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  1. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  2. The Impact of Surgical Timing in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0396 TITLE: The impact of surgical timing in acute traumatic spinal ...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2013 – 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The impact of surgical timing in acute traumatic spinal cord...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The optimal surgical timing following a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains controversial

  3. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  4. Developing quality of care indicators for patients with traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): A feasibility study using administrative health data

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Daria; Craven, B. Catharine; Jaglal, Susan B.; Verrier, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (1) to inform the development of health system quality indicators for traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury from acute care admission to community care discharge using administrative data, and (2) to examine characteristics and differences in care among type of care facility, and type of pathology using administrative data. Design Retrospective cohort study using administrative health data. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants Using administrative health data, we used International Classification codes 10th version Canadian Edition to identify incident cases of SCI from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2012. Results We identified 7,693 cases in our cohort, of whom 1,537 (20.0%) were categorized as traumatic spinal cord (TSCI) and 6,156 (80.0%) as non-traumatic (NTSCI). Of those identified with NTSCI, more than half (54.0%) were diagnosed with either Guillain Barré syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis (n = 3,326). More individuals admitted to a trauma/spine center were seen by an orthopedic surgeon or a neurosurgeon (20.3% compared to 5.6% for NTSCI; 77.7% compared to 24.9% for TSCI). Only 25.7% (n = 724) of the NTSCI cohort were admitted to a rehabilitation facility from a trauma/spine center, compared to 58.9% (n = 754) of those with TSCI. Conclusions Important challenges in data completeness and utility were identified. Province wide processes to flag incomplete data and provision of incentives for comprehensive data are urgently needed to develop quality indicators across the care continuum. Consensus on the coding for NTSCI for the purposes of developing health system indicators is required. PMID:26111282

  5. Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L; Creasey, Graham H; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16 to 74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI+TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI+ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI+contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the contralateral

  6. Combined SCI and TBI: Recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L.; Creasey, Graham H.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16–74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI + TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6 weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI + ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI + contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the

  7. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  8. Acute traumatic posterior elbow dislocation in children.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Justus; Zundel, Sabine M; Luithle, Tobias; Fuchs, Jörg; Kirschner, Hans-Joachim

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the elbow is often associated with significant morbidity and incomplete recovery. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse the outcome of 33 children (median age 10.8 years). Patients underwent reduction and assessment of stability under general anaesthesia. Pure dislocations (n=10) were immobilized, whereas unstable fractures (n=23) were stabilized. Refixation of ligaments was performed if stability was not achieved by fracture stabilization alone. Immobilization was continued for 26 (pure dislocations) or 35 days (associated injuries), respectively. Results were excellent (n=9) or good (n=1) after pure dislocation. Results were excellent (n=15), good (n=7) or poor (n=1) in children with associated injuries. Accurate diagnosis, concentric stable reduction of the elbow as well as stable osteosynthesis of displaced fractures are associated with good results in children with acute posterior elbow dislocations.

  9. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    evaluated the impact of deletion of connexins (Cx30/Cx43) in astrocytes on post-traumatic ATP release. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a...Introduction The proposed studies were based on the observati on that ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors drives the innate inf lammatory...tissue swelling. Prior studies have shown that excess ive ATP release from peri-traumatic regions contributes to the inflammatory response to SCI by

  10. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    impact of deletion of connexins (Cx30/Cx43) in astrocytes on post-traumatic ATP release. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a significant reduction...the observation that ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors drives the innate inflammatory response initiated by spinal cord injury. P2X7R...swelling. Prior studies have shown that excessive ATP release from peri-traumatic regions contributes to the inflammatory response to SCI by

  11. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy: Initiated by Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Brohi, Karim; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Ganter, Michael T.; Matthay, Michael A.; Mackersie, Robert C.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Coagulopathy following major trauma is conventionally attributed to activation and consumption of coagulation factors. Recent studies have identified an acute coagulopathy present on admission that is independent of injury severity. We hypothesized that early coagulopathy is due to tissue hypoperfusion, and investigated derangements in coagulation associated with this. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of major trauma patients admitted to a single trauma center. Blood was drawn within 10 minutes of arrival for analysis of partial thromboplastin and prothrombin times, prothrombin fragments 1+2, fibrinogen, thrombomodulin, protein C, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and d-dimers. Base deficit (BD) was used as a measure of tissue hypoperfusion. Results: A total of 208 patients were enrolled. Patients without tissue hypoperfusion were not coagulopathic, irrespective of the amount of thrombin generated. Prolongation of the partial thromboplastin and prothrombin times was only observed with an increased BD. An increasing BD was associated with high soluble thrombomodulin and low protein C levels. Low protein C levels were associated with prolongation of the partial thromboplastin and prothrombin times and hyperfibrinolysis with low levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and high d-dimer levels. High thrombomodulin and low protein C levels were significantly associated with increased mortality, blood transfusion requirements, acute renal injury, and reduced ventilator-free days. Conclusions: Early traumatic coagulopathy occurs only in the presence of tissue hypoperfusion and appears to occur without significant consumption of coagulation factors. Alterations in the thrombomodulin-protein C pathway are consistent with activated protein C activation and systemic anticoagulation. Admission plasma thrombomodulin and protein C levels are predictive of clinical outcomes following major trauma. PMID:17457176

  12. Management of acute traumatic stress in nuclear and radiological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Marina; Jordan, Osvaldo; Kuper, Enrique; Hernandez, Daniel; Galmarini, Martin; Ferraro, Augusto

    2010-06-01

    In order to effectively respond to and minimize the psychological impact following disasters, such as radio-nuclear ones, it is essential to understand the mechanisms involved in such conditions and how to prevent and treat the psychological impacts, including those related to acute traumatic stress and its consequences across life span. Radio-nuclear emergencies may cause psychological traumatic stress, with its potentially significant consequences in mental health, with both short and long-term effects, which extend beyond the individuals directly affected. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by human senses and most people are unaware of the magnitude of its effects, which could result in feelings of helplessness and vulnerability. Those situations with a high degree of uncertainty, regarding potential future health effects, are more psychologically traumatic than others. The present century has witnessed a steady increase in the number of publications concerning the mental health impact of traumatic events, showing the need of increasing the study of traumatic stress and its impact on mental health. A prompt, planned and effective response to manage disaster-induced acute traumatic stress may prevent the evolutionary reactions of traumatic stress into disorders or even chronic stress diseases that can appear after a nuclear or radiological emergency.

  13. Acute and post-traumatic stress disorder after spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Bowles, S V; James, L C; Solursh, D S; Yancey, M K; Epperly, T D; Folen, R A; Masone, M

    2000-03-15

    When a spontaneous abortion is followed by complicated bereavement, the primary care physician may not consider the diagnosis of acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. The major difference between these two conditions is that, in acute stress disorder, symptoms such as dissociation, reliving the trauma, avoiding stimuli associated with the trauma and increased arousal are present for at least two days but not longer than four weeks. When the symptoms persist beyond four weeks, the patient may have post-traumatic stress disorder. The symptoms of distress response after spontaneous abortion include psychologic, physical, cognitive and behavioral effects; however, patients with distress response after spontaneous abortion often do not meet the criteria for acute or post-traumatic stress disorder. After spontaneous abortion, as many as 10 percent of women may have acute stress disorder and up to 1 percent may have post-traumatic stress disorder. Critical incident stress debriefing, which may be administered by trained family physicians or mental health practitioners, may help patients who are having a stress disorder after a spontaneous abortion.

  14. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Galeiras Vázquez, R; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Mourelo Fariña, M; Montoto Marqués, A; Salvador de la Barrera, S

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury requires a multidisciplinary approach both for specialized treatment of the acute phase and for dealing with the secondary complications. A suspicion or diagnosis of spinal cord injury is the first step for a correct management. A review is made of the prehospital management and characteristics of the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Respiratory monitoring for early selective intubation, proper identification and treatment of neurogenic shock are essential for the prevention of secondary spinal cord injury. The use of corticosteroids is currently not a standard practice in neuroprotective treatment, and hemodynamic monitoring and early surgical decompression constitute the cornerstones of adequate management. Traumatic spinal cord injury usually occurs as part of multiple trauma, and this can make diagnosis difficult. Neurological examination and correct selection of radiological exams prevent delayed diagnosis of spinal cord injuries, and help to establish the prognosis.

  15. Diffuse Brain Injury Induces Acute Post-Traumatic Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Striz, Martin; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Donohue, Kevin D.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical observations report excessive sleepiness immediately following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of experimental evidence to support or refute the benefit of sleep following a brain injury. The aim of this study is to investigate acute post-traumatic sleep. Methods Sham, mild or moderate diffuse TBI was induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI) in male C57BL/6J mice at 9:00 or 21:00 to evaluate injury-induced sleep behavior at sleep and wake onset, respectively. Sleep profiles were measured post-injury using a non-invasive, piezoelectric cage system. In separate cohorts of mice, inflammatory cytokines in the neocortex were quantified by immunoassay, and microglial activation was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Results Immediately after diffuse TBI, quantitative measures of sleep were characterized by a significant increase in sleep (>50%) for the first 6 hours post-injury, resulting from increases in sleep bout length, compared to sham. Acute post-traumatic sleep increased significantly independent of injury severity and time of injury (9:00 vs 21:00). The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β increased in brain-injured mice compared to sham over the first 9 hours post-injury. Iba-1 positive microglia were evident in brain-injured cortex at 6 hours post-injury. Conclusion Post-traumatic sleep occurs for up to 6 hours after diffuse brain injury in the mouse regardless of injury severity or time of day. The temporal profile of secondary injury cascades may be driving the significant increase in post-traumatic sleep and contribute to the natural course of recovery through cellular repair. PMID:24416145

  16. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-30

    spinal cord injury (SCI), but evidence-based protocols are needed. Optimal early treatment and management of SCI has not been established in clinical...and electronic medical records of SCI patients We have held meetings with the SFGH spinal cord injury clinicians and have established methods for...of  blood  pressure  in  the  rats  after   spinal  cord   injury  at  the  high  thoracic  level  using  the

  17. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mourelo Fariña, M; Salvador de la Barrera, S; Montoto Marqués, A; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Galeiras Vázquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of treatment in acute traumatic spinal cord injury is to preserve residual neurologic function, avoid secondary injury, and restore spinal alignment and stability. In this second part of the review, we describe the management of spinal cord injury focusing on issues related to short-term respiratory management, where the preservation of diaphragmatic function is a priority, with prediction of the duration of mechanical ventilation and the need for tracheostomy. Surgical assessment of spinal injuries based on updated criteria is discussed, taking into account that although the type of intervention depends on the surgical team, nowadays treatment should afford early spinal decompression and stabilization. Within a comprehensive strategy in spinal cord injury, it is essential to identify and properly treat patient anxiety and pain associated to spinal cord injury, as well as to prevent and ensure the early diagnosis of complications secondary to spinal cord injury (thromboembolic disease, gastrointestinal and urinary disorders, pressure ulcers).

  18. Weight-supported treadmill vs over-ground training for walking after acute incomplete SCI

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, B; Apple, D.; Barbeau, H.; Basso, M.; Behrman, A.; Deforge, D.; Ditunno, J.; Dudley, G.; Elashoff, R.; Fugate, L.; Harkema, S.; Saulino, M.; Scott, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of step training with body weight support on a treadmill (BWSTT) with over-ground practice to the efficacy of a defined over-ground mobility therapy (CONT) in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Methods A total of 146 subjects from six regional centers within 8 weeks of SCI were entered in a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (MRCT). Subjects were graded on the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA) as B, C, or D with levels from C5 to L3 and had a Functional Independence Measure for locomotion (FIM-L) score <4. They received 12 weeks of equal time of BWSTT or CONT. Primary outcomes were FIM-L for ASIA B and C subjects and walking speed for ASIA C and D subjects 6 months after SCI. Results No significant differences were found at entry between treatment groups or at 6 months for FIM-L (n = 108) or walking speed and distance (n = 72). In the upper motor neuron (UMN) subjects, 35% of ASIA B, 92% of ASIA C, and all ASIA D subjects walked independently. Velocities for UMN ASIA C and D subjects were not significantly different for BWSTT (1.1 ± 0.6 m/s, n = 30) and CONT (1.1 ± 0.7, n = 25) groups. Conclusions The physical therapy strategies of body weight support on a treadmill and defined overground mobility therapy did not produce different outcomes. This finding was partly due to the unexpectedly high percentage of American Spinal Injury Association C subjects who achieved functional walking speeds, irrespective of treatment. The results provide new insight into disability after incomplete spinal cord injury and affirm the importance of the multicenter, randomized clinical trial to test rehabilitation strategies. PMID:16505299

  19. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-06

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system.

  20. Acute post-traumatic stress symptoms and age predict outcome in military blast concussion.

    PubMed

    Mac Donald, Christine L; Adam, Octavian R; Johnson, Ann M; Nelson, Elliot C; Werner, Nicole J; Rivet, Dennis J; Brody, David L

    2015-05-01

    High rates of adverse outcomes have been reported following blast-related concussive traumatic brain injury in US military personnel, but the extent to which such adverse outcomes can be predicted acutely after injury is unknown. We performed a prospective, observational study of US military personnel with blast-related concussive traumatic brain injury (n = 38) and controls (n = 34) enrolled between March and September 2012. Importantly all subjects returned to duty and did not require evacuation. Subjects were evaluated acutely 0-7 days after injury at two sites in Afghanistan and again 6-12 months later in the United States. Acute assessments revealed heightened post-concussive, post-traumatic stress, and depressive symptoms along with worse cognitive performance in subjects with traumatic brain injury. At 6-12 months follow-up, 63% of subjects with traumatic brain injury and 20% of controls had moderate overall disability. Subjects with traumatic brain injury showed more severe neurobehavioural, post-traumatic stress and depression symptoms along with more frequent cognitive performance deficits and more substantial headache impairment than control subjects. Logistic regression modelling using only acute measures identified that a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, older age, and more severe post-traumatic stress symptoms provided a good prediction of later adverse global outcomes (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.84). Thus, US military personnel with concussive blast-related traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan who returned to duty still fared quite poorly on many clinical outcome measures 6-12 months after injury. Poor global outcome seems to be largely driven by psychological health measures, age, and traumatic brain injury status. The effects of early interventions and longer term implications of these findings are unknown.

  1. Traumatic Memories in Acute Stress Disorder: An Analysis of Narratives before and after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulds, Michelle L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociative reactions in acute stress disorder purportedly impede encoding and organization of traumatic memories and consequently impair the individual's ability to retrieve trauma-related details. A qualitative examination was conducted on trauma narratives of individuals with acute stress disorder (N = 15) prior to cognitive behavior…

  2. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  3. Acute care alternate-level-of-care days due to delayed discharge for traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Amy, Chen; Zagorski, Brandon; Chan, Vincy; Parsons, Daria; Vander Laan, Rika; Colantonio, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Alternate-level-of-care (ALC) days represent hospital beds that are taken up by patients who would more appropriately be cared for in other settings. ALC days have been found to be costly and may result in worse functional outcomes, reduced motor skills and longer lengths of stay in rehabilitation. This study examines the factors that are associated with acute care ALC days among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). We used the Discharge Abstract Database to identify patients with ABI using International Classification of Disease-10 codes. From fiscal years 2007/08 to 2009/10, 17.5% of patients with traumatic and 14% of patients with non-traumatic brain injury had at least one ALC day. Significant predictors include having a psychiatric co-morbidity, increasing age and length of stay in acute care. These findings can inform planning for care of people with ABI in a publicly funded healthcare system.

  4. Functional Definition and Characterisation of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Ross; Manson, Joanna; De’Ath, Henry; Platton, Sean; Coates, Amy; Allard, Shubha; Hart, Daniel; Pearse, Rupert; Pasi, K. John; MacCallum, Peter; Stanworth, Simon; Brohi, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify an appropriate diagnostic tool for the early diagnosis of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy (ATC) and validate this modality through prediction of transfusion requirements in trauma hemorrhage. Design Prospective observational cohort study Setting Level 1 trauma centre Patients Adult trauma patients who met the local criteria for full trauma team activation. Exclusion criteria included emergency department (ED) arrival >2 hours after injury, >2000ml of intravenous fluid before ED arrival or transfer from another hospital. Interventions None Measurements Blood was collected on arrival in ED and analysed with laboratory prothrombin time (PT), point of care (PoC) PT and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Prothrombin ratio (PTr) was calculated and ATC defined as laboratory PTr>1.2. Transfusion requirements were recorded for the first 12 hours following admission. Main Results 300 patients were included in the study. Laboratory PT results were available at median 78 (62-103) minutes. PoC PTr had reduced agreement with laboratory PTr in patients with ATC, with 29% false negative results. In ATC the ROTEM Clot Amplitude at 5 minutes (CA5) was diminished by 42% and this persisted throughout clot maturation. ROTEM clotting time was not significantly prolonged. A CA5 threshold ≤35mm had a detection rate of 77% for ATC with a false positive rate of 13%. Patients with CA5 ≤35mm were more likely to receive red cell (46% vs 17%, p<0.001) and plasma (37% vs 11%, p<0.001) transfusions. The CA5 could identify patients who would require massive transfusion (detection rate of 71%, vs 43% for PTr >1.2, p<0.001). Conclusions In trauma hemorrhage PTr is not rapidly available from the laboratory and PoC devices can be inaccurate. ATC is functionally characterised by a reduction in clot strength. With a threshold of CA5 ≤35mm ROTEM can identify ATC at 5 minutes and predict the need for massive transfusion. PMID:21765358

  5. Acute Cortical Transhemispheric Diaschisis after Unilateral Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Le Prieult, Florie; Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Imbrosci, Barbara; Mittmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Focal neocortical brain injuries lead to functional alterations, which can spread beyond lesion-neighboring brain areas. The undamaged hemisphere and its associated disturbances after a unilateral lesion, so-called transhemispheric diaschisis, have been progressively disclosed over the last decades; they are strongly involved in the pathophysiology and, potentially, recovery of brain injuries. Understanding the temporal dynamics of these transhemispheric functional changes is crucial to decipher the role of the undamaged cortex in the processes of functional reorganization at different stages post-lesion. In this regard, little is known about the acute-subacute processes after 24-48 h in the brain hemisphere contralateral to injury. In the present study, we performed a controlled cortical impact to produce a unilateral traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the motor and somatosensory cortex of mice. In vitro extracellular multi-unit recordings from large neuronal populations, together with single-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cortical network contralateral to the lesion, revealed a strong, but transient, neuronal hyperactivity as early as 24-48 h post-TBI. This abnormal excitable state in the intact hemisphere was not accompanied by alterations in neuronal intrinsic properties, but it was associated with an impairment of the phasic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission and an increased expression of GABAA receptor subunits related to tonic inhibition exclusively in the contralateral hemisphere. These data unravel a series of early transhemispheric functional alterations after diffuse unilateral cortical injury, which may compensate and stabilize the disrupted brain functions. Therefore, our findings support the hypothesis that the undamaged hemisphere could play a significant role in early functional reorganization processes after a TBI.

  6. Clinical and Mechanistic Drivers of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Kutcher, Matt; Redick, Britt; Nelson, Mary; Call, Mariah; Knudson, M Margaret; Schreiber, Martin A; Bulger, Eileen M; Muskat, Peter; Alarcon, Louis H; Myers, John G; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Brasel, Karen J; Phelan, Herb A; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Matijevic, Nena

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy (ATC) occurs after severe injury and shock and is associated with increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. The effects of ATC and hemostatic resuscitation on outcome are not well-explored. The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study provided a unique opportunity to characterize coagulation and the effects of resuscitation on ATC after severe trauma. Methods Blood samples were collected upon arrival on a subset of PROMMTT patients. Plasma clotting factor levels were prospectively assayed for coagulation factors. These data were analyzed with comprehensive PROMMTT clinical data. Results There were 1198 patients with laboratory results of whom 41.6% were coagulopathic. Using International Normalized Ratio (INR)≥1.3, 41.6% (448) of patients were coagulopathic while 20.5% (214) were coagulopathic using partial thromboplastin time (PTT)≥35. Coagulopathy was primarily associated with a combination of an ISS>15 and a BD<−6 (P<.05). Regression modeling for INR-based coagulopathy shows that pre-hospital crystalloid (odds ratio (OR)=1.05), Injury Severity Score (ISS, OR=1.03), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR=0.93), heart rate (OR=1.08), systolic blood pressure (OR=0.96), base deficit (BD, OR=0.92) and temperature (OR=0.84) were significant predictors of coagulopathy (all P<.03). A subset of 165 patients had blood samples collected and coagulation factor analysis performed. Elevated ISS and BD were associated with elevation of aPC and depletion of factors (all P<.05). Reductions in factors I, II, V, VIII and an increase in aPC drive ATC (all p<.04). Similar results were found for PTT-defined coagulopathy. Conclusions ATC is associated with depletion of factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, IX and X and is driven by the activation of the protein C system. These data provide additional mechanistic understanding of the drivers of coagulation abnormalities after injury. Further understanding of the drivers of

  7. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  8. Acute Stress Disorder as a Predictor of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Physical Assault Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elklit, Ask; Brink, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The authors' objective was to examine the ability of acute stress disorder (ASD) and other trauma-related factors in a group of physical assault victims in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months later. Subjects included 214 victims of violence who completed a questionnaire 1 to 2 weeks after the assault, with 128 participating…

  9. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord injury? Where is the nearest SCI Model System of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More ... spinal cord injury? Where is the nearest SCI Model System of Care? Follow Us! Get Email Updates Questions & Comments Suggest ...

  10. Modeling the Patient Journey from Injury to Community Reintegration for Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Canadian Centre

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Argelio; Gurling, James; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Burns, Anthony S.; Lewis, Rachel; Soril, Lesley; Fallah, Nader; Street, John T.; Bélanger, Lise; Townson, Andrea; Liang, Liping; Atkins, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient’s journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. Methods To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC), Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. Findings To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s) of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. Conclusion The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery. PMID:24023623

  11. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  12. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Steven T.; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Gandy, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression—has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  13. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE.

  14. The influence of time from injury to surgery on motor recovery and length of hospital stay in acute traumatic spinal cord injury: an observational Canadian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R John; Johnson, Michael G; Linassi, A G; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24 h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72 h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24 h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24 h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24 h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS.

  15. Emergency anesthesia for evacuating a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage in a child overdosed with hypertonic saline

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, Chulananda; Bedford, James; Harpreet, Sodhi; Giombini, Mariangela; Sheikh, Asme

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old child with a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage received 10 times higher dose of hypertonic saline inadvertently immediately before surgery. This case report describes deviations in fluid management needed to alleviate salt toxicity and its adverse effects during surgery under anesthesia perioperatively. The child made an uneventful recovery with no evident residual damage at follow-up. PMID:28217157

  16. Clinical Trial of AC105 (Mg/PEG) for Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    505-9. Kwon BK, Roy J, Lee JH, Okon E, Zhang H, Marx JC, Kindy MS. (2009) Magnesium chloride in a polyethylene glycol formulation as a...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. is developing the polymer formulation of magnesium , known as AC-105...15. SUBJECT TERMS AC-105, Magnesium , Mg, Spinal Cord Injury, SCI 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  17. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    microglia in response to SCI, and of the role of P2X7 receptor activation in that process . Indeed, in parallel work using uninjured human brain tissue...distinct glial fates are instructed, and how that process may be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Thus, on the basis of the injury-associated...autocrine loop for the self -maintenance of glial progenitors, the perturbation of which might dictate progenitor recruitment as either reactive glia or

  18. Acute mild traumatic brain injury is not associated with white matter change on diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Ilvesmäki, Tero; Luoto, Teemu M; Hakulinen, Ullamari; Brander, Antti; Ryymin, Pertti; Eskola, Hannu; Iverson, Grant L; Ohman, Juha

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to (i) evaluate the influence of age on diffusion tensor imaging measures of white matter assessed using tract-based spatial statistics; (ii) determine if mild traumatic brain injury is associated with microstructural changes in white matter, in the acute phase following injury, in a large homogenous sample that was carefully screened for pre-injury medical, psychiatric, or neurological problems; and (iii) examine if injury severity is related to white matter changes. Participants were 75 patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (age = 37.2 ± 12.0 years, 45 males and 30 females) and 40 controls (age = 40.6 ± 12.2 yrs, 20 males and 20 females). Age effects were analysed by comparing control subgroups aged 31-40, 41-50, and 51-60 years against a group of 18-30-year-old control subjects. Widespread statistically significant areas of abnormal diffusion tensor measures were observed in older groups. Patients and controls were compared using age and gender as covariates and in age- and gender-matched subgroups. Subgroups of patients with more severe injuries were compared to age-and gender-matched controls. No significant differences were detected in patient-control or severity analyses (all P-value > 0.01). In this large, carefully screened sample, acute mild traumatic brain injury was not associated with diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities detectable with tract-based spatial statistics.

  19. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  20. Review of Acute Traumatic Closed Mallet Finger Injuries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Botero, Santiago; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan Jose; Benaïda, Anissa; Collon, Sylvie; Facca, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    In adults, mallet finger is a traumatic zone I lesion of the extensor tendon with either tendon rupture or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. High-energy mechanisms of injury generally occur in young men, whereas lower energy mechanisms are observed in elderly women. The mechanism of injury is an axial load applied to a straight digit tip, which is then followed by passive extreme distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) hyperextension or hyperflexion. Mallet finger is diagnosed clinically, but an X-ray should always be performed. Tubiana's classification takes into account the size of the bony articular fragment and DIPJ subluxation. We propose to stage subluxated fractures as stage III if the subluxation is reducible with a splint and as stage IV if not. Left untreated, mallet finger becomes chronic and leads to a swan-neck deformity and DIPJ osteoarthritis. The goal of treatment is to restore active DIPJ extension. The results of a six- to eight-week conservative course of treatment with a DIPJ splint in slight hyperextension for tendon lesions or straight for bony avulsions depends on patient compliance. Surgical treatments vary in terms of the approach, the reduction technique, and the means of fixation. The risks involved are stiffness, septic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Given the lack of consensus regarding indications for treatment, we propose to treat all cases of mallet finger with a dorsal glued splint except for stage IV mallet finger, which we treat with extra-articular pinning. PMID:27019806

  1. Development of a Small Molecule P2X7R Antagonist as a Treatment for Acute SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    brain edema. Methods Mice. Aqp4−/− mice were generated by GenOway by cloning and sequencing of a targeted region of the murine Aqp4 gene in a 129/Sv... genetic back- ground. The strategy was to design a targeted locus allowing us to delete exons 1–3 to avoid any expression of putative splice variants...was made on the back region and a laminectomy was performed aseptically at the T11-T12 level. Before SCI, a catheter was placed in the left femoral

  2. Apolipoprotein E-Mimetic COG1410 Reduces Acute Vasogenic Edema following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang; Wu, Yue; Zhong, Jianjun; Liu, Jieshi; Qin, Xinghu; Chen, Ligang; Vitek, Michael P.; Li, Fengqiao; Xu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The degree of post-traumatic brain edema and dysfunction of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) influences the neurofunctional outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previous studies have demonstrated that the administration of apolipoprotein E-mimetic peptide COG1410 reduces the brain water content after subarachnoid hemorrhage, intra-cerebral hemorrhage, and focal brain ischemia. However, the effects of COG1410 on vasogenic edema following TBI are not known. The current study evaluated the effects of 1 mg/kg daily COG1410 versus saline administered intravenously after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on BBB dysfunction and vasogenic edema at an acute stage in mice. The results demonstrated that treatment with COG1410 suppressed the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9, reduced the disruption of the BBB and Evans Blue dye extravasation, reduced the TBI lesion volume and vasogenic edema, and decreased the functional deficits compared with mice treated with vehicle, at an acute stage after CCI. These findings suggest that COG1410 is a promising preclinical therapeutic agent for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. PMID:26192010

  3. Effective factors on linguistic disorder during acute phase following traumatic brain injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Kapourchali, Sara Ramezani; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnezhad; Saberi, Alia; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been known to be the leading cause of breakdown and long-term disability in people under 45 years of age. This study highlights the effective factors on post-traumatic (PT) linguistic disorder and relations between linguistic and cognitive function after trauma in adults with acute TBI. A cross-sectional design was employed to study 60 post-TBI hospitalized adults aged 18-65 years. Post-traumatic (PT) linguistic disorder and cognitive deficit after TBI were respectively diagnosed using the Persian Aphasia Test (PAT) and Persian version of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at discharge. Primary post-resuscitation consciousness level was determined using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Paracilinical data was obtained by CT scan technique. Multiple logistic regression analysis illustrated that brain injury severity was the first powerful significant predictor of PT linguistic disorder after TBI and frontotemporal lesion was the second. It was also revealed that cognitive function score was significantly correlated with score of each language skill except repetition. Subsequences of TBI are more commonly language dysfunctions that demand cognitive flexibility. Moderate, severe and fronto-temporal lesion can increase the risk of processing deficit in linguistic macrostructure production and comprehension. The dissociation risk of cortical and subcortical pathways related to cognitive-linguistic processing due to intracranial lesions can augment possibility of lexical-semantic processing deficit in acute phase which probably contributes to later cognitive-communication disorder.

  4. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency Requiring Valve Repair in an Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yoshinori; Sudo, Yoshio; Sueta, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid insufficiency due to penetrating cardiac trauma is rare. Patients with tricuspid insufficiency due to trauma can tolerate this abnormality for months or even years. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with penetrating cardiac trauma on the right side of her heart that required tricuspid valve repair in an acute setting. She sustained cut and stab wounds on her bilateral forearms and in the neck and epigastric region. She had cardiac tamponade and developed pulseless electrical activity, which required emergency surgery. The right ventricle and superior vena cava were dissected approximately 5 cm and 2 cm, respectively. After these wounds had been repaired, the patient's inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass suggested rightsided heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed tricuspid insufficiency. Right atriotomy was performed, and a detailed examination revealed that the tricuspid valve septal leaflet was split in two. There was also an atrial septal injury that created a connection with the left atrium; these injuries were not detected from the right ventricular wound. After repair, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass with mild tricuspid insufficiency was achieved, and she recovered uneventfully. This case emphasized the importance of thoroughly investigating intracardiac injury and transesophageal echocardiography.

  5. Acute evaluation of conversational discourse skills in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Joanne; de Guise, Elaine; Champoux, Marie-Claude; Couturier, Céline; Lamoureux, Julie; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed; Feyz, Mitra

    2014-12-01

    This study looked at performance on the conversational discourse checklist of the Protocole Montréal d'évaluation de la communication (D-MEC) in 195 adults with TBI of all severity hospitalized in a Level 1 Trauma Centre. To explore validity, results were compared to findings on tests of memory, mental flexibility, confrontation naming, semantic and letter category naming, verbal reasoning, and to scores on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. The relationship to outcome as measured with the Disability Rating Scale (DRS), the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E), length of stay, and discharge destinations was also determined. Patients with severe TBI performed significantly worse than mild and moderate groups (χ(2)(KW2df) = 24.435, p = .0001). The total D-MEC score correlated significantly with all cognitive and language measures (p < .05). It also had a significant moderate correlation with the DRS total score (r = -.6090, p < .0001) and the GOS-E score (r = .539, p < .0001), indicating that better performance on conversational discourse was associated with a lower disability rating and better global outcome. Finally, the total D-MEC score was significantly different between the discharge destination groups (F(3,90) = 20.19, p < .0001). Thus, early identification of conversational discourse impairment in acute care post-TBI was possible with the D-MEC and could allow for early intervention in speech-language pathology.

  6. Multimodality approach for imaging of non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Kiran; Kielar, Ania; Dighe, Manjiri K; O'Malley, Ryan; Wang, Carolyn; Gross, Joel A; Itani, Malak; Lalwani, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    "Acute abdomen" includes spectrum of medical and surgical conditions ranging from a less severe to life-threatening conditions in a patient presenting with severe abdominal pain that develops over a period of hours. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of these conditions helps in reducing related complications. Clinical assessment is often difficult due to availability of over-the-counter analgesics, leading to less specific physical findings. The key clinical decision is to determine whether surgical intervention is required. Laboratory and conventional radiographic findings are often non-specific. Thus, cross-sectional imaging plays a pivotal role for helping direct management of acute abdomen. Computed tomography is the primary imaging modality used for these cases due to fast image acquisition, although US is more specific for conditions such as acute cholecystitis. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound is very helpful in patients who are particularly sensitive to radiation exposure, such as pregnant women and pediatric patients. In addition, MRI is an excellent problem-solving modality in certain conditions such as assessment for choledocholithiasis in patients with right upper quadrant pain. In this review, we discuss a multimodality approach for the usual causes of non-traumatic acute abdomen including acute appendicitis, diverticulitis, cholecystitis, and small bowel obstruction. A brief review of other relatively less frequent but important causes of acute abdomen, such as perforated viscus and bowel ischemia, is also included.

  7. The impact of acute hyponatraemia on severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ke, C; Poon, W S; Ng, H K; Tang, N L; Chan, Y; Wang, J Y; Hsiang, J N

    2000-01-01

    The effect of experimental acute hyponatraemia on severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was studied in a modified impact-acceleration model. The cortical contusional volume was quantified by image analysis on serial sections, injured axons were visualized and quantified by beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein (beta-APP) immunohistochemical staining. Regional brain water content was estimated by the wet-dry weight method. The experiment was conducted in Group I (injury only) and Group II (injury followed by acute hyponatraemia). Comparison between the two groups showed that acute hyponatraemia significantly increased contusional volume (3.24 +/- 0.70 mm3 vs. 1.80 +/- 0.65 mm3, P = 0.009) and the number of injured axons (128.7 +/- 44.3 vs. 41.7 +/- 50.1, P = 0.04) in the right thalamus & basal ganglia region. Water content of the brain stem region was also significantly increased by acute hyponatraemia (73.71 +/- 0.14% vs. 72.28 +/- 0.93%, P = 0.004). These results suggest that acute hyponatraemia potentiates secondary brain damage in severe TBI by augmentation of both focal contusion and diffuse axonal injury. The injured brain stem region is more susceptible to edema formation induced by experimental acute hyponatraemia.

  8. Traumatic Life Events Prior to Alcohol-Related Admission of Injured Acute Care Inpatients: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Roselyn; Russo, Joan; Darnell, Doyanne; Wang, Jin; Ingraham, Leah; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Approximately 30 million Americans present to acute care medical settings annually after incurring traumatic injuries. Posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms are endemic among injury survivors. Our paper is a replication and extension of a previous report documenting a pattern of multiple traumatic life events across patients admitted to Level I trauma centers for an alcohol-related injury. Method This study is a secondary analysis of a nationwide 20-site randomized trial of an alcohol brief intervention with 660 traumatically injured inpatients. Pre-injury trauma history was assessed using the National Comorbidity Survey trauma history screen at the 6 month time point. Results Most common traumatic events experienced by our population of alcohol positive trauma survivors were having had someone close unexpectedly die, followed by having seen someone badly beaten or injured. Of particular note, there is high reported prevalence of rape/sexual assault, and childhood abuse and neglect among physically injured trauma survivors. Additional trauma histories are increasingly common among alcohol-positive patients admitted for a traumatic injury. Conclusions Due to the high rate of experienced multiple traumatic events among acutely injured inpatients, the trauma history screen could be productively integrated into screening and brief intervention procedures developed for acute care settings. PMID:26745689

  9. Corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, P.; Roberts, I.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury. Summary odds ratios were estimated as an inverse variance weighted average of the odds ratios for each study. SETTING: Randomised trials available by March 1996. SUBJECTS: The included trials with outcome data comprised 2073 randomised participants. RESULTS: The effect of corticosteroids on the risk of death was reported in 13 included trials. The pooled odds ratio for the 13 trials was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.74 to 1.12). Pooled absolute risk reduction was 1.8% (-2.5% to 5.7%). For the 10 trials that reported death or disability the pooled odds ratio was 0.90 (0.72 to 1.11). For infections of any type the pooled odds ratio was 0.92 (0.69 to 1.23) and for the seven trials reporting gastrointestinal bleeding it was 1.05 (0.44 to 2.52). With only those trials with the best quality of concealment of allocation, the pooled odds ratio estimates for death and death or disability became closer to unity. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review of randomised controlled trials of corticosteroids in acute traumatic brain injury shows that there remains considerable uncertainty over their effects. Neither moderate benefits nor moderate harmful effects can be excluded. The widely practicable nature of the drugs and the importance of the health problem suggest that large simple trials are feasible and worth while to establish whether there are any benefits from use of corticosteroids in this setting. PMID:9224126

  10. Acute Traumatic Tear of Latissimus Dorsi Muscle in an Elite Track Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Mehmet Mesut; Ergen, Emin; Üstüner, Evren

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively. PMID:24765503

  11. Acute traumatic tear of latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Mehmet Mesut; Ergen, Emin; Ustüner, Evren

    2013-08-02

    Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively.

  12. A longitudinal fMRI investigation in acute post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Li, Weihui; Hou, Cailan; Zhong, Yuan; He, Zhong; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies have implicated limbic, paralimbic, and prefrontal cortex in the pathophysiology of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, little is known about the neural substrates of acute PTSD and how they change with symptom improvement. Purpose To examine the neural circuitry underlying acute PTSD and brain function changes during clinical recovery from this disorder. Material and Methods Nineteen acute PTSD patients and nine non-PTSD subjects who all experienced a devastating mining accident underwent clinical assessment as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. Two years after the accident, a subgroup of 17 patients completed a second clinical evaluation, of which 13 were given an identical follow-up scan. Results Acute PTSD patients demonstrated greater activation in the vermis and right posterior cingulate, and greater deactivation in the bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobules than controls in the traumatic versus neutral condition. At follow-up, PTSD patients showed symptom reduction and decreased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum. Correlation results confirmed these findings and indicated that brain activation in the posterior cingulate/precuneus and vermis was predictive of PTSD symptom improvement. Conclusion The findings support the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule, posterior cingulate, and vermis in the pathogenesis of acute PTSD. Brain activation in the vermis and posterior cingulate/precuneus appears to be a biological marker of recovery potential from PTSD. Furthermore, decreased activation of the middle frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum may reflect symptom improvement.

  13. The management of the acute traumatic subungual haematoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin; Becker, Giles; Little, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal mode of managing the acute traumatic subungual haematoma in the hand. In this context the medical literature was searched systematically and the results analysed. The final dataset consisted of four articles. The complication rates of all forms of treatment were low. The outcome in terms of nail cosmesis was generally good, although the method of outcome measurement was variable in nature. There was no difference in cosmetic outcome when comparing nail bed repair with simple decompression. In conclusion the outcome in terms of nail cosmesis does not appear to be affected by the mode of treatment. The acutely painful subungual haematoma should be decompressed, whether this be done by trephining or nail removal. Future research includes the potential for a randomised controlled trial to compare nail bed repair with trephination.

  14. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  15. Posttraumatic Inflammation as a Key to Neuroregeneration after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Arash; Child, Christopher; Bruckner, Thomas; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Daniel, Volker; Biglari, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines might have a large impact on the secondary phase and on the neurological outcome of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). We measured the serum levels of different cytokines (Interferon-γ, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) over a 12-week period in 40 acute traumatic SCI patients: at admission on average one hour after initial trauma; at four, nine, 12, and 24 h; Three, and seven days after admission; and two, four, eight, and twelve weeks after admission. This was done using a Luminex Performance Human High Sensitivity Cytokine Panel. SCI was classified using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) at time of admission and after 12 weeks. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in patients without neurological remission and in patients with an initial AIS A (p < 0.05). This study shows significant differences in cytokine concentrations shown in traumatic SCI patients with different neurological impairments and within a 12-week period. IL-8 and IL-10 are potential peripheral markers for neurological remission and rehabilitation after traumatic SCI. Furthermore our cytokine expression pattern of the acute, subacute, and intermediate phase of SCI establishes a possible basis for future studies to develop standardized monitoring, prognostic, and tracking techniques. PMID:25860946

  16. QuickBrain MRI for the detection of acute pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Newgard, Craig D; Selden, Nathan R; Jafri, Mubeen A; Hansen, Matthew L

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The current gold-standard imaging modality for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is CT, but it confers risks associated with ionizing radiation. QuickBrain MRI (qbMRI) is a rapid brain MRI protocol that has been studied in the setting of hydrocephalus, but its ability to detect traumatic injuries is unknown. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric patients with TBI who were undergoing evaluation at a single Level I trauma center between February 2010 and December 2013. Patients who underwent CT imaging of the head and qbMRI during their acute hospitalization were included. Images were reviewed independently by 2 neuroradiology fellows blinded to patient identifiers. Image review consisted of identifying traumatic mass lesions and their intracranial compartment and the presence or absence of midline shift. CT imaging was used as the reference against which qbMRI was measured. RESULTS A total of 54 patients met the inclusion criteria; the median patient age was 3.24 years, 65% were male, and 74% were noted to have a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or greater. The sensitivity and specificity of qbMRI to detect any lesion were 85% (95% CI 73%-93%) and 100% (95% CI 61%-100%), respectively; the sensitivity increased to 100% (95% CI 89%-100%) for clinically important TBIs as previously defined. The mean interval between CT and qbMRI was 27.5 hours, and approximately half of the images were obtained within 12 hours. CONCLUSIONS In this retrospective pilot study, qbMRI demonstrated reasonable sensitivity and specificity for detecting a lesion or injury seen with neuroimaging (radiographic TBI) and clinically important acute pediatric TBI.

  17. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  18. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  20. The modified Bosworth technique for the treatment of acute traumatic Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Efstathopoulos, N; Agoropoulos, Z; Papachristou, G; Karachalios, G G; Kokorogiannis, K; Kaloudis, J

    1996-09-01

    Between 1983 and 1994, 15 patients (range 18 to 62 years) with acute traumatic Achilles tendon rupture, were treated surgically in our Department. We employed a modified Bosworth technique. The modifications were the use of a shorter strip of tendon and more secure fixation of the proximal and distal stump, than the original Bosworth technique. Postoperatively an above - knee plaster cast was applied with the knee flexed 30°-40° and the foot in a relaxed equinus position. The plaster cast was changed to a below - knee after 4 weeks and the foot gradually dorsiflexed to a neutral position until the 8th week, and then the plaster cast was removed. No patient had wound separation, infection or skin sloughs. After an average follow-up of 9 years, no rerupture has been reported and all the patients have returned to their pre injury activities.

