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Sample records for acute traumatic coagulopathy

  1. Sympathoadrenal Activation is Associated with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy and Endotheliopathy in Isolated Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Alex P.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Lejnieks, Brandon; Min, Arimie; Shiu, Maria Y.; Peng, Henry T.; Baker, Andrew J.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Churchill, Nathan; Inaba, Kenji; Nascimento, Bartolomeu B.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Beckett, Andrew; Rhind, Shawn G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly characterized. Objectives: To examine early posttraumatic alterations in coagulofibrinolytic, endothelial, and inflammatory blood biomarkers in relation to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and 6-month patient outcomes, using multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. Patients and Methods: A multicenter observational study of 159 adult isolated TBI patients admitted to the emergency department at an urban level I trauma center, was performed. Plasma concentrations of 6 coagulofibrinolytic, 10 vascular endothelial, 19 inflammatory, and 2 catecholamine biomarkers were measured by immunoassay on admission and 24 h postinjury. Neurological outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. PLS-discriminant analysis was used to identify salient biomarker contributions to unfavorable outcome, whereas PLS regression analysis was used to evaluate the covariance between SNS correlates (catecholamines) and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation. Results: Biomarker profiles in patients with an unfavorable outcome displayed procoagulation, hyperfibrinolysis, glycocalyx and endothelial damage, vasculature activation, and inflammation. A strong covariant relationship was evident between catecholamines and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation at both admission and 24 h postinjury. Conclusions: Biomarkers of coagulopathy and endotheliopathy are associated with poor outcome after TBI. Catecholamine levels were highly correlated with endotheliopathy and coagulopathy markers within the first 24 h after injury. Further research is warranted to characterize the pathogenic role of SNS-mediated hemostatic alterations in isolated TBI. PMID:27206278

  2. Inducing Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy In Vitro: The Effects of Activated Protein C on Healthy Human Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Benjamin M.; Kornblith, Lucy Z.; Cheung, Christopher K.; Kutcher, Matthew E.; Miyazawa, Byron Y.; Vilardi, Ryan F.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute traumatic coagulopathy has been associated with shock and tissue injury, and may be mediated via activation of the protein C pathway. Patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy have prolonged PT and PTT, and decreased activity of factors V and VIII; they are also hypocoagulable by thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and other viscoelastic assays. To test the etiology of this phenomenon, we hypothesized that such coagulopathy could be induced in vitro in healthy human blood with the addition of activated protein C (aPC). Methods Whole blood was collected from 20 healthy human subjects, and was “spiked” with increasing concentrations of purified human aPC (control, 75, 300, 2000 ng/mL). PT/PTT, factor activity assays, and ROTEM were performed on each sample. Mixed effect regression modeling was performed to assess the association of aPC concentration with PT/PTT, factor activity, and ROTEM parameters. Results In all subjects, increasing concentrations of aPC produced ROTEM tracings consistent with traumatic coagulopathy. ROTEM EXTEM parameters differed significantly by aPC concentration, with stepwise prolongation of clotting time (CT) and clot formation time (CFT), decreased alpha angle (α), impaired early clot formation (a10 and a20), and reduced maximum clot firmness (MCF). PT and PTT were significantly prolonged at higher aPC concentrations, with corresponding significant decreases in factor V and VIII activity. Conclusion A phenotype of acute traumatic coagulopathy can be induced in healthy blood by the in vitro addition of aPC alone, as evidenced by viscoelastic measures and confirmed by conventional coagulation assays and factor activity. This may lend further mechanistic insight to the etiology of coagulation abnormalities in trauma, supporting the central role of the protein C pathway. Our findings also represent a model for future investigations in the diagnosis and treatment of acute traumatic coagulopathy. PMID:27008408

  3. Impact of β-Adrenoceptor Blockade on Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Disturbances in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Yu, Wen-kui; Lin, Zhi-liang; Tan, Shan-jun; Bai, Xiao-wu; Ding, Kai; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Sympathetic hyperactivity occurs early in acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and is closely related to its development. β-adrenoceptor antagonists are known to alleviate adverse sympathetic effects and improve outcome in various diseases. We investigated whether β-blockers have protective effects against inflammation and endothelial and hemostatic disorders in ATC. Material/Methods ATC was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Rats were randomly assigned to the sham, ATCC (ATC control), and ATCB (ATC with beta-adrenoceptor blockade) groups. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with propranolol or vehicle at baseline. Heart rate variability (HRV) and markers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial activation were measured, and Western blotting analysis of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was done after shock. Separate ATCC and ATCB groups were observed to compare overall mortality. Results HRV showed enhanced sympathetic tone in the ATCC group, which was reversed by propranolol. Propranolol attenuated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, as well as fibrinolysis markers plasmin antiplasmin complex and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The increased serum syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin were inhibited by propranolol, and the NF-κB expression was also decreased by propranolol pretreatment. But propranolol did not alter overall mortality in rats with ATC after shock. Conclusions Beta-adrenoceptor blockade can alleviate sympathetic hyperactivity and exert anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrinolysis, and endothelial protective effects, confirming its pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ATC. Its mechanism in ATC should be explored further. PMID:25676919

  4. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Jeff; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Sepsis, defined by the presence of infection and host inflammation, is a lethal clinical syndrome with an increasing mortality rate worldwide. In severe disease, the coagulation system becomes diffusely activated, with consumption of multiple clotting factors resulting in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). When present, DIC portends a higher mortality rate. Understanding the mechanisms that tie inflammation and diffuse thrombosis will allow therapeutic interventions to be developed. The Coagulopathy of Acute Sepsis is a dynamic process that is time and disease burden specific. Whole blood testing of coagulation may provide more clinically useful information than classical tests. Natural anticoagulants that regulate thrombosis are down regulated in sepsis. Patients may benefit from modulation of the coagulation system when systemic inflammation and hypercoagulopathy exist. Proper timing of anticoagulant therapy may ultimately lead to decreased incidence of multisystem organ dysfunction (MODS). Recent Findings The pathogenesis of coagulopathy in sepsis is driven by an up-regulation of procoagulant mechanisms and simultaneous down-regulation of natural anticoagulants. Inflammation caused by the invading organism is a natural host defense than cannot be eliminated during treatment. Successful strategies to prevent MODS center on stratifying patients at high risk for DIC and restoring the balance of inflammation and coagulation. Summary The prevention of DIC in septic patients is a key therapeutic target in preventing death from multisystem organ failure. Stratifying patients for therapy using thromboelastometry, specific markers for DIC, and composite scoring systems is an area of growing research. PMID:25590467

  5. Blockade of Extracellular High-Mobility Group Box 1 Attenuates Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Abnormalities in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Kun; Shen, Xiao; Fan, Xin-xin; Ding, Kai; Liu, Ren-min; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background As an extracellularly released mediator, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) initiates sterile inflammation following severe trauma. Serum HMGB1 levels correlate well with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in trauma patients, which is independently associated with higher mortality. We investigated the involvement of HMGB1 in ATC through blocking extracellular HMGB1. Material/Methods The ATC model was induced by polytrauma and hemorrhage in male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly assigned to sham, ATC, and ATCH (ATC with HMGB1 blockade) groups. Thrombelastography (TEG) was performed to monitor changes in coagulation function. Serum levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, and IL-6 were measured, as well as lung levels of HMGB1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB and expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). Results Compared with the sham group, HMGB1 increased the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6, whereas HMGB1 blockade inhibited the induction of TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 also induced elevated serum soluble P-selectin and fibrinolysis markers plasmin-antiplasmin complex, which both were reduced by HMGB1 blockade. Thrombelastography revealed the hypocoagulability status in the ATC group, which was attenuated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Furthermore, the lung level of NF-κB and expression of RAGE were decreased by anti-HMGB1 antibody, suggesting the role of RAGE/NF-κB pathway in ATC. Conclusions HMGB1 blockade can attenuate inflammation and coagulopathy in ATC rats. Anti-HMGB1 antibody might exert protective effects partly through the RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Thus, HMGB1 has potential as a therapeutic target in ATC. PMID:27436061

  6. Normalization of coagulopathy is associated with improved outcome after isolated traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Daniel S; Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-07-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has been reported in the setting of isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) and is associated with poor outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of procoagulant agents administered to patients with ATC and iTBI during resuscitation, hypothesizing that timely normalization of coagulopathy may be associated with a decrease in mortality. A retrospective review of the Alfred Hospital trauma registry, Australia, was conducted and patients with iTBI (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] ⩾3 and all other body AIS <3) and coagulopathy (international normalized ratio ⩾1.3) were selected for analysis. Data on procoagulant agents used (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, prothrombin complex concentrates, tranexamic acid, vitamin K) were extracted. Among patients who had achieved normalization of INR or survived beyond 24hours and were not taking oral anticoagulants, the association of normalization of INR and death at hospital discharge was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 157 patients with ATC of whom 68 (43.3%) received procoagulant products within 24hours of presentation. The median time to delivery of first products was 182.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 115-375) minutes, and following administration of coagulants, time to normalization of INR was 605 (IQR 274-1146) minutes. Normalization of INR was independently associated with significantly lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.10; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38). Normalization of INR was associated with improved mortality in patients with ATC in the setting of iTBI. As there was a substantial time lag between delivery of products and eventual normalization of coagulation, specific management of coagulopathy should be implemented as early as possible. PMID:26947341

  7. Relationship between trauma-induced coagulopathy and progressive hemorrhagic injury in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Tian, Heng-Li

    2016-06-01

    Progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) can be divided into coagulopathy-related PHI and normal coagu- lation PHI. Coagulation disorders after traumatic brain injuries can be included in trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). Some studies showed that TIC is associated with PHI and increases the rates of disability and mortality. In this review, we discussed some mechanisms in TIC, which is of great importance in the development of PHI, including tissue factor (TF) hypothesis, protein C pathway and thrombocytopenia. The main mechanism in the relation of TIC to PHI is hypocoagulability. We also reviewed some coagulopathy parameters and proposed some possible risk factors, predictors and therapies. PMID:27321300

  8. The coagulopathy of trauma.

    PubMed

    Maegele, M

    2014-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death, with uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination being the primary causes of preventable deaths during the first 24 h following trauma. Death usually occurs quickly, typically within the first 6 h after injury. One out of four patients arriving at the Emergency Department after trauma is already in hemodynamic and hemostatic depletion. This early manifestation of hemostatic depletion is referred to as the coagulopathy of trauma, which may distinguished as: (i) acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and (ii) iatrogenic coagulopathy (IC). The principle drivers of ATC have been characterized by tissue trauma, inflammation, hypoperfusion/shock, and the acute activation of the neurohumoral system. Hypoperfusion leads to an activation of protein C with cleavage of activated factors V and VIII and the inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), with subsequent fibrinolysis. Endothelial damage and activation results in Weibel-Palade body degradation and glycocalyx shedding associated with autoheparinization. In contrast, there is an IC which occurs secondary to uncritical volume therapy, leading to acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. This coagulopathy may, then, be an integral part of the "vicious cycle" when combined with acidosis and hypothermia. The awareness of the specific pathophysiology and of the principle drivers underlying the coagulopathy of trauma by the treating physician is paramount. It has been shown that early recognition prompted by appropriate and aggressive management can correct coagulopathy, control bleeding, reduce blood product use, and improve outcome in severely injured patients. This paper summarizes: (i) the current concepts of the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy of trauma, including ATC and IC, (ii) the current strategies available for the early identification of patients at risk for coagulopathy and ongoing life-threatening hemorrhage after trauma, and (iii) the current and updated European

  9. Early Platelet Dysfunction: An Unrecognized Role in the Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Thomas, Scott; Sauaia, Angela; Evans, Ed; Harr, Jeffrey; Silliman, Christopher C.; Ploplis, Victoria; Castellino, Francis J.; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of platelet dysfunction, using an end-point of assembly into a stable thrombus, following severe injury. Background: Although the current debate on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has focused on the consumption or inhibition of coagulation factors, the question of early platelet dysfunction in this setting remains unclear. Study Design Prospective platelet function in assembly and stability of the thrombus was determined within 30 minutes of injury using whole blood samples from trauma patients at the point of care employing thrombelastography (TEG)-based platelet functional analysis. Results There were 51 patients in the study. There were significant differences in the platelet response between trauma patients and healthy volunteers such that there was impaired aggregation to these agonists. In trauma patients, the median ADP inhibition of platelet function was 86.1% (IQR: 38.6–97.7%), compared to 4.2 % (IQR 0–18.2%) in healthy volunteers. Following trauma, the impairment of platelet function in response to AA was 44.9% (IQR 26.6–59.3%), compared to 0.5% (IQR 0–3.02%) in volunteers (Wilcoxon non parametric test p<0.0001 for both tests). Conclusions In this study, we show that platelet dysfunction is manifest following major trauma, before significant fluid or blood administration. These data suggest a potential role for early platelet transfusion in severely injured patients at risk for postinjury coagulopathy. PMID:22520693

  10. Cardiolipin-mediated procoagulant activity of mitochondria contributes to traumatic brain injury-associated coagulopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zilong; Wang, Min; Tian, Ye; Hilton, Tristan; Salsbery, Breia; Zhou, Eric Z; Wu, Xiaoping; Thiagarajan, Perumal; Boilard, Eric; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid located exclusively in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Its presence in blood indicates mitochondrial damage and release from injured cells. Here, we report the detection of CL-exposed brain-derived mitochondrial microparticles (mtMPs) at 17 547 ± 2677/μL in the peripheral blood of mice subjected to fluid percussion injury to the brain. These mtMPs accounted for 55.2% ± 12.6% of all plasma annexin V-binding microparticles found in the acute phase of injury. They were also released from cultured neuronal and glial cells undergoing apoptosis. The mtMPs synergized with platelets to facilitate vascular leakage by disrupting the endothelial barrier. The disrupted endothelial barrier allowed the release of mtMPs into the systemic circulation to promote coagulation in both traumatically injured and mtMP- or CL-injected mice, leading to enhanced fibrinolysis, vascular fibrin deposition, and thrombosis. This mtMP-induced coagulation was mediated by CL transported from the inner to the outer mitochondrial membrane and was blocked by the scavenging molecule lactadherin. The mtMP-bound CL was ∼1600 times as active as purified CL in promoting coagulation. This study uncovered a novel procoagulant activity of CL and CL-exposed mitochondria that may contribute to traumatic brain injury-associated coagulopathy and identified potential pathways to block this activity. PMID:27002118

  11. Coagulopathy and encephalopathy in a dog with acute hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Strombeck, D R; Krum, S; Rogers, Q

    1976-10-15

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation developed secondary to hepatic necrosis in a 5-year-old Saint Bernard. Although the coagulopathy responded to treatment with heparin, the dog died from the combined effects of gastric hemorrhage and encephalopathy, both of which are complications of hepatic necrosis. PMID:977448

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of fluid-blood levels for coagulopathy in acute intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, M.J.; Hardee, E.P.; Hayman, L.A.; Contant, C.F. Jr. )

    1994-02-01

    To characterize the imaging features of intracerebral hemorrhages in patients with coagulopathies that alter prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. A fluid-blood level was defined as a horizontal interface between hypodense bloody serum layered above hyperdense settled blood. The prevalence of fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhages was determined on third-generation CT scans in 32 patients with elevation in prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time. This was compared with the frequency of fluid-blood levels in 185 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage in which there was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy. The probability of finding a fluid-blood level in an intracerebral hemorrhage of a patient with abnormal prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time was 59% (sensitivity). The probability that there will be no fluid-blood level in a patient with a normal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time was 98% (specificity). Fluid-blood levels in acute intracerebral hemorrhage are moderately sensitive to the presence of coagulopathy (i.e., abnormal prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) and highly specific for this condition. Thus, an intracerebral hemorrhage with a fluid-blood level should prompt a thorough search for coagulopathy because early treatment of this condition may improve the 40% mortality in these patients. Caution should be used to distinguish the horizontal interface of a fluid-blood level from a clot with a flat top. A decubitus CT is useful in these rare instances. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Post-translational oxidative modification of fibrinogen is associated with coagulopathy after traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Cardenas, Jessica C; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Wade, Charles E; Wang, Xu; St John, Alexander E; Lim, Esther B; Stern, Susan A; Ward, Kevin R; López, José A; Chung, Dominic

    2016-07-01

    Victims of trauma often develop impaired blood clot formation (coagulopathy) that contributes to bleeding and mortality. Fibrin polymerization is one critical component of clot formation that can be impacted by post-translational oxidative modifications of fibrinogen after exposure to oxidants. In vitro evidence suggests that Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide formation, in particular, can induce conformational changes that prevent lateral aggregation of fibrin protofibrils during polymerization. We used mass spectrometry of plasma from trauma patients to find that fibrinogen Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide content was selectively-increased in patients with coagulopathy vs. those without coagulopathy. This evidence supports a novel linkage between oxidative stress, coagulopathy, and bleeding after injury. PMID:27105953

  14. Coagulopathy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Correlation with Progressive Hemorrhagic Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiang; Sun, Yi-Rui; Wu, Xing; Yu, Jian; Li, Zhi-Qi; Du, Zhuo-Ying; Wu, Xue-Hai; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Hu, Jin

    2016-07-15

    The association between coagulopathy and either isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI) or progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) remains controversial. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether isolated TBI induces pronounced coagulopathy, in comparison with non-TBI or TBI in conjunction with other injuries (TBI + other injuries), and to examine whether there is any evidence of a relationship between coagulopathy and PHI in patients who have experienced TBI. The MEDLINE(®) and Embase databases, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central), were trawled for relevant studies. Searches covered the period from the inception of each of the databases to June 2015, and were conducted using appropriate combinations of terms and key words based on medical subject headings (MeSH). Studies were included if they compared isolated TBI with a similar severity of injury to other body regions, or compared PHI with non-PHI, with regard to coagulation tests and the prevalence of coagulopathy. We extracted the means and standard deviations (SD) of coagulation test levels, as well as their ranges or the percentage of abnormal coagulation tests, in both cases and controls. A total of 19 studies were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Only the mean fibrinogen (FIB) in isolated TBI was found to be significantly higher than in TBI + other injuries (pooled mean difference [MD] 32.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.92-59.25; p = 0.02); in contrast, it was also significantly higher than in non-TBI (pooled MD 15.44; 95% CI 0.28-30.59; p = 0.05). We identified 15 studies that compared coagulopathy between a PHI group and a non-PHI group. The PHI group had a lower platelet count (PLT) value (pooled MD -19.21; 95% CI: -26.99 to -11.44, p < 0.001) and a higher international normalized ratio (INR) value (pooled MD 0.07; 95% CI: 0.02-0.13, p = 0.006) than the non-PHI group, but no differences were observed in the mean activated partial

  15. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  16. Targeted Thromboelastographic (TEG) Blood Component and Pharmacologic Hemostatic Therapy in Traumatic and Acquired Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mark; Fritz, Stephanie; Hake, Daniel; Son, Michael; Greve, Sarah; Jbara, Manar; Chitta, Swetha; Fritz, Braxton; Miller, Adam; Bader, Mary K; McCollester, Jonathon; Binz, Sophia; Liew-Spilger, Alyson; Thomas, Scott; Crepinsek, Anton; Shariff, Faisal; Ploplis, Victoria; Castellino, Francis J

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is a recently described condition which traditionally has been diagnosed by the common coagulation tests (CCTs) such as prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), platelet count, and fibrinogen levels. The varying sensitivity and specificity of these CCTs have led trauma coagulation researchers and clinicians to use Viscoelastic Tests (VET) such as Thromboelastography (TEG) to provide Targeted Thromboelastographic Hemostatic and Adjunctive Therapy (TTHAT) in a goal directed fashion to those trauma patients in need of hemostatic resuscitation. This review describes the utility of VETs, in particular, TEG, to provide TTHAT in trauma and acquired non-trauma-induced coagulopathy. PMID:26960340

  17. Acute liver injury with severe coagulopathy in marasmus caused by a somatic delusional disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lance L; Jesudian, Arun B

    2011-01-01

    Marasmus is a severe form of protein-calorie malnutrition characterized by the depletion of fat stores, muscle wasting, and the lack of edema. In developed countries, marasmus is often the result of anorexia nervosa. Abnormal transaminases with liver synthetic dysfunction have rarely been reported with anorexia nervosa. To our knowledge, we report the first detailed case of acute liver injury with severe coagulopathy (INR > 1.5) in a patient with marasmus due to self-induced calorie restriction caused by a somatic delusional disorder. This case highlights the severity of liver injury that may occur with significant weight loss from self-induced calorie restriction and the rapid normalization of this injury with treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of patterns of acute liver injury in patients with severe protein-calorie malnutrition, regardless of the underlying cause. PMID:25954537

  18. Changes in fibrinogen availability and utilization in an animal model of traumatic coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Impaired haemostasis following shock and tissue trauma is frequently detected in the trauma setting. These changes occur early, and are associated with increased mortality. The mechanism behind trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is not clear. Several studies highlight the crucial role of fibrinogen in posttraumatic haemorrhage. This study explores the coagulation changes in a swine model of early TIC, with emphasis on fibrinogen levels and utilization of fibrinogen. Methods A total of 18 landrace pigs were anaesthetized and divided into four groups. The Trauma-Shock group (TS) were inflicted bilateral blast femoral fractures with concomitant soft tissue injury by a high-energy rifle shot to both hind legs, followed by controlled exsanguination. The Shock group (S) was exposed to shock by exsanguination, whereas a third group was exposed to trauma only (T). A fourth group (C) served as control. Physiological data, haematological measurements, blood gas analyses and conventional coagulation assays were recorded at baseline and repeatedly over 60 minutes. Thrombelastometry were performed by means of the tissue factor activated ExTEM assay and the platelet inhibiting FibTEM assay. Data were statistically analysed by repeated measurements analyses method. Results A significant reduction of fibrinogen concentration was observed in both the TS and S groups. INR increased significantly in the S group and differed significantly from the TS group. Maximum clot firmness (MCF) of the ExTEM assay was significantly reduced over time in both TS and S groups. In the FibTEM assay a significant shortening of the clotting time and an increase in MCF was observed in the TS group compared to the S group. Conclusion Despite a reduction in clotting capability measured by ExTEM MCF and a reduced fibrinogen concentration, extensive tissue trauma may induce an increased fibrin based clotting activity that attenuates the hypocoagulable tendency in exsanguinated animals. PMID

  19. Coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Sarah C; Duhachek-Stapelman, Amy L; Russell, Robert T; Lisco, Steven J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States among children aged 1 to 21 years. The most common cause of lethality in pediatric trauma is traumatic brain injury. Early coagulopathy has been commonly observed after severe trauma and is usually associated with severe hemorrhage and/or traumatic brain injury. In contrast to adult patients, massive bleeding is less common after pediatric trauma. The classical drivers of trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, acidosis, hemodilution, and consumption of coagulation factors secondary to local activation of the coagulation system after severe traumatic injury. Furthermore, there is also recent evidence for a distinct mechanism of trauma-induced coagulopathy that involves the activation of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Whether this new mechanism of posttraumatic coagulopathy plays a role in children is still unknown. The goal of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the incidence and potential mechanisms of coagulopathy after pediatric trauma and the role of rapid diagnostic tests for early identification of coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss different options for treating coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma. PMID:24569507

  20. Reversal of warfarin associated coagulopathy with 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate in traumatic brain injury and intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yanamadala, Vijay; Walcott, Brian P; Fecci, Peter E; Rozman, Peter; Kumar, Jay I; Nahed, Brian V; Swearingen, Brooke

    2014-11-01

    Warfarin-associated intracranial hemorrhage is associated with a high mortality rate. Ongoing coagulopathy increases the likelihood of hematoma expansion and can result in catastrophic hemorrhage if surgery is performed without reversal. The current standard of care for emergency reversal of warfarin is with fresh frozen plasma (FFP). In April 2013, the USA Food and Drug Administration approved a new reversal agent, 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), which has the potential to more rapidly correct coagulopathy. We sought to determine the feasibility and outcomes of using PCC for neurosurgical patients. A prospective, observational study of all patients undergoing coagulopathy reversal for intracranial hemorrhage from April 2013 to December 2013 at a single, tertiary care center was undertaken. Thirty three patients underwent emergent reversal of coagulopathy using either FFP or PCC at the discretion of the treating physician. Intracranial hemorrhage included subdural hematoma, intraparenchymal hematoma, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. FFP was used in 28 patients and PCC was used in five patients. International normalized ratio at presentation was similar between groups (FFP 2.9, PCC 3.1, p=0.89). The time to reversal was significantly shorter in the PCC group (FFP 256 minutes, PCC 65 minutes, p<0.05). When operations were performed, the time delay to perform operations was also significantly shorter in the PCC group (FFP 307 minutes, PCC 159 minutes, p<0.05). In this preliminary experience, PCC appears to provide a rapid reversal of coagulopathy. Normalization of coagulation parameters may prevent further intracranial hematoma expansion and facilitate rapid surgical evacuation, thereby improving neurological outcomes. PMID:24953825

  1. Significant Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in the Setting of Massive Bee Venom-Induced Coagulopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Stack, Kelsey; Pryor, Lindsey

    2016-09-01

    Bees and wasps of the Hymenoptera order are encountered on a daily basis throughout the world. Some encounters prove harmless, while others can have significant morbidity and mortality. Hymenoptera venom is thought to contain an enzyme that can cleave phospholipids and cause significant coagulation abnormalities. This toxin and others can lead to reactions ranging from local inflammation to anaphylaxis. We report a single case of a previously healthy man who presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and anaphylaxis after a massive honeybee envenomation that caused a fall from standing resulting in significant head injury. He was found to have significant coagulopathy and subdural bleeding that progressed to near brain herniation requiring emergent decompression. Trauma can easily occur to individuals escaping swarms of hymenoptera. Closer attention must be paid to potential bleeding sources in these patients and in patients with massive bee envenomation. PMID:27427329

  2. Mediastinal Packing for Intractable Coagulopathy in Acute Aortic Dissection (Types 1 and 2 DeBakey): A Life-Saving Technique—Report of Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Moeinipour, Aliasghar; Fathi, Mehdi; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza; Amini, Shahram; Hoseinikhah, Hamid; Kianinejad, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Nonsurgical bleeding after complex thoracic aortic procedures (such as aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm) is a great challenge for cardiac surgeons because of severe coagulopathy, exsanguinous bleeding, and inevitable death. Temporary mediastinal packing (with sponge) in such cases is the only life-saving technique with good result in most cases. Herein, we presented three cases with acute aortic dissection with intractable bleeding that was successfully managed with mediastinal packing. PMID:26435855

  3. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Michael; Kredo, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In South Africa, trauma is a major concern, with violence and road traffic accidents being the fifth and seventh leading causes of death, respectively. Antifibrinolytic agents have been used in trauma and major surgery to prevent fibrinolysis and reduce blood loss. We highlight an updated Cochrane review investigating the effect of antifibrinolytic drugs in patients with acute traumatic injury. The review authorsconducted comprehensive literature searches in January 2015 with regard to all randomised controlled trials comparing antifibrinolytic agents after acute traumatic injury. Three randomised controlled trials, of which two (n=20 451) assessed the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA), were included. The authors concluded that TXA safely reduces mortality in trauma with bleeding without increasing the risk ofadverse events. TXA should be administered as early as possible, and within 3 hours of injury. There is still uncertainty with regard to the effect of TXA on patients with traumatic brain injury; however, ongoing randomised controlled trials should shed more light on this. PMID:27499400

  4. Mechanisms of early trauma-induced coagulopathy: The clot thickens or not?

    PubMed

    Dobson, Geoffrey P; Letson, Hayley L; Sharma, Rajiv; Sheppard, Forest R; Cap, Andrew P

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is a hemostatic disorder that is associated with significant bleeding, transfusion requirements, morbidity and mortality. A disorder similar or analogous to TIC was reported around 70 years ago in patients with shock, hemorrhage, burns, cardiac arrest or undergoing major surgery, and the condition was referred to as a "severe bleeding tendency," "defibrination syndrome," "consumptive disorder," and later by surgeons treating US Vietnam combat casualties as a "diffuse oozing coagulopathy." In 1982, Moore's group termed it the "bloody vicious cycle," others "the lethal triad," and in 2003 Brohi and colleagues introduced "acute traumatic coagulopathy" (ATC). Since that time, early TIC has been cloaked in many names and acronyms, including a "fibrinolytic form of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC)." A global consensus on naming is urgently required to avoid confusion. In our view, TIC is a dynamic entity that evolves over time and no single hypothesis adequately explains the different manifestations of the coagulopathy. However, early TIC is not DIC because an increased thrombin-generating potential in vitro does not imply a clinically relevant thrombotic state in vivo as early TIC is characterized by excessive bleeding, not thrombosis. DIC with its diffuse anatomopathologic fibrin deposition appears to be a latter phase progression of TIC associated with unchecked inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction. PMID:26218701

  5. Traumatic panhypopituitarism resulting in acute adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Phillip Benson; Cunningham, Aaron Joseph; Mentzer, Caleb James; Ahmad, Anbar; Young, Lester S; Abuzeid, Adel M

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary function plays an integral role in the physiologic response to traumatic injury. A significant proportion of trauma patients develop partial pituitary insufficiency. While isolated deficiencies of individual pituitary hormones are common, there are few reports in the literature of traumatic pan-pituitary failure with deficiency of all major pituitary hormones. We present a case of a patient involved in a motorcycle accident who sustained a sella turcica fracture, epidural hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage, optic nerve palsy, and bilateral abducens nerve palsies. Three days after the accident, the patient became hypotensive and progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. He was resuscitated and had spontaneous return of circulation. Despite adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor support, he remained profoundly hypotensive. Following administration of hydrocortisone, his blood pressures dramatically improved. He was found to have laboratory abnormalities, suggesting deficiencies of corticotropins, somatotropins, thyrotropins, gonadotropins, prolactin, and antidiuretic hormone. This is the first reported case of a patient with traumatic total panhypopituitarism complicated by acute adrenal crises during initial postinjury hospitalization. A review of the literature with comparison with other studies of trauma patients with deficiencies in five or more axes is presented. A high level of suspicion for central adrenal insufficiency and prompt administration of corticosteroids in the setting of symptomatic pituitary trauma can result in favorable outcomes. Screening for and treating posttraumatic hypopituitarism can result in improved rehabilitation and increased quality of life for trauma patients. PMID:26307884

  6. The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma is due to Impaired Initial Thrombin Generation but not Clot Formation or Clot Strength

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Droz, Nathan; Fragoso, Miguel; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    The Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma (ACOT) has been described as a very early hypocoagulable state, but the mechanism remains controversial. One proposed mechanism is tissue hypoperfusion leading to protein C activation, with subsequent inhibition of Factors V and VIII. Variability in trauma has impeded the use of clinical data towards the elucidation of the mechanisms of ACOT, but thrombelastography (TEG) may provide insight by assessing hemostatic function from initial thrombin activation to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that, in a controlled animal model of trauma/hemorrhagic shock, clotting factor dysfunction is the predominant mechanism in early ACOT. Methods Rats anesthetized by inhaled isoflurane (n=6) underwent laparotomy, and hemorrhage was induced to maintain a MAP of 35 mmHg for 30 minutes. Rats were then resuscitated with twice their shed blood volume in normal saline. TEG was performed at baseline, shock, and post-resuscitation periods. No heparin was given. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA with post-hoc Fisher’s test. Results Coagulation factor function was significantly impaired in the early stages of trauma/hemorrhagic shock. TEG R and SP-values were significantly increased from baseline to shock (p<0.001) and from shock to post-resuscitation periods (p<0.05). Delta (R-SP), a measure of thrombin generation, showed a significant increase (p<0.05) from baseline to shock. No significant changes were found in K, Angle, MA, and LY30 values. Conclusion Clotting factor derangement leading to impaired thrombin generation is the principle etiology of ACOT in this model and not the dynamics of clot formation, fibrin cross-linking, clot strength/platelet function, or fibrinolysis. PMID:21550061

  7. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticie diphacinone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Day, Daniel D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Voler, Steven F.; Eisemann, John D.; Johnston, John J.

    2011-01-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell?s viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  8. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  9. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron level in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 hours (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1±3.0 vs. 9.9±0.2 mm3 in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm3 in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI. PMID:24935175

  10. Pediatric traumatic brain injury: acute and rehabilitation costs.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, K M; Massagli, T L; Martin, K M; Rivara, J B; Fay, G C; Polissar, N L

    1993-07-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury constitutes an enormous public health problem, but little is known about the economic costs of such injury. Using charges as a proxy for cost, we prospectively collected data on initial hospital charges and professional fees for emergency department services, acute inpatient care, and acute inpatient rehabilitation for 96 patients with mild, moderate, and severe traumatic brain injuries. We also examined the relationship between these costs and injury severity and etiology. Acute care and rehabilitation median costs were $5,233 per child, $11,478 for hospitalized children, and $230 for those only seen in the emergency department. Median costs for injuries due to motor vehicles, bicycles, and falls were $15,213, $6,311, and $792, respectively. Using Glasgow Coma Scale criteria, median cost of mild, moderate, and severe traumatic brain injuries were $598, $12,022, and $53,332, respectively. Injury etiology added modestly but significantly to the prediction of cost over and above that predicted by injury severity alone. Rehabilitation costs accounted for 37% of the total for all children, but 45% of those with the most severe injuries. PMID:8328886

  11. The coagulopathy and thrombotic risk associated with L-asparaginase treatment in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Truelove, E; Fielding, A K; Hunt, B J

    2013-03-01

    The dramatic improvements seen in the outcome of paediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have led to increasing incorporation of L-asparaginase (L-Asp) in adult treatment protocols. However, its use is associated with a disruption in the physiological balance between haemostatic and anticoagulant pathways, with the predominant clinical manifestation being thrombosis. Although L-Asp therapy is known to be associated with an acquired deficiency of antithrombin (AT), the concurrent depletion of fibrinogen and other haemostatic proteins means that the precise mechanism of thrombosis remains to be defined. In vitro coagulation assays are often prolonged but thrombosis rather than haemorrhage is the primary concern. Management of thrombotic events in these patients is based around agents that rely on AT for their anticoagulant effect, even though it is usually depleted. There is currently only limited evidence supporting the use of AT concentrates in either primary prevention or management following an established event. Evidence-based guidelines for prevention and management strategies are lacking. PMID:23099335

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Coagulopathy-Related Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    VanDerWerf, Joshua; Kumar, Monisha A

    2016-06-01

    Coagulopathy, defined as impaired clot formation, is common in intensive care units (ICUs). Many physiological derangements lead to dysfunctional hemostasis in the ICU; most of these are acquired rather than congenital. Coagulopathies in the ICU are often related to systemic diseases, autoimmune dysfunction, acute infection, organ dysfunction, therapeutic medications, and/or other medical treatments. A significant complication of coagulopathy in the critically ill is major bleeding, defined as fatal hemorrhage, hemodynamic instability, transfusion requirement, or intracranial hematomas. Coagulopathy in the ICU often poses complex management dilemmas, especially when coagulopathy coexists with a thrombotic state. Coagulopathy associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) bears directly on neurologic prognosis and functional outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for the management of coagulopathies in neurocritical care; however, data derived from studies of patients with ICH may inform treatment decisions. This article focuses on acquired conditions such as pharmacological therapies, organ failure, and platelet dysfunction that are often associated with defective clot formation in the ICU that result in or exacerbate ICH. PMID:27214703

  13. Prothrombin complex concentrate use in coagulopathy of lethal brain injuries increases organ donation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Hays, Daniel; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Wynne, Julie; O' Keeffe, Terence; Green, Donald J; Friese, Randall S; Gruessner, Rainer; Rhee, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Coagulopathy is a defined barrier for organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. The purpose of this study was to document our experience with the use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to facilitate organ donation in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. We performed a 4-year retrospective analysis of all patients with devastating gunshot wounds to the brain. The data were analyzed for demographics, change in international normalized ratio (INR), and subsequent organ donation. The primary end point was organ donation. Eighty-eight patients with lethal traumatic brain injury were identified from the trauma registry of whom 13 were coagulopathic at the time of admission (mean INR 2.2 ± 0.8). Of these 13 patients, 10 patients received PCC in an effort to reverse their coagulopathy. Mean INR before PCC administration was 2.01 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.7 after administration (P < 0.006). Correction of coagulopathy was attained in 70 per cent (seven of 10) patients. Of these seven patients, consent for donation was obtained in six patients and resulted in 19 solid organs being procured. The cost of PCC per patient was $1022 ± 544. PCC effectively reveres coagulopathy associated with lethal traumatic brain injury and enabled patients to proceed to organ donation. Although various methodologies exist for the treatment of coagulopathy to facilitate organ donation, PCC provides a rapid and cost-effective therapy for reversal of coagulopathy in patients with lethal traumatic brain injuries. PMID:24887662

  14. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  15. Acute Traumatic Ulnar Nerve Subluxation: A Case Report and Pathomechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gangadharan, Sangeet; Shetty, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute traumatic subluxation of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel is rare or under-reported Case Report: A 31 year old Asian man presented with severe, radiating pain from the elbow to forearm, following a fall on his outstretched hand. He had swelling and severe tenderness at the posteromedial aspect of the elbow. Pain aggravated with elbow flexion beyond 80 degrees. There was no neurological deficit. Dynamic ultrasound demonstrated subluxation of ulnar nerve with elbow flexion. Broad arm sling immobilization was given for three weeks. At final follow up, he was asymptomatic with full range of pain free motion at the elbow. Conclusion: Our case report summarizes the presentation, management and pathomechanism of a rare clinical entity. PMID:27299098

  16. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-01

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system. PMID:23897140

  17. Thaliporphine derivative improves acute lung injury after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Huang, Chien-Chu; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs frequently in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Aquaporins (AQPs), particularly AQP1 and AQP4, maintain water balances between the epithelial and microvascular domains of the lung. Since pulmonary edema (PE) usually occurs in the TBI-induced ALI patients, we investigated the effects of a thaliporphine derivative, TM-1, on the expression of AQPs and histological outcomes in the lung following TBI in rats. TM-1 administered (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) at 3 or 4 h after TBI significantly reduced the elevated mRNA expression and protein levels of AQP1 and AQP4 and diminished the wet/dry weight ratio, which reflects PE, in the lung at 8 and 24 h after TBI. Postinjury TM-1 administration also improved histopathological changes at 8 and 24 h after TBI. PE was accompanied with tissue pathological changes because a positive correlation between the lung injury score and the wet/dry weight ratio in the same animal was observed. Postinjury administration of TM-1 improved ALI and reduced PE at 8 and 24 h following TBI. The pulmonary-protective effect of TM-1 may be attributed to, at least in part, downregulation of AQP1 and AQP4 expression after TBI. PMID:25705683

  18. Pharmacotherapy in rehabilitation of post-acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Iaccarino, Mary Alexis; Zafonte, Ross

    2016-06-01

    There are nearly 1.8 million annual emergency room visits and over 289,000 annual hospitalizations related to traumatic brain injury (TBI). The goal of this review article is to highlight pharmacotherapies that we often use in the clinic that have been shown to benefit various sequelae of TBI. We have decided to focus on sequelae that we commonly encounter in our practice in the post-acute phase after a TBI. These symptoms are hyper-arousal, agitation, hypo-arousal, inattention, slow processing speed, memory impairment, sleep disturbance, depression, headaches, spasticity, and paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity. In this review article, the current literature for the pharmacological management of these symptoms are mentioned, including medications that have not had success and some ongoing trials. It is clear that the pharmacological management specific to those with TBI is often based on small studies and that often treatment is based on assumptions of how similar conditions are managed when not relating to TBI. As the body of the literature expands and targeted treatments start to emerge for TBI, the function of pharmacological management will need to be further defined. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26801831

  19. Traumatic Memories in Acute Stress Disorder: An Analysis of Narratives before and after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulds, Michelle L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociative reactions in acute stress disorder purportedly impede encoding and organization of traumatic memories and consequently impair the individual's ability to retrieve trauma-related details. A qualitative examination was conducted on trauma narratives of individuals with acute stress disorder (N = 15) prior to cognitive behavior…

  20. Altered Cerebellar White Matter Integrity in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wu, Wenzhong; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Tianyao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Imaging studies of traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the cerebellum is often affected. We aim to examine fractional anisotropy alteration in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients in cerebellum-related white matter tracts. Materials and Methods This prospective study included 47 mild traumatic brain injury patients in the acute stage and 37 controls. MR imaging and neurocognitive tests were performed in patients within 7 days of injury. White matter integrity was examined by using diffusion tensor imaging. We used three approaches, tract-based spatial statistics, graphical-model-based multivariate analysis, and region-of-interest analysis, to detect altered cerebellar white matter integrity in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Results Results from three analysis methods were in accordance with each other, and suggested fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle and the pontine crossing tract was changed in the acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients, relative to controls (adjusted p-value < 0.05). Higher fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle was associated with worse performance in the fluid cognition composite (r = -0.289, p-value = 0.037). Conclusion Altered cerebellar fractional anisotropy in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients is localized in specific regions and statistically associated with cognitive deficits detectable on neurocognitive testing. PMID:26967320

  1. Hypothermia as a cause of coagulopathy during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Albert Wai-Cheung; Chen, Chia-Chen; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Poon, Kin-Shing

    2010-06-01

    We report a 27-year-old hemostatically competent female scheduled for partial hepatectomy. During the operation, she experienced an accidental inferior vena cava tear and suffered acute blood loss. After fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion, she developed hypothermia, with a temperature of 33.8 degrees C, and severe coagulopathy with activated clotting time exceeding 1500 seconds measured using the Hemochron Response system (ITC, Edison, NJ, USA). Despite sufficient blood transfusion and correction of her electrolyte imbalance, the poor hemostasis persisted. After per-forming peritoneal lavage with warm saline, her condition dramatically improved and her hypothermia and severe coagulopathy were reversed. PMID:20643371

  2. Acute and chronic efficacy of Bumetanide in an in vitro model of post-traumatic epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dzhala, Volodymyr; Staley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Seizures triggered by acute injuries to the developing brain respond poorly to first-line medications that target the inhibitory chloride-permeable GABAA-receptor. Neuronal injury is associated with profound increases in cytoplasmic chloride ([Cl−]i) resulting in depolarizing GABA signaling, higher seizure propensity and limited efficacy of GABAergic anticonvulsants. The Na+-K+-2Cl− (NKCC1) co-transporter blocker bumetanide reduces [Cl−]i and causes more negative GABA equilibrium potential in injured neurons. We therefore tested both the acute and chronic efficacy of bumetanide on early post-traumatic ictal-like epileptiform discharges and epileptogenesis. Methods Acute hippocampal slices were used as a model of severe traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic epileptogenesis. Hippocampal slices were then incubated for three weeks. After a one week latent period slice cultures developed chronic spontaneous ictal-like discharges. The anticonvulsant and antiepileptogenic efficacy of bumetanide, phenobarbital and the combination of these drugs was studied. Results Bumetanide reduced the frequency and power of early post-traumatic ictal-like discharges in vitro and enhanced the anticonvulsant efficacy of phenobarbital. Continuous two-three week administration of bumetanide as well as phenobarbital in combination with bumetanide failed to prevent post-traumatic ictal-like discharges and epileptogenesis. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a persistent contribution of NKCC1 co-transport in post-traumatic ictal-like activity, presumably as a consequence of chronic alterations in neuronal chloride homeostasis and GABA-mediated inhibition. New strategies for more effective reduction in post-traumatic and seizure-induced [Cl−]i accumulation could provide the basis for effective treatments for post-traumatic epileptogenesis and the resultant seizures. PMID:25495911

  3. Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster.

