ruta; Zhong, Xiaobo; Miller, Alan M.; Camitta, Bruce M.; George, Biju; Savani, Bipin N.; Ustun, Celalettin; Marks, David I.; Waller, Edmund K.; Baron, Frédéric; Freytes, César O.; Socie, Gérard; Akpek, Gorgun; Schouten, Harry C.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Koreth, John; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Bornhauser, Martin; Seftel, Matthew; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Laughlin, Mary J.; Sabloff, Mitchell; Ringdén, Olle; Gale, Robert Peter; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Vij, Ravi; Gergis, Usama; Mathews, Vikram; Saber, Wael; Chen, Yi-Bin; Liesveld, Jane L.; Cutler, Corey S.; Ghobadi, Armin; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Eapen, Mary; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Litzow, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of pre transplant (HCT) cytarabine consolidation therapy on post HCT outcomes has yet to be evaluated after reduced intensity or non-myeloablative conditioning. We analyzed 604 adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) reported to the CIBMTR who received a RIC or NMA HCT from an HLA-identical sibling, HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) donor in 2000–2010. We compared transplant outcomes based on exposure to cytarabine post remission consolidation. Three year survival rates were 36% (29–43%, 95% CI) in the no consolidation arm and 42% (37–47%, 95% CI) in the cytarabine consolidation arm (p=0.16). Disease free survival was 34% (27–41%, 95% CI) and 41% (35–46%, 95% CI) (p=0.15), respectively. Three year cumulative incidences of relapse were 37% (30–44%, 95% CI) and 38% (33–43%, 95% CI), respectively (p=0.80). Multivariate regression confirmed no effect of consolidation on relapse, DFS and survival. Prior to RIC/NMA HCT, these data suggest pre-HCT consolidation cytarabine does not significantly alter outcomes and support prompt transition to transplant as soon as morphologic CR1 is attained. If HCT is delayed while identifying a donor, our data suggest that consolidation does not increase transplant TRM and is reasonable if required. PMID:24184335

  9. Acute torsion of a retroperitoneal renal transplant mimicking renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thomas C; Clarke, Andrea Lynn; Campsen, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    When imaging a renal transplant, the combination of absent flow in the main renal vein and reversed diastolic flow in the intrarenal arteries is considered highly suggestive of renal vein thrombosis. We present a case of torsion of a transplant kidney presenting with identical findings. Renal transplant torsion in general is a rare entity, previously described only in intraperitoneally placed organs; this case is the first that we are aware of with torsion occurring in a retroperitoneally placed graft.

  10. [Telomere length and transrenal DNA isolated from transplanted kidney recipients' urine].

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Karolina; Drozd, Arleta; Borowiecka, Ewa; Domański, Leszek

    2015-05-17

    Transplantation is the preferred method of end stage renal insufficiency treatment due to better quality of life and extended life of transplanted patients. Currently a non-invasive test, which evaluates the risk of acute or chronic rejection or deterioration of the transplanted organ's function, is being sought. An increase of the transrenal DNA concentration in the urine of urinary tract infection patients and in renal graft recipients during an episode of acute rejection was observed. There were also reports on shortening of telomeres in transplanted organ chromosomes, as the result of accelerated aging of cells, and its connection with the onset of chronic allograft nephropathy and the degree of its completion, and thus the deterioration of kidney function. The aim of this paper is to describe the urine genetic analysis through determining the length of the telomeres and the content of transrenal DNA to monitor kidney function and to evaluate the prevalence of acute and chronic rejection in patients after kidney transplantation. The genetic analysis of the biological material collected from patients relies on the determination of transrenal DNA content and length of DNA telomeres isolated from the urine of kidney recipients. The presented methods assume that the genetic profile of the transplanted organ recipient as well as kidney donor can be determined, so the source of the genetic material in the urine of the patient can be identified. A measurable effect of these methods' use would be to complement the evaluation of the prevalence of acute and chronic rejection and transplanted kidney function with a modern, non-invasive method, which is the analysis of telomere length from sediment of urine and the content of transrenal DNA in the urine.

  11. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Abraham S; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion. PMID:24772235

  13. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  14. The role of purinergic signaling in the liver and in transplantation: effects of extracellular nucleotides on hepatic graft vascular injury, rejection and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beldi, Guido; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Wu, Yan; Miller, Lindsay; Banz, Yara; Sun, Xiaofeng; Robson, Simon C.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides (e.g. ATP, UTP, ADP) are released by activated endothelium, leukocytes and platelets within the injured vasculature and bind specific cell-surface type-2 purinergic (P2) receptors. This process drives vascular inflammation and thrombosis within grafted organs. Importantly, there are also vascular ectonucleotidases i.e. ectoenzymes that hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides in the blood to generate nucleosides (viz. adenosine). Endothelial cell NTPDase1/CD39 has been shown to critically modulate levels of circulating nucleotides. This process tends to limit the activation of platelet and leukocyte expressed P2 receptors and also generates adenosine to reverse inflammatory events. This vascular protective CD39 activity is rapidly inhibited by oxidative reactions, such as is observed with liver ischemia reperfusion injury. In this review, we chiefly address the impact of these signaling cascades following liver transplantation. Interestingly, the hepatic vasculature, hepatocytes and all non-parenchymal cell types express several components co-ordinating the purinergic signaling response. With hepatic and vascular dysfunction, we note heightened P2- expression and alterations in ectonucleotidase expression and function that may predispose to progression of disease. In addition to documented impacts upon the vasculature during engraftment, extracellular nucleotides also have direct influences upon liver function and bile flow (both under physiological and pathological states). We have recently shown that alterations in purinergic signaling mediated by altered CD39 expression have major impacts upon hepatic metabolism, repair mechanisms, regeneration and associated immune responses. Future clinical applications in transplantation might involve new therapeutic modalities using soluble recombinant forms of CD39, altering expression of this ectonucleotidase by drugs and/or using small molecules to inhibit deleterious P2-mediated signaling while