  1. GFAP-BDP as an Acute Diagnostic Marker in Traumatic Brain Injury: Results from the Prospective Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Yue, John K.; Puccio, Ava M.; Panczykowski, David M.; Inoue, Tomoo; McMahon, Paul J.; Sorani, Marco D.; Yuh, Esther L.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Valadka, Alex B.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Casey, Scott S.; Cheong, Maxwell; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Hricik, Allison J.; Hochberger, Kerri; Menon, David K.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Schnyer, David M.; Vassar, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reliable diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health need. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is expressed in the central nervous system, and breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are released following parenchymal brain injury. Here, we evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of elevated levels of plasma GFAP-BDP in TBI. Participants were identified as part of the prospective Transforming Research And Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Study. Acute plasma samples (<24 h post-injury) were collected from patients presenting with brain injury who had CT imaging. The ability of GFAP-BDP level to discriminate patients with demonstrable traumatic lesions on CT, and with failure to return to pre-injury baseline at 6 months, was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Of the 215 patients included for analysis, 83% had mild, 4% had moderate, and 13% had severe TBI; 54% had acute traumatic lesions on CT. The ability of GFAP-BDP level to discriminate patients with traumatic lesions on CT as evaluated by AUC was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84–0.93). The optimal cutoff of 0.68 ng/mL for plasma GFAP-BDP level was associated with a 21.61 odds ratio for traumatic findings on head CT. Discriminatory ability of unfavorable 6 month outcome was lower, AUC 0.65 (95% CI, 0.55–0.74), with a 2.07 odds ratio. GFAP-BDP levels reliably distinguish the presence and severity of CT scan findings in TBI patients. Although these findings confirm and extend prior studies, a larger prospective trial is still needed to validate the use of GFAP-BDP as a routine diagnostic biomarker for patient care and clinical research. The term “mild” continues to be a misnomer for this patient population, and underscores the need for evolving classification strategies for TBI targeted therapy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01565551; NIH Grant 1RC2 NS069409) PMID:23489259

  2. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  3. Serum neurogranin measurement as a biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Korley, Frederick K.; Dai, Min; Everett, Allen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neurogranin (NRGN) is a small neuronal protein that plays an important role in synaptic signaling by regulating calmodulin (CaM) availability. In this study, we developed an ELISA to measure NRGN quantitatively in serum samples from a cohort of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients and a non-TBI control cohort, and explored the potential value of NRGN as a circulating biomarker for TBI. Design and methods Recombinant His-NRGN protein was used to develop mouse monoclonal capture and rabbit polyclonal detection antibodies, and they were used to develop a sandwich ELISA. After validation, we used this ELISA to measure serum samples from a cohort of typical adult acute TBI patients (N = 76 TBI cases) and non-TBI control patients (N = 150 controls). Results The NRGN ELISA lower limit of detection was 0.055 ng/mL, lower limit of quantification was 0.2 ng/mL, and interassay CVs were ≤ 10.7%. The average recovery was 99.9% (range from 97.2–102%). Serum NRGN concentrations in TBI cases were significantly higher than in controls (median values were 0.18 ng/mL vs. 0.02 ng/mL, p < 0.0001), but did not discriminate TBI cases with intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.09). Conclusions We have developed a highly sensitive and reproducible ELISA for measuring circulating NRGN in blood samples. Serum NRGN concentrations in acute TBI patients were significantly higher than in controls, indicating that NRGN could have utility as a circulating biomarker for acute TBI. This report provides evidence to support larger and controlled TBI clinical studies for NRGN validation and prediction of outcomes. PMID:26025774

  4. Beneficial Effect of Erythropoietin Short Peptide on Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kang, Mitchell; Marchese, Michelle; Rodriguez, Esther; Lu, Wei; Li, Xintong; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Dowling, Peter

    2016-04-01

    There is currently no effective medical treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Beyond the immediate physical damage caused by the initial impact, additional damage evolves due to the inflammatory response that follows brain injury. Here we show that therapy with JM4, a low molecular weight 19-amino acid nonhematopoietic erythropoietin (EPO) peptidyl fragment, containing amino acids 28-46 derived from the first loop of EPO, markedly reduces acute brain injury. Mice underwent controlled cortical injury and received either whole molecule EPO, JM4, or sham-treatment with phosphate-buffered saline. Animals treated with JM4 peptide exhibited a large decrease in number of dead neural cells and a marked reduction in lesion size at both 3 and 8 days postinjury. Therapy with JM4 also led to improved functional recovery and we observed a treatment window for JM4 peptide that remained open for at least 9 h postinjury. The full-length EPO molecule was divided into a series of 6 contiguous peptide segments; the JM4-containing segment and the adjoining downstream region contained the bulk of the death attenuating effects seen with intact EPO molecule following TBI. These findings indicate that the JM4 molecule substantially blocks cell death and brain injury following acute brain trauma and, as such, presents an excellent opportunity to explore the therapeutic potential of a small-peptide EPO derivative in the medical treatment of TBI.

  5. Nicotinamide reduces acute cortical neuronal death and edema in the traumatically injured brain.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Michael R; Gilbert, David R; Holland, Michael A; Pierce, Jeremy L

    2006-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that administration of nicotinamide (Vitamin B(3)) in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ischemia significantly reduced the size of infarction or injury and improved functional recovery. The present study evaluated the ability of nicotinamide to provide acute neuroprotection and edema reduction following TBI. Groups of rats were assigned to nicotinamide (500mg/kg) or saline (1.0ml/kg) treatment conditions and received contusion injuries or sham surgeries. Drug treatment was administered 15min following injury. Brains were harvested 24h later and either processed for histology or water content. Frozen sections were stained with the degenerating neuron stain (Fluoro-Jade B) (FJ) and cell counts were performed at the site of injury. Additional brains were processed for water content (a measure of injury-induced edema). Results of this study showed that administration of nicotinamide following TBI significantly reduced the number of FJ(+) neurons in the injured cortex compared to saline-treated animals. Examination of the water content of the brains also revealed that administration of nicotinamide significantly attenuated the amount of water compared to saline-treated animals in the injured cortex. These results indicate that nicotinamide administration significantly reduced neuronal death and attenuated cerebral edema following injury. The current findings suggest that nicotinamide significantly modulates acute pathophysiological processes following injury and that this may account for its beneficial effects on recovery of function following injury.

  6. Clinical and imaging assessment of acute combat mild traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Mac Donald, Christine L.; Rivet, Dennis; Ritter, John; May, Todd; Barefield, Maria; Duckworth, Josh; LaBarge, Donald; Asher, Dean; Drinkwine, Benjamin; Woods, Yvette; Connor, Michael; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) will noninvasively reveal white matter changes not present on conventional MRI in acute blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and to determine correlations with clinical measures and recovery. Methods: Prospective observational study of 95 US military service members with mTBI enrolled within 7 days from injury in Afghanistan and 101 healthy controls. Assessments included Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPCSQ), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Military (PCLM), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), conventional MRI, and DTI. Results: Significantly greater impairment was observed in participants with mTBI vs controls: RPCSQ (19.7 ± 12.9 vs 3.6 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), PCLM (32 ± 13.2 vs 20.9 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), BDI (7.4 ± 6.8 vs 2.5 ± 4.9, p < 0.001), and BESS (18.2 ± 8.4 vs 15.1 ± 8.3, p = 0.01). The largest effect size in ANAM performance decline was in simple reaction time (mTBI 74.5 ± 148.4 vs control −11 ± 46.6 milliseconds, p < 0.001). Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced in mTBI compared with controls in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (0.393 ± 0.022 vs 0.405 ± 0.023, p < 0.001). No abnormalities were detected with conventional MRI. Time to return to duty correlated with RPCSQ (r = 0.53, p < 0.001), ANAM simple reaction time decline (r = 0.49, p < 0.0001), PCLM (r = 0.47, p < 0.0001), and BDI (r = 0.36 p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Somatic, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms and performance deficits are substantially elevated in acute blast-related mTBI. Postconcussive symptoms and performance on measures of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and neurocognitive performance at initial presentation correlate with return-to-duty time. Although changes in fractional anisotropy are uncommon and subtle, DTI is more sensitive than conventional MRI in

  7. Progressive Return to Activity Following Acute Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non-deployed Settings (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Return to Activity Following Acute Concussion /Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non...Following Acute Concussion /Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Guidance for the Primary Care Manager in Deployed and Non-deployed Settings (BRIEFING SLIDES) 5a...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Describe the role of this clinical recommendation and overall goal for recovery following concussion /mTBI Understand the

  8. Biomarkers of increased diffusion anisotropy in semi-acute mild traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Ling, Josef M; Peña, Amanda; Yeo, Ronald A; Merideth, Flannery L; Klimaj, Stefan; Gasparovic, Charles; Mayer, Andrew R

    2012-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent neurological insult and frequently results in neurobehavioural sequelae. However, little is known about the pathophysiology underlying the injury and how these injuries change as a function of time. Although diffusion tensor imaging holds promise for in vivo characterization of white matter pathology, both the direction and magnitude of anisotropic water diffusion abnormalities in axonal tracts are actively debated. The current study therefore represents both an independent replication effort (n = 28) of our previous findings (n = 22) of increased fractional anisotropy during semi-acute injury, as well as a prospective study (n = 26) on the putative recovery of diffusion abnormalities. Moreover, new analytical strategies were applied to capture spatially heterogeneous white matter injuries, which minimize implicit assumptions of uniform injury across diverse clinical presentations. Results indicate that whereas a general pattern of high anisotropic diffusion/low radial diffusivity was present in various white matter tracts in both the replication and original cohorts, this pattern was only consistently observed in the genu of the corpus callosum across both samples. Evidence for a greater number of localized clusters with increased anisotropic diffusion was identified across both cohorts at trend levels, confirming heterogeneity in white matter injury. Pooled analyses (50 patients; 50 controls) suggested that measures of diffusion within the genu were predictive of patient classification, albeit at very modest levels (71% accuracy). Finally, we observed evidence of recovery in lesion load in returning patients across a 4-month interval, which was correlated with a reduction in self-reported post-concussive symptomatology. In summary, the corpus callosum may serve as a common point of injury in mild traumatic brain injury secondary to anatomical (high frequency of long unmyelinated fibres) and biomechanics factors. A

  9. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Dalwadi, Pradip P.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Tayde, Parimal S.; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women) were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3) and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening PMID:28217503

  10. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for Acute Renal Failure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Yong; Choi, Hyun-Yong; You, Nam-Kyu; Roh, Tae Hoon; Seo, Sook Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on survival and relevant factors in patients who underwent CRRT after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the laboratory, clinical, and radiological data of 29 patients who underwent CRRT among 1,190 TBI patients treated at our institution between April 2011 and June 2015. There were 20 men and 9 women, and the mean age was 60.2 years. The mean initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 9.2, and the mean injury severity score was 24. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used for analysis of survival and relevant factors. Results The actuarial median survival time of the 29 patients was 163 days (range, 3-317). Among the above 29 patients, 22 died with a median survival time of 8 days (range, 3-55). The causes of death were TBI-related in 8, sepsis due to pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in 4, and multi-organ failure in 10. Among the various factors, urine quantity of more than 500 mL for 24-hours before receiving CRRT was a significant and favorable factor for survival in the multivariate analysis (p=0.026). Conclusion According to our results, we suggest that early intervention with CRRT may be beneficial in the treatment of TBI patients with impending acute renal failure (ARF). To define the therapeutic advantages of early CRRT in the TBI patients with ARF, a well-designed and controlled study with more cases is required. PMID:27857914

  11. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study.

  12. Sympathoadrenal Activation is Associated with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy and Endotheliopathy in Isolated Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Alex P.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Lejnieks, Brandon; Min, Arimie; Shiu, Maria Y.; Peng, Henry T.; Baker, Andrew J.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Churchill, Nathan; Inaba, Kenji; Nascimento, Bartolomeu B.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Beckett, Andrew; Rhind, Shawn G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly characterized. Objectives: To examine early posttraumatic alterations in coagulofibrinolytic, endothelial, and inflammatory blood biomarkers in relation to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and 6-month patient outcomes, using multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. Patients and Methods: A multicenter observational study of 159 adult isolated TBI patients admitted to the emergency department at an urban level I trauma center, was performed. Plasma concentrations of 6 coagulofibrinolytic, 10 vascular endothelial, 19 inflammatory, and 2 catecholamine biomarkers were measured by immunoassay on admission and 24 h postinjury. Neurological outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. PLS-discriminant analysis was used to identify salient biomarker contributions to unfavorable outcome, whereas PLS regression analysis was used to evaluate the covariance between SNS correlates (catecholamines) and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation. Results: Biomarker profiles in patients with an unfavorable outcome displayed procoagulation, hyperfibrinolysis, glycocalyx and endothelial damage, vasculature activation, and inflammation. A strong covariant relationship was evident between catecholamines and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation at both admission and 24 h postinjury. Conclusions: Biomarkers of coagulopathy and endotheliopathy are associated with poor outcome after TBI. Catecholamine levels were highly correlated with endotheliopathy and coagulopathy markers within the first 24 h after injury. Further research is warranted to characterize the pathogenic role of SNS-mediated hemostatic alterations in isolated TBI. PMID:27206278

  13. Chemical sympathectomy attenuates inflammation, glycocalyx shedding and coagulation disorders in rats with acute traumatic coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Yu, Wen-Kui; Lin, Zhi-Liang; Tan, Shan-Jun; Bai, Xiao-Wu; Ding, Kai; Li, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) may trigger sympathoadrenal activation associated with endothelial damage and coagulation disturbances. Overexcitation of sympathetic nerve in this state would disrupt sympathetic-vagal balance, leading to autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the autonomic function in ATC and its influence on inflammation, endothelial and coagulation activation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham, ATC control (ATCC) and ATC with sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (ATCS) group. Sham animals underwent the same procedure without trauma and bleeding. Following trauma and hemorrhage, rats underwent heart rate variability (HRV) test, which predicts autonomic dysfunction through the analysis of variation in individual R-R intervals. Then, rats were euthanized at baseline, and at 0, 1 and 2 h after shock and blood gas, conventional coagulation test and markers of inflammation, coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage and catecholamine were measured. HRV showed an attenuation of total power and high frequency, along with a rise of low frequency and low frequency : high frequency ratio in the ATC rats, which both were reversed by sympathectomy in the ATCS group. Additionally, sympathetic denervation significantly suppressed the increase of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and the fibrinolysis markers including tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-antiplasmin complex. Serum catecholamine, soluble thrombomodulin and syndecan-1 were also effectively inhibited by sympathectomy. These data indicated that autonomic dysfunction in ATC involves both sympathetic activation and parasympathetic inhibition. Moreover, sympathectomy yielded anti-inflammatory, antifibrinolysis and endothelial protective effects in rats with ATC. The role of autonomic neuropathy in ATC should be explored further.

  14. Acute traumatic coagulopathy among major trauma patients in an urban tertiary hospital in sub Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality from trauma remains a major public health issue as it is the leading cause of death in persons aged 5 to 44 years .Uncontrolled hemorrhage and coagulopathy is responsible for over 50% of all trauma related deaths within the first 48hrs of admission. Coagulation profiles are not routinely done among trauma patients in resource limited settings and there is a paucity of data on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in sub Saharan Africa. The study was conducted to evaluate the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time (PT/PTT) as predictors of mortality and morbidity among major trauma patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was carried out, in which major trauma patients admitted in A&E department between December 2011 to April 2012 were recruited. Five (5) mls of venous blood was drawn from a convenient vein within 10 minutes of the patient’s arrival at A&E for analysis of PT/PTT. Patients were stratified into two groups by the presence/absence of coagulopathy then followed up for a 2 week period for morbidity and mortality. Results A total of 182 major trauma patients were recruited; 149 (81.9%) were males, the mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.8). Prevalence of coagulopathy was 54% (98/182). The mean ISS for the ATC group was 36.9 and the non ATC group was 26.9 (p=0.001). Patients with ATC stayed longer in hospital 11.24 days than non ATC patients 8 days (p=0.001). ATC was strongly associated with ARI (p= 0.003). Mortality was more in the ATC group 29 deaths compared to 9 deaths in the non ATC group. PTT was a strong independent predictor of mortality. Conclusion A significant proportion of major trauma patients were coagulopathic. Initial coagulation profile is useful in predicting outcomes for major trauma patients. PMID:23150904

  15. Acute Alcohol Intoxication Prolongs Neuroinflammation without Exacerbating Neurobehavioral Dysfunction following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Sophie X.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of death and disability among young persons with ∼1.7 million reported cases in the United States annually. Although acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) is frequently present at the time of TBI, conflicting animal and clinical reports have failed to establish whether AAI significantly impacts short-term outcomes after TBI. The objective of this study was to determine whether AAI at the time of TBI aggravates neurobehavioral outcomes and neuroinflammatory sequelae post-TBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically instrumented with gastric and vascular catheters before a left lateral craniotomy. After recovery, rats received either a primed constant intragastric alcohol infusion (2.5 g/kg+0.3 g/kg/h for 15 h) or isocaloric/isovolumic dextrose infusion followed by a lateral fluid percussion TBI (∼1.4 J, ∼30 ms). TBI induced apnea and a delay in righting reflex. AAI at the time of injury increased the TBI induced delay in righting reflex without altering apnea duration. Neurological and behavioral dysfunction was observed at 6 h and 24 h post-TBI, and this was not exacerbated by AAI. TBI induced a transient upregulation of cortical interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 mRNA expression at 6 h, which was resolved at 24 h. AAI did not modulate the inflammatory response at 6 h but prevented resolution of inflammation (IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and MCP-1 expression) at 24 h post-TBI. AAI at the time of TBI did not delay the recovery of neurological and neurobehavioral function but prevented the resolution of neuroinflammation post-TBI. PMID:24050411

  16. Cognitive Training for Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Harry; Collins, Daniel; Lampit, Amit; Deol, Kiran; Fleming, Jennifer; Valenzuela, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To quantitatively aggregate effects of cognitive training (CT) on cognitive and functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) more than 12-months post-injury. Design: We systematically searched six databases for non-randomized and randomized controlled trials of CT in TBI patients at least 12-months post-injury reporting cognitive and/or functional outcomes. Main Measures: Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g) of post-training change. We investigated heterogeneity across studies using subgroup analyses and meta-regressions. Results: Fourteen studies encompassing 575 patients were included. The effect of CT on overall cognition was small and statistically significant (g = 0.22, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38; p = 0.01), with low heterogeneity (I2 = 11.71%) and no evidence of publication bias. A moderate effect size was found for overall functional outcomes (g = 0.32, 95%CI 0.08 to 0.57, p = 0.01) with low heterogeneity (I2 = 14.27%) and possible publication bias. Statistically significant effects were also found only for executive function (g = 0.20, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.39, p = 0.03) and verbal memory (g = 0.32, 95%CI 0.14 to 0.50, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite limited studies in this field, this meta-analysis indicates that CT is modestly effective in improving cognitive and functional outcomes in patients with post-acute TBI and should therefore play a more significant role in TBI rehabilitation. PMID:27833541

  17. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  18. Elevated serum lactoferrin and neopterin are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gang; Wei, Chengshou; Gu, Song; Tang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that lactoferrin (LF) and neopterin (NT) are correlated with infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether serum levels of LF and NT are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Material and methods A total of 268 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury who underwent spinal surgery were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of LF, NT, and C-reactive protein (CRP), in addition to white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Results In total, 22 of 268 patients (8.2%) developed postoperative infectious complications. The levels of serum LF, NT, and CRP were significantly higher in the infected patients than in the non-infected patients. No significant differences were observed in postoperative WBC count and ESR between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that LF (OR: 1.004 (1.002–1.007)), NT (OR: 1.137 (1.054–1.227)), and CRP (OR: 1.023 (1.002–1.044)) were significantly associated with the presence of postoperative infectious complications. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for LF, NT, and CRP was 0.709, 0.779, and 0.629, respectively. Conclusions Elevated serum concentrations of LF and NT are associated with early infection after surgery. Compared to CRP, elevated levels of LF and NT are better indicators for predicting postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:24273571

  19. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Diana; Tomaszczyk, Jennifer; McFadyen, Bradford J.; Green, Robin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: While a growing number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is limited research as of yet on environmental factors that may influence this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1) examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE) can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2) examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes. Methods: We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery. Results: One hundred and twenty-three articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behavior in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences revealed that variables such as insurance coverage, financial, and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, can have an impact on clinical outcomes. Conclusion: There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-acute cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society. PMID:23616755

  20. [Acute traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in severe polytrauma--a case report].

    PubMed

    Rohe, G; Feyerherd, F; Möx, B; Hachenberg, T

    2000-04-01

    A 41-year-old man suffered severe polytrauma and developed a traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock. Thrombolysis as well as coronary bypass grafting was contraindicated due to accompanying injuries. An attempted early coronary revascularization by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) failed due to dissection of the left interventricular coronary artery. Treatment of cardiac insufficiency was complicated by intraabdominal haemorrhage enforcing emergency laparotomy. Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation proved to be efficient in supporting circulation in these circumstances. The case report documents the practicability and importance of treating both myocardial ischaemia and attending injuries in an equivalent and coordinated manner in traumatic myocardial infarction.

  1. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  2. Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Multiple-Frequency Bands in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Bai, Lijun; Kuang, Hongmei; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO). Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01-0.08 Hz) in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4) frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the mini-mental state examination score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory, and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  3. Neurosurgical Treatment Variation of Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation of Acute Subdural Hematoma Management in Belgium and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Thomas A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; Kho, Kuan H; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-02-15

    Several recent global traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiatives rely on practice variation in diagnostic and treatment methods to answer effectiveness questions. One of these scientific dilemmas, the surgical management of the traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) might be variable among countries, among centers within countries, and even among neurosurgeons within a center, and hence be amenable for a comparative effectiveness study. The aim of our questionnaire, therefore, was to explore variations in treatment for ASDH among neurosurgeons in similar centers in a densely populated geographical area. An online questionnaire, involving treatment decisions on six case vignettes of ASDH, was sent to 93 neurosurgeons in The Netherlands and Belgium. Clinical and radiological variables differed per case. Sixty neurosurgeons filled out the questionnaire (response rate 65%). For case vignettes with severe TBI and an ASDH, there was a modest variation in the decision to evacuate the hematoma and a large variation in the decision to combine the evacuation with a decompressive craniectomy. The main reasons for operating were "neurological condition" and "mass effect." For ASDH and mild/moderate TBI, there was large variation in the decision of whether to operate or not, whereas "hematoma size" was the predominant motivation for surgery. Significant inter-center variation for the decision to evacuate the hematoma was observed (p = 0.01). Most pronounced was that 1 out of 7 (14%) neurosurgeons in one region chose a surgical strategy compared with 9 out of 10 (90%) in another region for the same scenario. In conclusion, variation exists in the neurosurgical management of TBI within an otherwise homogeneous setting. This variation supports the methodology of the international Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) initiative, and shaped the Dutch Neurotraumatology Quality Registry (Net-QuRe) initiative.

  4. Accelerated recovery from acute brain injuries: clinical efficacy of neurotrophic treatment in stroke and traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, N; Poon, W S

    2012-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating vascular diseases in the world as it is responsible for almost five million deaths per year. Almost 90% of all strokes are ischemic and mainly due to atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism and small-vessel disease. Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, which usually has the poorest prognosis. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation which mimics the action of a neurotrophic factor, protecting stroke-injured neurons and promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Cerebrolysin has been widely studied as a therapeutic tool for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as traumatic brain injury. In ischemic stroke, Cerebrolysin given as an adjuvant therapy to antiplatelet and rheologically active medication resulted in accelerated improvement in global, neurological and motor functions, cognitive performance and activities of daily living. Cerebrolysin was also safe and well tolerated when administered in patients suffering from hemorrhagic stroke. Traumatic brain injury leads to transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions. This is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to interpret the mental states of others, and executive functioning. Pilot clinical studies with adjuvant Cerebrolysin in the acute and postacute phases of the injury have shown faster recovery, which translates into an earlier onset of rehabilitation and shortened hospitalization time.

  5. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

  6. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    and Morris water maze. 3. Measured time course of GOT levels in blood and levels after iv injection of 130ug/kg of rGOT. 4. Completed sectioning of...Traumatic Brain Injury, Glutamate, GOT enzyme, Oxaloacetate, Fluid percussion, Morris water maze, Rotarod, Behavior 4 Accomplishments: What...experiments examining effects of rGOT and rGOT + OxAc on outcome on rotarod and Morris water maze. 3. Measured time course of GOT levels in blood and

  7. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  8. Non-traumatic acute paraplegia associated with a CT-guided needle biopsy in a silicotic nodule: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, LIYING; DING, XUN; LIAO, MEIYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of an adult patient with non-traumatic acute paraplegia following a computed tomography (CT)-guided automated cutting needle biopsy (ACNB). Multiple nodules and masses were revealed on performing chest radiography and CT on a 45-year-old man. In order to make a pathological diagnosis, a CT-guided biopsy using an automatic cutting needle was performed. However, 10 min after the biopsy, a weakness of the lower extremities occurred, and the patient collapsed to the ground, albeit with clear consciousness. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed subsequently revealed no abnormal findings in the spinal cord. An MRI performed 24 h later, however, revealed swelling of the thoracic spinal cord and a high-signal-intensity lesion in T2-weighted images at the level of T7, T8 and T9. The patient subsequently received hyperbaric oxygen therapy for a few days, and rehabilitative treatment over the course of a few weeks. At 6 months following the biopsy, the patient was unable to walk, although the patient could stand for 10 min and defecate independently. Currently, the patient remains active in daily life, in spite of confinement to a wheelchair. The present case study was reported to raise the awareness of the possibility of spinal cord ischemia and acute paraplegia following a CT-guided ACNB of the lungs. The mechanism underlying spinal cord ischemia remains to be fully elucidated, although is thought to be multifactorial, involving air embolism. PMID:26998303

  9. The acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury is characterized by a distance-dependent neuronal hypoactivity.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Victoria P A; Shultz, Sandy R; Yan, Edwin B; O'Brien, Terence J; Rajan, Ramesh

    2014-11-15

    The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes.

  10. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  11. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J.; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1–8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes. PMID:27754853

  12. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage: Independent Component and Seed-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Iraji, Armin; Benson, Randall R.; Welch, Robert D.; O'Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Imran Ayaz, Syed; Kulek, Andrew; Mika, Valerie; Medado, Patrick; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Liu, Tianming; Haacke, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for more than 1 million emergency visits each year. Most of the injured stay in the emergency department for a few hours and are discharged home without a specific follow-up plan because of their negative clinical structural imaging. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly functional MRI (fMRI), has been reported as being sensitive to functional disturbances after brain injury. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department of our local Level-1 trauma center for an advanced MRI scan at the acute stage. Sixteen age- and sex-matched controls were also recruited for comparison. Both group-based and individual-based independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in both posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus regions in comparison with controls, which is part of the default mode network (DMN). Further seed-based analysis confirmed reduced functional connectivity in these two regions and also demonstrated increased connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain in mTBI. Seed-based analysis using the thalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala regions further demonstrated increased functional connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain, particularly in the frontal lobe, in mTBI. Our data demonstrate alterations of multiple brain networks at the resting state, particularly increased functional connectivity in the frontal lobe, in response to brain concussion at the acute stage. Resting-state functional connectivity of the DMN could serve as a potential biomarker for improved detection of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:25285363

  13. A Case of Acute Traumatic Aortic Injury of a Right-sided Aortic Arch with Rupture of an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Taif, Sawsan; Al Kalbani, Jokha

    2013-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury is a potentially lethal condition with most patients die at the scene of the accidents. Rapid deceleration due to motor vehicle accidents is the commonest mechanism of injury. These injuries can be successfully repaired in the few patients who survive the initial trauma if proper diagnosis and rapid treatment are provided. The occurrence of acute traumatic aortic injury in patients with congenital abnormality of the aortic arch has been rarely reported; however, it renders the diagnosis and treatment more difficult. In this paper, we describe an extremely rare case of aortic injury in a young patient who had a right sided aortic arch with rupture of an aberrant left subclavian artery. The patient was suspected to have a Kommerell’s diverticulum in the aberrant subclavian artery origin. This injury resulted in an unusually huge pseudoaneurysm involving part of the mediastinum and extending into the neck. Unfortunately; patient succumbed in spite of surgical intervention. PMID:24421931

  14. New perspectives on central and peripheral immune responses to acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the brain (TBI) results in a complex set of responses involving various symptoms and long-term consequences. TBI of any form can cause cognitive, behavioral and immunologic changes in later life, which underscores the problem of underdiagnosis of mild TBI that can cause long-term neurological deficits. TBI disrupts the blood–brain barrier (BBB) leading to infiltration of immune cells into the brain and subsequent inflammation and neurodegeneration. TBI-induced peripheral immune responses can also result in multiorgan damage. Despite worldwide research efforts, the methods of diagnosis, monitoring and treatment for TBI are still relatively ineffective. In this review, we delve into the mechanism of how TBI-induced central and peripheral immune responses affect the disease outcome and discuss recent developments in the continuing effort to combat the consequences of TBI and new ways to enhance repair of the damaged brain. PMID:23061919

  15. Self-efficacy in acutely traumatized patients and the risk of developing a posttraumatic stress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Flatten, Guido; Wälte, Dieter; Perlitz, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs across 15-20% of victims suffering physical injury. The occurrence of PTSD has been attributed to both the trauma and the victim’s individual resources, such as resilience, coping strategies, and social support systems. In the present study, we explored the role of self-efficacy for cognitive self-regulation in the posttraumatic adaptation process of sixty-five patients immediately following trauma (T1) and approximately four months later (T2) assessing posttraumatic stress syndrome according to DSM-IV criteria. We hypothesized perceived self-efficacy as a predictor for an increased risk of developing posttraumatic stress symptoms. Self-efficacy measured immediately following trauma correlated significantly with the development of posttraumatic stress syndromes. This finding suggests that the evaluation of cognitive adaptation to trauma is a helpful marker for clinical outcome assessment and can therefore be used for the identification of patients needing psychotherapeutic intervention. PMID:19742277

  16. Acute non-traumatic gastrothorax: presentation of a case with chest pain and atypical radiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepwant; Mackeith, Pieter; Gopal, Dipesh Pravin

    2016-03-23

    A previously well 71-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with acute-onset left-sided chest pain. She was haemodynamically stable with unremarkable systemic examination. Her electrocardiogram and troponin were within normal limits and her chest radiograph showed a raised left hemi-diaphragm. Two hours after admission, this woman became acutely breathless, and suffered a pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a return of spontaneous circulation and regained consciousness. A repeat clinical assessment revealed a new left-sided dullness to percussion with contralateral percussive resonance on respiratory examination. CXR revealed a left pan-hemi-thoracic opacity whilst better definition using CT-pulmonary angiography (CTPA) indicated an acute tension gastrothorax secondary to a large left-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Nasogastric (NG) tube insertion was used to decompress the stomach and the patient underwent uncomplicated emergency laparoscopic hernia reduction. She remained well at 1-year follow-up.

  17. Symptoms of peritraumatic and acute traumatic stress among victims of an industrial disaster.

    PubMed

    Birmes, Philippe J; Brunet, Alain; Coppin-Calmes, Dominique; Arbus, Christophe; Coppin, Dominique; Charlet, Jean-Paul; Vinnemann, Nathalie; Juchet, Henri; Lauque, Dominique; Schmitt, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have examined peritraumatic distress, peritraumatic dissociation, and acute stress disorder as predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors examined whether these three predictors were associated with PTSD symptoms when considered simultaneously. Two-hundred victims of a factory explosion in Toulouse, France, were surveyed two and six months after the event with use of retrospective self-reports of peritraumatic distress, peritraumatic dissociation, and acute stress disorder. A hierarchical multiple regression predicting PTSD symptoms six months posttrauma indicated that all three constructs explained unique variance, accounting for up to 62 percent. Peritraumatic distress and dissociation and acute stress disorder appear conceptually different from one another and show promise in identifying who is at risk of PTSD.

  18. Acute traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation complicated by axillary nerve damage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1998-01-01

    An elite soccer player presented with a classic acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint complicated by axillary nerve damage. The incidence, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation and associated axillary nerve damage are discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 3

  19. Symptom Differences in Acute and Chronic Presentation of Childhood Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four child abuse victims, age 5-13, were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children with the acute form of PTSD exhibited such symptoms as difficulty falling asleep, hypervigilance, nightmares, and generalized anxiety. Children exhibiting chronic PTSD exhibited increased detachment, restricted range of affect,…

  20. Assessing blood granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as a potential biomarker of acute traumatic brain injury in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Dohi, Kenji; Hansen, Kim; Thompson, Hilaire J

    2016-02-01

    Previous work has found that serum G-CSF was acutely elevated in mice 24h but not one week after controlled cortical impact (CCI). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood G-CSF correlates with the elevated brain cytokines in mice after CCI and also if it correlates with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Here, we found in mice undergoing CCI, a procedure that induces direct injury to the brain, that serum G-CSF correlated directly or indirectly with several brain cytokines, indicating it is a useful marker for the neuroinflammation of TBI. A pilot study in humans (phase I, n=19) confirmed that plasma G-CSF is acutely elevated on day 1 (p<0.001) of TBI and has returned to baseline by one week. In a second human sample (phase II) (n=80), we found plasma G-CSF peaks about 12h after arriving in the emergency department (41.6+/-5.4 pg/ml). Aging was weakly associated (p<0.05) with a less robust elevation in serum G-CSF, but there was no difference with gender. ISS, a measure of total severity of injury, correlated with the degree of elevation in serum G-CSF (r=.419; p<0.05), but severity of head injury (via AIS) did not. The latter may have been because of the statistically narrow range of head injuries among our cases and the high number of cases diagnosed with closed head injury (a non-codable diagnosis). In conclusion, plasma G-CSF may be a useful biomarker of TBI, correlating with neuroinflammation in the animal model and in the human studies with time since injury and total severity of injury. As such, it may be useful in determining whether TBI has occurred within the last 24h.

  1. Early Administration of Selenium in Patients with Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Double-blinded Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Hassani, Valiollah; Mozari, Shakiba

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out to examine this hypothesis that administration of selenium can prevent the development of injuries by brain trauma and thus can modulate patients’ functional recovery and also improve posttraumatic outcome. Materials and Methods: This double-blinded controlled trial was carried out on 113 patients who were hospitalized following traumatic brain injury (TBI) with Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4–12 that were randomly assigned to receive selenium within 8 h after injury plus standard treatment group or routine standard treatment alone as the control. The primary endpoint was to assess patients’ functional recovery at 2 months after the injury based on extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score (GOS-E). Secondary outcomes included the changes in Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score (FOUR) score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score, side effects of selenium, length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, and length of hospital stay. Results: There was no difference in the length of ICU and hospital stay, the trend of the change in FOUR and SOFA scores within 15 days of first interventions, and the mean APACHE III score on the 1st and 15th days between the two groups. Mortality was 15.8% in selenium group and 19.6% in control group with no between-group difference. No difference was revealed between the two groups in appropriate outcome according to GOS-E score at 60 ± 10 days and also 30 ± 5 days according to the severity of TBI. Conclusion: This human trial study could not demonstrate beneficial effects of intravenous infusion of selenium in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI. PMID:28250601

  2. Reformatted images improve the detection rate of acute traumatic subdural hematomas on brain CT compared with axial images alone.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Timothy J; Mostertz, William; Matheus, Maria Gisele; Maass-Bolles, Genevieve; Sharma, Komal; Collins, Heather R; Kranz, Peter G

    2017-02-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDHs) comprise a significant percentage of missed intracranial hemorrhage on axial brain CT. SDH detection rates could be improved with the addition of reformatted images. Though performed at some centers, the potential additional diagnostic sensitivity of reformatted images has not yet been investigated. The purpose of our study is to determine if the addition of coronal and sagittal reformatted images to an axial brain CT increases the sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute traumatic SDH. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive brain CTs acquired for acute trauma that contained new SDHs. An equivalent number of normal brain CTs served as control. Paired sets of images were created for each case: (1) axial images only ("axial only") and (2) axial, coronal, sagittal images ("reformat added"). Three readers interpreted both the axial only and companion reformat added for each case, separated by 1 month. Reading times and SDH detection rates were compared. One hundred SDH and 100 negative examinations were collected. Sensitivity and specificity for the axial-only scans were 75.7 and 94.3 %, respectively, compared with 88.3 and 98.3 % for reformat added. There was a 24.3 % false negative (missed SDH) rate with axial-only scans versus 11.7 % with reformat added (p = <0.001). Median reader interpretation times were longer with the addition of reformatted images (125 versus 89 s), but this difference was not significant (p = 0.23). The addition of coronal and sagittal images in trauma brain CT resulted in improved sensitivity and specificity as well as a reduction in SDH false negatives by greater than 50 %. Reformatted images substantially reduce the number of missed SDHs compared with axial images alone.

  3. Comparison of acute and chronic traumatic brain injury using semi-automatic multimodal segmentation of MR volumes.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Alger, Jeffry R; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D

    2011-11-01

    Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options.

  4. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D; O'Neil, Brian J; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Haacke, E Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  5. Acute child and mother psychophysiological responses and subsequent PTSD symptoms following a child's traumatic event.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Sarah A; Christopher, Norman C; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between acute cortisol responses to trauma and subsequent PTSD symptoms (PTSS) in children and their biological mothers. Urinary cortisol levels were assessed in 54 children aged 8-18 upon admission to a level-1 trauma center. Six weeks posttrauma, 15-hour urine samples were collected from children and their mothers. Depression and PTSS were assessed at 6 weeks (N = 44) and 7 months (N = 38) posttrauma. Higher child in-hospital cortisol significantly predicted 6-week child PTSS. This was true only for boys at 7 months. In mothers, lower 6-week cortisol levels significantly predicted 7-month PTSS. Results extend findings of differing directions of acute hormonal predictors of PTSS in adults versus children to a sample of genetically related individuals.

  6. Evaluation of an Acute RNAi-Mediated Therapeutic for Visual Dysfunction Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    water from the brain to the blood and significantly impacts on brain swelling. We also show cognitive improvement in mice with focal cerebral...brain injury ( TBI ) is the leading cause of death in children and young adults globally. Malignant cerebral edema plays a major role in the...pathophysiology which evolves after severe TBI . Added to this is the significant morbidity and mortality from cerebral edema associated with acute stroke

  7. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Jeremy; Blow, Osbert; Krall, Scott P.; Gest, Albert; Smith, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging. Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53%) received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%). 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]%) of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%), CT Face (29%; 19–42%) and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%). Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan. PMID:26056616

  8. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  9. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  10. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  11. Improved outcomes from the administration of progesterone for patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guomin; Wei, Jing; Yan, Weiqi; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Zhenhui

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been increasing with greater incidence of injuries from traffic or sporting accidents. Although there are a number of animal models of TBI using progesterone for head injury, the effects of progesterone on neurologic outcome of acute TBI patients remain unclear. The aim of the present clinical study was to assess the longer-term efficacy of progesterone on the improvement in neurologic outcome of patients with acute severe TBI. Methods A total of 159 patients who arrived within 8 hours of injury with a Glasgow Coma Score ≤ 8 were enrolled in the study. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of progesterone was conducted in the Neurotrauma Center of our teaching hospital. The patients were randomized to receive either progesterone or placebo. The primary endpoint was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score 3 months after brain injury. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the modified Functional Independence Measure score and mortality. In a follow-up protocol at 6 months, the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Functional Independence Measure scores were again determined. Results Of the 159 patients randomized, 82 received progesterone and 77 received placebo. The demographic characteristics, the mechanism of injury, and the time of treatment were compared for the two groups. After 3 months and 6 months of treatment, the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale score analysis exhibited more favorable outcomes among the patients who were given progesterone compared with the control individuals (P = 0.034 and P = 0.048, respectively). The modified Functional Independence Measure scores in the progesterone group were higher than those in the placebo group at both 3-month and 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The mortality rate of the progesterone group was significantly lower than that of the placebo group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). The mean intracranial pressure values 72 hours and 7 days after

  12. Targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines following joint injury: acute intra-articular inhibition of interleukin-1 following knee injury prevents post-traumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a progressive, degenerative response to joint injury, such as articular fracture. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1(IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), are acutely elevated following joint injury and remain elevated for prolonged periods post-injury. To investigate the role of local and systemic inflammation in the development of post-traumatic arthritis, we targeted both the initial acute local inflammatory response and a prolonged 4 week systemic inflammatory response by inhibiting IL-1 or TNF-α following articular fracture in the mouse knee. Methods Anti-cytokine agents, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or soluble TNF receptor II (sTNFRII), were administered either locally via an acute intra-articular injection or systemically for a prolonged 4 week period following articular fracture of the knee in C57BL/6 mice. The severity of arthritis was then assessed at 8 weeks post-injury in joint tissues via histology and micro computed tomography, and systemic and local biomarkers were assessed in serum and synovial fluid. Results Intra-articular inhibition of IL-1 significantly reduced cartilage degeneration, synovial inflammation, and did not alter bone morphology following articular fracture. However, systemic inhibition of IL-1, and local or systemic inhibition of TNF provided no benefit or conversely led to increased arthritic changes in the joint tissues. Conclusion These results show that intra-articular IL-1, rather than TNF-α, plays a critical role in the acute inflammatory phase of joint injury and can be inhibited locally to reduce post-traumatic arthritis following a closed articular fracture. Targeted local inhibition of IL-1 following joint injury may represent a novel treatment option for PTA. PMID:24964765

  13. Acute psychological reactions in assault victims of non-domestic violence: peritraumatic dissociation, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Venke A; Wahl, Astrid K; Eilertsen, Dag Erik; Hanestad, Berit R; Weisaeth, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate acute and subacute post-traumatic reactions in victims of physical non-domestic violence. A Norwegian sample of 138 physically assaulted victims was interviewed and a questionnaire was completed. The following areas were examined: the frequency and intensity of acute and subacute psychological reactions such as peritraumatic dissociation (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety and depression; the relationship between several psychological reactions; the relationship between psychological reactions and level of physical injury, perceived life threat, and potential of severe physical injury, and the relationship between psychological reactions and socio-demographic variables. The following distress reactions were measured retrospectively: PD, PTSD, and anxiety and depression. Thirty-three per cent of the victims scored as probable PTSD cases according to the Post Traumatic Symptoms Scale 10 (PTSS-10); the corresponding Impact of Event Scale-15 (IES-15) score identified prevalence of 34% respectively. Forty-four per cent scored as cases with probable anxiety and depression, according to the Hopkins Symptom Check List 25 (HSCL-25). Severity of perceived threat predicted higher scores on all measures of psychological reactions. There were no statistically significant differences between acute and subacute groups on PD, PTSS-10, IES-15, IES-22 and HSCL-25 according to measured means (and standard deviations) and occurrence of probable cases and risk level cases. The results showed no connection between severity of physical injury and caseness. The acute psychological impairment that results from assault violence may have a deleterious effect on the mental health of victims.

  14. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD.

  15. Victoria Symptom Validity Test performance in acute severe traumatic brain injury: implications for test interpretation.

    PubMed

    Macciocchi, Stephen N; Seel, Ronald T; Alderson, Amy; Godsall, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Effort testing has become commonplace in clinical practice. Recent research has shown that performance on effort tests is highly correlated with performance on neuropsychological measures. Clinical application of effort testing is highly dependent on research derived interpretive guidelines. The Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) is one of many measures currently used in clinical practice. The VSVT has recommended interpretive guidelines published in the test manual, but the samples used in developing interpretive guidelines are small and heterogeneous and concern has been expressed regarding high false negative rates. In this study, a homogeneous sample of acute, severely brain injured persons were used to assess the sensitivity of the VSVT. Results confirmed that acute, severely brain injured persons (N=71) perform very well on the VSVT. The severe brain injury population is 99% likely to have between 44.1 and 46.8 correct VSVT Combined Score responses. While the VSVT was insensitive to memory dysfunction, the presence of severe visual perceptual (Benton Visual Form Discrimination Score<21) and verbal fluency (Controlled Oral Word Association Score<15) deficits predicted poor performance on the VSVT. These results provide further evidence that performance expectations currently incorporated in the VSVT manual interpretative criteria are too conservative. Empirically based alternative criteria for interpreting VSVT Combined Scores in the TBI population are presented.

  16. Traumatic brain injury results in acute rarefication of the vascular network.

    PubMed

    Obenaus, Andre; Ng, Michelle; Orantes, Amanda M; Kinney-Lang, Eli; Rashid, Faisal; Hamer, Mary; DeFazio, Richard A; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H; Pearce, William J

    2017-03-22

    The role of the cerebrovascular network and its acute response to TBI is poorly defined and emerging evidence suggests that cerebrovascular reactivity is altered. We explored how cortical vessels are physically altered following TBI using a newly developed technique, vessel painting. We tested our hypothesis that a focal moderate TBI results in global decrements to structural aspects of the vasculature. Rats (naïve, sham-operated, TBI) underwent a moderate controlled cortical impact. Animals underwent vessel painting perfusion to label the entire cortex at 1 day post TBI followed by whole brain axial and coronal images using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Cortical vessel network characteristics were analyzed for classical angiographic features (junctions, lengths) wherein we observed significant global (both hemispheres) reductions in vessel junctions and vessel lengths of 33% and 22%, respectively. Biological complexity can be quantified using fractal geometric features where we observed that fractal measures were also reduced significantly by 33%, 16% and 13% for kurtosis, peak value frequency and skewness, respectively. Acutely after TBI there is a reduction in vascular network and vascular complexity that are exacerbated at the lesion site and provide structural evidence for the bilateral hemodynamic alterations that have been reported in patients after TBI.