    PubMed

    Arnberg, Filip K; Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf; Hultman, Christina M; Lundin, Tom

    2011-04-01

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine posttraumatic stress in survivors 14 years after a ferry disaster, and estimate short- and long-term changes in stress associated with traumatic bereavement and acute dissociation. There were 852 people who perished in the disaster, 137 survived. The 51 Swedish survivors were surveyed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) at 3 months, 1, 3, and 14 years (response rates 82%, 65%, 51%, and 69%). Symptoms decreased from 3 months to 1 year; no change was found thereafter. After 14 years, 27% reported significant symptoms. Traumatic bereavement, but not acute dissociation, was associated with long-term symptom elevation. Chronic posttraumatic stress can persist in a minority of survivors, and traumatic bereavement appears to hinder recovery. PMID:21442665

  4. Acute Stress Disorder as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Physical Assault Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elklit, Ask; Brink, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The authors' objective was to examine the ability of acute stress disorder (ASD) and other trauma-related factors in a group of physical assault victims in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months later. Subjects included 214 victims of violence who completed a questionnaire 1 to 2 weeks after the assault, with 128 participating…

  5. [Metastatic prostate cancer complicated with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy causing acute renal failure, mimicking thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathomechanism, differential diagnosis and therapy related to a case].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Ragán, Márton; Kalmár, Katalin; Kovács, Lajos; Varga, Erzsébet; Varga, Tünde; Rakonczai, Ervin

    2010-12-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is characterized as activation of the clotting system resulting in fibrin thrombi, gradually diminishing levels of clotting factors with increased risk of bleeding. Basically two types of DIC are distinguished: (1) chronic (compensated) - with alteration of laboratory values and (2) acute (non-compensated) - with severe clinical manifestations: bleeding, shock, acute renal failure (ARF), transient focal neurologic deficit, delirium or coma. Chronic DIC related to metastatic neoplasia is caused by pancreatic, gastric or prostatic carcinoma in most of the cases. Incidence rate of DIC is 13-30% in prostate cancer, among those only 0.4-1.65% of patients had clinical signs and symptoms of DIC. In other words, chronic DIC is developed in one of eight patients with prostate cancer. DIC is considered as a poor prognostic factor in prostatic carcinoma. The similar clinical and laboratory findings of TTP-HUS (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - hemolytic uremic syndrome) and DIC makes it difficult to differentiate between them. A 71 years old male patient with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, significant carotid artery stenosis, gastric ulcer and alcoholic liver disease was admitted to another hospital with melena. Gastroscopy revealed intact gastric mucosa and actually non-bleeding duodenal ulcer covered by clots. Laboratory results showed hyperkalemia, elevated kidney function tests, indirect hyperbilirubinemia, increased liver function tests, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). He was treated with saline infusions, four units of red blood cells and one unit of fresh frozen plasma transfusions. Four days later he was transported to our Institution with ARF. Physical examination revealed dyspnoe, petechiae, hemoptoe, oliguria, chest-wall pain and aggressive behavior. Thrombocytopenia, signs of MAHA (fragmentocytes and helmet cells

  6. Traumatic brain injury in children: acute care management.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kristen; Meller, Karen; Kulpan, Carol; Mowery, Bernice D

    2013-01-01

    The care of the pediatric patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an all-encompassing nursing challenge. Nursing vigilance is required to maintain a physiological balance that protects the injured brain. From the time a child and family first enter the hospital, they are met with the risk of potential death and an uncertain future. The family is subjected to an influx of complex medical and nursing terminology and interventions. Nurses need to understand the complexities of TBI and the modalities of treatment, as well as provide patients and families with support throughout all phases of care. PMID:24640314

  7. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  8. Early coagulopathy is an independent predictor of mortality in children after severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Brent; Christiaans, Sarah C; Altice, Jessica L; Chen, Mike K; Bartolucci, Alfred A; Morgan, Charity J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Pittet, Jean-François

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether early coagulopathy affects the mortality associated with severe civilian pediatric trauma, trauma patients younger than 18 years admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit from 2001 to 2010 were evaluated. Patients with burns, primary asphyxiation, preexisting bleeding diathesis, lack of coagulation studies, or transferred from other hospitals more than 24 h after injury were excluded. Age, sex, race, mechanism of injury, initial systolic blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, platelet count, and international normalized ratio were recorded. An arterial or venous blood gas was performed, if clinically indicated. Coagulopathy was defined as an international normalized ratio greater than 1.2. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Eight hundred three patients were included in the study. Overall mortality was 13.4%. The incidence of age-adjusted hypotension was 5.4%. Early coagulopathy was observed in 37.9% of patients. High Injury Severity Score and/or hypotension were associated with early coagulopathy and higher mortality. Early coagulopathy was associated with a modest increase in mortality in pediatric trauma patients without traumatic brain injury (TBI). In contrast, the combination of TBI and early coagulopathy was associated with a fourfold increase in mortality in this patient population. Early coagulopathy is an independent predictor of mortality in civilian pediatric patients with severe trauma. The increase in mortality was particularly significant in patients with TBI either isolated or combined with other injuries, suggesting that a rapid correction of this coagulopathy could substantially decrease the mortality after TBI in pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23591559

  9. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  10. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  11. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  12. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  13. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  14. Nutritional treatment for acute and chronic traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Curtis, L; Epstein, P

    2014-09-01

    Proper nutrition is critical for recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt enteral feeding of moderate to severe TBI patients has been associated with significantly lower mortality and rates of infection. Probiotic supplementation has been associated with significantly lower rates of infection in TBI and other trauma patients. Human studies have suggested that supplementation with omega 3 fats, vitamin D, N-Acetylcysteine, branched chain amino acids, and zinc may be helpful for recovery from TBI. Animal TBI models have suggested that alpha-lipoic acid, magnesium, taurine, coenzyme Q10, and many phytonutrients (such as resveratrol) are also helpful. Unfortunately, recent human clinical trials with citicoline in TBI and stroke patients have produced disappointing results. Much more research is needed on multifaceted nutritional strategies to treat TBI patients in both the immediate post-injury phase and throughout the patients lifespan. PMID:24844176

  15. Right Median Nerve Electrical Stimulation for Acute Traumatic Coma Patients.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jin; Wang, Lei; Gao, Guoyi; Cooper, Edwin; Jiang, Jiyao

    2015-10-15

    The right median nerve as a peripheral portal to the central nervous system can be electrically stimulated to help coma arousal after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study set out to examine the efficacy and safety of right median nerve electrical stimulation (RMNS) in a cohort of 437 comatose patients after severe TBI from August 2005 to December 2011. The patients were enrolled 2 weeks after their injury and assigned to the RMNS group (n=221) receiving electrical stimulation for 2 weeks or the control group (n = 216) treated by standard management according to the date of birth in the month. The baseline data were similar. After the 2-week treatment, the RMNS-treated patients demonstrated a more rapid increase of the mean Glasgow Coma Score, although statistical significance was not reached (8.43 ± 4.98 vs. 7.47 ± 5.37, p = 0.0532). The follow-up data at 6-month post-injury showed a significantly higher proportion of patients who regained consciousness (59.8% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.0073). There was a lower proportion of vegetative persons in the RMNS group than in the control group (17.6% vs. 22.0%, p = 0.0012). For persons regaining consciousness, the functional independence measurement (FIM) score was higher among the RMNS group patients (91.45 ± 8.65 vs. 76.23 ± 11.02, p < 0.001). There were no unique complications associated with the RMNS treatment. The current study, although with some limitations, showed that RMNS may serve as an easy, effective, and noninvasive technique to promote the recovery of traumatic coma in the early phase. PMID:25664378

  16. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  17. Review of Acute Traumatic Closed Mallet Finger Injuries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Botero, Santiago; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan Jose; Benaïda, Anissa; Collon, Sylvie; Facca, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    In adults, mallet finger is a traumatic zone I lesion of the extensor tendon with either tendon rupture or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. High-energy mechanisms of injury generally occur in young men, whereas lower energy mechanisms are observed in elderly women. The mechanism of injury is an axial load applied to a straight digit tip, which is then followed by passive extreme distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) hyperextension or hyperflexion. Mallet finger is diagnosed clinically, but an X-ray should always be performed. Tubiana's classification takes into account the size of the bony articular fragment and DIPJ subluxation. We propose to stage subluxated fractures as stage III if the subluxation is reducible with a splint and as stage IV if not. Left untreated, mallet finger becomes chronic and leads to a swan-neck deformity and DIPJ osteoarthritis. The goal of treatment is to restore active DIPJ extension. The results of a six- to eight-week conservative course of treatment with a DIPJ splint in slight hyperextension for tendon lesions or straight for bony avulsions depends on patient compliance. Surgical treatments vary in terms of the approach, the reduction technique, and the means of fixation. The risks involved are stiffness, septic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Given the lack of consensus regarding indications for treatment, we propose to treat all cases of mallet finger with a dorsal glued splint except for stage IV mallet finger, which we treat with extra-articular pinning. PMID:27019806

  18. Acute traumatic cord injury associated with ossified ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Kow, Chien Yew; Chan, Patrick; Etherington, Greg; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-08-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is an uncommon condition, which usually occurs amongst people of Asian descent, and most commonly in the thoracic spine region. Whilst often asymptomatic, OLF can cause spinal canal stenosis, with patients presenting with back pain, posterior cord syndrome or myelopathy. We present a rare case of acute spinal cord injury associated with OLF after a kite surfing accident, with the resulting paraplegia partially improved after decompression was performed. The prevalence, presentation and management of OLF are also discussed. PMID:27052256

  19. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  20. Haemodynamic collapse in a patient with acute inferior myocardial infarction and concomitant traumatic acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoto; Dohi, Kaoru; Tanigawa, Takashi; Ito, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man suddenly collapsed and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. The cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempt succeeded in restoration of spontaneous circulation. The initial 12-lead electrocardiogram showed inferior acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The patient was initially diagnosed as having cardiogenic shock associated with inferior AMI. In spite of early coronary revascularisation, bradycardia and hypotension were sustained. After termination of sedation and extubation, he was found to have a quadriplegia and diagnosed with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, the patient was finally diagnosed with neurogenic shock caused by acute cervical SCI due to the traumatic injury preceded by loss of consciousness complicating inferior AMI. We should recognise that SCI has unique haemodynamic features that mimic those associated with inferior AMI, but requires very different treatment. PMID:24272986

  1. Corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, P.; Roberts, I.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury. Summary odds ratios were estimated as an inverse variance weighted average of the odds ratios for each study. SETTING: Randomised trials available by March 1996. SUBJECTS: The included trials with outcome data comprised 2073 randomised participants. RESULTS: The effect of corticosteroids on the risk of death was reported in 13 included trials. The pooled odds ratio for the 13 trials was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.12). Pooled absolute risk reduction was 1.8% (-2.5% to 5.7%). For the 10 trials that reported death or disability the pooled odds ratio was 0.90 (0.72 to 1.11). For infections of any type the pooled odds ratio was 0.92 (0.69 to 1.23) and for the seven trials reporting gastrointestinal bleeding it was 1.05 (0.44 to 2.52). With only those trials with the best quality of concealment of allocation, the pooled odds ratio estimates for death and death or disability became closer to unity. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review of randomised controlled trials of corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury shows that there remains considerable uncertainty over their effects. Neither moderate benefits nor moderate harmful effects can be excluded. The widely practicable nature of the drugs and the importance of the health problem suggest that large simple trials are feasible and worth while to establish whether there are any benefits from use of corticosteroids in this setting. PMID:9224126

  2. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Treatment of Acute Traumatic Superior Oblique Muscle Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Talebnejad, Mohammad Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam; Nowroozzadeh, M. Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection into the inferior oblique (IO) muscle for management of unilateral acute traumatic superior oblique (SO) palsy. Methods: In this prospective case series, 10-20 units of botulinum toxin A (Dysport, Ipsen, Biopharm Ltd., Wrexham, UK) was injected into the ipsilateral IO muscle of 13 consecutive patients with unilateral acute traumatic SO palsy. All patients received injections within four weeks of the incident. Results: Mean age was 29 ± 15 years and 12 (92%) subjects were male. Mean amount of hypertropia (in primary position) was decreased from 10.0 ± 3.9Δ at baseline to 4.6 ± 8.9Δ, one month after the injection, and to 1.5 ± 2.7Δ at final follow-up (P = 0.001). IO overaction improved from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 1.0 ± 1.2 and 0.6 ± 0.9 (P ≤ 0.001), and subjective torsion from 5.3 ± 3.9 to 3.2 ± 3.4 and 1.6 ± 2.5 degrees (P ≤ 0.001), at the same time intervals respectively. One month after the injection as well as at final follow-up, 10 (77%) patients were diplopia-free in primary and reading positions. Subgroup analysis showed that patients who recovered had less baseline hypertropia as compared to those who failed (8.3Δ vs. 15.7Δ, respectively; P = 0.01). All patients with a favorable outcome had baseline hypertropia of 10Δ or less. Conclusion: A single injection of BTA into the IO muscle can rapidly and safely resolve symptomatic diplopia in patients with acute traumatic SO palsy, while waiting for spontaneous recovery. PMID:26730311

  3. Acute Traumatic Tear of Latissimus Dorsi Muscle in an Elite Track Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Mehmet Mesut; Ergen, Emin; Üstüner, Evren

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively. PMID:24765503

  4. Etiology of non-traumatic acute abdomen in pediatric emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common complaint in pediatric emergency departments. A complete evaluation is the key factor approaching the disease and should include the patient’s age, any trauma history, the onset and chronicity of the pain, the related symptoms and a detailed physical examination. The aim of this review article is to provide some information for physicians in pediatric emergency departments, with the age factors and several causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain. The leading causes of acute abdominal pain are divided into four age groups: infants younger than 2 years old, children 2 to 5, children 5 to 12, and children older than 12 years old. We review the information about acute appendicitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, infection, Meckel’s diverticulum and mesenteric adenitis. In conclusion, the etiologies of acute abdomen in children admitted to the emergency department vary depending on age. A complete history and detailed physical examination, as well as abdominal imaging examinations, could provide useful information for physicians in the emergency department to narrow the differential diagnosis of abdominal emergencies and give a timely treatment. PMID:24364022

  5. Progesterone for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junpeng; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of progesterone administrated in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN registry and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing progesterone and placebo administrated in acute TBI patients. The primary outcome was mortality and the secondary outcomes were unfavorable outcomes and adverse events. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of progesterone administrated in patients with acute TBI. Results A total of 6 studies met inclusion criteria, involving 2,476 patients. The risk of bias was considered to be low in 4 studies but high in the other 2 studies. The results of meta-analysis indicated progesterone did not reduce the mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.57–1.20) or unfavorable outcomes (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.78–1.02) of acute TBI patients in comparison with placebo. Sensitivity analysis yielded consistent results. Progesterone was basically safe and well tolerated in TBI patients with the exception of increased risk of phlebitis or thrombophlebitis (RR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.96–4.66). Conclusions Despite some modest bias, present evidence demonstrated that progesterone was well tolerated but did not reduce the mortality or unfavorable outcomes of adult patients with acute TBI. PMID:26473361

  6. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  7. TACTIC: Trans-Agency Consortium for Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Kenneth G.; Freeman, Kalev

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) includes heterogeneous coagulopathic syndromes with different underlying causes, and treatment is challenged by limited diagnostic tests to discriminate between these entities in the acute setting. We provide an overview of progress in understanding the mechanisms of TIC and the context for several of the hypotheses that will be tested in “TACTIC”. Although connected to ongoing clinical trials in trauma, TACTIC itself has no intent to conduct clinical trials. We do anticipate that “early translation” of promising results will occur. Functions anticipated at this early translational level include: 1. Basic science groundwork for future therapeutic candidates; 2. Development of acute coagulopathy scoring systems; 3. Coagulation factor composition-based computational analysis; 4. Characterization of novel analytes including tissue factor, polyP, histones, meizo and α-thrombin-antithrombin complexes, factor XIa, platelet markers of activation and trauma, signatures of protein C activation and fibrinolysis markers; 5. Assessment of visco-elastic tests and new point-of-care methods. PMID:26149052

  8. Sleep in the Acute Phase of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Snapshot of Polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Wiseman-Hakes, Catherine; Duclos, Catherine; Blais, Hélène; Dumont, Marie; Bernard, Francis; Desautels, Alex; Menon, David K; Gilbert, Danielle; Carrier, Julie; Gosselin, Nadia

    2016-09-01

    Background and Objectives The onset of pervasive sleep-wake disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is poorly understood. This study aimed to (a) determine the feasibility of using polysomnography in patients in the acute, hospitalized stage of severe TBI and (b) explore sleep quality and sleep architecture during this stage of recovery, compared to patients with other traumatic injuries. Methods A cross-sectional case-control design was used. We examined the sleep of 7 patients with severe TBI (17-47 years; 20.3 ± 15.0 days postinjury) and 6 patients with orthopedic and/or spinal cord injuries (OSCI; 19-58 years; 16.9 ± 4.9 days postinjury). One night of ambulatory polysomnography was performed at bedside. Results Compared to OSCI patients, TBI patients showed a significantly longer duration of nocturnal sleep and earlier nighttime sleep onset. Sleep efficiency was low and comparable in both groups. All sleep stages were observed in both groups with normal proportions according to age. Conclusion Patients in the acute stage of severe TBI exhibit increased sleep duration and earlier sleep onset, suggesting that the injured brain enhances sleep need and/or decreases the ability to maintain wakefulness. As poor sleep efficiency could compromise brain recovery, further studies should investigate whether strategies known to optimize sleep in healthy individuals are efficacious in acute TBI. While there are several inherent challenges, polysomnography is a useful means of examining sleep in the early stage of recovery in patients with severe TBI. PMID:26704256

  9. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  10. [Therapy of trauma-induced coagulopathy - what is the evidence?].

    PubMed

    Guth, Matthias C; Kaufner, Lutz; Kleber, Christian; von Heymann, Christian

    2012-09-01

    The increasing understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy has led to an expansion of treatment strategies in the acute management of trauma patients. The aim of this manuscript is to give a summary of current recommendations for the treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy based on current literature and valid guidelines. Thetrauma-induced coagulopathyis an independentacutemultifactorial diseasewith significantimpact on the mortalityof severelyinjured patients. Largely responsible for the occurrence and severity of trauma-induced coagulopathy seems to be tissue trauma and shock-induced hypoperfusion. Coagulopathy is amplified by accompanying factors such as hypothermia or dilution. Diagnosis and therapy of deranged coagulation should start as soon as possible. Routinely tested coagulation parameters are of limited use to confirm diagnosis. Therapy follows the concept of "damage control resuscitation". Infusion of large volumes should be avoided and a mean arterial pressure of 65mmHg (in consideration of contraindications!) may be aimed.A specific protocol for massive transfusion should be introduced and continued.Acidaemia should be prevented and treated by appropriate shock therapy.Loss of body temperature should be prevented and treated. Hypocalcaemia <0.9 mmol/l should be avoided and may be treated. For actively bleeding patients, packed red blood cells (pRBC) may be given at haemoglobin<10g/dl(0,62mmol/l). If massive transfusion is performed using fresh frozen plasma (FFP), a ratio of FFP to pRBC of 1:2 to 1:1 should be achieved.For treatment of hyperfibrinolysis after severe trauma the use of tranexamic acid should be considered at an early stage. Fibrinogen should be substituted at levels <1,5g/l (4,41μmol/l). Prothrombin complex concentrates may be helpfull for treatment of diffuse bleeding or anticoagulativemedikation. In acute bleeding, platelets may be transfused at a platet count <100000/μl. For diffuse bleeding or thrombocytopathic patients

  11. Acute Neuroimmune Modulation Attenuates the Development of Anxiety-Like Freezing Behavior in an Animal Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Krista M.; Bercum, Florencia M.; McCallum, Danielle L.; Rudy, Jerry W.; Frey, Lauren C.; Johnson, Kirk W.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chronic anxiety is a common and debilitating result of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. While little is known about the neural mechanisms of this disorder, inflammation resulting from activation of the brain's immune response to insult has been implicated in both human post-traumatic anxiety and in recently developed animal models. In this study, we used a lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI) model of TBI in the rat and examined freezing behavior as a measure of post-traumatic anxiety. We found that LFPI produced anxiety-like freezing behavior accompanied by increased reactive gliosis (reflecting neuroimmune inflammatory responses) in key brain structures associated with anxiety: the amygdala, insula, and hippocampus. Acute peri-injury administration of ibudilast (MN166), a glial cell activation inhibitor, suppressed both reactive gliosis and freezing behavior, and continued neuroprotective effects were apparent several months post-injury. These results support the conclusion that inflammation produced by neuroimmune responses to TBI play a role in post-traumatic anxiety, and that acute suppression of injury-induced glial cell activation may have promise for the prevention of post-traumatic anxiety in humans. PMID:22435644

  12. Acute Traumatic Compartment Syndrome in Pediatric Foot: A Systematic Review and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Kelly; Nguyen, Hienvu; Russell, Lindsay; Lee, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the lower leg and foot is a not widely reported, but serious, potential complication that can develop after fractures, crush injuries, or high-velocity trauma of the lower extremity. Early recognition and treatment are critical in preventing morbidity and permanent complications. Although compartment syndrome of the lower leg and foot has been well-studied and documented in adults, its occurrence in the pediatric population is rare. We performed a systematic review of the published data and present the case of the youngest patient with isolated ACS of the foot. A high index of suspicion is warranted in pediatric patients with a traumatic injury to the lower extremity for compartment syndrome. Inconclusive radiographic findings owing to skeletal immaturity and the inability to verbalize symptoms place young children at high risk of undiagnosed compartment syndrome. Clinicians should have a very low threshold for fasciotomy to prevent long-term sequelae associated with undiagnosed compartment syndrome. PMID:27067201

  13. Low-level laser therapy attenuates the acute inflammatory response induced by muscle traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; Scheffer, Debora da Luz; Glaser, Viviane; Remor, Aline Pertile; Pinho, Ricardo Aurino; Aguiar Junior, Aderbal Silva; Latini, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of early and long-term low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers after acute-traumatic muscle injury in Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into the following four groups: control group (CG), muscle injury group (IG), CG + LLLT, and IG + LLLT: laser treatment with doses of 3 and 5 J/cm(2). Muscle traumatic injury was induced by a single-impact blunt trauma in the rat gastrocnemius. Irradiation for 3 or 5 J/cm(2) was initiated 2, 12, and 24 h after muscle trauma induction, and the treatment was continued for five consecutive days. All the oxidant markers investigated. namely thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance, carbonyl, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, were increased as soon as 2 h after muscle injury and remained increased up to 24 h. These alterations were prevented by LLLT at a 3 J/cm(2) dose given 2 h after the trauma. Similarly, LLLT prevented the trauma-induced proinflammatory state characterized by IL-6 and IL-10. In parallel, trauma-induced reduction in BDNF and VEGF, vascular remodeling and fiber-proliferating markers, was prevented by laser irradiation. In order to test whether the preventive effect of LLLT was also reflected in muscle functionality, we tested the locomotor activity, by measuring distance traveled and the number of rearings in the open field test. LLLT was effective in recovering the normal locomotion, indicating that the irradiation induced biostimulatory effects that accelerated or resolved the acute inflammatory response as well as the oxidant state elicited by the muscle trauma. PMID:26983894

  14. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Glenn R.; Freeman, Kalev; Thomas, Alex; Shpaner, Marina; OKeefe, Michael; Watts, Richard; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2015-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures) within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma). The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject’s reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D.) hours after injury (time 1). At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2), 18 of mTBI subjects (64%) reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects compared to

  15. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Glenn R; Freeman, Kalev; Thomas, Alex; Shpaner, Marina; OKeefe, Michael; Watts, Richard; Naylor, Magdalena R

    2015-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures) within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma). The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D.) hours after injury (time 1). At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2), 18 of mTBI subjects (64%) reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects compared to

  16. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  17. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  18. Serum neurogranin measurement as a biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Korley, Frederick K.; Dai, Min; Everett, Allen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neurogranin (NRGN) is a small neuronal protein that plays an important role in synaptic signaling by regulating calmodulin (CaM) availability. In this study, we developed an ELISA to measure NRGN quantitatively in serum samples from a cohort of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients and a non-TBI control cohort, and explored the potential value of NRGN as a circulating biomarker for TBI. Design and methods Recombinant His-NRGN protein was used to develop mouse monoclonal capture and rabbit polyclonal detection antibodies, and they were used to develop a sandwich ELISA. After validation, we used this ELISA to measure serum samples from a cohort of typical adult acute TBI patients (N = 76 TBI cases) and non-TBI control patients (N = 150 controls). Results The NRGN ELISA lower limit of detection was 0.055 ng/mL, lower limit of quantification was 0.2 ng/mL, and interassay CVs were ≤ 10.7%. The average recovery was 99.9% (range from 97.2–102%). Serum NRGN concentrations in TBI cases were significantly higher than in controls (median values were 0.18 ng/mL vs. 0.02 ng/mL, p < 0.0001), but did not discriminate TBI cases with intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.09). Conclusions We have developed a highly sensitive and reproducible ELISA for measuring circulating NRGN in blood samples. Serum NRGN concentrations in acute TBI patients were significantly higher than in controls, indicating that NRGN could have utility as a circulating biomarker for acute TBI. This report provides evidence to support larger and controlled TBI clinical studies for NRGN validation and prediction of outcomes. PMID:26025774

  19. Clotting Factor Deficiency in Early Trauma-Associated Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Scarpelini, Sandro; Callum, Jeannie; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Mann, Kenneth G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Jansen, Jan; Tien, Homer

    2011-01-01

    Background Coagulopathic bleeding is a leading cause of in-hospital death after injury. A recently proposed transfusion strategy calls for early and aggressive frozen plasma transfusion to bleeding trauma patients, thus addressing trauma-associated coagulopathy (TAC) by transfusing clotting factors (CF). This strategy may dramatically improve survival of bleeding trauma patients. However, other studies suggest that early TAC occurs by protein C activation and is independent of CF deficiency. The present study investigated whether CF deficiency is associated with early trauma-associated coagulopathy. Methods Prospective observational cohort study of severely traumatized patients (ISS ≥16) admitted shortly after injury, receiving minimal fluids and no prehospital blood. Blood was assayed for CF levels, thromboelastography and routine coagulation tests. Critical CF deficiency was defined as ≤30% activity of any CF. Results Of 110 patients, 22 (20%) had critical CF deficiency: critically low factor V level was evident in all these patients. INR, aPTT and TEG were abnormal in 32%, 36% and 35% respectively of patients with any critically low CF. Patients with critical CF deficiency suffered more severe injuries, were more acidotic, received more blood transfusions and showed a trend towards higher mortality (32% vs. 18% p=.23). Computational modelling showed coagulopathic patients had pronounced delays and quantitative deficits in generating thrombin. Conclusions 20% of all severely injured patients had critical clotting factor deficiency on admission, particularly of factor V. The observed factor V deficit aligns with current understanding of the mechanisms underlying early TAC. Critical deficiency of factor V impairs thrombin generation and profoundly affects hemostasis. PMID:22071999

  20. Gender Differences in Awareness and Outcomes During Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Paul B.; Holcomb, Megan G.; Rolston, Cynthia D.; Artman, Laura K.; Lu, Juan; Nersessova, Karine S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recent literature on traumatic brain injury (TBI), though mixed when reporting outcomes, seems collectively to suggest possible gender advantage for women in postinjury recovery, especially in executive functions. Hormonal neuroprotection, through female reproductive hormones, is often proposed as an underlying factor in these results. We explored potential gender differences in an aspect of executive functions, self-awareness (SA), which is often impaired after TBI, limits patient effort in critical rehabilitation, and increases caregiver burden. Methods: Within a prospective survey, repeated-measures design, 121 patients with moderate or severe TBI undergoing acute rehabilitation in a Level 1 trauma center, a family member or caregiver informant, and a treating clinician were asked to complete the Patient Competency Rating Scale (PCRS) and the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe) at admission and discharge. Results: Although overall, women and men with TBI showed generally similar levels of SA, women had significantly better awareness of their injury-related deficits at acute rehabilitation discharge, even when controlling for age, education, and injury severity. Conclusions: Mixed findings in this study mirror the pattern of results that dominate the published literature on gender and TBI. Gender differences in executive dysfunction may not be as large or robust as some researchers argue. In addition, complex interplays of socialization, gender-role expectations, naturally occurring male and female ability differences, and differences in access to postinjury rehabilitation are understudied potential moderators. PMID:24932911

  1. Forward and inverse electroencephalographic modeling in health and in acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Goh, S.Y. Matthew; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Chambers, Micah C.; Kikinis, Ron; Van Horn, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective EEG source localization is demonstrated in three cases of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) with progressive lesion loads using anatomically faithful models of the head which account for pathology. Methods Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes were used to generate head models via the finite element method (FEM). A total of 25 tissue types—including 6 types accounting for pathology— were included. To determine the effects of TBI upon source localization accuracy, a minimum-norm operator was used to perform inverse localization and to determine the accuracy of the latter. Results The importance of using a more comprehensive number of tissue types is confirmed in both health and in TBI. Pathology omission is found to cause substantial inaccuracies in EEG forward matrix calculations, with lead field sensitivity being underestimated by as much as ~200% in (peri-) contusional regions when TBI-related changes are ignored. Failing to account for such conductivity changes is found to misestimate substantial localization error by up to 35 mm. Conclusions Changes in head conductivity profiles should be accounted for when performing EEG modeling in acute TBI. Significance Given the challenges of inverse localization in TBI, this framework can benefit neurotrauma patients by providing useful insights on pathophysiology. PMID:23746499

  2. Clinical and imaging assessment of acute combat mild traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Mac Donald, Christine L.; Rivet, Dennis; Ritter, John; May, Todd; Barefield, Maria; Duckworth, Josh; LaBarge, Donald; Asher, Dean; Drinkwine, Benjamin; Woods, Yvette; Connor, Michael; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) will noninvasively reveal white matter changes not present on conventional MRI in acute blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and to determine correlations with clinical measures and recovery. Methods: Prospective observational study of 95 US military service members with mTBI enrolled within 7 days from injury in Afghanistan and 101 healthy controls. Assessments included Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPCSQ), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Military (PCLM), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), conventional MRI, and DTI. Results: Significantly greater impairment was observed in participants with mTBI vs controls: RPCSQ (19.7 ± 12.9 vs 3.6 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), PCLM (32 ± 13.2 vs 20.9 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), BDI (7.4 ± 6.8 vs 2.5 ± 4.9, p < 0.001), and BESS (18.2 ± 8.4 vs 15.1 ± 8.3, p = 0.01). The largest effect size in ANAM performance decline was in simple reaction time (mTBI 74.5 ± 148.4 vs control −11 ± 46.6 milliseconds, p < 0.001). Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced in mTBI compared with controls in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (0.393 ± 0.022 vs 0.405 ± 0.023, p < 0.001). No abnormalities were detected with conventional MRI. Time to return to duty correlated with RPCSQ (r = 0.53, p < 0.001), ANAM simple reaction time decline (r = 0.49, p < 0.0001), PCLM (r = 0.47, p < 0.0001), and BDI (r = 0.36 p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Somatic, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms and performance deficits are substantially elevated in acute blast-related mTBI. Postconcussive symptoms and performance on measures of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and neurocognitive performance at initial presentation correlate with return-to-duty time. Although changes in fractional anisotropy are uncommon and subtle, DTI is more sensitive than conventional MRI in

  3. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  4. Acute traumatic brain injury: is current management evidence based? An empirical analysis of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jin; Gao, Guoyi; Jiang, Jiyao

    2013-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem worldwide with a high rate of death and long-term disability. Previous studies have summarized evidence from large-scale randomized trials, finding no intervention showing convincing efficacy for acute TBI management. The present empirical study set out to assess another crucial component of evidence base-systematic review, which contributes a lot to evidence-based health care, in terms of clinical issues, methodological aspects, and implication for practice and research. A total of 44 systematic reviews pertaining to therapeutic interventions for acute TBI were identified through electronic database searching, clinical guideline retrieval, and expert consultation, of which 21 were published in Cochrane Library and 23 in peer-reviewed journals. Their methodological quality was generally satisfactory, with the median Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire score of 5.5 (interquartile range 2-7). Cochrane reviews are of better quality than regular journal reviews. Twenty-nine high-quality reviews provided no conclusive evidence for the investigated 22 interventions except for an adverse effect of corticosteroids. Less than one-third of the component trials were reported with adequate allocation concealment. Additionally other methodological flaws in design-for example, ignoring heterogeneity among the TBI population-also contributed to the failure of past clinical research. Based on the above findings, evidence from both systematic reviews and clinical trials does not fully support current management of acute TBI. Translating from laboratory success to clinical effect remains an unique challenge. Accordingly it may be the time to rethink the way in future practice and clinical research in TBI. PMID:23151044

  5. Acute Serum Hormone Levels: Characterization and Prognosis after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Emily H.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L.; Dobos, Julie A.; Brett, Christopher A.; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global

  6. Acute serum hormone levels: characterization and prognosis after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amy K; McCullough, Emily H; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L; Dobos, Julie A; Brett, Christopher A; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C Edward; Berga, Sarah L; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global outcome for

  7. Acute Minocycline Treatment Mitigates the Symptoms of Mild Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Kamnaksh, Alaa; Wingo, Daniel; Ahmed, Farid; Grunberg, Neil E.; Long, Joseph B.; Kasper, Christine E.; Agoston, Denes V.

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a significant challenge for the civilian and military health care systems due to its high prevalence and overall complexity. Our earlier works showed evidence of neuroinflammation, a late onset of neurobehavioral changes, and lasting memory impairment in a rat model of mild blast-induced TBI (mbTBI). The aim of our present study was to determine whether acute treatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug minocycline (Minocin®) can mitigate the neurobehavioral abnormalities associated with mbTBI, Furthermore, we aimed to assess the effects of the treatment on select inflammatory, vascular, neuronal, and glial markers in sera and in brain regions associated with anxiety and memory (amygdala, prefrontal cortex, ventral, and dorsal hippocampus) following the termination (51 days post-injury) of the experiment. Four hours after a single exposure to mild blast overpressure or sham conditions, we treated animals with a daily dose of minocycline (50 mg/kg) or physiological saline (vehicle) for four consecutive days. At 8 and 45 days post-injury, we tested animals for locomotion, anxiety, and spatial memory. Injured animals exhibited significantly impaired memory and increased anxiety especially at the later testing time point. Conversely, injured and minocycline treated rats’ performance was practically identical to control (sham) animals in the open field, elevated plus maze, and Barnes maze. Protein analyses of sera and brain regions showed significantly elevated levels of all of the measured biomarkers (except VEGF) in injured and untreated rats. Importantly, minocycline treatment normalized serum and tissue levels of the majority of the selected inflammatory, vascular, neuronal, and glial markers. In summary, acute minocycline treatment appears to prevent the development of neurobehavioral abnormalities likely through mitigating the molecular pathologies of the injury in an experimental model of mb

  8. Non-terminal animal model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis induced by acute joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Mary K.; Trumble, Troy N.; Carlson, Cathy S.; Groschen, Donna M.; Merritt, Kelly A.; Brown, Murray P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Develop a non-terminal animal model of acute joint injury that demonstrates clinical and morphological evidence of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Methods An osteochondral (OC) fragment was created arthroscopically in one metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of 11 horses and the contralateral joint was sham operated. Eleven additional horses served as unoperated controls. Every 2 weeks, force plate analysis, flexion response, joint circumference, and synovial effusion scores were recorded. At weeks 0 and 16, radiographs (all horses) and arthroscopic videos (OC injured and sham joints) were graded. At week 16, synovium and cartilage biopsies were taken arthroscopically from OC injured and sham joints for histologic evaluation and the OC fragment was removed. Results Osteochondral fragments were successfully created and horses were free of clinical lameness after fragment removal. Forelimb gait asymmetry was observed at week 2 (P=0.0012), while joint circumference (P<0.0001) and effusion scores (P<0.0001) were increased in injured limbs compared to baseline from weeks 2 to 16. Positive flexion response of injured limbs was noted at multiple time points. Capsular enthesophytes were seen radiographically in injured limbs. Articular cartilage damage was demonstrated arthroscopically as mild wear-lines and histologically as superficial zone chondrocyte death accompanied by mild proliferation. Synovial hyperemia and fibrosis were present at the site of OC injury. Conclusion Acute OC injury to the MCP joint resulted in clinical, imaging, and histologic changes in cartilage and synovium characteristic of early PTOA. This model will be useful for defining biomarkers of early osteoarthritis and for monitoring response to therapy and surgery. PMID:23467035

  9. Acute clinical care and care coordination for traumatic brain injury within Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Michael S; Helmick, Kathy M; Girard, Philip D; Meyer, Kim S; Dinegar, Kathy; George, Karyn

    2009-01-01

    The nature of current combat situations that U.S. military forces encounter and the use of unconventional weaponry have dramatically increased service personnel's risks of sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the true incidence and prevalence of combat-related TBI are unknown, service personnel returning from deployment have reported rates of concussion between 10% and 20%. The Department of Defense has recently released statistics on TBI dating back to before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to better elucidate the impact and burden of TBI on America's warriors and veterans. Patients with severe TBI move through a well-established trauma system of care, beginning with triage of initial injury by first-responders in the war zone to acute care to rehabilitation and then returning home and to the community. Mild and moderate TBIs may pose different clinical challenges, especially when initially undetected or if treatment is delayed because more serious injuries are present. To ensure identification and prompt treatment of mild and moderate TBI, the U.S. Congress has mandated that military and Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals screen all service personnel returning from combat. Military health professionals must evaluate them for concussion and then treat the physical, emotional, and cognitive problems that may surface. A new approach to health management and care coordination is needed that will allow medical transitions between networks of care to become more centralized and allow for optimal recovery at all severity levels. This article summarizes the care systems available for the acute management of TBI from point of injury to stateside military treatment facilities. We describe TBI assessment, treatment, and overall coordination of care, including innovative clinical initiatives now used. PMID:20104395

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children: Post-Acute Effects on Cognitive and School Readiness Skills

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H. Gerry; Swartwout, Maegan; Yeates, Keith O.; Walz, Nicolay C.; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented weaknesses in cognitive ability and early academic readiness in young children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, few of these studies have rigorously controlled for demographic characteristics, examined the effects of TBI severity on a wide range of skills, or explored moderating influences of environmental factors on outcomes. To meet these objectives, each of three groups of children with TBI (20 with severe, 64 with moderate, and 15 with mild) were compared with a group of 117 children with orthopedic injuries (OI group). The children were hospitalized for their injuries between 3 and 6 years of age and were assessed an average of 1½ months post injury. Analysis revealed generalized weaknesses in cognitive and school readiness skills in the severe TBI group and suggested less pervasive effects of moderate and mild TBI. Indices of TBI severity predicted outcomes within the TBI sample and environmental factors moderated the effects of TBI on some measures. The findings document adverse effects of TBI in early childhood on post-acute cognitive and school readiness skills and indicate that residual deficits are related to both injury severity and the family environment. PMID:18764969

  11. Early Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity Predicts the Severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Acutely Traumatized Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling-di; Wan, Jie-qing; Sun, Ya-wen; Su, Shan-shan; Ding, Wei-na; Xu, Jian-rong

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between resting-state functional connectivity and the severity of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 15 people who developed PTSD following recent trauma. Fifteen participants who experienced acute traumatic events underwent a 7.3-min resting functional magnetic resonance imaging scan within 2 days post-event. All the patients were diagnosed with PTSD within 1 to 6 months after trauma. Brain areas in which activity was correlated with that of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were assessed. To assess the relationship between the severity of PTSD symptoms and PCC connectivity, contrast images representing areas positively correlated with the PCC were correlated with the subject’s Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale scores (CAPS) when they were diagnosed. Furthermore, the PCC, medial prefrontal cortex and bilateral amygdala were selected to assess the correlation of the strength of functional connectivity with the CAPS. Resting state connectivity with the PCC was negatively correlated with CAPS scores in the left superior temporal gyrus and right hippocampus/amygdala. Furthermore, the strength of connectivity between the PCC and bilateral amygdala, and even between the bilateral amygdala could predict the severity of PTSD symptoms later. These results suggest that early altered resting-state functional connectivity of the PCC with the left superior temporal gyrus, right hippocampus and amygdala could predict the severity of the disease and may be a major risk factor that predisposes patients to develop PTSD. PMID:23056477

  12. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  13. Acute Alcohol Intoxication Prolongs Neuroinflammation without Exacerbating Neurobehavioral Dysfunction following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Sophie X.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of death and disability among young persons with ∼1.7 million reported cases in the United States annually. Although acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) is frequently present at the time of TBI, conflicting animal and clinical reports have failed to establish whether AAI significantly impacts short-term outcomes after TBI. The objective of this study was to determine whether AAI at the time of TBI aggravates neurobehavioral outcomes and neuroinflammatory sequelae post-TBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically instrumented with gastric and vascular catheters before a left lateral craniotomy. After recovery, rats received either a primed constant intragastric alcohol infusion (2.5 g/kg+0.3 g/kg/h for 15 h) or isocaloric/isovolumic dextrose infusion followed by a lateral fluid percussion TBI (∼1.4 J, ∼30 ms). TBI induced apnea and a delay in righting reflex. AAI at the time of injury increased the TBI induced delay in righting reflex without altering apnea duration. Neurological and behavioral dysfunction was observed at 6 h and 24 h post-TBI, and this was not exacerbated by AAI. TBI induced a transient upregulation of cortical interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 mRNA expression at 6 h, which was resolved at 24 h. AAI did not modulate the inflammatory response at 6 h but prevented resolution of inflammation (IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and MCP-1 expression) at 24 h post-TBI. AAI at the time of TBI did not delay the recovery of neurological and neurobehavioral function but prevented the resolution of neuroinflammation post-TBI. PMID:24050411

  14. Preventing Flow-Metabolism Uncoupling Acutely Reduces Axonal Injury after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Chen, Szu-Fu; Richards, Hugh K.; Pickard, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously presented evidence that the development of secondary traumatic axonal injury is related to the degree of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and flow-metabolism uncoupling. We have now tested the hypothesis that augmenting LCBF in the acute stages after brain injury prevents further axonal injury. Data were acquired from rats with or without acetazolamide (ACZ) that was administered immediately following controlled cortical impact injury to increase cortical LCBF. Local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRglc) and LCBF measurements were obtained 3 h post-trauma in the same rat via 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 14C-iodoantipyrine co-registered autoradiographic images, and compared to the density of damaged axonal profiles in adjacent sections, and in additional groups at 24 h used to assess different populations of injured axons stereologically. ACZ treatment significantly and globally elevated LCBF twofold above untreated-injured rats at 3 h (p<0.05), but did not significantly affect LCMRglc. As a result, ipsilateral LCMRglc:LCBF ratios were reduced by twofold to sham-control levels, and the density of β-APP-stained axons at 24 h was significantly reduced in most brain regions compared to the untreated-injured group (p<0.01). Furthermore, early LCBF augmentation prevented the injury-associated increase in the number of stained axons from 3–24 h. Additional robust stereological analysis of impaired axonal transport and neurofilament compaction in the corpus callosum and cingulum underlying the injury core confirmed the amelioration of β-APP axon density, and showed a trend, but no significant effect, on RMO14-positive axons. These data underline the importance of maintaining flow-metabolism coupling immediately after injury in order to prevent further axonal injury, in at least one population of injured axons. PMID:22321027

  15. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  16. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury: acute versus chronic disturbances?

    PubMed

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rödiger, Lars A; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2014-04-01

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully understood. As the admission computed tomography (CT) often is normal, perfusion CT imaging may be a useful indicator of brain dysfunction in the acute phase after injury in these patients. In the present study, directly after admission perfusion CT imaging was performed in mild TBI patients with follow-up neuropsychological assessment in those with complaints and a normal non-contrast CT. Neuropsychological tests comprised the 15 Words test Immediate Recall, Trailmaking test part B, Zoo Map test and the FEEST, which were dichotomized into normal and abnormal. Perfusion CT results of patients with normal neuropsychological test scores were compared to those with abnormal test scores. In total eighteen patients were included. Those with an abnormal score on the Zoo Map test had a significant lower CBV in the right frontal and the bilateral parieto-temporal white matter. Patients with an abnormal score on the FEEST had a significant higher MTT in the bilateral frontal white matter and a significant decreased CBF in the left parieto-temporal grey matter. No significant relation between the perfusion CT parameters and the 15 Words test and the Trailmaking test part B was present. In conclusion, impairments in executive functioning and emotion perception assessed with neuropsychological tests during follow up were related to differences in cerebral perfusion at admission in mild TBI. The pathophysiological concept of these findings is discussed. PMID:24556319

  17. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  18. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  19. Decreased Regional Homogeneity in Patients With Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Kuang, Hongmei; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Siyong; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2015-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is characterized by structural disconnection and large-scale neural network dysfunction in the resting state. However, little is known concerning the intrinsic changes in local spontaneous brain activity in patients with mTBI. The aim of the current study was to assess regional synchronization in acute mTBI patients. Fifteen acute mTBI patients and 15 sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) were studied. We used the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method to map local connectivity across the whole brain and performed a two-sample t-test between the two groups. Compared with HCs, patients with acute mTBI showed significantly decreased ReHo in the left insula, left precentral/postcentral gyrus, and left supramarginal gyrus (p < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected). The ReHo index of the left insula showed a positive correlation with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores across all acute mTBI patients (p < 0.05, uncorrected). The ReHo method may provide an objective biomarker for evaluating the functional abnormity of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:26348589

  20. [The effect of neurotrophic treatment on the activation of reparative processes in patients with acute traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Selianina, N V; Karakulova, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    The complex study of cognitive and emotional status, levels of serum serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were performed in 72 patients with acute traumatic brain injury, with a special focus on middle brain injuries (MBI), treated with Cerebrolysin. The neurological and cognitive impairment, mild state anxiety and depression and increased levels of humoral serotonin, which depends on the severity of the injury, were identified in patients with MBI before treatment. After the treatment, there were the decrease in the severity of neurological symptoms and a significant positive dynamics on the FAB scale as well as the increase in blood BDNF and serotonin levels. It has been concluded that using cerebrolysin in complex treatment of acute MBI promotes activation of neurotrophic processes and improves outcomes of closed craniocerebral injury. PMID:22951781

  1. Late Mortality During the First Year After Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Divanoglou, Anestis; Westgren, Ninni; Seiger, Åke; Hulting, Claes; Levi, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the possible impact of the system of care on mortality during the first year after acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Objective: To evaluate late mortality (ie, >7 days after trauma) during the first year after acute TSCI in 2 European Union (EU) regions, Thessaloniki in Greece and Stockholm in Sweden. Methods: This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS), which is a prospective, population-based study. Incidence cohorts of TSCI cases were identified and followed up in both study regions through STATSCIS. Data from Thessaloniki region were collected through physical examination, medical records review, and interviews with TSCI individuals and the medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved mainly from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry, as well as from direct contact with all intensive care facilities of the region. Results: The annual case mortality rate after acute TSCI was nearly 20% in Thessaloniki and 0% in Stockholm. The mean time of survival after trauma for the 12 mortality cases of Thessaloniki was 47 days (median  =  24, SD ± 67, range  =  8–228). Factors associated with mortality were higher age and presence of comorbid spinal disorders but also the inefficient transfer logistics, initially missed spinal instability, and unsuccessfully treated complications. Conclusions: The annual case mortality rate in Thessaloniki was dramatically higher than in Stockholm. The different approaches to care, one systematic and the other not, is postulated to be an important factor leading to such major discrepancies between the outcomes of these 2 EU regions. PMID:20486530

  2. Assessment of toxicity and coagulopathy of brodifacoum in Japanese quail and testing in wild owls.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kirstin H; Harr, Kendal E; Bennett, Darin C; Williams, Tony D; Cheng, Kimberly M; Maisonneuve, France; Elliott, John E

    2015-07-01

    Based on detection of hepatic residues, scavenging and predatory non-target raptors are widely exposed to second generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs). A small proportion, generally <10%, of tested birds are diagnosed as acutely poisoned. Little is known, however, of sub-lethal effects of SGARs, such as interaction of clotting capacity with traumatic injury. Assessment of coagulation function of birds submitted live to wildlife rehabilitators or veterinarians may provide a means of establishing the proportion of animals suffering sub-lethal coagulopathies, as well as identifying individuals requiring treatment. As a first step in exploring the potential of this approach, we dosed Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) with the SGAR, brodifacoum, at 0, 0.8, 1.4, 1.9, and 2.5 mg/kg and sampled birds at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-dosing. Prothrombin time (PT), which measures the extrinsic coagulation pathway, was significantly prolonged in 98% of brodifacoum-exposed quail in a dose- and time-dependent manner. 50-fold prolongation of PT occurred at higher brodifacoum dosages and correlated to hemorrhage found at necropsy. Activated clotting time (ACT), a measure of the intrinsic pathway also increased with dose and time. Hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) decreased dose- and time-dependently at doses ≥1.4 mg/kg with no significant change at 0.8 mg/kg. Reference intervals for PT (10.0-16.2 s), ACT (30-180 s), Hb (9.6-18.4 g/dl), and Hct (34-55%) were established in Japanese quail. Species-specific reference intervals are required as barn owl PT (17-29 s) and quail PT were different. The proportion of brodifacoum-exposed quail with hemorrhage was not correlated with liver residues, but was correlated with PT, suggesting that this assay is a useful indicator of avian anticoagulant rodenticide exposure. PTs measured in free-living barn owls sampled between April 2009 and August 2010 in the lower Fraser Valley of BC do not suggest significant exposure to SGARs. PMID

  3. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Diana; Tomaszczyk, Jennifer; McFadyen, Bradford J.; Green, Robin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: While a growing number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is limited research as of yet on environmental factors that may influence this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1) examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE) can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2) examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes. Methods: We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery. Results: One hundred and twenty-three articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behavior in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences revealed that variables such as insurance coverage, financial, and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, can have an impact on clinical outcomes. Conclusion: There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-acute cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society. PMID:23616755

  4. Evaluation of cerebral-cardiac syndrome using echocardiography in a canine model of acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Qian, Rong; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Xiumei; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Xiaodong; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can induce general adaptation syndrome (GAS), which subsequently results in myocardial dysfunction and damage in some patients with acute TBI; this condition is also termed as cerebral-cardiac syndrome. However, most clinicians ignore the detection and treatment of myocardial dysfunction, and instead concentrate only on the serious neural damage that is observed in acute TBI, which is one of the most important fatal factors. Therefore, clarification is urgently needed regarding the relationship between TBI and myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we evaluated 18 canine models of acute TBI, by using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography and strain rate imaging to accurately evaluate myocardial function and regional microcirculation, including the strain rate of the different myocardial segments, time-amplitude curves, mean ascending slope of the curve, and local myocardial blood flow. Our results suggest that acute TBI often results in cerebral-cardiac syndrome, which rapidly progresses to the serious stage within 3 days. This study is the first to provide comprehensive ultrasonic characteristics of cerebral-cardiac syndrome in an animal model of TBI. PMID:26064794

  5. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  6. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration.