  15. Cadaveric renal transplantation: the Chennai experience.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, M R; Soundararajan, P

    2008-05-01

    Transplantation of human organs is undoubtedly one of the greatest medical breakthroughs of this century. However, few Indian patients are able to benefit from this medical advance. It is estimated that in India every year over 152,000 people are diagnosed to have end-stage renal failure needing renal transplantation. The Transplantation of Human Organs Act passed by the Indian parliament in 1994 was subsequently ratified by the state legislature of Tamil Nadu in May 1995. It accepted brain death as a form of death and prohibited commerce in organs. The first cadaveric kidney transplant in Sri Ramachandra medical college was performed in 1995 with 68 cadaveric kidney transplants thereafter. The mean age of the donors was 36 +/- 12.8 years. The mean cold ischemia time was 5.6 +/- 3.2 hours. As many as 14 donors displayed acute renal failure (serum creatinine more than 1.2 mg/dL). Immediate graft function was established in 34 patients (50%). Four had graft rupture, two of which were successfully repaired. Postoperatively 12 patients (17.6%) displayed delayed graft function requiring dialysis. During the first year, 18 patients (26.4%) experienced acute rejection episodes, of which 14 were cellular and four vascular rejection types. As many as eight patients were lost to follow-up within one year; the mean follow-up time was 968 +/- 86 days. Patient survival at 1 year was 88.2% and that of the graft 73.5%. The 5-year patient and graft survival rates were 61.7% and 58.8%, respectively. The mean serum creatinine of patients currently followed is 2.2 +/- 0.86 mg/dL. The rate of cadaver kidney transplantation in India is low despite initiatives by our university to promote donation. Creating a positive public attitude, early brain death identification, and certification, prompt consent for organ donation, adequate hospital infrastructure, and support logistics are prerequisites for successful organ transplantation.

  16. A refined risk score for acute GVHD that predicts response to initial therapy, survival and transplant-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Margaret L.; Robin, Marie; Harris, Andrew C.; DeFor, Todd E.; Martin, Paul J.; Alousi, Amin; Ho, Vincent T.; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Ferrara, James L.M.; Jones, Richard; Arora, Mukta; Blazar, Bruce R.; Holtan, Shernan G.; Jacobsohn, David; Pasquini, Marcelo; Socie, Gerard; Antin, Joseph H.; Levine, John E.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    To develop a novel acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) Risk Score, we examined the GVHD clinical stage and grade of 1723 patients at the onset of treatment with systemic steroids. Using clinical grouping, descriptive statistics and recursive partitioning, we identified poorly responsive, high-risk (HR) acute GVHD by the number of involved organs and severity of GVHD at onset. The overall response [(complete response/partial response (CR/PR)] rate 28 days after initiation of steroid therapy for acute GVHD was lower in the 269 patients with HR-GVHD than in the 1454 patients with standard risk (SR)-GVHD [44% (95% CI 38–50%) vs. 68% (95% CI 66–70%), p<0.001. Patients with HR-GVHD were less likely to respond at day 28 [odds ratio (OR), 0.3, 95% CI 0.2–0.4, p<0.001], and had higher risks of mortality [relative risk (RR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.7–2.6, P<0.001] and transplant-related mortality (RR 2.5, 95% CI 2.0–3.2%, p<0.001) compared to patients with SR-GVHD. This refined definition of acute GVHD risk is a better predictor of response, survival and transplant-related mortality than other published acute GVHD risk scores. Patients with HR-GVHD are candidates for studies investigating new treatment approaches. Likewise, patients with SR-GVHD are candidates for studies investigating less toxic therapy. PMID:25585275

  17. A Promoter Polymorphism in the CD59 Complement Regulatory Protein Gene in Donor Lungs Correlates With a Higher Risk for Chronic Rejection After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Budding, K; van de Graaf, E A; Kardol-Hoefnagel, T; Broen, J C A; Kwakkel-van Erp, J M; Oudijk, E-J D; van Kessel, D A; Hack, C E; Otten, H G

    2016-03-01

    Complement activation leads primarily to membrane attack complex formation and subsequent target cell lysis. Protection against self-damage is regulated by complement regulatory proteins, including CD46, CD55, and CD59. Within their promoter regions, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present that could influence transcription. We analyzed these SNPs and investigated their influence on protein expression levels. A single SNP configuration in the promoter region of CD59 was found correlating with lower CD59 expression on lung endothelial cells (p = 0.016) and monocytes (p = 0.013). Lung endothelial cells with this SNP configuration secreted more profibrotic cytokine IL-6 (p = 0.047) and fibroblast growth factor β (p = 0.036) on exposure to sublytic complement activation than cells with the opposing configuration, whereas monocytes were more susceptible to antibody-mediated complement lysis (p < 0.0001). Analysis of 137 lung transplant donors indicated that this CD59 SNP configuration correlates with impaired long-term survival (p = 0.094) and a significantly higher incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (p = 0.046) in the recipient. These findings support a role for complement in the pathogenesis of this posttransplant complication and are the first to show a deleterious association of a donor CD59 promoter polymorphism in lung transplantation.