  17. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  18. Acute stress disorder and the transition to post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents: prevalence, course, prognosis, diagnostic suitability and risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; McKinnon, Anna; Dixon, Clare; Boyle, Adrian; Smith, Patrick; Dalgleish, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Background Early recovery from trauma exposure in youth is poorly understood. This prospective longitudinal study examined the early course of traumatic stress responses in recently trauma-exposed youth; evaluated the revised DSM-5 acute stress disorder (ASD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnoses and alternative diagnoses; and identifed risk factors for persistent traumatic stress. Method Participants were 8-17 year old Emergency Departments attendees exposed to single incident traumas. Structured clinical interviews were undertaken at two (n=226) and nine weeks (n=208) post-trauma. Results Using the revised criteria in DSM-5, 14.2% met criteria for ASD at week 2 and 9.6% met criteria for PTSD at 9 weeks. These prevalences were similar to the corresponding DSM-IV diagnoses (18.6% ASD at week two; 8.7% PTSD at week nine). Using the same diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV or DSM-5) across assessments (i.e. ‘2 week PTSD’) suggested that caseness declined in prevalence by approximately half. Overlap between DSM-IV and DSM-5 ASD and DSM-5 preschool child PTSD diagnoses was considerable. Two diagnoses were strongly predictive of corresponding week nine diagnoses. Youth with ASD who subsequently had PTSD reported more negative alterations in cognition and mood at two-weeks than those youth who did not develop PTSD. Conclusions Youth exposed to single-event traumas experience considerable natural recovery in the first months post-trauma. Using DSM-5 criteria, ASD may not capture all clinically significant traumatic stress in the acute phase and is only moderately sensitive for later PTSD. Future research needs to address the role and etiology of negative alterations in cognition and mood symptoms. PMID:28135019

  19. An acute osteomyelitis model in traumatized rat tibiae involving sand as a foreign body, thermal injury, and bimicrobial contamination.

    PubMed

    McPherson, James C; Runner, Royce R; Shapiro, Brian; Walsh, Douglas S; Stephens-DeValle, Julie; Buxton, Thomas B

    2008-08-01

    The multfactorial nature of bone injuries in modern warfare and emergency trauma patients warrants enhancement of existing models. To develop a more appropriate model, rat tibiae (n = 195) were mechanically injured, divided into 2 groups (with or without thermal injury), and contaminated with a range of Staphylococcus aureus (Cowan 1) inocula. In some experiments, S. aureus inocula also contained Escherichia coli or foreign bodies (sand or soil). The primary outcome measure was the amount of S. aureus remaining in the tibia (tibial bacterial load) 24 h after contamination, reported as log10 cfu/g bone. S. aureus showed ID50 and ID95 values of 72 and 977 cfu, respectively. Values were lower than seen previously by using S. aureus strain SMH. S. aureus tibial bacterial loads were higher in tibiae with mechanical and thermal injury (log10 4.15 +/- 0.27 cfu/g) versus mechanical injury alone (log10 3.1 +/- 0.47 cfu/g, P = 0.028). The addition of E. coli to the S. aureus inoculum had no effect on tibial bacterial loads (S. aureus only, log10 4.24 +/- 0.92 cfu/g; S. aureus + E. coli, log10 4.1 +/- 1.0 cfu/g, P = 0.74). Sand, added as a foreign body, increased tibial bacterial load. Combined mechanical and thermal trauma of the tibia is associated with increased S. aureus tibial bacterial loads, increasing the risk of acute osteomyelitis. Understanding the interplay of mechanical and thermal injuries, bimicrobial contamination, and foreign bodies may improve our understanding of traumatic bone injuries and the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis.

  20. Quality of measurements of acute surgical and traumatic wounds using a digital wound-analysing tool.

    PubMed

    Landa, Dymmie Lc; van Dishoeck, Anne-Margreet; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Hovius, Steven Er

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of measurements using a wound-analysing tool and their interpretability. Wound surface areas and tissue types, such as granulation, slough and necrosis, in twenty digital photographs were measured using a specific software program. The ratio of these tissue types in a wound was calculated using a wound profile. We calculated the intraclass coefficient or κ for reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC). The inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0·99 for surface area, 0·76 for granulation, 0·67 for slough and 0·22 for necrosis. The profiles gave an overall κ of 0·16. For test-retest reliability, the ICC was 0·99 for surface area, 0·81 for granulation, 0·80 for slough and 0·97 for necrosis. The agreement of the applied profiles in the test-retest was 66% (40-100). SEM and SDC for surface area were 0·10/0·27; for granulation, 6·88/19·08; for slough, 7·17/19·87; and for necrosis, 0·35/0·98, respectively. Measuring wound surface area and tissue types by means of digital photo analysis is a reliable and applicable method for monitoring wound healing in acute wounds in daily practice as well as in research.

  1. INCREASE IN ACTIVATED PROTEIN C MEDIATES ACUTE TRAUMATIC COAGULOPATHY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chesebro, Brian B.; Rahn, Pamela; Carles, Michel; Esmon, Charles T.; Xu, Jun; Brohi, Karim; Frith, Daniel; Pittet, Jean-François; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    In severely injured and hypoperfused trauma patients, endogenous acute coagulopathy (EAC) is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Recent human data correlate this coagulopathy with activation of the protein C pathway. To examine the mechanistic role of protein C in the development of EAC, we used a mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, characterized by the combination of tissue injury and severe metabolic acidosis. Mice were subjected to one of four treatment groups: 1) C, control; 2) T, trauma (laparotomy); 3) H, hemorrhage (MAP, 35 mmHg × 60 min); 4) TH, trauma + hemorrhage. After 60 min, blood was drawn for analysis. Compared with C mice, the TH mice had a significantly elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (23.3 vs. 34.5 s) and significantly increased levels of activated protein C (aPC; 2.30 vs. 13.58 ng/mL). In contrast, T and H mice did not develop an elevated activated partial thromboplastin time or increased aPC. Selective inhibition of the anticoagulant property of aPC prevented the coagulopathy seen in response to trauma/hemorrhage (23.5 vs. 38.6 s [inhibitory vs. control monoclonal antibody]) with no impact on survival during the shock period. However, complete blockade of both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of aPC caused 100% mortality within 45 min of shock, with histopathology evidence of pulmonary thrombosis and perivascular hemorrhage. These results indicate that our unique mouse model of T/H shock mimics our previous observations in trauma patients and demonstrates that EAC is mediated by the activation of the protein C pathway. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of protein C activation seems to be necessary for survival of the initial shock injury. PMID:19333141

  2. MISCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME AFTER TRAUMATIC INJURY: THE COST OF LESS RIGOROUS APPROACHES

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Carolyn M; Dobbins, Sarah; Redick, Brittney J; Greenberg, Molly D; Calfee, Carolyn S; Cohen, Mitchell Jay

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adherence to rigorous research protocols for identifying acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after trauma is variable. To examine how misclassification of ARDS may bias observational studies in trauma populations, we evaluated the agreement of two methods for adjudicating ARDS after trauma: the gold standard, direct review of chest radiographs and review of dictated radiology reports, a commonly used alternative. METHODS This nested cohort study included 123 mechanically ventilated patients between 2005–2008, with at least one PaO2:FiO2 <300 within the first 8 days of admission. Two blinded physician investigators adjudicated ARDS by two methods. The investigators directly reviewed all chest radiographs to evaluate for bilateral infiltrates. Several months later, blinded to their previous assessments, they adjudicated ARDS using a standardized rubric to classify radiology reports. A kappa statistics was calculated. Regression analyses quantified the association between established risk factors as well as important clinical outcomes and ARDS determined by the aforementioned methods as well as hypoxemia as a surrogate marker. RESULTS The kappa was 0.47 for the observed agreement between ARDS adjudicated by direct review of chest radiographs and ARDS adjudicated by review of radiology reports. Both the magnitude and direction of bias on the estimates of association between ARDS and established risk factors as well as clinical outcomes varied by method of adjudication. CONCLUSION Classification of ARDS by review of dictated radiology reports had only moderate agreement with the gold standard, ARDS adjudicated by direct review of chest radiographs. While the misclassification of ARDS had varied effects on the estimates of associations with established risk factors, it tended to weaken the association of ARDS with important clinical outcomes. A standardized approach to ARDS adjudication after trauma by direct review of chest radiographs will minimize

  3. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activity in Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Pain gests that interventions preferentially targeting nociceptive pri- mary afferent neurons, such as antagonists of Nav1.8 (Jarvis et al., 2007) or... pain afflicts a majority of SCI patients (Dijkers et al., 2009). This pain is typically divided into two major classes, nociceptive and neuropathic...Bryce et al., 2012). The largest prospective pain study of patients with traumatic SCI found that moderate-to-severe nociceptive and neuro- pathic pain

  4. Methodology for the development and calibration of the SCI-QOL item banks

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W.; Gershon, Richard; Heinemann, Allen W.; Cella, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a comprehensive, psychometrically sound, and conceptually grounded patient reported outcomes (PRO) measurement system for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Individual interviews (n = 44) and focus groups (n = 65 individuals with SCI and n = 42 SCI clinicians) were used to select key domains for inclusion and to develop PRO items. Verbatim items from other cutting-edge measurement systems (i.e. PROMIS, Neuro-QOL) were included to facilitate linkage and cross-population comparison. Items were field tested in a large sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n = 877). Dimensionality was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis. Local item dependence and differential item functioning were assessed, and items were calibrated using the item response theory (IRT) graded response model. Finally, computer adaptive tests (CATs) and short forms were administered in a new sample (n = 245) to assess test-retest reliability and stability. Participants and Procedures A calibration sample of 877 individuals with traumatic SCI across five SCI Model Systems sites and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center completed SCI-QOL items in interview format. Results We developed 14 unidimensional calibrated item banks and 3 calibrated scales across physical, emotional, and social health domains. When combined with the five Spinal Cord Injury – Functional Index physical function banks, the final SCI-QOL system consists of 22 IRT-calibrated item banks/scales. Item banks may be administered as CATs or short forms. Scales may be administered in a fixed-length format only. Conclusions The SCI-QOL measurement system provides SCI researchers and clinicians with a comprehensive, relevant and psychometrically robust system for measurement of physical-medical, physical-functional, emotional, and social outcomes. All SCI-QOL instruments are freely available on Assessment CenterSM. PMID:26010963

  5. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    By almost any measure, the SciDAC community has come a long way since DOE launched the SciDAC program back in 2001. At the time, we were grappling with how to efficiently run applications on terascale systems (the November 2001 TOP500 list was led by DOE's ASCI White IBM system at Lawrence Livermore achieving 7.2 teraflop/s). And the results stemming from the first round of SciDAC projects were summed up in two-page reports. The scientific results were presented at annual meetings, which were by invitation only and typically were attended by about 75 researchers. Fast forward to 2009 and we now have SciDAC Review, a quarterly magazine showcasing the scientific computing contributions of SciDAC projects and related programs, all focused on presenting a comprehensive look at Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing. That is also the motivation behind the annual SciDAC conference that in 2009 was held from June 14-18 in San Diego. The annual conference, which can also be described as a celebration of all things SciDAC, grew out those meetings organized in the early days of the program. In 2005, the meeting was held in San Francisco and attendance was opened up to all members of the SciDAC community. The schedule was also expanded to include a keynote address, plenary speakers and other features found in a conference format. This year marks the fifth such SciDAC conference, which now comprises four days of computational science presentations, multiple poster sessions and, since last year, an evening event showcasing simulations and modeling runs resulting from SciDAC projects. The fifth annual SciDAC conference was remarkable on several levels. The primary purpose, of course, is to showcase the research accomplishments resulting from SciDAC programs in particular and computational science in general. It is these accomplishments, represented in 38 papers and 52 posters, that comprise this set of conference proceedings. These proceedings can stand alone as

  6. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin K W; Yang, Zhihui; Yue, John K; Zhang, Zhiqun; Winkler, Ethan A; Puccio, Ava M; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Lingsma, Hester F; Yuh, Esther L; Mukherjee, Pratik; Valadka, Alex B; Gordon, Wayne A; Okonkwo, David O; Manley, Geoffrey T; Cooper, Shelly R; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Hricik, Allison J; Inoue, Tomoo; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Schnyer, David M; Sinha, Tuhin K; Vassar, Mary J

    2016-07-01

    We described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter observational study Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI Pilot (TRACK-TBI Pilot) to cover the full spectrum of TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale 3-15) by using acute (<24 h) plasma samples from 196 patients with acute TBI admitted to three Level I trauma centers, and a second cohort of 21 participants with chronic TBI admitted to inpatient TBI rehabilitation. We find that acute patients self-reporting previous TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) (n = 43) had higher day 1 AutoAb[GFAP] (mean ± standard error: 9.11 ± 1.42; n = 43) than healthy controls (2.90 ± 0.92; n = 16; p = 0.032) and acute patients reporting no previous TBI (2.97 ± 0.37; n = 106; p < 0.001), but not acute patients reporting previous TBI without LOC (8.01 ± 1.80; n = 47; p = 0.906). These data suggest that while exposure to TBI may trigger the AutoAb[GFAP] response, circulating antibodies are elevated specifically in acute TBI patients with a history of TBI. AutoAb[GFAP] levels for participants with chronic TBI (average post-TBI time 176 days or 6.21 months) were also significantly higher (15.08 ± 2.82; n = 21) than healthy controls (p < 0.001). These data suggest a persistent upregulation of the autoimmune response to specific brain antigen(s) in the subacute to chronic phase after TBI, as well as after repeated TBI insults. Hence, AutoAb[GFAP] may be a sensitive assay to study the dynamic interactions between post-injury brain and patient-specific autoimmune responses across acute and chronic settings after TBI.

  7. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella: current perspectives and trends in Brazil☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; da Silva, Adriano Vaso Rodrigues; Ueda, Léo Renato Shigueru; Astur, Diego da Costa; Yazigi Júnior, João Alberto; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating medial patellofemoral lesions (MPFL) of the knee in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella. Materials and methods A questionnaire comprising 15 closed questions on topics relating to treating MPFL of the knee following acute dislocation of the patella was used. It was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 44th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2012. Results 106 knee surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them were from the southeastern region of Brazil. The majority (57%) reported that they perform fewer than five MPFL reconstruction procedures per year. Indication of non-surgical treatment after a first episode of acute dislocation of the patella was preferred and done by 93.4% of the sample. Only 9.1% of the participants reported that they had never observed postoperative complications. Intraoperative radioscopy was used routinely by 48%. The professionals who did not use this tool to determine the point of ligament fixation in the femur did not have a statistically greater number of postoperative complications than those who used it (p > 0.05). Conclusions There are clear evolutionary trends in treatments and rehabilitation for acute dislocation of the patella due to MPFL, in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends. PMID:26229852

  8. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    injury, levels of cytokines and hor- mones, such as adrenaline and vasopressin, rise, and cytokine, hormone and thrombin production lead to endothelial...BC, Rhee P, et al. Impact of the duration of plateletstorage in critically ill trauma patients. J Trauma 2011; 71:1766 1773. 79. Falati S, Liu Q

  9. Parent and Child Agreement for Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Psychopathology in a Prospective Study of Children and Adolescents Exposed to Single-Event Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined…

  10. Geomapping of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in Canada and Factors Related to Triage Pattern.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Christiana L; Noonan, Vanessa K; Shurgold, Jayson; Chen, Jason; Rivers, Carly S; Hamedani, Hamid Khaleghi; Humphreys, Suzanne; Bailey, Christopher; Attabib, Najmedden; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Goytan, Michael; Paquet, Jérôme; Fox, Richard; Ahn, Henry; Kwon, Brian K; Fourney, Daryl R

    2017-03-22

    Current research indicates that more than half of patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) experience delays in transfer and receive surgery more than 24 hours post-injury. The objectives of this study were to determine the geographic distribution of tSCI in Canada relative to specialized treatment facilities, to assess clinical and logistical factors at play for indirect admissions to those facilities, and to explore differences in current time to admission and simulated scenarios in an attempt to assess the potential impact of changes to triage protocols. This study included data from 876 patients with tSCI enrolled in the prospectively collected acute Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013 who had data on the location of their injury. Patients transported directly to a RHSCIR acute facility were more likely to reach the facility within 1 h of injury while those transported indirectly were more likely to arrive 7 h later. Considering the injuries occurring within 40 km of a RHSCIR acute facility (n=323), 249 patients (77%) were directly and 74 (23%) were indirectly admitted. In the multivariate regression analysis, only older age and longer road distance remained significantly associated with being indirectly admitted to a RHSCIR facility. Compared to the current status, the median time to admission decreased by 20% (3.5 h) in the 100% direct admission scenario; and increased by 102% (8.9 h) in the 100% indirect admission scenario.

  11. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    It takes a village to perform a petascale computation—domain scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computer system vendors, program managers, and support staff—and the village was assembled during 24-28 June 2007 in Boston's Westin Copley Place for the third annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) 2007 Conference. Over 300 registered participants networked around 76 posters, focused on achievements and challenges in 36 plenary talks, and brainstormed in two panels. In addition, with an eye to spreading the vision for simulation at the petascale and to growing the workforce, 115 participants—mostly doctoral students and post-docs complementary to the conferees—were gathered on 29 June 2007 in classrooms of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a full day of tutorials on the use of SciDAC software. Eleven SciDAC-sponsored research groups presented their software at an introductory level, in both lecture and hands-on formats that included live runs on a local BlueGene/L. Computation has always been about garnering insight into the behavior of systems too complex to explore satisfactorily by theoretical means alone. Today, however, computation is about much more: scientists and decision makers expect quantitatively reliable predictions from simulations ranging in scale from that of the Earth's climate, down to quarks, and out to colliding black holes. Predictive simulation lies at the heart of policy choices in energy and environment affecting billions of lives and expenditures of trillions of dollars. It is also at the heart of scientific debates on the nature of matter and the origin of the universe. The petascale is barely adequate for such demands and we are barely established at the levels of resolution and throughput that this new scale of computation affords. However, no scientific agenda worldwide is pushing the petascale frontier on all its fronts as vigorously as SciDAC. The breadth of this conference

  12. Preface: SciDAC 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William M., Dr.

    2006-01-01

    The second annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held from June 25-29, 2006 at the new Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver, Colorado. This conference showcased outstanding SciDAC-sponsored computational science results achieved during the past year across many scientific domains, with an emphasis on science at scale. Exciting computational science that has been accomplished outside of the SciDAC program both nationally and internationally was also featured to help foster communication between SciDAC computational scientists and those funded by other agencies. This was illustrated by many compelling examples of how domain scientists collaborated productively with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to effectively take advantage of terascale computers (capable of performing trillions of calculations per second) not only to accelerate progress in scientific discovery in a variety of fields but also to show great promise for being able to utilize the exciting petascale capabilities in the near future. The SciDAC program was originally conceived as an interdisciplinary computational science program based on the guiding principle that strong collaborative alliances between domain scientists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists are vital to accelerated progress and associated discovery on the world's most challenging scientific problems. Associated verification and validation are essential in this successful program, which was funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE OS) five years ago. As is made clear in many of the papers in these proceedings, SciDAC has fundamentally changed the way that computational science is now carried out in response to the exciting challenge of making the best use of the rapid progress in the emergence of more and more powerful computational platforms. In this regard, Dr. Raymond Orbach, Energy Undersecretary for Science at the DOE and Director of the OS has stated

  13. Parent Perceptions of How Nurse Encounters Can Provide Caring Support for the Family in Early Acute Care Following Children’s Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A child’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a family crisis requiring extensive cultural, informational, psychological, and environmental support. Nurses need to understand parents’ expectations of caring in early acute care so they can tailor their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors appropriately to accommodate the family’s needs. Methods In a previous qualitative study of 42 parents or caregivers from 37 families of children with moderate to severe TBI, parents of children with severe TBI (n = 25) described their appraisals of nurse caring and uncaring behaviors in early acute care. Swanson’s theory of caring was used to categorize parents’ descriptions in order to inform nursing early acute care practices and family-centered care. Results Caring nurse encounters included: (a) involving parents in the care of their child and reflecting on all socio-cultural factors shaping family resources and responses (knowing); (b) respecting that family grief can be co-mingled with resilience, and that parents are typically competent to be involved in decision-making (maintaining belief); (d) actively listening and engaging parents in order to fully understand family values and needs (being with); (e) decreasing parents’ workload to get information, emotional support, and providing a safe cultural, psychological, and physical environment for the family (doing for), and; (f) providing anticipatory guidance to navigate the early acute care system and giving assistance to learn and adjust to their situation (enabling). Conclusion Application of Swanson’s caring theory is prescriptive in helping individual nurses and early acute care systems to meet important family needs following children’s severe TBI. PMID:26871242

  14. Bench-to-Bedside and Bedside Back to the Bench; Seeking a Better Understanding of the Acute Pathophysiological Process in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Agoston, Denes V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial investments, traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the major disorders that lack specific pharmacotherapy. To a substantial degree, this situation is due to lack of understanding of the pathophysiological process of the disease. Experimental TBI research offers controlled, rapid, and cost-effective means to identify the pathophysiology but translating experimental findings into clinical practice can be further improved by using the same or similar outcome measures and clinically relevant time points. The pathophysiology during the acute phase of severe TBI is especially poorly understood. In this Mini review, I discuss some of the incongruences between current clinical practices and needs versus information provided by experimental TBI research as well as the benefits of designing animal experiments with translation into clinical practice in mind. PMID:25852631

  15. COMBAT: A Prospective, Randomized Investigation of Plasma First Resuscitation for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    even before actual hemorrhage shock has enough time to ensue, consistent with the concept of traumatic diabetes or trauma-induced insulin resistance...1082, 1999. 14. Dunn E, Moore E, Breslich D, Galloway W. Acidosis-induced coagu- lopathy. Surg Forum 30: 471–473, 1979. 15. Foot CL, Fraser JF, Mullany...Wolfe RR, Jahoor F, Hartl WH. Protein and amino acid metabolism after injury. Diabetes Metab Rev 5: 149–164, 1989. 50. Zhang Y, Dai Y, Wen J, Zhang W

  16. COMBAT - A Prospective, Randomized Investigation of Plasma First Resuscitation for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    even before actual hemorrhage shock has enough time to ensue, consistent with the concept of traumatic diabetes or trauma-induced insulin resistance...1082, 1999. 14. Dunn E, Moore E, Breslich D, Galloway W. Acidosis-induced coagu- lopathy. Surg Forum 30: 471–473, 1979. 15. Foot CL, Fraser JF, Mullany...Wolfe RR, Jahoor F, Hartl WH. Protein and amino acid metabolism after injury. Diabetes Metab Rev 5: 149–164, 1989. 50. Zhang Y, Dai Y, Wen J, Zhang W

  17. Effects of electromyostimulation on muscle and bone in men with acute traumatic spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Arija-Blázquez, Alfredo; Ceruelo-Abajo, Silvia; Díaz-Merino, María S.; Godino-Durán, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Dhier, Luís; Martin, José L. R.; Florensa-Vila, José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 14 weeks of electromyostimulation (EMS) training (47 minutes/day, 5 days/week) on both muscle and bone loss prevention in persons with recent, complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, experimental, controlled, single-blind randomized trial with external blind evaluation by third parties. Methods Eight men with recent SCI (8 weeks from injury; ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) “A”) were randomized into the intervention or the control groups. Cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Bone mineral density changes were assessed with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Several bone biomarkers (i.e. total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, insulin-growth factor I, osteocalcin, serum type I collagen C-telopeptide), lipid, and lipoprotein profiles were quantified. A standard oral glucose tolerance test was performed before and after the 14-week training. All analyses were conducted at the beginning and after the intervention. Results The intervention group showed a significant increase in QF muscle size when compared with the control group. Bone losses were similar in both groups. Basal levels of bone biomarkers did not change over time. Changes in lipid and lipoprotein were similar in both groups. Glucose and insulin peaks moved forward after the training in the intervention group. Conclusions This study indicates that skeletal muscle of patients with complete SCI retains the ability to grow in response to a longitudinal EMS training, while bone does not respond to similar external stimulus. Increases in muscle mass might have induced improvements in whole body insulin-induced glucose uptake. PMID:24090427

  18. Acute and Chronic Plasma Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Stress Effects in a Mouse Model with Features of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; D’Arpa, Peter; Donohue, Duncan E.; Muhie, Seid; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Luke, Brian T.; Grapov, Dmitry; Carroll, Erica E.; Meyerhoff, James L.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Acute responses to intense stressors can give rise to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD diagnostic criteria include trauma exposure history and self-reported symptoms. Individuals who meet PTSD diagnostic criteria often meet criteria for additional psychiatric diagnoses. Biomarkers promise to contribute to reliable phenotypes of PTSD and comorbidities by linking biological system alterations to behavioral symptoms. Here we have analyzed unbiased plasma metabolomics and other stress effects in a mouse model with behavioral features of PTSD. In this model, C57BL/6 mice are repeatedly exposed to a trained aggressor mouse (albino SJL) using a modified, resident-intruder, social defeat paradigm. Our recent studies using this model found that aggressor-exposed mice exhibited acute stress effects including changed behaviors, body weight gain, increased body temperature, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic histopathologies and transcriptomic changes of heart tissue. Some of these acute stress effects persisted, reminiscent of PTSD. Here we report elevated proteins in plasma that function in inflammation and responses to oxidative stress and damaged tissue at 24 hrs post-stressor. Additionally at this acute time point, transcriptomic analysis indicated liver inflammation. The unbiased metabolomics analysis showed altered metabolites in plasma at 24 hrs that only partially normalized toward control levels after stress-withdrawal for 1.5 or 4 wks. In particular, gut-derived metabolites were altered at 24 hrs post-stressor and remained altered up to 4 wks after stress-withdrawal. Also at the 4 wk time point, hyperlipidemia and suppressed metabolites of amino acids and carbohydrates in plasma coincided with transcriptomic indicators of altered liver metabolism (activated xenobiotic and lipid metabolism). Collectively, these system-wide sequelae to repeated intense stress suggest that the simultaneous perturbed functioning of multiple organ systems (e.g., brain, heart

  19. Preface: SciDAC 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    On 26-30 June 2005 at the Grand Hyatt on Union Square in San Francisco several hundred computational scientists from around the world came together for what can certainly be described as a celebration of computational science. Scientists from the SciDAC Program and scientists from other agencies and nations were joined by applied mathematicians and computer scientists to highlight the many successes in the past year where computation has led to scientific discovery in a variety of fields: lattice quantum chromodynamics, accelerator modeling, chemistry, biology, materials science, Earth and climate science, astrophysics, and combustion and fusion energy science. Also highlighted were the advances in numerical methods and computer science, and the multidisciplinary collaboration cutting across science, mathematics, and computer science that enabled these discoveries. The SciDAC Program was conceived and funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science. It is the Office of Science's premier computational science program founded on what is arguably the perfect formula: the priority and focus is science and scientific discovery, with the understanding that the full arsenal of `enabling technologies' in applied mathematics and computer science must be brought to bear if we are to have any hope of attacking and ultimately solving today's computational Grand Challenge problems. The SciDAC Program has been in existence for four years, and many of the computational scientists funded by this program will tell you that the program has given them the hope of addressing their scientific problems in full realism for the very first time. Many of these scientists will also tell you that SciDAC has also fundamentally changed the way they do computational science. We begin this volume with one of DOE's great traditions, and core missions: energy research. As we will see, computation has been seminal to the critical advances that have been made in this arena. Of course, to

  20. The usefulness of EEG, exogenous evoked potentials, and cognitive evoked potentials in the acute stage of post-anoxic and post-traumatic coma.

    PubMed

    Guérit, J M

    2000-12-01

    Three-modality evoked potentials (TMEPs) have been used for several years in association with the EEG as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in acute anoxic or traumatic coma. Cognitive EPs have been recently introduced. EEG and cognitive EPs provide functional assessment of the cerebral cortex. TMEP parameters can be described by two indices: the index of global cortical function (IGCF) and the index of brainstem conduction (IBSC). Although it remains a unique tool for epilepsy assessment, the value of EEG is largely limited by its high sensitivity to the electrical environmental noise, its dependence on sedative drugs, and its inability to test the brainstem. Major TMEP alterations (absence of cortical activities more than 24 hours after the onset of post-anoxic coma, major pontine involvement in head trauma) are associated in all cases with an ominous prognosis (death or vegetative state). However, even if mild TMEP changes are associated with a good prognosis in 65% (post-anoxic coma) to 90% (head trauma) of cases, some patients never recover despite exogenous TMEPs that are only mildly altered in the acute stage. Thus, cognitive EPs can usefully complement exogenous EPs as a prognostic tool in coma. Indeed, even if the absence of cognitive EPs in comatose patients does not have any prognostic value, their presence implies a very high (more than 90%) probability of consciousness recovery. The major technical challenge for the future will be the development of reliable tools for continuous EEG and TMEP monitoring.

  1. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  2. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  3. A State-of-the-Science Overview of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Acute Management of Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bragge, Peter; Synnot, Anneliese; Maas, Andrew I; Menon, David K; Cooper, D James; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Gruen, Russell L

    2016-08-15

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major global challenge, with rising incidence, unchanging mortality and lifelong impairments. State-of-the-science reviews are important for research planning and clinical decision support. This review aimed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating interventions for acute management of moderate/severe TBI, synthesize key RCT characteristics and findings, and determine their implications on clinical practice and future research. RCTs were identified through comprehensive database and other searches. Key characteristics, outcomes, risk of bias, and analysis approach were extracted. Data were narratively synthesized, with a focus on robust (multi-center, low risk of bias, n > 100) RCTs, and three-dimensional graphical figures also were used to explore relationships between RCT characteristics and findings. A total of 207 RCTs were identified. The 191 completed RCTs enrolled 35,340 participants (median, 66). Most (72%) were single center and enrolled less than 100 participants (69%). There were 26 robust RCTs across 18 different interventions. For 74% of 392 comparisons across all included RCTs, there was no significant difference between groups. Positive findings were broadly distributed with respect to RCT characteristics. Less than one-third of RCTs demonstrated low risk of bias for random sequence generation or allocation concealment, less than one-quarter used covariate adjustment, and only 7% employed an ordinal analysis approach. Considerable investment of resources in producing 191 completed RCTs for acute TBI management has resulted in very little translatable evidence. This may result from broad distribution of research effort, small samples, preponderance of single-center RCTs, and methodological shortcomings. More sophisticated RCT design, large multi-center RCTs in priority areas, increased focus on pre-clinical research, and alternatives to RCTs, such as comparative

  4. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-05

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program.

  5. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    The fourth annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held June 13-18, 2008, in Seattle, Washington. The SciDAC conference series is the premier communitywide venue for presentation of results from the DOE Office of Science's interdisciplinary computational science program. Started in 2001 and renewed in 2006, the DOE SciDAC program is the country's - and arguably the world's - most significant interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of advanced scientific computing methods and their application to fundamental and applied areas of science. SciDAC supports computational science across many disciplines, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, fusion sciences, and nuclear physics. Moreover, the program actively encourages the creation of long-term partnerships among scientists focused on challenging problems and computer scientists and applied mathematicians developing the technology and tools needed to address those problems. The SciDAC program has played an increasingly important role in scientific research by allowing scientists to create more accurate models of complex processes, simulate problems once thought to be impossible, and analyze the growing amount of data generated by experiments. To help further the research community's ability to tap into the capabilities of current and future supercomputers, Under Secretary for Science, Raymond Orbach, launched the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program in 2003. The INCITE program was conceived specifically to seek out computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. The program encourages proposals from universities, other research institutions, and industry. During the first two years of the INCITE program, 10 percent of the resources at NERSC were allocated to INCITE awardees. However, demand for supercomputing resources

  6. Traumatic brain injury in U.S. Veterans with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Creasey, Graham H; Lateva, Zoia C; Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose, Sophia Miryam; Rose, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Patients with both a spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often very difficult to manage and can strain the resources of clinical units specialized in treating either diagnosis. However, a wide range of estimates exists on the extent of this problem. The aim of this study was to describe the scope of the problem in a well-defined population attending a comprehensive SCI unit. Electronic medical records of all patients with SCI being followed by the SCI unit in a U.S. Veterans' hospital were searched to identify those with concurrent TBI. The data were analyzed for age, sex, cause of injury, level and completeness of SCI, cognitive impairment, relationship with Active Duty military, and date of injury. Of 409 Veterans with a traumatic SCI, 99 (24.2%) were identified as having had a concurrent TBI. The occurrence did not appear to be closely related to military conflict. Reports of TBI were much more common in the last 20 yr than in previous decades. Documentation of TBI in patients with SCI was inconsistent. Improved screening and documentation could identify all patients with this dual diagnosis and facilitate appropriate management.

  7. Effect of acute poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition by 3-AB on blood-brain barrier permeability and edema formation after focal traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lescot, Thomas; Fulla-Oller, Laurence; Palmier, Bruno; Po, Christelle; Beziaud, Tiphaine; Puybasset, Louis; Plotkine, Michel; Gillet, Brigitte; Meric, Philippe; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine

    2010-06-01

    Recent evidence supports a crucial role for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the exact causes of MMP-9 upregulation after TBI are not fully understood, several arguments suggest a contribution of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in the neuroinflammatory response leading to MMP-9 activation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of PARP inhibition by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) (1) on MMP-9 upregulation and BBB integrity, (2) on edema formation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (3) on neuron survival as assessed by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and (4) on neurological deficits at the acute phase of TBI. Western blots and zymograms showed blunting of MMP-9 upregulation 6 h after TBI. BBB permeability was decreased at the same time point in 3-AB-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats. Cerebral MRI showed less "free" water in 3-AB-treated than in vehicle-treated rats 6 h after TBI. MRI findings 24 h after TBI indicated predominant cytotoxic edema, and at this time point no significant differences were found between 3-AB- and vehicle-treated rats with regard to MMP-9 upregulation, BBB permeability, or MRI changes. At both 6 and 24 h, neurological function was better in the 3-AB-treated than in the vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that PARP inhibition by 3-AB protected the BBB against hyperpermeability induced by MMP-9 upregulation, thereby decreasing vasogenic edema formation 6 h after TBI. Furthermore, our data confirm the neuroprotective effect of 3-AB at the very acute phase of TBI.

  8. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  9. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Kathryn A.; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Menon, David K.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT “Lab” model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research. PMID:25898072

  10. White matter microstructure in chronic moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: Impact of acute-phase injury-related variables and associations with outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Håberg, A K; Olsen, A; Moen, K G; Schirmer-Mikalsen, K; Visser, E; Finnanger, T G; Evensen, K A I; Skandsen, T; Vik, A; Eikenes, L

    2015-07-01

    This study examines how injury mechanisms and early neuroimaging and clinical measures impact white matter (WM) fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and tract volumes in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how WM integrity in the chronic phase is associated with different outcome measures obtained at the same time. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T was acquired more than 1 year after TBI in 49 moderate-to-severe-TBI survivors and 50 matched controls. DTI data were analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics and automated tractography. Moderate-to-severe TBI led to widespread FA decreases, MD increases, and tract volume reductions. In severe TBI and in acceleration/deceleration injuries, a specific FA loss was detected. A particular loss of FA was also present in the thalamus and the brainstem in all grades of diffuse axonal injury. Acute-phase Glasgow Coma Scale scores, number of microhemorrhages on T2*, lesion volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and duration of posttraumatic amnesia were associated with more widespread FA loss and MD increases in chronic TBI. Episodes of cerebral perfusion pressure <70 mmHg were specifically associated with reduced MD. Neither episodes of intracranial pressure >20 mmHg nor acute-phase Rotterdam CT scores were associated with WM changes. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended scores and performance-based cognitive control functioning were associated with FA and MD changes, but self-reported cognitive control functioning was not. In conclusion, FA loss specifically reflects the primary injury severity and mechanism, whereas FA and MD changes are associated with objective measures of general and cognitive control functioning.

  11. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bao-chun; Liu, Li-jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO2) and oxygen partial pressure (PaO2). To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO2 and PaO2, but received no treatment. rSO2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth. PMID:27857747

  12. Complementary and alternative therapies and SCI nursing.

    PubMed

    Oliver, N R

    2001-01-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are experimenting with different complementary and alternative techniques and practices in their quest to improve their health status or change symptom experiences. Consumer utilization patterns are described, activities to ensure the safety and efficacy of alternative practices are reviewed, and relationships to nursing interventions and nursing responsibilities are presented. The relationship between complementary/alternative therapies and spinal cord injury (SCI) nursing practice, education, and research are described, as well as strategies for integrating these therapies into SCI nursing. The potential roles for SCI nurses and benefits to individuals with SCI are unlimited.

  13. Traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord impairment in New Zealand: incidence and characteristics of people admitted to spinal units

    PubMed Central

    Derrett, Sarah; Beaver, Carolyn; Sullivan, Martin J; Herbison, G Peter; Acland, Rick; Paul, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the incidence (all ages) of spinal cord neurological impairment (SCI; traumatic and non-traumatic) in New Zealand and describes pre-SCI characteristics and early post-SCI outcomes for participants (16–64 years) in this longitudinal study. Demographic and clinical data on all people admitted to New Zealand's two spinal units (mid-2007 to mid-2009) were included for the estimate of incidence. Participants in this longitudinal study were asked at first interview about pre-SCI socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics, and about post-SCI symptoms, general health status (EQ-5D) and disability (WHODAS 12-item). Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) for European, Māori, Pacific and ‘Other’ ethnicities were 29 (24–34), 46 (30–64), 70 (40–100) and 16 (9–22) per million, respectively. Interviews with 118 (73%) participants (16–64 years), occurred 6.5 months post-SCI. Most reported bother with symptoms, and problems with health status and disability. Compared with Europeans, the incidence of SCI is high among Māori and particularly high among Pacific people. Six months after SCI, proximate to discharge from the spinal units, considerable symptomatic, general health and disability burden was borne by people with SCI. PMID:22544829

  14. Traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord impairment in New Zealand: incidence and characteristics of people admitted to spinal units.

    PubMed

    Derrett, Sarah; Beaver, Carolyn; Sullivan, Martin J; Herbison, G Peter; Acland, Rick; Paul, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    This paper estimates the incidence (all ages) of spinal cord neurological impairment (SCI; traumatic and non-traumatic) in New Zealand and describes pre-SCI characteristics and early post-SCI outcomes for participants (16-64 years) in this longitudinal study. Demographic and clinical data on all people admitted to New Zealand's two spinal units (mid-2007 to mid-2009) were included for the estimate of incidence. Participants in this longitudinal study were asked at first interview about pre-SCI socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics, and about post-SCI symptoms, general health status (EQ-5D) and disability (WHODAS 12-item). Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) for European, Māori, Pacific and 'Other' ethnicities were 29 (24-34), 46 (30-64), 70 (40-100) and 16 (9-22) per million, respectively. Interviews with 118 (73%) participants (16-64 years), occurred 6.5 months post-SCI. Most reported bother with symptoms, and problems with health status and disability. Compared with Europeans, the incidence of SCI is high among Māori and particularly high among Pacific people. Six months after SCI, proximate to discharge from the spinal units, considerable symptomatic, general health and disability burden was borne by people with SCI.

  15. Acute Axonal Degeneration Drives Development of Cognitive, Motor, and Visual Deficits after Blast-Mediated Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Jaymie R.; Genova, Rachel M.; Britt, Jeremiah K.; McDaniel, Latisha; Harper, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Axonal degeneration is a prominent feature of many forms of neurodegeneration, and also an early event in blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI), the signature injury of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is not known, however, whether this axonal degeneration is what drives development of subsequent neurologic deficits after the injury. The Wallerian degeneration slow strain (WldS) of mice is resistant to some forms of axonal degeneration because of a triplicated fusion gene encoding the first 70 amino acids of Ufd2a, a ubiquitin-chain assembly factor, that is linked to the complete coding sequence of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMAT1). Here, we demonstrate that resistance of WldS mice to axonal degeneration after blast-mediated TBI is associated with preserved function in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, cerebellar-dependent motor balance, and retinal and optic nerve–dependent visual function. Thus, early axonal degeneration is likely a critical driver of subsequent neurobehavioral complications of blast-mediated TBI. Future therapeutic strategies targeted specifically at mitigating axonal degeneration may provide a uniquely beneficial approach to treating patients suffering from the effects of blast-mediated TBI. PMID:27822499

  16. Acute Axonal Degeneration Drives Development of Cognitive, Motor, and Visual Deficits after Blast-Mediated Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Terry C; Voorhees, Jaymie R; Genova, Rachel M; Davis, Kevin C; Madison, Ashley M; Britt, Jeremiah K; Cintrón-Pérez, Coral J; McDaniel, Latisha; Harper, Matthew M; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a prominent feature of many forms of neurodegeneration, and also an early event in blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI), the signature injury of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is not known, however, whether this axonal degeneration is what drives development of subsequent neurologic deficits after the injury. The Wallerian degeneration slow strain (WldS) of mice is resistant to some forms of axonal degeneration because of a triplicated fusion gene encoding the first 70 amino acids of Ufd2a, a ubiquitin-chain assembly factor, that is linked to the complete coding sequence of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMAT1). Here, we demonstrate that resistance of WldS mice to axonal degeneration after blast-mediated TBI is associated with preserved function in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, cerebellar-dependent motor balance, and retinal and optic nerve-dependent visual function. Thus, early axonal degeneration is likely a critical driver of subsequent neurobehavioral complications of blast-mediated TBI. Future therapeutic strategies targeted specifically at mitigating axonal degeneration may provide a uniquely beneficial approach to treating patients suffering from the effects of blast-mediated TBI.

  17. Targeting Translational Successes through CANSORT-SCI: Using Pet Dogs To Identify Effective Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Granger, Nicolas; Olby, Natasha J; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Jeffery, Nick D; Tipold, Andrea; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Stein, Veronika M; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Blight, Andrew R; Grossman, Robert G; Basso, D Michele; Levine, Jonathan M

    2017-03-22

    Translation of therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) from laboratory to clinic has been historically challenging, highlighting the need for robust models of injury that more closely mirror the human condition. The high prevalence of acute, naturally occurring SCI in pet dogs provides a unique opportunity to evaluate expeditiously promising interventions in a population of animals that receive diagnoses and treatment clinically in a manner similar to persons with SCI, while adhering to National Institutes of Health guidelines for scientific rigor and transparent reporting. In addition, pet dogs with chronic paralysis are often maintained long-term by their owners, offering a similarly unique population for study of chronic SCI. Despite this, only a small number of studies have used the clinical dog model of SCI. The Canine Spinal Cord Injury Consortium (CANSORT-SCI) was recently established by a group of veterinarians and basic science researchers to promote the value of the canine clinical model of SCI. The CANSORT-SCI group held an inaugural meeting November 20 and 21, 2015 to evaluate opportunities and challenges to the use of pet dogs in SCI research. Key challenges identified included lack of familiarity with the model among nonveterinary scientists and questions about how and where in the translational process the canine clinical model would be most valuable. In light of these, we review the natural history, outcome, and available assessment tools associated with canine clinical SCI with emphasis on their relevance to human SCI and the translational process.

  18. Measuring stigma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Stigma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Pace, Natalie; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W.; Heinemann, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a calibrated item bank and computer adaptive test (CAT) to assess the effects of stigma on health-related quality of life in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration field testing, confirmatory factor analysis, and item response theory (IRT)-based psychometric analyses. Setting Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Main Outcome Measures SCI-QOL Stigma Item Bank Results A sample of 611 individuals with traumatic SCI completed 30 items assessing SCI-related stigma. After 7 items were iteratively removed, factor analyses confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. Graded Response Model IRT analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 23 items. Conclusions The SCI-QOL Stigma item bank is unique not only in the assessment of SCI-related stigma but also in the inclusion of individuals with SCI in all phases of its development. Use of confirmatory factor analytic and IRT methods provide flexibility and precision of measurement. The item bank may be administered as a CAT or as a 10-item fixed-length short form and can be used for research and clinical applications. PMID:26010973

  19. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    military veteran who suffered a service-related traumatic SCI. Methods: An in-depth anthropological interview was used with Jake, a 28-year old marine...spinal cord injury. 9 Participants Seth Messinger, Principal Investigator Associate Professor of Anthropology Seth Messinger is responsible...Networks for Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury in Obtaining Employment. Annals of Anthropological Practice. 37,2:40-56 Fritz, H., Lysack, C

  20. Evaluating the relationship between memory functioning and cingulum bundles in acute mild traumatic brain injury using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Trevor C; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Yallampalli, Ragini; McCauley, Stephen R; Troyanskaya, Maya; Chu, Zili; Li, Xiaoqi; Hanten, Gerri; Hunter, Jill V; Levin, Harvey S

    2010-02-01

    Compromised memory functioning is one of the commonly reported cognitive sequelae seen following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to be sufficiently sensitive at detecting early microstructural pathological alterations after mTBI. Given its location and shape, the cingulate, which is comprised of the cingulate gyrus (gray matter) and cingulum bundles (white matter), is selectively vulnerable to mTBI. In this study we examined the integrity of cingulum bundles using DTI, and the relationship between cingulum bundles and memory functioning. Twelve adolescents with mTBI and 11 demographically-matched healthy controls were studied. All participants with mTBI had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, and were without intracranial findings on CT scan. Brain scans were performed on average 2.92 days post-injury, and all participants were administered the Verbal Selective Reminding Test (VSRT), an episodic verbal learning and memory task. Participants with mTBI had a significantly lower apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) bilaterally than controls (p < 0.001). Despite the marginal significance of the group difference in fractional anisotropy (FA), the effect size between groups was moderate (d = 0.66). Cognitively, healthy controls performed better than the TBI group on immediate and delayed recall; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. In the mTBI group, FA of the left cingulum bundle was significantly correlated with 30-min delayed recall (r = -0.56, p = 0.05). A marginally significant correlation was found between ADC of the left cingulum bundle and the total words of immediate recall (r = 0.59, p = 0.07). No significant correlation was found between DTI metrics and memory functioning for the control group. These preliminary findings indicate that cingulate injury likely contributes to the cognitive sequelae seen during the early phase post-mTBI.