    PubMed

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients' motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  7. Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Multiple-Frequency Bands in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Bai, Lijun; Kuang, Hongmei; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO). Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01–0.08 Hz) in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4) frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the mini-mental state examination score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory, and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients. PMID:26869907

  8. Coagulopathy and its management in patients with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Glas, G J; Levi, M; Schultz, M J

    2016-05-01

    Severe burn injury is associated with systemic coagulopathy. The changes in coagulation described in patients with severe burns resemble those found patients with sepsis or major trauma. Coagulopathy in patients with severe burns is characterized by procoagulant changes, and impaired fibrinolytic and natural anticoagulation systems. Both the timing of onset and the severity of hemostatic derangements are related to the severity of the burn. The exact pathophysiology and time course of coagulopathy are uncertain, but, at least in part, result from hemodilution and hypothermia. As the occurrence of coagulopathy in patients with severe burns is associated with increased comorbidity and mortality, coagulopathy could be seen as a potential therapeutic target. Clear guidelines for the treatment of coagulopathy in patients with severe burns are lacking, but supportive measures and targeted treatments have been proposed. Supportive measures are aimed at avoiding preventable triggers such as tissue hypoperfusion caused by shock, or hemodilution and hypothermia following the usually aggressive fluid resuscitation in these patients. Suggested targeted treatments that could benefit patients with severe burns include systemic treatment with anticoagulants, but sufficient randomized controlled trial evidence is lacking. PMID:26854881

  9. The Natural History of Acute Recovery of Blast-Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Series During War.

    PubMed

    Larres, David T; Carr, Walter; Gonzales, Elizandro G; Hawley, Jason S

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) secondary to blast exposure is a common injury in the Global War on Terrorism, but little is known about the acute effects, recovery, pathophysiology, and neuropathology of blast-induced mild TBI (mTBI) in humans in a battlefield environment. Moreover, there is ongoing debate whether blast-induced mTBI is a different injury with a unique pathophysiology compared with mTBI from blunt trauma. In the case series reported here from Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, 15 military service members with acute concussion/mTBI associated with blast exposure were evaluated within the first 24 hours after concussion and on days 2, 3, 5, and 7 with a Graded Symptom Checklist and a balance assessment, the Balance Error Scoring System. These data suggest that the recovery in blast-induced mTBI follows the pattern of recovery in sports-related concussion reported in The National Collegiate Athletic Association Concussion Study. In this retrospective case series, we provide the first description of the natural history of acute recovery in blast-induced mTBI, and we suspect, given our experience treating military service members, that further observations of the natural history of recovery in blast-induced mTBI will continue to mirror the natural history of recovery in sports concussion. PMID:27168549

  10. Accelerated recovery from acute brain injuries: clinical efficacy of neurotrophic treatment in stroke and traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, N; Poon, W S

    2012-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating vascular diseases in the world as it is responsible for almost five million deaths per year. Almost 90% of all strokes are ischemic and mainly due to atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism and small-vessel disease. Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, which usually has the poorest prognosis. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation which mimics the action of a neurotrophic factor, protecting stroke-injured neurons and promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Cerebrolysin has been widely studied as a therapeutic tool for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as traumatic brain injury. In ischemic stroke, Cerebrolysin given as an adjuvant therapy to antiplatelet and rheologically active medication resulted in accelerated improvement in global, neurological and motor functions, cognitive performance and activities of daily living. Cerebrolysin was also safe and well tolerated when administered in patients suffering from hemorrhagic stroke. Traumatic brain injury leads to transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions. This is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to interpret the mental states of others, and executive functioning. Pilot clinical studies with adjuvant Cerebrolysin in the acute and postacute phases of the injury have shown faster recovery, which translates into an earlier onset of rehabilitation and shortened hospitalization time. PMID:22514794

  11. Increased Risk of Post-Trauma Stroke after Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-07-01

    This study determines whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an independent risk factor for an increased risk of post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) stroke during 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year follow-ups, respectively, after adjusting for other covariates. Clinical data for the analysis were from the National Health Insurance Database 2000, which covered a total of 2121 TBI patients and 101 patients with a diagnosis of TBI complicated with ARDS (TBI-ARDS) hospitalized between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to record stroke occurrences after discharge from the hospital. The prognostic value of TBI-ARDS was evaluated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. The main outcome found that stroke occurred in nearly 40% of patients with TBI-ARDS, and the hazard ratio for post-TBI stroke increased fourfold during the 5-year follow-up period after adjusting for other covariates. The increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the ARDS group was considerably higher than in the TBI-only cohort. This is the first study to report that post-traumatic ARDS yielded an approximate fourfold increased risk of stroke in TBI-only patients. We suggest intensive and appropriate medical management and intensive follow-up of TBI-ARDS patients during the beginning of the hospital discharge. PMID:26426583

  12. Massive rotator cuff tear associated with acute traumatic posterior shoulder dislocation: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Luenam, Suriya; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat

    2013-12-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear in association with acute traumatic posterior glenohumeral dislocation is rare. To our knowledge, only four documented cases have been reported in the literature. We present two additional cases of such injury secondary to the traffic accident. The first patient had an unsuccessful closed reduction due to the posterior instability while the second developed the profound shoulder weakness following the reduction. From the findings of our cases together with the previous reports, every patient had a unique injury mechanism of high-energy directed axial loading on an outstretched, adducted, and internally rotated arm. The glenohumeral capsule and rotator cuff were uniformly avulsed from the humeral attachment, and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus were always involved. However, the clinical presentations were variable based on the severity of the associated rotator cuff tear. The outcomes of operative treatment in this type of injury with the open repair were favorable. PMID:22782426

  13. Relationships between acute imaging biomarkers and theory of mind impairment in post-acute pediatric traumatic brain injury: A prospective analysis using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Cooper, Janine M; Beare, Richard; Ditchfield, Michael; Coleman, Lee; Silk, Timothy; Crossley, Louise; Rogers, Kirrily; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith O; Anderson, Vicki A

    2015-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) forms an integral component of socially skilled behavior, and is critical for attaining developmentally appropriate goals. The protracted development of ToM is mediated by increasing connectivity between regions of the anatomically distributed 'mentalizing network', and may be vulnerable to disruption from pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study aimed to evaluate the post-acute effects of TBI on first-order ToM, and examine relations between ToM and both local and global indices of macrostructural damage detected using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). 104 children and adolescents with TBI and 43 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging including a susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks post-injury and were assessed on cognitive ToM tasks at 6-months after injury. Compared to TD controls and children with mild-moderate injuries, children with severe TBI showed significantly poorer ToM. Moreover, impairments in ToM were related to diffuse neuropathology, and parietal lobe lesions. Our findings support the vulnerability of the immature social brain network to disruption from TBI, and suggest that global macrostructural damage commonly associated with traumatic axonal injury (TAI) may contribute to structural disconnection of anatomically distributed regions that underlie ToM. This study suggests that SWI may be a valuable imaging biomarker to predict outcome and recovery of social cognition after pediatric TBI. PMID:25445779

  14. Treatment of acute, non-traumatic pain using a combination of diclofenac-cholestyramine, uridine triphosphate, cytidine monophosphate, and hydroxycobalamin.

    PubMed

    Mibielli, Marco Antonio; Nunes, Carlos Pereira; Cohen, José Carlos; Scussel, Ari Boulanger; Higashi, Rafael; Bendavit, Gabriel Gherman; Oliveira, Lisa; Geller, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical study in parallel groups evaluated the safety and efficacy of an oral combination diclofenac-cholestyramine, nucleotides (uridine and cytidine) and vitamin B12 versus the oral combination of nucleotides and vitamin B12 in the treatment of acute, non-traumatic pain. Subjects received twice-daily, 10-day oral administration of diclofenac-cholestyramine + uridine + cytidine + vitamin B12 (Group DN, n=40) or uridine + cytidine + vitamin B12 (Group NB, n=41). The primary study endpoint was the number of subjects with VAS reduction of >30mm after 10 days of treatment. Secondary endpoints included the number of patients with improvement >5 points in the Patient Functionality Questionnaire after 10 days of treatment, and the number of subjects presenting adverse events. Treatment with the combination of diclofenac-cholestyramine, nucleotides and Vitamin B12 resulted in a higher number of subjects with VAS score reductions >30mm after 10 days of treatment (87.5% subjects) than in the control group administered nucleotides and Vitamin B12 (51.23% of subjects), (p>0.0006). A significantly higher number of subjects in the DN group (80%) had a score reduction of >5 points in the Patient Functionality Questionnaire at after 10 days of treatment compared to Group NB (29.3%), (p<0.001). The number of subjects presenting AEs did not vary significantly between treatment groups (p=0.587). The combination of diclofenac-cholestyramine with uridine, cytidine and vitamin B12 was well-tolerated over a 10-day treatment period. The combination reduced pain and improved functionality among subjects presenting acute, non-traumatic pain in the lower back, hips, and neck. PMID:22128442

  15. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  16. A Snapshot of Coagulopathy After Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Judith; Fries, Dietmar; Solomon, Cristina; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Ausserer, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often associated with important blood loss, allogeneic blood product usage, morbidity, and mortality. Coagulopathy during CPB is complex, and the current lack of uniformity for triggers and hemostatic agents has led to a wide variability in bleeding treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a simplified picture of the data available on patients' coagulation status at the end of CPB in order to provide relevant information for the development of tailored transfusion algorithms. A nonsystematic literature review was carried out to identify changes in coagulation parameters during CPB. Both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time increased during CPB, by a median of 33.3% and 17.9%, respectively. However, there was marked variability across the published studies, indicating these tests may be unreliable for guiding hemostatic therapy. Some thrombin generation (TG) parameters were affected, as indicated by a median increase in TG lag time of 55.0%, a decrease in TG peak of 17.5%, and only a slight decrease in endogenous thrombin potential of 7%. The most affected parameters were fibrinogen levels and platelet count/function. Both plasma fibrinogen concentration and FIBTEM maximum clot firmness decreased during CPB (median change of 36.4% and 33.3%, respectively) as did platelet count (44.5%) and platelet component (34.2%). This review provides initial information regarding changes in coagulation parameters during CPB but highlights the variability in the reported results. Further studies are warranted to guide physicians on the parameters most appropriate to guide hemostatic therapy. PMID:27268940

  17. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  18. Non-traumatic acute paraplegia associated with a CT-guided needle biopsy in a silicotic nodule: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, LIYING; DING, XUN; LIAO, MEIYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of an adult patient with non-traumatic acute paraplegia following a computed tomography (CT)-guided automated cutting needle biopsy (ACNB). Multiple nodules and masses were revealed on performing chest radiography and CT on a 45-year-old man. In order to make a pathological diagnosis, a CT-guided biopsy using an automatic cutting needle was performed. However, 10 min after the biopsy, a weakness of the lower extremities occurred, and the patient collapsed to the ground, albeit with clear consciousness. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed subsequently revealed no abnormal findings in the spinal cord. An MRI performed 24 h later, however, revealed swelling of the thoracic spinal cord and a high-signal-intensity lesion in T2-weighted images at the level of T7, T8 and T9. The patient subsequently received hyperbaric oxygen therapy for a few days, and rehabilitative treatment over the course of a few weeks. At 6 months following the biopsy, the patient was unable to walk, although the patient could stand for 10 min and defecate independently. Currently, the patient remains active in daily life, in spite of confinement to a wheelchair. The present case study was reported to raise the awareness of the possibility of spinal cord ischemia and acute paraplegia following a CT-guided ACNB of the lungs. The mechanism underlying spinal cord ischemia remains to be fully elucidated, although is thought to be multifactorial, involving air embolism. PMID:26998303

  19. Induction and Expression of Fear Sensitization Caused by Acute Traumatic Stress.

    PubMed

    Perusini, Jennifer N; Meyer, Edward M; Long, Virginia A; Rau, Vinuta; Nocera, Nathaniel; Avershal, Jacob; Maksymetz, James; Spigelman, Igor; Fanselow, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Fear promotes adaptive responses to threats. However, when the level of fear is not proportional to the level of threat, maladaptive fear-related behaviors characteristic of anxiety disorders result. Post-traumatic stress disorder develops in response to a traumatic event, and patients often show sensitized reactions to mild stressors associated with the trauma. Stress-enhanced fear learning (SEFL) is a rodent model of this sensitized responding, in which exposure to a 15-shock stressor nonassociatively enhances subsequent fear conditioning training with only a single trial. We examined the role of corticosterone (CORT) in SEFL. Administration of the CORT synthesis blocker metyrapone prior to the stressor, but not at time points after, attenuated SEFL. Moreover, CORT co-administered with metyrapone rescued SEFL. However, CORT alone without the stressor was not sufficient to produce SEFL. In these same animals, we then looked for correlates of SEFL in terms of changes in excitatory receptor expression. Western blot analysis of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) revealed an increase in the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit that correlated with SEFL. Thus, CORT is permissive to trauma-induced changes in BLA function. PMID:26329286

  20. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage: Independent Component and Seed-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Iraji, Armin; Benson, Randall R.; Welch, Robert D.; O'Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Imran Ayaz, Syed; Kulek, Andrew; Mika, Valerie; Medado, Patrick; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Liu, Tianming; Haacke, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for more than 1 million emergency visits each year. Most of the injured stay in the emergency department for a few hours and are discharged home without a specific follow-up plan because of their negative clinical structural imaging. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly functional MRI (fMRI), has been reported as being sensitive to functional disturbances after brain injury. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department of our local Level-1 trauma center for an advanced MRI scan at the acute stage. Sixteen age- and sex-matched controls were also recruited for comparison. Both group-based and individual-based independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in both posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus regions in comparison with controls, which is part of the default mode network (DMN). Further seed-based analysis confirmed reduced functional connectivity in these two regions and also demonstrated increased connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain in mTBI. Seed-based analysis using the thalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala regions further demonstrated increased functional connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain, particularly in the frontal lobe, in mTBI. Our data demonstrate alterations of multiple brain networks at the resting state, particularly increased functional connectivity in the frontal lobe, in response to brain concussion at the acute stage. Resting-state functional connectivity of the DMN could serve as a potential biomarker for improved detection of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:25285363

  1. The Effect of Paracetamol on Core Body Temperature in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Manoj K.; Taylor, Colman; Billot, Laurent; Bompoint, Severine; Gowardman, John; Roberts, Jason A.; Lipman, Jeffery; Myburgh, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Strategies to prevent pyrexia in patients with acute neurological injury may reduce secondary neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the routine administration of 6 grams/day of intravenous paracetamol in reducing body temperature following severe traumatic brain injury, compared to placebo. Methods A multicentre, randomised, blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients were randomised to receive an intravenous infusion of either 1g of paracetamol or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) every 4 hours for 72 hours. The primary outcome was the mean difference in core temperature during the study intervention period. Results Forty-one patients were included in this study: 21 were allocated to paracetamol and 20 to saline. The median (interquartile range) number of doses of study drug was 18 (17–18) in the paracetamol group and 18 (16–18) in the saline group (P = 0.85). From randomisation until 4 hours after the last dose of study treatment, there were 2798 temperature measurements (median 73 [67–76] per patient). The mean ± standard deviation temperature was 37.4±0.5°C in the paracetamol group and 37.7±0.4°C in the saline group (absolute difference -0.3°C; 95% confidence interval -0.6 to 0.0; P = 0.09). There were no significant differences in the use of physical cooling, or episodes of hypotension or hepatic abnormalities, between the two groups. Conclusion The routine administration of 6g/day of intravenous paracetamol did not significantly reduce core body temperature in patients with TBI. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000444280 PMID:26678710

  2. Ethnoracial Variations in Acute PTSD Symptoms Among Hospitalized Survivors of Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Kari A.; Sue, Stanley; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Unützer, Jürgen; Wang, Jin; Rivara, Frederick P.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; Zatzick, Douglas F.

    2011-01-01

    Ethnoracial minority status contributes to an increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after trauma exposure, beyond other risk factors. A population-based sampling frame was used to examine the associations between ethnoracial groups and early PTSD symptoms while adjusting for relevant clinical and demographic characteristics. Acutely injured trauma center inpatients (N = 623) were screened with the PTSD Checklist. American Indian and African American patients reported the highest levels of posttraumatic stress and preinjury cumulative trauma burden. African American heritage was independently associated with an increased risk of higher acute PTSD symptom levels. Disparities in trauma history, PTSD symptoms, and event related factors emphasize the need for acute care services to incorporate culturally competent approaches for treating these diverse populations. PMID:20564368

  3. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27027934

  4. [POSSIBILITY OF CORRECTION OF METABOLIC DISORDERS WITH REAMBERIN IN ACUTE PERIOD OF TRAUMATIC INJURY].

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, L V; Marchenkov, Yu V; Volkov, D P; Rodionov, E P; Izmajlov, V V

    2015-01-01

    56 patients at the age of 18-60 years with severe trauma were examined. Influence of the polyelectrolytic (Reamberin)solution on an acid-base state, osmolarity and electrolytic composition of plasma in the acute posttraumatic period was evaluated. It was found that patients, who was treated by isotonic sodium chloride solution and Ringer's solution, had metabolic acidosis and hyperchloremia. In contrast, in the reamberin group 82% of patients had lower concentrations of chloride and had nothing acid-base disturbances on the second day after trauma. Reamberin didn't influence on plasma osmolarity and the rate of metabolic alkalosis during the acute period of a trauma. PMID:27025136

  5. Acute traumatic spinal injury following bicycle accidents: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, Niall P; Green, Connor; Burke, Neil; Synnott, Keith

    2012-06-01

    Although the vast majority of injuries suffered while cycling are minor, acute spinal injuries have been reported. We describe three cases of acute spinal injury occurring while cycling. All three patients reported being thrown over the handlebars, while travelling downhill at speed. Two of the cases resulted in profound neurological deficit. These cases show that there is a spectrum of spinal injury due to bicycle accidents, ranging from no neurological deficit to profound insult, and from high cervical injury to mid-thoracic spinal injury. In cases of bicycle accidents, increased awareness of the possibility of such spinal injury is advisable. PMID:22822586

  6. Acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation complicated by axillary nerve damage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1998-01-01

    An elite soccer player presented with a classic acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint complicated by axillary nerve damage. The incidence, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation and associated axillary nerve damage are discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 3

  7. Symptom Differences in Acute and Chronic Presentation of Childhood Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four child abuse victims, age 5-13, were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children with the acute form of PTSD exhibited such symptoms as difficulty falling asleep, hypervigilance, nightmares, and generalized anxiety. Children exhibiting chronic PTSD exhibited increased detachment, restricted range of affect,…

  8. Acute Reduction of Microglia Does Not Alter Axonal Injury in a Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathological processes that lead to long-term consequences of multiple concussions are unclear. Primary mechanical damage to axons during concussion is likely to contribute to dysfunction. Secondary damage has been hypothesized to be induced or exacerbated by inflammation. The main inflammatory cells in the brain are microglia, a type of macrophage. This research sought to determine the contribution of microglia to axon degeneration after repetitive closed-skull traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) using CD11b-TK (thymidine kinase) mice, a valganciclovir-inducible model of macrophage depletion. Low-dose (1 mg/mL) valganciclovir was found to reduce the microglial population in the corpus callosum and external capsule by 35% after rcTBI in CD11b-TK mice. At both acute (7 days) and subacute (21 days) time points after rcTBI, reduction of the microglial population did not alter the extent of axon injury as visualized by silver staining. Further reduction of the microglial population by 56%, using an intermediate dose (10 mg/mL), also did not alter the extent of silver staining, amyloid precursor protein accumulation, neurofilament labeling, or axon injury evident by electron microscopy at 7 days postinjury. Longer treatment of CD11b-TK mice with intermediate dose and treatment for 14 days with high-dose (50 mg/mL) valganciclovir were both found to be toxic in this injury model. Altogether, these data are most consistent with the idea that microglia do not contribute to acute axon degeneration after multiple concussive injuries. The possibility of longer-term effects on axon structure or function cannot be ruled out. Nonetheless, alternative strategies directly targeting injury to axons may be a more beneficial approach to concussion treatment than targeting secondary processes of microglial-driven inflammation. PMID:24797413

  9. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D; O'Neil, Brian J; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Haacke, E Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  10. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  11. Trauma-Related Altered States of Consciousness (TRASC) and Functional Impairment I: Prospective Study in Acutely Traumatized Persons.

    PubMed

    Frewen, Paul; Hegadoren, Kathy; Coupland, Nick J; Rowe, Brian H; Neufeld, Richard W J; Lanius, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework referred to as a 4-D model has been described for classifying posttraumatic stress symptoms into those potentially occurring within normal waking consciousness (NWC) versus those thought to intrinsically exemplify dissociative experiences, specifically, trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC). As a further test of this theoretical distinction, this prospective study evaluated whether TRASC and NWC forms of distress incrementally and prospectively predicted functional impairment at 6 and 12 weeks following presentation at hospital emergency departments in the acute aftermath of traumatic events in 180 persons. Establishing the clinical significance of both TRASC and NWC-distress symptoms, we found that 6-week markers of TRASC and NWC-distress independently predicted 12-week self-reported levels of social and occupational impairment. We also observed broad support for various predictions of the 4-D model except that, in contrast with hypotheses, childhood trauma history was generally more strongly correlated with symptoms of NWC-distress than with TRASC. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:26378486

  12. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  13. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Jeremy; Blow, Osbert; Krall, Scott P.; Gest, Albert; Smith, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging. Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53%) received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%). 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]%) of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%), CT Face (29%; 19–42%) and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%). Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan. PMID:26056616

  14. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. PMID:24447643

  15. Acute Alcohol Intoxication and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Skrifvars, Markus B.; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Lappalainen, Jaakko; Siironen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is controversial. We sought to assess the independent effect of positive BAC on long-term outcome in patients with TBI treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). We performed a retrospective analysis of 405 patients with TBI, admitted to the ICU of a large urban Level 1 trauma center between January 2009 and December 2012. Outcome was six-month mortality and unfavorable neurological outcome (defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 1 [death], 2, [vegetative state], or 3 [severe disability]). Patients were categorized by admission BAC into: no BAC (0.0‰; n=99), low BAC (<2.3‰; n=140) and high BAC (≥2.3‰; n=166). Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for baseline risk and severity of illness, was used to assess the independent effect of BAC on outcome (using the no BAC group as the reference). Overall six-month mortality was 25% and unfavorable outcome was 46%. Multivariate analysis showed low BAC to independently reduce risk of six-month mortality compared with no BAC (low BAC adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19–0.88, p=0.021) and high BAC (AOR 0.58, 95% CI 0.29–1.15, p=0.120). Furthermore, a trend towards reduced risk of six-month unfavorable neurological outcome for patients with positive BAC, compared to patients with negative BAC, was noted, although this did not reach statistical significance (low BAC AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.34–1.22, p=0.178, and high BAC AOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.32–1.09, p=0.089). In conclusion, low admission BAC (<2.3‰) was found to independently reduce risk of six-month mortality for patients with TBI, and a trend towards improved long-term neurological outcome was found for BAC-positive patients. The role of alcohol as a neuroprotective agent warrants further studies. PMID:25010885

  16. [Acute post-traumatic aortic insufficiency: transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis and therapy of the lesions].

    PubMed

    Brandstätt, P; Carlioz, R; Fontaine, B; Hémery, Y; Pats, B; Chapuis, O; Lang-Lazdunsky, L; Jancovici, R; Burlaton, J P; Hvass, U

    1998-10-01

    A 58-year-old car driver suffered a road accident responsible for severe blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma. Transoephageal echocardiography, performed following the secondary development of a diastolic murmur, confirmed the presence of aortic incompetence due to commissural avulsion and guided the surgical treatment, which consisted of commissural suspension under cardiopulmonary bypass via a mini transverse trans-sternal incision. The rarity of acute aortic valve incompetence following non-penetrating thoracic trauma is illustrated by the data of the literature. This lesion is due to either avulsion of a sigmoid cusp or commissure, or laceration of the valvular tissue. Transthoracic echocardiography confirms the reality of aortic incompetence suggested clinically by appearance of a diastolic murmur, but confirmation of the mechanism of the lesions is based on transoesophageal echocardiography which allows perfectly safe and rapid visualization of the mechanism of the valvular lesion, investigation of associated lesions and guidance of therapeutic management. PMID:9809140

  17. Traumatic amputations

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Arul

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic amputations remain one of the most emotionally disturbing wounds of conflict, as demonstrated by their frequent use in films to illustrate the horrors of war. Unfortunately, they remain common injuries, particularly following explosions, and, in addition, many survivors require primary amputation for unsalvageable injuries or to save their life. A third group, late amputations, is being increasingly recognised, often as a result of the sequelae of complex foot injuries. This article will look at the epidemiology of these injuries and their acute management, complications and outcome. PMID:26516502

  18. Methylene Blue Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury-Associated Neuroinflammation and Acute Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Ashley M.; Skendelas, John P.; Moussa, Daniel N.; Muccigrosso, Megan M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with cerebral edema, blood brain barrier breakdown, and neuroinflammation that contribute to the degree of injury severity and functional recovery. Unfortunately, there are no effective proactive treatments for limiting immediate or long-term consequences of TBI. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of methylene blue (MB), an antioxidant agent, in reducing inflammation and behavioral complications associated with a diffuse brain injury. Here we show that immediate MB infusion (intravenous; 15–30 minutes after TBI) reduced cerebral edema, attenuated microglial activation and reduced neuroinflammation, and improved behavioral recovery after midline fluid percussion injury in mice. Specifically, TBI-associated edema and inflammatory gene expression in the hippocampus were significantly reduced by MB at 1 d post injury. Moreover, MB intervention attenuated TBI-induced inflammatory gene expression (interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor α) in enriched microglia/macrophages 1 d post injury. Cell culture experiments with lipopolysaccharide-activated BV2 microglia confirmed that MB treatment directly reduced IL-1β and increased IL-10 messenger ribonucleic acid in microglia. Last, functional recovery and depressive-like behavior were assessed up to one week after TBI. MB intervention did not prevent TBI-induced reductions in body weight or motor coordination 1–7 d post injury. Nonetheless, MB attenuated the development of acute depressive-like behavior at 7 d post injury. Taken together, immediate intervention with MB was effective in reducing neuroinflammation and improving behavioral recovery after diffuse brain injury. Thus, MB intervention may reduce life-threatening complications of TBI, including edema and neuroinflammation, and protect against the development of neuropsychiatric complications. PMID:25070744

  19. Iatrogenic Coagulopathy and the Development of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after L-asparaginase Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Vallisa, Daniele; Morelli, Nicola; Scagnelli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome mostly related to hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, or to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Although the PRES pathophysiology is multifactorial, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are hypothesized to be the pivotal factors. Here we report a case of PRES in an adult patient after chemotherapy (Escherichia coli L-asparaginase [L-ASP], daunorubicin, vincristine, and intrathecal methotrexate) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of the PRES was strictly associated with an iatrogenic coagulopathy induced by L-ASP, which inhibits the biosynthesis of hepatic coagulation factors. The nadir of platelet count, antithrombin III (ATIII) and fibrinogen curve was coincident with the onset of the PRES neurological picture; subsequently, the normalization of the ATIII and fibrinogen levels seemed to parallel the good clinical evolution. This case seems to provide new insights into the PRES pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27014503

  20. Iatrogenic Coagulopathy and the Development of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after L-asparaginase Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Vallisa, Daniele; Morelli, Nicola; Scagnelli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome mostly related to hypertension, eclampsia, renal failure, or to chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Although the PRES pathophysiology is multifactorial, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are hypothesized to be the pivotal factors. Here we report a case of PRES in an adult patient after chemotherapy (Escherichia coli L-asparaginase [L-ASP], daunorubicin, vincristine, and intrathecal methotrexate) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The development of the PRES was strictly associated with an iatrogenic coagulopathy induced by L-ASP, which inhibits the biosynthesis of hepatic coagulation factors. The nadir of platelet count, antithrombin III (ATIII) and fibrinogen curve was coincident with the onset of the PRES neurological picture; subsequently, the normalization of the ATIII and fibrinogen levels seemed to parallel the good clinical evolution. This case seems to provide new insights into the PRES pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27014503

  1. Assessment of Impairment in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The most common primary end-point of the trial on treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is the degree of impairment. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Standards have been widely used to assess motor function and pin-prick and light-touch sensory function. In addition, pain assessment is another clinically relevant aspect of the impairment in individuals with SCI. Given this, we sought to systematically review the studies that focused on the psychometric properties of ASIA Standards and all previously used outcome measures of pain in the SCI population in the acute care setting. For the primary literature search strategy, the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were sought out. Subsequently, a secondary search strategy was carried out using the articles listed in the references of meta-analysis, systematic, and non-systematic review articles. Two reviewers (JCF and VN) independently selected the articles that fulfill the inclusion and exclusion, assessed the level of evidence of each article, and appraised the psychometric properties of each instrument. Divergences during those steps were solved by consensus between both reviewers. Of 400 abstracts captured in our primary search strategy on the ASIA Standards, 16 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. An additional 40 references were obtained from two prior systematic reviews on ASIA Standards. While 45 of 56 of the studies on ASIA Standards provided level 4 evidence, there were 11 level 2b evidence studies. Convergent construct validity (n = 34), reliability (n = 12), and responsiveness (n = 10) were the most commonly studied psychometric properties of the ASIA Standards, but two prior studies examined their content validity. Of the 267 abstracts yielded in our primary search on pain assessment, 24 articles with level 4 evidence fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. There was no study that examined pain assessment in the acute

  2. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin K W; Yang, Zhihui; Yue, John K; Zhang, Zhiqun; Winkler, Ethan A; Puccio, Ava M; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Lingsma, Hester F; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Valadka, Alex B; Gordon, Wayne A; Okonkwo, David O; Manley, Geoffrey T; Cooper, Shelly R; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Hricik, Allison J; Inoue, Tomoo; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Schnyer, David M; Sinha, Tuhin K; Vassar, Mary J

    2016-07-01

    We described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter observational study Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI Pilot (TRACK-TBI Pilot) to cover the full spectrum of TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale 3-15) by using acute (<24 h) plasma samples from 196 patients with acute TBI admitted to three Level I trauma centers, and a second cohort of 21 participants with chronic TBI admitted to inpatient TBI rehabilitation. We find that acute patients self-reporting previous TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) (n = 43) had higher day 1 AutoAb[GFAP] (mean ± standard error: 9.11 ± 1.42; n = 43) than healthy controls (2.90 ± 0.92; n = 16; p = 0.032) and acute patients reporting no previous TBI (2.97 ± 0.37; n = 106; p < 0.001), but not acute patients reporting previous TBI without LOC (8.01 ± 1.80; n = 47; p = 0.906). These data suggest that while exposure to TBI may trigger the AutoAb[GFAP] response, circulating antibodies are elevated specifically in acute TBI patients with a history of TBI. AutoAb[GFAP] levels for participants with chronic TBI (average post-TBI time 176 days or 6.21 months) were also significantly higher (15.08 ± 2.82; n = 21) than healthy controls (p < 0.001). These data suggest a persistent upregulation of the autoimmune response to specific brain antigen(s) in the subacute to chronic phase after TBI, as well as after repeated TBI insults. Hence, AutoAb[GFAP] may be a sensitive assay to study the dynamic interactions between post-injury brain and patient-specific autoimmune responses across acute and chronic settings after TBI. PMID:26560343

  3. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII. PMID:24608516

  4. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella: current perspectives and trends in Brazil☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; da Silva, Adriano Vaso Rodrigues; Ueda, Léo Renato Shigueru; Astur, Diego da Costa; Yazigi Júnior, João Alberto; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating medial patellofemoral lesions (MPFL) of the knee in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella. Materials and methods A questionnaire comprising 15 closed questions on topics relating to treating MPFL of the knee following acute dislocation of the patella was used. It was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 44th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2012. Results 106 knee surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them were from the southeastern region of Brazil. The majority (57%) reported that they perform fewer than five MPFL reconstruction procedures per year. Indication of non-surgical treatment after a first episode of acute dislocation of the patella was preferred and done by 93.4% of the sample. Only 9.1% of the participants reported that they had never observed postoperative complications. Intraoperative radioscopy was used routinely by 48%. The professionals who did not use this tool to determine the point of ligament fixation in the femur did not have a statistically greater number of postoperative complications than those who used it (p > 0.05). Conclusions There are clear evolutionary trends in treatments and rehabilitation for acute dislocation of the patella due to MPFL, in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends. PMID:26229852

  5. Acute over-the-counter pharmacological intervention does not adversely affect behavioral outcome following diffuse traumatic brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan L; Rowe, Rachel K; O'Hara, Bruce F; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may self-treat symptoms of concussion, including post-traumatic headache, taking over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Administering one dose of OTC analgesics immediately following experimental brain injury mimics the at-home treated population of concussed patients and may accelerate the understanding of the relationship between brain injury and OTC pharmacological intervention. In the current study, we investigate the effect of acute administration of OTC analgesics on neurological function and cortical cytokine levels after experimental diffuse TBI in the mouse. Adult, male C57BL/6 mice were injured using a midline fluid percussion (mFPI) injury model of concussion (6-10 min righting reflex time for brain-injured mice). Experimental groups included mFPI paired with either ibuprofen (60 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 16), acetaminophen (40 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 9), or vehicle (15% ethanol (v/v) in 0.9% saline; n = 13) and sham injury paired OTC medicine or vehicle (n = 7-10 per group). At 24 h after injury, functional outcome was assessed using the rotarod task and a modified neurological severity score. Following behavior assessment, cortical cytokine levels were measured by multiplex ELISA at 24 h post-injury. To evaluate efficacy on acute inflammation, cortical cytokine levels were measured also at 6 h post-injury. In the diffuse brain-injured mouse, immediate pharmacological intervention did not attenuate or exacerbate TBI-induced functional deficits. Cortical cytokine levels were affected by injury, time, or their interaction. However, levels were not affected by treatment at 6 or 24 h post-injury. These data indicate that acute administration of OTC analgesics did not exacerbate or attenuate brain-injury deficits which may inform clinical recommendations for the at-home treated mildly concussed patient. PMID:24760409

  6. Acute and chronically increased immunoreactivity to phosphorylation-independent but not pathological TDP-43 after a single traumatic brain injury in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Victoria E; Stewart, William; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Douglas H

    2011-12-01

    The pathologic phosphorylation and sub-cellular translocation of neuronal transactive response-DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was identified as the major disease protein in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions, now termed FTLD-TDP, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). More recently, TDP-43 proteinopathy has been reported in dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy caused by repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). While a single TBI has been linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease and an increased frequency of neurofibrillary tangles, TDP-43 proteinopathy has not been examined with survival following a single TBI. Using immunohistochemistry specific for both pathological phosphorylated TDP-43 (p-TDP-43) and phosphorylation-independent TDP-43 (pi-TDP-43), we examined acute (n = 23: Survival < 2 weeks) and long-term (n = 39; 1-47 years survival) survivors of a single TBI versus age-matched controls (n = 47). Multiple regions were examined including the hippocampus, medial temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and brainstem. No association was found between a history of single TBI and abnormally phosphorylated TDP-43 (p-TDP-43) inclusions. Specifically, just 3 of 62 TBI cases displayed p-TDP-43 pathology versus 2 of 47 control cases. However, while aggregates of p-TDP-43 were not increased acutely or long-term following TBI, immunoreactivity to phosphorylation-independent TDP-43 was commonly increased in the cytoplasm following TBI with both acute and long-term survival. Moreover, while single TBI can induce multiple long-term neurodegenerative changes, the absence of TDP-43 proteinopathy may indicate a fundamental difference in the processes induced following single TBI from those of repetitive TBI. PMID:22101322

  7. Comparison of non-sedated brain MRI and CT for the detection of acute traumatic injury in children 6 years of age or less.

    PubMed

    Young, Joseph Yeen; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Caruso, Paul Albert; Rincon, Sandra Patricia

    2016-08-01

    CT is considered the first-line study for acute intracranial injury in children because of its availability, detection of acute hemorrhage, and lack of sedation. An MRI study with rapidly acquired sequences can obviate the need for sedation and radiation. We compared the detection rate of rapid non-sedated brain MRI to CT for traumatic head injury in young children. We reviewed a series of children 6 years of age or less who presented to our ED during a 5-year period with head trauma and received a non-sedated brain MRI and CT within 24 h of injury. Most MRI studies were limited to triplane T2 and susceptibility sequences. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the MRIs and CTs and assessed the following findings: fracture, epidural hematoma (EDH)/subdural hematoma (SDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and parenchymal injury. Thirty of 33 patients had radiologically identified traumatic injuries. There was an overall agreement of 82 % between the two modalities. Skull fracture was the only injury subtype which had a statistically significant difference in detection between CT and MRI (p = 0.0001), with MRI missing 14 of 21 fractures detected on CT. While not statistically significant, MRI had a higher detection rate of EDH/SDH (p = 0.34), SAH (p = 0.07), and parenchymal injuries (p = 0.50). Non-sedated MRI has similar detection rates to CT for intracranial injury in young children presenting with acute head trauma and may be an alternative to CT in select patients. PMID:27166965

  8. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  9. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    C there was less clinical bleeding than when blood was reconstituted with components or when platelets were stored at 22°C. Early reversal of shock is essential to prevent exacerbation of coagulopathy and progression of cell death cascades in patients with severe traumatic injuries. Red blood cell storage solutions have evolved to accommodate the needs of non-critically ill patients yet may not be optimal for patients in hemorrhagic shock. Continued focus on the recognition and treatment of shock is essential for continued improvement in outcomes for patients who require damage control resuscitation and RDCR. PMID:24296434

  10. Parent and Child Agreement for Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Psychopathology in a Prospective Study of Children and Adolescents Exposed to Single-Event Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined…

  11. Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Argelio; Gurling, James; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Burns, Anthony S.; Lewis, Rachel; Soril, Lesley; Fallah, Nader; Street, John T.; Bélanger, Lise; Townson, Andrea; Liang, Liping; Atkins, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery. PMID:24023623

  12. Coagulopathy Due to Celiac Disease Presenting as Intramuscular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Cumbler, Ethan U.; Triebling, Andrzej T.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Celiac sprue most commonly presents with steatorrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Celiac disease is now becoming more recognized for its atypical presentations. Anemia, osteoporosis, and childhood failure to thrive have been widely discussed. Objective In this paper, we present a case of nontraumatic intramuscular hemorrhage associated with prolongation of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Main Results Coagulopathy, unmasked by the use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was found to be attributable to vitamin K deficiency associated with malabsorption of multiple fat soluble vitamins. Celiac sprue was confirmed by small bowel biopsy. A review of the literature finds that, whereas asymptomatic prolongation of coagulation is relatively common in celiac sprue, clinical bleeding is a rare but described presentation. Conclusion This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing hemorrhage as an atypical manifestation of celiac disease and offers the opportunity to review the clinical and laboratory evaluation of a patient who presents with unexplained hemorrhage. PMID:17768663

  13. Postoperative bypass bleeding: a bypass-associated dilutional (BAD) coagulopathy?

    PubMed

    Bull, Brian S; Hay, Karen L; Herrmann, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    A number of associations with post-bypass bleeding have been described in the accompanying paper. Herein we hypothesize that dilution is an underlying cause through a malign series of bypass-associated events. Heparinized blood behaves anomalously when diluted. Clotting times first shorten somewhat, then--as the dilution of whole blood approaches 50%--rapidly lengthen to unclottability. During cardiopulmonary bypass, low blood volume patients are at a significant risk of clotting factor dilution which will always be more severe than the level of whole blood dilution. If severe enough, this dilution may lower plasma clotting factors to a critical level and may result in excess protamine administration, secondary to overestimation of heparin. The presence of un-neutralized protamine combined with critically lowered clotting factors leads to marked coagulopathy. PMID:19699663

  14. Acute and Chronic Plasma Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Stress Effects in a Mouse Model with Features of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; D’Arpa, Peter; Donohue, Duncan E.; Muhie, Seid; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Luke, Brian T.; Grapov, Dmitry; Carroll, Erica E.; Meyerhoff, James L.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Acute responses to intense stressors can give rise to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD diagnostic criteria include trauma exposure history and self-reported symptoms. Individuals who meet PTSD diagnostic criteria often meet criteria for additional psychiatric diagnoses. Biomarkers promise to contribute to reliable phenotypes of PTSD and comorbidities by linking biological system alterations to behavioral symptoms. Here we have analyzed unbiased plasma metabolomics and other stress effects in a mouse model with behavioral features of PTSD. In this model, C57BL/6 mice are repeatedly exposed to a trained aggressor mouse (albino SJL) using a modified, resident-intruder, social defeat paradigm. Our recent studies using this model found that aggressor-exposed mice exhibited acute stress effects including changed behaviors, body weight gain, increased body temperature, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic histopathologies and transcriptomic changes of heart tissue. Some of these acute stress effects persisted, reminiscent of PTSD. Here we report elevated proteins in plasma that function in inflammation and responses to oxidative stress and damaged tissue at 24 hrs post-stressor. Additionally at this acute time point, transcriptomic analysis indicated liver inflammation. The unbiased metabolomics analysis showed altered metabolites in plasma at 24 hrs that only partially normalized toward control levels after stress-withdrawal for 1.5 or 4 wks. In particular, gut-derived metabolites were altered at 24 hrs post-stressor and remained altered up to 4 wks after stress-withdrawal. Also at the 4 wk time point, hyperlipidemia and suppressed metabolites of amino acids and carbohydrates in plasma coincided with transcriptomic indicators of altered liver metabolism (activated xenobiotic and lipid metabolism). Collectively, these system-wide sequelae to repeated intense stress suggest that the simultaneous perturbed functioning of multiple organ systems (e.g., brain, heart

  15. The usefulness of EEG, exogenous evoked potentials, and cognitive evoked potentials in the acute stage of post-anoxic and post-traumatic coma.