  18. A Promoter Polymorphism in the CD59 Complement Regulatory Protein Gene in Donor Lungs Correlates With a Higher Risk for Chronic Rejection After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Budding, K; van de Graaf, E A; Kardol-Hoefnagel, T; Broen, J C A; Kwakkel-van Erp, J M; Oudijk, E-J D; van Kessel, D A; Hack, C E; Otten, H G

    2016-03-01

    Complement activation leads primarily to membrane attack complex formation and subsequent target cell lysis. Protection against self-damage is regulated by complement regulatory proteins, including CD46, CD55, and CD59. Within their promoter regions, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present that could influence transcription. We analyzed these SNPs and investigated their influence on protein expression levels. A single SNP configuration in the promoter region of CD59 was found correlating with lower CD59 expression on lung endothelial cells (p = 0.016) and monocytes (p = 0.013). Lung endothelial cells with this SNP configuration secreted more profibrotic cytokine IL-6 (p = 0.047) and fibroblast growth factor β (p = 0.036) on exposure to sublytic complement activation than cells with the opposing configuration, whereas monocytes were more susceptible to antibody-mediated complement lysis (p < 0.0001). Analysis of 137 lung transplant donors indicated that this CD59 SNP configuration correlates with impaired long-term survival (p = 0.094) and a significantly higher incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (p = 0.046) in the recipient. These findings support a role for complement in the pathogenesis of this posttransplant complication and are the first to show a deleterious association of a donor CD59 promoter polymorphism in lung transplantation. PMID:26517734

  19. High day 28 ST2 levels predict for acute graft-versus-host disease and transplant-related mortality after cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Hilden, Patrick; Mumaw, Christen; Devlin, Sean M; Lubin, Marissa; Giralt, Sergio; Goldberg, Jenna D; Hanash, Alan; Hsu, Katharine; Jenq, Robert; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Sauter, Craig; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Young, James W; Brentjens, Renier; Kernan, Nancy A; Prockop, Susan E; O'Reilly, Richard J; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Paczesny, Sophie; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-01-01

    While cord blood transplantation (CBT) is an effective therapy for hematologic malignancies, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a leading cause of transplant-related mortality (TRM). We investigated if biomarkers could predict aGVHD and TRM after day 28 in CBT recipients. Day 28 samples from 113 CBT patients were analyzed. Suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) was the only biomarker associated with grades II-IV and III-IV aGVHD and TRM. Day 180 grade III-IV aGVHD in patients with high ST2 levels was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18-43) vs 13% (95% CI, 5-23) in patients with low levels (P = .024). The adverse effect of elevated ST2 was independent of HLA match. Moreover, high day 28 ST2 levels were associated with increased TRM with day 180 estimates of 23% (95% CI, 13-35) vs 5% (95% CI, 1-13) if levels were low (P = .001). GVHD was the most common cause of death in high ST2 patients. High concentrations of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, interleukin-8, and regenerating islet-derived protein 3-α were also associated with TRM. Our results are consistent with those of adult donor allografts and warrant further prospective evaluation to facilitate future therapeutic intervention to ameliorate severe aGVHD and further improve survival after CBT.

  20. [Immunosuppressive protocols in kidney transplantation: with or without induction?].

    PubMed

    Nehme Chelala, Dania; Mourani, Chebl; Moukarzel, Maroun; Azar, Hiba

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice of end stage kidney disease. Over the years, kidney transplantation progressed tremendously, mainly by the improvement of immunosuppressive drugs used in the prevention of acute rejection. Since the introduction of cyclosporine in the 80s, many immunosuppressive protocols have been established. These protocols are characterized by two strategies: with or without induction. The agents used in induction therapies can be polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. The decision of using induction therapy relies mainly on the evaluation of the immunological risk in the recipient. Even if protocols with induction have improved early results concerning acute rejection, the protocoles without induction seem justified in some candidates. The optimal immunosuppressive protocol is not yet established, and individualization of immunosuppressive treatment is necessary. PMID:26591195

  1. Cyclosporine Plus Methotrexate or Cyclosporine Plus Mycophenolate Mofetil as Graft Versus Host Disease Prophylaxis in Acute Leukemia Transplant: Comparison of Toxicity, Engraftment Kinetics and Transplant Outcome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok; Punatar, Sachin; Mathew, Libin; Kannan, Sadhana; Khattry, Navin