  1. A prospective study of the influence of acute alcohol intoxication versus chronic alcohol consumption on outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Shewchuk, Jason R; Rauscher, Alexander; Jarrett, Michael; Heran, Manraj K S; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Iverson, Grant L

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to disentangle the relative contributions of day-of-injury alcohol intoxication and pre-injury alcohol misuse on outcome from TBI. Participants were 142 patients enrolled from a Level 1 Trauma Center (in Vancouver, Canada) following a traumatic brain injury (TBI; 43 uncomplicated mild TBI and 63 complicated mild-severe TBI) or orthopedic injury [36 trauma controls (TC)]. At 6-8 weeks post-injury, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the whole brain was undertaken using a Phillips 3T scanner. Participants also completed neuropsychological testing, an evaluation of lifetime alcohol consumption (LAC), and had blood alcohol levels (BALs) taken at the time of injury. Participants in the uncomplicated mild TBI and complicated mild-severe TBI groups had higher scores on measures of depression and postconcussion symptoms (d = 0.45-0.83), but not anxiety, compared with the TC group. The complicated mild-severe TBI group had more areas of abnormal white matter on DTI measures (all p < .05; d = 0.54-0.61) than the TC group. There were no difference between groups on all neurocognitive measures. Using hierarchical regression analyses and generalized linear modeling, LAC and BAL did provide a unique contribution toward the prediction of attention and executive functioning abilities; however, the variance accounted for was small. LAC and BAL did not provide a unique and meaningful contribution toward the prediction of self-reported symptoms, DTI measures, or the majority of neurocognitive measures. In this study, BAL and LAC were not predictive of mental health symptoms, postconcussion symptoms, cognition, or white-matter changes at 6-8 weeks following TBI.

  2. Timing of Decompressive Surgery of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Evidence-Based Examination of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Cadotte, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the recommendations for spine surgery in specific cases of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) are well recognized, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the role of the timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord in the management of patients with SCI. Given this, we sought to critically review the literature regarding the pre-clinical and clinical evidence on the potential impact of timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord on outcomes after traumatic SCI. The primary literature search was performed using MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. A secondary search strategy incorporated articles referenced in prior meta-analyses and systematic and nonsystematic review articles. Two reviewers independently assessed every study with regard to eligibility, level of evidence, and study quality. Of 198 abstracts of pre-clinical studies, 19 experimental studies using animal SCI models fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Despite some discrepancies in the results of those pre-clinical studies, there is evidence for a biological rationale to support early decompression of the spinal cord. Of 153 abstracts of clinical studies, 22 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. While the vast majority of the clinical studies were level-4 evidence, there were two studies of level-2b evidence. The quality assessment scores varied from 7 to 25 with a mean value of 12.41. While 2 of 22 clinical studies assessed feasibility and safety, 20 clinical studies examined efficacy of early surgical intervention to stabilize and align the spine and to decompress the spinal cord; the most common definitions of early operation used 24 and 72 h after SCI as timelines. A number of studies indicated that patients who undergo early surgical decompression can have similar outcomes to patients who received a delayed decompressive operation. However, there is evidence to suggest that early surgical intervention is safe and feasible

  3. The Impact of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury on Cognitive Functioning Following Co-occurring Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Macciocchi, Stephen N.; Seel, Ronald T.; Thompson, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analytic studies have shown that mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) has relatively negligible effects on cognitive functioning at 90 or more days post-injury. Few studies have prospectively examined the effects of MTBI in acute physical trauma populations. This prospective, cohort study compared the cognitive performance of persons who sustained a spinal cord injury (SCI) and a co-occurring MTBI (N = 53) to persons who sustained an SCI alone (N = 64) between 26 and 76 days (mean = 46) post-injury. The presence of MTBI was determined based on acute medical record review using a standardized algorithm. Primary outcome measures were seven neuropsychological tests that evaluated visual, verbal, and working memory, perceptual reasoning, and processing speed that controlled for potential upper extremity impairment. Persons who sustained SCI with or without MTBI had lower than expected performance across all neuropsychological tests, on average about 1 SD below the mean. Analysis of covariance indicated that persons with MTBI did not evidence greater impairment on any neuropsychological test. The aggregated effect size (Cohen's d) was −0.16. The strongest predictors of neuropsychological test scores were education, race, history of learning problems, and days from injury to rehabilitation admission. MTBI did not predict performance on any neuropsychological test. These findings are consistent with other controlled studies that indicate a single MTBI has negligible long-term impacts on cognition. PMID:24055885

  4. Understanding Quality of Life in Adults with Spinal Cord Injury Via SCI-Related Needs and Secondary Complications

    PubMed Central

    Noreau, Luc; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Understanding the factors that can predict greater quality of life (QoL) is important for adults with spinal cord injury (SCI), given that they report lower levels of QoL than the general population. Objectives: To build a conceptual model linking SCI-related needs, secondary complications, and QoL in adults with SCI. Prior to testing the conceptual model, we aimed to develop and evaluate the factor structure for both SCI-related needs and secondary complications. Methods: Individuals with a traumatic SCI (N = 1,137) responded to an online survey measuring 13 SCI-related needs, 13 secondary complications, and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire to assess QoL. The SCI-related needs and secondary complications were conceptualized into factors, tested with a confirmatory factor analysis, and subsequently evaluated in a structural equation model to predict QoL. Results: The confirmatory factor analysis supported a 2-factor model for SCI related needs, χ2(61, N = 1,137) = 250.40, P <.001, comparative fit index (CFI) = .93, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = .05, standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = .04, and for 11 of the 13 secondary complications, χ2(44, N = 1,137) = 305.67, P < .001, CFI = .91, RMSEA = .060, SRMR = .033. The final 2 secondary complications were kept as observed constructs. In the structural model, both vital and personal development unmet SCI-related needs (β = -.22 and -.20, P < .05, respectively) and the neuro-physiological systems factor (β = -.45, P < .05) were negatively related with QoL. Conclusions: Identifying unmet SCI-related needs of individuals with SCI and preventing or managing secondary complications are essential to their QoL. PMID:25477745

  5. Blockade of Extracellular High-Mobility Group Box 1 Attenuates Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Abnormalities in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Kun; Shen, Xiao; Fan, Xin-Xin; Ding, Kai; Liu, Ren-Min; Wang, Feng

    2016-07-20

    BACKGROUND As an extracellularly released mediator, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) initiates sterile inflammation following severe trauma. Serum HMGB1 levels correlate well with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in trauma patients, which is independently associated with higher mortality. We investigated the involvement of HMGB1 in ATC through blocking extracellular HMGB1. MATERIAL AND METHODS The ATC model was induced by polytrauma and hemorrhage in male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly assigned to sham, ATC, and ATCH (ATC with HMGB1 blockade) groups. Thrombelastography (TEG) was performed to monitor changes in coagulation function. Serum levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, and IL-6 were measured, as well as lung levels of HMGB1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB and expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). RESULTS Compared with the sham group, HMGB1 increased the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6, whereas HMGB1 blockade inhibited the induction of TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 also induced elevated serum soluble P-selectin and fibrinolysis markers plasmin-antiplasmin complex, which both were reduced by HMGB1 blockade. Thrombelastography revealed the hypocoagulability status in the ATC group, which was attenuated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Furthermore, the lung level of NF-κB and expression of RAGE were decreased by anti-HMGB1 antibody, suggesting the role of RAGE/NF-κB pathway in ATC. CONCLUSIONS HMGB1 blockade can attenuate inflammation and coagulopathy in ATC rats. Anti-HMGB1 antibody might exert protective effects partly through the RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Thus, HMGB1 has potential as a therapeutic target in ATC.

  6. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  7. Investigating Microstructural Abnormalities and Neurocognition in Sub-Acute and Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Normal-Appearing White Matter: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Eyesha; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Papinutto, Nico; Lewis, Caroline E.; Jing, Ruiwei; Charles, Onella; Zhang, Shudong; Lin, Amy; Graham, Simon J.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Bharatha, Aditya; Cusimano, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    For a significant percentage of subjects, with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), who report persisting cognitive impairment and functional loss, the diagnosis is often impeded by the fact that routine neuroimaging often does not reveal any abnormalities. In this paper, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the apparently normal white matter (as assessed by routine magnetic resonance imaging) in the brains of 19 subjects with sub-acute (9) and chronic (10) TBI. We also assessed memory, executive function, and visual-motor coordination in these subjects. Using a voxel-wise approach, we investigated if parameters of diffusion were significantly different between TBI subjects and 17 healthy controls (HC), who were demographically matched to the TBI group. We also investigated if changes in DTI parameters were associated with neuropsychological performance in either group. Our results indicate significantly increased mean and axial diffusivity (MD and AD, respectively) values in widespread brain locations in TBI subjects, while controlling for age, sex, and time since injury. HC performed significantly better than the TBI subjects on tests of memory and executive function, indicating the persisting functional loss in chronic TBI. We found no correlation between diffusion parameters and performance on test of executive function in either group. We found negative correlation between FA and composite memory scores, and positive correlation between RD and visuomotor coordination test scores, in various tracts in both groups. Our study suggests that changes in MD and AD can indicate persisting micro-structure abnormalities in normal-appearing white matter in the brains of subjects with chronic TBI. Our results also suggest that FA in major white matter tracts is correlated with memory in health and in disease, alike; larger and longitudinal studies are needed to discern potential differences in these correlations in the two groups. PMID:28373856

  8. Investigating Microstructural Abnormalities and Neurocognition in Sub-Acute and Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Normal-Appearing White Matter: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Eyesha; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Papinutto, Nico; Lewis, Caroline E; Jing, Ruiwei; Charles, Onella; Zhang, Shudong; Lin, Amy; Graham, Simon J; Schweizer, Tom A; Bharatha, Aditya; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    For a significant percentage of subjects, with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), who report persisting cognitive impairment and functional loss, the diagnosis is often impeded by the fact that routine neuroimaging often does not reveal any abnormalities. In this paper, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the apparently normal white matter (as assessed by routine magnetic resonance imaging) in the brains of 19 subjects with sub-acute (9) and chronic (10) TBI. We also assessed memory, executive function, and visual-motor coordination in these subjects. Using a voxel-wise approach, we investigated if parameters of diffusion were significantly different between TBI subjects and 17 healthy controls (HC), who were demographically matched to the TBI group. We also investigated if changes in DTI parameters were associated with neuropsychological performance in either group. Our results indicate significantly increased mean and axial diffusivity (MD and AD, respectively) values in widespread brain locations in TBI subjects, while controlling for age, sex, and time since injury. HC performed significantly better than the TBI subjects on tests of memory and executive function, indicating the persisting functional loss in chronic TBI. We found no correlation between diffusion parameters and performance on test of executive function in either group. We found negative correlation between FA and composite memory scores, and positive correlation between RD and visuomotor coordination test scores, in various tracts in both groups. Our study suggests that changes in MD and AD can indicate persisting micro-structure abnormalities in normal-appearing white matter in the brains of subjects with chronic TBI. Our results also suggest that FA in major white matter tracts is correlated with memory in health and in disease, alike; larger and longitudinal studies are needed to discern potential differences in these correlations in the two groups.

  9. [SciELO: method for electronic publishing].

    PubMed

    Laerte Packer, A; Rocha Biojone, M; Antonio, I; Mayumi Takemaka, R; Pedroso García, A; Costa da Silva, A; Toshiyuki Murasaki, R; Mylek, C; Carvalho Reisl, O; Rocha F Delbucio, H C

    2001-01-01

    It describes the SciELO Methodology Scientific Electronic Library Online for electronic publishing of scientific periodicals, examining issues such as the transition from traditional printed publication to electronic publishing, the scientific communication process, the principles which founded the methodology development, its application in the building of the SciELO site, its modules and components, the tools use for its construction etc. The article also discusses the potentialities and trends for the area in Brazil and Latin America, pointing out questions and proposals which should be investigated and solved by the methodology. It concludes that the SciELO Methodology is an efficient, flexible and wide solution for the scientific electronic publishing.

  10. Acute traumatic posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow in pediatric patients: impact of surgery time and associated fractures on outcome.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Fuat; Dikmen, Goksel; Baş, Ali; Asma, Ali; Batibay, Sefa G; Şirikçi, Murat; Atalar, Ata Can

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of the time interval from initial injury to surgery and the presence of associated fracture on functional outcomes after acute posterior elbow fracture dislocation. Twenty-six pediatric patients were evaluated with respect to operation time point (within 24 h vs. later) and associated fracture retrospectively. The Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) score was used to assess functional results. The MEPI score was 91 (80-100) in patients with one associated fracture and 83 (75-95) (P=0.02) in patients with more than one associated fracture. The MEPI score in patients treated within 24 h was 90.3 (75-95) and in those treated later than 24 h, it was 88.6 (75-100) (P=0.6). Treatment time (within 24 h vs. later) does not affect outcomes, but increasing numbers of associated injuries affect outcomes negatively. Level of study: Level IV case series.

  11. Haemostatic drugs for traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Perel, Pablo; Roberts, Ian; Shakur, Haleema; Thinkhamrop, Bandit; Phuenpathom, Nakornchai; Yutthakasemsunt, Surakrant

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability. Intracranial bleeding is a common complication of TBI, and intracranial bleeding can develop or worsen after hospital admission. Haemostatic drugs may reduce the occurrence or size of intracranial bleeds and consequently lower the morbidity and mortality associated with TBI. Objectives To assess the effects of haemostatic drugs on mortality, disability and thrombotic complications in patients with traumatic brain injury. Search methods We searched the electronic databases: Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (3 February 2009), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to Week 3 2009), PubMed (searched 3 February 2009 (last 180 days)), EMBASE (1980 to Week 4 2009), CINAHL (1982 to January 2009), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) (1970 to January 2009), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S) (1990 to January 2009). Selection criteria We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing haemostatic drugs (antifibrinolytics: aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA), aminocaproic acid or recombined activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa)) with placebo, no treatment, or other treatment in patients with acute traumatic brain injury. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently examined all electronic records, and extracted the data. We judged that there was clinical heterogeneity between trials so we did not attempt to pool the results of the included trials. The results are reported separately. Main results We included two trials. One was a post-hoc analysis of 30 TBI patients from a randomised controlled trial of rFVIIa in blunt trauma patients. The risk ratio for mortality at 30 days was 0.64 (95% CI 0.25 to 1.63) for rFVIIa compared to placebo. This result should be considered with caution as the subgroup analysis was not pre-specified for the trial. The other trial

  12. Is respiration-induced variation in the photoplethysmogram associated with major hypovolemia in patients with acute traumatic injuries?

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; Reifman, Jaques

    2010-11-01

    It has been widely accepted that metrics related to respiration-induced waveform variation (RIWV) of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) have been associated with hypovolemia in mechanically ventilated patients and in controlled laboratory environments. In this retrospective study, we investigated if PPG RIWV metrics have diagnostic value for patients with acute hemorrhagic hypovolemia in the prehospital environment. Photoplethysmogram waveforms and basic vital signs were recorded in trauma patients during prehospital transport. Retrospectively, we used automated algorithms to select patient records with all five basic vital signs and 45 s or longer continuous, clean PPG segments. From these segments, we identified the onset and peak of individual heartbeats and computed waveform variations in the beats' peaks and amplitudes: (1) as the range between the maximum and the minimum (max-min) values and (2) as their interquartile range (IQR). We evaluated their receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for major hemorrhage. Separately, we tested whether RIWV metrics have potential independent information beyond basic vital signs by applying multivariate regression. In 344 patients, RIWV max-min yielded areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) not significantly better than a random AUC of 0.50. Respiration-induced waveform variation computed as IQR yielded ROC AUCs of 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.76) and of 0.64 (0.51-0.75), for peak and amplitude measures, respectively. The IQR metrics added independent information to basic vital signs (P < 0.05), but only moderately improved the overall AUC. Photoplethysmogram RIWV measured as IQR is preferable over max-min, and using PPG RIWV may enhance physiologic monitoring of spontaneously breathing patients outside strictly controlled laboratory environments.

  13. Possible Risk Factors for Acute Stress Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder After an Industrial Explosion

    PubMed Central

    TAYMUR, İbrahim; SARGIN, A. Emre; ÖZDEL, Kadir; TÜRKÇAPAR, Hakan M.; ÇALIŞGAN, Lale; ZAMKI, Erkut; DEMİREL, Başak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There have been deaths and injuries after an explosion which happened in an industrial region in Ankara in February 2011. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and to determine the variables which can be the risk factors for PTSD. Methods In this study, we included a total of 197 subjects who were present at the factory building and at the four offices nearby when the disaster occurred. All the participants were assessed one month after the explosion and 157 of them were reassessed six months after the explosion. Socio-demographic information forms were given and the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was administered to the participants one month after the explosion. Psychiatric assessments were done using the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis-I disorders (SCID-I). The CAPS was re-applied six month after the disaster. Results At the first-month assessments, ASD was detected in 37.1% of participants and PTSD in 13.7%, whereas PTSD was observed in 16.6% of subjects at the sixth month of the accident. According to the first month data, having any psychiatric disorder before the incident, physical injury, acquaintances among the dead and the injured people, being involved in the incident and seeing dead people were detected as the risk factors for PTSD. At the sixth month assessment, physical injury, acquaintances among the dead and the injured, being involved in the incident were seen as risk factors for PTSD. Conclusion ASD and PTSD can be seen after an explosion. Having a previous psychiatric disorder and being directly affected by trauma and being injured are the risk factors for PTSD. This study implies that preventive mental health care services should include the management of current psychiatric condition and employee safety issues.

  14. Combining Biochemical and Imaging Markers to Improve Diagnosis and Characterization of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Setting: Results from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Zhifeng; Gattu, Ramtilak; Kobeissy, Firas; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Ayaz, Syed Imran; Kulek, Andrew; Kas-Shamoun, Robert; Mika, Valerie; Zuk, Conor; Tomasello, Francesco; Mondello, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant healthcare burden and its diagnosis remains a challenge in the emergency department. Serum biomarkers and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have already demonstrated their potential to improve the detection of brain injury even in patients with negative computed tomography (CT) findings. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical value of a combinational use of both blood biomarkers and MRI in mTBI detection and their characterization in the acute setting (within 24 hours after injury). Methods Nine patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department. Serum samples were collected at the time of hospital admission and every 6 hours up to 24 hours post injury. Neuronal (Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1]) and glial (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) biomarker levels were analyzed. Advanced MRI data were acquired at 9±6.91 hours after injury. Patients’ neurocognitive status was assessed by using the Standard Assessment of Concussion (SAC) instrument. Results The median serum levels of UCH-L1 and GFAP on admission were increased 4.9 folds and 10.6 folds, respectively, compared to reference values. Three patients were found to have intracranial hemorrhages on SWI, all of whom had very high GFAP levels. Total volume of brain white matter (WM) with abnormal fractional anisotropy (FA) measures of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were negatively correlated with patients’ SAC scores, including delayed recall. Both increased and decreased DTI-FA values were observed in the same subjects. Serum biomarker level was not correlated with patients’ DTI data nor SAC score. Conclusions Blood biomarkers and advanced MRI may correlate or complement each other in different aspects of mTBI detection and characterization. GFAP might have potential to serve as a clinical screening tool for intracranial bleeding. UCH-L1 complements MRI in injury

  15. Posttraumatic rehabilitation and one year outcome following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): data from the well defined population based German Prospective Study 2000-2002.

    PubMed

    von Wild, K R H

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up examination to review the one-year outcome of patients after craniocerebral trauma with respect to health related quality of life (QoL) and social reintegration. The data are derived from the prospective controlled, well defined population based, multiple centre study that was performed in Germany for the first time in the years 2000-2001 with emphasis on quality management (structural, process, outcome) and regarding the patient's age, physical troubles, and impaired mental-cognitive, neurobehavioral functioning. TBI severity assessment is according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Early outcome after rehabilitation is assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of patients following rehabilitation and of 63% of all TBI with the aid of follow-up examination (simplified questionnaire) after one year. Catchment areas are Hanover (industrial) and Münster (more rural) with 2,114 million inhabitants. TBI is diagnosed according to ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 with at least two of the following symptoms: dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. Within one year 6.783 patients (58% male) were examined in the regional hospitals after acute TBI. The regional TBI incidence regarding hospital admission was 321/100.000 TBI. 28% of patients were < 1 to 15 years, 18% > 65 years of age. GCS was only assessed in 55% of patients. They were 90.9% mild, 3.9% moderate, and 5.2% severe TBI. A total of 5.221 TBI (= 77%) was hospitalised; 1.4% of them died. Only 258 patients (= 4.9%) of the hospitalized TBI received in-hospital neurorehabilitation (73% male), 68% within one month after injury. They were 10.9% severe, 23.4% moderate, and 65.7 mild TBI. 5% were < 16 years, 25% > 65 years. One-year follow-up examinations of 4307 individuals (= 63.5% of all TBI) are discussed. A total of 883 patients (= 20.6%) reported posttraumatic troubles, one half were > 64 years

  16. The neuropathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mckee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, is divided into three grades of severity: mild, moderate, and severe, based on the Glasgow Coma Scale, the loss of consciousness, and the development of post-traumatic amnesia. Although mild traumatic brain injury, including concussion and subconcussion, is by far the most common, it is also the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. Proper recognition, management, and treatment of acute concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are the fundamentals of an emerging clinical discipline. It is also becoming increasingly clear that some mild traumatic brain injuries have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Evidence indicates that a single traumatic brain injury can precipitate or accelerate multiple age-related neurodegenerations, increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease, and that repetitive mild traumatic brain injuries can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus, septal abnormalities, and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (τ) as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy frequently occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, and motor neuron disease. Currently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy can be diagnosed only at

  17. Astronomy Popularization via Sci-fi Movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingkang

    2015-08-01

    It is astronomers’ duty to let more and more young people know a bit astronomy and be interested in astronomy and appreciate the beauty and great achievements in astronomy. One of the most effective methods to popularize astronomy to young people nowadays might be via enjoying some brilliant sci-fi movies related to astronomy with some guidance from astronomers. Firstly, we will introduce the basic information of our selective course “Appreciation of Sci-fi Movies in Astronomy” for the non-major astronomy students in our University, which is surely unique in China, then we will show its effect on astronomy popularization based on several rounds of teaching.

  18. Learning by Creating and Exchanging Objects: The SCY Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Ton; Van Joolingen, Wouter R.; Giemza, Adam; Girault, Isabelle; Hoppe, Ulrich; Kindermann, Jorg; Kluge, Anders; Lazonder, Ard W.; Vold, Vibeke; Weinberger, Armin; Weinbrenner, Stefan; Wichmann, Astrid; Anjewierden, Anjo; Bodin, Marjolaine; Bollen, Lars; D'Ham, Cedric; Dolonen, Jan; Engler, Jan; Geraedts, Caspar; Grosskreutz, Henrik; Hovardas, Tasos; Julien, Rachel; Lechner, Judith; Ludvigsen, Sten; Matteman, Yuri; Meistadt, Oyvind; Naess, Bjorge; Ney, Muriel; Pedaste, Margus; Perritano, Anthony; Rinket, Marieke; Von Schlanbusch, Henrik; Sarapuu, Tago; Schulz, Florian; Sikken, Jakob; Slotta, Jim; Toussaint, Jeremy; Verkade, Alex; Wajeman, Claire; Wasson, Barbara; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Van Der Zanden, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Science Created by You (SCY) is a project on learning in science and technology domains. SCY uses a pedagogical approach that centres around products, called "emerging learning objects" (ELOs) that are created by students. Students work individually and collaboratively in SCY-Lab (the general SCY learning environment) on "missions" that are guided…

  19. Traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Popoola, D; Lou, M A; Sims, E H

    1983-05-01

    At the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital in Los Angeles, during the period from June 1972 to April 1981, seven patients underwent surgery for traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts. The overall average age was 28 and the average hospital stay was 31 days. Ultrasound was the most useful test for diagnosis and follow-up. Preoperatively, serum amylases were not consistently elevated. Overall recurrences and complications totaled 57 percent. There were no deaths. The authors consider a large cystogastrostomy the treatment of choice for mature cysts that are satisfactorily adherent to the stomach. The second preference is a Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy. External drainage was employed for acute cysts that required drainage. A distal pancreatectomy was performed for patients with small pancreatic tail pseudocysts. Patients who underwent acute drainage were usually drained externally and had a poorer outcome than patients who were operated on later with internal drainage. When compared with another group of 15 alcoholic patients who were operated on for pancreatic pseudocysts, patients with traumatic pseudocysts had a poorer outcome.

  20. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  1. Traumatic Fibromyositis

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Laurence M.

    1977-01-01

    Traumatic fibromyositis is not an inflammation; there is no fever, leukocytosis or increased sedimentation rate; electrical characteristics and serum enzyme levels are within normal limits, and there are no observable pathologic alterations, although they have been carefully searched for. Recent attempts to express the effects of muscular sprain or strain as a biochemical disturbance expressed in an unusual pattern of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes appear not only to be technically flawed but inconsistent with results of conventional enzyme studies on other muscle and interstitial inflammations. In the author's view, “traumatic” fibromyositis is no more than a verbal construct arrived at by adding an adjectival modifier to the old terms for idiopathic rheumatic disorders. An examination of the evolution of the concept of traumatic fibromyositis shows that it lacks validity as a clinical diagnosis and ought to be abandoned. PMID:268728

  2. Acute Traumatic Musculotendinous Avulsion of the Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon Treated with Primary Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Transfer: A Novel Technique of Management

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, P. Kiran; Mahapatra, Swagath; Raj Pallapati, Samuel C.; Thomas, Binu P.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic musculotendinous junction avulsions are rare injuries except in avulsion amputations. They pose a significant challenge to the treating surgeon. We present a 24-year-old male who sustained an open musculotendinous avulsion of the flexor pollicis longus tendon. He was treated with primary tendon transfer using the flexor digitorum superficialis of ring finger, in flexor zone 3. The functional result at 10 months following surgery was excellent. PMID:27019757

  3. Process benchmarking appraisal of surgical decompression of spinal cord following traumatic cervical spinal cord injury: opportunities to reduce delays in surgical management.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Julio C; Tung, Kayee; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-03-15

    Prior pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that early decompression of the spinal cord (≤ 24 h post-trauma) may have benefits regarding clinical outcomes and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study examines the benchmarking of management of patients with acute traumatic cervical SCI in order to determine the potential barriers and ideal timelines for each step to early surgical decompression. We reviewed patient charts and the Surgical Trial in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS) forms regarding the time and reasons for delay of each step in the management of patients with SCI. The reasons for delays were classified into: 1) health care-related ("extrinsic") factors and 2) patient-related ("intrinsic") factors. The cases were grouped into patients who underwent early surgical decompression of spinal cord (early-surgery group) and individuals who underwent later decompression (later-surgery group). Whereas both groups showed comparable time periods related to intrinsic factors, patients in the early surgery group had a significantly shorter time period associated with extrinsic factors when compared with the later surgery group. Both groups were comparable regarding pre-hospital time, time in a second general hospital prior to transfer to a spine center, and time in the trauma emergency department. Patients in the early surgery group had a significantly shorter waiting time, shorter waiting time for assessment by a spine surgeon, and a shorter waiting time for a surgical decision than did the later surgery group. Our benchmarking analysis suggests that health-related factors are key determinants of the timing from SCI to spinal cord decompression. Time in the general hospital and time of waiting for a surgical decision were the most important causes of delay of surgical spinal cord decompression. Early surgery is possible in the vast majority of the cases.

  4. A New Acute Impact-Compression Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Model in the Rodent

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Gray; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Wilcox, Jared T.; Badner, Anna; Mothe, Andrea; Foltz, Warren; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic injury to the lumbar spinal cord results in complex central and peripheral nervous tissue damage causing significant neurobehavioral deficits and personal/social adversity. Although lumbar cord injuries are common in humans, there are few clinically relevant models of lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI). This article describes a novel lumbar SCI model in the rat. The effects of moderate (20 g), moderate-to-severe (26 g) and severe (35 g, and 56 g) clip impact-compression injuries at the lumbar spinal cord level L1-L2 (vertebral level T11-T12) were assessed using several neurobehavioral, neuroanatomical, and electrophysiological outcome measures. Lesions were generated after meticulous anatomical landmarking using microCT, followed by laminectomy and extradural inclusion of central and radicular elements to generate a traumatic SCI. Clinically relevant outcomes, such as MR and ultrasound imaging, were paired with robust morphometry. Analysis of the lesional tissue demonstrated that pronounced tissue loss and cavitation occur throughout the acute to chronic phases of injury. Behavioral testing revealed significant deficits in locomotion, with no evidence of hindlimb weight-bearing or hindlimb-forelimb coordination in any injured group. Evaluation of sensory outcomes revealed highly pathological alterations including mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia indicated by increasing avoidance responses and decreasing latency in the tail-flick test. Deficits in spinal tracts were confirmed by electrophysiology showing increased latency and decreased amplitude of both sensory and motor evoked potentials (SEP/MEP), and increased plantar H-reflex indicating an increase in motor neuron excitability. This is a comprehensive lumbar SCI model and should be useful for evaluation of translationally oriented pre-clinical therapies. PMID:26414192

  5. Methods for a Randomized Trial of Weight-Supported Treadmill Training versus Conventional Training for Walking during Inpatient Rehabilitation after Incomplete Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Apple, David; Barbeau, Hugues; Basso, Michele; Behrman, Andrea; Deforge, Dan; Ditunno, John; Dudley, Gary; Elashoff, Robert; Fugate, Lisa; Harkema, Susan; Saulino, Michael; Scott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the rationale and methodology for the first prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a task-oriented walking intervention for subjects during early rehabilitation for an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The experimental strategy, body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT), allows physical therapists to systematically train patients to walk on a treadmill at increasing speeds typical of community ambulation with increasing weight bearing. The therapists provide verbal and tactile cues to facilitate the kinematic, kinetic, and temporal features of walking. Subjects were randomly assigned to a conventional therapy program for mobility versus the same intensity and duration of a combination of BWSTT and over-ground locomotor retraining. Subjects had an incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association grades B, C, and D) from C-4 to T-10 (upper motoneuron group) or from T-11 to L-3 (lower motoneuron group). Within 8 weeks of a SCI, 146 subjects were entered for 12 weeks of intervention. The 2 single-blinded primary outcome measures are the level of independence for ambulation and, for those who are able to walk, the maximal speed for walking 50 feet, tested 6 and 12 months after randomization. The trial’s methodology offers a model for the feasibility of translating neuroscientific experiments into a RCT to develop evidence-based rehabilitation practices. PMID:14503436

  6. A demographic profile of 7273 traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Vahid; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: To evaluate demographic profile of traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. Methods: Mobile rehabilitation teams gathered data in 20 out of 30 provinces in Iran. Of 8104 traumatic and non-traumatic SCI patients under coverage of the State Welfare Organization of Iran registered in the database, 7273 were included in the analysis. The aggregate data on SCIs, including age, gender, place of residence, education level, marital status, etiology of injury, age at the time of injury, time passed since injury, level of injury, type of cord injury, having caregiver, and occupation were recorded. Results: Of 7273 patients, 5175 (71.1%) were male. At the time of the study, 46% were in the age group 20-40 years old, 34% were more than 40, and 20% were less than 20 years old. The residential place of 26% was in villages. 23.9% were illiterate, 6.9% had high school diploma or higher. The distribution of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels of injury was 17.7, 24.4, and 57.9%, respectively. Overall, there were 49% married and 45.8% never married, while 1.4% patients were single because their partners had left them, 1.7% of partners had died, 1.9% had divorced, and 0.3% had remarried. At the time of the presentation of patients, 33% were 21-30 years-old, 17% were 31-40, and 16% were less than 20 years. About the type of cord injury, the paraplegia, paraparesia, quadriplegia, quadriparesia, and hemiparesia were present in 72.1, 12.5, 10.2, 4.0, and 1.1% of patients, respectively. Unemployment was reported in 55.6% of patients. However, 17% were unable to work, 7.1% had a job, and 3.4% were retired. Caregiver was not provided for 7.5% of them. The most prevalent causes of the injury were: trauma (57.4%), congenital (14.4%), tumors (4.4%), spinal degenerative disorder such as canal stenosis (2.2%), genetic (2.0%), infection (1.9%), scoliosis (1.1%), and miscellaneous (10.6%). Conclusions: These data will provide the information to guide

  7. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Omalu, Bennet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Posttraumatic encephalopathy is distinct from CTE, can be comorbid with CTE, and is a clinicopathologic syndrome induced by focal and/or diffuse, gross and/or microscopic destruction of brain tissue following brain trauma. The brain of a CTE sufferer may appear grossly unremarkable, but shows microscopic evidence of primary and secondary proteinopathies. The primary proteinopathy of CTE is tauopathy, while secondary proteinopathies may include, but are not limited to, amyloidopathy and TDP proteinopathy. Reported prevalence rates of CTE in cohorts exposed to TBI ranges from 3 to 80% across age groups.

  8. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Welcome to Seattle and the 2008 SciDAC Conference. This conference, the fourth in the series, is a continuation of the PI meetings we first began under SciDAC-1. I would like to start by thanking the organizing committee, and Rick Stevens in particular, for organizing this year's meeting. This morning I would like to look briefly at SciDAC, to give you a brief history of SciDAC and also look ahead to see where we plan to go over the next few years. I think the best description of SciDAC, at least the simulation part, comes from a quote from Dr Ray Orbach, DOE's Under Secretary for Science and Director of the Office of Science. In an interview that appeared in the SciDAC Review magazine, Dr Orbach said, `SciDAC is unique in the world. There isn't any other program like it anywhere else, and it has the remarkable ability to do science by bringing together physical scientists, mathematicians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists who recognize that computation is not something you do at the end, but rather it needs to be built into the solution of the very problem that one is addressing'. Of course, that is extended not just to physical scientists, but also to biological scientists. This is a theme of computational science, this partnership among disciplines, which goes all the way back to the early 1980s and Ken Wilson. It's a unique thread within the Department of Energy. SciDAC-1, launched around the turn of the millennium, created a new generation of scientific simulation codes. It advocated building out mathematical and computing system software in support of science and a new collaboratory software environment for data. The original concept for SciDAC-1 had topical centers for the execution of the various science codes, but several corrections and adjustments were needed. The ASCR scientific computing infrastructure was also upgraded, providing the hardware facilities for the program. The computing facility that we had at that time was the big 3

  9. An Exploratory Analysis of the Potential Association Between SCI Secondary Health Conditions and Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, John; Dumont, Frédéric S.; Leblond, Jean; Park, So Eyun; Noonan, Vanessa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Secondary health conditions (SHCs) are common following traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and are believed to influence a person’s ability to participate in daily activities (DAs). This association should be understood so that health care providers may target interventions with clarity and purpose to manage SHCs and facilitate DAs to maximal effect. Objective: To explore the association between SHCs and DAs expressed as the increased chance of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when an SHC is present. Methods: Community-dwelling persons with tSCI (n = 1,137) responded to the SCI Community Survey. The occurrence and frequency of 21 SHCs were determined. The extent of participation in 26 DAs was measured. The relative risk (RR) of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when a SHC is present was calculated. Results: When some SHC were present, the RR of not participating as much as wanted increased significantly (range, 15%-153%; P < .001). Certain SHCs (light-headedness/dizziness, fatigue, weight problems, constipation, shoulder problems) were associated with a greater chance of not participating in many DAs. No single SHC was associated with every DA and conversely not every DA was associated with an SHC. Conclusions: Maximizing participation in DAs requires minimizing SHCs in every instance. Understanding the association between SHCs and DAs may facilitate targeted care resulting in less severe SHCs, greater participation in DAs, and benefits to both the individual and society. PMID:25477741

  10. Web life: Planet SciCast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    So what is the site about? Planet SciCast is an online repository for short films about science - a bit like a science-specific, moderated version of YouTube. As of July 2009, the site hosts over 150 films on topics ranging from CERN's Large Hadron Collider to fun things to do with treacle. New content appears on the site every few weeks, and some films include links to information about related experiments, demos and activities. The site also runs an annual competition aimed at getting more people involved in making science films, with prizes in categories like "best original score" and "best presenter".

  11. Opening Remarks: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Good morning. Welcome to Boston, the home of the Red Sox, Celtics and Bruins, baked beans, tea parties, Robert Parker, and SciDAC 2007. A year ago I stood before you to share the legacy of the first SciDAC program and identify the challenges that we must address on the road to petascale computing—a road E E Cummins described as `. . . never traveled, gladly beyond any experience.' Today, I want to explore the preparations for the rapidly approaching extreme scale (X-scale) generation. These preparations are the first step propelling us along the road of burgeoning scientific discovery enabled by the application of X- scale computing. We look to petascale computing and beyond to open up a world of discovery that cuts across scientific fields and leads us to a greater understanding of not only our world, but our universe. As part of the President's America Competitiveness Initiative, the ASCR Office has been preparing a ten year vision for computing. As part of this planning the LBNL together with ORNL and ANL hosted three town hall meetings on Simulation and Modeling at the Exascale for Energy, Ecological Sustainability and Global Security (E3). The proposed E3 initiative is organized around four programmatic themes: Engaging our top scientists, engineers, computer scientists and applied mathematicians; investing in pioneering large-scale science; developing scalable analysis algorithms, and storage architectures to accelerate discovery; and accelerating the build-out and future development of the DOE open computing facilities. It is clear that we have only just started down the path to extreme scale computing. Plan to attend Thursday's session on the out-briefing and discussion of these meetings. The road to the petascale has been at best rocky. In FY07, the continuing resolution provided 12% less money for Advanced Scientific Computing than either the President, the Senate, or the House. As a consequence, many of you had to absorb a no cost extension for your

  12. Fever of unknown origin following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R D; Mysiw, W J

    1991-01-01

    Fever is a common complication of a traumatic brain injury, occurring during both the acute-care phase and the rehabilitation phase of recovery. The aetiology of fever in this population may remain obscure because of the presence of cognitive confusion associated with post-traumatic amnesia interfering with history taking and the difficult physical examination. We present a case where recovery from a traumatic brain injury was complicated by a fever of unknown origin that proved to be secondary to lateral sinus thrombophlebitis. This case emphasises the importance of a thorough knowledge of the differential diagnosis for fever that is unique to the traumatic brain injury population.

  13. Using SciDB to Support Photon Science Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, Jack; Wang, Daniel; lim, Kian-Tat; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Array data analytic systems like SciDB hold great potential to accelerate processing data from SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source and other experiments. SciDB is unique in its ability to integrate storage and processing of array data efficiently, providing both space-efficient storage and out-of-memory efficient parallel array processing. We describe a recent effort to leverage SciDB to store and process LCLS data. The work includes development of software to import data into SciDB, subsequent benchmarks, and interactive manipulation of data in SciDB.

  14. A brief overview of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Michael S; Meyer, Kimberly S

    2009-11-01

    The current conflicts in the Middle East have yielded increasing awareness of the acute and chronic effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The increasing frequency of exposure to blast and multiple deployments potentially impact the probability that a service member may sustain one of these injuries. The 2008 International Conference on Behavioral Health and Traumatic Brain Injury united experts in the fields of behavioral health and traumatic brain injury to address these significant health concerns. This article summarizes current Department of Defense (DOD) initiatives related to TBI and PTSD.

  15. Manual for the psychotherapeutic treatment of acute and post-traumatic stress disorders following multiple shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jochen; Titscher, Georg; Peregrinova, Ludmila; Kirsch, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background: In view of the increasing number of implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), the number of people suffering from so-called “multiple ICD shocks” is also increasing. The delivery of more than five shocks (appropriate or inappropriate) in 12 months or three or more shocks (so called multiple shocks) in a short time period (24 hours) leads to an increasing number of patients suffering from severe psychological distress (anxiety disorder, panic disorder, adjustment disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder). Untreated persons show chronic disease processes and a low rate of spontaneous remission and have an increased morbidity and mortality. Few papers have been published concerning the psychotherapeutic treatment for these patients. Objective: The aim of this study is to develop a psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder or adjustment disorder after multiple ICD shocks. Design: Explorative feasibility study: Treatment of 22 patients as a natural design without randomisation and without control group. The period of recruitment was three years, from March 2007 to March 2010. The study consisted of two phases: in the first phase (pilot study) we tested different components and dosages of psychotherapeutic treatments. The final intervention programme is presented in this paper. In the second phase (follow-up study) we assessed the residual post-traumatic stress symptoms in these ICD patients. The time between treatment and follow-up measurement was 12 to 30 months. Population: Thirty-one patients were assigned to the Department of Psychocardiology after multiple shocks. The sample consisted of 22 patients who had a post-traumatic stress disorder or an adjustment disorder and were willing and able to participate. They were invited for psychological treatment. 18 of them could be included into the follow-up study. Methods: After the clinical assessment at the beginning and at the end of the inpatient treatment a post

  16. SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Grigori R.

    2008-09-30

    The Institute for Ultrascale Visualization aims to address visualization needs of SciDAC science domains, including research topics in advanced scientific visualization architectures, algorithms, and interfaces for understanding large, complex datasets. During the current project period, the focus of the team at the University of Virginia has been interactive remote rendering for scientific visualization. With high-performance computing resources enabling increasingly complex simulations, scientists may desire to interactively visualize huge 3D datasets. Traditional large-scale 3D visualization systems are often located very close to the processing clusters, and are linked to them with specialized connections for high-speed rendering. However, this tight coupling of processing and display limits possibilities for remote collaboration, and prohibits scientists from using their desktop workstations for data exploration. In this project, we are developing a client/server system for interactive remote 3D visualization on desktop computers.