    PubMed

    Guérit, J M

    2000-12-01

    Three-modality evoked potentials (TMEPs) have been used for several years in association with the EEG as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in acute anoxic or traumatic coma. Cognitive EPs have been recently introduced. EEG and cognitive EPs provide functional assessment of the cerebral cortex. TMEP parameters can be described by two indices: the index of global cortical function (IGCF) and the index of brainstem conduction (IBSC). Although it remains a unique tool for epilepsy assessment, the value of EEG is largely limited by its high sensitivity to the electrical environmental noise, its dependence on sedative drugs, and its inability to test the brainstem. Major TMEP alterations (absence of cortical activities more than 24 hours after the onset of post-anoxic coma, major pontine involvement in head trauma) are associated in all cases with an ominous prognosis (death or vegetative state). However, even if mild TMEP changes are associated with a good prognosis in 65% (post-anoxic coma) to 90% (head trauma) of cases, some patients never recover despite exogenous TMEPs that are only mildly altered in the acute stage. Thus, cognitive EPs can usefully complement exogenous EPs as a prognostic tool in coma. Indeed, even if the absence of cognitive EPs in comatose patients does not have any prognostic value, their presence implies a very high (more than 90%) probability of consciousness recovery. The major technical challenge for the future will be the development of reliable tools for continuous EEG and TMEP monitoring. PMID:11233678

  16. Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Does Not Exacerbate Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the SOD1 (G93A) Rat Model(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Gretchen M; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Lamb, Alexander; Gowing, Genevieve; Shelest, Oksana; Alkaslasi, Mor; Ley, Eric J; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease in which upper and lower motor neurons degenerate, leading to muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death within 3 to 5 years of onset. While a small percentage of ALS cases are genetically linked, the majority are sporadic with unknown origin. Currently, etiological links are associated with disease onset without mechanistic understanding. Of all the putative risk factors, however, head trauma has emerged as a consistent candidate for initiating the molecular cascades of ALS. Here, we test the hypothesis that traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the SOD1 (G93A) transgenic rat model of ALS leads to early disease onset and shortened lifespan. We demonstrate, however, that a one-time acute focal injury caused by controlled cortical impact does not affect disease onset or survival. Establishing the negligible involvement of a single acute focal brain injury in an ALS rat model increases the current understanding of the disease. Critically, untangling a single focal TBI from multiple mild injuries provides a rationale for scientists and physicians to increase focus on repeat injuries to hopefully pinpoint a contributing cause of ALS. PMID:26464984

  17. Repeated Exposure to Conditioned Fear Stress Increases Anxiety and Delays Sleep Recovery Following Exposure to an Acute Traumatic Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Thompson, Robert S.; Opp, Mark R.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep–wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by human beings, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to no, mild (10), or severe (100) acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep/wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep/wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders. PMID

  18. A State-of-the-Science Overview of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Acute Management of Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bragge, Peter; Synnot, Anneliese; Maas, Andrew I; Menon, David K; Cooper, D James; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Gruen, Russell L

    2016-08-15

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major global challenge, with rising incidence, unchanging mortality and lifelong impairments. State-of-the-science reviews are important for research planning and clinical decision support. This review aimed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating interventions for acute management of moderate/severe TBI, synthesize key RCT characteristics and findings, and determine their implications on clinical practice and future research. RCTs were identified through comprehensive database and other searches. Key characteristics, outcomes, risk of bias, and analysis approach were extracted. Data were narratively synthesized, with a focus on robust (multi-center, low risk of bias, n > 100) RCTs, and three-dimensional graphical figures also were used to explore relationships between RCT characteristics and findings. A total of 207 RCTs were identified. The 191 completed RCTs enrolled 35,340 participants (median, 66). Most (72%) were single center and enrolled less than 100 participants (69%). There were 26 robust RCTs across 18 different interventions. For 74% of 392 comparisons across all included RCTs, there was no significant difference between groups. Positive findings were broadly distributed with respect to RCT characteristics. Less than one-third of RCTs demonstrated low risk of bias for random sequence generation or allocation concealment, less than one-quarter used covariate adjustment, and only 7% employed an ordinal analysis approach. Considerable investment of resources in producing 191 completed RCTs for acute TBI management has resulted in very little translatable evidence. This may result from broad distribution of research effort, small samples, preponderance of single-center RCTs, and methodological shortcomings. More sophisticated RCT design, large multi-center RCTs in priority areas, increased focus on pre-clinical research, and alternatives to RCTs, such as comparative

  19. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program. PMID:27382662

  20. Coagulopathy and transfusion therapy in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nacoti, Mirco; Corbella, Davide; Fazzi, Francesco; Rapido, Francesca; Bonanomi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and coagulopathy are critical issues complicating pediatric liver transplantation and contributing to morbidity and mortality in the cirrhotic child. The complexity of coagulopathy in the pediatric patient is illustrated by the interaction between three basic models. The first model, “developmental hemostasis”, demonstrates how a different balance between pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal hemostatic capacity in the pediatric patient at various ages. The second, the “cell based model of coagulation”, takes into account the interaction between plasma proteins and cells. In the last, the concept of “rebalanced coagulation” highlights how the reduction of both pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal, although unstable, coagulation profile. This new concept has led to the development of novel techniques used to analyze the coagulation capacity of whole blood for all patients. For example, viscoelastic methodologies are increasingly used on adult patients to test hemostatic capacity and to guide transfusion protocols. However, results are often confounding or have limited impact on morbidity and mortality. Moreover, data from pediatric patients remain inadequate. In addition, several interventions have been proposed to limit blood loss during transplantation, including the use of antifibrinolytic drugs and surgical techniques, such as the piggyback and lowering the central venous pressure during the hepatic dissection phase. The rationale for the use of these interventions is quite solid and has led to their incorporation into clinical practice; yet few of them have been rigorously tested in adults, let alone in children. Finally, the postoperative period in pediatric cohorts of patients has been characterized by an enhanced risk of hepatic vessel thrombosis. Thrombosis in fact remains the primary cause of early graft failure and re-transplantation within the first 30 d following surgery, and it occurs despite prolongation

  1. TRAUMA-INDUCED COAGULOPATHY: AN INSTITUTION’S 35 YEAR PERSPECTIVE ON PRACTICE AND RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, E.; Moore, E. E.; Moore, H. B.; Chapman, M. P.; Silliman, C. C.; Banerjee, A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Injury is the second leading cause of death worldwide, and as much as 40% of injury-related mortality is attributed to uncontrollable hemorrhage. This persists despite establishment of regionalized trauma systems and advances in the management of severely injured patients. Trauma-induced coagulopathy has been identified as the most common preventable cause of postinjury mortality. Methods A review of the current literature was performed by collecting PUBMED references related to trauma-induced coagulopathy. Data were then critically analyzed and summarized based on the authors’ clinical and research perspective, as well as that reported by other institutions and researchers interested in trauma-induced coagulopathy. A particular focus was placed on those aspects of coagulopathy in which agreement among clinical and basic scientists is currently lacking; these include, pathophysiology, the role of blood components and factor therapy, and goal-directed assessment and management. Results Trauma-induced coagulopathy has been recognized in approximately one-third of trauma patients. There is a vast range of severity, and the emergence of viscoelastic assays, such as thrombelastography and rotational thromboelastogram, has refined its diagnosis and management, particularly through the establishment of goal-directed massive transfusion protocols. Despite advancements in the diagnosis and management of trauma-induced coagulopathy, much remains to be understood regarding its pathophysiology. The cell-based model of hemostasis has allowed for characterization of endothelial dysfunction, impaired thrombin generation, platelet dysfunction, fibrinolysis, endogenous anticoagulants such as protein-C, and antifibrinolytic proteins. These concepts collectively compose the contemporary, but still partial, understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy. Conclusion Trauma-induced coagulopathy is a complex pathophysiological condition, of which some mechanisms have been

  2. Efficacy of Xuebijing for coagulopathy in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Si-Yuan; Feng, Xing-Huo; Lin, Chang-Liang; Tan, Yong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide evidence of the clinical efficacy of Xuebijing (XBJ) on blood coagulation in patients with sepsis. Methods: We conducted this meta-analysis in The People’s Hospital of Liaoning Province, Shenyang, China between December 2013 and May 2014. We searched a number of databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before December 2013 using the keywords ‘Xuebijing’, ‘coagulation’ and ‘sepsis’. Statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.2 from the Cochrane Collaboration. Results: Fourteen RCTs involving 867 patients were included. Compared with placebo, XBJ injection significantly improved platelets (mean differences [MD] = 42.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.42 - 61.86, p<0.00001), shortened the activated partial thromboplastin time (MD = -4.81, 95% CI: -7.86 - [-1.76], p=0.002), shortened the prothrombin time (MD = -2.33, 95% CI: -4.15 - [-0.51], p=0.01), and shortened the thrombin time (MD = -2.05, 95% CI: -3.52 - [-0.58], p=0.006). However, no significant difference was found between the XBJ injection and the placebo group for fibrinogen (MD = 0.21, 95% CI: -0.38 - 0.81, p=0.48). Conclusion: Xuebijing injection may improve coagulopathy in patients with sepsis. High-quality and large sample clinical trials are needed for confirmation. PMID:25719579

  3. Amorphous nanosilicas induce consumptive coagulopathy after systemic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Matsuyama, Keigo; Nakazato, Yasutaro; Arimori, Akihiro; Isobe, Masaaki; Tochigi, Saeko; Kondoh, Sayuri; Hirai, Toshiro; Akase, Takanori; Yamashita, Takuya; Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kamada, Haruhiko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Itoh, Norio; Kondoh, Masuo; Yagi, Kiyohito; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2012-02-01

    We previously reported that well-dispersed amorphous nanosilicas with particle size 70 nm (nSP70) penetrate skin and produce systemic exposure after topical application. These findings underscore the need to examine biological effects after systemic exposure to nanosilicas. The present study was designed to examine the biological effects. BALB/c mice were intravenously injected with amorphous nanosilicas of sizes 70, 100, 300, 1000 nm and then assessed for survival, blood biochemistry, and coagulation. As a result, injection of nSP70 caused fatal toxicity, liver damage, and platelet depletion, suggesting that nSP70 caused consumptive coagulopathy. Additionally, nSP70 exerts procoagulant activity in vitro associated with an increase in specific surface area, which increases as diameter reduces. In contrast, nSP70-mediated procoagulant activity was absent in factor XII-deficient plasma. Collectively, we revealed that interaction between nSP70 and intrinsic coagulation factors such as factor XII, were deeply related to nSP70-induced harmful effects. In other words, it is suggested that if interaction between nSP70 and coagulation factors can be suppressed, nSP70-induced harmful effects may be avoided. These results would provide useful information for ensuring the safety of nanomaterials (NMs) and open new frontiers in biological fields by the use of NMs.

  4. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  5. Effects of Intravenous and Catheter Directed Thrombolytic Therapy with Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator (Alteplase) in Non-Traumatic Acute Limb Ischemia; A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saroukhani, Abbas; Ravari, Hassan; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) in the patients with non-traumatic acute limb ischemia (ALI). Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial being performed between 2009 and 2011 in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. We included those patients who were<75 years, with symptoms of less than 14 days duration, ALI of grade IIa and IIb (according to Rutherford classification) and absence of distal run off. Baseline assessment of peripheral circulation performed in all the patients. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo intravenous (n=18) or catheter directed thrombolysis (n=20) with Alteplase. The primary endpoint of the study was improvement of clinical status measured by Rutherford classification, ankle brachial index (ABI), visual analogue scale (VAS) score measured at 1, 3 and 6 months. The secondary endpoint of the study was complete or near complete recanalization of the occluded artery. Results: A total number of 38 patients with mean age of 54.13±13.5 years were included in the study. There were 23 (60.5%) men and 15 (39.5%) women among the patients. Overall 3 (7.9%) patients had upper and 35 (92.1%) lower extremity ischemia. There was no significant difference between two study groups. None of the patients experienced major therapeutic side effects. Both ABI and VAS score improved in patients who have received first dose of t-PA within 24-hourof ALI. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the 6-month clinical grade (p=0.088), VAS score (p=0.316) and ABI (p=0.360). The angiographic improvement was significantly higher in CDT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis with t-PA is a safe and effective method in treatment of acute arteriolar ischemia of extremities. However there both intravenous thrombolysis and CDT are comparable regarding the clinical outcome. PMID

  6. Effects of Acute Restraint-Induced Stress on Glucocorticoid Receptors and BDNF after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Griesbach, Grace S.; Vincelli, Jennifer; Tio, Delia L.; Hovda, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that experimental mild traumatic brain injury results in increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post injury weeks, as determined by analyzing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation following restraint-induced stress. This is the same time period when rehabilitative exercise has proven to be ineffective after a mild fluid-percussion injury (FPI). Here we evaluated effects of stress on neuroplasticity. Adult male rats underwent either a FPI or sham injury. Additional rats were only exposed to anesthesia. Rats were exposed to 30-min of restraint stress, followed by tail vein blood collection at post-injury days (PID) 1, 7 and 14. The response to dexamethasone (DEX) was also evaluated. Hippocampal tissue was collected 120 min after stress onset. Brain derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) along with glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors were determined by western blot analysis. Results indicated injury dependent changes in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors that were influenced by the presence of dexamethasone. Control and FPI rats responded differentially to DEX in that GR increases after receiving the lower dose of DEX were longer lasting in the FPI group. A suppression of MR was found at PID 1 in vehicle treated FPI and Sham groups. Decreases in the precursor form of BDNF were observed in different FPI groups at PIDs 7 and 14, These findings suggest that the increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post injury weeks, after a mild FPI, has an impact on hippocampal neuroplasticity. PMID:22445725

  7. A prospective study of the influence of acute alcohol intoxication versus chronic alcohol consumption on outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Shewchuk, Jason R; Rauscher, Alexander; Jarrett, Michael; Heran, Manraj K S; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Iverson, Grant L

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to disentangle the relative contributions of day-of-injury alcohol intoxication and pre-injury alcohol misuse on outcome from TBI. Participants were 142 patients enrolled from a Level 1 Trauma Center (in Vancouver, Canada) following a traumatic brain injury (TBI; 43 uncomplicated mild TBI and 63 complicated mild-severe TBI) or orthopedic injury [36 trauma controls (TC)]. At 6-8 weeks post-injury, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the whole brain was undertaken using a Phillips 3T scanner. Participants also completed neuropsychological testing, an evaluation of lifetime alcohol consumption (LAC), and had blood alcohol levels (BALs) taken at the time of injury. Participants in the uncomplicated mild TBI and complicated mild-severe TBI groups had higher scores on measures of depression and postconcussion symptoms (d = 0.45-0.83), but not anxiety, compared with the TC group. The complicated mild-severe TBI group had more areas of abnormal white matter on DTI measures (all p < .05; d = 0.54-0.61) than the TC group. There were no difference between groups on all neurocognitive measures. Using hierarchical regression analyses and generalized linear modeling, LAC and BAL did provide a unique contribution toward the prediction of attention and executive functioning abilities; however, the variance accounted for was small. LAC and BAL did not provide a unique and meaningful contribution toward the prediction of self-reported symptoms, DTI measures, or the majority of neurocognitive measures. In this study, BAL and LAC were not predictive of mental health symptoms, postconcussion symptoms, cognition, or white-matter changes at 6-8 weeks following TBI. PMID:24964748

  8. Quantitative analysis of cellular inflammation after traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence for a multiphasic inflammatory response in the acute to chronic environment

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kevin D.; Nguyen, Hal X.; Galvan, Manuel D.; Salazar, Desirée L.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system results in the disruption of the blood brain/spinal barrier, followed by the invasion of cells and other components of the immune system that can aggravate injury and affect subsequent repair and regeneration. Although studies of chronic neuroinflammation in the injured spinal cord of animals are clinically relevant to most patients living with traumatic injury to the brain or spinal cord, very little is known about chronic neuroinflammation, though several studies have tested the role of neuroinflammation in the acute period after injury. The present study characterizes a novel cell preparation method that assesses, quickly and effectively, the changes in the principal immune cell types by flow cytometry in the injured spinal cord, daily for the first 10 days and periodically up to 180 days after spinal cord injury. These data quantitatively demonstrate a novel time-dependent multiphasic response of cellular inflammation in the spinal cord after spinal cord injury and are verified by quantitative stereology of immunolabelled spinal cord sections at selected time points. The early phase of cellular inflammation is comprised principally of neutrophils (peaking 1 day post-injury), macrophages/microglia (peaking 7 days post-injury) and T cells (peaking 9 days post-injury). The late phase of cellular inflammation was detected after 14 days post-injury, peaked after 60 days post-injury and remained detectable throughout 180 days post-injury for all three cell types. Furthermore, the late phase of cellular inflammation (14–180 days post-injury) did not coincide with either further improvements, or new decrements, in open-field locomotor function after spinal cord injury. However, blockade of chemoattractant C5a-mediated inflammation after 14 days post-injury reduced locomotor recovery and myelination in the injured spinal cord, suggesting that the late inflammatory response serves a reparative function. Together, these

  9. Recurrent coagulopathy after rattlesnake bite requiring continuous intravenous dosing of antivenom.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Charles W; Flach, F Eike

    2015-01-01

    Context. Snakebite envenomation is common and may result in systemic coagulopathy. Antivenom can correct resulting laboratory abnormalities; however, despite antivenom use, coagulopathy may recur, persist, or result in death after a latency period. Case Details. A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented to the emergency department after a rattlesnake bite to his right upper extremity. His presentation was complicated by significant glossal and oropharyngeal edema requiring emergent cricothyrotomy. His clinical course rapidly improved with the administration of snake antivenom (FabAV); the oropharyngeal and upper extremity edema resolved within several days. However, over the subsequent two weeks, he continued to have refractory coagulopathy requiring multiple units of antivenom. The coagulopathy finally resolved after starting a continuous antivenom infusion. Discussion. Envenomation may result in latent venom release from soft tissue depots that can last for two weeks. This case report illustrates the importance of close hemodynamic and laboratory monitoring after snakebites and describes the administration of continuous antivenom infusion, instead of multidose bolus, to neutralize latent venom release and correct residual coagulopathy. PMID:25664187

  10. Does highly symptomatic class membership in the acute phase predict highly symptomatic classification in victims 6 months after traumatic exposure?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    Recently studies have indicated the existence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorder (ASD) subtypes but no studies have investigated their mutual association. Although ASD may not be a precursor of PTSD per se, there are potential benefits associated with early identification of victims at risk of developing PTSD subtypes. The present study investigates ASD and PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) following bank robbery (N=371). Moreover, we assessed if highly symptomatic ASD and selected risk factors increased the probability of highly symptomatic PTSD. The results of LCA revealed a three class solution for ASD and a two class solution for PTSD. Negative cognitions about self (OR=1.08), neuroticism (OR=1.09) and membership of the 'High symptomatic ASD' class (OR=20.41) significantly increased the probability of 'symptomatic PTSD' class membership. Future studies are needed to investigate the existence of ASD and PTSD subtypes and their mutual relationship. PMID:27101400

  11. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-11-15

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery.

  12. Assessment of Disability in Patients with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Singh, Anoushka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Given the importance of accurately and reliably assessing disability in future clinical trials, which will test therapeutic strategies in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), we sought to appraise comprehensively studies that focused on the psychometric properties (i.e., reliability, validity, and responsiveness) of all previously used outcome measures in the SCI population. The search strategy included Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. Two reviewers independently assessed each study regarding eligibility, level of evidence (using Sackett's criteria), and quality. Of 363 abstracts captured in our search, 36 full articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eight different outcome measures were used to assess disability in the SCI population, including Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Spinal cord Injury Measure (SCIM), Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI), Quadriplegia Index of Function (QIF), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Timed Up & Go (TUG), 6-min walk test (6MWT), and 10-m walk test (10MWT). While 19 of 36 studies provided level-4 evidence, the remaining 17 articles were classified as level-2b evidence. Most of the instruments showed convergent construct validity in the SCI population, but criterion validity was not examined due to the lack a gold standard for assessment of disability. All instruments were tested in the rehabilitation and/or community setting, but only FIM was examined in the acute care setting. Based on our results of quality assessment, the SCIM has the most appropriate performance regarding the instrument's psychometric properties. Nonetheless, further investigations are required to confirm the adequate performance of the SCIM as a comprehensive measure of functional recovery in patients with SCI in rehabilitative care. The expert panel of the Spinal Cord Injury Solutions Network (SCISN) that participated in the modified Delphi process endorsed these conclusions. PMID:20367251

  13. Congenital Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Unique Translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.3)

    PubMed Central

    Bandt, S. Kathleen; Hurth, Kyle; Wambach, Jennifer A; Rao, Rakesh; Kulkarni, Shashikant; White, Francis V; Frater, John L; Leonard, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital leukemia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, even in tertiary children's hospitals. Leukemia may cause significant coagulopathy, putting the patient at risk of intracranial hemorrhage. In this case, the authors present a female infant with a unique mixed phenotypic congenital acute myeloid leukemia showing mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) rearrangement and severe coagulopathy resulting in a large subdural hematoma. Despite the fatal outcome in this case, neurosurgical treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia should be considered if coagulopathy and the clinical scenario allow. PMID:26244121

  14. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  15. Early post-traumatic stress disorder in relation to acute stress reaction: an ICD-10 study among help seekers following an earthquake.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Constantin R; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas J; Pappa, Dimitra A; Christodoulou, George N

    2006-08-30

    Disaster research related to earthquakes has almost exclusively dealt with their long-term psychosocial impact; besides, diagnoses were previously based only on DSM criteria. Therefore, it is pertinent to assess stress-related reactions of earthquake victims during the early post-disaster period through the application of ICD-10 criteria. For the first 3 weeks following an earthquake, 102 help-seekers were assessed based on a checklist of sociodemographic variables and a semi-structured interview for the detection of acute stress reaction (ASR) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to ICD-10. Forty-four subjects (43%) fulfilled the ICD-10 criteria for PTSD; all but one of them had suffered ASR. Moreover, among a series of potential predictors for PTSD, ASR was found to be the only significant one; this indicates a definite association between ASR and early development of PTSD. Logistic regression to predict group membership (PTSD/no PTSD) based on specific ASR symptoms showed that accelerated heart rate and feelings of derealization were the only significant predictors for early PTSD. Individuals who fulfill the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for ASR following an earthquake are at high risk for subsequent occurrence of early PTSD. Increased heart rate and feelings of derealization within the first 48 h after the traumatic event appear to be the principal factors associated with the development of early PTSD. In addition to their potential value for timely prevention and treatment, these findings raise important nosological issues pertaining to the current diagnostic classification of stress-related disorders (ICD-10 versus DSM-IV). PMID:16872683

  16. Acute traumatic posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow in pediatric patients: impact of surgery time and associated fractures on outcome.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Fuat; Dikmen, Goksel; Baş, Ali; Asma, Ali; Batibay, Sefa G; Şirikçi, Murat; Atalar, Ata Can

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of the time interval from initial injury to surgery and the presence of associated fracture on functional outcomes after acute posterior elbow fracture dislocation. Twenty-six pediatric patients were evaluated with respect to operation time point (within 24 h vs. later) and associated fracture retrospectively. The Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) score was used to assess functional results. The MEPI score was 91 (80-100) in patients with one associated fracture and 83 (75-95) (P=0.02) in patients with more than one associated fracture. The MEPI score in patients treated within 24 h was 90.3 (75-95) and in those treated later than 24 h, it was 88.6 (75-100) (P=0.6). Treatment time (within 24 h vs. later) does not affect outcomes, but increasing numbers of associated injuries affect outcomes negatively. Level of study: Level IV case series. PMID:26895289

  17. Amputation - traumatic

    MedlinePlus

    ... accidents, or from motor vehicle accidents. Natural disasters, war, and terrorist attacks can also cause traumatic amputations. ... bag and place the bag in an ice water bath. Do NOT directly put the body part ...

  18. Administration of bone marrow stromal cells in sepsis attenuates sepsis-related coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lifei; Huang, Yueyue; Pan, Xiaojun; Quan, Shichao; Xu, Shunyao; Li, Dequan; Song, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Wanzhou; Pan, Jingye

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Coagulopathy plays an important role in sepsis. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) administration could attenuate coagulopathy in sepsis. Materials and methods In vitro: endothelial cells were cultured with/without BMSCs for 6 h following LPS stimulation and were collected for thrombomodulin (TM) and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) measurements. In vivo: Thirty-six mice were randomized into sham, sepsis, and sepsis + BMSC groups (n = 12 each group). Sepsis was induced through cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). BMSC infusion was started at 6 h after CLP. Lung tissues and plasma samples were collected at 24 h after CLP for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), quantitative real-time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results In vitro: BMSCs attenuated the decrease in TM and EPCR mRNA and protein expression levels in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. In vivo: BMSC treatment decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment, and ameliorated coagulopathy, as suggested by the reduction in elevated TF, vWF, and TAT circulation levels. BMSC infusion decreased TF mRNA transcription and protein expression levels in lung tissues, and increased TM and EPCR mRNA transcription and expression levels. Discussion BMSC administration attenuated coagulopathy, and decreased lung injury and mesenteric perfusion impairment in sepsis. Key messages BMSCs increased the expression of TM and EPCR from endothelium cells exposed to LPS in vitro. BMSC treatment attenuated lung injury and coagulopathy in the mice cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. BMSC administration-attenuated coagulopathy is related to the reduced expression of TF and increased expression of TM and EPCR. PMID:26969493

  19. Severe coagulopathy and transient hypertension following a Rhabdophis subminiatus bite: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni Juwita; Adiwinata, Randy; Handayani, Siti; Rinaldi, Ikhwan

    2016-01-01

    Because the majority of colubrid species are considered harmless to human beings, colubrid snakebites are rarely reported. However, the venom of Rhabdophis, which is part of the Colubridae family, is procoagulant and leads to severe coagulopathy. Here, we present a case of disseminated intravascular coagulation with enhanced fibrinolysis following a Rhabdophis bite. Although coagulopathy can be treated effectively with the specific Rhabdophis antivenom, this antivenom is not widely available in Indonesia. We also found transient hypertension secondary to the colubrid venom, an unusual finding. PMID:27598644

  20. Coagulopathy following venous air embolism: a disastrous consequence -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Moningi, Srilata; Kulkarni, Dilip; Bhattacharjee, Suchanda

    2013-10-01

    Venous air embolism (VAE) is a life-threatening complication of some surgical procedures. Though occurrence of VAE is frequent during neurosurgical procedures, coagulopathy following VAE has not previously been reported. Coagulation abnormalities are more commonly reported associated with fat or amniotic fluid embolism, but rarely with VAE. We present a case of massive VAE in sitting position leading to fatal coagulopathy even after successful resuscitation following the event. Coagulation abnormalities and bleeding can produce catastrophic consequences in neurosurgical patients. This report emphasizes the possibility of this potentially fatal complication in patients who have sustained a massive VAE. PMID:24228151

  1. Postoperative coagulopathy after live related donor hepatectomy: Incidence, predictors and implications for safety of thoracic epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Karna, ST; Pandey, CK; Sharma, S; Singh, A; Tandon, M; Pandey, VK

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coagulopathy after living donor hepatectomy (LDH) may endanger donor safety during removal of thoracic epidural catheter (TEC). The present study was conducted to evaluate the extent and duration of immediate postoperative coagulopathy after LDH. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of perioperative record of LDH over three years was conducted after IRB approval. Variables such as age, gender, BMI, ASA classification, liver volume on CT scan, preoperative and postoperative INR, platelet count (PC) and ALT of each donor for five days was noted. In addition, duration of surgery, remnant as percentage total liver volume (Remnant%), blood loss, day of peak in PC and INR were also noted. Coagulopathy was defined as being present if INR exceeded 1.5 or platelet count fell below 1 × 105/mm3 on any day. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20 for Windows. Between group comparison was made using the Student ‘t’ test for continuous variables and chi square test for categorical variables. Univariate analysis was done. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find independent factor associated with coagulopathy. Results: Eighty four (84) donors had coagulopathy on second day (mean INR 1.9 ± 0.42). Low BMI, % of remnant liver and duration of surgery were independent predictors of coagulopathy. Right lobe hepatectomy had more coagulopathy than left lobe and low BMI was the only independent predictor. There was no correlation of coagulopathy with age, gender, blood loss, presence of epidural catheter, postoperative ALT or duration of hospital stay. High INR was the main contributor for coagulopathy. Conclusions: Coagulopathy is seen after donor hepatectomy. We recommend removal of the epidural catheter after the fifth postoperative day when INR falls below 1.5. PMID:26119437

  2. Thromboelastography in the Management of Coagulopathy Associated With Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Martin, Daniel S; Maddox, Victoria; Rattenbury, Simon; Bland, Davis; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan; Mepham, Stephen; Rodger, Alison; Warren, Simon; Chowdary, Pratima; Jacobs, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe the first use of thromboelastography (TEG) in the management of 2 cases of Ebola virus disease. Early in their illness, both patients had evidence of a consumptive coagulopathy. As this resolved, TEG demonstrated that both developed a marked hypercoagulable state, which was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin. PMID:26611775

  3. Ingestion of Superwarfarin Leading to Coagulopathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Austin T.; Hartzell, Joshua D.; More, Kenneth; Durning, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Superwarfarins are found in many pesticides, including D-con, Prufe I and II, Ramik, Talon-G, Ratak, and Contrac. Ingestion of can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. Physicians need to consider this diagnosis in any patient presenting with coagulopathy of unclear etiology. We present a patient with superwarfarin-induced coagulopathy and review previous cases in adults in the literature. The patient is a 60-year-old man who presented to our medical center with painless hematuria. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated prothrombin time (PT) (42.5 seconds), partial thromboplastin time (PTT) (64.6 seconds), and international normalized ratio (INR) of 7. Liver-associated enzymes were normal, and complete blood cell count (CBC) showed no evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Subsequent work-up included the absence of an inhibitor by mixing study and deficiencies of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. The patient's warfarin level was negative. A brodifacoum level was positive, confirming superwarfarin-induced coagulopathy. The patient is currently doing well with normal coagulation studies after receiving high doses of vitamin K for several weeks. The cause of his exposure to superwarfarin remains uncertain. Physicians need to be cognizant of this unusual cause of coagulopathy in adults. The appropriate diagnostic work-up and unique features of therapy are discussed. PMID:17415322

  4. Combining Biochemical and Imaging Markers to Improve Diagnosis and Characterization of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Setting: Results from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhifeng; Gattu, Ramtilak; Kobeissy, Firas; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Ayaz, Syed Imran; Kulek, Andrew; Kas-Shamoun, Robert; Mika, Valerie; Zuk, Conor; Tomasello, Francesco; Mondello, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant healthcare burden and its diagnosis remains a challenge in the emergency department. Serum biomarkers and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have already demonstrated their potential to improve the detection of brain injury even in patients with negative computed tomography (CT) findings. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical value of a combinational use of both blood biomarkers and MRI in mTBI detection and their characterization in the acute setting (within 24 hours after injury). Methods Nine patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department. Serum samples were collected at the time of hospital admission and every 6 hours up to 24 hours post injury. Neuronal (Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1]) and glial (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) biomarker levels were analyzed. Advanced MRI data were acquired at 9±6.91 hours after injury. Patients’ neurocognitive status was assessed by using the Standard Assessment of Concussion (SAC) instrument. Results The median serum levels of UCH-L1 and GFAP on admission were increased 4.9 folds and 10.6 folds, respectively, compared to reference values. Three patients were found to have intracranial hemorrhages on SWI, all of whom had very high GFAP levels. Total volume of brain white matter (WM) with abnormal fractional anisotropy (FA) measures of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were negatively correlated with patients’ SAC scores, including delayed recall. Both increased and decreased DTI-FA values were observed in the same subjects. Serum biomarker level was not correlated with patients’ DTI data nor SAC score. Conclusions Blood biomarkers and advanced MRI may correlate or complement each other in different aspects of mTBI detection and characterization. GFAP might have potential to serve as a clinical screening tool for intracranial bleeding. UCH-L1 complements MRI in injury

  5. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  6. Current Treatment for Venom-Induced Consumption Coagulopathy Resulting from Snakebite

    PubMed Central

    Maduwage, Kalana; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Venomous snakebite is considered the single most important cause of human injury from venomous animals worldwide. Coagulopathy is one of the commonest important systemic clinical syndromes and can be complicated by serious and life-threatening haemorrhage. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC) is the commonest coagulopathy resulting from snakebite and occurs in envenoming by Viperid snakes, certain elapids, including Australian elapids, and a few Colubrid (rear fang) snakes. Procoagulant toxins activate the clotting pathway, causing a broad range of factor deficiencies depending on the particular procoagulant toxin in the snake venom. Diagnosis and monitoring of coagulopathy is problematic, particularly in resource-poor countries where further research is required to develop more reliable, cheap clotting tests. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2013 were searched to identify clinical studies of snake envenoming with VICC. The UniPort database was searched for coagulant snake toxins. Despite preclinical studies demonstrating antivenom binding toxins (efficacy), there was less evidence to support clinical effectiveness of antivenom for VICC. There were no placebo-controlled trials of antivenom for VICC. There were 25 randomised comparative trials of antivenom for VICC, which compared two different antivenoms (ten studies), three different antivenoms (four), two or three different doses or repeat doses of antivenom (five), heparin treatment and antivenom (five), and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment and antivenom (one). There were 13 studies that compared two groups in which there was no randomisation, including studies with historical controls. There have been numerous observational studies of antivenom in VICC but with no comparison group. Most of the controlled trials were small, did not use the same method for assessing coagulopathy, varied the dose of antivenom, and did not provide complete details of the study design (primary outcomes, randomisation

  7. Resection of giant liver hemangioma in a pregnant woman with coagulopathy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Hazama, Ryoichi; Nishimoto, Masashi; Tanimura, Kenji; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Morizane, Mayumi; Nakabayashi, Koji; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Yamada, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemangioma is a common benign tumor in the liver and usually asymptomatic. Scanty evidence concerning treatment modality of symptomatic hemangioma during pregnancy exists. Case A 35 year-old woman with giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma developed consumption coagulopathy due to the enlarged tumor, and underwent danaparoid therapy from 5 weeks of gestation (GW). Magnetic resonance image revealed giant hemangioma with 20 cm in diameter in the right lobe of the liver. A surgical operation of liver resection was successfully performed at 16 GW. Thereafter, the coagulopathy disappeared. She delivered a healthy male infant at 36 GW. Conclusion This is the first case report of surgical resection therapy for giant liver hemangioma during pregnancy. PMID:22905301

  8. [Chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in a dog with lung worm infection].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, S; Moritz, A

    2009-06-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in a 1-year-old male Jack Russel Terrier dog with lung worm induced coagulopathy are described. The diagnosis was based upon history, clinical findings, radiography, endoscopy, cytology and laboratory results. The presenting complaint was chronic cough. Radiographically, a diffuse interstitial to bronchial lung pattern was observed. Blood analysis revealed thrombocytopaenia and prolonged coagulation times. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) was diagnosed based on D-dimer and fibrinogen measurements, and by thrombelastogram results. After stabilisation of the patient, bronchoscopy with a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, where large amounts of lung worm larvae were found cytologically. After treatment with fresh frozen plasma and fenbendazole, coagulation parameters improved and the cough resolved. PMID:19496048

  9. Bilateral Jugular Vein and Sigmoid Sinus Thrombosis Related to an Inherited Coagulopathy: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Altıntaş, Özge; Baran, Gözde; Mehdi, Elnur; Asil, Talip

    2014-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT) is a rare condition associated with malignancy, coagulopathy, and trauma. The optimal management of any IJVT must be individualized and depends on the condition of the patient. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with a history of a first trimester spontaneous abortion. Apart from a tension-type headache, she had no neurological symptoms. She reported an incidental diagnosis of right-sided IJVT when she was evaluated for hyperthyroidism ultrasonographically. On ultrasonography, we observed bilateral jugular vein thrombosis. The patient was started on oral warfarin. Seven months later, when she was adequately anticoagulated, she developed a second thrombosis. According to the etiological workup, she had a mutation in the homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and reduced protein C levels and activity. Conclusion. This report illustrates an unusual presentation of a rare condition. In this case, the etiology was associated with the coagulopathy, which occurred despite adequate anticoagulation. PMID:25221687

  10. The Emergent Reversal of Coagulopathies Encountered in Neurosurgery and Neurology: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Medow, Joshua Eric; Dierks, Matthew R.; Williams, Eliot; Zacko, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    It is imperative for neurologists, neurosurgeons, and neurointensivists to know how to stop life-threatening hemorrhage in both surgical and non-surgical patients. However, knowing how to medically correct a coagulopathy has become increasingly challenging as more contemporary and sophisticated anticoagulation agents are developed and prescribed. In a time-sensitive and life-threatening situation, where there is little margin for error, the neurosurgeon may not have ready access to information about the drug or condition that caused the coagulopathy or the information on how to treat it. This thorough review of the literature provides a comprehensive overview of the medications and conditions that can lead to persistent and/or life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:25380610

  11. Resuscitative strategies in traumatic hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Managing trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock is complex and difficult. Despite our knowledge of the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock in trauma patients that we have accumulated during recent decades, the mortality rate of these patients remains high. In the acute phase of hemorrhage, the therapeutic priority is to stop the bleeding as quickly as possible. As long as this bleeding is uncontrolled, the physician must maintain oxygen delivery to limit tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction. This process involves fluid resuscitation, the use of vasopressors, and blood transfusion to prevent or correct acute coagulopathy of trauma. The optimal resuscitative strategy is controversial. To move forward, we need to establish optimal therapeutic approaches with clear objectives for fluid resuscitation, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels to guide resuscitation and limit the risk of fluid overload and transfusion. PMID:23311726

  12. Toxicokinetics and coagulopathy threshold of the rodenticide diphacinone in eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, K.E.; Lazarus, Rebecca; Goldade, D.A.; Johnston, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, new regulations on second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides will likely be offset by expanded use of first-generation anticoagulant rodenticides. In the present study, eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio) were fed 10 µg diphacinone/g wet weight food for 7 d, and recovery was monitored over a 21-d postexposure period. By day 3 of exposure, diphacinone (DPN) was detected in liver (1.63 µg/g wet wt) and kidney (5.83 µg/g) and coagulopathy was apparent. By day 7, prothrombin time (PT) and Russell's viper venom time (RVVT) were prolonged, and some individuals were anemic. Upon termination of exposure, coagulopathy and anemia were resolved within 4 d, and residues decreased to <0.3 µg/g by day 7. Liver and kidney DPN elimination occurred in 2 phases (initial rapid loss, followed by slower loss rate), with overall half-lives of 11.7 d and 2.1 d, respectively. Prolonged PT and RVVT occurred in 10% of the exposed owls with liver DPN concentrations of 0.122 µg/g and 0.282 µg/g and in 90% of the owls with liver concentrations of 0.638 µg/g and 0.361 µg/g. These liver residue levels associated with coagulopathy fall in the range of values reported in raptor mortality incidents involving DPN. These tissue-based toxicity reference values for coagulopathy in adult screech-owls have application for interpreting nontarget mortality and assessing the hazard of DPN in rodent-control operations. Diphacinone exposure evokes toxicity in raptors within a matter of days; but once exposure is terminated, recovery of hemostasis occurs rapidly

  13. Toxicokinetics and coagulopathy threshold of the rodenticide diphacinone in eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio).

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barnett A; Horak, Katherine E; Lazarus, Rebecca S; Goldade, David A; Johnston, John J

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, new regulations on second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides will likely be offset by expanded use of first-generation anticoagulant rodenticides. In the present study, eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio) were fed 10 µg diphacinone/g wet weight food for 7 d, and recovery was monitored over a 21-d postexposure period. By day 3 of exposure, diphacinone (DPN) was detected in liver (1.63 µg/g wet wt) and kidney (5.83 µg/g) and coagulopathy was apparent. By day 7, prothrombin time (PT) and Russell's viper venom time (RVVT) were prolonged, and some individuals were anemic. Upon termination of exposure, coagulopathy and anemia were resolved within 4 d, and residues decreased to <0.3 µg/g by day 7. Liver and kidney DPN elimination occurred in 2 phases (initial rapid loss, followed by slower loss rate), with overall half-lives of 11.7 d and 2.1 d, respectively. Prolonged PT and RVVT occurred in 10% of the exposed owls with liver DPN concentrations of 0.122 µg/g and 0.282 µg/g and in 90% of the owls with liver concentrations of 0.638 µg/g and 0.361 µg/g. These liver residue levels associated with coagulopathy fall in the range of values reported in raptor mortality incidents involving DPN. These tissue-based toxicity reference values for coagulopathy in adult screech-owls have application for interpreting nontarget mortality and assessing the hazard of DPN in rodent-control operations. Diphacinone exposure evokes toxicity in raptors within a matter of days; but once exposure is terminated, recovery of hemostasis occurs rapidly. PMID:24014246

  14. Management of bleeding and coagulopathy following major trauma: an updated European guideline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based recommendations are needed to guide the acute management of the bleeding trauma patient. When these recommendations are implemented patient outcomes may be improved. Methods The multidisciplinary Task Force for Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma was formed in 2005 with the aim of developing a guideline for the management of bleeding following severe injury. This document represents an updated version of the guideline published by the group in 2007 and updated in 2010. Recommendations were formulated using a nominal group process, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) hierarchy of evidence and based on a systematic review of published literature. Results Key changes encompassed in this version of the guideline include new recommendations on the appropriate use of vasopressors and inotropic agents, and reflect an awareness of the growing number of patients in the population at large treated with antiplatelet agents and/or oral anticoagulants. The current guideline also includes recommendations and a discussion of thromboprophylactic strategies for all patients following traumatic injury. The most significant addition is a new section that discusses the need for every institution to develop, implement and adhere to an evidence-based clinical protocol to manage traumatically injured patients. The remaining recommendations have been re-evaluated and graded based on literature published since the last edition of the guideline. Consideration was also given to changes in clinical practice that have taken place during this time period as a result of both new evidence and changes in the general availability of relevant agents and technologies. Conclusions A comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to trauma care and mechanisms with which to ensure that established protocols are consistently implemented will ensure a uniform and high standard of care across Europe and beyond. Please see related letter by Morel

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  16. Recurrent secondary postpartum hemorrhages due to placental site vessel subinvolution and local uterine tissue coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) represents a serious problem for women and obstetricians. Because of its association with hemorrhagic shock and predisposition to disseminated coagulopathy, it is a leading cause of maternal deaths worldwide. Furthermore, the jeopardy of PPH is rising with the secondary form of PPH occurring between 24 hours and 6 weeks postpartum, when women are already discharged home. The causes of this pathology are severe inflammation (endometritis), inherited coagulation disorders, consumptive coagulopathy, and retained products of conceptions. Others are of rare occurrence, such as vessel subinvolution (VSI) of the placental implantation site, uterine artery pseudoaneurysm, or trauma. Case presentation We present a rare form of recurrent secondary postpartum hemorrhage in a woman after uncomplicated cesarean delivery, with review of the literature linked to the management of this situation originating in the rare local VSI in the placental implantation site, defective decidual homeostasis, and coagulopathy confined to the uterus. Conclusion The placental site VSI is one of the rare causes of secondary PPH, and this situation is frequently underdiagnosed by clinicians. The histological confirmation of dilated “clustered”-shaped myometrial arteries partially occluded by thrombi of variable “age” together with the presence of endovascular extravillous trophoblasts confirms the diagnosis. PMID:24558972

  17. Importance of fibrinogen in dilutional coagulopathy after neurosurgical procedures: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shalini; Nair, Bijesh Ravindran; Vidyasagar, Ajay; Joseph, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The routine management of coagulopathy during surgery involves assessing haemoglobin, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelets. Correction of these parameters involves administration of blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates. The study was aimed at identifying the most common coagulation abnormality during neurosurgical procedures and the treatment of dilutional coagulopathy with blood components. Methods: During 2 years period, all adult patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures who were transfused two or more units of red cells were prospectively evaluated for the presence of a coagulopathy. PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels were estimated before starting a component therapy. Results: After assessing PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels following two or more blood transfusions, thirty patients were found to have at least one abnormal parameter that required administration of a blood product. The most common abnormality was a low fibrinogen level, seen in 26 patients; this was the only abnormality in three patients. No patient was found to have an abnormal PT or aPTT without either the fibrinogen concentration or platelet count or both being low. Conclusion: Low fibrinogen concentration was the most common coagulation abnormality found after blood transfusions for neurosurgical procedures. PMID:27601735

  18. Controlled Cortical Impact Traumatic Brain Injury in 3xTg-AD Mice Causes Acute Intra-axonal Amyloid-beta Accumulation and Independently Accelerates the Development of Tau Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hien T; LaFerla, Frank M.; Holtzman, David M.; Brody, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by progressive neuronal loss, extracellular plaques containing the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Aβ is thought to act upstream of tau, affecting its phosphorylation and therefore aggregation state. One of the major risk factors for AD is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Acute intra-axonal Aβ and diffuse extracellular plaques occur in approximately 30% of human subjects following severe TBI. Intra-axonal accumulations of tau but not tangle-like pathologies have also been found in these patients. Whether and how these acute accumulations contribute to subsequent AD development is not known, and the interaction between Aβ and tau in the setting of TBI has not been investigated. Here, we report that controlled cortical impact TBI in 3xTg-AD mice resulted in intra-axonal Aβ accumulations and increased phospho-tau immunoreactivity at 24 hours and up to 7 days post TBI. Given these findings, we investigated the relationship between Aβ and tau pathologies following trauma in this model by systemic treatment of Compound E to inhibit γ-secrectase activity, a proteolytic process required for Aβ production. Compound E treatment successfully blocked post-traumatic Aβ accumulation in these injured mice at both time points. However, tau pathology was not affected. Our data support a causal role for TBI in acceleration of AD-related pathologies, and suggest that TBI may independently affect Aβ and tau abnormalities. Future studies will be required to assess the behavioral and long-term neurodegenerative consequences of these pathologies. PMID:21715616

  19. [Post-traumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Ponteva, Matti; Henriksson, Markus; Isoaho, Raimo; Laukkala, Tanja; Männikkö, Timo; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial support and careful monitoring are recommended for acute stress reaction (ASR) and acute stress disorder (ASD). If symptoms require, short focused cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy can be used for ASD. Medication is rarely necessary, but sleeping pills can be used for a short period. Trauma-focused psychotherapeutic interventions are first-line treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. SSRI or SNRI antidepressant medication is also effective. There is less evidence on antipsychotic and antiepileptic medication. Psychotherapeutic interventions and medication can be, and often are, combined. Children, the elderly, and military and peacekeeping personnel need interventions that are tailored to their needs. PMID:19839195

  20. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  1. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Francis J.; Chapman, Michael P.; Donahue, Deborah L.; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. METHODS We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. RESULTS In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p < 0.0001). Humans with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤ 8) showed an increase in ADP receptor inhibition at 93.1% (interquartile range [IQR], 44.8–98.3%; n = 29) compared with 56.5% (IQR, 35–79.1%; n = 41) in milder TBI and 15.5% (IQR, 13.2–29.1%) in controls (p = 0.0014 and p < 0.0001, respectively). No patient had significant hypotension or acidosis. Parallel trends were noted in AA receptor inhibition. CONCLUSION Platelet ADP and AA receptor inhibition is a prominent early feature of CTBI in humans and rats and is linked to the severity of brain injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014;76: 1169–1176. PMID:24747445

  2. Liver failure with coagulopathy, hyperammonemia and cyclic vomiting in a toddler revealed to have combined heterozygosity for genes involved with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Mira, Valerie; Boles, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    A girl with a 2 month history of cyclic episodes of vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy lasting 2-3 days each presented with acute hepatopathy (ALT 3,500 IU/L) with coagulopathy (PT 55 s) and hyperammonemia (207 μmol/L) at age 1½ years. Biochemical and molecular analyzes revealed ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency. While laboratory signs of mild hepatocellular dysfunction are common in OTC deficiency, substantial liver failure with coagulopathy is generally not seen, although four others cases have been reported, three of which presented with cyclic vomiting. Further evaluation in our case revealed elevated urine (198.8 μg/g creatinine) and liver (103 μg/g dry weight) copper content, and a heterozygous mutation in the Wilson disease gene, ATP7B. Our patient, now aged 5 years, has remained in excellent health with normal growth and development on fasting avoidance, a modified vegan diet, and sodium phenylbutyrate.These five cases demonstrate that generalized liver dysfunction/failure is a potential serious complication of OTC deficiency, although not a common one, and suggests that an ALT and PT should be obtained in OTC patients during episodes of hyperammonemia. Cyclic vomiting is a known presentation of OTC deficiency; it is not known if comorbid liver failure predisposes toward this phenotype. We propose that the heterozygote state in ATP7B increases the liver copper content, thus predisposing our patient with OTC deficiency to develop liver failure during a hyperammonemic episode. Our present case is an example of the opportunity of molecular diagnostics to identify putative modifier genes in patients with atypical presentations of genetic disorders. PMID:23430866

  3. Approach to Modeling, Therapy Evaluation, Drug Selection, and Biomarker Assessments for a Multicenter Pre-Clinical Drug Screening Consortium for Acute Therapies in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Patrick M; Bramlett, Helen M; Dixon, C Edward; Shear, Deborah A; Dietrich, W Dalton; Schmid, Kara E; Mondello, Stefania; Wang, Kevin K W; Hayes, Ronald L; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the signature injury in both the Iraq and Afghan wars and the magnitude of its importance in the civilian setting is finally being recognized. Given the scope of the problem, new therapies are needed across the continuum of care. Few therapies have been shown to be successful. In severe TBI, current guidelines-based acute therapies are focused on the reduction of intracranial hypertension and optimization of cerebral perfusion. One factor considered important to the failure of drug development and translation in TBI relates to the recognition that TBI is extremely heterogeneous and presents with multiple phenotypes even within the category of severe injury. To address this possibility and attempt to bring the most promising therapies to clinical trials, we developed Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT), a multicenter, pre-clinical drug screening consortium for acute therapies in severe TBI. OBTT was developed to include a spectrum of established TBI models at experienced centers and assess the effect of promising therapies on both conventional outcomes and serum biomarker levels. In this review, we outline the approach to TBI modeling, evaluation of therapies, drug selection, and biomarker assessments for OBTT, and provide a framework for reports in this issue on the first five therapies evaluated by the consortium. PMID:26439468

  4. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  5. Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy Is Associated with a Complex Inflammatory Response in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Daniel N; Gonzales, Mary D; Craig, Teresa; Dubick, Michael A; Cap, Andrew P; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-08-01

    Severe trauma can lead to a coagulopathy in patients, which is associated with increased mortality. We developed a rat polytrauma model that demonstrates a similar progression of coagulopathy. Because coagulation is influenced by changes in inflammation, and this interrelationship is poorly understood, we have studied the progression of inflammation, and its correlation with coagulation, in this rat model of severe polytrauma. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. Polytrauma was induced by damaging 10 cm of small intestines, right and medial liver lobes, right leg skeletal muscle, femur fracture, and hemorrhaging 40% of blood volume. No resuscitation was given. Polytrauma and hemorrhage resulted in a significant decrease in the number of lymphocytes and an increase in monocytes and granulocytes. There was an increase in plasma proinflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor α (40×), interleukin (IL)-6 (20×), IL-1β (16×), IL-17 (15×), interferon γ (10×), IL-1α (8×) and IL-12p70 (5×); anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-10 (100×), IL-13 (16×), and IL-4 (5×); chemokines: growth-regulated protein/keratinocyte chemoattractant (30×), macrophage inflammatory protein 3α (10×), regulated and normal T-cell expressed and secreted (3×); and growth factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (5×), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (6×), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (3×), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (2×), and IL-5 (3×). There was a strong and significant correlation between prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, and fibrin monomer concentration, and many cytokines. Polytrauma with hemorrhage is associated with a coagulopathy and a complex inflammatory response consisting of a concurrent rise in both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The rise in plasma concentrations of chemokines and growth factors likely contribute to the mobilization of monocytes and granulocytes

  6. Persistent fear of aftershocks, impairment of working memory, and acute stress disorder predict post-traumatic stress disorder: 6-month follow-up of help seekers following the L'Aquila earthquake.