    2016-09-01

    We sought to compare two graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis regimen, cyclosporine and methotrexate (CsA+MTX) with CsA+mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in 77 acute leukemia patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between January 2008 and March 2013. Fifty-three patients received CsA+MTX while 24 received CsA+MMF. The incidence of grade 3-4 mucositis and grade 3-4 diarrhea was 74 and 6 % with CsA+MTX compared to 33 % and 21 % with CsA+MMF (P = 0.001 and 0.09 respectively). Forty-two (79 %) patients in CsA+MTX group required total parenteral nutrition compared to 14 (58 %) in CsA+MMF group (P = 0.09). The incidence of engraftment fever was 17 % with CsA+MTX and 41 % with CsA+MMF (P = 0.02). The median time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment was 14 days and 13 days with CsA+MTX compared to 12 days and 10 days with CsA+MMF (P = 0.003 and 0.08 respectively). The incidence of any grade and grade II-IV acute GVHD was 45 and 13 % with CsA+MTX compared to 42 and 29 % with CsA+MMF (P = NS). Incidence of overall and extensive chronic GVHD was 57 and 38 % with CsA+MTX compared to 42 and 17 % with CsA+MMF (P = NS). Incidence of relapse was 38 % with CsA+MTX compared to 33 % with CsA+MMF (P = NS). TRM was 6 % with CsA+MTX and 21 % with CsA+MMF (P = NS). At 2 years, overall survival (OS) was 64 % in CsA+MTX group compared to 46 % in CsA+MMF group (P = NS). We conclude that CsA+MMF is associated with lesser toxicity, faster myeloid engraftment and similar rates of acute and chronic GVHD, TRM, relapse and OS compared to CsA+MTX in acute leukemia transplant.

  2. Successful Management of Acute Liver Failure Patients Waiting for Liver Transplantation by On-Line Hemodiafiltration with an Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Yasui, Shin; Kanda, Tatsuo; Hattori, Noriyuki; Wakamatsu, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Oda, Shigeto; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    On-line hemodiafiltration (OLHDF) is one of the treatment options in the management of acute liver failure (ALF) in Japan. It is essential to avoid infection in the management of ALF. In fact, infection is one of the prognostic factors in ALF. In this report, we present a middle-aged Japanese man with ALF associated with benzbromarone use. He was successfully managed without infection until liver transplantation by creating an arteriovenous fistula for OLHDF. Utilizing an arteriovenous fistula for OLHDF, rather than inserting a vascular access catheter, is a beneficial option to avoid infectious diseases in the management of ALF. PMID:27403116

  3. Interrupted development of dentition in children receiving bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphocytic Leukemia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Chris; Kaste, Sue; Owens, Amber

    2013-01-01

    This case series depicts dental anomalies that may develop in children who have undergone bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The most common finding in these patients was root stunting; other abnormalities included microdontia, hypodontia, taurodontia, caries, enamel pearls, and pulpal calcification. Recognition of these adverse effects of BMT on odontogenesis, as demonstrated on panoramic radiograph images, will allow healthcare providers to explain to parents and patients the possible dental outcomes associated with BMT and to optimize their dental health regimen.

  4. Substitution of methotrexate with corticosteroid for acute graft-versus-host disease prevention in transplanted patients who develop methotrexate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Kim, Ah Ran; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo-Han; Lee, Mark Hong

    2016-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) toxicity can hamper the administration of all planned doses in acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Reduction or omission of MTX doses results in an increased risk of acute GVHD. In this prospective observational study, we compared the incidence of GVHD and the transplant outcomes between patients who received the full treatment course of MTX (group 1), patients in whom MTX doses were omitted if MTX toxicity developed (group 2), and patients receiving corticosteroid instead of MTX if MTX toxicity developed (group 3). The cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD at 100 days post-transplantation was 22.2 % in group 1, 43.6 % in group 2, and 25.0 % in group 3 (P = 0.132). The risk of grades II-IV acute GVHD in group 2 was higher than that in group 1 (hazard ratio (HR) 3.262, P = 0.016), but the risk in group 3 was similar to that in group 1 (HR 0.960, P = 0.890). Group 3 also showed a trend towards a lower risk of chronic GVHD compared to the other groups. The cumulative risk of chronic GVHD at 2 years was 73.9, 71.6, and 33.3 % in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P = 0.084). However, a likely higher relapse incidence and infection-related mortality in group 3 produced a trend towards the lowest relapse-free survival (2-year RFS, 46.3, 49.3, and 25.0 % in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively; P = 0.329) and overall survival (2-year OS, 45, 52.3, and 25 %, respectively; P = 0.322) in group 3. Although the substitution of MTX with corticosteroid ameliorates the increased risk of GVHD in patients in which it is imperative to omit its dose, its negative impact on relapse and infection risk does not result in favorable transplant outcomes.

  5. Successful Management of Acute Liver Failure Patients Waiting for Liver Transplantation by On-Line Hemodiafiltration with an Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Yuki; Yasui, Shin; Kanda, Tatsuo; Hattori, Noriyuki; Wakamatsu, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Arai, Makoto; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Oda, Shigeto; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    On-line hemodiafiltration (OLHDF) is one of the treatment options in the management of acute liver failure (ALF) in Japan. It is essential to avoid infection in the management of ALF. In fact, infection is one of the prognostic factors in ALF. In this report, we present a middle-aged Japanese man with ALF associated with benzbromarone use. He was successfully managed without infection until liver transplantation by creating an arteriovenous fistula for OLHDF. Utilizing an arteriovenous fistula for OLHDF, rather than inserting a vascular access catheter, is a beneficial option to avoid infectious diseases in the management of ALF. PMID:27403116