  17. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and short forms and the SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tate, Denise G.; Spungen, Ann M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and Bladder Complications scale. Design Using a mixed-methods design, a pool of items assessing bladder and bowel-related concerns were developed using focus groups with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and SCI clinicians, cognitive interviews, and item response theory (IRT) analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning. Setting Thirty-eight bladder items and 52 bowel items were tested at the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation Research Center, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Participants Seven hundred fifty-seven adults with traumatic SCI. Results The final item banks demonstrated unidimensionality (Bladder Management Difficulties CFI = 0.965; RMSEA = 0.093; Bowel Management Difficulties CFI = 0.955; RMSEA = 0.078) and acceptable fit to a graded response IRT model. The final calibrated Bladder Management Difficulties bank includes 15 items, and the final Bowel Management Difficulties item bank consists of 26 items. Additionally, 5 items related to urinary tract infections (UTI) did not fit with the larger Bladder Management Difficulties item bank but performed relatively well independently (CFI = 0.992, RMSEA = 0.050) and were thus retained as a separate scale. Conclusion The SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks are psychometrically robust and are available as computer adaptive tests or short forms. The SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale is a brief, fixed-length outcomes instrument for individuals with a UTI. PMID:26010964

  18. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Welcome to San Diego and the 2009 SciDAC conference. Over the next four days, I would like to present an assessment of the SciDAC program. We will look at where we've been, how we got to where we are and where we are going in the future. Our vision is to be first in computational science, to be best in class in modeling and simulation. When Ray Orbach asked me what I would do, in my job interview for the SciDAC Director position, I said we would achieve that vision. And with our collective dedicated efforts, we have managed to achieve this vision. In the last year, we have now the most powerful supercomputer for open science, Jaguar, the Cray XT system at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). We also have NERSC, probably the best-in-the-world program for productivity in science that the Office of Science so depends on. And the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility offers architectural diversity with its IBM Blue Gene/P system as a counterbalance to Oak Ridge. There is also ESnet, which is often understated—the 40 gigabit per second dual backbone ring that connects all the labs and many DOE sites. In the President's Recovery Act funding, there is exciting news that ESnet is going to build out to a 100 gigabit per second network using new optical technologies. This is very exciting news for simulations and large-scale scientific facilities. But as one noted SciDAC luminary said, it's not all about the computers—it's also about the science—and we are also achieving our vision in this area. Together with having the fastest supercomputer for science, at the SC08 conference, SciDAC researchers won two ACM Gordon Bell Prizes for the outstanding performance of their applications. The DCA++ code, which solves some very interesting problems in materials, achieved a sustained performance of 1.3 petaflops, an astounding result and a mark I suspect will last for some time. The LS3DF application for studying nanomaterials also required the development of a

  19. A millenium approach to Data Acquisition: SCI and PCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hans; Bogaerts, A.; Lindenstruth, V.

    The international SCI standard IEEE/ANSI 1596a [Ref. 1.] is on its way to become the computer interconnect of the year 2000 since for a first time, low latency desktop multiprocessing and cluster computing can be implemented at low cost. The PCI bus is todays's dominating local bus extension for all major computer platforms as well as for buses like VMEbus. PCI is a self configuring memory and I/O system for peripheral components with a hierarchical architecture. SCI is a scalable, bus-like interconnect for distributed processors and memories. It allows for optionally coherent data caching and assures errorfree data delivery. First measurement with commercial SCI products (SBUS-SCI) confirm simulations that SCI can handle even the highest data rates of LHC experiments. The eventbuilder layer for a millenium very high rate DAQ system can therefore be viewed as a SCI network ( bridges, cables & switches) interfaced between PCI buses on the frontend (VMEb ) side and on the processor farm ( Multi-CPU) side. Such a combination of SCI and PCI enables PCI-PCI memory access, transparently across SCI. It also allows for a novel, low level trigger technique: the trigger algorithm can access VME data buffers with bus-like latencies like local memory, i.e. full data transfers become redundent. The first prototype of a PCI-SCI bridge for DAQ is presented as starting point for a test system with built-in scalability.

  20. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A; Pick, C; Harrach, R; Stein, G; Bendella, H; Ozsoy, O; Ozsoy, U; Schoenau, E; Jaminet, P; Sarikcioglu, L; Dunlop, S; Angelov, D N

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system.

  1. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, A.; Pick, C.; Harrach, R.; Stein, G.; Bendella, H.; Ozsoy, O.; Ozsoy, U.; Schoenau, E.; Jaminet, P.; Sarikcioglu, L.; Dunlop, S.; Angelov, D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system. PMID:26032204

  2. Use of a multi-level mixed methods approach to study the effectiveness of a primary care progressive return to activity protocol after acute mild traumatic brain injury/concussion in the military.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Emma; West, Therese A; Cole, Wesley R; Bailie, Jason M; McCulloch, Karen L; Ettenhofer, Mark L; Cecchini, Amy; Qashu, Felicia M

    2017-01-01

    The large number of U.S. service members diagnosed with concussion/mild traumatic brain injury each year underscores the necessity for clear and effective clinical guidance for managing concussion. Relevant research continues to emerge supporting a gradual return to pre-injury activity levels without aggravating symptoms; however, available guidance does not provide detailed standards for this return to activity process. To fill this gap, the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center released a recommendation for primary care providers detailing a step-wise return to unrestricted activity during the acute phase of concussion. This guidance was developed in collaboration with an interdisciplinary group of clinical, military, and academic subject matter experts using an evidence-based approach. Systematic evaluation of the guidance is critical to ensure positive patient outcomes, to discover barriers to implementation by providers, and to identify ways to improve the recommendation. Here we describe a multi-level, mixed-methods approach to evaluate the recommendation incorporating outcomes from both patients and providers. Procedures were developed to implement the study within complex but ecologically-valid settings at multiple military treatment facilities and operational medical units. Special consideration was given to anticipated challenges such as the frequent movement of military personnel, selection of appropriate design and measures, study implementation at multiple sites, and involvement of multiple service branches (Army, Navy, and Marine Corps). We conclude by emphasizing the need to consider contemporary approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of clinical guidance.

  3. Parent and child agreement for acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychopathology in a prospective study of children and adolescents exposed to single-event trauma.

    PubMed

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-04-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined by structured interview in a prospective study of assault and motor vehicle accident (MVA) child survivors, assessed at 2-4 weeks and 6 months post-trauma. Children were significantly more likely to meet criteria for ASD, as well as other ASD and PTSD symptom clusters, based on their own report than on their parent's report. Parent-child agreement for ASD was poor (Cohen's kappa = -.04), but fair for PTSD (Cohen's kappa = .21). Agreement ranged widely for other emotional disorders (Cohen's kappa = -.07-.64), with generalised anxiety disorder found to have superior parent-child agreement (when assessed by phi coefficients) relative to ASD and PTSD. The findings support the need to directly interview children and adolescents, particularly for the early screening of posttraumatic stress, and suggest that other anxiety disorders may have a clearer presentation post-trauma.

  4. Traumatic brain injury and epilepsy: Underlying mechanisms leading to seizure.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Chen, Yi-Wen; Smith, Kelly E; Huber, Jason D; Matsumoto, Rae; Rosen, Charles L; Tucker, Eric S; Richter, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy continues to be a major concern for those experiencing traumatic brain injury. Post-traumatic epilepsy accounts for 10-20% of epilepsy cases in the general population. While seizure prophylaxis can prevent early onset seizures, no available treatments effectively prevent late-onset seizure. Little is known about the progression of neural injury over time and how this injury progression contributes to late onset seizure development. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for post-traumatic epilepsy and the current pharmacologic agents used for treatment. We highlight limitations with the current approach and offer suggestions for remedying the knowledge gap. Critical to this pursuit is the design of pre-clinical models to investigate important mechanistic factors responsible for post-traumatic epilepsy development. We discuss what the current models have provided in terms of understanding acute injury and what is needed to advance understanding regarding late onset seizure. New model designs will be used to investigate novel pathways linking acute injury to chronic changes within the brain. Important components of this transition are likely mediated by toll-like receptors, neuroinflammation, and tauopathy. In the final section, we highlight current experimental therapies that may prove promising in preventing and treating post-traumatic epilepsy. By increasing understanding about post-traumatic epilepsy and injury expansion over time, it will be possible to design better treatments with specific molecular targets to prevent late-onset seizure occurrence following traumatic brain injury.

  5. Psychodynamic Assessment and Treatment of Traumatized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chertoff, Judith

    1998-01-01

    This article describes how psychodynamic assessment and treatment of traumatized patients can improve clinical acuity. The author describes an ego psychological, psychodynamic approach that involves 1) assessing the impact of trauma on the patient's ego defensive functioning and 2) elucidating the dynamic meaning of both the patient's presenting symptoms and the traumatic events that precipitated them. Clinical descriptions illustrate the ways in which psychodynamic psychotherapy may be particularly useful with patients whose acute symptoms develop following specific events. The author points out the advantages of an ego psychological, psychodynamic approach for her patients and the limitations of more symptom-based diagnostic assessments and treatments. PMID:9407474

  6. Endogenous expression of interleukin-4 regulates macrophage activation and confines cavity formation after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ihm; Jeong, Soo Ryeong; Kang, Young Mi; Han, Dae Hee; Jin, Byung Kwan; Namgung, Uk; Kim, Byung G

    2010-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers inflammatory reactions in which various types of cells and cytokines are involved. Several proinflammatory cytokines are up-regulated after SCI and play crucial roles in determining the extent of secondary tissue damage. However, relatively little is known about antiinflammatory cytokines and their roles in spinal cord trauma. Recent studies have shown that an antiinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4), is expressed and exerts various modulatory effects in CNS inflammation. We found in the present study that IL-4 was highly expressed at 24 hr after contusive SCI in rats and declined thereafter, with concurrent up-regulation of IL-4 receptor subunit IL-4alpha. The majority of IL-4-producing cells were myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils. Injection of neutralizing antibody against IL-4 into the contused spinal cord did not significantly affect the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha or other antiinflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Instead, attenuation of IL-4 activity led to a marked increase in the extent of ED1-positive macrophage activation along the rostrocaudal extent at 7 days after injury. The enhanced macrophage activation was preceded by an increase in the level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2). Finally, IL-4 neutralization resulted in more extensive cavitation at 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that endogenous expression of antiinflammatory cytokine IL-4 regulates the extent of acute macrophage activation and confines the ensuing secondary cavity formation after spinal cord trauma.

  7. Serum Lipid Profile in Subjects with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Laclaustra, Martin; Van Den Berg, Elizabeth Louise Maayken; Hurtado-Roca, Yamilée; Castellote, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Few large studies have examined the relationship between spinal cord injury (SCI) and lipid profile. We studied serum lipid concentrations in subjects with traumatic SCI in relation to the degree of neurological involvement and time since injury, and compared them with values from a reference sample for the Spanish population (DRECE study). Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort was built from 177 consecutive cases with traumatic SCI admitted to the SCI unit of the Miguel Servet Hospital in Aragon (Spain). Outcome measures (cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-c and LDL-c levels) were analyzed according to the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), neurological level of injury (involvement of all limbs vs. only lower limbs), and time since injury. All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. Results Cases without preserved motor function (AIS A or B) had lower total and HDL cholesterol than the others (-11.4 [-21.5, -1.4] mg/dL total cholesterol and -5.1 [-8.8, -1.4] mg/dL HDL-c), and cases with all-limb involvement had lower total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol than those with only lower-limb involvement (-14.0 [-24.6, -3.4] mg/dL total cholesterol, -4.1 [-8.0, -0.2] mg/dL HDL-c, and -10.0 [-19.7, -0.3] mg/dL LDL-c) (all p<0.05). No association was found between lipid concentrations and time since injury. Concentrations of lipid subfractions and triglycerides in SCI subjects were lower than in sex- and age-stratified values from the reference sample. Conclusion A high degree of neurological involvement in SCI (anatomically higher lesions and AIS A or B) is associated with lower total cholesterol and HDL-c. PMID:25706982

  8. SciDB and Geoinformatics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The SciDB project took as its design goals a list of features identified as being critical to scientific data management in a survey of working scientists (Stonebraker et al 2009). Earth scientists working with remote sensing data were well represented among those polled so it should come as no surprise that the platform has been embraced by that community. In this talk we focus on work done by researchers at NASA and INPE, and on applications created by commercial data providers in Korea and the United States. For each use-case, we will review the project team's objectives, the nature and quantity of the data involved, the their workload queries. As we discuss each use-case we will describe what is emerging as "best practice" for data management and analysis in this space. M. Stonebraker, J. Becla, D. J. DeWitt, K. T. Lim, D. Maier, O. Ratzesberger, and S. B. Zdonik. Requirements for science data bases and scidb. In CIDR 2009, Fourth Biennial Conference on Innovative Data Systems Research, Asilomar, CA, USA, January 4-7, 2009, Online Proceedings, 2009.

  9. Traumatic injuries in revue dancers.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Eileen M; Arendt, Michael; Mill, Helmgard; Koch, Franziska; Wanke, Alice; Groneberg, David A

    2014-03-01

    Revue productions are a combination of dancing and singing, musical and spoken sequences, and acrobatics, performed with or without a story line, and characterized by a versatility of dance styles and a high number of performances (over 250 in a 10-month season). The aim of this quantitative single cohort study is to evaluate work-related traumatic injuries in this dance genre. Data were obtained from work accident reports of the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the public sector in Berlin (UKB) involving 440 revue dancers (183 males and 257 females). Analysis was conducted with Excel 2007 and PASW Statistics 18. One out of three female dancers and one out of two male dancers sustained an acute injury in the course of a theatrical season (0.22 injuries per 1,000 hours). The incidence rate was 0.44 for males and 0.31 for females, with the lower extremity as the most commonly injured body region, followed by the spine. Of all occupational accidents, 75.1% happened on stage, with 69% during performances. The dance partner and dance floor were the most common exogenous factors resulting in a traumatic injury. Of all traumatic injuries, 81.7% occurred in the first 3 hours after starting work. Gender specific differences could be observed. Due to the limited availability of comparable studies of other forms of professional dance, in this study revue dance is largely considered as an independent genre.

  10. Changes of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis in an ovine model of simulated ACL reconstruction are associated with transient acute post-injury synovial inflammation and tissue catabolism.

    PubMed

    Heard, B J; Solbak, N M; Achari, Y; Chung, M; Hart, D A; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    2013-12-01

    The study described here tested the hypothesis that early intra-articular inflammation is associated with the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) in a sheep model. We extended previously published work in which we investigated joint gross morphology and synovial mRNA expression of inflammatory and catabolic molecules 2 weeks after anatomic Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) autograft reconstructive surgery (ACL-R). The same variables have been analyzed at 20 weeks post surgery together with new experimental variables at both time points. Animals were sacrificed at 20 weeks post ACL-R surgery and their joints graded for signs of PTOA. Synovial samples were harvested for histological grading plus mRNA and protein analysis for a panel of inflammatory and catabolic molecules. The mRNA expression levels for this panel plus connective tissue matrix turnover molecules were also investigated in cartilage samples. Results of gross morphological assessments at 20 weeks post surgery showed some changes consistent with early OA, but indicated little progression of damage from the 2 week time point. While significant alterations in mRNA levels for synovial inflammatory and catabolic molecules were detected at 2 weeks, values had normalized by 20 weeks. Similarly, all mRNA expression levels for inflammatory and catabolic molecules in articular cartilage had returned to normal levels by 20 weeks post ACL-R surgery. We conclude that synovial inflammatory processes are initiated very early after ACL-R surgery and may instigate events that lead to the gross cartilage and joint abnormalities observed as early as 2 weeks. However, the absence of sustained inflammation and joint instability may prevent OA progression.

  11. Effects of acute restraint-induced stress on glucocorticoid receptors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Griesbach, G S; Vincelli, J; Tio, D L; Hovda, D A

    2012-05-17

    We have previously reported that experimental mild traumatic brain injury results in increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post-injury weeks, as determined by analyzing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation following restraint-induced stress. This is the same time period when rehabilitative exercise has proven to be ineffective after a mild fluid-percussion injury (FPI). Here we evaluated effects of stress on neuroplasticity. Adult male rats underwent either an FPI or sham injury. Additional rats were only exposed to anesthesia. Rats were exposed to 30 min of restraint stress, followed by tail vein blood collection at post-injury days (PID) 1, 7, and 14. The response to dexamethasone (DEX) was also evaluated. Hippocampal tissue was collected 120 min after stress onset. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) along with glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors was determined by Western blot analysis. Results indicated injury-dependent changes in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors that were influenced by the presence of dexamethasone. Control and FPI rats responded differentially to DEX in that GR increases after receiving the lower dose of DEX were longer lasting in the FPI group. A suppression of MR was found at PID 1 in vehicle-treated FPI and Sham groups. Decreases in the precursor form of BDNF were observed in different FPI groups at PIDs 7 and 14. These findings suggest that the increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post-injury weeks, after a mild FPI, has an impact on hippocampal neuroplasticity.

  12. Quality management in traumatic brain injury (TBI) lessons from the prospective study in 6.800 patients after acute TBI in respect of neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    von Wild, K R H; Wenzlaff, P

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary results on epidemiology, acute hospital care, and neurorehabilitation of TBI are presented of the first ever prospective controlled German study to analyse the use of regional structures and quality management as provided by the German social healthcare system. The sum of inhabitants in Hannover and Münster area was 2,114 million. Within an area of 100 kilometres diameter each. 6.783 acute TBI (58% male) were admitted for acute treatment from March 2000 to 2001. Definition of acute TBI was according to the ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 in combination with dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. The incidence was 321/100.000 population. Cause of TBI was traffic accident in 26%, during leisure time 35%, at home 30% and at work 15%. Initial GCS (emergency room) was only assessed in 3.731 TBI (=55%). Out of those 3.395 = 90,9% were mild, 145 = 3,9% were moderate, and 191 = 5,2% severe TBI. 28% of 6.783 patients were <1 to 15 years, 18% > 65 years of age. The number admitted to hospital treatment is 5.221 = 77%, of whom 72 patients (=1,4%) died caused by TBI. One year follow-up in 4.307 TBI patients (=63.5%) revealed that only 258 patients (=3,8%) received neurorehabilitation (73% male), but 68% within one month of injury. Five percent of these patients were <16 years of age, 25% > 65 years. Early rehabilitation "B" was performed in 100 patients (=39%), 19% within one week following TBI. The management of frequent complications in 148 patients (=57%) and the high number of one or more different consultations (n = 196) confirmed the author's concept for early neurosurgical rehabilitation in TBI when rehabilitation centres were compared regarding GCS and GOS: Early GOS 1 = 4%; GOS 2 = 2,7%, GOS 3 = 37,3%, GOS 4 = 26,7%, GOS 5 = 29,3%, final GOS scores were 1 = 1,2%, 2 = 1,7%, 3 = 21,8%, 4 = 36,2%, and 5 = 39,1% of all patients at the end of rehabilitation

  13. Experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian R; Rosten, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. The universality of Python, the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development, interface with databases, manipulate graph structures. render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB, Octave, and R. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  14. 75 FR 24747 - SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier Operations Division A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of SCI, LLC/ON...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Phoenix, AZ; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In... of SCI, LLC/ON Semiconductor, Phoenix, Arizona. The notice was published in the Federal Register on... at the Phoenix Arizona location of SCI LLC/Zener-Rectifier, Operations Division, a wholly...

  15. Acute or Delayed Treatment with Anatabine Improves Spatial Memory and Reduces Pathological Sequelae at Late Time-Points after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott; Mouzon, Benoit; Paris, Daniel; Aponte, Destinee; Abdullah, Laila; Stewart, William; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2017-01-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has chronic and long-term consequences for which there are currently no approved pharmacological treatments. We have previously characterized the chronic neurobehavioral and pathological sequelae of a mouse model of repetitive mild TBI (r-mTBI) through to 2 years post-TBI. Despite the mild nature of the initial insult, secondary injury processes are initiated that involve neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways persisting and progressing for weeks and months post-injury and providing a potential window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this study we examined the efficacy of a novel anti-inflammatory compound, anatabine, in modifying outcome after TBI. Our model of r-mTBI involves a series of five mild impacts (midline impact at 5 m/sec, 1 mm strike depth, 200 msec dwell time) with an interval of 48 h. Anatabine treatment was administered starting 30 min after injury and was delivered continuously through drinking water. At 6 months after TBI, anatabine treatment improved spatial memory in injured mice. Nine months after TBI, a cohort of mice was euthanized for pathological analysis that revealed reductions in astroglial (glial fibrillary acid protein, GFAP) and microglial (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1, IBA1) responses in treated, injured animals. Treatments for the remaining mice were then crossed-over to assess the effects of late treatment administration and the effects of treatment termination. Nine months following crossover the remaining mice showed no effect of injury on their spatial memory, and whereas pathological analysis showed improvements in mice that had received delayed treatment, corpus callosum IBA1 increased in post-crossover placebo r-mTBI mice. These data demonstrate efficacy of both early and late initiation of treatment with anatabine in improving long term behavioral and pathology outcomes after mild TBI. Future studies will characterize the treatment window, the time

  16. Older Age Results in Differential Gene Expression after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Is Linked to Imaging Differences at Acute Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Latour, Lawrence L.; Kim, Hyungsuk; Turtzo, L. Christine; Olivera, Anlys; Livingston, Whitney S.; Wang, Dan; Martin, Christiana; Lai, Chen; Cashion, Ann; Gill, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Older age consistently relates to a lesser ability to fully recover from a traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is limited data to explicate the nature of age-related risks. This study was undertaken to determine the relationship of age on gene-activity following a TBI, and how this biomarker relates to changes in neuroimaging findings. A young group (between the ages of 19 and 35 years), and an old group (between the ages of 60 and 89 years) were compared on global gene-activity within 48 h following a TBI, and then at follow-up within 1-week. At each time-point, gene expression profiles, and imaging findings from both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography were obtained and compared. The young group was found to have greater gene expression of inflammatory regulatory genes at 48 h and 1-week in genes such as basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BACH2), leucine-rich repeat neuronal 3 (LRRN3), and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) compared to the old group. In the old group, there was increased activity in genes within S100 family, including calcium binding protein P (S100P) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), which previous studies have linked to poor recovery from TBI. The old group also had reduced activity of the noggin (NOG) gene, which is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is linked to neurorecovery and neuroregeneration compared to the young group. We link these gene expression findings that were validated to neuroimaging, reporting that in the old group with a MRI finding of TBI-related damage, there was a lesser likelihood to then have a negative MRI finding at follow-up compared to the young group. Together, these data indicate that age impacts gene activity following a TBI, and suggest that this differential activity related to immune regulation and neurorecovery contributes to a lesser likelihood of neuronal recovery in older patients as indicated through neuroimaging. PMID

  17. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury.

  18. Acute hip pain in the nonambulatory infant: Salter-Harris type I fracture in the capital femoral epiphysis without a traumatic history.

    PubMed

    Gross, Shari L; Orndorff, Douglas G; Romness, Mark; Poelstra, Kornelis A

    2006-05-01

    An otherwise healthy 11-month-old girl was brought to the hospital after her parents noted the acute onset of right hip pain and refusal to bear weight. No abnormalities were seen in the initial radiographs, laboratory values were within reference range, and noninvasive workup was negative for septic arthritis. The parents reported a recent minor fall from a standing position, but stated that the child seemed to return to normal without pain after a few minutes of crying. A hemarthrosis without purulence was found upon joint aspiration, and the patient improved significantly after administration of anti-inflammatory medication. Follow-up radiographs 13 days after initial presentation showed an extremely rare Salter-Harris type I proximal physeal fracture well into the healing process.

  19. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  20. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  1. Status of FNAL SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2007-12-01

    SciBooNE is a new experiment at FNAL which will make precision neutrino-nucleus cross section measurements in the one GeV region. These measurements are essential for the future neutrino oscillation experiments. We started data taking in the antineutrino mode on June 8, 2007, and collected 5.19 x 10{sup 19} protons on target (POT) before the accelerator shutdown in August. The first data from SciBooNE are reported in this article.

  2. Introduction to Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    With SciFinder Scholar now one of the preferred access routes to information in the sciences, many college information retrieval courses that dealt with online networks need to be redesigned. Although one of the basic assumptions within the design of SciFinder Scholar is that staff and students may retrieve valuable answers with little training, nevertheless, with a little instruction improved search results may be obtained. We present here our basic teaching program for senior undergraduate and postgraduate classes.

  3. Methodology of the Access to Care and Timing Simulation Model for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Care.

    PubMed

    Santos, Argelio; Fallah, Nader; Lewis, Rachel; Dvorak, Marcel F; Fehlings, Michael G; Burns, Anthony Scott; Noonan, Vanessa K; Cheng, Christiana L; Chan, Elaine; Singh, Anoushka; Belanger, Lise M; Atkins, Derek

    2017-03-12

    Despite the relatively low incidence, the management and care of persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) can be resource intensive and complex, spanning multiple phases of care and disciplines. Using a simulation model built with a system level view of the healthcare system allows for prediction of the impact of interventions on patient and system outcomes from injury through to community reintegration after tSCI. The Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project developed a simulation model for tSCI care using techniques from operations research and its development has been described previously. The objective of this article is to briefly describe the methodology and the application of the ACT Model as it was used in several of the articles in this focus issue. The approaches employed in this model provide a framework to look into the complexity of interactions both within and among the different SCI programs, sites and phases of care.

  4. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  5. Traumatic Brain Injuries. Guidelines Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Special Education Services Unit.

    This paper on traumatic brain injuries begins with statistics on the incidence of the disorder, especially as they relate to Colorado. Traumatic brain injury is then defined, and problems caused by traumatic brain injury are discussed. The components of effective programming for students with traumatic brain injuries are described, followed by the…

  6. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness.

  7. Protective effect of geraniol inhibits inflammatory response, oxidative stress and apoptosis in traumatic injury of the spinal cord through modulation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiansheng; Su, Baishan; Zhu, Hongbin; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Geraniol is a type of monoterpenoid with a rose scent and a slightly sweet flavor. It is found in the volatile oil of various plants, and has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of geraniol in inhibiting the inflammatory response, oxidative stress and apoptosis in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), as well as to analyze the mechanism underlying its effect. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced to traumatic SCI through a surgical procedure and were defined as the SCI model group. SCI or normal rats were then administered 250 mg/kg/day geraniol for 4 weeks. The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) test and the spinal cord water content were used to analyze the effect of geraniol against traumatic SCI in rats. The inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and caspase-9 and −3 activities were measured using commercial ELISA kits. In addition, the associated mechanism was analyzed, using western blot analysis to determine the protein expression levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The results of the present study demonstrated that BBB scores were significantly increased and the spinal cord water content was significantly inhibited in SCI rats after 3 weeks of geraniol treatment. Furthermore, the inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and the caspase-9 and −3 activities were significantly suppressed upon treatment with geraniol. Finally, the mechanism of geraniol against traumatic SCI downregulated the NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways in SCI rats. Therefore, the protective effect of geraniol is suggested to inhibit the inflammatory response, oxidative stress and apoptosis in traumatic SCI through the modulation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK. PMID:28105094

  8. Programs Addressing Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Among U.S. Military Servicemembers and Their Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    of the Health Sci- ences in conjunction with the Samueli Institute. Figure 2.3 Total Force Fitness Mission/performance Stress Well-being Prevention...Project  • Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain Injury Registry • Samueli Institute—The Family Needs Assessment at Fort Bliss The following entities

  9. Solving Large-scale Eigenvalue Problems in SciDACApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2005-06-29

    Large-scale eigenvalue problems arise in a number of DOE applications. This paper provides an overview of the recent development of eigenvalue computation in the context of two SciDAC applications. We emphasize the importance of Krylov subspace methods, and point out its limitations. We discuss the value of alternative approaches that are more amenable to the use of preconditioners, and report the progression using the multi-level algebraic sub-structuring techniques to speed up eigenvalue calculation. In addition to methods for linear eigenvalue problems, we also examine new approaches to solving two types of non-linear eigenvalue problems arising from SciDAC applications.

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain to bump against the inside of your skull. Common TBIs, such as concussions, can happen during ... an object, like a bullet or piece of skull, pierces your brain. Symptoms of a traumatic brain ...

  12. [Cranioencephalic traumatism. Audiovestibular sequelae].

    PubMed

    Llano, J A; Figuerola, E; Rosell, R; Liern, M

    1989-01-01

    A group of 80 patients with blunt head injury were examined. Long-term clinical neurologic and otologic sequelae of traumatic head injury are well recognized. The authors studied the vestibular disorders using ENG, EEG and high resolution CT.

  13. The traumatic bunion.

    PubMed

    Bohay, D R; Johnson, K D; Manoli, A

    1996-07-01

    In seven cases of Lisfranc joint injury after trauma, bunion deformity developed. This "traumatic bunion" occurs over a prolonged period of time after injury. A high index of suspicion is needed to identify the deformity as being traumatic in origin. Injury about the first metatarsophalangeal joint complex may also contribute to this deformity. When recognized, it may need to be treated with a first metatarsal-cuneiform fusion and distal soft tissue realignment.

  14. [Clinical approach to post-traumatic stress disorders].

    PubMed

    Boussaud, Marie

    2015-01-01

    A confrontation with death can lead to acute reactions of stress, followed possibly, after a phase of latency, by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is characterised by the appearance of a repetition syndrome combining reliving, hypervigilance and avoidance; comorbidities frequently arise, increasingthe risk of suicide. Caregivers have an important role to play in identifying them.

  15. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits.

  16. Traumatic Alterations in Consciousness: Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) refers to the clinical condition of transient alteration of consciousness as a result of traumatic injury to the brain. The priority of emergency care is to identify and facilitate the treatment of rare but potentially life threatening intra-cranial injuries associated with mTBI through the judicious application of appropriate imaging studies and neurosurgical consultation. Although post-mTBI symptoms quickly and completely resolve in the vast majority of cases, a significant number of patients will complain of lasting problems that may cause significant disability. Simple and early interventions such as patient education and appropriate referral can reduce the likelihood of chronic symptoms. Although definitive evidence is lacking, mTBI is likely to be related to significant long-term sequelae such as Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20709244

  17. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Annual] technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nogal, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Since January 1992, 9 exhibits have been constructed by the SciTech Clubs for Girls, which involved 63 girls, ages 10 to 14. These exhibits are: Bubble Shapes by the St. Charles Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 109. Density Games by the South Elgin Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 132. Electric Fleas by the Warrenville Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 305. Energy vs. Power by the Aurora Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 242. The Organ Pipe by the Bartlett Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 107. Ohm`s Law by the Geneva Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 401. What is Gravity by the Pilsen YMCA girls. Insulation at Work by the Algonquin Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 303. Series vs. Parallel by the Leland Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 50. The report is a description of each exhibit and the group that built the exhibit. Each group had a minimum of 10 hours of contact time at SciTech with the SciTech Clubs for Girls Program Coordinator. All mentors are female. Each exhibit building experience includes a trip to the hardware store to purchase supplies. After the exhibit is complete, the girls receive certificates of achievement and a SciTech Club Patch.

  18. Global prevalence and incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anoushka; Tetreault, Lindsay; Kalsi-Ryan, Suhkvinder; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic event that impacts a patient’s physical, psychological, and social well-being and places substantial financial burden on health care systems. To determine the true impact of SCI, this systematic review aims to summarize literature reporting on either the incidence or prevalence of SCI. Methods A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant literature published through June 2013. We sought studies that provided regional, provincial/state, or national data on the incidence of SCI or reported estimates of disease prevalence. The level of evidence of each study was rated using a scale that evaluated study design, methodology, sampling bias, and precision of estimates. Results The initial search yielded 5,874 articles, 48 of which met the inclusion criteria. Forty-four studies estimated the incidence of SCI and nine reported the prevalence, with five discussing both. Of the incidence studies, 14 provided figures at a regional, ten at a state or provincial level and 21 at a national level. The prevalence of SCI was highest in the United States of America (906 per million) and lowest in the Rhone-Alpes region, France (250 per million) and Helsinki, Finland (280 per million). With respect to states and provinces in North America, the crude annual incidence of SCI was highest in Alaska (83 per million) and Mississippi (77 per million) and lowest in Alabama (29.4 per million), despite a large percentage of violence injuries (21.2%). Annual incidences were above 50 per million in the Hualien County in Taiwan (56.1 per million), the central Portugal region (58 per million), and Olmsted County in Minnesota (54.8 per million) and were lower than 20 per million in Taipei, Taiwan (14.6 per million), the Rhone-Alpes region in France (12.7 per million), Aragon, Spain (12.1 per million

  19. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000925.htm Post-traumatic stress disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder . ...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic Brain Injury & Dystonia Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when a sudden trauma damages to the brain. TBI can occur when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and ...

  1. Traumatic injuries in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hard, D L; Myers, J R; Gerberich, S G

    2002-02-01

    The National Coalition for Agricultural Safety and Health (NCASH) in 1988 addressed issues in agriculture and noted "a sense of urgency... arose from the recognition of the unabating epidemic of traumatic death and injury in American farming . . ." This article provides an update to the NCASH conference on traumatic injuries in agriculture, a history on how the facts and figures were arrived at for the NCASH conference, and a current report on the status of traumatic injuries in agriculture in the U.S. Fatal and nonfatal injuries are addressed along with national and regional surveillance systems. The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) was used for reporting national agricultural production fatal injuries from 1992-1998 (25.8 deaths per 100,000 workers), the Traumatic Injury Surveillance of Farmers (TISF) 1993-1995 was used to report nonfatal injuries occurring nationally (7.5/100 workers), and Regional Rural Injury Studies I and II (RRIS-I and RRIS-II) were used to illustrate a regional approach along with in-depth, specific analyses. Fatality rates, which showed some decline in the 1980s, were fairly constant during the 1990s. Changes in nonfatal injury rates for this sector could not be assessed due to a lack of benchmark data. The main concerns identified in the 1989 NCASH report continue today: tractors are the leading cause of farm-related death due mostly to overturns; older farmers continue to be at the highest risk for farm fatalities; and traumatic injuries continue to be a major concern for youth living or working on U.S. farms. Fatal and nonfatal traumatic injuries associated with agricultural production are a major public health problem that needs to be addressed through comprehensive approaches that include further delineation of the problem, particularly in children and older adults, and identification of specific risk factors through analytic efforts. Continued development of relevant surveillance systems and implementation of appropriate

  2. The clinical spectrum of sport-related traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Barry D

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a substantial public health concern. Various types of acute TBI can occur in sport, but detection and management of cerebral concussion is of greatest importance as mismanagement of this syndrome can lead to persistent or chronic postconcussion syndrome (CPCS) or diffuse cerebral swelling. Chronic TBI encompasses a spectrum of disorders that are associated with long-term consequences of brain injury, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), dementia pugilistica, post-traumatic parkinsonism, post-traumatic dementia and CPCS. CTE is the prototype of chronic TBI, but can only be definitively diagnosed at autopsy as no reliable biomarkers of this disorder are available. Whether CTE shares neuropathological features with CPCS is unknown. Evidence suggests that participation in contact-collision sports may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease, but the data are conflicting. In this Review, the spectrum of acute and chronic sport-related TBI is discussed, highlighting how examination of athletes involved in high-impact sports has advanced our understanding of pathology of brain injury and enabled improvements in detection and diagnosis of sport-related TBI.

  3. Overview of the Scalable Coherent Interface, IEEE STD 1596 (SCI)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.; Wiggers, H.A.

    1992-10-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface standard defines a new generation of interconnection that spans the full range from supercomputer memory `bus` to campus-wide network. SCI provides bus-like services and a shared-memory software model while using an underlying, packet protocol on many independent communication links. Initially these links are 1 GByte/s (wires) and 1 GBit/s (fiber), but the protocol scales well to future faster or lower-cost technologies. The interconnect may use switches, meshes, and rings. The SCI distributed-shared-memory model is simple and versatile, enabling for the first time a smooth integration of highly parallel multiprocessors, workstations, personal computers, I/O, networking and data acquisition.

  4. Distributed job scheduling in SCI Local Area MultiProcessors

    SciTech Connect

    Agasaveeran, S.; Li, Qiang

    1996-12-31

    Local Area MultiProcessors (LAMP) is a network of personal workstations with distributed shared physical memory provided by high performance technologies such as SCI. LAMP is more tightly coupled than the traditional local area networks (LAN) but is more loosely coupled than the bus based multiprocessors. This paper presents a distributed scheduling algorithm which exploits the distributed shared memory in SCI-LAMP to schedule the idle remote processors among the requesting workstations. It considers fairness by allocating remote processing capacity to the requesting workstations based on their priorities according to the decay-usage scheduling approach. The performance of the algorithm in scheduling both sequential and parallel jobs is evaluated by simulation. It is found that the higher priority nodes achieve faster job response times and higher speedups than that of the lower priority nodes. Lower scheduling overhead allows finer granularity of remote processors sharing than in LAN.

  5. [False traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager].

    PubMed

    Nour, M; Talha, H; El Idrissi, R; Lahraoui, Y; Ouazzani, L; Oubejja, H; Erraji, M; Zerhouni, H; Ettayebi, F

    2014-12-01

    Most aneurysms of hand arteries are traumatic. It is a generally rare unrecognized pathology. Complications are serious (embolism and thromboses of interdigital arteries). Two main causes can be recalled: acute trauma, with development of a false aneurysm; repeated microtrauma (hand hammer syndrome), with occurrence of an arterial dysplasic aneurysm. The diagnosis is based on the presence of a pulsatile mass, with finger dysesthesia, unilateral Raynaud's phenomenon. It is confirmed by duplex Doppler. Arteriography is necessary but can be replaced by an angio-MR. We report a case of false traumatic aneurysm of the ulnar artery in a teenager. This case illustrates this rare condition and opens discussion on therapeutic options.

  6. Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    adult zebrafish (Specific Aim 1). We also will examine in vivo the role of PTP σ in inhibition of axon regeneration (Specific Aim 2). In addition, we...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0645 TITLE: Molecular Determinants Fundamental to Axon Regeneration ... Regeneration after SCI 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0645 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jeffrey Alan Plunkett, Ph.D

  7. Utilization of SciFinder Scholar at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Stacy A.; Wilson, Anne M.; Howes, Barbara

    2002-04-01

    The use of tools to search chemical information databases continues to be important to science educators. The ability to perform online searches of Chemical Abstracts Service can have a significant impact on teaching and research. The implementation of SciFinder Scholar at Butler University has resulted in significant changes in teaching, student-based research, and faculty development in the Chemistry Department. Details of these changes in courses, student research projects and proposals, and the professional growth of the faculty are discussed.

  8. Online Registries for Researchers: Using ORCID and SciENcv.

    PubMed

    Vrabel, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) registry helps resolve name ambiguity by assigning persistent unique identifiers that automatically link to a researcher's publications, grants, and other activities. This article provides an overview of ORCID and its benefits, citing several examples of its use in cancer and nursing journals. The article also briefly describes My NCBI and the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv) and its connection to ORCID.

  9. An Implantable Neuroprosthetic Device to Normalize Bladder Function after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    experiments using cats . These results have laid the foundation for us to further design and develop an implantable stimulator for human application in...experiments using cats . These results have laid the foundation for us to further design and develop this implantable stimulator into human application in...stimulator system Our previous studies [1-4] in anesthetized chronic SCI cats showed that blocking pudendal nerves using high-frequency (6-10 kHz

  10. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  11. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI.

  12. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sight and hearing Coordination Balance Brain-imaging tests Brain-imaging technology is currently used to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury. Some of the following technologies might be used for CTE diagnosis in ... following specialized MRI tests improve, they may be able to help diagnose ...

  13. Traumatic transection of aorta.

    PubMed

    Ho, C K; Yip, K T; Eng, J B; Rajan, L; Tan, B H

    2001-09-01

    A 16 year-old man presented with fracture of both his femurs after a road traffic accident. Chest radiograph revealed mediastinal widening. Subsequent CT scan and arch aortogram confirmed the findings of traumatic aortic arch transection at the isthmus. He underwent successful surgical repair. High index of suspicion and prompt actions are important in managing this potentially fatal but treatable condition.

  14. 75 FR 19626 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License: SciTech Medical Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Exclusive Patent License: SciTech Medical Inc. AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... SciTech Medical Inc. The proposed license is a revocable, nonassignable, partially exclusive...

  15. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  16. OPENING REMARKS: SciDAC: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2005 and San Francisco. SciDAC is all about computational science and scientific discovery. In a large sense, computational science characterizes SciDAC and its intent is change. It transforms both our approach and our understanding of science. It opens new doors and crosses traditional boundaries while seeking discovery. In terms of twentieth century methodologies, computational science may be said to be transformational. There are a number of examples to this point. First are the sciences that encompass climate modeling. The application of computational science has in essence created the field of climate modeling. This community is now international in scope and has provided precision results that are challenging our understanding of our environment. A second example is that of lattice quantum chromodynamics. Lattice QCD, while adding precision and insight to our fundamental understanding of strong interaction dynamics, has transformed our approach to particle and nuclear science. The individual investigator approach has evolved to teams of scientists from different disciplines working side-by-side towards a common goal. SciDAC is also undergoing a transformation. This meeting is a prime example. Last year it was a small programmatic meeting tracking progress in SciDAC. This year, we have a major computational science meeting with a variety of disciplines and enabling technologies represented. SciDAC 2005 should position itself as a new corner stone for Computational Science and its impact on science. As we look to the immediate future, FY2006 will bring a new cycle to SciDAC. Most of the program elements of SciDAC will be re-competed in FY2006. The re-competition will involve new instruments for computational science, new approaches for collaboration, as well as new disciplines. There will be new opportunities for virtual experiments in carbon sequestration, fusion, and nuclear power and nuclear waste, as well as collaborations

  17. A preliminary study of intravenous surfactants in paraplegic dogs: polymer therapy in canine clinical SCI.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Peter H; Leskovar, Alenka; Breur, Gert J; Coates, Joan R; Bergman, Robert L; Widmer, William R; Toombs, James P; Shapiro, Scott; Borgens, Richard B

    2004-12-01

    Hydrophilic polymers, both surfactants and triblock polymers, are known to seal defects in cell membranes. In previous experiments using laboratory animals, we have exploited this capability using polyethylene glycol (PEG) to repair spinal axons after severe, standardized spinal cord injury (SCI) in guinea pigs. Similar studies were conducted using a related co-polymer Poloxamer 188 (P 188). Here we carried out initial investigations of an intravenous application of PEG or P 188 (3500 Daltons, 30% w/w in saline; 2 mL/kg I.V. and 2 mL/kg body weight or 300 mL P 188 per kg, respectively) to neurologically complete cases of paraplegia in dogs. Our aim was to first determine if this is a clinically safe procedure in cases of severe naturally occurring SCI in dogs. Secondarily, we wanted to obtain preliminary evidence if this therapy could be of clinical benefit when compared to a larger number of similar, but historical, control cases. Strict entry criteria permitted recruitment of only neurologically complete paraplegic dogs into this study. Animals were treated by a combination of conventional and experimental techniques within approximately 72 h of admission for spinal trauma secondary to acute, explosive disk herniation. Outcome measures consisted of measurements of voluntary ambulation, deep and superficial pain perception, conscious proprioception in hindlimbs, and evoked potentials (somatosensory evoked potentials [SSEP]). We determined that polymer injection is a safe adjunct to the conventional management of severe neurological injury in dogs. We did not observe any unacceptable clinical response to polymer injection; there were no deaths, nor any other problem arising from, or associated with, the procedures. Outcome measures over the 6-8-week trial were improved by polymer injection when compared to historical cases. This recovery was unexpectedly rapid compared to these comparator groups. The results of this pilot trial provides evidence consistent with the

  18. Orthostatic Responses to Anticholinesterase Inhibition in Persons with SCI

    PubMed Central

    Wecht, Jill M.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Azarelo, Frank; Bauman, William A.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (Ach) is the pre-synaptic neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system. Increased pre-synaptic Ach may augment post-synaptic release of norepinephrine thereby increasing systemic blood pressure (BP). The primary objective of this investigation was to determine the hemodynamic effect of pyridostigmine bromide (PYRIDO: 60 mg), an Ach inhibitor (AchI), compared to no-drug (NO-D) during head-up tilt (HUT) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondarily we aimed to determine the effects of PYRIDO compared to NO-D on symptoms of orthostatic intolerance (OI) and adverse event reporting (AE). Ten individuals with SCI (C4–C7) were studied on 2 occasions: visit 1) NO-D and visit 2) PYRIDO. On each visit subjects underwent a progressive HUT maneuver to 15°, 25°, 35° for 5 minutes at each angle and 45 minutes at 45°. Supine and orthostatic heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic BP (SBP & DBP) were monitored and symptoms of OI and AE recorded. Supine hemodynamics did not differ between the trials. The significant fall in SBP during the NO-D trial was diminished with PYRIDO and five subjects had an increased DBP during HUT with PYRIDO compared to the NO-D trial. Individuals that responded to PYRIDO with an increase in orthostatic BP had significantly lower resting HR than non-responders (p<0.01), which suggests increased levels of pre-synaptic Ach. Subjective symptoms of OI and AE reporting did not differ between the two trials. These preliminary data suggest that PYRIDO is safe and may be effective at ameliorating the orthostatic fall in BP in select individuals with SCI. PMID:25916633

  19. Nuclear Physics in the SciDAC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2009-08-01

    Lattice QCD currently provides our only means of solving QCD (Quantum Chromo Dynamics) -- the theory of the strong nuclear force -- in the low-energy regime, and thus of crucial importance for theoretical and experimental research programs in High Energy and Nuclear Physics. Under the SciDAC program, a software infrastructure has been developed for lattice QCD that effectively utilize the capabilities of the INCITE facilities. These developments have enabled a new generation of Nuclear Physics calculations investigating the spectrum and structure of matter, such as the origin of mass and spin. This software infrastructure is described and recent results are reviewed.