    PubMed

    Roncone, Rita; Giusti, Laura; Mazza, Monica; Bianchini, Valeria; Ussorio, Donatella; Pollice, Rocco; Casacchia, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our 6-month follow-up study was to assess predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals seeking treatment at the General Hospital Psychiatric Unit within the first month following the L'Aquila earthquake. Clinical, trauma-related and neurocognitive variables were considered. At the 6-month follow-up, 91 (74.5%) out of 122 subjects were re-assessed and administered the Impact of Events Scale-revised (IES-R) for the detection of PTSD according to DSM-IV criteria. Within 4 weeks following the earthquake, patients were assessed with a checklist of traumatic-event-related variables, along with the Stanford Acute Stress Disorder Questionnaire (SASDQ) for the detection of ASD, with a short battery on working (Wechler Memory Scale-R, Digit Forward and Backward) and verbal memory (subtest of Milan Overall Dementia Assessment, MODA). A statistically significant higher proportion of subjects affected by 'partial' ASD showed a PTSD diagnosis (80.6%, N = 29) compared to not diagnosed subjects (40%, N = 22) and a PTSD diagnosis was shown by all the 4 subjects (4.4%) affected by 'full' ASD at the entry in the study. At the 6-month follow-up 56% of the sample could be considered affected by PTSD on the IES-R scale. The results of the logistic regression analysis on our selected predictors indicated that the persistent fear of aftershocks seemed to increase by over 57 times the likelihood of positive estimate of PTSD, followed by impairment of working memory backward (OR 48.2), and having being diagnosed as ASD case in the first 4 week after the earthquake (OR 17.4). This study underlines the importance of identifying PTSD predictors, in order to planning early treatment interventions after natural disasters. PMID:24324929

  7. Manual for the psychotherapeutic treatment of acute and post-traumatic stress disorders following multiple shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jochen; Titscher, Georg; Peregrinova, Ludmila; Kirsch, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), the number of people suffering from so-called “multiple ICD shocks” is also increasing. The delivery of more than five shocks (appropriate or inappropriate) in 12 months or three or more shocks (so called multiple shocks) in a short time period (24 hours) leads to an increasing number of patients suffering from severe psychological distress (anxiety disorder, panic disorder, adjustment disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder). Untreated persons show chronic disease processes and a low rate of spontaneous remission and have an increased morbidity and mortality. Few papers have been published concerning the psychotherapeutic treatment for these patients. Objective: The aim of this study is to develop a psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder or adjustment disorder after multiple ICD shocks. Design: Explorative feasibility study: Treatment of 22 patients as a natural design without randomisation and without control group. The period of recruitment was three years, from March 2007 to March 2010. The study consisted of two phases: in the first phase (pilot study) we tested different components and dosages of psychotherapeutic treatments. The final intervention programme is presented in this paper. In the second phase (follow-up study) we assessed the residual post-traumatic stress symptoms in these ICD patients. The time between treatment and follow-up measurement was 12 to 30 months. Population: Thirty-one patients were assigned to the Department of Psychocardiology after multiple shocks. The sample consisted of 22 patients who had a post-traumatic stress disorder or an adjustment disorder and were willing and able to participate. They were invited for psychological treatment. 18 of them could be included into the follow-up study. Methods: After the clinical assessment at the beginning and at the end of the inpatient treatment a post

  8. Correction of coagulopathy associated with non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) by surgical debulking in a case of ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albright, Benjamin B; Black, Jonathan D; Vilardo, Nicole; Schwartz, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    •Ovarian cancer, particularly clear cell carcinoma, creates a hypercoagulable state.•This state can predispose to non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE).•NBTE can embolize and cause widespread arterial infarction.•NBTE is sometimes associated with a treatment refractory disseminated coagulopathy.•Surgical removal of the primary mass can sometimes reverse the coagulopathy. PMID:27354993

  9. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  10. Suppression of acute proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine upregulation by post-injury administration of a novel small molecule improves long-term neurologic outcome in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Eric; Somera-Molina, Kathleen; Van Eldik, Linda J; Watterson, D Martin; Wainwright, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with its associated morbidity is a major area of unmet medical need that lacks effective therapies. TBI initiates a neuroinflammatory cascade characterized by activation of astrocytes and microglia, and increased production of immune mediators including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This inflammatory response contributes both to the acute pathologic processes following TBI including cerebral edema, in addition to longer-term neuronal damage and cognitive impairment. However, activated glia also play a neuroprotective and reparative role in recovery from injury. Thus, potential therapeutic strategies targeting the neuroinflammatory cascade must use careful dosing considerations, such as amount of drug and timing of administration post injury, in order not to interfere with the reparative contribution of activated glia. Methods We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines following TBI would decrease neurologic injury and improve functional neurologic outcome. We used the small molecule experimental therapeutic, Minozac (Mzc), to suppress TBI-induced up-regulation of glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines back towards basal levels. Mzc was administered in a clinically relevant time window post-injury in a murine closed-skull, cortical impact model of TBI. Mzc effects on the acute increase in brain cytokine and chemokine levels were measured as well as the effect on neuronal injury and neurobehavioral function. Results Administration of Mzc (5 mg/kg) at 3 h and 9 h post-TBI attenuates the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, reduces astrocyte activation, and the longer term neurologic injury, and neurobehavioral deficits measured by Y maze performance over a 28-day recovery period. Mzc-treated animals also have no significant increase in brain water content (edema), a major cause of the neurologic morbidity associated

  11. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  12. Riluzole for the treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury: rationale for and design of the NACTN Phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, Michael G; Wilson, Jefferson R; Frankowski, Ralph F; Toups, Elizabeth G; Aarabi, Bizhan; Harrop, James S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Harkema, Susan J; Guest, James D; Tator, Charles H; Burau, Keith D; Johnson, Michele W; Grossman, Robert G

    2012-09-01

    In the immediate period after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) a variety of secondary injury mechanisms combine to gradually expand the initial lesion size, potentially leading to diminished neurological outcomes at long-term follow-up. Riluzole, a benzothiazole drug, which has neuroprotective properties based on sodium channel blockade and mitigation of glutamatergic toxicity, is currently an approved drug that attenuates the extent of neuronal degeneration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, several preclinical SCI studies have associated riluzole administration with improved functional outcomes and increased neural tissue preservation. Based on these findings, riluzole has attracted considerable interest as a potential neuroprotective drug for the treatment of SCI. Currently, a Phase I trial evaluating the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of riluzole in human SCI patients is being conducted by the North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury. The current review summarizes the existing preclinical and clinical literature on riluzole, provides a detailed description of the Phase I trial, and suggests potential opportunities for future investigation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00876889. PMID:22985381

  13. Thrombin products: economic impact of immune-mediated coagulopathies and practical formulary considerations.

    PubMed

    Voils, Stacy A

    2009-07-01

    Thrombin has demonstrated utility in aiding surgical hemostasis since its introduction more than 60 years ago. It is used across a wide variety of surgical procedures by virtually every specialty. Only recently have new equally effective and safe products entered the market, causing decision makers to evaluate formulary selection among products with otherwise modest differences. This evaluation includes identifying costs beyond those of acquisition and storage, as well as indirect factors such as monitoring or specialized distribution requirements. One factor to consider specifically in selection of topical thrombin products is the potential for patients to develop an immune-mediated coagulopathy (IMC) after exposure to bovine-derived thrombin. Costs due to adverse drug events fall into the category of indirect costs and, in some instances, can be substantial if bleeding due to IMC occurs. PMID:19558281

  14. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  15. Life-threatening coagulopathy and hypofibrinogenaemia induced by tigecycline in a patient with advanced liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Rossitto, Giacomo; Piano, Salvatore; Rosi, Silvia; Simioni, Paolo; Angeli, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial infections because of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are spreading worldwide. In patients with advanced liver cirrhosis, healthcare-acquired and hospital-acquired infections are common and are frequently sustained by MDR bacteria. In these settings, tigecycline, a new antibiotic, has been shown to be useful in the treatment of MDR bacteria, and it has been proposed for the treatment of hospital-acquired infections in patients with cirrhosis. Nevertheless, poor data exist on the safety profile of tigecycline in patients with cirrhosis. Here, an experience is reported in a female patient with advanced liver cirrhosis, who developed sepsis by an MDR Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and was treated with tigecycline. She experienced life-threatening side effects consisting of severe coagulopathy with hypofibrinogenaemia and subsequent gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The side effect disappeared after the withdrawal of tigecycline. Therefore, a strict monitoring of coagulation parameters in patients with cirrhosis treated with tigecycline is recommended. PMID:24667348

  16. Bothrops jararaca Venom Metalloproteinases Are Essential for Coagulopathy and Increase Plasma Tissue Factor Levels during Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Karine M.; Alves, André F.; Barbaro, Katia C.; Santoro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Bleeding tendency, coagulopathy and platelet disorders are recurrent manifestations in snakebites occurring worldwide. We reasoned that by damaging tissues and/or activating cells at the site of the bite and systemically, snake venom toxins might release or decrypt tissue factor (TF), resulting in activation of blood coagulation and aggravation of the bleeding tendency. Thus, we addressed (a) whether TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an oxireductase involved in TF encryption/decryption, were altered in experimental snake envenomation; (b) the involvement and significance of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP) and serine proteinases (SVSP) to hemostatic disturbances. Methods/Principal Findings Crude Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) was preincubated with Na2-EDTA or AEBSF, which are inhibitors of SVMP and SVSP, respectively, and injected subcutaneously or intravenously into rats to analyze the contribution of local lesion to the development of hemostatic disturbances. Samples of blood, lung and skin were collected and analyzed at 3 and 6 h. Platelet counts were markedly diminished in rats, and neither Na2-EDTA nor AEBSF could effectively abrogate this fall. However, Na2-EDTA markedly reduced plasma fibrinogen consumption and hemorrhage at the site of BjV inoculation. Na2-EDTA also abolished the marked elevation in TF levels in plasma at 3 and 6 h, by both administration routes. Moreover, increased TF activity was also noticed in lung and skin tissue samples at 6 h. However, factor VII levels did not decrease over time. PDI expression in skin was normal at 3 h, and downregulated at 6 h in all groups treated with BjV. Conclusions SVMP induce coagulopathy, hemorrhage and increased TF levels in plasma, but neither SVMP nor SVSP are directly involved in thrombocytopenia. High levels of TF in plasma and TF decryption occur during snake envenomation, like true disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, and might be implicated in engendering

  17. Older Age Results in Differential Gene Expression after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Is Linked to Imaging Differences at Acute Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Latour, Lawrence L.; Kim, Hyungsuk; Turtzo, L. Christine; Olivera, Anlys; Livingston, Whitney S.; Wang, Dan; Martin, Christiana; Lai, Chen; Cashion, Ann; Gill, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Older age consistently relates to a lesser ability to fully recover from a traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is limited data to explicate the nature of age-related risks. This study was undertaken to determine the relationship of age on gene-activity following a TBI, and how this biomarker relates to changes in neuroimaging findings. A young group (between the ages of 19 and 35 years), and an old group (between the ages of 60 and 89 years) were compared on global gene-activity within 48 h following a TBI, and then at follow-up within 1-week. At each time-point, gene expression profiles, and imaging findings from both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography were obtained and compared. The young group was found to have greater gene expression of inflammatory regulatory genes at 48 h and 1-week in genes such as basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BACH2), leucine-rich repeat neuronal 3 (LRRN3), and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) compared to the old group. In the old group, there was increased activity in genes within S100 family, including calcium binding protein P (S100P) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), which previous studies have linked to poor recovery from TBI. The old group also had reduced activity of the noggin (NOG) gene, which is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is linked to neurorecovery and neuroregeneration compared to the young group. We link these gene expression findings that were validated to neuroimaging, reporting that in the old group with a MRI finding of TBI-related damage, there was a lesser likelihood to then have a negative MRI finding at follow-up compared to the young group. Together, these data indicate that age impacts gene activity following a TBI, and suggest that this differential activity related to immune regulation and neurorecovery contributes to a lesser likelihood of neuronal recovery in older patients as indicated through neuroimaging. PMID

  18. Older Age Results in Differential Gene Expression after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Is Linked to Imaging Differences at Acute Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Eun; Latour, Lawrence L; Kim, Hyungsuk; Turtzo, L Christine; Olivera, Anlys; Livingston, Whitney S; Wang, Dan; Martin, Christiana; Lai, Chen; Cashion, Ann; Gill, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Older age consistently relates to a lesser ability to fully recover from a traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is limited data to explicate the nature of age-related risks. This study was undertaken to determine the relationship of age on gene-activity following a TBI, and how this biomarker relates to changes in neuroimaging findings. A young group (between the ages of 19 and 35 years), and an old group (between the ages of 60 and 89 years) were compared on global gene-activity within 48 h following a TBI, and then at follow-up within 1-week. At each time-point, gene expression profiles, and imaging findings from both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography were obtained and compared. The young group was found to have greater gene expression of inflammatory regulatory genes at 48 h and 1-week in genes such as basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BACH2), leucine-rich repeat neuronal 3 (LRRN3), and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) compared to the old group. In the old group, there was increased activity in genes within S100 family, including calcium binding protein P (S100P) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), which previous studies have linked to poor recovery from TBI. The old group also had reduced activity of the noggin (NOG) gene, which is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is linked to neurorecovery and neuroregeneration compared to the young group. We link these gene expression findings that were validated to neuroimaging, reporting that in the old group with a MRI finding of TBI-related damage, there was a lesser likelihood to then have a negative MRI finding at follow-up compared to the young group. Together, these data indicate that age impacts gene activity following a TBI, and suggest that this differential activity related to immune regulation and neurorecovery contributes to a lesser likelihood of neuronal recovery in older patients as indicated through neuroimaging. PMID

  19. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptorSarm1(sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model.Sarm1(-/-)mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared toSarm1(+/+)mice. Furthermore, mice lackingSarm1had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function inSarm1(-/-)animals. Finally, usingin vivoproton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism inSarm1(-/-)mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26912636

  20. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  1. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2015-02-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  2. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  3. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Murariu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana

    2012-01-01

    The diversity that exists in the types of trauma, in the investigated anatomical structures, in the sites of trauma, in the outcomes of traumatic injuries, and in the general reaction of the body lead to a symptomatological polymorphism of post-traumatic sequelae. Therefore it is impossible to establish a well-defined nosological entity of these sequelae. The damaged tissues react under a very similar scheme, irrespective of the type of tissue, trauma or area, namely, through an inflammatory process, that causes various sequelae depending on certain parameters. Südeck post-traumatic osteodystrophy may be defined as a pathological entity based on some well-defined clinical features, on the development of its own therapy and on its more or less ubiquitous character. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy of the hand is rarely found isolated. This "acute bone atrophy" is usually included in the "pathological syndrome of the hand" and is caused by circulatory disorders that occur on a traumatized hand or on a hand with injury "at a distance", especially when nerve damage is involved. PMID:23700903

  4. [Post-traumatic stress disorder: a problem for occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Koniarek, J

    2000-01-01

    The impact of the mental stress on the human functioning and health has been evidenced in numerous studies. The majority of these studies focus on adverse effects of a long-term stress. Recently, a growing attention has been paid to the relationship between health and acute stress induced by sudden and short-lasting events or experiences characterised by particular intensity. A traumatic stress is one of the forms of the acute stress. It is some kind of reaction to an event in which life of an individual is directly threatened (serious injury, endangered physical integrity, etc.) or he/she witnesses sudden death, serious injury or life-threatening situation of other people. Traumatic experiences may lead among others to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The review of the studies, presented in this paper, indicates that the proportion of people with traumatic experiences ranges between 40 and 90% depending on the population. There are professions (rescue services, the police, etc.) with inherent traumatic experiences. About 10% of people with traumatic experiences develop PTSD. The author indicates factors responsible for the development of PTSD. The society, particularly people whose professions involve traumatic experiences, and those employed in various institutions responsible for health care should be aware of health problems related to this kind of experiences. PMID:11002473

  5. Efficacy of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Treatment in Patients with Liver Coagulopathy Who Underwent Various Invasive Hepatobiliary and Gastrointestinal Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lesmana, Cosmas Rinaldi A.; Cahyadinata, Lidwina; Pakasi, Levina S.; Lesmana, Laurentius A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) containing prothrombin, factors VII, IX, and X, as well as the inhibitors protein C and S have been used as an emergent reversal for oral anticoagulation therapy. The use of PCCs in hepatobiliary disorder patients or patients with liver coagulopathy who need to undergo invasive procedures has not been well studied. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of PCC treatment in order to control or prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo various invasive procedures. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, non-randomized, before-and-after study in patients with hepatobiliary disorders who underwent invasive procedures accompanied by liver impairment and received PCC injection (Cofact®, Sanquin, The Netherlands). Patients with coagulopathy from various causes were recruited consecutively. Data collected were the episodes of bleeding, liver function test and the international normalized ratio (INR) before and after PCC therapy. The primary endpoint was INR change after treatment, while secondary endpoints included bleeding control and bleeding event after treatment. Results Thirty patients (17 men, 13 women) were enrolled. Patients’ mean age was 57.0 + 15.5 years. Liver cirrhosis was found in 14 patients (46.7%). The procedures consisted of liver biopsy, liver abscess aspiration, abdominal paracentesis, therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, abdominal surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. After treatment, 25 patients (83.3%) showed a decreased median INR (from 1.6 to 1.3) (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test). Five patients failed to show INR reduction. No new bleeding event related to the invasive procedures was observed. Conclusion PCC treatment is effective to control and prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo invasive procedures. PMID:27482190

  6. Cellular microparticle and thrombogram phenotypes in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study: correlation with coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Wade, Charles E.; Holcomb, John B.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Muskat, Peter; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Cardenas, Jessica C.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Cohen, Mitchell Jay

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma-induced coagulopathy following severe injury is associated with increased bleeding and mortality. Injury may result in alteration of cellular phenotypes and release of cell-derived microparticles (MP). Circulating MPs are procoagulant and support thrombin generation (TG) and clotting. We evaluated MP and TG phenotypes in severely injured patients at admission, in relation to coagulopathy and bleeding. Methods As part of the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study, research blood samples were obtained from 180 trauma patients requiring transfusions at 5 participating centers. Twenty five healthy controls and 40 minimally injured patients were analyzed for comparisons. Laboratory criteria for coagulopathy was activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) ≥35 sec. Samples were analyzed by Calibrated Automated Thrombogram to assess TG, and by flow cytometry for MP phenotypes [platelet (PMP), erythrocyte (RMP), leukocyte (LMP), endothelial (EMP), tissue factor (TFMP), and Annexin V positive (AVMP)]. Results 21.7% of patients were coagulopathic with the median (IQR) APTT of 44 sec (37, 53), and an Injury Severity Score of 26 (17, 35). Compared to controls, patients had elevated EMP, RMP, LMP, and TFMP (all p<0.001), and enhanced TG (p<0.0001). However, coagulopathic PROMMTT patients had significantly lower PMP, TFMP, and TG, higher substantial bleeding, and higher mortality compared to non-coagulopathic patients (all p<0.001). Conclusions Cellular activation and enhanced TG are predominant after trauma and independent of injury severity. Coagulopathy was associated with lower thrombin peak and rate compared to non-coagulopathic patients, while lower levels of TF-bearing PMPs were associated with substantial bleeding. PMID:25086657

  7. Intra-operative correction of acidosis, coagulopathy and hypothermia in combat casualties with severe haemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Ross, J D; Poon, H; Midwinter, M J; Jansen, J O

    2013-08-01

    We assessed acidosis, coagulopathy and hypothermia, before and after surgery in 51 combat troops operated on for severe blast injury. Patients were transfused a median (IQR [range]) of 27 (17-38 [5-84]) units of red cell concentrate, 27 (16-38 [4-83]) units of plasma, 2.0 (0.5-3.5 [0-13.0]) units of cryoprecipitate and 4 (2-6 [0-17]) pools of platelets. The pH, base excess, prothrombin time and temperature increased: from 7.19 (7.10-7.29 [6.50-7.49]) to 7.45 (7.40-7.51 [7.15-7.62]); from -9.0 (-13.5 to -4.5 [-28 to -2]) mmol.l⁻¹ to 4.5 (1.0-8.0 [-7 to +11]) mmol.l⁻¹; from 18 (15-21 [9-24]) s to 14 (11-18 [9-21]) s; and from 36.1 (35.1-37.1 [33.0-38.1]) °C to 37.4 (37.0-37.9 [36.0-38.0]) °C, respectively. Contemporary intra-operative resuscitation strategies can normalise the physiological derangements caused by haemorrhagic shock. PMID:23724784

  8. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  9. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Javidi, H; Yadollahie, M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack), being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events.PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed "acute PTSD," otherwise, it is called "chronic PTSD." 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%-40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%-20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%-32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%), firefighters (21%), and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults.Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for work-related PTSD. Working with

  10. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  11. [Fundamentals of comprehensive prevention of the post-traumatic fat embolism syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kroupa, J

    1993-01-01

    Urgent top standard provisions implemented as soon as possible after serious injuries with the aim to prevent the development of shock or treat incipient and developing shock are among the most important aspects of prophylaxis of the traumatic fat embolism syndrome (FE). These provisions comprise quantitative and qualitative replacement of blood losses, prevention of spasms of the peripheral blood vessels, restoration of the microcirculation, maintenance of the acid-base equilibrium and a normal state of coagulation, normalization of fluctuations of the post-traumatic metabolic and humoral response, blocking of pathological impulses from the site of the fracture incl. settling of the long bones; suppression of hypoxia, in particular also by artificial pulmonary ventilation; a high caloric intake to prevent excessive development of lipolysis. Surgical operations with the exception of urgent ones which form part of urgent intensive care must be postponed to the time when clinical manifestations of traumatic shock have completely subsided. The group of comprehensive prophylactic provisions comprises also pharmacological measures/drugs and substances which influence the pathogenetic basis associated with the genesis and development of the FE syndrome and the more general syndrome of post-traumatic dyslipidaemic coagulopathy resp. PMID:8498119

  12. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy - A Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Viswanathan, Ramachandran; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-03-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  13. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in primary nephrotic syndrome: effects on plasma lipids and coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Hall, A V; Parbtani, A; Clark, W F; Spanner, E; Huff, M W; Philbrick, D J; Holub, B J

    1992-12-01

    The effect of fish oil dietary supplementation on the dyslipidemia and coagulopathy of seven patients with nephrotic syndrome and hypoalbuminemia due to primary kidney disease was studied. Plasma lipids, platelet aggregation studies, simplate bleeding time, and fibrinogen levels were determined before and after 6 wk of treatment with fish oil (15 g/day of MaxEPA; 2.7 g of eicosapentenoic acid (EPA) and 1.8 g of docosahexenoic acid. Urea kinetics were determined from urine-urea concentration, urinary proteina, and urine volume. A 3-day dietary intake record was obtained from each patient before and after 6 wk of fish oil supplementation. There was no significant dietary change in protein, fat, or carbohydrate intake over the time period of the study. At study end, total triglycerides decreased from 2.98 +/- 1.31 to 2.18 +/- 1.14 mmol/L (P = 0.002), and very low-density lipoprotein-triglycerides decreased from 2.35 +/- 1.34 to 1.28 +/- 1.07 mmol/L (P = 0.01). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol increased from 5.18 +/- 1.74 to 7.35 +/- 2.83 mmol/L (P = 0.005). No significant changes occurred in bleeding time, platelet count, hematocrit, red blood cell flexibility, or whole blood viscosity. Platelet aggregation responses to collagen and arachidonic acid were consistently reduced after treatment, but there was no change in platelet response to ADP. The platelet membrane phospolipids showed a significantly increased incorporation of EPA after the fish oil diet (P = 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1477328

  14. Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy in the placenta: cerebral thrombi and infarcts, coagulopathies, and cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kraus, F T; Acheen, V I

    1999-07-01

    Thrombi in the fetal circulation of the placenta cause a pattern of clustered fibrotic villi called fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV), which has been associated with serious injuries to neonates, especially brain injuries. Correlation of FTV with visceral thrombi in autopsy specimens might lead to a more accurate estimate of the prevalence of somatic thrombi as a significant and underrecognized cause of prenatal injury or perinatal death, and show the potential validity of placental FTV as an indicator of thrombotic lesions in the fetus and newborns who survive. Clinicopathologic correlation was used to perform a 3-year retrospective autopsy review. We identified 16 cases (19%) among 84 perinatal autopsy specimens in which placental FTV was associated with stillbirth, intrapartum, or neonatal death. Two liveborn neonates survived 2.5 hours, and one for 24 hours; there was one intrapartum death, and the rest were stillborn. Clinical evidence of severe central nervous system (CNS) injury to two of the liveborn infants was evident at birth. Twelve stillborns died from 12 to 48 hours before delivery. Placental FTV had features of organization that clearly antedated the fetal death. Autopsy findings confirmed somatic thrombi in six cases (37.5%) of the 16 with FTV, including cerebral thrombi or infarcts (three cases), renal thromboemboli (three cases), and pulmonary thromboemboli (two cases). One mother had history of deep vein thrombosis, and four of eight tested had abnormal coagulation test results. Placental FTV indicates a significant probability of thrombi in the fetus and represents an important, possibly underrecognized cause of perinatal mortality and neonatal injury. Parental coagulopathy as a significant factor in prenatal injury and death deserves more comprehensive study. The placenta remains an undervalued and underutilized surgical specimen in the evaluation of perinatal injury, especially cerebral palsy. PMID:10414494

  15. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Singh Pandav, Surinder

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Young patients are more prone to ocular trauma but most of the published studies describe complicated cataract as a result of trauma with its treatment modality. As a result, little is known about the different causes, common presenting signs and symptoms, visual outcomes, and most frequent management modalities of traumatic glaucoma in children. This review aims to study the demographical profile, presentation, management and outcome of traumatic glaucoma in children as well as the various factors associated with advanced glaucomatous changes. How to cite this article: Kaur S, Kaushik S, Pandav SS. Traumatic Glaucoma in Children. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014; 8(2):58-62. PMID:26997810

  16. Subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mott, Timothy F; McConnon, Michael L; Rieger, Brian P

    2012-12-01

    Although a universally accepted definition is lacking, mild traumatic brain injury and concussion are classified by transient loss of consciousness, amnesia, altered mental status, a Glasgow Coma Score of 13 to 15, and focal neurologic deficits following an acute closed head injury. Most patients recover quickly, with a predictable clinical course of recovery within the first one to two weeks following traumatic brain injury. Persistent physical, cognitive, or behavioral postconcussive symptoms may be noted in 5 to 20 percent of persons who have mild traumatic brain injury. Physical symptoms include headaches, dizziness, and nausea, and changes in coordination, balance, appetite, sleep, vision, and hearing. Cognitive and behavioral symptoms include fatigue, anxiety, depression, and irritability, and problems with memory, concentration and decision making. Women, older adults, less educated persons, and those with a previous mental health diagnosis are more likely to have persistent symptoms. The diagnostic workup for subacute to chronic mild traumatic brain injury focuses on the history and physical examination, with continuing observation for the development of red flags such as the progression of physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms, seizure, progressive vomiting, and altered mental status. Early patient and family education should include information on diagnosis and prognosis, symptoms, and further injury prevention. Symptom-specific treatment, gradual return to activity, and multidisciplinary coordination of care lead to the best outcomes. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities, psychosocial issues, and legal or compensatory incentives should be explored in patients resistant to treatment. PMID:23198672

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), ... barrier. NIH Patient Recruitment for Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a wide range of changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions. TBI can be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. People with severe injuries usually need rehabilitation. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  20. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  1. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  2. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  3. Evaluation of risk factors in patients with vitamin K-dependent coagulopathy presumed to be caused by exposure to brodifacoum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jeong; You, Mi-Ra; Moon, Woo-Ram; Sul, Hyoung; Chung, Choon-Hae; Park, Chi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, many cases of vitamin K-dependent coagulopathy of unknown origin have been reported. Such patients lack any relevant family history and have no systemic disease, raising suspicion of superwarfarin intoxication. We evaluated individual risk factors causing coagulopathy and hemorrhagic symptoms in patients with suspected superwarfarin intoxication. In addition, we determined how to effectively treat vitamin K-dependent coagulopathy caused by suspected superwarfarin intoxication. Methods Seven patients with suspected superwarfarin intoxication who lacked any definitive history of rodenticide ingestion were included. Thirty-one patients initially diagnosed with rodenticide poisoning were also included. We performed a retrospective chart review of all subjects and examined clinical data including patient demographics and medical histories. Results Patients initially diagnosed with rodenticide poisoning were divided into two groups, one of which had a laboratory abnormality (prothrombin time [PT] > 13 seconds) and another group with PTs in the normal range. There was no significant difference between the two groups in any of age, gender, the extent of chronic alcohol consumption, the causative rodenticide, psychiatric problems, ingestion of drugs interacting with warfarin, the extent of intoxication, or the type of ingestion attempt. The albumin level of the former group was significantly lower than that of the latter group (p = 0.014). Furthermore, a significant difference between the two groups was evident in terms of simultaneous ingestion of rodenticide and alcohol (p = 0.023). Conclusions Most patients with superwarfarin poisoning did not exhibit any complication. When such complications were evident, they were associated with serum albumin level and coingestion of rodenticide and alcohol. PMID:25045298

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. METHODS The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. RESULTS The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p < 0.05), improved cognition (t = 6.532, p < 0.001), and inhibited C/EBP homology protein activation (t = 5.631, p < 0.01). Additionally the data showed, for the first time, that endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the pathophysiology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. CONCLUSIONS Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. PMID

  5. Acute traumatic injuries in automotive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Warner, M; Baker, S P; Li, G; Smith, G S

    1998-10-01

    Motor vehicle manufacturing, with its varied tasks, challenging work environment, and diverse worker populations, presents many hazards to employees. This study examined routinely collected surveillance data from a major motor vehicle manufacturer to identify injury types, high-risk workers, causes of injury, and factors associated with work loss. Injury and personnel data were used to calculate injury rates. Injury data were from the routinely collected medical and safety surveillance system on occupational injuries. The number of persons working in the plants was estimated using year-end personnel reports. Key word searches supplementing the analyses provided insight into the specific circumstances of injury. The most common injuries were sprains/strains (39% of the total), lacerations (22%), and contusions (15%). Forty-nine percent of the injuries resulted in one or more lost or restricted workdays; 25% resulted in 7 or more lost or restricted workdays. The injuries most likely to result in work loss were amputations, hernias and fractures. Sprains/strains accounted for 65% of all lost workdays. Injury rates ranged from 13.8 per 100 person-years at stamping plants to 28.7 at parts depots. Even within similar types of plants, injury rates varied widely, with a twofold difference among the individual assembly plants in overall injury rates. Injury surveillance systems with descriptive data on injury events shed light on the circumstances under which certain types of injuries occur and can provide the basis for preventive interventions. Sources of variation and potential biases are discussed, providing guidance for those interested in designing and using surveillance systems for occupational injuries. PMID:9750941

  6. Traumatic Alterations in Consciousness: Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) refers to the clinical condition of transient alteration of consciousness as a result of traumatic injury to the brain. The priority of emergency care is to identify and facilitate the treatment of rare but potentially life threatening intra-cranial injuries associated with mTBI through the judicious application of appropriate imaging studies and neurosurgical consultation. Although post-mTBI symptoms quickly and completely resolve in the vast majority of cases, a significant number of patients will complain of lasting problems that may cause significant disability. Simple and early interventions such as patient education and appropriate referral can reduce the likelihood of chronic symptoms. Although definitive evidence is lacking, mTBI is likely to be related to significant long-term sequelae such as Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20709244

  7. Monitor lizard bite-induced acute kidney injury--a case report.

    PubMed

    Vikrant, Sanjay; Verma, Balbir Singh

    2014-04-01

    Envenomations by venomous lizards are rare. Monitor lizard bite-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a previously unreported complication in humans. A 55-year-old female was bitten on her right leg during farming activity by a monitor lizard (Varanus bengalensis). The patient experienced severe local pain and bleeding from the wound, coagulopathy, hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, sepsis, and AKI. Patient was treated with supportive care and peritoneal dialysis but succumbed to a sudden cardiac arrest. Post mortem kidney biopsy revealed pigment induced-acute tubular injury. AKI after monitor lizard envenomation is caused by acute tubular injury in the setting of intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and sepsis. Coagulopathy and direct nephrotoxicity may be the other contributory factors in causing AKI. PMID:24341640

  8. A catalog for transcripts in the venom gland of the Agkistrodon acutus: identification of the toxins potentially involved in coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Qinghua, Liu; Xiaowei, Zhang; Wei, Yin; Chenji, Li; Yijun, Huang; Pengxin, Qiu; Xingwen, Su; Songnian, Hu; Guangmei, Yan

    2006-03-10

    Agkistrodon acutus is a special agkistrodon halys, only distributed in Southern China, with a few exceptions in Vietnam. It is a cherished element used in traditional Chinese medicine. In order to produce a global panorama of gene expression in the Agkistrodon acutus venom gland, a non-normalized cDNA library was constructed, and 8696 high quality 5' end expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) were sequenced and analyzed. The initial sequences were assembled into 2855 clusters. Of these clusters, only 45.60% clusters matched known sequence and 54.40% had no match to any known sequence in GenBank. Except for putative cellular proteins (1184 clusters), the remaining 118 clusters (40.16% of all ESTs) corresponded to sequences associated with diverse toxin function. According to expression abundance, the major toxin components were metalloproteinases (32.08%) and C-type lectin (5.22%), and other components including bradykinin-potentiating peptide (0.90%), serine proteases (0.51%), nucleotidase and nuclease (0.41%), phospholipase A2 (0.30%), disintegrin (0.05%), cytokine-like molecules (0.06%), and other proteins (0.63%). The majority of these components are thought to be responsible for coagulopathy after A. acutus bites. We have therefore generated a comprehensive catalog of the A. acutus venom gland described so far. Gene expression from the very specialized secretory tissue, especially for those involved in coagulopathy, can be surveyed and provide important information in finding novel toxins. PMID:16438937

  9. The hemostatic disturbance in patients with acute aortic dissection: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xinliang; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-09-01

    Coagulopathy is still a frequent complication in the surgical treatment of acute aortic dissection. However, the physiopathology of surgically induced coagulopathy has never been systematically and comprehensively studied in patients with acute aortic dissection. The aim of the present study was to describe the perioperative hemostatic system in patients with acute aortic dissection.The 87 patients who underwent aortic arch surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection from January 2013 to September 2015 were enrolled in this study. The perioperative biomarkers of hemostatic system were evaluated using standard laboratory tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) at 5 time points: anesthesia induction (T1), lowest nasopharyngeal temperature (T2), protamine reversal (T3), 4 hours after surgery (T4), and 24 hours after surgery (T5).The ELISAs biomarkers revealed activation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex [TAT] and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 [F1 + 2] were elevated), suppression of anticoagulation (antithrombin III [AT III] levels were depressed), and activation of fibrinolysis (plasminogen was decreased and plasmin-antiplasmin complex [PAP] was elevated). The standard laboratory tests also demonstrated that surgery resulted in a significant reduction in platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration.Systemic activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and inhibition of anticoagulation were observed during the perioperative period in patients with acute aortic dissection. Indeed, these patients exhibited consumption coagulopathy and procoagulant state perioperatively. Therefore, we believe that this remarkable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy has a high risk of bleeding and may influence postoperative outcome of patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:27603366

  10. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  11. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Traumatic Brain Injury National Data Center (TBINDC) at Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Center is the coordinating center for the research and dissemination efforts of the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program funded by the National Instit...

  12. Pathophysiology and Management of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children.

    PubMed

    Guilliams, Kristin; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Key pathophysiologic processes of traumatic brain injury are initiated by mechanical forces at the time of trauma, followed by complex excitotoxic cascades associated with compromised cerebral autoregulation and progressive edema. Acute care focuses on avoiding secondary insults, including hypoxia, hypotension, and hyperthermia. Children with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury often require intensive monitoring and treatment of multiple parameters, including intracranial pressure, blood pressure, metabolism, and seizures, to minimize secondary brain injury. Child neurologists can play an important role in acute and long-term care. Acutely, as members of a multidisciplinary team in the intensive care unit, child neurologists monitor for early signs of neurological change, guide neuroprotective therapies, and transition patients to long-term recovery. In the longer term, neurologists are uniquely positioned to treat complications of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, including epilepsy and cognitive and behavioral issues. PMID:25512361

  13. Vicarious traumatization: concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Pamela Diane

    2011-12-01

    There is growing knowledge of the effects of stress on professionals, including various negative symptoms that may mirror the biopsychosocial effects exhibited by the victims of trauma. Multiple concepts including burn out, compassion fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and secondary traumatic stress, are terms that have been incorrectly interchanged with the term vicarious traumatization (VT). Clarity of vicarious victimization and understanding contributing factors is imperative in order to facilitate future research and implement timely and effective interventions, as well as sculpt evidence based practice. This concept anaylsis, complete with a concept map, discusses VT; related terminology; symptomology; prevention and relevant interventions; and discusses opportunities for personal/professional growth for nurses and especially forensic nurses working with victims of violence. PMID:22123041

  14. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  15. Severe Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Schmicker, Robert H.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Bulger, Eileen; Tisherman, Samuel; Hoyt, David B.; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The public health implications of regional variation in incidence and outcome of severe traumatic injury remain to be analyzed. The objective of this study was to determine whether the incidence and outcome associated with severe traumatic injury differs across geographic regions of North America. Methods A prospective, observational study was conducted of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium of all patients in 9 North American sites (6 US and 3 Canadian) sustaining severe traumatic injury from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 followed to hospital discharge. Eligible patients were assessed by organized emergency medical services, and had field-based physiologic criteria including systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12, respiratory rate <10 or >29 per minute, advanced airway procedure, or traumatic death in the field. Census data were used to determine rates adjusted for age and sex. The main outcome measures were incidence rate, mortality rate, case fatality rate, and survival to discharge for patients sustaining severe traumatic injury assessed by EMS. Results The total catchment population of 20.5 million yielded 7080 cases of severe traumatic injury. Median age was 36 years and 67% were male. The median incidence of EMS-assessed severe traumatic injury per 100,000 population across sites was 37.4 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24.6 – 69.6); survival ranged from 39.8% to 80.8%, with a median of 64.5% (IQR = 55.5–78.4). About 942 cases were pronounced dead at the scene and 5857 patients were transported to hospital; 4477 (63.2%) were discharged alive. The median incidence of severe trauma due to a blunt mechanism, transported to hospital, was 25.8 (IQR = 13.1–44.3); survival ranged from 52.6% to 87.3%, with a median of 78.0% (IQR = 68.4–83.5). The median incidence of severe penetrating trauma, transported to hospital, was 2.6 (IQR = 1.5–10.4); survival ranged from 37.5% to 84.7%, with a median of 67.5% (IQR = 54.1

  16. Endovascular treatment of blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Georghios

    2009-06-01

    Blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury (BTTAI) is a lethal injury associated with a prehospital mortality of 80% to 90%. Patients arriving in the emergency room and considered appropriate to undergo emergency open surgical repair still have a mortality rate of 15% to 30% because of severe associated injuries. Conventional open surgical repair requires a left thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aortic-cross clamping and unclamping, with or without the adjunct use of partial or full cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic heparinization. All this leads to significant physiological stress and surgical trauma resulting in perioperative complications such as major blood loss, coagulopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, bowel infarction, and paraplegia. Despite advances in anesthesia, critical care medicine, and surgical techniques, a recent meta-analysis showed no definite improvement in operative mortality over the past decade, following open surgical repair in patients with BTTAI. Endovascular repair of BTTAI does not require a thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aorticcross clamping and unclamping, or systemic heparinization. As a result, endovascular repair of BTTAI has emerged as an effective, minimally invasive treatment alternative, especially in patients with severe concomitant injuries, which may be prohibitive to open surgical repair. Recent published studies have shown that endovascular repair of BTTAI is associated with lower morbidity, mortality, stroke, and paraplegia/paraparesis rates, when compared with open surgical repair of BTTAI. PMID:19617250

  17. Traumatic acute subdural hygroma mimicking acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kamezaki, Takao; Yanaka, Kiyoyuki; Fujita, Keishi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nagatomo, Yasushi; Nose, Tadao

    2004-04-01

    Subdural hygroma is a frequent delayed complication of head trauma. Most hygromas are clinically 'silent' and a few cases have shown slow deterioration in the chronic stage. We report a case of subdural hygroma showing unique radiological findings and rapid deterioration. A 74-years-old female presented with a mild headache and consciousness disturbance after head injury. Computed tomography showed a midline shift as a result of two components piling up in the subdural space; the outer components showed low density, the inner components high density. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that these two subdural components were subdural hygroma and subarachnoid hematoma. Simple burr hole irrigation, rather than large craniotomy, was thought to be more appropriate treatment to reduce the mass effect. Simple burr hole irrigation was performed to remove the subdural hygroma and the patient showed an excellent recovery. Careful examination of the radiological findings prevented an unnecessary procedure in this case. A possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. PMID:14975427

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A. (2008). Mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq. New England Journal of Medicine, 358, 453–463. ... and Spotlights U.S. hospitals miss followup for suspected child abuse Q&A with NICHD Acting Director Catherine ...

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a concussion may feel dazed and may lose vision or balance for a while after the injury A brain contusion is a bruise of the brain. This ... consciousness Headache Confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded Blurry vision ... or severe traumatic brain injury include all of the symptoms listed above ...