  6. Corneal Graft Rejection Ten Years after Penetrating Keratoplasty in the Cornea Donor Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Steven P.; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Raghinaru, Dan; Dontchev, Mariya; Blanton, Christopher L.; Holland, Edward J; Lass, Jonathan H.; Kenyon, Kenneth R.; Mannis, Mark J; Mian, Shahzad I.; Rapuano, Christopher J.; Stark, Walter J.; Beck, Roy W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of donor and recipient factors on corneal allograft rejection and evaluate whether a rejection event was associated with graft failure. Methods 1,090 subjects undergoing penetrating keratoplasty for a moderate risk condition (principally Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema) were followed for up to 12 years. Associations of baseline recipient and donor factors with the occurrence of a rejection event were assessed in univariate and multivariate proportional hazards models. Results Among 651 eyes with a surviving graft at 5 years, the 10-year graft failure (± 99% CI) rates were 12% ± 4% among eyes with no rejection events in the first 5 years, 17% ± 12% in eyes with at least one probable, but no definite rejection event, and 22% ± 20% in eyes with at least one definite rejection event. The only baseline factor significantly associated with a higher risk of definite graft rejection was a preoperative history of glaucoma, particularly when prior glaucoma surgery had been performed and glaucoma medications were being used at time of transplant (10-year incidence 35% ± 23% compared with 14% ± 4% in eyes with no history of glaucoma/intraocular pressure treatment, p=0.008). Conclusion Those patients who experienced a definite rejection event frequently went on to graft failure raising important questions as to how we might change acute and long-term corneal graft management. Multivariate analysis indicated that the prior use of glaucoma medications and glaucoma filtering surgery was a significant risk factor related to a definite rejection event. PMID:25119961

  7. Monitoring of organ transplants through genomic analyses of circulating cell-free DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vlaminck, Iwijn

    Solid-organ transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage organ diseases, but complications due to infection and acute rejection undermine its long-term benefits. While clinicians strive to carefully monitor transplant patients, diagnostic options are currently limited. My colleagues and I in the lab of Stephen Quake have found that a combination of next-generation sequencing with a phenomenon called circulating cell-free DNA enables non-invasive diagnosis of both infection and rejection in transplantation. A substantial amount of small fragments of cell-free DNA circulate in blood that are the debris of dead cells. We discovered that donor specific DNA is released in circulation during injury to the transplant organ and we show that the proportion of donor DNA in plasma is predictive of acute rejection in heart and lung transplantation. We profiled viral and bacterial DNA sequences in plasma of transplant patients and discovered that the relative representation of different viruses and bacteria is informative of immunosuppression. This discovery suggested a novel biological measure of a person's immune strength, a finding that we have more recently confirmed via B-cell repertoire sequencing. Lastly, our studies highlight applications of shotgun sequencing of cell-free DNA in the broad, hypothesis free diagnosis of infection.

  8. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  9. Expanding transplant options to patients over 50 years. Improved outcome after reduced intensity conditioning mismatched-unrelated donor transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Savani, Bipin N.; Labopin, Myriam; Kröger, Nicolaus; Finke, Jürgen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Niederwieser, Dietger; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Bunjes, Donald; Glass, Bertram; Socié, Gerard; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Baron, Frédéric; Ciceri, Fabio; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Esteve, Jordi; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of patients undergoing HLA-matched unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following reduced-intensity conditioning or myeloablative regimens is reported to be equivalent; however, it is not known if the intensity of the conditioning impacts outcomes after mismatched unrelated donor transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Eight hundred and eighty three patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning were compared with 1041 myeloablative conditioning regimen recipients in the setting of mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The donor graft was HLA-matched at 9/10 in 872 (83.8%) and at 8/10 in 169 (16.2%) myeloablative conditioning recipients, while in the reduced-intensity conditioning cohort, 754 (85.4%) and 129 (14.6%) were matched at 9/10 and 8/10 loci, respectively. Myeloablative conditioning regimen recipients were younger, 70% being <50 years of age compared to only 30% in the reduced-intensity conditioning group (P=0.0001). Significantly, more patients had secondary acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.04) and Karnofsky Performance Status score <90% (P=0.02) in the reduced-intensity conditioning group. Patients <50 and ≥50 years were analyzed separately. On multivariate analysis and after adjusting for differences between the two groups, reduced-intensity conditioning in patients age ≥50 years was associated with higher overall survival (HR 0.78; P=0.01), leukemia-free survival (HR 0.82; P=0.05), and decreased non-relapse mortality (HR 0.73; P=0.03). Relapse incidence (HR 0.91; P=0.51) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (HR 1.31; P=0.11) were, however, not significantly different. In patients <50 years old, there were no statistically significant differences in overall survival, leukemia-free survival, relapse incidence, non-relapse mortality, and chronic graft-versus-host-disease between the groups. Our study shows no significant outcome differences in patients younger than 50 years receiving reduced-intensity vs

  10. Peripheral blood CD5-positive B lymphocytes (B-1a cells) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; de Sabata, Donata; Ledro, Silvia; Vella, Antonio; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Benedetti, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Only few data are available in literature regarding the reconstitution of B-1a cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation performed for haematological malignancies. Methods In this study we used flow cytometry to assess the reconstitution of the peripheral blood B-1a cell compartment after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cytometric analyses were performed over time on 11 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in our Haematology Unit and the results were compared with available data regarding B-1a cell reconstitution after allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Results In spite of an earlier recovery of B-1a cells in the peripheral blood after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the reconstitution of this B-cell subset was similar, regardless of the source of stem cells employed. Conclusions Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the origin of B-1a cells in humans in health and illness. PMID:19112737