  20. Strategies for chemical reaction searching in SciFinder

    PubMed

    Ridley

    2000-09-01

    The bibliographic, chemical structure, and chemical reaction databases produced by Chemical Abstracts Service allow a number of possibilities for chemical reaction searching. While these same databases may be searched through the STN network, many end-users find the intuitive software interface SciFinder simpler, but there still are issues to address. Searching may be performed through keywords, chemical structures, or chemical reactions, and the answers may vary with respect to precision and comprehension. Often combinations of search options may be needed to best solve the problem. Retrosynthetic analyses are easily performed in the chemical reaction database and can give unique insights into synthetic alternatives.

  1. Introduction to Structure Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    CAS Registry Numbers provide a key to searching for chemical substances in CAS databases, and the challenge is to obtain the Registry Numbers for all the substances required. When the substances can be represented by structures, then one option is to find the Registry Numbers through structure searches. With SciFinder Scholar, the process of drawing and searching structures is intuitive; however, there are underlying issues and opportunities that need some explanation in courses on chemical information retrieval.We describe here our introductory course, which addresses the major ones.

  2. Psychosis following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Arciniegas, David B; Harris, Susie N; Brousseau, Kristin M

    2003-11-01

    Psychosis is a relatively infrequent but potentially serious and debilitating consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and one about which there is considerable scientific uncertainty and disagreement. There are several substantial clinical, epidemiological, and neurobiological differences between the post-traumatic psychoses and the primary psychotic disorders. The recognition of these differences may facilitate identification and treatment of patients whose psychosis is most appropriately regarded as post-traumatic. In the service of assisting psychiatrists and other mental health clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of persons with post-traumatic psychoses, this article will review post-traumatic psychosis, including definitions relevant to describing the clinical syndrome, as well as epidemiologic, neurobiological, and neurogenetic factors attendant to it. An approach to evaluation and treatment will then be offered, emphasizing identification of the syndrome of post-traumatic psychosis, consideration of the differential diagnosis of this condition, and careful selection and administration of treatment interventions.

  3. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages.

  4. Psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI

    PubMed Central

    Soler, MD; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Saurí, J; Widerström-Noga, EG

    2013-01-01

    Study design Postal surveys. Objectives To confirm the factor structure of the Spanish version of the MPI-SCI (MPI-SCI-S, Multidimensional Pain Inventory in the SCI population) and to test its internal consistency and construct validity in a Spanish population. Setting Guttmann Institute, Barcelona, Spain. Methods The MPI-SCI-S along with Spanish measures of pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale), pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory), functional independence (Functional Independence Measure), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), locus of control (Multidimensional health Locus of Control), support (Functional Social Support Questionnaire (Duke-UNC)), psychological well-being (Psychological Global Well-Being Index) and demographic/injury characteristics were assessed in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain (n = 126). Results Confirmatory factor analysis suggested an adequate factor structure for the MPI-SCI-S. The internal consistency of the MPI-SCI-S subscales ranged from acceptable (r = 0.66, Life Control) to excellent (r = 0.94, Life Interference). All MPI-SCI-S subscales showed adequate construct validity, with the exception of the Negative and Solicitous Responses subscales. Conclusions The Spanish version of the MPI-SCI is adequate for evaluating chronic pain impact following SCI in a Spanish-speaking population. Future studies should include additional measures of pain-related support in the Spanish-speaking SCI population. PMID:23608807

  5. Disconnection between the default mode network and medial temporal lobes in post-traumatic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    De Simoni, Sara; Grover, Patrick J.; Jenkins, Peter O.; Honeyfield, Lesley; Quest, Rebecca A.; Ross, Ewan; Scott, Gregory; Wilson, Mark H.; Majewska, Paulina; Waldman, Adam D.; Patel, Maneesh C.

    2016-01-01

    connection correlated with both associative memory and information processing speed and normalized when these functions improved. We have previously shown abnormally high posterior cingulate cortex connectivity in the chronic phase after traumatic brain injury, and this abnormality was also observed in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Patients with post-traumatic amnesia showed evidence of widespread traumatic axonal injury measured using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. This change was more marked within the cingulum bundle, the tract connecting the parahippocampal gyrus to the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of post-traumatic amnesia and evidence that memory impairment acutely after traumatic brain injury results from altered parahippocampal functional connectivity, perhaps secondary to the effects of axonal injury on white matter tracts connecting limbic structures involved in memory processing. PMID:27797805

  6. Disconnection between the default mode network and medial temporal lobes in post-traumatic amnesia.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Sara; Grover, Patrick J; Jenkins, Peter O; Honeyfield, Lesley; Quest, Rebecca A; Ross, Ewan; Scott, Gregory; Wilson, Mark H; Majewska, Paulina; Waldman, Adam D; Patel, Maneesh C; Sharp, David J

    2016-12-01

    connection correlated with both associative memory and information processing speed and normalized when these functions improved. We have previously shown abnormally high posterior cingulate cortex connectivity in the chronic phase after traumatic brain injury, and this abnormality was also observed in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Patients with post-traumatic amnesia showed evidence of widespread traumatic axonal injury measured using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. This change was more marked within the cingulum bundle, the tract connecting the parahippocampal gyrus to the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of post-traumatic amnesia and evidence that memory impairment acutely after traumatic brain injury results from altered parahippocampal functional connectivity, perhaps secondary to the effects of axonal injury on white matter tracts connecting limbic structures involved in memory processing.

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    symptoms which delays treatment and may lead to worse outcomes of care. The military culture values and esteems physical and mental toughness. In this...culture service members suffering mental health problems fear being ostracized , humiliated, and belittled. They also fear negative career... self regulate and inhibit behavioral responses. The individual’s ability to emotionally cope with a traumatic event in the immediate aftermath of a

  8. Traumatic facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda N; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Boahene, Kofi Derek O

    2013-10-01

    Facial nerve trauma can be a devastating injury resulting in functional deficits and psychological distress. Deciding on the optimal course of treatment for patients with traumatic facial nerve injuries can be challenging, as there are many critical factors to be considered for each patient. Choosing from the great array of therapeutic options available can become overwhelming to both patients and physicians, and in this article, the authors present a systematic approach to help organize the physician's thought process.

  9. Traumatic-event headaches

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic headaches from head trauma and whiplash injury are well-known and common, but chronic headaches from other sorts of physical traumas are not recognized. Methods Specific information was obtained from the medical records of 15 consecutive patients with chronic headaches related to physically injurious traumatic events that did not include either head trauma or whiplash injury. The events and the physical injuries produced by them were noted. The headaches' development, characteristics, duration, frequency, and accompaniments were recorded, as were the patients' use of pain-alleviative drugs. From this latter information, the headaches were classified by the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society as though they were naturally-occurring headaches. The presence of other post-traumatic symptoms and litigation were also recorded. Results The intervals between the events and the onset of the headaches resembled those between head traumas or whiplash injuries and their subsequent headaches. The headaches themselves were, as a group, similar to those after head trauma and whiplash injury. Thirteen of the patients had chronic tension-type headache, two had migraine. The sustained bodily injuries were trivial or unidentifiable in nine patients. Fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration was not evident in these patients of whom seven were not even seeking payments of any kind. Conclusions This study suggests that these hitherto unrecognized post-traumatic headaches constitute a class of headaches characterized by a relation to traumatic events affecting the body but not including head or whiplash traumas. The bodily injuries per se can be discounted as the cause of the headaches. So can fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration. Altered mental states, not systematically evaluated here, were a possible cause of the headaches. The overall resemblance of these headaches to the headaches after head or whiplash traumas implies

  10. SciFi - A large scintillating fibre tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirn, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (∅ = 0.25 mm) read out by state-of-the-art multi-channel Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) arrays. A custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design and the latest lab and test beam results.

  11. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  12. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  13. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE.

  14. An Independent, Prospective, Head to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury PRINCIPAL...CONTRACT NUMBER Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...tools (NCAT’s) for the acute neurocognitive assessment, tracking cognitive recovery, and informing clinical management after mild traumatic brain injury

  15. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Brian; Shippen, James; Armengol, Monica; Gibbons, Robin; Holderbaum, William; Harwin, William

    2016-01-01

    FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III) system. PMID:28078075

  16. eSciMart: Web Platform for Scientific Software Marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. P.; Demichev, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we suggest a design of a web marketplace where users of scientific application software and databases, presented in the form of web services, as well as their providers will have presence simultaneously. The model, which will be the basis for the web marketplace is close to the customer-to-customer (C2C) model, which has been successfully used, for example, on the auction sites such as eBay (ebay.com). Unlike the classical model of C2C the suggested marketplace focuses on application software in the form of web services, and standardization of API through which application software will be integrated into the web marketplace. A prototype of such a platform, entitled eSciMart, is currently being developed at SINP MSU.

  17. Personal growth after traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael

    Psychiatric practice acknowledges that people who are subjected to traumatic events may develop emotional negativity requiring intervention. However, it has recently been acknowledged that emotional distress caused by a traumatic event can facilitate that person's recovery into an emotionally stronger person. This article aims to provide a clinical understanding of the phenomenon of post-trauma growth.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  19. Asymptomatic Traumatic Hepatothorax, Symptomatic Gall Stone Disease – A Rare Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Zirpe, Dinesh; Gopakumar, Chandrasekharn Valiathan; Swain, Sudeepta Kumar; Surendran, Rajagopal

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia rarely affects right side due to protective effect of liver. In adult it is mainly caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Acute presentations are often life threatening and usually clinch the diagnosis early. It may remain asymptomatic for many years unless being detected incidentally during investigations for some unrelated reason or getting complicated by some pathology of herniated viscera. High degree of suspicion is required to detect this delayed presentation particularly in a post-trauma patient as this condition may require modifications in management. We report a case of acute cholecystitis which revealed a rare association of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia and hepatothorax. PMID:28050431

  20. Traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shaun C; Chute, Dennis J; Desai, Bharati C; Koloski, Eugene R

    2008-11-01

    Although the Heimlich maneuver is considered the best intervention for relieving acute upper airway obstruction, several complications have been reported in the literature. These complications can occur as a result of an increase in abdominal pressure leading to a variety of well-documented visceral injuries, including the great vessels. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis after the Heimlich maneuver is a rare but recognized event; however, to date no case of traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta has been described. We report the first known case, to our knowledge, of a traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta after a forcefully applied Heimlich maneuver.

  1. [Traumatic shock--physiopathologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Fabiano, G; Pezzolla, A; Filograna, M A; Ferrarese, F

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic shock is a complex phenomenon that represents the culminating element of a series of events. It is, in fact, the outcome of an imbalance-decompensation of the organism's defence mechanisms, in which the oxygen supply to the mitochondria is hampered by a macro and/or microcirculation failure. Basically, it is a form of hypovolemic shock in which further factors have a role, including the activation of inflammation mediators. It should also be stressed that part of the cellular damage is caused by tissue reperfusion. Good hemodynamic compensation is maintained with loss of up to 30% of the circulation mass but, beyond this amount, a fall of the cardiac index, peripheral pO2, and an increase of blood lactates will ensue. Hypoxia causes capillary injury and increased permeability, resulting in the formation of edema and finally in loss of the self-regulating power of the microcirculation. Moreover, it strongly stimulates pro-inflammatory activation of the macrophages and the release of vasoactive substances, such as prostaglandins and thromboxanes. The inflammatory response is triggered by cascade systems (such as the complement, coagulation, kinins, fibrinolysis), cell elements (endothelium, leukocytes, macrophages, monocytes, mast cells) and the release of mediators (cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, histamine, etc.) and others interacting factors. In severe trauma, the inflammatory process extends beyond the local limits, maintaining and aggravating the state of shock and causing a Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), with involvement and injury of healthy organs and tissues even at a distance from the site of trauma, raising a risk of onset of ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome), sepsis, MODS (Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome). Tissue reperfusion (reoxygenation) also induces the production of toxic metabolites, such as hydroxylated anions, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide: peroxidation of the phospholipid cell membranes alters the barrier

  2. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    represented >1 vertebral level edema ; and grade 4 represented mixed hemorrhage and edema .2, 3 We also measured the greatest longitudinal extent of...differ in their mild to moderate grades and direction of significance, however both consider hemorrhage superimposed on edema as the highest grade...primarily concerned with single vertebral level vs. multiple vertebral level edema . The sagittal grading system (ordinal) and the longitudinal extent of

  3. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  4. Traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Brody, David L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Levin, Harvey; McKee, Ann; Ribbers, Gerard M; Yaffe, Kristine; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-11-17

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are clinically grouped by severity: mild, moderate and severe. Mild TBI (the least severe form) is synonymous with concussion and is typically caused by blunt non-penetrating head trauma. The trauma causes stretching and tearing of axons, which leads to diffuse axonal injury - the best-studied pathogenetic mechanism of this disorder. However, mild TBI is defined on clinical grounds and no well-validated imaging or fluid biomarkers to determine the presence of neuronal damage in patients with mild TBI is available. Most patients with mild TBI will recover quickly, but others report persistent symptoms, called post-concussive syndrome, the underlying pathophysiology of which is largely unknown. Repeated concussive and subconcussive head injuries have been linked to the neurodegenerative condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been reported post-mortem in contact sports athletes and soldiers exposed to blasts. Insights from severe injuries and CTE plausibly shed light on the underlying cellular and molecular processes involved in mild TBI. MRI techniques and blood tests for axonal proteins to identify and grade axonal injury, in addition to PET for tau pathology, show promise as tools to explore CTE pathophysiology in longitudinal clinical studies, and might be developed into diagnostic tools for CTE. Given that CTE is attributed to repeated head trauma, prevention might be possible through rule changes by sports organizations and legislators.

  5. Traumatic Brachial Artery Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ergunes, Kazim; Yilik, Levent; Ozsoyler, Ibrahim; Kestelli, Mert; Ozbek, Cengiz; Gurbuz, Ali

    2006-01-01

    We performed this retrospective study to analyze our strategies for managing and surgically treating brachial artery injuries. Fifty-seven patients with a total of 58 traumatic brachial artery injuries underwent surgery at our institution, from August 1996 through November 2004. Fifty-four patients were male and 3 were female (age range, 7 to 75 years; mean, 29.4 years). Forty-four of the patients had penetrating injuries (18 had stab wounds; 16, window glass injuries; and 10, industrial accidents), 10 had blunt trauma injuries (traffic accidents), and 3 had gunshot injuries. Fourteen patients (24.6%) had peripheral nerve injury. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasonographic examination. The repair of the 58 arterial injuries involved end-to-end anastomosis for 32 injuries (55.2%), reverse saphenous vein graft interpositional grafts for 18 (31%), and primary repair for 8 (13.8%). Venous continuity was achieved in 11 (84.6%) of 13 patients who had major venous injuries. Nine of the 57 patients (15.8%) required primary fasciotomy. Follow-up showed that 5 of the 14 patients with peripheral nerve injury had apparent disabilities due to nerve injury. One patient underwent amputation. There were no deaths. We believe that good results can be achieved in patients with brachial artery injuries by use of careful physical examination, Doppler ultrasonography, and restoration of viability with vascular repair and dbridement of nonviable tissues. Traumatic neurologic injury frequently leads to disability of the extremities. PMID:16572866

  6. [Social support after traumatism].

    PubMed

    Maercker, A; Heim, E; Hecker, T; Thoma, M V

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept of social support has recently become of relevance again, particularly in the context of traumatized patient groups, which include refugees and migrants. This article summarizes the evidence from social support research, e. g. different types of positive effects as well as context, gender and cultural aspects. These aspects are highlighted by means of studies stemming from applied healthcare research and thus describe a wide range of health effects, e.g. increased well-being and reduced depressive symptoms, improved functional abilities, better immune status and longevity. Two new trauma-specific differentiations of the social support concept are introduced: societal acknowledgement as a trauma survivor and disclosure of traumatic experiences. Against this background several implications for working with refugees arise: promotion of self-efficacy and posttraumatic maturation as well as the treatment of mental disorders show considerable benefits from focusing on social support. Finally, possibilities emerging from digital communication media are discussed, which are particularly relevant in this context.

  7. ScienceDirect through SciVerse: a new way to approach Elsevier.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Jason

    2011-01-01

    SciVerse is the new combined portal from Elsevier that services their ScienceDirect collection, SciTopics, and their Scopus database. Using SciVerse to access ScienceDirect is the specific focus of this review. Along with advanced keyword searching and citation searching options, SciVerse also incorporates a very useful image search feature. The aim seems to be not only to create an interface that provides broad functionality on par with other database search tools that many searchers use regularly but also to create an open platform that could be changed to respond effectively to the needs of customers.

  8. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed.

  9. Therapeutically targeting astrocytes with stem and progenitor cell transplantation following traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Falnikar, Aditi; Li, Ke; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes via multipotent neural stem cell (NSC) and lineage-restricted neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cell transplantation in general offers the potential to replace central nervous system (CNS) cell types, achieve remyelination, deliver missing gene products, promote and guide axonal growth, modulate the host immune response, deliver neuroprotective factors, and provide a cellular substrate for bridging the lesion site, amongst other possible benefits. A host of cell types that differ in their developmental stage, CNS region and species of derivation, as well as in their phenotypic potential, have been tested in a variety of SCI animal models. Historically in the SCI field, most pre-clinical NSC and NPC transplantation studies have focused on neuronal and oligodendrocyte replacement. However, much less attention has been geared towards targeting astroglial dysfunction in the inured spinal cord, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in both normal CNS function and in the diseased nervous system. Despite the relative lack of studies, cell transplantation-based targeting of astrocytes dates back to some of the earliest transplant studies in SCI animal models. In this review, we will describe the history of work involving cell transplantation for targeting astrocytes in models of SCI. We will also touch on the current state of affairs in the field, as well as on important future directions as we move forward in trying to develop this approach into a viable strategy for SCI patients. Practical issues such as timing of delivery, route of transplantation and immunesuppression needs are beyond the scope of this review. PMID:25251595

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury in Sports: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sahler, Christopher S.; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical diagnosis of neurological dysfunction following head trauma, typically presenting with acute symptoms of some degree of cognitive impairment. There are an estimated 1.7 to 3.8 million TBIs each year in the United States, approximately 10 percent of which are due to sports and recreational activities. Most brain injuries are self-limited with symptom resolution within one week, however, a growing amount of data is now establishing significant sequelae from even minor impacts such as headaches, prolonged cognitive impairments, or even death. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment according to standardized guidelines are crucial when treating athletes who may be subjected to future head trauma, possibly increasing their likelihood of long-term impairments. PMID:22848836

  11. [Evoked potentials and post-traumatic evolution].

    PubMed

    Guérit, J-M

    2005-06-01

    Visual, somatosensory, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials provide functional quantitative assessment of the cerebral cortex and brainstem. Their contribution at the acute stage of coma concerns diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up. Four patterns are observed in traumatic coma: pattern 1=dysfunction of the cerebral cortex, brainstem integrity: good prognosis in more than 80% of cases; pattern 2=midbrain dysfunction: prognosis depends on both the reversibility of midbrain dysfunction and the extent of associated axonal lesions in the hemispheric white matter; pattern 3=pontine dysfunction due to transtentorial herniation: ominous prognosis, this pattern must be early detected by continuous monitoring; pattern 4=brain death: we currently use evoked potentials at the only brain-death confirmatory test, even in sedated patients. The contribution of evoked potentials in vegetative or minimally responsive states concerns the identification of these patients whose state is determined by midbrain dysfunction and the evaluation of persisting cognitive abilities in individual cases.

  12. Neurorestorative Treatments for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major cause of death and permanent disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. A total of 1.5 million people experience head trauma each year in the United States, with an annual economic cost exceeding $56 billion. Unfortunately, almost all Phase III TBI clinical trials have yet to yield a safe and effective neuroprotective treatment, raising questions regarding the use of neuroprotective strategies as the primary therapy for acute brain injuries. Recent preclinical data suggest that neurorestorative strategies that promote angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing endothelial cells), axonal remodeling (axonal sprouting and pruning), neurogenesis (generation of new neurons) and synaptogenesis (formation of new synapses) provide promising opportunities for the treatment of TBI. This review discusses select cell-based and pharmacological therapies that activate and amplify these endogenous restorative brain plasticity processes to promote both repair and regeneration of injured brain tissue and functional recovery after TBI. PMID:21122475

  13. Critical care management of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Menon, D K; Ercole, A

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing global problem, which is responsible for a substantial burden of disability and death, and which generates substantial healthcare costs. High-quality intensive care can save lives and improve the quality of outcome. TBI is extremely heterogeneous in terms of clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and outcome. Current approaches to the critical care management of TBI are not underpinned by high-quality evidence, and many of the current therapies in use have not shown benefit in randomized control trials. However, observational studies have informed the development of authoritative international guidelines, and the use of multimodality monitoring may facilitate rational approaches to optimizing acute physiology, allowing clinicians to optimize the balance between benefit and risk from these interventions in individual patients. Such approaches, along with the emerging impact of advanced neuroimaging, genomics, and protein biomarkers, could lead to the development of precision medicine approaches to the intensive care management of TBI.

  14. Inflammatory neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matthew V.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits an inflammatory response in the central nervous system (CNS) that involves both resident and peripheral immune cells. Neuroinflammation can persist for years following a single TBI and may contribute to neurodegeneration. However, administration of anti-inflammatory drugs shortly after injury was not effective in the treatment of TBI patients. Some components of the neuroinflammatory response seem to play a beneficial role in the acute phase of TBI. Indeed, following CNS injury, early inflammation can set the stage for proper tissue regeneration and recovery, which can, perhaps, explain why general immunosuppression in TBI patients is disadvantageous. Here, we discuss some positive attributes of neuroinflammation and propose that inflammation be therapeutically guided in TBI patients rather than globally suppressed. PMID:27540166

  15. Increased sleep need and daytime sleepiness 6 months after traumatic brain injury: a prospective controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Imbach, Lukas L; Valko, Philipp O; Li, Tongzhou; Maric, Angelina; Symeonidou, Evangelia-Regkina; Stover, John F; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mica, Ladislav; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2015-03-01

    Post-traumatic sleep-wake disturbances are common after acute traumatic brain injury. Increased sleep need per 24 h and excessive daytime sleepiness are among the most prevalent post-traumatic sleep disorders and impair quality of life of trauma patients. Nevertheless, the relation between traumatic brain injury and sleep outcome, but also the link between post-traumatic sleep problems and clinical measures in the acute phase after traumatic brain injury has so far not been addressed in a controlled and prospective approach. We therefore performed a prospective controlled clinical study to examine (i) sleep-wake outcome after traumatic brain injury; and (ii) to screen for clinical and laboratory predictors of poor sleep-wake outcome after acute traumatic brain injury. Forty-two of 60 included patients with first-ever traumatic brain injury were available for follow-up examinations. Six months after trauma, the average sleep need per 24 h as assessed by actigraphy was markedly increased in patients as compared to controls (8.3 ± 1.1 h versus 7.1 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.0001). Objective daytime sleepiness was found in 57% of trauma patients and 19% of healthy subjects, and the average sleep latency in patients was reduced to 8.7 ± 4.6 min (12.1 ± 4.7 min in controls, P = 0.0009). Patients, but not controls, markedly underestimated both excessive sleep need and excessive daytime sleepiness when assessed only by subjective means, emphasizing the unreliability of self-assessment of increased sleep propensity in traumatic brain injury patients. At polysomnography, slow wave sleep after traumatic brain injury was more consolidated. The most important risk factor for developing increased sleep need after traumatic brain injury was the presence of an intracranial haemorrhage. In conclusion, we provide controlled and objective evidence for a direct relation between sleep-wake disturbances and traumatic brain injury, and for clinically significant underestimation of post-traumatic

  16. Sleep and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic sleep-wake disturbances are frequent and often chronic complications after traumatic brain injury. The most prevalent sleep-wake disturbances are insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and pleiosomnia, (i.e., increased sleep need). These disturbances are probably of multifactorial origin, but direct traumatic damage to key brain structures in sleep-wake regulation is likely to contribute. Diagnosis and treatment consist of standard approaches, but because of misperception of sleep-wake behavior in trauma patients, subjective testing alone may not always suffice.

  17. Diagnosis and Prognosis of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    van Middendorp, Joost J.; Goss, Ben; Urquhart, Susan; Atresh, Sridhar; Williams, Richard P.; Schuetz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite promising advances in basic spinal cord repair research, no effective therapy resulting in major neurological or functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) is available to date. The neurological examination according to the International Standards for Neurological and Functional Classification of Spinal Cord Injury Patients (International Standards) has become the cornerstone in the assessment of the severity and level of the injury. Based on parameters from the International Standards, physicians are able to inform patients about the predicted long-term outcomes, including the ability to walk, with high accuracy. In those patients who cannot participate in a reliable physical neurological examination, magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological examinations may provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information. As clinical research on this topic continues, the prognostic value of the reviewed diagnostic assessments will become more accurate in the near future. These advances will provide useful information for physicians to counsel tSCI patients and their families during the catastrophic initial phase after the injury. PMID:24353930

  18. "Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Launch of a Major European Outreach Programme Seven of Europe's leading Research Organizations [1] launch joint outreach programme for the European Science and Technology Week at the Technopolis Museum in Brussels on 22 March. Their aim is to show Europeans how today's society couldn't be without fundamental research . Could you imagine life without mobile phones, cars, CD players, TV, refrigerators, computers, the internet and the World Wide Web, antibiotics, vitamins, anaesthetics, vaccination, heating, pampers, nylon stockings, glue, bar codes, metal detectors, contact lenses, modems, laser printers, digital cameras, gameboys, play stations...? Technology is everywhere and used by everyone in today's society, but how many Europeans suspect that without studies on the structure of the atom, lasers would not exist, and neither would CD players? Most do not realise that most things they couldn't be without have required years of fundamental research . To fill this knowledge gap, the leading Research Organizations in Europe [1], with the support of the research directorate of the European Commission, have joined forces to inform Europeans how technology couldn't be without science, and how science can no longer progress without technology. The project is called...... Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! Sci-Tech - Couldn't be without it! invites Europeans to vote online in a survey to identify the top ten technologies they can't live without. It will show them through a dynamic and entertaining Web space where these top technologies really come from, and it will reveal their intimate links with research. Teaching kits will be developed to explain to students how their favourite gadgets actually work, and how a career in science can contribute to inventions that future generations couldn't be without. The results of the survey will be presented as a series of quiz shows live on the Internet during the Science Week, from 4 to 10 November. Sci-tech - Couldn't be without

  19. rOpenSci - open tools for open science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, K.

    2013-12-01

    Solving many of the basic and applied challenges in ecology and evolution requires access to large amounts of data, often spanning long spatial and temporal scales. The long-established model where researchers collect and analyze their own data will soon be replaced by one where disparate datasets are brought to bear on both basic and applied problems. As science becomes more data-driven, it faces a whole new set of challenges. Researchers will not only have to maintain expertise in their domains but also learn new skills to curate, retrieve, and analyze these newly available data. In order to fully realize the potential of data-driven science and allow researchers to draw insights from these vast data stores, we need to address challenges associated with all aspects of the research life cycle. To foster and support a new generation of data-driven science, my colleagues and I founded a project called rOpenSci (http://ropensci.org). The project is an integrated effort to build tools and training using Ecology and Evolution as a model community. In this talk I will outline several of the barriers that need to be overcome including better incentive mechanisms for data, training gaps, and lowering technical barriers.

  20. SciDAC-Center for Plasma Edge Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Choong Seock

    2012-06-04

    The SciDAC ProtoFSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) [http://www.cims.nyu.edu/cpes/] was awarded to New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in FY 2006. C.S. Chang was the institutional and national project PI. It's mission was 1) to build kinetic simulation code applicable to tokamak edge region including magnetic divertor geometry, 2) to build a computer science framework which can integrate the kinetic code with MHD/fluid codes in multiscale, 3) to conduct scientific research using the developed tools. CPES has built two such edge kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which are still the only working kinetic edge plasma codes capable of including the diverted magnetic field geometry. CPES has also built the code coupling framework EFFIS (End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation), which incubated and used the Adios (www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/adios/) and eSiMon (http://www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/esimmon/) technologies, together with the Kepler technology.

  1. STARtorialist: Astronomy Outreach via Fashion, Sci-Fi, & Pop Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Ash, Summer

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical images in the public domain have increasingly been used as inspiration and patterns for clothing, accessories, and home decor. These 'AstroFashion' items are as diverse as DIY projects, handmade and boutique products, mass-produced commercial items, and haute couture. STARtorialist is a Tumblr-based blog that curates the proliferation of these products with the goal of celebrating the beauty of the universe and highlighting the science behind the images. The blog also includes sci-fi, space, and science-related aspects of popular culture. Each post features images and descriptions of the products, and often where/how we found them and/or the people wearing them, with links to the original astronomical images or other relevant science content. The popularity of each post is evident in the number of 'notes', including 'faves' (personal bookmarks) and 'reblogs' (shares with other users). Since launching the blog in December 2013, with an average of one post per day, we've attracted hundreds of followers on Tumblr and Twitter and thousands of notes on Tumblr. We will present our most popular posts and recommend how education, outreach, and press offices can add Tumblr to their social media repertoire.

  2. Progesterone neuroprotection in traumatic CNS injury and motoneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gonzalez, Susana L; Garay, Laura; Meyer, Maria; Gargiulo, Gisella; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Studies on the neuroprotective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in the nervous system are of great interest due to their potential clinical connotations. In peripheral neuropathies, progesterone and reduced derivatives promote remyelination, axonal regeneration and the recovery of function. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), progesterone has the ability to reduce edema and inflammatory cytokines, prevent neuronal loss and improve functional outcomes. Clinical trials have shown that short-and long-term progesterone treatment induces a significant improvement in the level of disability among patients with brain injury. In experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), molecular markers of functional motoneurons become impaired, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA, Na,K-ATPase mRNA, microtubule-associated protein 2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). SCI also produces motoneuron chromatolysis. Progesterone treatment restores the expression of these molecules while chromatolysis subsided. SCI also causes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination. In this case, a short progesterone treatment enhances proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into mature myelin-producing cells, whereas prolonged treatment increases a transcription factor (Olig1) needed to repair injury-induced demyelination. Progesterone neuroprotection has also been shown in motoneuron neurodegeneration. In Wobbler mice spinal cord, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of BDNF, ChAT and Na,K-ATPase, prevents vacuolar motoneuron degeneration and the development of mitochondrial abnormalities, while functionally increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Multiple mechanisms contribute to these progesterone effects, and the role played by classical nuclear receptors, extra nuclear receptors, membrane receptors, and the reduced metabolites of progesterone in neuroprotection and myelin formation remain an exciting field worth of exploration.

  3. Traumatic Rib Injury: Patterns, Imaging Pitfalls, Complications, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Brett S; Gange, Christopher P; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Klionsky, Nina; Hobbs, Susan K; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    The ribs are frequently affected by blunt or penetrating injury to the thorax. In the emergency department setting, it is vital for the interpreting radiologist to not only identify the presence of rib injuries but also alert the clinician about organ-specific injury, specific traumatic patterns, and acute rib trauma complications that require emergent attention. Rib injuries can be separated into specific morphologic fracture patterns that include stress, buckle, nondisplaced, displaced, segmental, and pathologic fractures. Specific attention is also required for flail chest and for fractures due to pediatric nonaccidental trauma. Rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, both of which increase as the number of fractured ribs increases. Key complications associated with rib fracture include pain, hemothorax, pneumothorax, extrapleural hematoma, pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, acute vascular injury, and abdominal solid-organ injury. Congenital anomalies, including supernumerary or accessory ribs, vestigial anterior ribs, bifid ribs, and synostoses, are common and should not be confused with traumatic pathologic conditions. Nontraumatic mimics of traumatic rib injury, with or without fracture, include metastatic disease, primary osseous neoplasms (osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and osteochondroma), fibrous dysplasia, and Paget disease. Principles of management include supportive and procedural methods of alleviating pain, treating complications, and stabilizing posttraumatic deformity. By recognizing and accurately reporting the imaging findings, the radiologist will add value to the care of patients with thoracic trauma. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  4. Particles in Action. Study Guide. Unit C2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a four-part unit…

  5. Close Encounters of the Best Kind: The Latest Sci-Fi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzel, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Not only is science fiction alive and well--it's flourishing. From the big screen (howdy, Wall-E) to the big books (like Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games, which has attracted loads of prepublication praise), 2008 has been a great year for sci-fi. Publishers have released truckloads of new sci-fi titles this year, but what's particularly…

  6. The Adequacy of the Science Citation Index (SCI) as an Indicator of International Scientific Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Mark P.; Narin, Francis

    1981-01-01

    Presents the results of a study of Science Citation Index (SCI) as a source for developing indicators of international scientific activity. Journal counts based on SCI and British Library Lending Division (BLLD) cataloging records are compared and reference patterns in key journals are described. Eleven references are listed. (JL)

  7. What is Matter? Study Guide. Unit C1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a two-part unit…

  8. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  9. What Makes Things Happen? Study Guide. Unit B. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  10. Membrane Targeting and Insertion of the C-Tail Protein SciP.

    PubMed

    Pross, Eva; Soussoula, Lavinia; Seitl, Ines; Lupo, Domenico; Kuhn, Andreas

    2016-10-09

    C-tailed membrane proteins insert into the bilayer post-translationally because the hydrophobic anchor segment leaves the ribosome at the end of translation. Nevertheless, we find here evidence that the targeting of SciP to the membrane of Escherichia coli occurs co-translationally since signal elements in the N-terminal part of the SciP protein sequence are present. Two short hydrophobic sequences were identified that targeted a green fluorescent protein-SciP fusion protein to the membrane involving the signal recognition particle. After targeting, the membrane insertion of SciP is catalyzed by YidC independent of the SecYEG translocase. However, when the C-terminal tail of SciP was extended to 21 aa residues, we found that SecYEG becomes involved and makes its membrane insertion more efficient.

  11. First time experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian R; Rosten, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB. Octave. and R. The universality of Python. the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development. interface with databases, manipulate graph structures, render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  12. Neuroimaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Current and Future Predictors of Functional Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskauer, Stacy J.; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Although neuroimaging has long played a role in the acute management of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), until recently, its use as a tool for understanding and predicting long-term brain-behavior relationships after TBI has been limited by the relatively poor sensitivity of routine clinical imaging for detecting diffuse axonal injury…

  13. Students with Traumatic Brain Injury: Making the Transition from Hospital to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mira, Mary P.; Tyler, Janet Siantz

    1991-01-01

    This paper uses a case study of a 16-year-old girl with traumatic brain injury (TBI) to present information on the demographics of head injury, neuropathology, recovery patterns, acute rehabilitation, educationally significant effects, behavioral sequelae, the school as a vehicle for rehabilitation, a transition model, school reentry, and…

  14. Traumatic dissection of the internal carotid artery: simultaneous infarct of optic nerve and brain

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Edgar; Martinez, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Traumatic intracranial internal carotid artery dissection is a rare but significant cause of stroke in patients in their forties, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Simultaneous ischemic stroke and optic nerve infarction can occur. Clinical suspicion of dissection is determining in the acute management. PMID:25356244

  15. Acute Stress Symptoms in Young Children with Burns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Frederick J.; Saxe, Glenn; Ronfeldt, Heidi; Drake, Jennifer E.; Burns, Jennifer; Edgren, Christy; Sheridan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms are a focus of much research with older children, but little research has been conducted with young children, who account for about 50% of all pediatric burn injuries. This is a 3-year study of 12- to 48-month-old acutely burned children to assess acute traumatic stress outcomes. The aims were to…

  16. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM): two cases of SPAM following surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Kamran; Kandwal, Pankaj; Gupta, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    To report two cases of traumatic paraplegia who developed Sub-acute Post-Traumatic Ascending Myelopathy (SPAM) following surgical decompression.We hereby report two cases (both 35yr old male) with traumatic paraplegia that developed ascending weakness at 3rd and 5th Post-Op day respectively following surgical decompression. Both the patients experienced remarkable improvement in Neurology after treatment with steroids. The authors conclude by emphasizing on minimum cord handling during surgical decompression of the spinal cord to avoid this potentially life threatening complication.

  17. Data Sharing and Publication Using the SciDrive Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, D.; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R.; Graham, M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite all the progress made during the last years in the field of cloud data storage, the problem of fast and reliable data storage for the scientific community still remains open. The SciDrive project meets the need for a free open-source scientific data publishing platform. Having the primary target audience of astronomers as the largest data producers, the platform however is not bound to any scientific domain and can be used by different communities. Our current installation provides a free and safe storage platform for scientists to publish their data and share it with the community with the simplicity of Dropbox. The system allows service providers to harvest from the files and derive their broader context in a fairly automated fashion. Collecting various scientific data files in a single location or multiple connected sites allows building an intelligent system of metadata extractors. Our system is aimed at simplifying the cataloging and processing of large file collections for the long tail of scientific data. We propose an extensible plugin architecture for automatic metadata extraction and storage. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. This approach makes the simple BLOB storage a smart system providing access to various data in its own representation, such as a database for files containing tables, or providing additional search and access features such as full-text search, image pyramids or thumbnails creation, simulation dataset id extractor for fast search. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University.

  18. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  19. Traumatic stress disorders following first-trimester spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Stephen V; Bernard, Rebecca S; Epperly, Ted; Woodward, Stephanie; Ginzburg, Karni; Folen, Raymond; Perez, Theresita; Koopman, Cheryl

    2006-11-01

    Provide counsel and support to women after a spontaneous abortion. Research indicates that many women will talk with their physician about their emotional distress and that physicians provide good information after the spontaneous abortion. Evaluate women for acute stress disorder (ASD) after a spontaneous abortion. Research found that women reporting physical, emotional, or sexual abuse are more likely to experience ASD. Patients should be assessed for post-traumatic stress disorder in follow-up visits 1 month after the initial visit. Research has found that up to 25% of women meet criteria for PTSD 1 month post the spontaneous abortion and 7% met criteria at 4 months. Physicians should refer women who are experiencing traumatic stress to a behavioral health professional.

  20. White Matter Abnormalities in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Following a Specific Traumatic Event.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Lei, Du; Li, Lingjiang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Suo, Xueling; Xiao, Fenglai; Kuang, Weihong; Li, Jin; Bi, Feng; Lui, Su; Kemp, Graham J; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-02-01

    Studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are complicated by wide variability in the intensity and duration of prior stressors in patient participants, secondary effects of chronic psychiatric illness, and a variable history of treatment with psychiatric medications. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, patient samples have often been small, and they were not often compared to similarly stressed patients without PTSD in order to control for general stress effects. Findings from these studies have been inconsistent. The present study investigated whole-brain microstructural alterations of white matter in a large drug-naive population who survived a specific, severe traumatic event (a major 8.0-magnitude earthquake). Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we explored group differences between 88 PTSD patients and 91 matched traumatized non-PTSD controls in fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as its component elements axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD), and examined these findings in relation to findings from deterministic DTI tractography. Relations between white matter alterations and psychiatric symptom severity were examined. PTSD patients, relative to similarly stressed controls, showed an FA increase as well as AD and RD changes in the white matter beneath left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and forceps major. The observation of increased FA in the PTSD group suggests that the pathophysiology of PTSD after a specific acute traumatic event is distinct from what has been reported in patients with several years duration of illness. Alterations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be an important aspect of illness pathophysiology, possibly via the region's established role in fear extinction circuitry. Use-dependent myelination or other secondary compensatory changes in response to heightened demands for threat appraisal and emotion regulation may be involved.

  1. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  2. White Matter Abnormalities in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Following a Specific Traumatic Event

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Lei, Du; Li, Lingjiang; Huang, Xiaoqi; Suo, Xueling; Xiao, Fenglai; Kuang, Weihong; Li, Jin; Bi, Feng; Lui, Su; Kemp, Graham J.; Sweeney, John A.; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are complicated by wide variability in the intensity and duration of prior stressors in patient participants, secondary effects of chronic psychiatric illness, and a variable history of treatment with psychiatric medications. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, patient samples have often been small, and they were not often compared to similarly stressed patients without PTSD in order to control for general stress effects. Findings from these studies have been inconsistent. The present study investigated whole-brain microstructural alterations of white matter in a large drug-naive population who survived a specific, severe traumatic event (a major 8.0-magnitude earthquake). Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we explored group differences between 88 PTSD patients and 91 matched traumatized non-PTSD controls in fractional anisotropy (FA), as well as its component elements axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD), and examined these findings in relation to findings from deterministic DTI tractography. Relations between white matter alterations and psychiatric symptom severity were examined. PTSD patients, relative to similarly stressed controls, showed an FA increase as well as AD and RD changes in the white matter beneath left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and forceps major. The observation of increased FA in the PTSD group suggests that the pathophysiology of PTSD after a specific acute traumatic event is distinct from what has been reported in patients with several years duration of illness. Alterations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be an important aspect of illness pathophysiology, possibly via the region's established role in fear extinction circuitry. Use-dependent myelination or other secondary compensatory changes in response to heightened demands for threat appraisal and emotion regulation may be involved. PMID:26981581

  3. Post-traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sutapa Ford, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...other documentation. PT090084: “Post-traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Contract...Psychological Health: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH

  4. Data publication and sharing using the SciDrive service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Dmitry; Medvedev, D.; Szalay, A. S.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the last years progress in scientific data storage, still remains the problem of public data storage and sharing system for relatively small scientific datasets. These are collections forming the “long tail” of power log datasets distribution. The aggregated size of the long tail data is comparable to the size of all data collections from large archives, and the value of data is significant. The SciDrive project's main goal is providing the scientific community with a place to reliably and freely store such data and provide access to it to broad scientific community. The primary target audience of the project is astoromy community, and it will be extended to other fields. We're aiming to create a simple way of publishing a dataset, which can be then shared with other people. Data owner controls the permissions to modify and access the data and can assign a group of users or open the access to everyone. The data contained in the dataset will be automaticaly recognized by a background process. Known data formats will be extracted according to the user's settings. Currently tabular data can be automatically extracted to the user's MyDB table where user can make SQL queries to the dataset and merge it with other public CasJobs resources. Other data formats can be processed using a set of plugins that upload the data or metadata to user-defined side services. The current implementation targets some of the data formats commonly used by the astronomy communities, including FITS, ASCII and Excel tables, TIFF images, and YT simulations data archives. Along with generic metadata, format-specific metadata is also processed. For example, basic information about celestial objects is extracted from FITS files and TIFF images, if present. A 100TB implementation has just been put into production at Johns Hopkins University. The system features public data storage REST service supporting VOSpace 2.0 and Dropbox protocols, HTML5 web portal, command-line client and Java

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  6. Early Traumatic Stress Responses in Parents Following a Serious Illness in Their Child: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Claudia; Muscara, Frank; Anderson, Vicki A; McCarthy, Maria C

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of the literature investigating the early traumatic stress responses in parents of children diagnosed with a serious illness/injury. A literature review was conducted (September 2013) using Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Twenty-four studies related to parents of children hospitalized due to diagnosis of cancer, type 1 diabetes, meningococcal disease, trauma or serious injury, preterm birth and other serious illnesses requiring admission to intensive care were included. Parents were assessed for early traumatic stress symptoms within 3 months of their child's diagnosis/hospitalization. Prevalence rates of acute stress disorder in parents ranged from 12 to 63%. Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 8 to 68%. Variability was related to methodological factors including differences in study design, timing of assessments, measurement tools, and scoring protocols. Psychosocial factors rather than medical factors predicted parent distress. This review integrates and compares early traumatic reactions in parents with children suffering a range of serious illnesses. Findings suggest a high prevalence of acute and posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents. Methodological inconsistencies made comparison of early traumatic stress prevalence rates difficult. Risk factors associated with traumatic stress symptoms were identified.