  20. Rehabilitation outcome after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Irdesel, J; Aydiner, S B; Akgoz, S

    2007-02-01

    Rehabilitation goals after traumatic brain injury are improving function, increasing the level of independence as high as possible, preventing complications and providing an acceptable environment to the patient. Several complications can be encountered during the rehabilitation period which lead to physical, cognitive and neurobehavioral impairments that cause major delay in functional improvement. This prospective study was designed in order to investigate the complications and their relations with functional recovery in patients that were included in the acute phase of a rehabilitation program. Thirty traumatic brain injured patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units of Uludag University School of Medicine were included in the study. Rehabilitation program consisted in appropriate positioning, range of motion exercises, postural drainage and respiratory exercises. Complications that were encountered during intensive care rehabilitation program were recorded. All patients were evaluated by Functional Independence Measure, Disability Rating Scale and Ranchos Los Amigos Levels of Cognitive Function Scale at admission and discharge. Improvement was observed in patients in terms of functional outcome and disability levels. Pneumonia, athelectasis, anemia and meningitis were the most frequent complications. Deterioration in functional outcome and disability levels was noted as the number of these complications increased. In conclusion, rehabilitation has an important role in the management of traumatic brain injured patients. Reduction of frequency of complications and improvement in functional outcome and disability levels can be achieved through rehabilitation programs. Long-term controlled studies with large number of patients are needed in order to obtain accurate data on factors associated with rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:17393041

  1. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. PMID:26048614

  2. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  3. Blood levels of histone-complexed DNA fragments are associated with coagulopathy, inflammation and endothelial damage early after trauma

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pär I; Windeløv, Nis A; Rasmussen, Lars S; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tissue injury increases blood levels of extracellular histones and nucleic acids, and these may influence hemostasis, promote inflammation and damage the endothelium. Trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) may result from an endogenous response to the injury that involves the neurohumoral, inflammatory and hemostatic systems. Aims: To study the contribution of extracellular nucleic constituents to TIC, inflammation and endothelial damage. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study. Materials and Methods: We investigated histone-complexed DNA fragments (hcDNA) along with biomarkers of coagulopathy, inflammation and endothelial damage in plasma from 80 trauma patients admitted directly to the Trauma Centre from the scene of the accident. Blood was sampled a median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post injury. Trauma patients with hcDNA levels >median or ≤median were compared. Results: Trauma patients with high plasma hcDNA had higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) and level of sympathoadrenal activation (higher adrenaline and noradrenaline) and a higher proportion of prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and higher D-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), Annexin V and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) concurrent with lower plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1) and prothrombin fragment (PF) 1 + 2 (all P < 0.05), all indicative of impaired thrombin generation, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet activation. Furthermore, patients with high hcDNA had enhanced inflammation and endothelial damage evidenced by higher plasma levels of terminal complement complex (sC5b-9), IL-6, syndecan-1, thrombomodulin and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (all P < 0.05). Conclusions: Excessive release of extracellular histones and nucleic acids seems to contribute to the hypocoagulability, inflammation and endothelial damage observed early after trauma. PMID:23960372

  4. Venom Concentrations and Clotting Factor Levels in a Prospective Cohort of Russell’s Viper Bites with Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Maduwage, Kalana; Scorgie, Fiona E.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; O’Leary, Margaret A.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.; Lincz, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Russell’s viper envenoming is a major problem in South Asia and causes venom induced consumption coagulopathy. This study aimed to investigate the kinetics and dynamics of venom and clotting function in Russell’s viper envenoming. Methodology/Principal Findings In a prospective cohort of 146 patients with Russell’s viper envenoming, we measured venom concentrations, international normalised ratio [INR], prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, IX and X, and von Willebrand factor antigen. The median age was 39y (16–82y) and 111 were male. The median peak INR was 6.8 (interquartile range[IQR]:3.7 to >13), associated with low fibrinogen [median,<0.01g/L;IQR:<0.01–0.9g/L), low factor V levels [median,<5%;IQR:<5–4%], low factor VIII levels [median,40%;IQR:12–79%] and low factor X levels [median,48%;IQR:29–67%]. There were smaller reductions in factors II, IX and VII over time. All factors recovered over 48h post-antivenom. The median INR remained >3 at 6h post-antivenom but had reduced to <2, by 24h. The aPTT had also returned to close to normal (<50sec) at 24h. Factor VII, VIII and IX levels were unusually high pre-antivenom, median peak concentrations of 393%, 307% and 468% respectively. Pre-antivenom venom concentrations and the INR (r = 0.20, p = 0.02) and aPTT (r = 0.19, p = 0.03) were correlated (non-parametric Spearman analysis). Conclusions Russell’s viper coagulopathy results in prolonged aPTT, INR, low fibrinogen, factors V, VIII and X which recover over 48h. Severity of clotting abnormalities was associated with venom concentrations. PMID:26296235

  5. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsauo Jiaywei Li Xiao Li Hongcui Wei Bo Luo Xuefeng Zhang Chunle Tang Chengwei; Wang Weiping

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  6. Clinical Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Sandsmark, Danielle K

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability that often affects young people. After injury, the degree of recovery can be highly variable, with some people regaining near complete function while others remain severely disabled. Understanding what factors influence recovery is important for counseling patients and families in the acute period after injury and can help guide therapeutic decisions in the acute period following injury. In this review, prognostic algorithms useful for clinicians are discussed. Tools for grading patient outcomes, their role in clinical care and research studies, and their limitations are reviewed. Ongoing work focusing on the development of biomarkers to track TBI recovery and the refinement of clinical outcome metrics is summarized. PMID:27072952

  7. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  8. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C.; Sakorafas, Lois U.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are rare and challenging to diagnose. Following trauma, diagnosis may occur immediately or in a delayed fashion. It is believed that left traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are more common as a result of the protective right-sided anatomic lie of the liver. If unrecognized, traumatic diaphragmatic injuries are subject to enlarge over time as a result of the normal pressure changes observed between the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Additionally, abrupt changes to the pressure gradients, such as those which occur with positive pressure ventilation or surgical manipulation of the abdominal wall, can act as a nidus for making an asymptomatic hernia symptomatic. We report our experience with a delayed traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large bowel incarceration two months after abdominoplasty. In our review of the literature, we were unable to find any reports of delayed presentation of a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia occurring acutely following abdominoplasty. PMID:24900935

  9. Post traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J; Kyrios, M; Bennett, P

    1996-10-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after a person has been exposed to a traumatic event involving actual or threatened death, and has responded with intense fear or helplessness. The event is then persistently re-experienced. The person avoids stimuli associated with the trauma and experiences a numbing of general responsiveness. Symptoms of increased arousal can occur as well as depression and anxiety. PTSD causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The general practitioner is uniquely placed to identify PTSD and can have a key role in treatment. Cognitive behavioural treatment is a central therapeutic approach and can be carried out in general practice. The issues are to counteract the physiological components, expose the patient to the feared situation and help the patient to relearn that the stimuli are not necessarily associated with danger or threat. Repeated brief consultations over time can facilitate this process. PMID:8936738

  10. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages. PMID:24160423

  11. [Effects of traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Herbst, Gesa; Jaeger, Ulrich; Leichsenring, Falk; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis PTSD does not adequately describe the impact of exposure to childhood trauma of the developing child. The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of different interpersonal trauma types and to describe the long-term effects of maltreatment and neglect in a clinical sample of 34 adolescents. The majority (62%) of the sample was exposed to two different types of trauma during childhood. Emotional abuse and emotional neglect have been the most common trauma types (59%; 53%). 71% of the traumatized adolescents did not meet the criteria for PTSD. The most common diagnosis in the sample was Borderline Personality Disorder. All average scores at SCL-90-Symptom-Scale were clinical significant. Half of the sample reported suicide attempts and self destructive behavior. One third reported substance abuse and aggressive behavior against others respectively. None of the traumatized adolescents had a positive Self-concept. Altogether the results show that abused children and adolescents have a range of psychological sequelae that are not captured in the PTSD diagnostic criteria. Therefore the results support the necessity for a new and more precise diagnosis for chronically traumatized children and adolescents. PMID:19961125

  12. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  13. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  14. Plasmapheresis in Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy: An Effective Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed Majidi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is an idiopathic disorder with an unknown cause occurring in late pregnancy. The treatment in these patients is often immediate termination of pregnancy, and plasmapheresis provides an effective treatment option. In this paper, we introduce three pregnant women treated with plasmapheresis. The first case was a 22-year-old primigravida woman treated with 22 sessions of plasmapheresis due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and ventilator-dependent respiratory failure. The second case was a 23-year-old woman in her second pregnancy treated with 4 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, hepatic and renal failure, coagulopathy, and hypoglycemia. The third patient was a 23-year-old primigravida woman treated with 3 plasmapheresis sessions due to AFLP, renal failure, and coagulopathy. Plasmapheresis can be a life-saving treatment in patients with AFLP and is strongly recommended for patients with severity of their disease accompanied by other organ disorders. In addition, shortening the time interval between the termination of pregnancy and initializing plasmapheresis improves the outcome and reduces the duration of hospital stay and sessions of plasmapheresis. PMID:23424692

  15. Late Onset Traumatic Diaphragmatic Herniation Leading to Intestinal Obstruction and Pancreatitis: Two Separate Cases

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic injuries caused by blunt or penetrating trauma are rare entities, they are the most commonly misdiagnosed injuries in trauma patients and occur in approximately 3–7% of all abdominal or thoracic traumas. Acute pancreatitis secondary to late presenting diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. Here we present two separate cases: one with acute bowel obstruction and the other with acute pancreatitis secondary to late onset traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (three and twenty-eight years after chest trauma, resp.). PMID:26380126

  16. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  17. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  18. Traumatic fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Khuwaitir, Tarig S; Al-Moghairi, Abdurahman M; Sherbeeni, Suphia M; Subh, Hamed M

    2002-12-01

    Traumatic fat embolism syndrome occurs most often following fractures of long bones sustained in road traffic accidents and is a common cause of medical consultation from the orthopedic surgery department. The sub-clinical presentation is subtle and expresses itself by the presence of hypoxemia, while the full clinical syndrome compromises respiratory insufficiency, an altered consciousness and a characteristic petechial rash. Recognition is simple once the patient is viewed in the context of his or her clinical setting. Diagnosis is aided further by the presence of hematological and biochemical abnormalities including anemia, thrombocytopenia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fat macroglobulinemia. Imaging by chest radiograph, computed tomography or magnetic resonance of the brain is used to confirm the extent of the respective organ involvement and to exclude alternative pathologies. The release of free fatty acids into the circulation and their subsequent effects is the key pathological event. Treatment is based on supportive care and high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We report a patient with traumatic fat embolism syndrome who developed the syndromes classical symptoms and signs following fracture of the long bones of his left lower leg. Admission to an intensive care unit, mechanical ventilatory support with positive end-expiratory pressure and corticosteroid therapy lead to his improvement and allowed eventual open reduction and internal fixation and discharge of our patient. Modern therapy offers a relatively good prognosis for patients with traumatic fat embolism syndrome; the optimal dose and timing of corticosteroid therapy in prophylaxis and treatment however, remain the subject of intense debate. PMID:12518208

  19. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care. PMID:23566590

  20. [Traumatic disease and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, I I; Nasonkin, O S; Nemchenko, N S; Gol'm, N P; Zimina, Z P

    1984-06-01

    The authors have established that the traumatic disease is accompanied by phasic nonspecific changes of metabolism correlating with the trauma severity as well as with its specific features and outcomes. Within the first 3-7 days catabolic processes are found to prevail and metabolic acidosis develop. Later, anabolic processes become activated in the non-complicated course of the disease. Normalization of most biochemical processes is accomplished within 15-21 days. More pronounced and prolonged disturbances of metabolism are observed in complications and lethal outcomes. PMID:6474706

  1. Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Are Associated with Coagulopathy Causing Ischemic Stroke via Tissue Factor-Independent Way: The OASIS-CANCER Study

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Jong-Won; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer and stroke, which are known to be associated with one another, are the most common causes of death in the elderly. However, the pathomechanisms that lead to stroke in cancer patients are not well known. Circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in cancer-associated thrombosis and tumor progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that cancer cell-derived EVs cause cancer-related coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke. Methods Serum levels of D-dimer and EVs expressing markers for cancer cells (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [CD326]), tissue factor (TF [CD142]), endothelial cells (CD31+CD42b-), and platelets (CD62P) were measured using flow cytometry in (a) 155 patients with ischemic stroke and active cancer (116 − cancer-related, 39 − conventional stroke mechanisms), (b) 25 patients with ischemic stroke without cancer, (c) 32 cancer patients without stroke, and (d) 101 healthy subjects. Results The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs correlated with the levels of D-dimer and TF+ EVs. The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs (CD326+ and CD326+CD142+) were higher in cancer-related stroke than in other groups (P<0.05 in all the cases). Path analysis showed that cancer cell-derived EVs are related to stroke via coagulopathy as measured by D-dimer levels. Poor correlation was observed between TF+ EV and D-dimer, and path analysis demonstrated that cancer cell-derived EVs may cause cancer-related coagulopathy independent of the levels of TF+ EVs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cancer cell-derived EVs mediate coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke via TF-independent mechanisms. PMID:27427978

  2. [Update on Current Care Guidelines: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder].

    PubMed

    Ponteva, Matti; Henriksson, Markus; Isoaho, Raimo; Laukkala, Tanja; Punamäki, Leena; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    The updated Current Care Guidelines for ASD and PTSD recommend psychosocial support and careful monitoring for acute stress reaction (ASR) and acute stress disorder (ASD). If symptoms require, short focused cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy can be used for ASD. Medication is rarely necessary. Trauma-focused psychotherapeutic interventions are the first-line treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Antidepressant medication is an effective second-line treatment. Psychotherapeutic interventions and medication should often be combined. Specific groups, such as children, the elderly, and military and peacekeeping personnel need tailored interventions. PMID:26237898

  3. Acute Hepatic Failure in a Dog after Xylitol Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Renee D; Hovda, Lynn R

    2016-06-01

    Xylitol is a five-carbon sugar alcohol produced from natural resources frequently used as a sugar substitute for humans. We report the development and successful treatment of acute hepatic failure and coagulopathy in a dog after xylitol ingestion. A 9-year-old 4.95 kg (10.9 lb) neutered male Chihuahua was evaluated at a veterinary clinic for vomiting after ingesting 224 g (45 g/kg, 20.5 g/lb) of granulated xylitol. Hypoglycemia developed within 1-2 h, elevated liver values, suggesting the development of acute hepatic failure, within 12 h and coagulopathy less than 24 h after ingestion. Treatment included maropitant, intravenous dextrose, phytonadione, metronidazole, and fresh frozen plasma. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and S-adensoyl-L-methionine (SAMe) provided hepatic detoxification and support. The dog survived and liver values returned to normal within 1 month post ingestion. No adverse effects to hepatic function have been identified 2 years after acute xylitol toxicity. This paper is one of the few reports of successful management of a dog with hypoglycemia, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy caused by xylitol toxicity. To date, this is the highest published xylitol dose survived by a dog, as well as the only reported case that documents laboratory changes throughout the course of toxicity and includes normal hepatic indices for 7 months following xylitol toxicity. The rapidly expanding use of xylitol in a variety of products intended for human consumption has led to a rise in xylitol toxicity cases reported in dogs, and clinicians should be aware that more dogs may potentially be exposed and develop similar manifestations. PMID:26691320

  4. Traumatic aortic aneurysm diagnosed by computed tomography angiography in a 22-year-old man presenting with progressive dyspnea and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Liu, Ai-Hong; Wang, Yan-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially fatal complication that can occur secondary to acute chest trauma. However, early diagnosis of this complication is often neglected due to the presence of severe chest and abdominal trauma. We report a case of delayed traumatic aortic aneurysm that was diagnosed by computed tomography angiography on day 13 after a traffic accident. PMID:27209281

  5. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  6. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy – A Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  7. Adenosine Neuromodulation and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lusardi, T.A

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, with widespread activity across all organ systems. There is evidence that adenosine regulation is a significant factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) onset, recovery, and outcome, and a growing body of experimental work examining the therapeutic potential of adenosine neuromodulation in the treatment of TBI. In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine (dys)regulation has been demonstrated following TBI, and correlated to several TBI pathologies, including impaired cerebral hemodynamics, anaerobic metabolism, and inflammation. In addition to acute pathologies, adenosine function has been implicated in TBI comorbidities, such as cognitive deficits, psychiatric function, and post-traumatic epilepsy. This review presents studies in TBI as well as adenosine-related mechanisms in co-morbidities of and unfavorable outcomes resulting from TBI. While the exact role of the adenosine system following TBI remains unclear, there is increasing evidence that a thorough understanding of adenosine signaling will be critical to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of TBI. PMID:20190964

  8. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  9. Inflammatory neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Russo, Matthew V; McGavern, Dorian B

    2016-08-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits an inflammatory response in the central nervous system (CNS) that involves both resident and peripheral immune cells. Neuroinflammation can persist for years following a single TBI and may contribute to neurodegeneration. However, administration of anti-inflammatory drugs shortly after injury was not effective in the treatment of TBI patients. Some components of the neuroinflammatory response seem to play a beneficial role in the acute phase of TBI. Indeed, following CNS injury, early inflammation can set the stage for proper tissue regeneration and recovery, which can, perhaps, explain why general immunosuppression in TBI patients is disadvantageous. Here, we discuss some positive attributes of neuroinflammation and propose that inflammation be therapeutically guided in TBI patients rather than globally suppressed. PMID:27540166

  10. Neurobiological consequences of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide public health problem typically caused by contact and inertial forces acting on the brain. Recent attention has also focused on the mechanisms of injury associated with exposure to blast events or explosions. Advances in the understanding of the neuropathophysiology of TBI suggest that these forces initiate an elaborate and complex array of cellular and subcellular events related to alterations in Ca++ homeostasis and signaling. Furthermore, there is a fairly predictable profile of brain regions that are impacted by neurotrauma and the related events. This profile of brain damage accurately predicts the acute and chronic sequelae that TBI survivors suffer from, although there is enough variation to suggest that individual differences such as genetic polymorphisms and factors governing resiliency play a role in modulating outcome. This paper reviews our current understanding of the neuropathophysiology of TBI and how this relates to the common clinical presentation of neurobehavioral difficulties seen after an injury. PMID:22033563

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Models in Animals.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death in young adults in industrialized nations and in the developing world the WHO considers TBI a silent epidemic caused by an increasing number of traffic accidents. Despite the major improvement of TBI outcome in the acute setting in the past 20 years, the assessment, therapeutic interventions, and prevention of long-term complications remain a challenge. In order to get a deeper insight into the pathology of TBI and advancement of medical understanding and clinical progress experimental animal models are an essential requirement. This chapter provides an overview of most commonly used experimental animal TBI models and the pathobiological findings based on current data. In addition, limitations and advantages of each TBI model are mentioned. This will hopefully give an insight into the possibilities of each model and be of value in choosing one when designing a study. PMID:27604712

  12. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Tsinoglou, Konstantinos; Tsandiridis, Christos; Papastergiou, Christos; Bintoudi, Antonia

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst constitutes an uncommon, though well recognized, manifestation of closed chest trauma. It is usually encountered in young patients, whose compliant chest wall permits the transmission of great compressive forces to the lung parenchyma and the laceration of the latter. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is usually detected during the imaging evaluation of multi-injured patients with the use of computed tomography, as it is often not apparent in the initial supine anteroposterior chest radiographs. We present 5 cases of trauma patients, in whom we detected the presence of multiple traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts during the imaging evaluation of blunt chest trauma with the use of computed tomography. PMID:17721334

  13. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. For Consumers General Information Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ( NIMH ) Anxiety Information Stress Information Depression Information St. John's Wort Information See more Research ...

  14. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder . It can occur after you have gone through an extreme ... Normally, after the event, the body recovers. The stress hormones and chemicals the body releases due to ...

  16. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... some people, but not in others. Your genes, emotions, and family setting may all play roles. Past emotional trauma may increase your risk of PTSD after a recent traumatic event. With PTSD, the body's response to ...

  17. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such ... at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people ...

  18. Traumatic hand amputation while wakeboarding

    PubMed Central

    Woodacre, Timothy; Marshall, Morwena

    2011-01-01

    Wakeboarding is a sport increasing in popularity in the UK and the rest of the world. It is known to be associated with a high incidence of relatively minor injuries to the participating sportsperson. The authors present the case of a traumatic hand amputation to an associated third party and highlight the potential for serious injuries to all those directly involved with the sport. The authors demonstrate the successful application of military principles to a traumatic amputation in a civilian setting. PMID:22693318

  19. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  20. Detection of Venom after Antivenom Is Not Associated with Persistent Coagulopathy in a Prospective Cohort of Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenomings

    PubMed Central

    Maduwage, Kalana; O'Leary, Margaret A.; Scorgie, Fiona E.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harindra; Lincz, Lisa F.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Venom recurrence or persistence in the circulation after antivenom treatment has been documented many times in viper envenoming. However, it has not been associated with clinical recurrence for many snakes, including Russell's viper (Daboia spp.). We compare the recovery of coagulopathy to the recurrence or persistence of venom in patients with Russell's viper envenoming. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included patients with Russell's viper (D. russelii) envenoming presenting over a 30 month period who had Russell's viper venom detected by enzyme immunoassay. Demographics, information on the snake bite, and clinical effects were collected for all patients. All patients had serum collected for venom specific enzyme immunoassay and citrate plasma to measure fibrinogen levels and prothrombin time (international normalised ratio; INR). Patients with venom recurrence/persistence were compared to those with no detectable recurrence of venom. There were 55 patients with confirmed Russell's viper envenoming and coagulopathy with low fibrinogen concentrations: 31 with venom recurrence/persistence, and 24 with no venom detected post-antivenom. Fibrinogen concentrations increased and INR decreased after antivenom in both the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, antivenom dose and length of hospital were similar for both groups. Pre-antivenom venom concentrations were higher in patients with venom recurrence/persistence with a median venom concentration of 385 ng/mL (16–1521 ng/mL) compared to 128 ng/mL (14–1492 ng/mL; p = 0.008). Conclusion Recurrence of Russell's viper venom was not associated with a recurrence of coagulopathy and length of hospital stay. Further work is required to determine if the detection of venom recurrence is due to the venom specific enzyme immunoassay detecting both venom-antivenom complexes as well as free venom. PMID:25521820

  1. Neuroimaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Current and Future Predictors of Functional Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskauer, Stacy J.; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Although neuroimaging has long played a role in the acute management of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), until recently, its use as a tool for understanding and predicting long-term brain-behavior relationships after TBI has been limited by the relatively poor sensitivity of routine clinical imaging for detecting diffuse axonal injury…

  2. Students with Traumatic Brain Injury: Making the Transition from Hospital to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mira, Mary P.; Tyler, Janet Siantz

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses a case study of a 16-year-old girl with traumatic brain injury (TBI) to present information on the demographics of head injury, neuropathology, recovery patterns, acute rehabilitation, educationally significant effects, behavioral sequelae, the school as a vehicle for rehabilitation, a transition model, school reentry, and…

  3. Post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle, pubis and ischium in 7 patients.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui-min; Chen, Jie; Ji, Ying-yao; Yang, Di-sheng

    2004-08-01

    Post-traumatic osteolysis (PTOL) is a very rare disease occurring after acute trauma or repetitive micro-trauma, which is characterized by persistent pain in the injured site. In this study, we reported 7 patients, in whom osteolysis developed in the distal clavicle, pubis and ischium. PMID:15294106

  4. Traumatic brain injury: a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajaneesh; Sen, Nilkantha

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), a major global health and socioeconomic problem, is now established as a chronic disease process with a broad spectrum of pathophysiological symptoms followed by long-term disabilities. It triggers multiple and multidirectional biochemical events that lead to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Recent studies have presented strong evidence that patients with TBI history have a tendency to develop proteinopathy, which is the pathophysiological feature of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This review mainly focuses on mechanisms related to AD, CTE, and ALS that are induced after TBI and their relevance to the advancement of these neurodegenerative diseases. This review encompasses acute effects and chronic neurodegenerative consequences after TBI for a better understanding of TBI-induced neuronal death and to design therapies that will effectively treat patients in the primary or secondary progressive stages. PMID:26352199

  5. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM): two cases of SPAM following surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Kamran; Kandwal, Pankaj; Gupta, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    To report two cases of traumatic paraplegia who developed Sub-acute Post-Traumatic Ascending Myelopathy (SPAM) following surgical decompression.We hereby report two cases (both 35yr old male) with traumatic paraplegia that developed ascending weakness at 3rd and 5th Post-Op day respectively following surgical decompression. Both the patients experienced remarkable improvement in Neurology after treatment with steroids. The authors conclude by emphasizing on minimum cord handling during surgical decompression of the spinal cord to avoid this potentially life threatening complication. PMID:24823733

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research. PMID:23314081

  7. Traumatic unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Doe, Joseph W; Jay, Walter M

    2006-01-01

    A 23-year-old man was admitted for a closed head injury following a fall from a height of 5 meters from a ladder. Because of a C-7 burst fracture, a halo and halo vest were applied approximately 9 hours following the fall. Approximately 21 hours after the accident, the patient complained of diplopia. On neuro-ophthalmology evaluation, a unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia was noted. MRI of the brain, performed 3 days after application of the halo and vest, showed a small infarct at the posterior aspect of the inferior midbrain, slightly left of midline. At 9.5 weeks there was 90% improvement of the internuclear ophthalmoplegia noted. Of the reported cases in the medical literature of traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, 30 (83.33%) cases were male and 6 (16.67%) were female. The mean age was 31.7. 54% of the cases were bilateral; 46% unilateral. Mechanisms include: motor vehicle accident: 28 (41.79%), fall: 7 (10.45%), blunt trauma: 11 (16.42%), penetrating trauma 1: (1.49%), bike accident 3: (4.48%), other: 1 (1.49%), Unknown: 16 (23.88%). PMID:17182412

  8. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury. PMID:26176500

  9. White Matter Abnormalities in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Following a Specific Traumatic Event.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Lei, Du; Li, Lingjiang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Suo, Xueling; Xiao, Fenglai; Kuang, Weihong; Li, Jin; Bi, Feng; Lui, Su; Kemp, Graham J; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-02-01

    Studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are complicated by wide variability in the intensity and duration of prior stressors in patient participants, secondary effects of chronic psychiatric illness, and a variable history of treatment with psychiatric medications. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, patient samples have often been small, and they were not often compared to similarly stressed patients without PTSD in order to control for general stress effects. Findings from these studies have been inconsistent. The present study investigated whole-brain microstructural alterations of white matter in a large drug-naive population who survived a specific, severe traumatic event (a major 8.0-magnitude earthquake). Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we explored group differences between 88 PTSD patients and 91 matched traumatized non-PTSD controls in fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as its component elements axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD), and examined these findings in relation to findings from deterministic DTI tractography. Relations between white matter alterations and psychiatric symptom severity were examined. PTSD patients, relative to similarly stressed controls, showed an FA increase as well as AD and RD changes in the white matter beneath left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and forceps major. The observation of increased FA in the PTSD group suggests that the pathophysiology of PTSD after a specific acute traumatic event is distinct from what has been reported in patients with several years duration of illness. Alterations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be an important aspect of illness pathophysiology, possibly via the region's established role in fear extinction circuitry. Use-dependent myelination or other secondary compensatory changes in response to heightened demands for threat appraisal and emotion regulation may be involved. PMID:26981581

  10. White Matter Abnormalities in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Following a Specific Traumatic Event

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Lei, Du; Li, Lingjiang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Suo, Xueling; Xiao, Fenglai; Kuang, Weihong; Li, Jin; Bi, Feng; Lui, Su; Kemp, Graham J.; Sweeney, John A.; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are complicated by wide variability in the intensity and duration of prior stressors in patient participants, secondary effects of chronic psychiatric illness, and a variable history of treatment with psychiatric medications. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, patient samples have often been small, and they were not often compared to similarly stressed patients without PTSD in order to control for general stress effects. Findings from these studies have been inconsistent. The present study investigated whole-brain microstructural alterations of white matter in a large drug-naive population who survived a specific, severe traumatic event (a major 8.0-magnitude earthquake). Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we explored group differences between 88 PTSD patients and 91 matched traumatized non-PTSD controls in fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as its component elements axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD), and examined these findings in relation to findings from deterministic DTI tractography. Relations between white matter alterations and psychiatric symptom severity were examined. PTSD patients, relative to similarly stressed controls, showed an FA increase as well as AD and RD changes in the white matter beneath left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and forceps major. The observation of increased FA in the PTSD group suggests that the pathophysiology of PTSD after a specific acute traumatic event is distinct from what has been reported in patients with several years duration of illness. Alterations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be an important aspect of illness pathophysiology, possibly via the region's established role in fear extinction circuitry. Use-dependent myelination or other secondary compensatory changes in response to heightened demands for threat appraisal and emotion regulation may be involved. PMID:26981581

  11. Recombinant Factor VIIa Reduces Bleeding after Blunt Liver Injury in a Pig Model of Dilutional Coagulopathy under Severe Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Spronk, Henri M. H.; Braunschweig, Till; Rossaint, Rolf; Wüst, Dirk C.; van Oerle, Rene; Lauritzen, Brian; Tolba, Rene; Grottke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is registered for use in haemophilia with inhibitors and other rare bleeding disorders, but has also been used in various other clinical conditions to terminate life-threatening bleeding. Underlying conditions (e.g. coagulopathy) and dosing may affect treatment efficacy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of increasing doses of rFVIIa on blood loss and coagulation assays in haemodiluted and hypothermic pigs undergoing blunt liver injury. Methods A grade III blunt liver injury was induced in 28 pigs after 70% haemodilution and cooling to 32.6–33.4°C. Ten minutes after trauma, animals randomly received placebo or 90, 180 or 360 μg/kg rFVIIa. Global coagulation parameters, thromboelastometry (TEM) and plasma thrombin generation (TG) were determined at different time points during the observation period of 120 minutes. Results Total blood loss was significantly lower following 90 μg/kg rFVIIa (1206 [1138–1470] mL) relative to placebo (2677 [2337–3068] mL; p<0.05), with no increased effect with higher dose levels of rFVIIa. Following trauma and haemodilution, coagulation was impaired relative to baseline in both TEM and TG analysis. At 60 and 120 minutes after trauma, TEM variables improved in the rFVIIa-treated animals compared with the placebo group. Similarly, rFVIIa improved coagulation kinetics in TG. As was observed with blood loss, no significant effect between different rFVIIa dose levels was found in TEM or TG. Macro- and microscopic post-mortem examination did not reveal any signs of thromboembolic events. Conclusion Early administration of 90 μg/kg rFVIIa reduced blood loss in pigs undergoing blunt liver injury even after severe haemodilution and hypothermia, with no further effect of higher dose levels. Coagulation assays showed impaired coagulation in coagulopathic animals, with a dose-independent improvement in animals treated with rFVIIa. PMID:26098426

  12. Pretrauma Center Red Blood Cell Transfusion Is Associated With Reduced Mortality and Coagulopathy in Severely Injured Patients With Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Minei, Joseph P.; Maier, Ronald V.; West, Michaela A.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Moore, Ernest E.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason L.; Inflammation, The

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of pretrauma center (PTC) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion with outcomes in severely injured patients. Background Hemorrhage remains a major driver of mortality. Little evidence exists supporting PTC interventions to mitigate this. Methods Blunt injured patients in shock arriving at a trauma center within 2 hours of injury were included from the Glue Grant database. Subjects were dichotomized by PTC RBC transfusion. Outcomes included 24-hour mortality, 30-day mortality, and trauma-induced coagulopathy [(TIC), admission international normalized ratio >1.5]. Cox regression and logistic regression determined the association of PTC RBC transfusion with outcomes. To address baseline differences, propensity score matching was used. Results Of 1415 subjects, 50 received PTC RBC transfusion. Demographics and injury severity score were similar. The PTC RBC group received 1.3 units of RBCs (median), and 52% were scene transports. PTC RBC transfusion was associated with a 95% reduction in odds of 24-hour mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 0.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01–0.48; P < 0.01], 64% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality [hazard ratio = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15–0.83; P = 0.02], and 88% reduction in odds of TIC (OR = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02–0.79; P = 0.03). The matched cohort included 113 subjects (31% PTC RBC group). Baseline characteristics were similar. PTC RBC transfusion was associated with a 98% reduction in odds of 24-hour mortality (OR = 0.02; 95% CI, 0.01–0.69; P = 0.04), 88% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03–0.61; P = 0.01), and 99% reduction in odds of TIC (OR = 0.01; 95% CI, 0.01–0.95; P = 0.05). Conclusions PTC RBC administration was associated with a lower risk of 24-hour mortality, 30-day mortality, and TIC in severely injured patients with blunt trauma, warranting further prospective study. PMID:24670858

  13. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  14. Acute Stress Symptoms in Young Children with Burns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Frederick J.; Saxe, Glenn; Ronfeldt, Heidi; Drake, Jennifer E.; Burns, Jennifer; Edgren, Christy; Sheridan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms are a focus of much research with older children, but little research has been conducted with young children, who account for about 50% of all pediatric burn injuries. This is a 3-year study of 12- to 48-month-old acutely burned children to assess acute traumatic stress outcomes. The aims were to…

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions Share Tweet Linkedin ... top What to Do if You Suspect Traumatic Brain Injury Anyone with signs of moderate or severe ...

  16. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with post-traumatic stress need early treatment with methods that are used to treat other trauma victims. ... symptoms of post-traumatic stress. The crisis intervention method aims to relieve distress and help the patient ...

  17. Interventional Treatment for Post-traumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (migraine) is the most common symptom of concussion and traumatic brain injury. An expert opinion-based review along with a literature review (PubMed) was conducted looking at known interventional procedures for post-traumatic headache using the keywords post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic migraine headache, concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury and the following categories: mechanism, pathophysiology, treatment, physical therapy, neurostimulation, Botox@/Onabotulinum toxin, and surgical intervention. The results returned a total of 181 articles of which 52 were selected. None of the articles included randomized placebo-controlled studies, and most were either prospective or retrospective case analysis and/or review articles or consensus opinion papers, with most studies yielding positive results. Despite a lack of hard evidence, interventional procedures, alone or in combination, appear to be an effective treatment for post-traumatic headaches. PMID:27130542

  18. Traumatic corneal endothelial rings from homemade explosives.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soo Khai; Rudkin, Adam K; Galanopoulos, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic corneal endothelial rings are remarkably rare ocular findings that may result from blast injury. We present a unique case of bilateral traumatic corneal endothelial rings secondary to blast injury from homemade explosives. PMID:23474743

  19. Prognostic factors of early outcome and discharge status in patients undergoing surgical intervention following traumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tatsuhiro; Moriel, Gabriela; Kramer, Daniel R; Attenello, Frank; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Over the past several decades, the rate of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency room visits in the United States has steadily increased, yet mortality in these patients has decreased. This improvement in outcome is largely due to advances in prehospital care, intensive care unit management, and the effectiveness of neurosurgical procedures, such as decompressive craniectomies. It is imperative to identify clinical factors predictive of patients who benefit from early mobilization of resources and operative treatment. Equally important is the identification of patients with good prognostic signs among patients receiving surgical intervention for TBI. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 181 patients requiring craniectomies and craniotomies for decompression or evacuation of an intracranial hemorrhage following TBI at a single level I trauma center between 2008-2010. Demographic features and perioperative clinical characteristics of these patients were examined in relation to favorable outcomes, defined as discharge to home or a rehabilitation facility, and unfavorable outcomes, defined as in-hospital mortality or discharge to step-down medical facilities. Younger age, greater Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, absence of preoperative coagulopathies, absence of hypernatremia, and absence of fever were all independent predictors of favorable outcome. Additionally, increased operative duration and increased length of hospital stay were identified as independent predictors of negative outcomes after surgery. This work supports some of the current prognostic models in the literature and identifies additional clinical variables with predictive value of early outcome and discharge status in patients undergoing surgical evacuation of traumatic intracranial hemorrhages. PMID:27424129

  20. Memory for Traumatic Experiences in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Ingrid M.; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Sayfan, Liat; Melinder, Annika; Goodman, Gail S.

    2004-01-01

    Traumatic experiences in early childhood raise important questions about memory development in general and about the durability and accessibility of memories for traumatic events in particular. We discuss memory for early childhood traumatic events, from a developmental perspective, focusing on those factors that may equally influence memories for…

  1. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  2. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  3. Early Traumatic Stress Responses in Parents Following a Serious Illness in Their Child: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Claudia; Muscara, Frank; Anderson, Vicki A; McCarthy, Maria C

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of the literature investigating the early traumatic stress responses in parents of children diagnosed with a serious illness/injury. A literature review was conducted (September 2013) using Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Twenty-four studies related to parents of children hospitalized due to diagnosis of cancer, type 1 diabetes, meningococcal disease, trauma or serious injury, preterm birth and other serious illnesses requiring admission to intensive care were included. Parents were assessed for early traumatic stress symptoms within 3 months of their child's diagnosis/hospitalization. Prevalence rates of acute stress disorder in parents ranged from 12 to 63%. Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 8 to 68%. Variability was related to methodological factors including differences in study design, timing of assessments, measurement tools, and scoring protocols. Psychosocial factors rather than medical factors predicted parent distress. This review integrates and compares early traumatic reactions in parents with children suffering a range of serious illnesses. Findings suggest a high prevalence of acute and posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents. Methodological inconsistencies made comparison of early traumatic stress prevalence rates difficult. Risk factors associated with traumatic stress symptoms were identified. PMID:26296614

  4. Traumatic asphyxia: An autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Nursel; Eren, Bülent; Erkol, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic asphyxia is a form of asphyxia where respiration is prevented by external pressure on the body. A 19-year-old man was found by relatives compressed by motorboat in the garage. The death was investigated by the prosecutor; body was taken to the Morgue Department for performing autopsy. On gross physical examination; the face, neck and upper part of the chest were congested and many petechiae were observed on the conjunctivae, but not in low extremities. Autopsy macroscopic examination of lungs revealed congestion, sub pleural superficial bleeding areas. In the presented case death was reported as traumatic asphyxia by thorax compression without other lethal factors. PMID:26585308

  5. Post-Traumatic Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Edward J.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Visual loss following head trauma is common, and the diagnosis can be challenging for the neurologist called to perform an emergency room assessment. The approach to the patient with post-traumatic visual loss is complicated by a wide range of potential ocular and brain injuries with varying pathophysiology. In addition to direct injuries of the eye and orbit, traumatic optic neuropathies, carotid cavernous fistulas, and damage to the intracranial visual pathways are classic causes of visual loss after head trauma. This review provides an update on the diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:18660739

  6. Considerations for animal models of blast-related traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The association of military blast exposure and brain injury was first appreciated in World War I as commotio cerebri, and later as shell shock. Similar injuries sustained in modern military conflicts are now classified as mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent research has yielded new insights into the mechanisms by which blast exposure leads to acute brain injury and chronic sequelae, including postconcussive syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, post-traumatic headache, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a tau protein neurodegenerative disease. Impediments to delivery of effective medical care for individuals affected by blast-related TBI include: poor insight into the heterogeneity of neurological insults induced by blast exposure; limited understanding of the mechanisms by which blast exposure injures the brain and triggers sequelae; failure to appreciate interactive injuries that affect frontal lobe function, pituitary regulation, and neurovegetative homeostasis; unknown influence of genetic risk factors, prior trauma, and comorbidities; absence of validated diagnostic criteria and clinical nosology that differentiate clinical endophenotypes; and lack of empirical evidence to guide medical management and therapeutic intervention. While clinicopathological analysis can provide evidence of correlative association, experimental use of animal models remains the primary tool for establishing causal mechanisms of disease. However, the TBI field is confronted by a welter of animal models with varying clinical relevance, thereby impeding scientific coherence and hindering translational progress. Animal models of blast TBI will be far more translationally useful if experimental emphasis focuses on accurate reproduction of clinically relevant endpoints (output) rather than scaled replication of idealized blast shockwaves (input). The utility of an animal model is dependent on the degree to which the model recapitulates pathophysiological mechanisms

  7. Considerations for animal models of blast-related traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lee E; McKee, Ann C; Stanton, Patric K

    2014-01-01

    The association of military blast exposure and brain injury was first appreciated in World War I as commotio cerebri, and later as shell shock. Similar injuries sustained in modern military conflicts are now classified as mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent research has yielded new insights into the mechanisms by which blast exposure leads to acute brain injury and chronic sequelae, including postconcussive syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, post-traumatic headache, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a tau protein neurodegenerative disease. Impediments to delivery of effective medical care for individuals affected by blast-related TBI include: poor insight into the heterogeneity of neurological insults induced by blast exposure; limited understanding of the mechanisms by which blast exposure injures the brain and triggers sequelae; failure to appreciate interactive injuries that affect frontal lobe function, pituitary regulation, and neurovegetative homeostasis; unknown influence of genetic risk factors, prior trauma, and comorbidities; absence of validated diagnostic criteria and clinical nosology that differentiate clinical endophenotypes; and lack of empirical evidence to guide medical management and therapeutic intervention. While clinicopathological analysis can provide evidence of correlative association, experimental use of animal models remains the primary tool for establishing causal mechanisms of disease. However, the TBI field is confronted by a welter of animal models with varying clinical relevance, thereby impeding scientific coherence and hindering translational progress. Animal models of blast TBI will be far more translationally useful if experimental emphasis focuses on accurate reproduction of clinically relevant endpoints (output) rather than scaled replication of idealized blast shockwaves (input). The utility of an animal model is dependent on the degree to which the model recapitulates pathophysiological mechanisms

  8. Bilateral Traumatic Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in a Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Rosenthal, Karen L; Chandler, Heidi K; Wheeler, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) luxation was diagnosed postmortem in a female, 6-mo-old CD rat (Rattus norvegicus) after probable head entrapment and subsequent disentanglement from a protective jacket. Clinical antemortem signs included inability to close her mouth, prehend food and drink water, anxiety, and linear skin erosions extending down the right and left commissures of the mouth. Radiography revealed rostral displacement of the mandible with concomitant malocclusion. The combination of clinical signs, acute nature of the presentation, and torn appearance of the protective jacket were strongly indicative of a traumatic etiology. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of TMJ luxation in a rat. PMID:22330578

  9. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J; Berkowitz, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae; however, this topic has been understudied. This review considers the rationale for examining traumatic events and related symptomology in individuals with ASD and summarizes the limited research on this topic. A conceptual framework for understanding the interplay of ASD, trauma and traumatic sequelae is proposed and recommendations for future research presented. PMID:25711547

  10. Imaging assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Currie, Stuart; Saleem, Nayyar; Straiton, John A; Macmullen-Price, Jeremy; Warren, Daniel J; Craven, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes injury that occurs to the brain as a result of trauma. It should be appreciated as a heterogeneous, dynamic pathophysiological process that starts from the moment of impact and continues over time with sequelae potentially seen many years after the initial event. Primary traumatic brain lesions that may occur at the moment of impact include contusions, haematomas, parenchymal fractures and diffuse axonal injury. The presence of extra-axial intracranial lesions such as epidural and subdural haematomas and subarachnoid haemorrhage must be anticipated as they may contribute greatly to secondary brain insult by provoking brain herniation syndromes, cranial nerve deficits, oedema and ischaemia and infarction. Imaging is fundamental to the management of patients with TBI. CT remains the imaging modality of choice for initial assessment due to its ease of access, rapid acquisition and for its sensitivity for detection of acute haemorrhagic lesions for surgical intervention. MRI is typically reserved for the detection of lesions that may explain clinical symptoms that remain unresolved despite initial CT. This is especially apparent in the setting of diffuse axonal injury, which is poorly discerned on CT. Use of particular MRI sequences may increase the sensitivity of detecting such lesions: diffusion-weighted imaging defining acute infarction, susceptibility-weighted imaging affording exquisite data on microhaemorrhage. Additional advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI may provide important information regarding coexistent structural and functional brain damage. Gaining robust prognostic information for patients following TBI remains a challenge. Advanced MRI sequences are showing potential for biomarkers of disease, but this largely remains at the research level. Various global collaborative research groups have been established in an effort to combine imaging data with clinical and

  11. Conservative management of a case of traumatic pancreatitis in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dixit, P; Sharma, V; Singh, K R; Thapa, B R; Rathore, M

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is relatively uncommon in pediatric age group. Traumatic injury is an important cause of AP in children. Ductal disruption resulting from pancreatic trauma usually needs surgical intervention. A three-and-a-half year old child presented with complaints of abdominal pain and distension following blunt trauma abdomen. Computed tomography of abdomen revealed presence of grade III pancreatic injury with fluid collection in lesser sac. The patient was managed with antibiotics and pigtail drainage and he improved. Therapy for traumatic pancreatitis in paediatric patients must be individualised. Even high grade injuries can be managed non-operatively. PMID:24992606

  12. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  13. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassuk, Ellen L.; Konnath, Kristina; Volk, Katherine T.