  11. Risk Factors, Pattern and Clinical Outcome of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Acute Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok; Punatar, Sachin; Gawande, Jayant; Mathew, Libin; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Kannan, Sadhana; Khattry, Navin

    2015-12-01

    We sought to determine risk factors, pattern and outcome of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) in seventy-seven acute leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant at our centre from January 2008 to March 2013. GVHD prophylaxis with cyclosporine-methotrexate or cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil was used. Patients were divided in 2 groups, grade II-IV aGVHD (group A) and grade 0-I aGVHD (group B). Incidence of any grade and grade II-IV aGVHD was 44 and 18 %, respectively. The most common site of aGVHD was gastro-intestinal tract (65 %) followed by skin (35 %). Higher total nucleated cell (TNC) dose infused was associated with increased incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD. Incidence of relapse and incidence of slippage of chimerism was 21 and 36 % in group A while 37 and 27 % in group B respectively. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 21 % in group A and 13 % in group B. Probability of OS and RFS at 4 years was 63 and 34 % in group A compared with 40 and 38 % in group B, respectively. We conclude that higher TNC dose infused is a risk factor for grade II-IV aGVHD with gut being the commonest site. Grade II-IV aGVHD did not have a significant impact on incidence of relapse, TRM and OS.

  12. Challenges in pediatric renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Licia; Amore, Alessandro; Coppo, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation in children is the best option to treat renal failure. Over the last 25 years the improvements in therapy have dramatically reduced the risk of early acute rejection and graft loss, however the long term results in terms of graft survival and morbidity still require search for new immunosuppressive regimens. Tolerance of the graft and minimization of side effects are the challenges for improving the outcome of children with a grafted kidney. Notwithstanding the difficulties in settling in children large multicenter trials to derive statistically useful data, many important contributions in the last years brought important modifications in the immunosuppressive therapy, including minimization protocols of steroids and calcineurin inhibitors and new induction drugs. New methods for diagnosis of anti HLA antibodies and some new protocols to improve both chance and outcome of transplantation in immunized subjects represent area of ongoing research of extreme interest for children. PMID:25540732

  13. Unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of non-malignant genetic diseases: An alemtuzumab based regimen is associated with cure of clinical disease; earlier clearance of alemtuzumab may be associated with graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Mahadeo, Kris Michael; Zhao, Quan; Khazal, Sajad; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M; Shah, Ami J; Kapoor, Neena

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with matched unrelated donors (MUD), offers potentially curative therapy for patients with non-malignant genetic diseases. In this pilot study conducted from 2006 to 2014, we report the outcomes of 15 patients with non-malignant genetic diseases who received a myeloablative regimen with a reduced cyclophosphamide dose, adjunctive serotherapy and MUD HSCT [intravenous alemtuzumab (52 mg/m(2) ), busulfan (16 mg/kg), fludarabine (140mg/m(2) ), and cyclophosphamide (105 mg/kg)]. Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus/cyclosporine and methylprednisolone. Median (range) time to neutrophil engraftment (>500 cells/µL) and platelet engraftment (>20,000/mm(3) ) were 15 (12-28) and 25 (17-30) days, respectively. At a median follow-up of 2 (0.2-5.4) years, the overall survival (OS) was 93.3% (95% CI: 0.61-0.99) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 73.3% (95% CI: 0.44-0.89). Among this small sample, earlier alemtuzumab clearance was significantly associated with graft rejection (P = 0.047), earlier PHA response (P = 0.009) and a trend toward earlier recovery of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) (P = 0.06). This regimen was associated with durable donor engraftment and relatively low rates of regimen related toxicity (RRT); future alemtuzumab pharmacokinetic studies may improve outcomes, by allowing targeted alemtuzumab clearance to reduce graft rejection and promote more rapid immune reconstitution.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  16. The Clinical Impact of Humoral Immunity in Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J.; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V. Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H. Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study. PMID:23449533

  17. The clinical impact of humoral immunity in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abanti; Ozawa, Mikki; Everly, Matthew J; Ettenger, Robert; Dharnidharka, Vikas; Benfield, Mark; Mathias, Robert; Portale, Anthony; McDonald, Ruth; Harmon, William; Kershaw, David; Vehaskari, V Matti; Kamil, Elaine; Baluarte, H Jorge; Warady, Bradley; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K; Hsieh, Szu-chuan; Dai, Hong; Naesens, Maarten; Waskerwitz, Janie; Salvatierra, Oscar; Terasaki, Paul I; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-03-01