  7. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  8. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  9. Linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy: identification of potential mechanisms leading to neurofibrillary tangle development.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon Peter; Turner, Ryan Coddington; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Bailes, Julian Edwin; Huber, Jason Delwyn; Rosen, Charles Lee

    2014-07-01

    Significant attention has recently been drawn to the potential link between head trauma and the development of neurodegenerative disease, namely chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The acute neurotrauma associated with sports-related concussions in athletes and blast-induced traumatic brain injury in soldiers elevates the risk for future development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as CTE. CTE is a progressive disease distinguished by characteristic tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and, occasionally, transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) oligomers, both of which have a predilection for perivascular and subcortical areas near reactive astrocytes and microglia. The disease is currently only diagnosed postmortem by neuropathological identification of NFTs. A recent workshop sponsored by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke emphasized the need for premortem diagnosis, to better understand disease pathophysiology and to develop targeted treatments. In order to accomplish this objective, it is necessary to discover the mechanistic link between acute neurotrauma and the development of chronic neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as CTE. In this review, we briefly summarize what is currently known about CTE development and pathophysiology, and subsequently discuss injury-induced pathways that warrant further investigation. Understanding the mechanistic link between acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration will facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for CTE and other related disorders.

  10. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  11. The Page kidney phenomenon secondary to a traumatic fall.

    PubMed

    Babel, Nitin; Sakpal, Sujit Vijay; Chamberlain, Ronald Scott

    2010-02-01

    Page kidney is a rare phenomenon of hyperreninemic hypertension caused by compression of the renal parenchyma. It has been reported in healthy individuals after blunt abdominal or flank trauma, and in patients after invasive nephrological interventions. We present a case of acute on chronic renal failure and Page kidney phenomenon in an elderly male after a traumatic fall, who underwent effective medical management until spontaneous recovery to baseline was observed. A brief discussion on the Page kidney phenomenon is provided with a suggested algorithmic approach towards the management of this process.

  12. The application of operations research methodologies to the delivery of care model for traumatic spinal cord injury: the access to care and timing project.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Soril, Lesley; Atkins, Derek; Lewis, Rachel; Santos, Argelio; Fehlings, Michael G; Burns, Anthony S; Singh, Anoushka; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2012-09-01

    The long-term impact of spinal cord injury (SCI) on the health care system imposes a need for greater efficiency in the use of resources and the management of care. The Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project was developed to model the health care delivery system in Canada for patients with traumatic SCI. Techniques from Operations Research, such as simulation modeling, were used to predict the impact of best practices and policy initiatives on outcomes related to both the system and patients. These methods have been used to solve similar problems in business and engineering and may offer a unique solution to the complexities encountered in SCI care delivery. Findings from various simulated scenarios, from the patients' point of injury to community re-integration, can be used to inform decisions on optimizing practice across the care continuum. This article describes specifically the methodology and implications of producing such simulations for the care of traumatic SCI in Canada. Future publications will report on specific practices pertaining to the access to specialized services and the timing of interventions evaluated using the ACT model. Results from this type of research will provide the evidence required to support clinical decision making, inform standards of care, and provide an opportunity to engage policymakers.

  13. Sci-Hub: What Librarians Should Know and Do about Article Piracy.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2017-01-01

    The high cost of journal articles has driven many researchers to turn to a new way of getting access: "pirate" article sites. Sci-Hub, the largest and best known of these sites, currently offers instant access to more than 58 million journal articles. Users attracted by the ease of use and breadth of the collection may not realize that these articles are often obtained using stolen credentials and downloading them may be illegal. This article will briefly describe Sci-Hub and how it works, the legal and ethical issues it raises, and the problems it may cause for librarians. Librarians should be aware of Sci-Hub and the ways it may change their patrons' expectations. They should also understand the risks Sci-Hub can pose to their patrons and their institutions.

  14. 76 FR 10395 - BreconRidge Manufacturing Solutions, Now Known as Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Design and Manufacturing, a Subsidiary of Sanmina-SCI Corporation, Including On- Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services, Penski, Inc., and Whitney Enterprises... Corporation, Division Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Design and Manufacturing, a subsidiary of...

  15. Complementary use of the SciSearch database for improved biomedical information searching.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C M

    1998-01-01

    The use of at least two complementary online biomedical databases is generally considered critical for biomedical scientists seeking to keep fully abreast of recent research developments as well as to retrieve the highest number of relevant citations possible. Although the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE is usually the database of choice, this paper illustrates the benefits of using another database, the Institute for Scientific Information's SciSearch, when conducting a biomedical information search. When a simple query about red wine consumption and coronary artery disease was posed simultaneously in both MEDLINE and SciSearch, a greater number of relevant citations were retrieved through SciSearch. This paper also provides suggestions for carrying out a comprehensive biomedical literature search in a rapid and efficient manner by using SciSearch in conjunction with MEDLINE. PMID:9549014

  16. SciServer Compute brings Analysis to Big Data in the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Medvedev, Dmitry; Lemson, Gerard; Souter, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    SciServer Compute uses Jupyter Notebooks running within server-side Docker containers attached to big data collections to bring advanced analysis to big data "in the cloud." SciServer Compute is a component in the SciServer Big-Data ecosystem under development at JHU, which will provide a stable, reproducible, sharable virtual research environment.SciServer builds on the popular CasJobs and SkyServer systems that made the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archive one of the most-used astronomical instruments. SciServer extends those systems with server-side computational capabilities and very large scratch storage space, and further extends their functions to a range of other scientific disciplines.Although big datasets like SDSS have revolutionized astronomy research, for further analysis, users are still restricted to downloading the selected data sets locally - but increasing data sizes make this local approach impractical. Instead, researchers need online tools that are co-located with data in a virtual research environment, enabling them to bring their analysis to the data.SciServer supports this using the popular Jupyter notebooks, which allow users to write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the server with the data (extensions to Matlab and other languages are planned). We have written special-purpose libraries that enable querying the databases and other persistent datasets. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files. Communication between the various components of the SciServer system is managed through SciServer‘s new Single Sign-on Portal.We have created a number of demos to illustrate the capabilities of SciServer Compute, including Python and R scripts

  17. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    include an analysis of osteomyelitis diagnosis and treatment with plans to submit a proposed algorithm to the SCI-QUERI‘ (SCI-Quality Enhancement...34, is there independent ability to % SERVICE CONNECTED BOWEL PRGM LOC # HRS PER TREATMENT BLADDER CONTINENT BLADDER MANAGEMENT INDEWELLING CATHETER...ANEMIA AUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA DIABETES1 DIABETES2 HETEROTOPIC OSSIFICATION HYPERTHYROID HYPOTHYROID OSTEOMYELITIS PAIN LEVEL 1-10 TOBACCO USE PAST

  18. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    SCI, although the risk is high in this population of osteoporosis -related bone fracture. This study aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower... Osteoporosis , FES-rowing, zoledronic acid, exercise, bone health 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...Introduction Serious spinal cord injury (SCI) causes osteoporosis in the lower extremities, significantly increasing the risk of bone fracture in

  19. Mid-year Status of MESSENGER SciBox Science Planning and Commanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L.; Choo, T. H.; Steele, R. J.; Lucks, M.; Nair, H.; Perry, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Berman, A. F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    More than halfway into its primary orbital mission, MESSENGER has successfully exploited the SciBox planning and commanding system to automate science observation scheduling and command generation for its full instrument suite, as well as its radio-frequency communication and guidance and control systems. MESSENGER's SciBox software coordinates instrument observations to determine the optimal conflict-free science schedule for the entire orbital mission and generates weekly command sequences for submission to mission operations. SciBox maximizes science return by filling all available observing opportunities and fully utilizing onboard storage and downlink bandwidth. As of four months into its one-year orbital mission, MESSENGER SciBox had scheduled the acquisition and downlink of nearly 40,000 images and comparable data sets from the spacecraft's six other instruments. The flexibility of MESSENGER SciBox allows for rapid re-optimization of schedules in the event of unforeseen circumstances. It has also allowed the science and planning teams to analyze rapidly the effects of modifying operational parameters and adding new observations. Within two hours, the entire mission can be re-optimized, schedules and command sequences generated, and a full set of plots and reports produced. The effects on resource usage, observational coverage, and compliance with operational constraints may be quickly assessed. This rapid turnaround ensures that optimal schedules are produced regardless of circumstances. We present an overview of the MESSENGER SciBox design and its operation.

  20. Disconnection of the Ascending Arousal System in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Haynes, Robin L.; Takahashi, Emi; Klein, Joshua P.; Cummings, Peter; Benner, Thomas; Greer, David M.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Wu, Ona; Kinney, Hannah C.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic coma is associated with disruption of axonal pathways throughout the brain but the specific pathways involved in humans are incompletely understood. In this study, we used high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) to map the connectivity of axonal pathways that mediate the 2 critical components of consciousness – arousal and awareness – in the postmortem brain of a 62-year-old woman with acute traumatic coma and in 2 control brains. HARDI tractography guided tissue sampling in the neuropathological analysis. HARDI tractography demonstrated complete disruption of white matter pathways connecting brainstem arousal nuclei to the basal forebrain and thalamic intralaminar and reticular nuclei. In contrast, hemispheric arousal pathways connecting the thalamus and basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex were only partially disrupted, as were the cortical “awareness pathways.” Neuropathologic examination, which utilized β-amyloid precursor protein and fractin immunomarkers, revealed axonal injury in the white matter of the brainstem and cerebral hemispheres that corresponded to sites of HARDI tract disruption. Axonal injury was also present within the grey matter of the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal forebrain, and cerebral cortex. We propose that traumatic coma may be a subcortical disconnection syndrome related to the disconnection of specific brainstem arousal nuclei from the thalamus and basal forebrain. PMID:23656993

  1. [Neuroendocrine dysfunctions and their consequences following traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly; Góth, Miklós

    2012-06-17

    Posttraumatic hypopituitarism is of major public health importance because it is more prevalent than previously thought. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in children with traumatic brain injury is unknown. Most cases of posttraumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated in the clinical practice, and it may contribute to the severe morbidity seen in patients with traumatic brain injury. In the acute phase of brain injury, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency should not be missed. Determination of morning serum cortisol concentration is mandatory, because adrenal insufficiency can be life threatening. Morning serum cortisol lower than 200 nmol/L strongly suggests adrenal insufficiency. A complete hormonal investigation should be performed after one year of the trauma. Isolated growth hormone deficiency is the most common deficiency after traumatic brain injury. Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma (because of boxing, kickboxing, football and ice hockey) may also result in hypopituitarism. Close co-operation between neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, rehabilitation physicians and representatives of other disciplines is important to provide better care for these patients.

  2. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  3. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy after T12 burst fracture in a 32-year-old male: case report and surgical result of cervical durotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Huili; Liu, Haiying; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to a rare neurological deterioration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to discuss evidence supporting an increase in cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we present an extremely rare case of subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) in which the patient sustained a T12 fracture initially resulting in paraplegia and after undergoing posterior fixation and anterior decompression. The patient was a 32-year-old healthy man who sustained a T12 burst fracture with complete paraplegia after a fall injury. The patient underwent a posterior reduction and short-segment fixation 8 h after the injury and an anterior thoracoscopic-assisted decompression on post-traumatic day 8. On post-traumatic day 21, he had a progressive neurological deterioration with dyspnoea and decreased muscle strength of both upper extremities that could not be relieved by conservative intervention. After undergoing a cervical posterior laminectomy and durotomy, the patient exhibited the clinical manifestation of brain herniation. There was no recovery of autonomous respiration, and the patient entered a coma. The patient died on post-traumatic day 25 because of cardiac and respiratory arrest. SPAM is a rare, potentially fatal neurological deterioration after SCI; however, a prompt diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance imaging. Our observations suggest that an increase in CSFP may be the main cause of SPAM. The paraplegic level should be recorded daily so that neurological deterioration can be recognised as soon as possible.

  4. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Steve; Hamilton, Laura K; Vaugeois, Alexandre; Beaudoin, Stéfanny; Breault-Dugas, Christian; Pineau, Isabelle; Lévesque, Sébastien A; Grégoire, Catherine-Alexandra; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2014-01-01

    The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE), remyelination (LPC) and significant locomotor defects (EAE). Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  5. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  6. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassuk, Ellen L.; Konnath, Kristina; Volk, Katherine T.

    2006-01-01

    The unexpected loss of a loved one, a car accident, or exposure to a violent experience is familiar to many. Everyone reacts to such events, but the responses vary widely, ranging from numbness and withdrawal, to crying, nervousness, and agitation. Because traumatic events are prevalent, cause profound suffering, and may lead to life altering…

  7. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  9. Children's Memory for Traumatic Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carole; Bell, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Three- through 13-year olds were interviewed a few days after a hospital stay for traumatic injury, and again six months later. Children provided considerable information about the injury and hospital stay and made few commission errors; children's distress at the time of injury did not affect their recall of the event, but distress during the…

  10. FK506 treatment inhibits caspase-3 activation and promotes oligodendroglial survival following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Stephanie; Knapp, Pamela; Springer, Joe

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this study is to examine the ability of FK506, an immunosuppressant that inhibits calcineurin activation, to limit caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following spinal cord injury (SCI). To better establish a role for calcineurin and caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following SCI, rats received a contusion injury to the spinal cord followed by treatment with FK506 or rapamycin (another immunosuppressant with no detectable inhibitory action on calcineurin activation). Animals were then sacrificed at 8 days postinjury and spinal cord tissue was processed using immunofluorescence histochemistry to examine cellular caspase-3 activation in ventral and dorsal white matter. In all treatment groups, numerous oligodendroglia were found to express the activated form of caspase-3 in regions proximal and distal to the injury epicenter. However, our findings suggest that treatment with FK506, but not rapamycin reduces the number of oligodendroglia expressing activated caspase-3 and increases the number of surviving oligodendroglia in dorsal white matter. These results provide initial evidence that agents that reduce the actions of calcineurin and subsequent caspase-3 activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of traumatic SCI.

  11. Dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P G; Rabchevsky, A G; Hicks, R R; Gibson, T R; Fletcher-Turner, A; Scheff, S W

    2000-01-01

    Acute neuropathology following experimental traumatic brain injury results in the rapid necrosis of cortical tissue at the site of injury. This primary injury is exacerbated in the ensuing hours and days via the progression of secondary injury mechanism(s) leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Recent evidence from our laboratory demonstrates that the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A significantly ameliorates cortical damage following traumatic brain injury. The present study extends the previous findings utilizing a unilateral controlled cortical impact model of traumatic brain injury in order to establish a dose-response curve and optimal dosing regimen of cyclosporin A. Following injury to adult rats, cyclosporin A was administrated at various dosages and the therapy was initiated at different times post-injury. In addition to examining the effect of cyclosporin A on the acute disruption of the blood-brain barrier following controlled cortical impact, we also assessed the efficacy of cyclosporin A to reduce tissue damage utilizing the fluid percussion model of traumatic brain injury. The findings demonstrate that the neuroprotection afforded by cyclosporin A is dose-dependent and that a therapeutic window exists up to 24h post-injury. Furthermore, the optimal cyclosporin dosage and regimen markedly reduces disruption of the blood-brain barrier acutely following a cortical contusion injury, and similarly affords significant neuroprotection following fluid percussion injury. These findings clearly suggest that the mechanisms responsible for tissue necrosis following traumatic brain injury are amenable to pharmacological intervention.

  12. Traumatic fragmented medial coronoid process in a Chihuahua.

    PubMed

    Hadley, H S; Wheeler, J L; Manley, P A

    2009-01-01

    Fragmented medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a disease process that has not previously been reported in toy-breed dogs. This report describes a presumptive case of FMCP in a 14-month-old Chihuahua that was presented for evaluation approximately four weeks following acute onset of moderate lameness in the left forelimb. Definitive diagnosis of a fragmented medial coronoid process was based upon computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan also demonstrated moderate joint incongruity in the affected elbow. Surgical removal of the fragment and subtotal coronoidectomy were performed via a medial arthrotomy. An ulnar ostectomy was also performed to address joint incongruity. Histology of specimens removed at surgery did not demonstrate evidence of microdamage as characteristic of FMCP in large breed dogs, and instead, suggested that the fracture was acute and traumatic in nature. Rapid return to function was observed following surgery.

  13. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  14. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage

    PubMed Central

    Balarezo, María G.; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2015-01-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article. Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan’s blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking

  15. Autoantibodies in traumatic brain injury and central nervous system trauma.

    PubMed

    Raad, M; Nohra, E; Chams, N; Itani, M; Talih, F; Mondello, S; Kobeissy, F

    2014-12-05

    Despite the debilitating consequences and the widespread prevalence of brain trauma insults including spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), there are currently few effective therapies for most of brain trauma sequelae. As a consequence, there has been a major quest for identifying better diagnostic tools, predictive models, and directed neurotherapeutic strategies in assessing brain trauma. Among the hallmark features of brain injury pathology is the central nervous systems' (CNS) abnormal activation of the immune response post-injury. Of interest, is the occurrence of autoantibodies which are produced following CNS trauma-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and released into peripheral circulation mounted against self-brain-specific proteins acting as autoantigens. Recently, autoantibodies have been proposed as the new generation class of biomarkers due to their long-term presence in serum compared to their counterpart antigens. The diagnostic and prognostic value of several existing autoantibodies is currently being actively studied. Furthermore, the degree of direct and latent contribution of autoantibodies to CNS insult is still not fully characterized. It is being suggested that there may be an analogy of CNS autoantibodies secretion with the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, in which case, understanding and defining the role of autoantibodies in brain injury paradigm (SCI and TBI) may provide a realistic prospect for the development of effective neurotherapy. In this work, we will discuss the accumulating evidence about the appearance of autoantibodies following brain injury insults. Furthermore, we will provide perspectives on their potential roles as pathological components and as candidate markers for detecting and assessing CNS injury.

  16. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  17. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, ‘Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?’ While the answer is ‘probably,’ more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature. PMID:25143737

  18. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, 'Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?' While the answer is 'probably,' more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature.

  19. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Kolias, Angelos G.; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A.; Pickard, John D.; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Murray, Gordon D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of “opening the skull” in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  20. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Angelos G; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Pickard, John D; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Murray, Gordon D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented.

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  2. Diagnostic confirmation of mild traumatic brain injury by diffusion tensor imaging: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic brain injury is a form of acquired brain injury that results from sudden trauma to the head. Specifically, mild traumatic brain injury is a clinical diagnosis that can have significant effects on an individual's life, yet is difficult to identify through traditional imaging techniques. Case presentation This is the case of a 68-year-old previously healthy African American woman who was involved in a motor vehicle accident that resulted in significant head trauma. After the accident, she experienced symptoms indicative of mild traumatic brain injury and sought a neurological consultation when her symptoms did not subside. She was initially evaluated with a neurological examination, psychological evaluation, acute concussion evaluation and a third-party memory test using software from CNS Vital Signs for neurocognitive function. A diagnosis of post-concussion syndrome was suggested. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed decreased fractional anisotropy in the region immediately adjacent to both lateral ventricles, which was used to confirm the diagnosis. Fractional anisotropy is a scalar value between zero and one that describes the degree of anisotropy of a diffusion process. These results are indicative of post-traumatic gliosis and are undetectable by magnetic resonance imaging. Our patient was treated with cognitive therapy. Conclusion Minor traumatic brain injury is a common injury with variable clinical presentation. The system of diagnosis used in this case found a significant relationship between the clinical assessment and imaging results. This would not have been possible using traditional imaging techniques and highlights the benefits of using diffusion tensor imaging in the sub-acute assessment of minor traumatic brain injury. PMID:22339800

  3. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    Context: The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. Evidence Acquisition: The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Conclusion: Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. PMID:26733590

  4. Systemic manifestations of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Samson Sujit Kumar; Buell, Thomas; Robertson, Claudia S

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects functioning of various organ systems in the absence of concomitant non-neurologic organ injury or systemic infection. The systemic manifestations of TBI can be mild or severe and can present in the acute phase or during the recovery phase. Non-neurologic organ dysfunction can manifest following mild TBI or severe TBI. The pathophysiology of systemic manifestations following TBI is multifactorial and involves an effect on the autonomic nervous system, involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, release of inflammatory mediators, and treatment modalities used for TBI. Endocrine dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and respiratory manifestations are common following TBI. The influence of TBI on systemic immune response, coagulation cascade, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, and other systems is becoming more evident through animal studies and clinical trials. Systemic manifestations can independently act as risk factors for mortality and morbidity following TBI. Some conditions like neurogenic pulmonary edema and disseminated intravascular coagulation can adversely affect the outcome. Early recognition and treatment of systemic manifestations may improve the clinical outcome following TBI. Further studies are required especially in the field of neuroimmunology to establish the role of various biochemical cascades, not only in the pathophysiology of TBI but also in its systemic manifestations and outcome.

  5. Paintball-related traumatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Luck, Joshua; Bell, Daniel; Bashir, Gareth

    2016-04-27

    Paintball is a popular recreational sport played at both amateur and professional level. Ocular injuries are well recognised, although there is a growing body of literature documenting superficial vascular as well as deep solid organ injuries. An 18-year-old man presented with signs and symptoms consistent with acute appendicitis. Intraoperatively, a grade III liver injury was identified and packed before a relook at 48 h. No further active bleeding was identified; however, follow-up ultrasound at 3 weeks demonstrated non-resolution of a large subcapsular haematoma. The patient was readmitted for a short period of observation and discharged with repeat ultrasound scheduled for 3 months. This represents the first report of paintball-related blunt traumatic injury to the liver. Solid organ injuries of this nature have only been reported three times previously-all in the urological setting. This case also highlights issues surrounding the use of routine follow-up imaging in blunt liver trauma and provides a concise discussion of the relevant literature.

  6. Impact of Health Behaviors and Health Management on Employment After SCI: Psychological Health and Health Management

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Michelle A.; Krause, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between employment and psychological health and health management as described by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who were employed at least once following injury. Methods: A qualitative approach used 6 focus groups at 2 sites with 44 participants who were at least 10 years post SCI. All had been employed at some point since injury. Heterogeneous and homogeneous groups were delineated based on specific characteristics, such as education, gender, or race. Group sessions followed a semi-structured interview format with questions about personal, environmental, and policy related factors influencing employment following SCI. All group sessions were recorded, transcribed, and coded into conceptual categories to identify topics, themes, and patterns. Inferences were drawn about their meaning. NVivo 10 software using the constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Results: Narratives discussed the relationship between employment and psychological and emotional health and health management. Four themes were identified: (1) adjustment and dealing with emotional reactions, (2) gaining self-confidence, (3) preventing burnout, and (4) attitudes and perspectives. Most themes reflected issues that varied based on severity of injury as well as stage of employment. Conclusions: Individuals with SCI who are successful in working following injury must determine how to perform the behaviors necessary to manage their health and prevent emotional or physical complications. The emotional consequences of SCI must be recognized and addressed and specific behaviors enacted in order to optimize employment outcomes.

  7. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  8. Post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, Julian C; Koenigs, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Disentangling the effects of "organic" neurologic damage and psychological distress after a traumatic brain injury poses a significant challenge to researchers and clinicians. Establishing a link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been particularly contentious, reflecting difficulties in establishing a unique diagnosis for conditions with overlapping and sometimes contradictory symptom profiles. However, each disorder is linked to a variety of adverse health outcomes, underscoring the need to better understand how neurologic and psychiatric risk factors interact following trauma. Here, we present data showing that individuals with a TBI are more likely to develop PTSD, and that individuals with PTSD are more likely to develop persistent cognitive sequelae related to TBI. Further, we describe neurobiological models of PTSD, highlighting how patterns of neurologic damage typical in TBI may promote or protect against the development of PTSD in brain-injured populations. These data highlight the unique course of PTSD following a TBI and have important diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment implications for individuals with a dual diagnosis.

  9. Comment on "chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model".

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin; Petzold, Axel

    2012-10-24

    In a case study, the authors report an increase in phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain, a marker of neuroaxonal damage, in the plasma of a blast-exposed patient immediately after injury. They suggest that this phosphoprotein may be a useful body fluid indicator of acute blast traumatic brain injury.

  10. Inflammation and white matter degeneration persist for years after a single traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Victoria E; Stewart, Janice E; Begbie, Finn D; Trojanowski, John Q; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2013-01-01

    A single traumatic brain injury is associated with an increased risk of dementia and, in a proportion of patients surviving a year or more from injury, the development of hallmark Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies. However, the pathological processes linking traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease remain poorly understood. Growing evidence supports a role for neuroinflammation in the development of Alzheimer's disease. In contrast, little is known about the neuroinflammatory response to brain injury and, in particular, its temporal dynamics and any potential role in neurodegeneration. Cases of traumatic brain injury with survivals ranging from 10 h to 47 years post injury (n = 52) and age-matched, uninjured control subjects (n = 44) were selected from the Glasgow Traumatic Brain Injury archive. From these, sections of the corpus callosum and adjacent parasaggital cortex were examined for microglial density and morphology, and for indices of white matter pathology and integrity. With survival of ≥3 months from injury, cases with traumatic brain injury frequently displayed extensive, densely packed, reactive microglia (CR3/43- and/or CD68-immunoreactive), a pathology not seen in control subjects or acutely injured cases. Of particular note, these reactive microglia were present in 28% of cases with survival of >1 year and up to 18 years post-trauma. In cases displaying this inflammatory pathology, evidence of ongoing white matter degradation could also be observed. Moreover, there was a 25% reduction in the corpus callosum thickness with survival >1 year post-injury. These data present striking evidence of persistent inflammation and ongoing white matter degeneration for many years after just a single traumatic brain injury in humans. Future studies to determine whether inflammation occurs in response to or, conversely, promotes white matter degeneration will be important. These findings may provide parallels for studying neurodegenerative disease

  11. Traumatic brain injury among Indiana state prisoners.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bradley; Sapp, Dona; Kincaid, Ashley

    2014-09-01

    Research on traumatic brain injury among inmates has focused on comparing the rate of traumatic brain injury among offenders to the general population, but also how best to screen for traumatic brain injury among this population. This study administered the short version of the Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method to all male inmates admitted into Indiana state prisons were screened for a month (N = 831). Results indicate that 35.7% of the inmates reported experiencing a traumatic brain injury during their lifetime and that these inmates were more likely to have a psychiatric disorder and a prior period of incarceration than those without. Logistic regression analysis finds that a traumatic brain injury predicts the likelihood of prior incarceration net of age, race, education, and psychiatric disorder. This study suggests that brief instruments can be successfully implemented into prison screenings to help divert inmates into needed treatment.

  12. Pharmacotherapy of post-traumatic stress disorder: a family practitioners guide to management of the disease.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A; Struzik, Lukasz; Vivian, Lisa L; Vermani, Monica; McBride, Joanna C

    2005-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is a difficult to treat, yet common disorder, which is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and societal burden. Comprehensive management of post-traumatic stress disorder must include both psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic components. The current evidence-based pharmacologic management approaches to post-traumatic stress disorder, suggests that first-line treatments for monotherapy are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sertraline, paroxetine and fluoxetine. Other potential options include other monotherapies including venlafaxine, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, as well as adjunctive usage of atypical antipsychotics, lamotrigine, trazadone and a number of adrenergic agents. A trial of therapy should be at least 8 weeks and continue for at the very least 12 months, but is likely to be much longer. In light of the risks of untreated post-traumatic stress disorder (e.g., suicide and impaired psychosocial functioning), therapy may need to be continued for 2 years or more. Pharmacologic therapy instituted at the time of acute psychologic trauma shows promise for the prevention of post-traumatic stress disorder in the future and warrants further study.

  13. Pharmacotherapy as prophylactic treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Roque, Autumn Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder has a lifetime prevalence of almost 9% in the United States. The diagnosis is associated with increased rates of comorbid substance abuse and increased rates of depression. Providers are taught how to diagnose and treat PTSD, but little discussion is devoted to how to prevent the disorder. Behavioral research in animal studies has provided some evidence for the use of medications in decreasing the fear response and the reconsolidation of memories. A heightened fear response and the re-experience of traumatic memory are key components for diagnosis. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the evidence for pharmacotherapy as prophylactic treatment in acute stress/trauma in order to prevent the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. The body of the review includes discussions on medications, medications as adjunct to script-driven imagery, and special considerations for military, first responders, and women. This article concludes with implications for practice and recommendations for future research. The key words used for the literature search were "prophylactic treatment of PTSD," "pharmacotherapy and trauma," "pharmacological prevention of PTSD," "beta blockers and the prevention of PTSD," "acute stress and prevention of PTSD," "propranolol and PTSD," "secondary prevention of PTSD," and "medications used to prevent PTSD." Findings were categorized by medications and medications as adjunct to script-driven imagery. The literature suggests that hydrocortisone, propranolol, and morphine may decrease symptoms and diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder.

  14. Biomaterial scaffolds used for the regeneration of spinal cord injury (SCI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonhang; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-11-01

    This review presents a summary of various types of scaffold biomaterials used alone or together with therapeutic drugs and cells to regenerate spinal cord injury (SCI). The inhibitory environment and loss of axonal connections after SCI give rise to critical obstacles to regeneration of lost tissues and neuronal functions. Biomaterial scaffolds can provide a bridge to connect lost tissues, an adhesion site for implanted or host cells, and sustained release of therapeutic drugs in the injured spinal cord. In addition, they not only provide a structural platform, but can play active roles by inhibiting apoptosis of cells, inflammation and scar formation, and inducing neurogenesis, axonal growth and angiogenesis. Many synthetic and natural biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively investigated and tested in vitro and in animal SCI models for these purposes. We summarized the literature on the biomaterials commonly used for spinal cord regeneration in terms of historical backgrounds and current approaches.

  15. Charged-Current Neutral Pion production at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, J.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2009-10-01

    SciBooNE, located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon below 1 GeV neutrino energy. SciBooNE is studying charged current interactions. Among them, neutral pion production interactions will be the focus of this poster. The experimental signature of neutrino-induced neutral pion production is constituted by two electromagnetic cascades initiated by the conversion of the {pi}{sup 0} decay photons, with an additional muon in the final state for CC processes. In this poster, I will present how we reconstruct and select charged-current muon neutrino interactions producing {pi}{sup 0}'s in SciBooNE.

  16. Catecholamines in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    could lead to memories that are too strong, contributing to the recurrent, intrusive retrieval of the traumatic events that occurs in PTSD. As a...emotionally arousing experiences are typically vivid and persistent. The recurrent, intrusive memories of traumatic events in post-traumatic stress disorder...signaling plays a critical role in the maintenance of waking and in the regulation of REM sleep. J Neurophysiol 92:2071–2082. Ouyang M, Zhang L, Zhu

  17. [Post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth].

    PubMed

    Korábová, I; Masopustová, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth to health care professionals. The text focuses on the diagnostic definition of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth, symptoms, physiological background, prevalence, course, risk factors and consequences of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth for a woman, her child and her partner. Options for interventions and therapy are outlined as well.

  18. Traumatic grief and traumatic stress in survivors 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Jean; Séjourné, Nathalène; Bui, Eric; Birmes, Philippe; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between exposure to traumatic events and traumatic grief and the role of mediating and moderating variables [peritraumatic distress, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptoms of depression] were studied in survivors of the genocide of Batutsi in Rwanda in 1994. One hundred and two survivors (70 women, mean age 45 ± 7.53 years) participated in this retrospective study. All of them had lost a member of their family. The severity of traumatic exposure (Comprehensive Trauma Inventory), peritraumatic distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory), current PTSD symptoms (PTSD Checklist), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and traumatic grief symptoms (Inventory of Traumatic Grief) was evaluated. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then conducted to examine the relative contribution of each variable to the symptoms of traumatic grief. The severity of traumatic exposure was related to traumatic grief symptoms (B=0.06, R=0.6, R(2) =0.36 and ß=0.6, t=7.54, p=0.00). The Baron and Kenny procedure (1986) (including three separate regressions), along with the Sobel test, was used to test mediation effects. Peritraumatic distress and PTSD symptoms may be mediating variables between traumatic exposure and traumatic grief. Traumatic grief is a complex but assessable entity, where previous distress and suffering result from both psychological trauma and the loss of a loved one.

  19. Traumatic basilar impression: case report.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, T; Tanabe, H; Hasegawa, T; Ohta, T

    1995-07-01

    A very rare case of traumatic basilar impression is reported. The patient, a 57-year-old man, was hit on the head vertically in the parietal region. X ray of the cervical spine and computed tomography (CT) scans showed intracranial indentation of the atlas and the odontoid process with a depressed fracture around the foramen magnum. There are no previous reports about this type of fracture.

  20. Implementing Connected Component Labeling as a User Defined Operator for SciDB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oloso, Amidu; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Clune, Thomas; Brown, Paul; Poliakov, Alex; Yu, Hongfeng

    2016-01-01

    We have implemented a flexible User Defined Operator (UDO) for labeling connected components of a binary mask expressed as an array in SciDB, a parallel distributed database management system based on the array data model. This UDO is able to process very large multidimensional arrays by exploiting SciDB's memory management mechanism that efficiently manipulates arrays whose memory requirements far exceed available physical memory. The UDO takes as primary inputs a binary mask array and a binary stencil array that specifies the connectivity of a given cell to its neighbors. The UDO returns an array of the same shape as the input mask array with each foreground cell containing the label of the component it belongs to. By default, dimensions are treated as non-periodic, but the UDO also accepts optional input parameters to specify periodicity in any of the array dimensions. The UDO requires four stages to completely label connected components. In the first stage, labels are computed for each subarray or chunk of the mask array in parallel across SciDB instances using the weighted quick union (WQU) with half-path compression algorithm. In the second stage, labels around chunk boundaries from the first stage are stored in a temporary SciDB array that is then replicated across all SciDB instances. Equivalences are resolved by again applying the WQU algorithm to these boundary labels. In the third stage, relabeling is done for each chunk using the resolved equivalences. In the fourth stage, the resolved labels, which so far are "flattened" coordinates of the original binary mask array, are renamed with sequential integers for legibility. The UDO is demonstrated on a 3-D mask of O(1011) elements, with O(108) foreground cells and O(106) connected components. The operator completes in 19 minutes using 84 SciDB instances.

  1. Bringing the SciBar detector to the booster neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Alcaraz, J.; Andringa, S.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Catala, J.; Cervera, A.; Conrad, J.M.; Couce, E.; Dore, U.; Espinal, X.; Finley, D.A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ishii, T.; Jover, G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, Y.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona, IFAE /Tokyo U., ICRR /Valencia U., IFIC /Kyoto U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Stratton Mountain Sch. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Colorado U.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. At that time, the SciBar detector became available for use in other neutrino beam lines, including the BNB, which has been providing neutrinos to the MiniBooNE experiment since late 2002. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. For each of these proposed measurements, the SciBar/BNB combination presents a unique opportunity or will significantly improve upon current or near-future experiments for several reasons. First, the fine granularity of SciBar allows detailed reconstruction of final states not possible with the MiniBooNE detector. Additionally, the BNB neutrino energy spectrum is a close match to the expected T2K energy spectrum in a region where cross sections are expected to vary dramatically with energy. As a result, the SciBar/BNB combination will provide cross-section measurements in an energy range complementary to MINERvA and complete the knowledge of neutrino cross sections over the entire energy range of interest to the upcoming off-axis experiments.

  2. Acute vascular abdomen. General outlook and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Miani, S; Boneschi, M; La Penna, A; Erba, M; De Monti, M; Giordanengo, F

    1999-09-01

    Acute vascular abdomen is a severe and life-threatening pathology due to arterial degeneration, leading to hemorrhage or arterial occlusion leading to ischemia. Differential diagnosis of patients with severe abdominal pain and/or shock include several vascular and traumatic diseases, the most common being rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), or less frequently rupture of visceral artery aneurysm. Also acute aortic dissection, iatrogenic injury and acute mesenteric ischemia may lead to acute vascular abdomen. Clinical evaluation of the haemodynamic status of the patient may be very difficult, and may require airway maintenance and ventilation with a rapid treatment of hemorrhagic shock. In the stable patient with an uncertain diagnosis, CT scan, NMR and selective angiography may be helpful in diagnosis before vascular repair. On the contrary, the unstable patient, after hemodynamic resuscitation, must be operated on expeditiously. We present our vascular algorithms, to assess timing of diagnosis and treatment of this severe acute disease.

  3. Postpartum Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression During Pregnancy & Postpartum Anxiety During Pregnancy & Postpartum Pregnancy or Postpartum Obsessive Symptoms Postpartum Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Bipolar Mood Disorders Postpartum Psychosis Tools for ...

  4. CitSci.org: A New Model for Managing, Documenting, and Sharing Citizen Science Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Kaplan, Nicole; Newman, Greg; Scarpino, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Citizen science projects have the potential to advance science by increasing the volume and variety of data, as well as innovation. Yet this potential has not been fully realized, in part because citizen science data are typically not widely shared and reused. To address this and related challenges, we built CitSci.org (see www.citsci.org), a customizable platform that allows users to collect and generate diverse datasets. We hope that CitSci.org will ultimately increase discoverability and confidence in citizen science observations, encouraging scientists to use such data in their own scientific research.

  5. Final Report for DOE Project: Portal Web Services: Support of DOE SciDAC Collaboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Thomas, PI; Geoffrey Fox, Co-PI; Gannon, D; Pierce, M; Moore, R; Schissel, D; Boisseau, J

    2007-10-01

    Grid portals provide the scientific community with familiar and simplified interfaces to the Grid and Grid services, and it is important to deploy grid portals onto the SciDAC grids and collaboratories. The goal of this project is the research, development and deployment of interoperable portal and web services that can be used on SciDAC National Collaboratory grids. This project has four primary task areas: development of portal systems; management of data collections; DOE science application integration; and development of web and grid services in support of the above activities.

  6. SciServer: An Online Collaborative Environment for Big Data in Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, Jordan; Souter, Barbara; Lemson, Gerard; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr

    2017-01-01

    For the past year, SciServer Compute (http://compute.sciserver.org) has offered access to big data resources running within server-side Docker containers. Compute has allowed thousands of researchers to bring advanced analysis to big datasets like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others, while keeping the analysis close to the data for better performance and easier read/write access. SciServer Compute is just one part of the SciServer system being developed at Johns Hopkins University, which provides an easy-to-use collaborative research environment for astronomy and many other sciences.SciServer enables these collaborative research strategies using Jupyter notebooks, in which users can write their own Python and R scripts and execute them on the same server as the data. We have written special-purpose libraries for querying, reading, and writing data. Intermediate results can be stored in large scratch space (hundreds of TBs) and analyzed directly from within Python or R with state-of-the-art visualization and machine learning libraries. Users can store science-ready results in their permanent allocation on SciDrive, a Dropbox-like system for sharing and publishing files.SciServer Compute’s virtual research environment has grown with the addition of task management and access control functions, allowing collaborators to share both data and analysis scripts securely across the world. These features also open up new possibilities for education, allowing instructors to share datasets with students and students to write analysis scripts to share with their instructors. We are leveraging these features into a new system called “SciServer Courseware,” which will allow instructors to share assignments with their students, allowing students to engage with big data in new ways.SciServer has also expanded to include more datasets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A part of that growth has been the addition of the SkyQuery component, which allows for simple, fast

  7. GeoSciML version 3: A GML application for geologic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    International Union of Geological Sciences., I. C.; Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    After 2 years of testing and development, XML schema for GeoSciML version 3 are now ready for application deployment. GeoSciML draws from many geoscience data modelling efforts to establish a common suite of feature types to represent information associated with geologic maps (materials, structures, and geologic units) and observations including structure data, samples, and chemical analyses. After extensive testing and use case analysis, in December 2008 the CGI Interoperability Working Group (IWG) released GeoSciML 2.0 as an application schema for basic geological information. GeoSciML 2.0 is in use to deliver geologic data by the OneGeology Europe portal, the Geological Survey of Canada Groundwater Information Network (wet GIN), and the Auscope Mineral Resources portal. GeoSciML to version 3.0 is updated to OGC Geography Markup Language v3.2, re-engineered patterns for association of element values with controlled vocabulary concepts, incorporation of ISO19156 Observation and Measurement constructs for representing numeric and categorical values and for representing analytical data, incorporation of EarthResourceML to represent mineral occurrences and mines, incorporation of the GeoTime model to represent GSSP and stratigraphic time scale, and refactoring of the GeoSciML namespace to follow emerging ISO practices for decoupling of dependencies between standardized namespaces. These changes will make it easier for data providers to link to standard vocabulary and registry services. The depth and breadth of GeoSciML remains largely unchanged, covering the representation of geologic units, earth materials and geologic structures. ISO19156 elements and patterns are used to represent sampling features such as boreholes and rock samples, as well as geochemical and geochronologic measurements. Geologic structures include shear displacement structures (brittle faults and ductile shears), contacts, folds, foliations, lineations and structures with no preferred

  8. Aging, neurodegenerative disease, and traumatic brain injury: the role of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Esopenko, Carrie; Levine, Brian

    2015-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment Impact on Cognition, Quality of Life, and Cardiovascular Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0479 TITLE: Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Chronic SCI: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment Impact on Cognition...SCI. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, we will objectively measure sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in chronic SCI patients using

  10. Thromboembolism in the Sub-Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Belci, Maurizio; Van Middendorp, Joost J; Al Halabi, Ahmed; Meagher, Tom M

    2016-01-01

    To review the evidence of thromboembolism incidence and prophylaxis in the sub-acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI) 3–6 months post injury. All observational and experimental studies with any length of follow-up and no limitations on language or publication status published up to March 2015 were included. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes studied were incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the sub-acute phase of SCI. The secondary outcome was type of thromboprophylaxis. Our search identified 4305 references and seven articles that met the inclusion criteria. Five papers reported PE events and three papers reported DVT events in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Studies were heterogeneous in populations, design and outcome reporting, therefore a meta-analysis was not performed. The included studies report a PE incidence of 0.5%–6.0% and DVT incidence of 2.0%–8.0% in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Thromboprophylaxis was poorly reported. Spinal patients continue to have a significant risk of PE and DVT after the acute period of their injury. Clinicians are advised to have a low threshold for suspecting venous thromboembolism in the sub-acute phase of SCI and to continue prophylactic anticoagulation therapy for a longer period of time. PMID:27790330

  11. A multimethod research investigation of consumer involvement in Australian health service accreditation programmes: the ACCREDIT-SCI study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Moldovan, Max; Mumford, Virginia; Pawsey, Marjorie; Irene Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Health service accreditation programmes are a regulatory mechanism adopted to drive improvements inpatient safety and quality. Research investigating the benefits or limitations, of consumer involvement in accreditation programmes is negligible. To develop our knowledge in this area the ACCREDIT collaboration (Accreditation Collaborative for the Conduct of Research, Evaluation and Designated Investigations through Teamwork) has developed a research plan, known as the ACCREDIT-SCI (Standards of Consumer Involvement) study protocol. Two complementary studies have been designed: one, to examine the effectiveness of a standard for consumer participation and two, to explore how patient experiences vary across a range of settings with differing accreditation results. Methods and design The research setting is the Australian healthcare system, and the two studies focus on three accreditation programmes in the primary, acute and aged care domains. The studies will use multimethods: document analysis; interviews and surveys. Participants will be stakeholders across the three domains including: policy officers; frontline healthcare professionals; accreditation agency personnel, including surveyors and healthcare consumers. Drawing on previous experience, the research team has developed purpose-designed tools. Data will be analysed using thematic, narrative and statistical (descriptive and inferential) procedures. Ethics and dissemination The University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the two studies (HREC 10274). Findings will be disseminated through seminars, conference presentations, academic publications and research partner websites. The findings will be formulated to facilitate uptake by policy and accreditation agency professionals, researchers and academics, and consumers, nationally and internationally. PMID:23059848

  12. Scalable Earth-observation Analytics for Geoscientists: Spacetime Extensions to the Array Database SciDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Marius; Lahn, Florian; Pebesma, Edzer; Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Today's amount of freely available data requires scientists to spend large parts of their work on data management. This is especially true in environmental sciences when working with large remote sensing datasets, such as obtained from earth-observation satellites like the Sentinel fleet. Many frameworks like SpatialHadoop or Apache Spark address the scalability but target programmers rather than data analysts, and are not dedicated to imagery or array data. In this work, we use the open-source data management and analytics system SciDB to bring large earth-observation datasets closer to analysts. Its underlying data representation as multidimensional arrays fits naturally to earth-observation datasets, distributes storage and computational load over multiple instances by multidimensional chunking, and also enables efficient time-series based analyses, which is usually difficult using file- or tile-based approaches. Existing interfaces to R and Python furthermore allow for scalable analytics with relatively little learning effort. However, interfacing SciDB and file-based earth-observation datasets that come as tiled temporal snapshots requires a lot of manual bookkeeping during ingestion, and SciDB natively only supports loading data from CSV-like and custom binary formatted files, which currently limits its practical use in earth-observation analytics. To make it easier to work with large multi-temporal datasets in SciDB, we developed software tools that enrich SciDB with earth observation metadata and allow working with commonly used file formats: (i) the SciDB extension library scidb4geo simplifies working with spatiotemporal arrays by adding relevant metadata to the database and (ii) the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) driver implementation scidb4gdal allows to ingest and export remote sensing imagery from and to a large number of file formats. Using added metadata on temporal resolution and coverage, the GDAL driver supports time-based ingestion of

  13. Post-traumatic stress disorder: a right temporal lobe syndrome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, B.; Leuthold, A. C.; Tan, H.-R. M.; Lewis, S. M.; Winskowski, A. M.; Dikel, T. N.; Georgopoulos, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    In a recent paper (Georgopoulos et al 2010 J. Neural Eng. 7 016011) we reported on the power of the magnetoencephalography (MEG)-based synchronous neural interactions (SNI) test to differentiate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects from healthy control subjects and to classify them with a high degree of accuracy. Here we show that the main differences in cortical communication circuitry between these two groups lie in the miscommunication of temporal and parietal and/or parieto-occipital right hemispheric areas with other brain areas. This lateralized temporal-posterior pattern of miscommunication was very similar but was attenuated in patients with PTSD in remission. These findings are consistent with observations (Penfield 1958 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 44 51-66, Penfield and Perot 1963 Brain 86 595-696, Gloor 1990 Brain 113 1673-94, Banceaud et al 1994 Brain 117 71-90, Fried 1997 J. Neuropsychiatry Clin. Neurosci. 9 420-8) that electrical stimulation of the temporal cortex in awake human subjects, mostly in the right hemisphere, can elicit the re-enactment and re-living of past experiences. Based on these facts, we attribute our findings to the re-experiencing component of PTSD and hypothesize that it reflects an involuntarily persistent activation of interacting neural networks involved in experiential consolidation.