    2006-01-01

    The unexpected loss of a loved one, a car accident, or exposure to a violent experience is familiar to many. Everyone reacts to such events, but the responses vary widely, ranging from numbness and withdrawal, to crying, nervousness, and agitation. Because traumatic events are prevalent, cause profound suffering, and may lead to life altering…

  14. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  16. Acute Warfarin Toxicity as Initial Manifestation of Metastatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Nihar; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Near complete infiltration of the liver secondary to metastasis from the head and neck cancer is a rare occurrence. The prognosis of liver failure associated with malignant infiltration is extremely poor; the survival time of patients is extremely low. We present a case of acute warfarin toxicity as initial manifestation of metastatic liver disease. Our patient is a 64-year-old woman presenting with epigastric pain and discomfort, found to have unrecordable International Normalized Ratio. She rapidly deteriorated with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, profound shock requiring high dose vasopressor infusion, severe coagulopathy, worsening liver enzymes with worsening of lactic acidosis and severe metabolic abnormalities, and refractory to aggressive supportive care and died in less than 48 hours. Autopsy revealed that >90% of the liver was replaced by tumor masses. PMID:27042361

  17. Disconnection of the Ascending Arousal System in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Haynes, Robin L.; Takahashi, Emi; Klein, Joshua P.; Cummings, Peter; Benner, Thomas; Greer, David M.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Wu, Ona; Kinney, Hannah C.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic coma is associated with disruption of axonal pathways throughout the brain but the specific pathways involved in humans are incompletely understood. In this study, we used high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) to map the connectivity of axonal pathways that mediate the 2 critical components of consciousness – arousal and awareness – in the postmortem brain of a 62-year-old woman with acute traumatic coma and in 2 control brains. HARDI tractography guided tissue sampling in the neuropathological analysis. HARDI tractography demonstrated complete disruption of white matter pathways connecting brainstem arousal nuclei to the basal forebrain and thalamic intralaminar and reticular nuclei. In contrast, hemispheric arousal pathways connecting the thalamus and basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex were only partially disrupted, as were the cortical “awareness pathways.” Neuropathologic examination, which utilized β-amyloid precursor protein and fractin immunomarkers, revealed axonal injury in the white matter of the brainstem and cerebral hemispheres that corresponded to sites of HARDI tract disruption. Axonal injury was also present within the grey matter of the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal forebrain, and cerebral cortex. We propose that traumatic coma may be a subcortical disconnection syndrome related to the disconnection of specific brainstem arousal nuclei from the thalamus and basal forebrain. PMID:23656993

  18. MRI in acute ligamentous injuries of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Martella, Ilenia; Azzali, Emanuele; Milanese, Gianluca; Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Ruggirello, Margherita; Trunfio, Vincenzo; Parziale, Raffaele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Capasso, Raffaella; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injuries and affect more frequently young athletes; imaging is needed for an accurate diagnosis of such traumatic injuries. The purpose of this review is to analyse the magnetic resonance (MR) findings of both normal and pathological ankle's ligaments; indeed, MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute traumatic injuries and is useful for differentiation of the causes of ankle instability as well as for pre-operative planning. PMID:27467862

  19. The acute management of trauma hemorrhage: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, trauma is a leading cause of death and disability. Haemorrhage is responsible for up to 40% of trauma deaths. Recent strategies to improve mortality rates have focused on optimal methods of early hemorrhage control and correction of coagulopathy. We undertook a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) which evaluated trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock within the first 24 hours of injury and appraised how the interventions affected three outcomes: bleeding and/or transfusion requirements; correction of trauma induced coagulopathy and mortality. Methods Comprehensive searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 7, 2010), Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and the National Health Service Blood and Transplant Systematic Review Initiative (NHSBT SRI) RCT Handsearch Database. Results A total of 35 RCTs were identified which evaluated a wide range of clinical interventions in trauma hemorrhage. Many of the included studies were of low methodological quality and participant numbers were small. Bleeding outcomes were reported in 32 studies; 7 reported significantly reduced transfusion use following a variety of clinical interventions, but this was not accompanied by improved survival. Minimal information was found on traumatic coagulopathy across the identified RCTs. Overall survival was improved in only three RCTs: two small studies and a large study evaluating the use of tranexamic acid. Conclusions Despite 35 RCTs there has been little improvement in outcomes over the last few decades. No clear correlation has been demonstrated between transfusion requirements and mortality. The global trauma community should consider a coordinated and strategic approach to conduct well designed studies with pragmatic endpoints. PMID:21392371

  20. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  1. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  2. Spontaneous peri-nephric hematoma in a patient with acute kidney injury following Russell's viper envenomation.

    PubMed

    Golay, Vishal; Roychowdhary, Arpita; Pandey, Rajendra

    2015-03-01

    Snake bite envenomation is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the tropics and severe coagulopathy with bleeding manifestations is usually seen, especially with viperine bites. We present a case of a 34-year-old male who had developed AKI following Russell's viper envenomation along with disseminated intravascular coagulation. The patient was seemingly improving during the course of his treatment but subsequently developed a spontaneous unilateral peri-nephric hematoma and finally succumbed to this complication. This is a rare presentation that can be clinically innoccuous in a disease where there are multiple bleeding manifestations and, carries a very poor outcome. PMID:25758885

  3. Paintball-related traumatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Luck, Joshua; Bell, Daniel; Bashir, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Paintball is a popular recreational sport played at both amateur and professional level. Ocular injuries are well recognised, although there is a growing body of literature documenting superficial vascular as well as deep solid organ injuries. An 18-year-old man presented with signs and symptoms consistent with acute appendicitis. Intraoperatively, a grade III liver injury was identified and packed before a relook at 48 h. No further active bleeding was identified; however, follow-up ultrasound at 3 weeks demonstrated non-resolution of a large subcapsular haematoma. The patient was readmitted for a short period of observation and discharged with repeat ultrasound scheduled for 3 months. This represents the first report of paintball-related blunt traumatic injury to the liver. Solid organ injuries of this nature have only been reported three times previously-all in the urological setting. This case also highlights issues surrounding the use of routine follow-up imaging in blunt liver trauma and provides a concise discussion of the relevant literature. PMID:27122206

  4. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury. PMID:23964217

  5. ANTIOXIDANT THERAPIES FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Edward D.; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Mustafa, Ayman G.

    2010-01-01

    Free radical-induced oxidative damage reactions, and membrane lipid peroxidation (LP) in particular, are one of the best validated secondary injury mechanisms in preclinical traumatic brain injury models. In addition to the disruption of the membrane phospholipid architecture, LP results in the formation of cytotoxic aldehyde-containing products that bind to cellular proteins and impair their normal functions. This article reviews the progress over the past three decades in regards to the preclinical discovery and attempted clinical development of antioxidant drugs designed to inhibit free radical-induced LP and its neurotoxic consequences via different mechanisms including the O2•- scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the lipid peroxidation inhibitor tirilazad. In addition, various other antioxidant agents that have been shown to have efficacy in preclinical TBI models are briefly presented such as the LP inhibitors U83836E, resveratrol, curcumin, OPC-14177 and lipoic acid; the iron chelator deferoxamine and the nitroxide-containing antioxidants such as α-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone and tempol. A relatively new antioxidant mechanistic strategy for acute TBI is aimed at the scavenging of aldehydic LP by-products that are highly neurotoxic with “carbonyl scavenging” compounds. Finally, it is proposed that the most effective approach to interrupt posttraumatic oxidative brain damage after TBI might involve the combined treatment with mechanistically-complementary antioxidants that simultaneously scavenge LP-initiating free radicals, inhibit LP propagation and lastly remove neurotoxic LP byproducts. PMID:20129497

  6. Crural Artery Traumatic Injuries: Treatment with Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Suri, Rajeev; Cura, Marco; Kroma, Ghazwan; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to report our experience with the endovascular treatment of crural arterial injuries using transcatheter and direct embolization techniques. A total of eight consecutive patients have been treated during a 7-year period. Six males and two females, mean age 32 years (range, 15-56 years), presented with penetrating trauma to the lower extremities. Mechanisms of injuries were stab wounds in six patients, gun shot wound in one patient, and iatrogenic injury in one patient. Five patients presented with acute trauma, while three patients presented with delayed injuries. Crural arterial injuries encountered included pseudoaneurysms with arteriovenous fistulas (n = 6), pseudoaneurysms with vessel transections (n = 2), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). Proximal and distal embolization with coils was used in three cases, proximal embolization with coils in three cases, percutaneous thrombin injection in one case, and liquid n-butyl cyanoacrylate in one case. Complete exclusion of the lesions was accomplished by sacrifice of one crural vessel in seven cases and of two crural vessels in one case. Two cases of delayed injuries required combined coil and liquid embolization techniques for lesion exclusion. A minor complication (groin hematoma) occurred in one patient, no distal ischemia was seen, and no amputations were required. Mean follow-up was 61 days (range, 1-180 days). One pseudoaneurysm treated with thrombin injection recurred and required surgical excision. We conclude that transcatheter embolization alone or in combination with different endovascular techniques is useful in the treatment of traumatic crural vessel injuries.

  7. The 'multiplex model' of somatic symptoms: application to tinnitus among traumatized Cambodian refugees.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Hinton, Susan D; Loeum, Reattidara J-R; Pich, Vuth; Pollack, Mark H

    2008-06-01

    Somatic symptoms are a common clinical presentation of distress among ethnic populations in the USA, particularly traumatized refugees. In this article, we apply a 'multiplex model' of bodily experience to explain how a somatic symptom is evoked, amplified, and generates distress, particularly distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder. We illustrate the multiplex model's applicability to acute episodes of tinnitus (i.e., a buzzing-like sound in the ear) among Cambodian refugees, a common symptom in that group. The article demonstrates the importance of carefully examining somatic symptoms and associated meanings in distressed ethnic populations, especially traumatized refugees, and aims to contribute to a medical anthropology of somatic symptoms. PMID:18562496

  8. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Angelos G; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Pickard, John D; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Murray, Gordon D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  9. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Kolias, Angelos G.; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A.; Pickard, John D.; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Murray, Gordon D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of “opening the skull” in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  10. Acute interventions for refugee children and families.

    PubMed

    Brymer, Melissa J; Steinberg, Alan M; Sornborger, Jo; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert S

    2008-07-01

    This article describes the exposure of refugees, and particularly refugee children, to trauma, loss, and severe hardship in their countries of origin, while fleeing to their host countries, and after arrival in the host country. It then discusses acute psychosocial interventions for traumatized children and families, in particular the "Psychological First Aid" and "Skills for Psychological Recovery" guidelines developed by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It concludes by discussing the need to establish an evidence base for the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:18558316

  11. Management in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shalimar; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare, potentially fatal complication of severe hepatic illness resulting from various causes. In a clinical setting, severe hepatic injury is usually recognised by the appearance of jaundice, encephalopathy and coagulopathy. The central and most important clinical event in ALF is occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and cerebral edema which is responsible for most of the fatalities in this serious clinical syndrome. The pathogenesis of encephalopathy and cerebral edema in ALF is unique and multifactorial. Ammonia plays a central role in the pathogenesis. The role of newer ammonia lowering agents is still evolving. Liver transplant is the only effective therapy that has been identified to be of promise in those with poor prognostic factors, whereas in the others, aggressive intensive medical management has been documented to salvage a substantial proportion of patients. A small fraction of patients undergo liver transplant and the remaining are usually treated with medical therapy. Therefore, identification of the complications and causes of death in such patients, and use of appropriate prognostic models to identify those who need liver transplant and those who can be managed with medical treatment is a vital component of therapeutic strategy. In this review, we discuss the various pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options available. PMID:26041950

  12. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  13. Traumatic bone cyst of mandible.

    PubMed

    Surej Kumar, L K; Kurien, Nikhil; Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed

    2015-06-01

    The traumatic bone cyst, an uncommon lesion of the jaws, belongs to the category of 'pseudocyst' owing to its lack of a lining epithelial membrane. It is an asymptomatic lesion, which is often diagnosed accidentally during routine radiological examination commonly present in the posterior mandible as a unilocular radiolucency with scalloping borders. The exact etiopathogenesis of the lesion is still debated, though the role of trauma is often associated. Here we report a rare case of traumatic bone cyst in the anterior mandible, in a 16-year-old female patient with a previous history of trauma to chin; diagnosed and treated successfully in our surgical unit. The case is discussed in relation to its clinical presentation, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, management and prognosis. PMID:26028875

  14. Traumatic andropause after combat injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth Huw; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Sharma, Davendra Murray; Bowley, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    In association with lower extremity amputation, complex genitourinary injuries have emerged as a specific challenge in modern military trauma surgery. Testicular injury or loss has profound implications for the recovering serviceman, in terms of hormone production and future fertility. The initial focus of treatment for patients with traumatic testicular loss is haemostasis, resuscitation and management of concurrent life-threatening injuries. Multiple reoperations are commonly required to control infection in combat wounds; in a review of 300 major lower extremity amputations, 53% of limbs required revisional surgery, with infection the commonest indication. Atypical infections, such as invasive fungal organisms, can also complicate military wounding. We report the case of a severely wounded serviceman with complete traumatic andropause, whose symptomatic temperature swings were initially mistaken for signs of occult sepsis. PMID:26318170

  15. Traumatic Retrolisthesis of L5 and L5/S1 Extruded Disc Herniation; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pourabbas, Babak; Effani, Mohammad Ali; Namdari, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic retrolisthesis is a rare injury and may result in intervertebral disc extrusion and nerve root injury. These injuries are highly unstable and require surgery for decompression and stabilization. Traumatic retrolisthesis of L5 with acute L5/S1 disc extrusion associated with nerve root injury has not been reported previously in English literatures. We herein report a case of traumatic retrolisthesis of L5 and extruded disc. A 22 year-old patient presented with lower extremity weakness due to L5/S1 retrolisthesis and traumatic acute L5/S1 disc extrusion after falling of 8 meters height. The patient underwent surgical decompression and reduction with instrumentation. Accordingly complete recovery of neurologic deficit was occurred. Therefore, early decompression of the nerve roots followed by circumferential instrumentation and fusion of the involved segment results in dramatic improvement in neurologic symptoms.  PMID:27540553

  16. Traumatic Retrolisthesis of L5 and L5/S1 Extruded Disc Herniation; A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pourabbas, Babak; Effani, Mohammad Ali; Namdari, Asghar

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic retrolisthesis is a rare injury and may result in intervertebral disc extrusion and nerve root injury. These injuries are highly unstable and require surgery for decompression and stabilization. Traumatic retrolisthesis of L5 with acute L5/S1 disc extrusion associated with nerve root injury has not been reported previously in English literatures. We herein report a case of traumatic retrolisthesis of L5 and extruded disc. A 22 year-old patient presented with lower extremity weakness due to L5/S1 retrolisthesis and traumatic acute L5/S1 disc extrusion after falling of 8 meters height. The patient underwent surgical decompression and reduction with instrumentation. Accordingly complete recovery of neurologic deficit was occurred. Therefore, early decompression of the nerve roots followed by circumferential instrumentation and fusion of the involved segment results in dramatic improvement in neurologic symptoms. PMID:27540553

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  18. Traumatic brain injury among Indiana state prisoners.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bradley; Sapp, Dona; Kincaid, Ashley

    2014-09-01

    Research on traumatic brain injury among inmates has focused on comparing the rate of traumatic brain injury among offenders to the general population, but also how best to screen for traumatic brain injury among this population. This study administered the short version of the Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method to all male inmates admitted into Indiana state prisons were screened for a month (N = 831). Results indicate that 35.7% of the inmates reported experiencing a traumatic brain injury during their lifetime and that these inmates were more likely to have a psychiatric disorder and a prior period of incarceration than those without. Logistic regression analysis finds that a traumatic brain injury predicts the likelihood of prior incarceration net of age, race, education, and psychiatric disorder. This study suggests that brief instruments can be successfully implemented into prison screenings to help divert inmates into needed treatment. PMID:24588316

  19. Medico-legal implications of traumatic cataract.

    PubMed

    Moreschi, Carlo; Da Broi, Ugo; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic cataract is due to lens damage when mechanical, irradiative, electrical or chemical agents injury the globe. The appearance of a traumatic cataract is typically short and unilateral with rare spontaneous resolution and often involves other ocular anatomical areas. Medico-legal evaluation of the appearance and the consequences of a traumatic cataract requires a correct methodological approach with the support of qualified ophthalmological competences. PMID:23357390

  20. [Post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth].

    PubMed

    Korábová, I; Masopustová, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth to health care professionals. The text focuses on the diagnostic definition of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth, symptoms, physiological background, prevalence, course, risk factors and consequences of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth for a woman, her child and her partner. Options for interventions and therapy are outlined as well. PMID:26982058

  1. Traumatic grief and traumatic stress in survivors 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Jean; Séjourné, Nathalène; Bui, Eric; Birmes, Philippe; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between exposure to traumatic events and traumatic grief and the role of mediating and moderating variables [peritraumatic distress, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptoms of depression] were studied in survivors of the genocide of Batutsi in Rwanda in 1994. One hundred and two survivors (70 women, mean age 45 ± 7.53 years) participated in this retrospective study. All of them had lost a member of their family. The severity of traumatic exposure (Comprehensive Trauma Inventory), peritraumatic distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory), current PTSD symptoms (PTSD Checklist), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and traumatic grief symptoms (Inventory of Traumatic Grief) was evaluated. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then conducted to examine the relative contribution of each variable to the symptoms of traumatic grief. The severity of traumatic exposure was related to traumatic grief symptoms (B=0.06, R=0.6, R(2) =0.36 and ß=0.6, t=7.54, p=0.00). The Baron and Kenny procedure (1986) (including three separate regressions), along with the Sobel test, was used to test mediation effects. Peritraumatic distress and PTSD symptoms may be mediating variables between traumatic exposure and traumatic grief. Traumatic grief is a complex but assessable entity, where previous distress and suffering result from both psychological trauma and the loss of a loved one. PMID:22282057

  2. An experience with plasma exchange treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a case with fulminant hepatitis related to L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Calan, Mehmet; Bilgir, Ferda; Cagliyan, Gulsum; Arslan, Oyku

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of lymphoid precursors with arrested maturation. L-asparaginase is commonly used in combination chemotherapy of both pediatric and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The most commonly encountered side effects of L-asparaginase are hypersensitivity reactions like pyrexia, urticaria, skin rash, and respiratory distress. There are also other side effects like anaphylaxis, coagulopathy, pancreatitis, thrombosis, and hepatic toxicity. Plasmapheresis can sometimes be appropriate to manage an overdose of drugs that circulate in the plasma compartment. We have reported plasmapheresis treatment of fulminant hepatitis in a patient with ALL after L-asparaginase treatment. PMID:23871581

  3. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. Results To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1–9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Conclusions We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are

  4. Post-traumatic stress responses following liver transplantation in older children.

    PubMed

    Walker, A M; Harris, G; Baker, A; Kelly, D; Houghton, J

    1999-03-01

    Eighteen children aged between 7 and 16 years who had undergone a liver transplantation were interviewed using the Child Post-Traumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPTS-RI) to discover if they had post-traumatic stress symptoms. A case control design was used to define which factors were important for the development of post-traumatic stress. Results of a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with post-traumatic stress symptom intensity as measured on the CPTS-RI as the dependent variable, revealed a significant difference between the liver transplantation group compared with children who had a chronic life-threatening illness or had undergone a routine surgical operation. A post hoc (Tukey's HSD test) statistical analysis was performed and significance at the .05 level was found between the liver transplantation group and both the chronic illness group and the routine surgical operation group. Our results indicate that the acute life-threat involved in the liver transplantation contributed to the development of post-traumatic stress. It was thought that dissociation may be important in preventing the resolution of the trauma. Additional investigations are needed with larger numbers in a longitudinal study beginning before the transplant to determine the course of the PTSD symptoms and the appropriate timing of interventions to reduce the harmful effects of these symptoms. PMID:10190338

  5. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  6. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  7. A rare autopsy case of traumatic rhabdomyolysis associated with intermittent assault.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Fumiko; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Go; Ishii, Namiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Abe, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nagasawa, Sayaka; Saito, Hisako; Yajima, Daisuke; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic rhabdomyolysis generally occurs after severe blunt trauma and is acute in onset, associated with severe disease, and potentially lethal. Accordingly, diagnosis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis in patients without massive subcutaneous or intramuscular hemorrhage is difficult, especially in the postmortem period, which is limited in terms of the availability of biochemical examination tools and accurate history of illness. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of death from traumatic rhabdomyolysis among individuals who did not pursue medical consultation. A previously healthy man in his early sixties had been punched and kicked several times in the previous 2months, but he had not gone to a hospital. He suddenly lost consciousness at his workplace approximately 5days after the most recent assault, and cardiopulmonary arrest occurred when the emergency service arrived. He died the same day, and a medicolegal autopsy was performed. Although several sites of minor subcutaneous and muscle hemorrhage were observed, the cause of death was unclear upon macroscopic assessment. Immunohistochemical staining revealed acute renal failure caused by rhabdomyolysis. We herein report a rare case of fatal traumatic rhabdomyolysis, seemingly associated with minor and apparently nonlethal muscle injury. PMID:27161922

  8. Aging, Neurodegenerative Disease, and Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25192426

  9. Post-traumatic acute anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foo, D; Subrahmanyan, T S; Rossier, A B

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients with motor complete but sensory incomplete lesions following vertebral and spinal cord injuries are described. Sensory dissociation was present with more impairment of pain than touch or proprioception. The loss of pain sensation was complete in seven patients, but was incomplete in the other six subjects four of whom showed major motor recovery. The major point of interest of this study is to show that patients who retain not only touch but also pain sensation have a definitely better prognosis for neurological recovery. PMID:7290729

  10. Traumatic brain injury: a review of characteristics, molecular basis and management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Cui, Daming; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical cause of hospitalization, disability, and death worldwide. The global increase in the incidence of TBI poses a significant socioeconomic burden. Guidelines for the management of acute TBI mostly pertain to emergency treatment. Comprehensive gene expression analysis is currently available for several animal models of TBI, along with enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms activated during injury and subsequent recovery. The current review focuses on the characteristics, molecular basis and management of TBI. PMID:27100477

  11. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper is a clinical discussion of post-traumatic stress disorder and violence, particularly as it applies to the Vietnam Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. In the first section, the syndrome is described as the sudden onset of explosive rage and unprovoked violence with little or no warning, accompanied by a drastic change in personality. It is…

  12. Traumatic Bonding: Clinical Implications in Incest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deYoung, Mary; Lowry, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    "Traumatic bonding" is defined as "the evolution of emotional dependency between...a child and an adult [in] a relationship characterized by periodic sexual abuse." Maintains that the concept holds promise for explaining confusing dynamics of incest. Demonstrates ways in which traumatic bonding can be applied to cases of incest and discusses…

  13. Liver scan in traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Liver imaging was performed in two patients with traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia. It has elucidated the cause of obliteration of the right hemidiaphragmatic shadow on the chest x-ray. These cases are illustrative of the usefulness of liver imaging in the diagnosis of traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia as well as hepatic injury.

  14. Traumatic rupture of the right subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Girdwood, Robert W.; Holden, Michael P.; Ionescu, Marian I.

    1972-01-01

    The case report of a patient who sustained a traumatic rupture of the right subclavian artery in a motor vehicle accident is presented. The preoperative diagnosis, surgical approach, postoperative management, and indications for angiography in traumatic lesions of the thoracic aorta and great vessels are discussed. The relevant literature is reviewed. Images PMID:5034604

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Challenge for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M.; Gable, Robert A.; Mohr, J. Darrell

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide information designed to enhance the knowledge and understanding of school personnel about traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors specifically define TBI and enumerate common characteristics associated with traumatic brain injury, discuss briefly the growth and type of services provided, and offer some…

  16. Secondary Traumatic Stress in Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bride, Brian E.; Walls, Erin

    2006-01-01

    The terms secondary traumatic stress (STS), vicarious traumatization (VT), and compassion fatigue (CF) have all been used, sometimes interchangeably, to refer to the observation that those who provide clinical services to trauma survivors may themselves experience considerable emotional disruption, becoming indirect victims of the trauma.…

  17. Delayed Post-Traumatic Anisocoria.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Özdemir, Özcan; Uzan, Çağdaş; Yelken, Birgül

    2015-06-01

    Post-traumatic carotid artery dissection is one of the major causes of ischemic stroke in young patients; its diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians because of its variable clinical presentation. An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man was referred to the intensive care unit of our faculty for the management of multiple trauma because of a car accident. At 11 days from admission, his doctor noticed the advent of anisocoria. A prompt treatment was instituted with anti-platelet and-coagulant agents. The patient had a complete resolution of symptoms. The prognosis was good, and the patient achieved a complete clinical recovery. He was discharged without any sequelae. PMID:27366498

  18. Sleep in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Vermaelen, James; Greiffenstein, Patrick; deBoisblanc, Bennett P

    2015-07-01

    More than one-half million patients are hospitalized annually for traumatic brain injury (TBI). One-quarter demonstrate sleep-disordered breathing, up to 50% experience insomnia, and half have hypersomnia. Sleep disturbances after TBI may result from injury to sleep-regulating brain tissue, nonspecific neurohormonal responses to systemic injury, ICU environmental interference, and medication side effects. A diagnosis of sleep disturbances requires a high index of suspicion and appropriate testing. Treatment starts with a focus on making the ICU environment conducive to normal sleep. Treating sleep-disordered breathing likely has outcome benefits in TBI. The use of sleep promoting sedative-hypnotics and anxiolytics should be judicious. PMID:26118920

  19. Early traumatic events in psychopaths.

    PubMed

    Borja, Karina; Ostrosky, Feggy

    2013-07-01

    The relationship between diverse early traumatic events and psychopathy was studied in 194 male inmates. Criminal history transcripts were revised, and clinical interviews were conducted to determine the level of psychopathy using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) Form, and the Early Trauma Inventory was applied to assess the incidence of abuse before 18 years of age. Psychopathic inmates presented a higher victimization level and were more exposed to certain types of intended abuse than sociopathic inmates, while the sum of events and emotional abuse were associated with the PCL-R score. Our studies support the influence of early adverse events in the development of psychopathic offenders. PMID:23550705

  20. Posttraumatic Inflammation as a Key to Neuroregeneration after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Child, Christopher; Bruckner, Thomas; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Daniel, Volker; Biglari, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines might have a large impact on the secondary phase and on the neurological outcome of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). We measured the serum levels of different cytokines (Interferon-γ, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) over a 12-week period in 40 acute traumatic SCI patients: at admission on average one hour after initial trauma; at four, nine, 12, and 24 h; Three, and seven days after admission; and two, four, eight, and twelve weeks after admission. This was done using a Luminex Performance Human High Sensitivity Cytokine Panel. SCI was classified using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) at time of admission and after 12 weeks. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in patients without neurological remission and in patients with an initial AIS A (p < 0.05). This study shows significant differences in cytokine concentrations shown in traumatic SCI patients with different neurological impairments and within a 12-week period. IL-8 and IL-10 are potential peripheral markers for neurological remission and rehabilitation after traumatic SCI. Furthermore our cytokine expression pattern of the acute, subacute, and intermediate phase of SCI establishes a possible basis for future studies to develop standardized monitoring, prognostic, and tracking techniques. PMID:25860946

  1. Traumatic herniation of the buccal fat pad.

    PubMed

    Iehara, Tomoko; Tomoyasu, Chihiro; Nakajima, Hisakazu; Osamura, Toshio; Hosoi, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic herniation of the buccal fat pad is a rare traumatic disease. Treatment consists of either excision or replacement. We herein report the first case in which a traumatic herniation of the buccal fat pad healed naturally. It was necessary to differentiate the disease from lipoblastoma. A 17-month-old boy was admitted to a clinic with an intraoral tumor that had suddenly increased in size. The tumor was diagnosed as herniation of the buccal fat pad on pathology of a biopsy specimen. In the present case, the escaped buccal fat body returned naturally and engrafted without dysfunction or facial defects. Given that young children may easily fall down with various objects in their mouth, care is required to prevent traumatic accidents. Traumatic herniation of the buccal fat pad should be considered in the differentiation of tumors of the oral cavity in young children. PMID:26892590

  2. The challenge in management of hemorrhagic shock in trauma.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Mathews; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-04-01

    Transfusion and resuscitation practices in trauma have undergone a sea change over the past decade. New understanding of transfusion physiology and experiences in military trauma over the last decade has identified key factors taken as challenges in trauma. The most important challenge remains acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) which sets in early after a trauma and spirals the patient into shock and continued bleeding. World wide trauma is the leading cause of mortality. More than 6 million deaths occur due to trauma out of which 20% are due to uncontrollable bleeding. Out of the hospital admissions in trauma 20% develop coagulopathy. Mortality is three to four times higher in a patient with coagulopathy and thus prevention and correction of coagulopathy is the central goal of the management of hemorrhagic shock in trauma. Damage control resuscitation (DCR), a strategy combining the techniques of permissive hypotension, hemostatic resuscitation and damage control surgery has been widely adopted as the preferred method of resuscitation in patients with haemorrhagic shock. The over-riding goals of DCR are to mitigate metabolic acidosis, hypothermia and coagulopathy, This article looks at the importance of acute traumatic coagulopathy, its etiology, diagnosis, effects and resuscitation strategies to prevent it and to see the background behind this shift. PMID:24843206

  3. Components of Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Indices

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, John D.; Kreider, Scott; Cuthbert, Jeffrey; Whyte, John; Dams-O’Connor, Kristen; Faul, Mark; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Whiteneck, Gale; Pretz, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are underlying dimensions common among traditional traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity indices and, if so, the extent to which they are interchangeable when predicting short-term outcomes. This study had an observational design, and took place in United States trauma centers reporting to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). The sample consisted of 77,470 unweighted adult cases reported to the NTDB from 2007 to 2010, with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) TBI codes. There were no interventions. Severity indices used were the Emergency Department Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) Total score and each of the subscales for eye opening (four levels), verbal response (five levels), and motor response (six levels); the worst Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) severity score for the head (six levels); and the worst Barell index type (three categories). Prediction models were computed for acute care length of stay (days), intensive care unit length of stay (days), hospital discharge status (alive or dead), and, if alive, discharge disposition (home versus institutional). Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) indicated a two dimensional relationship among items of severity indexes. The primary dimension reflected overall injury severity. The second dimension seemed to capture volitional behavior without the capability for cogent responding. Together, they defined two vectors around which most of the items clustered. A scale that took advantage of the order of items along these vectors proved to be the most consistent index for predicting short-term health outcomes. MCA provided useful insight into the relationships among components of traditional TBI severity indices. The two vector pattern may reflect the impact of injury on different cortical and subcortical networks. Results are discussed in terms of score substitution and the ability to impute missing values. PMID

  4. Is nasogastric suction necessary in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Naeije, R; Salingret, E; Clumeck, N; De Troyer, A; Devis, G

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with mild to moderately severe acute pancreatitis were randomly allocated to treatment with or without nasogastric suction (27 and 31 patients respectively). Intravenous fluids and pethidine hydrochloride were also given. The two groups were comparable clinically at the start of the study. There were no differences between the two groups in the mean duration of the following features: abdominal pain or tenderness; absence of bowel movements; raised serum amylase concentration; time to resumption of oral feeding; and days in hospital. Prolonged hyperamylasaemia (serum amylase greater than 0.33 mU/l) occurred in one patient in the suction group and in three patients in the non-suction group. A mild recurrence of abdominal pain after resumption of oral feeding occurred in three patients in the suction group and in two patients in the non-suction group. Two patients in the suction group developed overt consumption coagulopathy and two others pulmonary complications. No patient in the non-suction group had complications. The findings suggest that most patients with mild to moderately severe acute pancreatitis do not benefit from nasogastric suction. The procedure should be elective rather than mandatory in treating this condition. PMID:698650

  5. [Traumatic Injury of the Diaphragm].

    PubMed

    Kadokura, Mitsutaka

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) is relatively rare condition, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. TDI usually results from blunt trauma and penetrating trauma. The majority causes of blunt TDI are victims of motor vehicle accidents. The incidence rates of TDI is unknown because of it can be overlooked if it is unsuspected with non-specific radiological and clinical findings. The mortality rates associated with blunt and penetrating TDI are affected by the severity of concurrent organ injuries. The diagnoses of TDI are frequently missed in the post-traumatic assessment because of non-specific symptoms or physical findings. When the site of trauma is in the abdomen, there will be high rate of an intra-abdominal organ injury. Furthermore, when the site of trauma is in the chest, there will be the abdominal organ injury in 50%.Surgical operation should be performed as soon as possible for concomitant injuries. Diaphragmatic repair can be performed using laparotomy, thoracotomy, or both approaches. Primary suture of the diaphragm can be performed in the majority of TDI patients. The outcome of post TDI depends on concurrent organ injury. In case of emergency, it is important to take an appropriate diagnosis and treatment for any concomitant injuries. PMID:26197916

  6. Preconditioning for traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yokobori, Shoji; Mazzeo, Anna T; Hosein, Khadil; Gajavelli, Shyam; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is now focused on the prevention of primary injury and reduction of secondary injury. However, no single effective treatment is available as yet for the mitigation of traumatic brain damage in humans. Both chemical and environmental stresses applied before injury, have been shown to induce consequent protection against post-TBI neuronal death. This concept termed “preconditioning” is achieved by exposure to different pre-injury stressors, to achieve the induction of “tolerance” to the effect of the TBI. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this “tolerance” phenomenon are not fully understood in TBI, and therefore even less information is available about possible indications in clinical TBI patients. In this review we will summarize TBI pathophysiology, and discuss existing animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of preconditioning in diffuse and focal type of TBI. We will also review other non-TBI preconditionng studies, including ischemic, environmental, and chemical preconditioning, which maybe relevant to TBI. To date, no clinical studies exist in this field, and we speculate on possible futureclinical situation, in which pre-TBI preconditioning could be considered. PMID:24323189

  7. Traumatic Dural Venous Sinus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Jung, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The importance of traumatic dural venous sinus injury lies in the probability of massive blood loss at the time of trauma or emergency operation resulting in a high mortality rate during the perioperative period. We considered the appropriate methods of treatment that are most essential in the overall management of traumatic dural venous sinus injuries. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all cases involving patients with dural venous sinus injury who presented to our hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Results Between January 1999 and December 2014, 20 patients with a dural venous sinus injury out of the 1,200 patients with severe head injuries who had been operated upon in our clinic were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 male and 3 female patients. In 11 out of the 13 patients with a linear skull fracture crossing the dural venous sinus, massive blood loss from the injured sinus wall could be controlled by simple digital pressure using Gelfoam. All 5 patients with a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the venous sinus developed massive sinus bleeding that could not be controlled by simple digital pressure. Conclusion When there is a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the dural venous sinus or a depressed skull fracture penetrating the sinus, the surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of potentially fatal venous sinus injury, even in the absence of a hematoma. PMID:27169076

  8. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Arjunan Muthu; Sundar, Gangadhara; Chye, Lim Thiam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current literature on investigation and management of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), propose recommendations for diagnosis and management, and explore novel future treatments. TON, though uncommon, causes substantial visual loss. Without clear guidelines, there is much ambiguity regarding its diagnosis and management. Investigation and treatment (conservative, medical, surgical, and combined) vary widely between centers. Electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PROSPERO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for content that matched “Traumatic optic neuropathy.” Articles with abstracts and full text available, published in the past 10 years, written English and limited to human adults, were selected. All study designs were acceptable except case reports and case series with fewer 10 patients. All abstracts were then evaluated for relevance. References of these studies were evaluated and if also relevant, included. A total of 2,686 articles were retrieved and 43 examined for relevance. Of these, 23 articles were included. TON is a clinical diagnosis. Visual-evoked potential is useful in diagnosis and prognosis. Computed tomography demonstrates canal fractures and concomitant injuries. Magnetic resonance images should be reserved for select and stable patients. Conservative treatment is appropriate in mild TON. Steroids are of questionable benefit and may be harmful. Surgery should be reserved for patients with radiological evidence of compression and individualized. PMID:25709751

  9. MRI findings of post-traumatic subperiosteal hematoma of the iliac bone with resultant femoral nerve palsy in an adolescent boy.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Maegen; Kruse, Richard; Eutsler, Eric P; Averill, Lauren W

    2016-08-01

    Post-traumatic subperiosteal hematoma of the iliac bone may present insidiously without external evidence of bleeding or go undetected in the acute setting. In some cases, the patient may come to medical attention due to femoral nerve palsy rather than hip or groin pain. In this report, we describe a case of femoral nerve palsy caused by acute post-traumatic subperiosteal hematoma of the iliac bone using MRI to highlight the subperiosteal location. Anatomy of the femoral nerve is also discussed. PMID:27043730

  10. The Role of Markers of Inflammation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Thomas; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Within minutes of a traumatic impact, a robust inflammatory response is elicited in the injured brain. The complexity of this post-traumatic squeal involves a cellular component, comprising the activation of resident glial cells, microglia, and astrocytes, and the infiltration of blood leukocytes. The second component regards the secretion immune mediators, which can be divided into the following sub-groups: the archetypal pro-inflammatory cytokines (Interleukin-1, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Interleukin-6), the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, Interleukin-10, and TGF-beta), and the chemotactic cytokines or chemokines, which specifically drive the accumulation of parenchymal and peripheral immune cells in the injured brain region. Such mechanisms have been demonstrated in animal models, mostly in rodents, as well as in human brain. Whilst the humoral immune response is particularly pronounced in the acute phase following Traumatic brain injury (TBI), the activation of glial cells seems to be a rather prolonged effect lasting for several months. The complex interaction of cytokines and cell types installs a network of events, which subsequently intersect with adjacent pathological cascades including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, or reparative events including angiogenesis, scarring, and neurogenesis. It is well accepted that neuroinflammation is responsible of beneficial and detrimental effects, contributing to secondary brain damage but also facilitating neurorepair. Although such mediators are clear markers of immune activation, to what extent cytokines can be defined as diagnostic factors reflecting brain injury or as predictors of long term outcome needs to be further substantiated. In clinical studies some groups reported a proportional cytokine production in either the cerebrospinal fluid or intraparenchymal tissue with initial brain damage, mortality, or poor outcome scores. However, the validity of cytokines as biomarkers is not broadly accepted. This

  11. Malignant Infiltration of the Liver Presenting as Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Nicole E.; Sanders, Corron; Hughes, Randall S.; Fontana, Robert J.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Fix, Oren; Han, Steven H.; Naugler, Willscott E.; Zaman, Atif; Lee, William M.

    2014-01-01

    There have been few reports of acute liver failure (ALF, with encephalopathy and coagulopathy) due to infiltration of the liver by malignant cells. We describe a case series of 27 patients with ALF caused by malignancy. We examined a large, multi-center ALF registry (1910 patients; mean age, 47.1±13.9 years) and found only 27 cases (1.4%) of ALF attributed to malignancy. Twenty cases (74%) presented with abdominal pain and 11 with ascites. The malignancies included lymphoma or leukemia (33%), breast cancer, (30%), and colon cancer (7%); 90% of the patients with lymphoma or leukemia had no history of cancer, compared to 25% of patients with breast cancer. Overall, 44% of the patients had evidence of liver masses by imaging. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy in 15 (55%) and autopsy for 6 cases. Twenty-four patients (89%) died within 3 weeks of ALF. PMID:25277846

  12. [Acute liver failure due to human herpesvirus 6 in an infant].

    PubMed

    Tronconi, G M; Mariani, B; Pajno, R; Fomasi, M; Cococcioni, L; Biffi, V; Bove, M; Corsin, P; Garbetta, G; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases' review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus's genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus. PMID:23342747

  13. Acute Stress Symptoms in Children: Results From an International Data Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Rork, Kristine; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Kenardy, Justin; Kohser, Kristen L.; Landolt, Markus A.; Le Brocque, Robyne; Marsac, Meghan L.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nixon, Reginald D.V.; Bui, Eric; McGrath, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms and to examine proposed "DSM-5" symptom criteria in relation to concurrent functional impairment in children and adolescents. Method: From an international archive, datasets were identified that included assessment of acute traumatic stress reactions and concurrent…

  14. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-ping; Li, Yi-ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Zi-shu; Zhou, Shun-ke; Tao, Fang-xu; Zhang, Zhi-xue

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073378

  15. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  16. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reifschneider, Kent; Auble, Bethany A.; Rose, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life. PMID:26287247

  17. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  18. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  19. [Early childhood violent and sexual traumatization].

    PubMed

    Heigl-Evers, A; Kruse, J

    1991-04-01

    Violent and sexual child abuse represents an extreme traumatization that can continue to influence the lives of affected children into adulthood. Freud (1917) provided a concept of the influence of this extreme form of traumatization in his model of the traumatic neurosis. It is described as an after-the-fact attempt to master the flood of sensations that characterizes the trauma. More recent theoretical models identify a collapse of the ego during trauma as well as the effects of this collapse on the formation of self and object representants at the heart of the traumatic event. As a result of the collapse of the ego during trauma, the traumatized individual does not succeed in forming mature memories of the experience. Immature memories of trauma are marked by, among other things, very diffuse, near physical feelings that cannot be integrated into the ego (Cohen 1980). From the perspective of object relation theories, the lack of integration of "bad" and "good" self of the traumatized individual is emphasized by the abuser. Drawing on case studies, the authors illuminate the importance of the principle of the answer (Heigl-Evers/Heigl 1979, 1983) to the efforts to differentiate and integrate in the treatment of extremely traumatized patients. PMID:1857676

  20. Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Almutez; Savage, Howard I; Scherer, Roberta W; Goldberg, Morton F; Lindsley, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic hyphema is the entry of blood into the anterior chamber (the space between the cornea and iris) subsequent to a blow or a projectile striking the eye. Hyphema uncommonly causes permanent loss of vision. Associated trauma (e.g. corneal staining, traumatic cataract, angle recession glaucoma, optic atrophy, etc.) may seriously affect vision. Such complications may lead to permanent impairment of vision. Patients with sickle cell trait/disease may be particularly susceptible to increases of elevated intraocular pressure. If rebleeding occurs, the rates and severity of complications increase. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of various medical interventions in the management of traumatic hyphema. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 8), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMED-LINE (January 1946 to August 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 30 August 2013. Selection criteria Two authors independently assessed the titles and abstracts of all reports identified by the electronic and manual searches. In this review, we included randomized and quasi-randomized trials that compared various medical interventions versus other medical interventions or control groups for the treatment of traumatic hyphema following closed globe trauma. We applied no restrictions regarding age, gender, severity of the closed globe trauma, or level of visual acuity at the time of enrolment. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted the

  1. Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Almutez; Savage, Howard I; Scherer, Roberta W; Goldberg, Morton F; Lindsley, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Background Traumatic hyphema is the entry of blood into the anterior chamber (the space between the cornea and iris) subsequent to a blow or a projectile striking the eye. Hyphema uncommonly causes permanent loss of vision. Associated trauma (e.g., corneal staining, traumatic cataract, angle recession glaucoma, optic atrophy, etc.) may seriously affect vision. Such complications may lead to permanent impairment of vision. Patients with sickle cell trait/disease may be particularly susceptible to increases of elevated intraocular pressure. If rebleeding occurs, the rates and severity of complications increase. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of various medical interventions in the management of traumatic hyphema. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1950 to June 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2010), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov). We searched the reference lists of identified trial reports to find additional trials. We also searched the ISI Web of Science Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) to find studies that cited the identified trials. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 25 June 2010. Selection criteria Two authors independently assessed the titles and abstracts of all reports identified by the electronic and manual searches. In this review, we included randomized and quasi-randomized trials that compared various medical interventions to other medical interventions or control groups for the treatment of traumatic hyphema following closed globe trauma. There were no restrictions regarding age, gender, severity of the closed globe trauma or level of visual acuity at the time

  2. Endothelial Cell Sensitization by Death Receptor Fractions of an Anti-Dengue Nonstructural Protein 1 Antibody Induced Plasma Leakage, Coagulopathy, and Mortality in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Ying-Chen; Lien, Te-Sheng; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Wang, Teng-Yi; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-09-15

    The mechanisms leading to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) remain elusive. DHF preferentially occurs during secondary dengue infections, suggesting that aberrant immune responses are involved in its development. We previously demonstrated that the autoantibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1; anti-NS1 Igs) induce plasma leakage and mortality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. However, the involved pathogenic Ig fractions of anti-NS1 Igs remain unclear. In this study, the autoreactive Igs in patients with DHF and in NS1-immunized rabbits crossreacted with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (death receptor [DR]4). Challenges with the DENV in a subcytotoxic dose sensitized endothelial cells to apoptosis. Treatments with the autoantibodies induced proapoptotic activities and suppressed the surface expression of endothelial anticoagulant thrombomodulin. Combined treatments comprising the DENV and DR4 affinity-purified fractions of anti-NS1 IgGs (anti-NS1-DR4 Ig), but not preimmune control IgGs, in subcytotoxic doses led to apoptosis in endothelial cells. Treatments with the anti-NS1-DR4 Ig led to plasma leakage, coagulopathy, and morality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. These results suggest that DR4-induced endothelial cell sensitization through NS1-elicited autoantibodies exacerbates anticoagulant suppression, vascular injury, and plasma leakage. Detecting and blocking anti-DR Igs in patients may be novel strategies for managing severe DENV infection. PMID:26259584

  3. Assessing Traumatic Event Exposure: Comparing the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to the Structured Clinical Interview for "DSM-IV"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Jessica M.; Burke, Christopher K.; Stoller, Kenneth B.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Brooner, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis requires first identifying a traumatic event, but very few studies have evaluated methods of potential traumatic event assessment and their impact on PTSD diagnosis. The authors compared a behaviorally specific comprehensive multiple-item traumatic event measure with a single-item measure to…

  4. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Burg, Matthew M; Soufer, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling condition that develops consequent to trauma exposure such as natural disasters, sexual assault, automobile accidents, and combat that independently increases risk for early incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular (CV) mortality by over 50 % and incident hypertension risk by over 30 %. While the majority of research on PTSD and CVD has concerned initially healthy civilian and military veteran samples, emerging research is also demonstrating that PTSD consequent to the trauma of an acute cardiac event significantly increases risk for early recurrence and mortality and that patient experiences in the clinical pathway that are related to the emergency department environment may provide an opportunity to prevent PTSD onset and thus improve outcomes. Future directions for clinical and implementation science concern broad PTSD and trauma screening in the context of primary care medical environments and the testing of PTSD treatments with CVD-related surrogates and endpoints. PMID:27566327

  5. Midline (Central) Fluid Percussion Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel K; Griffiths, Daniel R; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Research models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold significant validity towards the human condition, with each model replicating a subset of clinical features and symptoms. After 30 years of characterization and implementation, fluid percussion injury (FPI) is firmly recognized as a clinically relevant model of TBI, encompassing concussion through severe injury. The midline variation of FPI may best represent mild and diffuse clinical brain injury, because of the acute behavioral deficits, the late onset of subtle behavioral morbidities, and the absence of gross histopathology. This chapter outlines the procedures for midline (diffuse) FPI in adult male rats and mice. With these procedures, it becomes possible to generate brain-injured laboratory animals for studies of injury-induced pathophysiology and behavioral deficits, for which rational therapeutic interventions can be implemented. PMID:27604721

  6. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  7. Self-efficacy expectations among traumatized adolescents.