    The development of anti-donor humoral responses after transplantation associates with higher risks for acute rejection and 1-year graft survival in adults, but the influence of humoral immunity on transplant outcomes in children is not well understood. Here, we studied the evolution of humoral immunity in low-risk pediatric patients during the first 2 years after renal transplantation. Using data from 130 pediatric renal transplant patients randomized to steroid-free (SF) or steroid-based (SB) immunosuppression in the NIH-SNSO1 trial, we correlated the presence of serum anti-HLA antibodies to donor HLA antigens (donor-specific antibodies) and serum MHC class 1-related chain A (MICA) antibody with both clinical outcomes and histology identified on protocol biopsies at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months. We detected de novo antibodies after transplant in 24% (23% of SF group and 25% of SB group), most often after the first year. Overall, 22% developed anti-HLA antibodies, of which 6% were donor-specific antibodies, and 6% developed anti-MICA antibody. Presence of these antibodies de novo associated with significantly higher risks for acute rejection (P=0.02), chronic graft injury (P=0.02), and decline in graft function (P=0.02). In summary, antibodies to HLA and MICA antigens appear in approximately 25% of unsensitized pediatric patients, placing them at greater risk for acute and chronic rejection with accelerated loss of graft function. Avoiding steroids does not seem to modify this incidence. Whether serial assessments of these antibodies after transplant could guide individual tailoring of immunosuppression requires additional study.

  18. Impact of cytomegalovirus on early immunosenescence of CD8+ T lymphocytes after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantisán, Sara; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Lara, Rosario; Zarraga, Sofía; Montejo, Miguel; Solana, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of elderly people eligible for solid organ transplants has made it necessary to reevaluate how the decline in immune function associated to ageing (immunosenescence) affects solid organ transplants. Some immunosenescence biomarkers, such as the expansion of CD28(-)CD8+ T lymphocytes, have been associated to cytomegalovirus infection and are related to a form of accelerated immune senescence in transplant recipients. However, the impact of cytomegalovirus replication on downregulation of CD28 on total CD8+ T cells is independent of patients' age, whereas downregulation on cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells depends on patients' age, inducing early immunosenescence of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells in young but not elderly solid organ transplants recipients. Although immunosenescence in transplant recipients should be considered a two-edged sword as it is a risk factor for the development of tumors after transplantation, it has a beneficial effect in attenuating acute allograft rejection and correlates with better clinical outcomes.

  19. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G; Piemontese, S; Arcese, W; Bacigalupo, A; Blaise, D; Bosi, A; Huang, H; Karakasis, D; Koc, Y; Michallet, M; Picardi, A; Sanz, J; Santarone, S; Sengelov, H; Sierra, J; Vincent, L; Volt, F; Nagler, A; Gluckman, E; Ciceri, F; Rocha, V; Mohty, M

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared outcomes after UCBT and Haplo in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Median follow-up was 24 months. Analysis was performed separately for patients with AML, n=918 (Haplo=360, UCBT=558) and ALL, n=528 (Haplo=158 and UCBT=370). UCBT was associated with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant differences were observed between Haplo and UCBT for relapse incidence (HR=0.95, P=0.76 for AML and HR=0.82, P=0.31 for ALL), non-relapse mortality (HR=1.16, P=0.47 for AML and HR=1.23, P=0.23 for ALL) and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.78, P=0.78 for AML and HR=1.00, P=0.84 for ALL). There were no statistically differences on main outcomes after unmanipulated Haplo and UCBT, and both approaches are valid for acute leukemia patients lacking a HLA matched donor. Both strategies expand the donor pool for patients in need.

  20. Transplant graft vasculopathy: an emerging target for prevention and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Kang, Shin-Wook; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Kim, Yu Seun; Yang, Chul Woo; Johnson, Richard J

    2004-12-31

    Maintenance of healthy endothelium is essential to vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for transplant allograft function. Damage of microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy, which is an important predictor of graft loss and is often associated with transplant vasculopathy. In this review, we will discuss the role of microvascular endothelium, in renal allograft dysfunction, particularly as it relates to markers of endothelial dysfunction and endothelial repair mechanisms. We also discuss the potential for therapies targeting endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy.

  1. Reduced intensity conditioning followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for adult patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Anthony S.; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Kogut, Neil M.; Spielberger, Ricardo T.; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Senitzer, David; Snyder, David S.; Thomas, Sandra H.; J.Forman, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with high-risk features has a poor prognosis in adults despite aggressive chemotherapy. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a lower toxicity alternative for high-risk patients requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), however it has not been widely used for ALL. We conducted a retrospective study of 24 high-risk adult ALL patients who received an RIC regimen of fludarabine/melphalan prior to allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant between 6/14/02 and 6/15/07 at City of Hope. Indications for the RIC regimen were: 1) age 50 or older (42%), 2) compromised organ function (54%), or 3) recipient of a previous HCT (37.5%). Patients had a median age of 47.5 years and the median follow-up was 28.5 months for living patients. Both overall survival and disease-free survival at two years was 61.5%. Relapse incidence was 21.1% and non-relapse mortality was 21.5% at two years. cGVHD developed in 86% of evaluable patients. In this series, no significant correlations were made between outcomes and patient age, presence of Philadelphia chromosome, relatedness of donor source or prior HCT. These high survival rates for high-risk ALL patients following RIC HCT may offer a promising option for patients not eligible for a standard myeloablative transplant. PMID:19822300

  2. Moderate hyperprolactinemia is associated with survival in patients with acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parra, Adalberto; Ramírez-Peredo, Jorge; Reyes, Enrique; Hidalgo, Rocío; Macías-Gallardo, Julio; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Garza, Eduardo; Infante, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, César H; Salazar-Riojas, Rosario; Villarreal, Jesús Z; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2012-03-01