    PubMed

    Saigh, P A; Mroueh, M; Zimmerman, B J; Fairbank, J A

    1995-07-01

    Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy (MSPSE) were administered to three matched groups of adolescents. The first group met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. The second had been exposed to qualitatively and quantitatively similar stressors and did not meet criteria for PTSD (traumatized PTSD negatives). The third group consisted of non-traumatized controls. Data analysis revealed that the adolescents with PTSD had appreciably lower self-efficacy ratings on eight of the nine subtests that comprise the MSPSE. Non-significant differences were observed when the MSPSE subtest scores of the traumatized PTSD negatives and controls were compared. PMID:7654163

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Traumatic Hip Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Begly, John P; Robins, Bryan; Youm, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic hip dislocations are high-energy injuries that often result in considerable morbidity. Although appropriate management improves outcomes, associated hip pathology may complicate the recovery and lead to future disability and pain. Historically, open reduction has been the standard of care for treating hip dislocations that require surgical intervention. The use of hip arthroscopy to treat the sequelae and symptoms resulting from traumatic hip dislocations recently has increased, however. When used appropriately, hip arthroscopy is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment option for intra-articular pathology secondary to traumatic hip dislocation. PMID:27007728

  9. CT of acute abdominal aortic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O; Heiken, Jay P

    2003-11-01

    Aortic aneurysm rupture, aortic dissection, PAU, acute aortic occlusion, traumatic aortic injury, and aortic fistula represent acute abdominal aortic conditions. Because of its speed and proximity to the emergency department, helical CT is the imaging test of choice for these conditions. MR imaging also plays an important role in the imaging of aortic dissection and PAU, particularly when the patient is unable to receive intravenous contrast material. In this era of MDCT, conventional angiography is used as a secondary diagnostic tool to clarify equivocal findings on cross-sectional imaging. Ultrasound is helpful when CT is not readily available and the patient is unable or too unstable to undergo MR imaging. PMID:14661663

  10. Protocol for a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components compared to other resuscitative fluids in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation of patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. It has been speculated that early resuscitation with blood components may have benefits in terms of treating trauma-induced coagulopathy, which in turn may influence survival. The proposed systematic review will evaluate the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components (red blood cells and/or plasma or whole blood), in both civilian and military settings, compared with other resuscitation strategies in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. Methods/design Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. General medical and specialist databases will be searched; the search strategy will combine terms for the population, intervention and setting. Studies will be selected for review if the population includes adult patients with major traumatic haemorrhage who receive blood components in a pre-hospital setting (civilian or military). Systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled observational studies will be included. Uncontrolled studies will be considered depending on the volume of controlled evidence. Quality assessment will be tailored to different study designs. Both patient related and surrogate outcomes will be considered. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analyses and subgroup analyses will be undertaken where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Discussion Given the increasing use by emergency services of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base for this practice. As far as the authors are aware, the proposed systematic review will be the first to address this topic. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013794 PMID:25344301

  11. Why traumatized borderline patients relapse.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, A H

    1996-01-01

    To be freed of longstanding painful symptoms or to become capable of functioning effectively has unconscious and sometimes conscious negative connotations for patients severely traumatized by childhood sexual abuse. These include rising expectations felt as coming both from within and without; disappointment that life can never make up for what has happened; loss of a justification for receiving care; fear that getting well invalidates the original trauma. Giving up illness may mean renouncing revenge and denying the seriousness of the childhood misery. To the extent that the torment of flashbacks and nightmares represents a continuation of the only family relationships the patient has known, losing these symptoms can feel as if being left entirely alone. The destructive impact of embittered and paranoid reactions unleashed by the experience of change for the better can be mitigated by the therapist's recognition of, and the focus upon, the negative meanings of progress toward health. PMID:9009374

  12. Scholastic impairments among traumatized adolescents.

    PubMed

    Saigh, P A; Mroueh, M; Bremner, J D

    1997-05-01

    This investigation sought to determine if exposure to exceptional stress is associated with academic deficits or whether academic deficits are specifically associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In order to address these questions, the Metropolitan Achievement Test (MAT) as well as a measure of intelligence were administered to three groups of Lebanese adolescents. The first group met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. The second group had been exposed to qualitatively and quantitatively similar stressors but did not meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD. The third group consisted of nontraumatized controls. Data analysis using IQ as a covariate determined that the MAT scores of the PTSD subjects were significantly lower than the scores of the stress exposed PTSD negatives and controls. No significant differences were observed when the MAT scores of the stress exposed PTSD negatives and controls were compared. PMID:9149452

  13. [Traumatic hip dislocation in childhood].

    PubMed

    Stachel, P; Hofmann-v Kap-herr, S; Schild, H

    1989-06-01

    The article reports on eight cases of traumatic dislocation of the hip in children. Six of these were genuine dislocations and two dislocation fractures. The children were between 5 and 13 years of age at the time of injury. Seven of these 8 children could be followed up one to 21 years after the accident. All 7 children were free from complaints at the time of follow-up examination; in one case only we found a moderate loss of function in the injured hip joint. In this patient the x-ray film showed deformation of the head of the femur after partial necrosis of the femoral head, as well as initial signs of coxarthrosis. Prognosis of this rare injury in children is favourable if repositioning is performed in time and if relief of the hip is effected for the proper period of time, depending on the individual case. PMID:2665382

  14. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships. PMID:26449269

  15. Pathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W

    2014-12-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently encountered in veterinary practice in companion animals, livestock and horses, inflicted head injury is a common method of euthanasia in domestic livestock, and malicious head trauma can lead to forensic investigation, the pathology of TBI has generally received little attention in the veterinary literature. This review highlights the pathology and pathogenesis of cerebral lesions produced by blunt, non-missile and penetrating, missile head injuries as an aid to the more accurate diagnosis of neurotrauma cases. If more cases of TBI in animals that result in fatality or euthanasia are subjected to rigorous neuropathological examination, this will lead to a better understanding of the nature and development of brain lesions in these species, rather than extrapolating data from human studies. PMID:25178417

  16. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory. PMID:23041686

  17. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    PubMed

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  18. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  19. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  20. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  1. The pathophysiology underlying repetitive mild traumatic brain injury in a novel mouse model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Anthony L.; Plog, Benjamin A.; Dayawansa, Samantha; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T.; Chen, Michael; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Deane, Rashid; Huang, Jason H.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background: An animal model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is essential for further understanding the pathophysiological link between repetitive head injury and the development of chronic neurodegenerative disease. We previously described a model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in mice that encapsulates the neurobehavioral spectrum characteristic of patients with CTE. We aimed to study the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this animal model. Methods: Our previously described model allows for controlled, closed head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Briefly, 12-week-old mice were divided into three groups: Control, single, and repetitive mTBI. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily, for 7 days. Mice were then subsequently sacrificed for macro- and micro-histopathologic analysis at 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months after the last TBI received. Brain sections were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) for astrocytes, CD68 for activated microglia, and AT8 for phosphorylated tau protein. Results: Brains from single and repetitive mTBI mice lacked macroscopic tissue damage at all time-points. Single mTBI resulted in an acute rea ctive astrocytosis at 7 days and increased phospho-tau immunoreactivity that was present acutely and at 1 month, but was not persistent at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI resulted in a more marked neuroinflammatory response, with persistent and widespread astrogliosis and microglial activation, as well as significantly elevated phospho-tau immunoreactivity to 6-months. Conclusions: The neuropathological findings in this new model of repetitive mTBI resemble some of the histopathological hallmarks of CTE, including increased astrogliosis, microglial activation, and hyperphosphorylated tau protein accumulation. PMID:25593768

  2. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Musleh, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%-70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. PMID:26929626

  3. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  4. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Musleh, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. PMID:26929626

  5. International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1:30 p.m. Central Time Trauma Tools Teaching Resources In the future, the ISTSS website will ... of the most challenging and rewarding aspects of teaching about traumatic stress for possible publication on the ...

  6. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (TBISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had developed and maintains a surveillance system to understand the magnitude and characteristics of hospitalized and fatal traumatic brain injuries in the United State...

  7. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  8. Traumatic injury among females: does gender matter?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Generally, the incidence of traumatic injuries is disproportionately high in males. However, trauma in females is underreported. Aim To study the epidemiology and outcome of different mechanisms and types of traumatic injuries in women. Methods We conducted a traditional narrative review using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE, searching for English-language publications for gender-specific trauma between January 1993 and January 2013 using key words “trauma”, “gender”, “female” and “women”. Results Among 1150 retrieved articles, 71 articles were relevant over 20 years. Although it is an important public health problem, traumatic injuries among females remain under-reported. Conclusion There is a need for further research and evaluation of the exact burden of traumatic injuries among females together with the implementation of effective community based preventive programs. PMID:25089153

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  10. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  11. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Geoffrey T.; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W.; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach—balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents—might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days. PMID:24808792

  12. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  13. The Dens: Normal Development, Developmental Variants and Anomalies, and Traumatic Injuries.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, William T; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of cervical spine imagining can be challenging, especially in children and the elderly. The biomechanics of the developing pediatric spine and age-related degenerative changes predispose these patient populations to injuries centered at the craniocervical junction. In addition, congenital anomalies are common in this region, especially those associated with the axis/dens, due to its complexity in terms of development compared to other vertebral levels. The most common congenital variations of the dens include the os odontoideum and a persistent ossiculum terminale. At times, it is necessary to distinguish normal development, developmental variants, and developmental anomalies from traumatic injuries in the setting of acute traumatic injury. Key imaging features are useful to differentiate between traumatic fractures and normal or variant anatomy acutely; however, the radiologist must first have a basic understanding of the spectrum of normal developmental anatomy and its anatomic variations in order to make an accurate assessment. This review article attempts to provide the basic framework required for accurate interpretation of cervical spine imaging with a focus on the dens, specifically covering the normal development and ossification of the dens, common congenital variants and their various imaging appearances, fracture classifications, imaging appearances, and treatment options. PMID:26199787

  14. The Dens: Normal Development, Developmental Variants and Anomalies, and Traumatic Injuries

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, William T; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of cervical spine imagining can be challenging, especially in children and the elderly. The biomechanics of the developing pediatric spine and age-related degenerative changes predispose these patient populations to injuries centered at the craniocervical junction. In addition, congenital anomalies are common in this region, especially those associated with the axis/dens, due to its complexity in terms of development compared to other vertebral levels. The most common congenital variations of the dens include the os odontoideum and a persistent ossiculum terminale. At times, it is necessary to distinguish normal development, developmental variants, and developmental anomalies from traumatic injuries in the setting of acute traumatic injury. Key imaging features are useful to differentiate between traumatic fractures and normal or variant anatomy acutely; however, the radiologist must first have a basic understanding of the spectrum of normal developmental anatomy and its anatomic variations in order to make an accurate assessment. This review article attempts to provide the basic framework required for accurate interpretation of cervical spine imaging with a focus on the dens, specifically covering the normal development and ossification of the dens, common congenital variants and their various imaging appearances, fracture classifications, imaging appearances, and treatment options. PMID:26199787

  15. Classroom Strategies for Teaching Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinski, Jennifer Blevins

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions currently face the largest influx of veteran students since World War II. As the number of veteran students who may experience learning problems caused by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and/or Traumatic Brain Injury continues to rise, the need for instructional strategies that address their needs increases. Educators may…

  16. Stress and Traumatic Stress: How Do Past Events Influence Current Traumatic Stress among Mothers Experiencing Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julie K.; Hall, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relationship between past traumatic events and the level of current traumatic stress among mothers experiencing homelessness. The data for this study were gathered from 75 homeless mothers between May 2006 and October 2006 using a cross-sectional survey design with purposive sampling. All mothers…

  17. Gender Differences in Traumatic Events and Rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Nish, David; Leonard, Noelle R.; Strauss, Shiela M.

    2007-01-01

    In the present report we describe patterns of traumatic events and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), both partial and full, among homeless youth and those at risk for homelessness, with an emphasis on gender differences. Participants were 85 homeless and at-risk youth (49% female) recruited from a drop-in center in New York City in 2000.…

  18. Factors prognosticating the outcome of decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Priya; Haspani, Saffari; Idris, Zamzuri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this prospective cohort study was to analyse the characteristics of severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in a regional trauma centre Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL) along with its impact of various prognostic factors post Decompressive Craniectomy (DC). Materials and Methods: Duration of the study was of 13 months in HKL. 110 consecutive patients undergoing DC and remained in our centre were recruited. They were then analysed categorically with standard analytical software. Results: Age group have highest range between 12-30 category with male preponderance. Common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident involving motorcyclist. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant in referral area (P = 0.006). In clinical evaluation statistically significant was the motor score (P = 0.040), pupillary state (P = 0.010), blood pressure stability (P = 0.013) and evidence of Diabetes Insipidus (P < 0.001). In biochemical status the significant statistics included evidence of coagulopathy (P < 0.001), evidence of acidosis (P = 0.003) and evidence of hypoxia (P = 0.030). In Radiological sector, significant univariate analysis proved in location of the subdural clot (P < 0.010), location of the contusion (P = 0.045), site of existence of both type of clots (P = 0.031) and the evidence of edema (P = 0.041). The timing of injury was noted to be significant as well (P = 0.061). In the post operative care was, there were significance in the overall stability in intensive care (P < 0.001), the stability of blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, pulse rates and oxygen saturation (all P < 0.001)seen individually, post operative ICP monitoring in the immediate (P = 0.002), within 24 hours (P < 0.001) and within 24-48 hours (P < 0.001) period, along with post operative pupillary size (P < 0.001) and motor score (P < 0.001). Post operatively, radiologically significant statistics included evidence of midline shift post operatively in the CT scan

  19. Comparison of the Recovery Patterns of Language and Cognitive Functions in Patients with Post-Traumatic Language Processing Deficits and in Patients with Aphasia Following a Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukovic, Mile; Vuksanovic, Jasmina; Vukovic, Irena

    2008-01-01

    In this study we investigated the recovery patterns of language and cognitive functions in patients with post-traumatic language processing deficits and in patients with aphasia following a stroke. The correlation of specific language functions and cognitive functions was analyzed in the acute phase and 6 months later. Significant recovery of the…

  20. Building trust to work with children after a severe traumatic accident.

    PubMed

    Hall, Julianne; Nayar, Shoba

    2014-01-01

    Trust is integral to nursing; yet little is known about how nurses establish trust when working with patients. This grounded theory study explored nurses' perspectives of how to build trust with a child and family in the context of paediatric acute health care. Seven paediatric acute care nurses were asked what they did when they cared for a child admitted to an acute care ward from emergency department or intensive care unit following a severe traumatic accident. Building trust emerged as the basic social process for an effective working relationship between a nurse and family to promote the rehabilitation of the child. This paper argues that building trust is critical to nurses developing a working relationship with both child and family to promote optimal health, and enables nurses to effectively step out and handover the care of the child to the family. PMID:24787249

  1. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Acute Liver Failure: Institutional Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick R; Mallory, Grant W; Atkinson, John L D; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) has been associated with cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), which may be managed utilizing an ICP monitor. The most feared complication of placement is catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of severe coagulopathy. Previous studies reported hemorrhage rates between 3.8-22 % among various devices, with epidural catheters having lower hemorrhage rates and precision relative to subdural bolts and intraparenchymal catheters. We sought to identify institutional hemorrhagic rates of ICP monitoring in ALF and its associated factors in a modern series guided by protocol implantation. Patient records treated for ALF with ICP monitoring at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN from 1995 to 2014 were reviewed. Protocalized since 1995, epidural (EP) ICP monitors were first used followed by intraparenchymal (IP) for stage III-IV hepatic encephalopathy. The following variables and outcomes were collected: patient demographics, ICPs and treatment methods, laboratory data, imaging studies, number of days for ICP monitoring, radiographic and symptomatic hemorrhage rates, orthotopic liver transplantation rates, and death. A total of 20 ICP monitors were placed for ALF, 7 EP, and 13 IP. International normalized ratio (INR) at placement of an EP monitor was 2.4 (1.7-3.2) with maximum of 2.7 (2.0-3.6) over the following 2.3 (1-3) days. Mean EP ICP at placement was 36.3 (11-55) and maximum of 43.1 (20-70) mm Hg. INR at placement of an IP monitor was 1.3 (<0.8-3.0) with maximum value of 2.9 (1.6-5.4) over the following 4.2 (2-6) days. Mean IP ICP at placement was 9.9 (2-19) and maximum was 39.8 (11-100) mm Hg. There was one asymptomatic hemorrhage in the EP group (14.3 % hemorrhage rate) and two hemorrhages in the IP group (hemorrhage rate was 15.4 %), both of which were fatal. Overall mortality rate in the EP group was 71.4 % (5/7) with two patients receiving transplantation, and one death in the transplant group. Overall mortality

  2. Alcohol's Burden on Immunity Following Burn, Hemorrhagic Shock, or Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Molina, Patricia E; Katz, Paige S; Souza-Smith, Flavia; Ford, Stephen M; Teng, Sophie X; Dodd, Tracy Y; Maxi, John K; Mayeux, Jacques P

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption contributes to increased incidence and severity of traumatic injury. Compared with patients who do not consume alcohol, alcohol-consuming patients have higher rates of long-term morbidity and mortality during recovery from injury. This can be attributed in part to an impaired immune response in individuals who consume alcohol. Acute and chronic alcohol use can affect both the innate and adaptive immune defense responses within multiple organ systems; the combination of alcohol use and injury results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral pathogens. This review examines the major deleterious effects of alcohol on immunity following tissue damage or traumatic injury, with a focus on alcohol's influence on the ability of the immune and major organ systems to fight disease and to repair damaged tissues following injury. PMID:26695749

  3. Dislocation of the penis: a rare complication after traumatic pelvic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei Chin; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Teh, Hui Seong; Teo, Chang Peng Colin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the male external genitalia is frequently encountered, but acute traumatic dislocation of the penile structure is extremely rare, with only a few reports found in the literature. We herein report the case of a 21-year-old man who sustained blunt trauma to the pelvis following a motor vehicle accident, and had features suspicious of penile dislocation. With the use of computed tomography and bedside ultrasonography, a diagnosis of penile dislocation was made, which was subsequently confirmed intraoperatively. Immediate surgical intervention via gentle manipulation of the penile tissue back to its native position was performed in order to restore normal anatomy. The exact mechanism of penile dislocation is not known. However, circumferential laceration around the foreskin causing degloving injury of the penis is suggested in our patient. PMID:25640107

  4. Alcohol’s Burden on Immunity Following Burn, Hemorrhagic Shock, or Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Katz, Paige S.; Souza-Smith, Flavia; Ford, Stephen M.; Teng, Sophie X.; Dodd, Tracy Y.; Maxi, John K.; Mayeux, Jacques P.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption contributes to increased incidence and severity of traumatic injury. Compared with patients who do not consume alcohol, alcohol-consuming patients have higher rates of long-term morbidity and mortality during recovery from injury. This can be attributed in part to an impaired immune response in individuals who consume alcohol. Acute and chronic alcohol use can affect both the innate and adaptive immune defense responses within multiple organ systems; the combination of alcohol use and injury results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral pathogens. This review examines the major deleterious effects of alcohol on immunity following tissue damage or traumatic injury, with a focus on alcohol’s influence on the ability of the immune and major organ systems to fight disease and to repair damaged tissues following injury. PMID:26695749

  5. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  6. Traumatic events and tonic immobility.

    PubMed

    Bados, Arturo; Toribio, Lidia; García-Grau, Eugeni

    2008-11-01

    Tonic immobility is a basic defense strategy which has not been studied in depth in humans. Data suggest that it may be a relatively frequent phenomenon in victims of rape and sexual abuse, but its occurrence has not been systematically explored in other types of trauma. We carried out a retrospective study in a sample of 100 university students to establish whether tonic immobility varies depending on the nature of the worst trauma experienced, defined subjectively by each participant. Immobility was assessed using the Tonic Immobility Scale and traumas were assessed using the modified Traumatic Events Questionnaire. Seventy percent of the sample had experienced trauma of some kind. There were no significant differences in tonic immobility between different types of trauma (e.g., physical abuse, assault or aggression, serious accident), except that the mean tonic immobility score was significantly higher in the group with trauma due to physical/psychological or sexual abuse than in the group with trauma due to receiving news of the mutilation, serious injury, or violent or sudden death of a loved one. We conclude tentatively that tonic immobility may be typical not only of sexual traumas, but of other kinds of directly experienced traumas as well. PMID:18988436

  7. Neurostimulation for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Samuel S; Dixon, C Edward; Okonkwo, David O; Richardson, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a significant public health problem and is a leading cause of death and disability in many countries. Durable treatments for neurological function deficits following TBI have been elusive, as there are currently no FDA-approved therapeutic modalities for mitigating the consequences of TBI. Neurostimulation strategies using various forms of electrical stimulation have recently been applied to treat functional deficits in animal models and clinical stroke trials. The results from these studies suggest that neurostimulation may augment improvements in both motor and cognitive deficits after brain injury. Several studies have taken this approach in animal models of TBI, showing both behavioral enhancement and biological evidence of recovery. There have been only a few studies using deep brain stimulation (DBS) in human TBI patients, and future studies are warranted to validate the feasibility of this technique in the clinical treatment of TBI. In this review, the authors summarize insights from studies employing neurostimulation techniques in the setting of brain injury. Moreover, they relate these findings to the future prospect of using DBS to ameliorate motor and cognitive deficits following TBI. PMID:25170668

  8. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-04-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  9. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-01-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  10. Antioxidant therapies in traumatic brain and spinal cord injury*

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Mona; Hall, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Free radical formation and oxidative damage have been extensively investigated and validated as important contributors to the pathophysiology of acute central nervous system injury. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is an early event following injury occurring within minutes of mechanical impact. A key component in this event is peroxynitrite-induced lipid peroxidation. As discussed in this review, peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation irreversibly damages neuronal membrane lipids and protein function, which results in subsequent disruptions in ion homeostasis, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, mitochondrial respiratory failure and microvascular damage. Antioxidant approaches include the inhibition and/or scavenging of superoxide, peroxynitrite, or carbonyl compounds, the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and the targeting of the endogenous antioxidant defense system. This review covers the preclinical and clinical literature supporting the role of ROS and RNS and their derived oxygen free radicals in the secondary injury response following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) and reviews the past and current trends in the development of antioxidant therapeutic strategies. Combinatorial treatment with the suggested mechanistically complementary antioxidants will also be discussed as a promising neuroprotective approach in TBI and SCI therapeutic research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antioxidants and antioxidant treatment in disease. PMID:22080976

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Iatrogenic and Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Stefan; Donas, Konstantinos P. Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Horsch, Svante

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the early and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute carotid artery dissections, its specific problems, and its limitations. We encountered seven patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, three cases of which occurred after carotid endarterectomy, two after carotid angioplasty and stenting, and two after trauma. Balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents were placed using a transfemoral approach. Success in restoring the carotid lumen was achieved in all patients. No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients experienced significant clinical improvement while in the hospital and achieved complete long-term recovery. At follow-up (mean, 22.4 months), good luminal patency of the stented segments was observed. In conclusion, in this small series, primary stent-supported angioplasty seems to be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of selected patients having acute traumatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, with excellent early and midterm results. Larger series and longer-term follow-up are required before definitive recommendations can be made.

  12. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  13. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  14. Acute liver failure and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined by the presence of coagulopathy (International Normalized Ratio ≥ 1.5) and hepatic encephalopathy due to severe liver damage in patients without pre-existing liver disease. Although the mortality due to ALF without liver transplantation is over 80%, the survival rates of patients have considerably improved with the advent of liver transplantation, up to 60% to 90% in the last two decades. Recent large studies in Western countries reported 1, 5, and 10-year patient survival rates after liver transplantation for ALF of approximately 80%, 70%, and 65%, respectively. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), which has mainly evolved in Asian countries where organ availability from deceased donors is extremely scarce, has also improved the survival rate of ALF patients in these regions. According to recent reports, the overall survival rate of adult ALF patients who underwent LDLT ranges from 60% to 90%. Although there is still controversy regarding the graft type, optimal graft volume, and ethical issues, LDLT has become an established treatment option for ALF in areas where the use of deceased donor organs is severely restricted. PMID:25343108

  15. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  16. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-28

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  17. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  18. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  19. Secondary Traumatization in Vietnam Veterans' Families.

    PubMed

    Yager, Thomas J; Gerszberg, Nicole; Dohrenwend, Bruce P

    2016-08-01

    This research focused on secondary traumatization of wives and offspring of 115 male Vietnam veterans, a subsample from the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study who had one or more children aged 6 to 16 years and had had a clinical interview. Traumatization was defined as meeting criteria for lifetime war-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Secondary traumatization was operationalized by elevated scores on children's internalizing or externalizing behavior problems and on wives' demoralization. There was evidence of secondary traumatization in the veterans' sons (odds ratio [OR] = 20.31 for internalizing behavior problems). Current PTSD in the veterans was associated with demoralization in their wives or partners (β = 0.24), which in turn was associated with behavior problems in their daughters (ORs = 2.67 and 4.61 for internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, respectively; these were adjusted for veteran's PTSD). Demoralization of the wife or partner was also associated with current alcoholism in the veterans (β = 0.30, adjusting for veteran's PTSD). These associations were also adjusted for other veteran risk factors, including severity of combat exposure, involvement in harming civilians or prisoners, and prewar vulnerability. Even with the degree of secondary traumatization present, the veterans' children appeared at least as healthy as counterparts in the general population. PMID:27529559

  20. Purines: forgotten mediators in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Edwin K; Boison, Detlev; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the topic of traumatic brain injury has gained attention in both the scientific community and lay press. Similarly, there have been exciting developments on multiple fronts in the area of neurochemistry specifically related to purine biology that are relevant to both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. At the 2105 meeting of the National Neurotrauma Society, a session sponsored by the International Society for Neurochemistry featured three experts in the field of purine biology who discussed new developments that are germane to both the pathomechanisms of secondary injury and development of therapies for traumatic brain injury. This included presentations by Drs. Edwin Jackson on the novel 2',3'-cAMP pathway in neuroprotection, Detlev Boison on adenosine in post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy, and Michael Schwarzschild on the potential of urate to treat central nervous system injury. This mini review summarizes the important findings in these three areas and outlines future directions for the development of new purine-related therapies for traumatic brain injury and other forms of central nervous system injury. In this review, novel therapies based on three emerging areas of adenosine-related pathobiology in traumatic brain injury (TBI) were proposed, namely, therapies targeting 1) the 2',3'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway, 2) adenosine deficiency after TBI, and 3) augmentation of urate after TBI. PMID:26809224

  1. High Resolution Ultrasound in the Evaluation and Management of Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alaqeel, Ahmed; Alshomer, Feras

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound has been used as an important tool in the diagnosis, management and monitoring of both acute and chronic peripheral nerve injuries. According to literature, it demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of specific pathologies and its ability to differentiate between them. Literature has been reviewed, summarizing the specific finding of such modality in various peripheral neuropathies and with a specific focus over its role in evaluation and management of traumatic peripheral neuropathies. PMID:25337305

  2. Hybrid procedure for a traumatic aortic rupture consisting of endovascular repair and minimally invasive arch vessel transposition without sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yang Gi; Choo, Suk Jung; Lim, Ju Yong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chung, Cheol Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Emergency surgical repair for acute traumatic aortic ruptures has been associated with a high peri-procedural mortality rate. Endovascular stent-grafting, as a less invasive procedure, has shown encouraging results. This report describes a patient with a short landing zone, who was treated by transposing the supra-aortic branch without sternotomy, followed by covered stent-grafting with an extended proximal bare portion to enhance fixation. PMID:20052360

  3. POST-TRAUMATIC OSTEOARTHRITIS: IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR EARLY INTERVENTION†

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Chubinskaya, Susan; Guilak, Farshid; Martin, James A.; Oegema, Theodore R.; Olson, Steven A.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Even with current treatments of acute joint injuries, more than 40% of people who suffer significant ligament or meniscus tears, or articular surface injuries, will develop osteoarthritis. Correspondingly, 12% or more of all patients with lower extremity osteoarthritis have a history of joint injury. Recent research suggests that acute joint damage that occurs at the time of an injury initiates a sequence of events that can lead to progressive articular surface damage. New molecular interventions, combined with evolving surgical methods, aim to minimize or prevent progressive tissue damage triggered by joint injury. Seizing the potential for progress in the treatment of joint injuries to forestall OA will depend on advances in: (1) quantitative methods of assessing the injury severity, including both structural damage and biologic responses, (2) understanding of the pathogenesis of post-traumatic OA, taking into account potential interactions among the different tissues and the role of post-traumatic incongruity and instability, and (3) application of engineering and molecular research to develop new methods of treating injured joints. This paper highlights recent advances in understanding of the structural damage and the acute biological response following joint injury, and it identifies important directions for future research. PMID:21520254

  4. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  5. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  6. Discriminating military and civilian traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew W; Velez, Carmen S

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at higher rates among service members than civilians. Explosions from improvised explosive devices and mines are the leading cause of TBI in the military. As such, TBI is frequently accompanied by other injuries, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. In addition to postconcussion symptoms, those who sustain a TBI commonly report chronic pain and posttraumatic stress symptoms. This combination of symptoms is so typical they have been referred to as the "polytrauma clinical triad" among injured service members. We explore whether these symptoms discriminate civilian occurrences of TBI from those of service members, as well as the possibility that repeated blast exposure contributes to the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'. PMID:25827093

  7. Headache management in concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    Headache is one of the most common symptoms after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and posttraumatic headache (PTH) may be part of a constellation of symptoms that is seen in the postconcussive syndrome. PTH has no defining clinical features; currently it is classified as a secondary headache based on its close temporal relationship to the injury. A growing number of studies are characterizing PTH by using primary headache classifications. Moderate to severe PTH that is often disabling may be classified as migraine or probable migraine and is found in substantial numbers of individuals. Recent data from civilian adult, pediatric, and military populations all find that PTH may be more of a chronic problem than previously thought, with a prevalence of close to half of the injured population. In addition, if PTH definitions are strictly adhered to, then many cases of PTH may be missed, thus underestimating the scope of the problem. New headaches may be reported well after the 7 days required for diagnosis of PTH by the guidelines of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. A history of headache before a head injury occurs and female gender are possible risk factors for headache after TBI. Treatment of PTH may be acute or preventive, and recommendations are made for the use of migraine-specific acute therapy when indicated. Preventive therapy may be considered when PTH is frequent, disabling, or refractory to acute therapies. Comorbid conditions should be considered when choosing an appropriate preventive therapy. The symptom of headache as a "return to play" or "return to duty" barrier must be viewed in the context of other symptoms of mild TBI. PMID:22035683

  8. Blood products and their use in traumatic major haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Simon Ross

    2016-02-01

    Blood loss due to trauma is a leading cause of death in young people and is the result of the 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, which collectively reduce haemostasis. Emergency department nurses can help to reverse the triad through the timely and efficient use of blood products and fluids. This article briefly examines different blood groups, describes the elements of the lethal triad, and discusses the blood products used to transfuse patients with major haemorrhage. PMID:26853674

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury Causes a Tacrolimus-Sensitive Increase in Non-Convulsive Seizures in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John N.; Gandhi, Anandh; Singh, Baljinderjit; Churn, Severn B.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a significant but potentially preventable complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous research in animal models of acquired epilepsy has implicated the calcium-sensitive phosphatase, calcineurin. In addition, our lab recently found that calcineurin activity in the rat hippocampus increases acutely after lateral TBI. Here we use a calcineurin inhibitor test whether an acute increase in calcineurin activity is necessary for the development of late post-traumatic seizures. Adult rats were administered the calcineurin inhibitor Tacrolimus (5mg/kg; i.p.) 1 hour after lateral fluid percussion TBI and then monitored by video-electrocorticography (video-ECoG) for spontaneous seizure activity 5 weeks or 33 weeks later. At 5 weeks post-TBI, we observed epileptiform activity on the video-ECoG of brain injured rats but no seizures. By 33 weeks post-TBI though, nearly all injured rats exhibited spontaneous seizures, including convulsive seizures which were infrequent but lasted minutes (18% of injured rats), and non-convulsive seizures which were frequent but lasted tens of seconds (94% of injured rats). We also identified non-convulsive seizures in a smaller subset of control and sham TBI rats (56%), reminiscent of idiopathic seizures described in other rats strains. Non-convulsive seizures in the brain injured rats, however, were four-times more frequent and two-times longer lasting than in their uninjured littermates. Interestingly, rats administered Tacrolimus acutely after TBI showed significantly fewer non-convulsive seizures than untreated rats, but a similar degree of cortical atrophy. The data thus indicate that administration of Tacrolimus acutely after TBI suppressed non-convulsive seizures months later. PMID:25580467

  10. Brief Information on Childhood Traumatic Grief for School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This information sheet summarizes material found in the "In-Depth General Information Guide to Childhood Traumatic Grief" and "In-Depth Information on Childhood Traumatic Grief for School Personnel." Childhood traumatic grief is a condition that some children develop after the death of a close friend or family member. Children who develop…

  11. Resolving Child and Adolescent Traumatic Grief: Creative Techniques and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar-Bailey, Meredith; Kress, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a review of creative interventions that can be helpful in facilitating the resolution of traumatic grief in children and adolescents. Traumatic grief is conceptualized as a condition in which a person loses a close loved one (e.g., a parent or a sibling) in a traumatic manner, and ensuing trauma-related symptoms disrupt the…

  12. Childhood Traumatic Grief Educational Materials for School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This guide to childhood traumatic grief for school personnel builds on the "In-Depth General Information Guide to Childhood Traumatic Grief" and the "Brief Information on Childhood Traumatic Grief" and should be read in conjunction with them. This guide for school personnel pays special attention to the reactions and symptoms school personnel…

  13. MedlinePlus: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... traumatic stress disorder Traumatic events and children Related Health Topics Stress Veterans and Military Health National Institutes of Health ... Stress Disorder is the National Institute of Mental Health NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): NIH Research to Results PTSD: A ...

  14. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  15. [Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with delayed unusual disclosure].

    PubMed

    Thicoïpé, M; Sztark, F; Lassié, P; Tueux, O; Dabadie, P

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the case of a delayed presentation of a traumatic diaphragmatic rupture in a 22-year-old patient admitted to hospital for a minor surgical procedure under general anaesthesia. Nine months before, he had a road traffic accident with a minor thoracic trauma. Three days after surgery, the patient was readmitted for a tension hydrothorax due to the herniation and the perforation of the stomach into the left pleural cavity. Such a delayed presentation of a traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains uncommon. The peroperative ventilatory factors involved in the development of the hernia are discussed. PMID:8572411

  16. What is post-traumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are categorized as separate and discrete disorders, the boundary between them is sometimes indistinct. Their separation is based on the assumption that PTSD results primarily from psychological stress, while TBI is the consequence of an identifiable injury to the brain. This distinction is based on an antiquated polarity between mind and brain, and the separation of the two disorders often becomes arbitrary in day-to-day psychiatric practice and research. PMID:22033951

  17. Traumatic Endophthalmitis due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaru-ampornpan, Pimkwan; Agarwal, Anita; Midha, Narinder K.; Kim, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of traumatic endophthalmitis due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans. Design. Case report. Methods. Retrospective chart review. Results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of traumatic endophthalmitis due to C. cellulans, which did not respond to intravitreal antibiotics or repeat vitrectomy and ultimately led to the discovery of an occult intraocular foreign body. Conclusions. C. cellulans is a rare cause of endophthalmitis. Greater awareness of this bacterium in the ophthalmic literature as a cause of endophthalmitis and its association with foreign bodies may allow earlier and more purposeful intervention in future cases. PMID:22606461

  18. Management of Major Traumatic Upper Extremity Amputations.

    PubMed

    Solarz, Mark K; Thoder, Joseph J; Rehman, Saqib

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic upper extremity amputation is a life-altering event, and recovery of function depends on proper surgical management and postoperative rehabilitation. Many injuries require revision amputation and postoperative prosthesis fitting. Care should be taken to preserve maximal length of the limb and motion of the remaining joints. Skin grafting or free tissue transfer may be necessary for coverage to allow preservation of length. Early prosthetic fitting within 30 days of surgery should be performed so the amputee can start rehabilitation while the wound is healing and the stump is maturing. Multidisciplinary care is essential for the overall care of the patient following a traumatic amputation of the upper limb. PMID:26614927

  19. Clinical Influence of Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis on Neurological Outcome after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Major Fracture or Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Seiji; Morishita, Yuichiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Ideta, Ryosuke; Mori, Eiji; Yugue, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To clarify the influence of cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) on neurological functional recovery after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without major fracture or dislocation. Overview of Literature The biomechanical etiology of traumatic CSCI remains under discussion and its relationship with CSCS is one of the most controversial issues in the clinical management of traumatic CSCI. Methods To obtain a relatively uniform background, patients non-surgically treated for an acute C3–4 level CSCI without major fracture or dislocation were selected. We analyzed 58 subjects with traumatic CSCI using T2-weighted mid-sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. The sagittal diameter of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) column, degree of canal stenosis, and neurologic outcomes in motor function, including improvement rate, were assessed. Results There were no significant relationships between sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their American Spinal Injury Association motor scores at both admission and discharge. Moreover, no significant relationships were observed between the sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their neurological recovery during the following period. Conclusions No relationships between pre-existing CSCS and neurological outcomes were evident after traumatic CSCI. These results suggest that decompression surgery might not be recommended for traumatic CSCI without major fracture or dislocation despite pre-existing CSCS. PMID:27340535

  20. Treating traumatic bleeding in a combat setting.

    PubMed

    Clifford, C Cloonan

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  1. The cellular basis of traumatic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane

    2004-12-01

    Bleeding is clearly a major cause of morbidity and death after trauma. When bleeding is attributable to transection of major vessels, surgical repair is appropriate. Posttraumatic microvascular bleeding attributable to coagulopathy secondary to metabolic derangements, hypothermia, and depletion or dysfunction of cellular and protein components requires a different approach. Although transfusion of blood products may be necessary to replace the blood loss, it does not always correct the problem of microvascular bleeding. The type of injury, mode of care, and treatment objectives differ significantly for combat-wounded soldiers versus civilian trauma patients. Although hemorrhage is responsible for 50% of combat deaths, published information about coagulation monitoring among combat patients is very limited. These articles summarize the appropriate monitoring of hemostasis among combat trauma patients, review the unique nature of combat casualties and the medical system used to treat them, and discuss information available from civilian studies. Because the development of coagulopathy is relatively infrequent in the young, otherwise healthy, military population, the routine screening measures currently used are adequate to guide initial blood product administration. However, as new intravenous hemostatic agents are used for these patients, better laboratory measures will be required. Although hemorrhage is the leading cause of death for combat casualties, catastrophic hemorrhage is rarely a prehospital combat medical management problem because, when it occurs, it tends to cause death before medical care can be provided. In civilian environments, most seriously injured victims can be reached and transported by emergency medical services personnel within minutes; in combat, it often takes hours simply to transport casualties off the battlefield. In combat situations, even if the transport distances are small, the hazardous nature of the forward combat areas frequently

  2. Different Neural Mechanisms Underlie Deficits in Mental Flexibility in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Compared to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2015-01-01

    Mental flexibility is a core executive function that underlies the ability to adapt to changing situations and respond to new information. Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) complain of a number of executive function difficulties, one of which is mental inflexibility or an inability to switch between concepts. While the behavioral presentation of mental inflexibility is similar in those with PTSD or mTBI, we hypothesized that the differences in their etiology would manifest as differences in their underlying brain processing. The neural substrates of mental flexibility have been examined with a number of neuroimaging modalities. Functional magnetic resonance imaging has elucidated the brain regions involved, whereas electroencephalography has been applied to understand the timing of the brain activations. Magnetoencephalography, with its high temporal and spatial resolution, has more recently been used to delineate the spatiotemporal progression of brain processes involved in mental flexibility and has been applied to the study of clinical populations. In a number of separate studies, our group has compared the source localization and brain connectivity during a mental flexibility set-shifting task in a group of soldiers with PTSD and civilians with an acute mTBI. In this article, we review the results from these studies and integrate the data between groups to compare and contrast differences in behavioral, neural, and connectivity findings. We show that the different etiologies of PTSD and mTBI are expressed as distinct neural profiles for mental flexibility that differentiate the groups despite their similar clinical presentations. PMID:26696907

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  4. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26417498

  5. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26417498

  6. [Traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite in a sportsman.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Casper Smedegaard; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Holck, Kim

    2014-05-12

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old sportsman who experi-enced acute onset of strong pain and loss of ability to extend his right knee during a game of beach volley. X-ray imaging showed a patella in two parts with rounded edges and with a diastasis of more than 2 cm. Intra-operatively atrophic fibrocartilage was found on both parts of the patella. Asymptomatic patella bi-partite was found on X-ray imaging of the patient's left knee, and he was diagnosed to have traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgical and radiological findings. PMID:25351835

  7. Simultaneous cesarean delivery and craniotomy in a term pregnant patient with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Badran, Basma Abed; Eisa, Ahmed Amin; Barakat, Rafik Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with traumatic brain injury is challenging. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory, and management should be individualized according to the type and extent of injury, maternal status, gestational age, and fetal status. We report a 27-year-old term primigravida presenting after head injury with Glasgow coma scale score 11 and anisocoria. Depressed temporal bone fracture and acute epidural hematoma were diagnosed, necessitating an urgent neurosurgery. Her fetus was viable with no signs of distress and no detected placental abnormalities. Cesarean delivery was performed followed by craniotomy in the same setting under general anesthesia with good outcome of the patient and her baby. PMID:25829914

  8. Systemic inflammation and multiple organ injury in traumatic hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaizheng; Xiao, Xuefei; Sun, Chuanzheng; Sun, Dao; Li, Yayong; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a severe outcome of traumatic injury that accounts for numerous traumatic deaths. In the process of traumatic HS, both hemorrhage and trauma can trigger a complex cascade of posttraumatic events that are related to inflammatory and immune responses, which may lead to multiple organ injury or even death. From a mechanistic perspective, systemic inflammation and organ injury are involved coagulation, the complement system, impaired microcirculation and inflammatory signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the systemic inflammation and multiple organ injury in post-traumatic HS. PMID:25961533

  9. Acute Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Young, Meilin; Adurty, Rajashekar; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is defined as the abnormal presence of air within the pleural space (cavity) that results in the partial or complete collapse of a lung. It can occur spontaneously or due to a traumatic event. Symptoms can vary from a nondescriptive complaint of shortness of breath or chest pain to complete cardiopulmonary collapse. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical suspicion along with supporting imaging studies. Treatment often involves surgical or nonsurgical approaches with goal to alleviate symptoms and prevent recurrence. PMID:26919678

  10. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  11. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury: Empirical Family Assessment Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Duane S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are described for quantifying and formalizing assessment of traumatic brain injury patient families. The advantages and disadvantages of empirical and clinical assessment are outlined, and four family assessment methods are reviewed: self-report, interview, observation, and laboratory. Specific assessment instruments are noted along with…

  13. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  14. [Traumatic apophyseolysis of the ischiadic tuber].

    PubMed

    Ibing, H P

    1991-09-01

    Traumatic apophyseolysis of the os ischii is a rare injury occurring during sports activities. It mostly affects young men between 14 and 25 years of age. Conservative treatment is often sufficient unless there is a mechanical obstruction or an irritation of the conditioned rupture of the os ischii with subsequent load-dependent complaints. PMID:1751565

  15. Clinimetric measurement in traumatic brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Opara, N; Małecka, I; Szczygiel, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Every year, about 1.5 million affected people die and several millions receive emergency treatment. Most of the burden (90%) is in low and middle-income countries. The costs of care depend on the level of disability. The burden of care after traumatic brain injury is caused by disability as well as by psychosocial and emotional sequelae of injury. The final consequence of brain injury is the reduction of quality of life. It is very difficult to predict the outcome after traumatic brain injury. The basic clinical model included four predictors: age, score in Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. These are the neuroradiological markers of recovery after TBI (CT, MRI and PET) and biomarkers: genetic markers of ApoE Gene, ectoenzyme CD 38 (cluster of differentiation 38), serum S100B, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron specific endolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GPAP). These are many clinimetric scales which are helpful in prognosing after head injury. In this review paper, the most commonly used scales evaluating the level of consciousness after traumatic brain injury have been presented. PMID:25408714

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and Vocational Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corthell, David W., Ed.

    Intended to serve as a resource guide on traumatic brain injury for rehabilitation practitioners, the book's 10 chapters are grouped into sections which provide an introduction and examine aspects of evaluation, treatment and placement planning, and unresolved issues. Chapters have the following titles and authors: "Scope of the Problem" (Marilyn…

  18. Urethrorrhagia Secondary to Traumatic Penile Pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    José, Campos S; Nicolás, Besser P; Pablo, Aguirre A; Vicente, Sepúlveda Z; Juan Carlos, Bravo P; David, Carvajal S

    2016-07-01

    Male 12-year-old patient presenting urethrorrhagia after straddle injury associated to hemodynamic instability secondary to traumatic formation of pseudoaneurysm of the pudendal artery in the bulb of the penis. Satisfactory treatment with angiographic selective and direct percutaneous embolization was performed, with resolution of the bleeding. PMID:27335780

  19. School Reentry Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deidrick, Kathleen K. M.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    Successful school reentry following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical to recovery. Physical, cognitive, behavioral, academic, and social problems can affect a child's school performance after a TBI. However, early intervention has the potential to improve child academic outcomes and promote effective coping with any persistent changes in…

  20. A Bilateral Traumatic Hip Obturator Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet Adnan; Acar, Nihat; Karci, Tolga; Sesli, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    A case of a bilateral simultaneous traumatic obturator dislocation of both hip joints in an 18-year-old young man following a traffic accident is presented. We reduced the dislocated femoral heads immediately under general anesthesia followed by passive and active exercises and early full-weight bearing mobilization. After 5 years, the result was excellent. PMID:26977327