    Fasting serum prolactin (PRL) levels in response to metoclopramide (MCP) and lymphocyte cytokine profiles was studied in patients given allografts and their donors. Thirty normoprolactinemic volunteers (12-59 years) were studied: group 1, 10 healthy men; group 2, 8 males and 2 females with various hematologic diseases; and group 3, 3 males and 7 females HLA-identical sibling donors: PRL and cytokines were measured. Four surviving recipients developed acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (+), and six did not. Before transplant Fasting PRL concentrations were higher in 'future' GVHD(+) recipients than in their donors (P < 0.001). The opposite was seen in response to MCP (P = 0.01). Donors had a predominant T-helper type 1 (Th1) cytokine profile compared with recipients (P ≤ 0.02), and GVHD(+) recipients had a greater tumor necrosis factor (TNF) value than GVHD(-) (P = 0.05). After transplant On days +30 and +100, a mild sustained rise in fasting PRL levels occurred only in GVHD(+) recipients (P ≤ 0.05) simultaneously with a transient rise in Th1 cytokines. GVHD(-) recipients had no changes. Donors with a Th1 cytokine profile might be more prone to induce GVHD in their recipients, and a mild sustained rise in PRL concentrations after transplantation in recipients GVHD(+) might participate in the amelioration of the severity of GVHD.

  3. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  4. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yanshun; Qin, Maoquan; Wang, Bin; Li, Sidan; Zhu, Guanghua; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Huyong

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI) myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD). The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD) was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS) rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. PMID:27217774

  5. Oral Maintenance Chemotherapy with 6-Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Ineligible for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Won; Jeong, Seong Hyun; Ahn, Mi Sun; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kang, Seok Yun; Choi, Jin-Hyuk; Park, Joon Seong

    2015-10-01

    For decades, maintenance chemotherapy has failed to improve the cure rate or prolong the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), other than those with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Immediately after the first complete remission following consolidation therapy was obtained, oral maintenance chemotherapy (daily 6-mercaptopurine and weekly methotrexate) was given and continued for two years in transplant-ineligible AML patients. Leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were studied and compared between these patients and the historical control group who did not receive maintenance therapy. Consecutive 52 transplant-ineligible AML patients were analyzed. Among these patients, 27 received oral maintenance chemotherapy. No significant difference was found in the patients' characteristics between the maintenance and the control groups. The median OS was 43 (95% CI, 19-67) and 19 (95% CI, 8-30) months in the maintenance and the control groups, respectively (P = 0.202). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of maintenance therapy was an independent prognostic factor for better OS (P = 0.021) and LFS (P = 0.024). Clinical benefit from maintenance chemotherapy was remarkable in older patients (≥ 60 yr) (P = 0.035), those with intermediate or unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 0.006), those with initial low blast count in peripheral blood (P = 0.044), and those receiving less than two cycles of consolidation therapy (P = 0.017). Maintenance oral chemotherapy as a post-remission therapy can prolong the survival of patients with AML who are not eligible for transplantation, particularly older patients, those with intermediate or unfavorable cytogenetics, those with initial low blast count, and those receiving less than two cycles of consolidation therapy.

  6. Pre-transplant achievement of negativity in minimal residual disease and French-American-British L1 morphology predict superior outcome after allogeneic transplant for Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand predictive factors and improve the clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we analyzed 67 Southeast Asian patients transplanted in our institutions. Multivariate analysis showed that disease status before transplant, year of transplant and, interestingly, French-American-British (FAB) subtype had a significant impact on overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality. Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative at transplant had a 3-year OS of 73% compared to those who were MRD positive (45%) and refractory (0%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 18% and 36% for the MRD negative and positive groups, respectively. FAB L1 subtype had a significantly superior 3-year OS of 63% vs. 29% for L2 subtype. Pre-transplant use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly improved outcomes in univariate but not multivariate analysis, as it served to induce more patients into MRD negativity, which was the factor that directly improved transplant outcome.

  7. Aging Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Giordani, María C; Imperiali, Nora

    2016-01-01

    There are several immunological and non-immunological factors related to renal graft deterioration, and histological lesions such as interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy overlap with those observed in aging kidneys. Consequently, it has been proposed that kidney transplant senescence could contribute to graft loss. The process of cell senescence displays characteristics such as an increased expression of specific aging suppressor genes, shortened telomeres, mitochondrial changes, increased expression of negative regulators of the cell cycle, and immunological senescence. Additionally, tubular frailty characterizes the aged kidney, making it more susceptible to ischemia, reperfusion, toxic injury, and consequently, to inflammation. Moreover, renal tissue injury predisposes the older graft not only to progressive deterioration due to glomerular hyperfiltration, but also triggers acute rejection due to increased immunogenicity. In conclusion, renal graft senescence is a complex process, and its better understanding will help the nephrologist in its management in order to achieve a longer graft survival. PMID:27103042

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported. PMID:26960588

  9. Liver transplantation in small babies.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J; Gámez, M; Santamaría, M L; Murcia, J; Díaz, M C; Camarena, C; Jara, P; Tovar, J A

    1993-08-01

    Pediatric liver transplantation is an effective treatment for end-stage liver disease with 1- and 5-year survivals approaching 90% and 70%, respectively. Survival is influenced by the recipient's age, weight, primary disease,