  14. [Analysis of the citation of the articles published in National Journal of Andrology by SCI periodicals from 2002 to 2008].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai

    2009-03-01

    Science Citation Index (SCI) is one of the world's most important and influential information retrieval systems. Today Web of Science covers over 9000 international and regional journals and book series in every field of natural sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities. More and more Chinese periodicals have been cited by SCI. This paper briefly introduces the SCI database and its selection process and analyzes the citation of the articles published in National Journal of Andrology (NJA) by SCI journals from 2002 to 2008, aiming to provide some information for the internationalization of NJA.

  15. Acute Stress Symptoms in Children: Results From an International Data Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Rork, Kristine; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Kenardy, Justin; Kohser, Kristen L.; Landolt, Markus A.; Le Brocque, Robyne; Marsac, Meghan L.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nixon, Reginald D.V.; Bui, Eric; McGrath, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms and to examine proposed "DSM-5" symptom criteria in relation to concurrent functional impairment in children and adolescents. Method: From an international archive, datasets were identified that included assessment of acute traumatic stress reactions and…

  16. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hemorrhage. 4. Development of delivery system for the calcium alginate foam (a single foam formulation). 5. Development of delivery system for...the calcium alginate-fibrin sealant foam (a dual foam formulation). 6. Development of delivery system for the Barbasol-fibrin sealant foam (a...fibrin barrier that stops bleeding and acts as a scaffold for healing.1−4 During the healing process, the fibrin clot is enzymatically digested

  17. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    single foams in rabbits (tamponade carrier & FS foams separately) This Task currently is delayed. During the first year the rabbit noncompressible...fiber strand diameter could be found to provide excellent short-term mechanical stability and degradation in a few short days. Results are summarized...initially was hypothesized that a blend of PCL and PLA with an optimal fiber strand diameter could provide excellent short-term mechanical stability

  18. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerosis : Studies in Coronary Artery Disease Laboratory of Devendra K. Agrawal Creighton University School of Medicine Animal Model Of Coronary...Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Atherosclerosis Coronary Lumen Ischemia Myocardial Infarction http://medicine-science.com Stent Current

  19. Laparoscopically assisted repair of an acute traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, G; Slater, R; Garner, J P

    2013-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a heavy smoker and drinker presented to the emergency department with left-sided thoracoabdominal pain after falling down the stairs. Initial clinical findings were left-sided chest tenderness with no clinical evidence of subcutaneous emphysema. Twenty-four hours later the patient's respiratory distress increased—repeat chest X-ray showed a left gastrothorax indicative of a ruptured left hemi diaphragm. Diagnostic laparoscopy in the supine position via an umbilical port confirmed the presence of the stomach, spleen and splenic flexure of the colon in the left chest. Laparoscopic reduction of the stomach and colon was performed, but a small upper midline incision was required to reduce the spleen without injury. The diaphragmatic tear was repaired by direct open suture. The patient required a brief period of postoperative ventilation via a tracheostomy. The patient remained well at a 3-month follow-up visit. PMID:23813999

  20. Acute sports-related traumatic brain injury and repetitive concussion.

    PubMed

    Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Broglio, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are described as functional, not structural injuries, and therefore cannot be easily detected through standard diagnostic imaging. The vast differences between individual athletes makes identifying and evaluating sport-related concussion one of the most complex and perplexing injuries faced by medical personnel. The literature, as well as most consensus statements, supports the use of a multifaceted approach to concussion evaluation on the sideline of the athletic field. Using a standardized clinical examination that is supported by objective measures of concussion-related symptoms, cognitive function, and balance provides clinicians with the ability to track recovery in an objective manner. When used in combination, these tests allow for more informed diagnosis and treatment plan, which should involve a graduated return to play progression. Establishing a comprehensive emergency action plan that can guide the on-field management of a more serious and potentially catastrophic brain injury is also essential. This review will address these management issues, as well as the recent concerns about the risk of long-term neurologic conditions believed to be associated with repetitive concussion.

  1. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    hemostasis, liver injury, biologics, clotting factors, biomaterial, bandage, wound, noncompressible, incompressible 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Polymer Liver Injury Exsanguination 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY Summarize the progress during appropriate reporting period (single annual or...optimize the adhesion phenomena between the synthetic bandage/fibrin sealant device and the surface of liver , in the absence of endogenous clotting

  2. Acute non-traumatic spinal subdural haematoma: an unusual aetiology.

    PubMed

    Seizeur, Romuald; Ahmed, Seddik Sid; Simon, Alexandre; Besson, Gérard; Forlodou, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    We report an unusual case of a spinal subdural haematoma associated with a ruptured spinal aneurysm. The delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis of this rare entity can have disastrous consequences. We discuss various possible aetiologies and its association with spinal aneurysms.

  3. Acute Pharmacological DVT Prophylaxis after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Deep vein thromboses are a common occurrence following SCI. Administration of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) within 72 h of injury is recommended to minimize the occurrence of DVT. Furthermore, when surgical intervention is required, LMWH should be held the morning of surgery, and resumed within 24 h post-operatively. PMID:20795870

  4. What Makes Things Happen? Teacher's Guide. Unit B. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  5. Particles in Action. Teacher's Guide. Unit C2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  6. Purification and biochemical characterisation of human and murine stem cell inhibitors (SCI).

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Freshney, M G; Donaldson, D; Pragnell, I B

    1992-01-01

    We have recently characterised an inhibitor of haemopoietic stem cell proliferation (SCI/MIP-1 alpha) and report here on its purification and initial biological and biochemical characterisation. The activity can be detected by direct addition to the CFU-A stem cell assay and this simple test for inhibitory activity has greatly facilitated the purification of the molecule. The purification involves a combination of Mono Q ion exchange chromatography, heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography and Blue Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified stem cell inhibitor is an 8 kD peptide which is identical to the previously described peptide macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha. The peptide has a natural tendency to form large self-aggregates and appears, in physiological buffers, to have a native molecular weight of around 90 kD. SCI is a heat stable, protease sensitive protein which is half maximally active at between 10 and 25 pM in the CFU-A assay. The self-aggregates can be disrupted by dilute solutions of acetic acid and it appears that disruption increases the specific activity of SCI preparations. We also report the characterisation of the human homologue of the stem cell inhibitor (human SCI/MIP-1 alpha) which is 74% identical to murine MIP-1 alpha and which shares all the above features of the murine inhibitor.

  7. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur; DeTar, Carleton; Tousaint, Doug

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  8. Novel Target for Ameliorating Pain and Other Problems after SCI: Spontaneous Activityin Nociceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the function of a sodium ion channel, Nav1.8, that is selectively expressed in primary afferent neurons (especially nociceptors) ameliorate reflex...potent and selective Nav1.8 sodium channel blocker, attenuates neuropathic and inflammatory pain in the rat. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 104:8520–8525

  9. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  10. SciJourn is magic: construction of a science journalism community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Celeste R.

    2016-01-01

    This article is the first to describe the discoursal construction of an adolescent community of practice (CoP) in a non-school setting. CoPs can provide optimal learning environments. The adolescent community centered around science journalism and positioned itself dichotomously in relationship to school literacy practices. The analysis focuses on recordings from a panel-style research interview from an early implementation of the Science Literacy Through Science Journalism (SciJourn) project. Researchers trained high school students participating in a youth development program to write science news articles. Students engaged in the authentic practices of professional science journalists, received feedback from a professional editor, and submitted articles for publication. I used a fine-grained critical discourse analysis of genre, discourse, and style to analyze student responses about differences between writing in SciJourn and in school. Students described themselves as agentic in SciJourn and passive in school, using an academic writing discourse of deficit to describe schooling experiences. They affiliated with and defined a SciJourn CoP, constructing positive journalistic identities therein. Educators are encouraged to develop similar CoPs. The discursive features presented may be used to monitor the development of communities of practice in a variety of settings.

  11. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    2009. Patients with or without pressure ulcers were included. Patients with SCI due to terminal disease, multiple sclerosis of amyotrophic lateral ... sclerosis were excluded. A data extraction tool was used to compile information known to impact the development of pressure ulcers in persons with

  12. SciEthics Interactive: Science and Ethics Learning in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadolny, Larysa; Woolfrey, Joan; Pierlott, Matthew; Kahn, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Learning in immersive 3D environments allows students to collaborate, build, and interact with difficult course concepts. This case study examines the design and development of the TransGen Island within the SciEthics Interactive project, a National Science Foundation-funded, 3D virtual world emphasizing learning science content in the context of…

  13. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert

    2013-04-20

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems had high priority within DOE SC at the start of the second phase of the SciDAC program, SciDAC-2, as it continues to do so today. Achieving expected levels of performance on high-end computing (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing architectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, the University of Southern California?s Information Sciences Institute organized the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. Within PERI, USC?s primary research activity was automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity was spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and was based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other recent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our other major component was application engagement, to which we devoted approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with SciDAC-2 applications. This report is a summary of the overall results of the USC PERI effort.

  14. Evaluating soil organic C sequestration in the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index (SCI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models that are sensitive to management, edaphic factors, and climate could provide insightful probes of how land owners and producers might be able to sequester soil organic C and engage in emerging carbon markets. We used the soil conditioning index (SCI) embedded in the RUSLE2 model t...

  15. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Final report], September 1, 1991--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, E.; Diaz, O.; Cox, J.

    1994-12-31

    The program of SciTech Clubs for Girls and its progress are described. This is a program that promotes the learning of science and mathematics by girls in the age range of 9 to 13 years through the process of building exhibits and learning from local professionals. A list of exhibits and a critique of the program are given.

  16. Microlithography and resist technology information at your fingertips via SciFinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuk, Rengin; Macko, John R.; Staggenborg, Lisa

    1997-07-01

    Finding and retrieving the information you need about microlithography and resist technology in a timely fashion can make or break your competitive edge in today's business environment. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) provides the most complete and comprehensive database of the chemical literature in the CAplus, REGISTRY, and CASREACT files including 13 million document references, 15 million substance records and over 1.2 million reactions. This includes comprehensive coverage of positive and negative resist formulations and processing, photoacid generation, silylation, single and multilayer resist systems, photomasks, dry and wet etching, photolithography, electron-beam, ion-beam and x-ray lithography technologies and process control, optical tools, exposure systems, radiation sources and steppers. Journal articles, conference proceedings and patents related to microlithography and resist technology are analyzed and indexed by scientific information analysts with strong technical background in these areas. The full CAS database, which is updated weekly with new information, is now available at your desktop, via a convenient, user-friendly tool called 'SciFinder.' Author, subject and chemical substance searching is simplified by SciFinder's smart search features. Chemical substances can be searched by chemical structure, chemical name, CAS registry number or molecular formula. Drawing chemical structures in SciFinder is easy and does not require compliance with CA conventions. Built-in intelligence of SciFinder enables users to retrieve substances with multiple components, tautomeric forms and salts.

  17. The SciELO Open Access: A Gold Way from the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Abel L.

    2009-01-01

    Open access has long emphasized access to scholarly materials. However, open access can also mean access to the means of producing visible and recognized journals. This issue is particularly important in developing and emergent countries. The SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library On-line) project, first started in Brazil and, shortly afterward, in…

  18. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A; Nordenbo, Annette; Cameron, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled paroxysmal autonomic changes and posturing in the early post‐acute phase following limited success with conventional medication regimens. In two subjects, other medications were reduced or ceased without a recurrence of symptoms. It is proposed that medications that can block or minimise abnormal afferent stimuli may represent a better option for dysautonomia management than drugs which increase inhibition of efferent pathways. Potential mechanisms for these effects are discussed. PMID:17435191

  19. SciSpark's SRDD : A Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset for Multidimensional Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamuttam, R. S.; Wilson, B. D.; Mogrovejo, R. M.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGibbney, L. J.; Ramirez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data and climate model output are multi-dimensional arrays of massive sizes locked away in heterogeneous file formats (HDF5/4, NetCDF 3/4) and metadata models (HDF-EOS, CF) making it difficult to perform multi-stage, iterative science processing since each stage requires writing and reading data to and from disk. We have developed SciSpark, a robust Big Data framework, that extends ApacheTM Spark for scaling scientific computations. Apache Spark improves the map-reduce implementation in ApacheTM Hadoop for parallel computing on a cluster, by emphasizing in-memory computation, "spilling" to disk only as needed, and relying on lazy evaluation. Central to Spark is the Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD), an in-memory distributed data structure that extends the functional paradigm provided by the Scala programming language. However, RDDs are ideal for tabular or unstructured data, and not for highly dimensional data. The SciSpark project introduces the Scientific Resilient Distributed Dataset (sRDD), a distributed-computing array structure which supports iterative scientific algorithms for multidimensional data. SciSpark processes data stored in NetCDF and HDF files by partitioning them across time or space and distributing the partitions among a cluster of compute nodes. We show usability and extensibility of SciSpark by implementing distributed algorithms for geospatial operations on large collections of multi-dimensional grids. In particular we address the problem of scaling an automated method for finding Mesoscale Convective Complexes. SciSpark provides a tensor interface to support the pluggability of different matrix libraries. We evaluate performance of the various matrix libraries in distributed pipelines, such as Nd4jTM and BreezeTM. We detail the architecture and design of SciSpark, our efforts to integrate climate science algorithms, parallel ingest and partitioning (sharding) of A-Train satellite observations from model grids. These

  20. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80. The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved

  1. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies.

    PubMed

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael; Wring, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80 The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved comparably to CASP.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Challenge for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M.; Gable, Robert A.; Mohr, J. Darrell

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide information designed to enhance the knowledge and understanding of school personnel about traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors specifically define TBI and enumerate common characteristics associated with traumatic brain injury, discuss briefly the growth and type of services provided, and offer some…

  3. The Effects of Traumatic and Abusive Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzeck, Tricia L.; Rokach, Ami; Chin, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to understand what constitutes a traumatic relationship experience for adults in abusive intimate relationships and what effects, losses, and coping strategies were the most salient for these participants. A total of 101 individuals (42 males, 59 females) who reported experiencing an abusive or traumatic relationship…

  4. Traumatic Bonding: Clinical Implications in Incest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deYoung, Mary; Lowry, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    "Traumatic bonding" is defined as "the evolution of emotional dependency between...a child and an adult [in] a relationship characterized by periodic sexual abuse." Maintains that the concept holds promise for explaining confusing dynamics of incest. Demonstrates ways in which traumatic bonding can be applied to cases of incest…

  5. Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Ho, Chung-Han; Yu, Shou-Chun; Kao, Pei-Hsin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-01-01

    Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) may involve new-onset anxiety and depression post-discharge. However, long-term population-based studies have lacked access to follow-up conditions in terms of new-onset anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to estimate the long-term risk of new-onset anxiety and depression post-discharge. Methods The Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database was used in this study. Individuals with tSCI were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnostic codes of 806 and 952 from 1999–2008. The comparison cohort (other health conditions group) was randomly selected from the LHID2000 and was 1:1 matched by age, sex, index year, and comorbidities to reduce the selection bias. All study participants were retrospectively followed for a maximum of 3 years until the end of follow-up, death, or new-onset anxiety (ICD-9-CM: 309.2–309.4) or depression (ICD-9-CM: 296.2, 296.5, 296.82, 300.4, 309.0–309.1, and 311). Persons who were issued a catastrophic illness card for tSCI were categorized as having a severe level of SCI (Injury Severity Score [ISS] ≥16). Poisson regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratios of anxiety or depression between patients with tSCI and other health conditions. The relative risk of anxiety or depression was estimated using a Cox regression analysis, which was adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results Univariate analyses showed that the tSCI patients (n = 3556) had a 1.33 times greater incidence of new-onset anxiety or depression (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–1.57) compared to the other health conditions group (n = 3556). After adjusting for potential risk factors, the tSCI patients had a significant 1.29-fold increased risk of anxiety or depression compared to the group with other health conditions (95% CI: 1.09–1

  6. Acute pancreatitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is being encountered more often in children due to antimetabolite therapy, accidental injury, and traumatic battering. Pancreatitis may occur in the absence of traditionally elevated serum amylase and lipase, and initial diagnosis may depend upon ultrasonography. Traditional therapy of enteric rest with nasogastric suction has been supported by the use of parenteral nutrition. Newer pharmaceutical agents have been ineffective in altering the course of the illness or in preventing complications of pseudocyst or abscess. PMID:6382834

  7. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoo, Jeehyun; Kim, Il-Sun; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyejin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Hwang, Kyujin; Kim, Miri; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-01-01

    In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs) transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C), 1 (A → B), and 2 (B → D), whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B). Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), Registration Number: KCT0000879. PMID:26568892

  8. Science Classroom Inquiry (SCI) Simulations: A Novel Method to Scaffold Science Learning

    PubMed Central

    Peffer, Melanie E.; Beckler, Matthew L.; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students’ self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study. PMID:25786245

  9. Science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations: a novel method to scaffold science learning.

    PubMed

    Peffer, Melanie E; Beckler, Matthew L; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students' self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study.

  10. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms.

  11. Pulsed arterial spin labeling effectively and dynamically observes changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Ping; Li, Yi-Ning; Liu, Jun; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Zi-Shu; Zhou, Shun-Ke; Tao, Fang-Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Xue

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow is strongly associated with brain function, and is the main symptom and diagnostic basis for a variety of encephalopathies. However, changes in cerebral blood flow after mild traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. This study sought to observe changes in cerebral blood flow in different regions after mild traumatic brain injury using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Our results demonstrate maximal cerebral blood flow in gray matter and minimal in the white matter of patients with mild traumatic brain injury. At the acute and subacute stages, cerebral blood flow was reduced in the occipital lobe, parietal lobe, central region, subcutaneous region, and frontal lobe. Cerebral blood flow was restored at the chronic stage. At the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, changes in cerebral blood flow were not apparent in the insula. Cerebral blood flow in the temporal lobe and limbic lobe diminished at the acute and subacute stages, but was restored at the chronic stage. These findings suggest that pulsed arterial spin labeling can precisely measure cerebral blood flow in various brain regions, and may play a reference role in evaluating a patient's condition and judging prognosis after traumatic brain injury.

  12. Early traumatic events in psychopaths.

    PubMed

    Borja, Karina; Ostrosky, Feggy

    2013-07-01

    The relationship between diverse early traumatic events and psychopathy was studied in 194 male inmates. Criminal history transcripts were revised, and clinical interviews were conducted to determine the level of psychopathy using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) Form, and the Early Trauma Inventory was applied to assess the incidence of abuse before 18 years of age. Psychopathic inmates presented a higher victimization level and were more exposed to certain types of intended abuse than sociopathic inmates, while the sum of events and emotional abuse were associated with the PCL-R score. Our studies support the influence of early adverse events in the development of psychopathic offenders.

  13. Traumatic subarachnoid-pleural fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.; Stothert, J.C. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    Traumatic subarachnoid-pleural fistulas are rare. The authors found nine cases reported since 1959. Seven have been secondary to trauma and two following thoracotomy. One patient's death is thought to be directly related to the fistula. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients with a pleural effusion and associated vertebral trauma. The diagnosis can usually be confirmed with contrast or radioisotopic myelography. Successful closure of the fistula will usually occur spontaneously with closed tube drainage and antibiotics; occasionally, thoracotomy is necessary to close the rent in the dura.

  14. Hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Eva; Bernabeu, Ignacio; Castro, Ana I; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain (TBI) injury is widely variable in the literature; a meta-analysis determined a pooled prevalence of anterior hypopituitarism of 27.5%. Growth hormone deficiency is the most prevalent hormone insufficiency after TBI; however, the prevalence of each type of pituitary deficiency is influenced by the assays used for diagnosis, severity of head trauma, and time of evaluation. Recent studies have demonstrated improvement in cognitive function and cognitive quality of life with substitution therapy in GH-deficient patients after TBI.

  15. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  16. Update on the 2012 guidelines for the management of pediatric traumatic brain injury - information for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nina; Benzon, Hubert A; Vavilala, Monica S

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant contributor to death and disability in children. Considering the prevalence of pediatric TBI, it is important for the clinician to be aware of evidence-based recommendations for the care of these patients. The first edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents was published in 2003. The Guidelines were updated in 2012, with significant changes in the recommendations for hyperosmolar therapy, temperature control, hyperventilation, corticosteroids, glucose therapy, and seizure prophylaxis. Many of these interventions have implications in the perioperative period, and it is the responsibility of the anesthesiologist to be familiar with these guidelines.

  17. The Role of Markers of Inflammation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Thomas; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Within minutes of a traumatic impact, a robust inflammatory response is elicited in the injured brain. The complexity of this post-traumatic squeal involves a cellular component, comprising the activation of resident glial cells, microglia, and astrocytes, and the infiltration of blood leukocytes. The second component regards the secretion immune mediators, which can be divided into the following sub-groups: the archetypal pro-inflammatory cytokines (Interleukin-1, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Interleukin-6), the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, Interleukin-10, and TGF-beta), and the chemotactic cytokines or chemokines, which specifically drive the accumulation of parenchymal and peripheral immune cells in the injured brain region. Such mechanisms have been demonstrated in animal models, mostly in rodents, as well as in human brain. Whilst the humoral immune response is particularly pronounced in the acute phase following Traumatic brain injury (TBI), the activation of glial cells seems to be a rather prolonged effect lasting for several months. The complex interaction of cytokines and cell types installs a network of events, which subsequently intersect with adjacent pathological cascades including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, or reparative events including angiogenesis, scarring, and neurogenesis. It is well accepted that neuroinflammation is responsible of beneficial and detrimental effects, contributing to secondary brain damage but also facilitating neurorepair. Although such mediators are clear markers of immune activation, to what extent cytokines can be defined as diagnostic factors reflecting brain injury or as predictors of long term outcome needs to be further substantiated. In clinical studies some groups reported a proportional cytokine production in either the cerebrospinal fluid or intraparenchymal tissue with initial brain damage, mortality, or poor outcome scores. However, the validity of cytokines as biomarkers is not broadly accepted. This

  18. [Comparison and thinking on literatures of low back pain treated with acupuncture-moxibustion published in foreign SCI journals and domestic core journals].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Jun; Li, Rui

    2012-07-01

    The literatures of clinical research on acupuncture treatment of low back pain included in foreign SCI journals as well as the domestic core journals in the recent 10 years were collected in this article to discuss the divergence of views domestically and abroad. The result showed that acute and chronic back pain and low back pain were generally set as the targets of research abroad. While, diseases with western diagnosis such as lumbar disc herniation was often set as the study target by domestic researchers. It indicats that divergence existed in understanding and study methods between Chinese and foreign research fellows. Thus, comparison should be carried out so as to learn from the strong points of each other and close the gap.

  19. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Arciniegas, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Opinion statement Cognitive impairment is a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a substantial source of disability. Across all levels of TBI severity, attention, processing speed, episodic memory, and executive function are most commonly affected.The differential diagnosis for posttraumatic cognitive impairments is broad, and includes emotional, behavioral, and physical problems as well as substance use disorders, medical conditions, prescribed and self-administered medications, and symptom elaboration. Thorough neuropsychiatric assessment for such problems is a pre-requisite to treatments specifically targeting cognitive impairments.First-line treatments for posttraumatic cognitive impairments are non-pharmacologic, including education, realistic expectation setting, environmental and lifestyle modifications, and cognitive rehabilitation.Pharmacotherapies for posttraumatic cognitive impairments include uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) antagonists, medications that directly or indirectly augment cerebral catecholaminergic or acetylcholinergic function, or agents with combinations of these properties.In the immediate post-injury period, treatment with uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists reduces duration of unconsciousness. The mechanism for this effect may involve attenuation of neurotrauma-induced glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity and/or stabilization of glutamate signaling in the injured brain.During the sub-acute or late post-injury periods, medications that augment cerebral acetylcholinergic function may improve declarative memory. Among responders to this treatment, secondary benefits on attention, processing speed, and executive function impairments as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances may be observed. During these post-injury periods, medications that augment cerebral catecholaminergic function may improve hypoarousal, processing speed, attention, and/or executive function as well as comorbid depression or apathy

  20. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2, 40-50 nm) exacerbate pathophysiology of traumatic spinal cord injury and deteriorate functional outcome in the rat. An experimental study using pharmacological and morphological approaches.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Lafuente, José V

    2009-08-01

    Silicon (SiO2) nanoparticles or silica dust is quite common form of exposure to soldiers engaged in gulf war that may influence their health and brain function. It is quite likely that traumatic injuries to the CNS may be influenced by exposure to these nanoparticles. However, the details of silicon nanoparticles on human health functions are still unknown. In this investigation we examined the effects of chronic silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2, 40-50 nm) exposure on spinal cord injury (SCI) induced alterations on the functional outcome and the cord pathology in a rat model. Since nanoparticles induce oxidative stress, the influence of an antioxidant compound H-290/51 was also examined in these nanoparticles treated injured rats as well. Rats treated with SiO2 for 7 days did not show any significant alteration in behaviour on rota rod performances or on capacity angle tests. However, subjection of these nanoparticles exposed rats to SCI resulted in a profound deterioration in motor functions compared to normal rats with SCI. The magnitude of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption to Evans blue and radioiodine tracers and edema formation was much more aggravated following SCI in nanoparticles treated animals compared to untreated traumatized rats. Pretreatment with H-290/51 (50 mg/kg, p.o.) 30 min before SCI in nanoparticle treated rats did not alter spinal cord pathology or functional outcome, however, this dose of the compound was very effective in reducing pathophysiology of SCI in normal animals. These observations are the first to suggest that exposure of nanoparticles enhances the sensitivity of CNS to injuries and alter the effect of neuroprotective drugs.

  1. Mild Hyperthermia Worsens the Neuropathological Damage Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Atsushi; Atkins, Coleen M.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The effects of slight variations in brain temperature on the pathophysiological consequences of acute brain injury have been extensively described in models of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In contrast, limited information is available regarding the potential consequences of temperature elevations on outcome following mild TBI (mTBI) or concussions. One potential confounding variable with mTBI is the presence of elevated body temperature that occurs in the civilian or military populations due to hot environments combined with exercise or other forms of physical exertion. We therefore determined the histopathological effects of pre- and post-traumatic hyperthermia (39°C) on mTBI. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: pre/post-traumatic hyperthermia, post-traumatic hyperthermia alone for 2 h, and normothermia (37°C). The pre/post-hyperthermia group was treated with hyperthermia starting 15 min before mild parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (1.4–1.6 atm), with the temperature elevation extending for 2 h after trauma. At 72 h after mTBI, the rats were perfusion-fixed for quantitative histopathological evaluation. Contusion areas and volumes were significantly larger in the pre/post-hyperthermia treatment group compared to the post-hyperthermia and normothermic groups. In addition, pre/post-traumatic hyperthermia caused the most severe loss of NeuN-positive cells in the dentate hilus compared to normothermia. These neuropathological results demonstrate that relatively mild elevations in temperature associated with peri-traumatic events may affect the long-term functional consequences of mTBI. Because individuals exhibiting mildly elevated core temperatures may be predisposed to aggravated brain damage after mTBI or concussion, precautions should be introduced to target this important physiological variable. PMID:22026555

  2. Preclinical assessment for selectively disrupting a traumatic memory via post-retrieval inhibition of glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Taubenfeld, Stephen M.; Riceberg, Justin S.; New, Antonia S.; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Traumatic experiences may lead to debilitating psychiatric disorders including acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Current treatments for these conditions are largely ineffective; therefore, novel therapies are needed. A cardinal symptom of these pathologies is the re-experiencing of the trauma through intrusive memories and nightmares. Studies in animal models indicate that memories can be weakened by interfering with the post-retrieval re-stabilization process known as memory reconsolidation. We previously reported that, in rats, intra-amygdala injection of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486 disrupts the reconsolidation of a traumatic memory. Here we tested parameters important for designing novel clinical protocols targeting the reconsolidation of a traumatic memory with RU38486. Methods Using rat inhibitory avoidance, we tested the efficacy of post-retrieval systemic administration of RU38486 on subsequent memory retention and evaluated several key preclinical parameters. Results Systemic administration of RU38486 before or after retrieval persistently weakens IA memory retention in a dose-dependent manner, and memory does not re-emerge following footshock reminders. The efficacy of treatment is a function of the intensity of the initial trauma, and intense traumatic memories can be disrupted by changing the time and number of interventions. Furthermore, one or two treatments are sufficient to maximally disrupt the memory. The treatment selectively targets the reactivated memory without interfering with the retention of another non-reactivated memory. Conclusions RU38486 is a potential novel treatment for psychiatric disorders linked to traumatic memories. Our data provide the parameters for designing promising clinical trials for the treatment of flashback-type symptoms of PTSD. PMID:18708183

  3. Atoms and Molecules. Study Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a four-part unit…

  4. Using Electricity. Study Guide. Unit I2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  5. Understanding Electricity. Study Guide. Unit I1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidume, Kwashira

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  6. Ranking Business and Economics Journals in South America Using the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer K.; Pradenas, Lorena; Parada, Victor; Scherer, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Access to published research for knowledge creation and education in the administrative science disciplines in South America has been enhanced since the introduction of the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). Although SciELO has been available as an online journal indexing and publication service since 1998, there have been no…

  7. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  8. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  9. What Do You Know about Water? Study Guide. Unit D. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a three-part unit…

  10. Life, Beginning and Growing. Study Guide. Unit E1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a three-part unit…

  11. 32 CFR 147.32 - Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI levels and temporary eligibility for âQâ access authorization: For someone who is not the... Guidelines for Temporary Access § 147.32 Temporary eligibility for access at the top secret and SCI...

  12. Our Planet Earth. Teacher's Guide. Unit F1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities,…

  13. Reproducing by Flowers and Seeds. Study Guide. Unit E2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zesaguli, Josie

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and environmental laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide consists of…

  14. Sense from Senses. Study Guide. Unit J. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simango, Sam

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  15. Forces in Living Things. Study Guide. Unit H2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty; Zesaguli, Josie

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  16. Learning to be a Scientist. Study Guide. Unit A1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Sue

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide introduces students to…

  17. Living Things and Their Food. Study Guide. Unit G2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  18. Energy for Living. Study Guide. Unit G1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide includes activities and…

  19. Forces in Action. Study Guide. Unit H1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Peter

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  20. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  1. Interaction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with the membrane-binding domains following spinal cord injury (SCI): introduction of a mechanism for SCI repair.

    PubMed

    Rad, Iman; Khodayari, Kaveh; Hadi Alijanvand, Saeid; Mobasheri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-binding domains regulate positioning of the membrane proteins via specific interactions with phospholipid's head groups. Spinal cord injury (SCI) diminishes the integrity of neural fiber membranes at nanoscopic level. In cases that the ruptured zone size is beyond the natural resealing ability, there is a need for reinforcing factors such as polymers (e.g. Polyethylene glycol) to patch the dismantled axoplasm. Certain conserved sequential and structural patterns of interacting residues specifically bind to PEGs. It is also found that PEG600, PEG400 and PEG200 share the strongest interaction with the lipid-binding domains even more successful than phospholipid head groups. The alpha helix structure composed of hydrophobic, neutral and acidic residues prepares an opportunity for PEG400 to play an amphipathic role in the interaction with injured membrane. This in-silico study introduces a mechanism for PEG restorative ability at the molecular level. It is believed that PEG400 interrelates the injured membrane to their underneath axoplasm while retaining the integrity of ruptured membrane via interaction with ENTH domains of membrane proteins. This privilege of PEG400 in treating injured membrane must be considered in designing of polymeric biomaterials that are introduced for SCI repair.

  2. Infrared pupillometry, the Neurological Pupil index and unilateral pupillary dilation after traumatic brain injury: implications for treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jefferson William; Vakil-Gilani, Kiana; Williamson, Kay Lyn; Cecil, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    Pupillary dysfunction, a concerning finding in the neurologic examination of the patient with an acute traumatic brain injury often dictates the subsequent treatment paradigm. Patients were monitored closely with an infrared pupillometer, with NPi technology, for acute changes in pupillary function. NPi technology applies a scalar value to pupillary function. A retrospective chart review was performed of traumatic brain injury patients with acute unilateral pupillary dilation, admitted to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center's NeuroTrauma Unit, Portland, OR, and followed as outpatients, between January 2012 and December 2013. Clinical exam findings of pupillary size, NPi scores, and brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography images were analyzed. Five traumatic brain injury patients were identified with unilateral pupillary dysfunction with long-term follow-up after the initial injury. Each patient was monitored closely in the trauma bay for neurological deterioration with a pupillometer and the clinical exam. Two patients underwent subsequent intracranial pressure monitoring based on a deteriorating clinical scenario, including consistent abnormal unilateral NPi scores. One patient with consistent abnormal NPi scores and an improved clinical exam did not undergo invasive interventions. Two patients showed early improvement in NPi scores correlating with the normalization of their pupillary reactivity. Anisocoria improved in all patients despite concurrent abnormal NPi scores. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography imaging studies, with a focus on the third nerve, revealed focal abnormalities consistent with the clinical findings. A unilateral blown pupil and abnormal NPi score in a traumatic brain injury patient are not necessarily indicative of intracranial pressure issues, and must be correlated with the entire clinical scenario, to determine the etiology of the third nerve injury and direct potential therapeutic interventions. Early NPi score

  3. Preconditioning for traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yokobori, Shoji; Mazzeo, Anna T; Hosein, Khadil; Gajavelli, Shyam; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is now focused on the prevention of primary injury and reduction of secondary injury. However, no single effective treatment is available as yet for the mitigation of traumatic brain damage in humans. Both chemical and environmental stresses applied before injury, have been shown to induce consequent protection against post-TBI neuronal death. This concept termed “preconditioning” is achieved by exposure to different pre-injury stressors, to achieve the induction of “tolerance” to the effect of the TBI. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this “tolerance” phenomenon are not fully understood in TBI, and therefore even less information is available about possible indications in clinical TBI patients. In this review we will summarize TBI pathophysiology, and discuss existing animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of preconditioning in diffuse and focal type of TBI. We will also review other non-TBI preconditionng studies, including ischemic, environmental, and chemical preconditioning, which maybe relevant to TBI. To date, no clinical studies exist in this field, and we speculate on possible futureclinical situation, in which pre-TBI preconditioning could be considered. PMID:24323189

  4. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Arjunan Muthu; Sundar, Gangadhara; Chye, Lim Thiam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current literature on investigation and management of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), propose recommendations for diagnosis and management, and explore novel future treatments. TON, though uncommon, causes substantial visual loss. Without clear guidelines, there is much ambiguity regarding its diagnosis and management. Investigation and treatment (conservative, medical, surgical, and combined) vary widely between centers. Electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PROSPERO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for content that matched “Traumatic optic neuropathy.” Articles with abstracts and full text available, published in the past 10 years, written English and limited to human adults, were selected. All study designs were acceptable except case reports and case series with fewer 10 patients. All abstracts were then evaluated for relevance. References of these studies were evaluated and if also relevant, included. A total of 2,686 articles were retrieved and 43 examined for relevance. Of these, 23 articles were included. TON is a clinical diagnosis. Visual-evoked potential is useful in diagnosis and prognosis. Computed tomography demonstrates canal fractures and concomitant injuries. Magnetic resonance images should be reserved for select and stable patients. Conservative treatment is appropriate in mild TON. Steroids are of questionable benefit and may be harmful. Surgery should be reserved for patients with radiological evidence of compression and individualized. PMID:25709751

  5. Preconditioning for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, Shoji; Mazzeo, Anna T; Hosein, Khadil; Gajavelli, Shyam; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bullock, M Ross

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is now focused on the prevention of primary injury and reduction of secondary injury. However, no single effective treatment is available as yet for the mitigation of traumatic brain damage in humans. Both chemical and environmental stresses applied before injury have been shown to induce consequent protection against post-TBI neuronal death. This concept termed "preconditioning" is achieved by exposure to different pre-injury stressors to achieve the induction of "tolerance" to the effect of the TBI. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this "tolerance" phenomenon are not fully understood in TBI, and therefore even less information is available about possible indications in clinical TBI patients. In this review, we will summarize TBI pathophysiology, and discuss existing animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of preconditioning in diffuse and focal type of TBI. We will also review other non-TBI preconditioning studies, including ischemic, environmental, and chemical preconditioning, which maybe relevant to TBI. To date, no clinical studies exist in this field, and we speculate on possible future clinical situations, in which pre-TBI preconditioning could be considered.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  7. [Hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury: diagnostic and therapeutic issues].

    PubMed

    Lecoq, A-L; Chanson, P

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a well-known public health problem worldwide and is a leading cause of death and disability, particularly in young adults. Besides neurological and psychiatric issues, pituitary dysfunction can also occur after TBI, in the acute or chronic phase. The exact prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism is difficult to assess due to the wide heterogeneity of published studies and bias in interpretation of hormonal test results in this specific population. Predictive factors for hypopituitarism have been proposed and are helpful for the screening. The pathophysiology of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is not well understood but the vascular hypothesis is privileged. Activation of pituitary stem/progenitor cells is probably involved in the recovery of pituitary functions. Those cells also play a role in the induction of pituitary tumors, highlighting their crucial place in pituitary conditions. This review updates the current data related to anterior pituitary dysfunction after TBI and discusses the bias and difficulties encountered in its diagnosis.

  8. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  9. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reifschneider, Kent; Auble, Bethany A.; Rose, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life. PMID:26287247

  10. GENESIS SciFlo: Enabling Multi-Instrument Atmospheric Science Using Grid Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Tang, B.; Manipon, G.; Yunck, T.; Fetzer, E.; Braverman, A.; Dobinson, E.

    2004-12-01

    The General Earth Science Investigation Suite (GENESIS) project is a NASA-sponsored partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, academia, and NASA data centers to develop a new suite of web services tools to facilitate multi-sensor investigations in Earth System Science. The goal of GENESIS is to enable large-scale, multi-instrument atmospheric science using combined datasets from the AIRS, MODIS, MISR, and GPS sensors. Investigations will include cross-comparison of spaceborne climate sensors, cloud spectral analysis, study of upper troposphere-strato-sphere water transport, study of the aerosol indirect cloud effect, and global climate model validation. The challenges are to bring together very large datasets, reformat and understand the individual instrument retrievals, co-register or re-grid the retrieved physical parameters, perform computationally-intensive data fusion and data mining operations, and accumulate complex statistics over months to years of data. To meet these challenges, we are developing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data access, subsetting, registration, mining, fusion, compression, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a system for Scientific Knowledge Creation on the Grid using a Semantically-Enabled Dataflow Execution Environment. SciFlo leverages Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) Web Services and the Grid Computing standards (Globus Alliance toolkits), and enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling reusable web services and executable operators into a distributed computing flow (operator tree). The SciFlo client & server engines optimize the execution of such distributed data flows and allow the user to transparently find and use datasets and operators without worrying about the actual location of the Grid resources. The scientist injects a distributed computation into the Grid by simply filling out

  11. GeoSciGraph: An Ontological Framework for EarthCube Semantic Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Schachne, A.; Condit, C.; Valentine, D.; Richard, S.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2015-12-01

    The CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geosciences Interoperability) project compiles an inventory of a wide variety of earth science resources including documents, catalogs, vocabularies, data models, data services, process models, information repositories, domain-specific ontologies etc. developed by research groups and data practitioners. We have developed a multidisciplinary semantic framework called GeoSciGraph semantic ingration of earth science resources. An integrated ontology is constructed with Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as its upper ontology and currently ingests multiple component ontologies including the SWEET ontology, GeoSciML's lithology ontology, Tematres controlled vocabulary server, GeoNames, GCMD vocabularies on equipment, platforms and institutions, software ontology, CUAHSI hydrology vocabulary, the environmental ontology (ENVO) and several more. These ontologies are connected through bridging axioms; GeoSciGraph identifies lexically close terms and creates equivalence class or subclass relationships between them after human verification. GeoSciGraph allows a community to create community-specific customizations of the integrated ontology. GeoSciGraph uses the Neo4J,a graph database that can hold several billion concepts and relationships. GeoSciGraph provides a number of REST services that can be called by other software modules like the CINERGI information augmentation pipeline. 1) Vocabulary services are used to find exact and approximate terms, term categories (community-provided clusters of terms e.g., measurement-related terms or environmental material related terms), synonyms, term definitions and annotations. 2) Lexical services are used for text parsing to find entities, which can then be included into the ontology by a domain expert. 3) Graph services provide the ability to perform traversal centric operations e.g., finding paths and neighborhoods which can be used to perform ontological operations like

  12. Patients "At Risk" of Suffering from Persistent Complaints after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Coping, Mood Disorders, and Post-Traumatic Stress.

    PubMed

    Scheenen, Myrthe E; Spikman, Jacoba M; de Koning, Myrthe E; van der Horn, Harm J; Roks, Gerwin; Hageman, Gerard; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Although most patients recover fully following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), a minority (15-25%) of all patients develop persistent post-traumatic complaints (PTC) that interfere with the resumption of previous activities. An early identification of patients who are at risk for PTC is currently performed by measuring the number of complaints in the acute phase. However, only part of this group will actually develop persisting complaints, stressing the need for studies on additional risk factors. This study aimed to compare this group of patients with many complaints with patients with few and no complaints to identify potential additional discriminating characteristics and to evaluate which of these factors have the most predictive value for being at risk. We evaluated coping style, presence of psychiatric history, injury characteristics, mood-related symptoms, and post-traumatic stress. We included 820 patients (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13-15) admitted to three level-1 trauma centers as part of the UPFRONT-study. At 2 weeks after injury, 60% reported three or more complaints (PTC-high), 25% reported few complaints (PTC-low), and 15% reported no complaints (PTC-zero). Results showed that PTC-high consisted of more females (78% vs. 73% and 52%, p < 0.001), were more likely to have a psychiatric history (7% vs. 2% and 5%), and had a higher number of reported depression (22% vs. 6% and 3%, p < 0.001), anxiety (25% vs. 7% and 5%), and post-traumatic stress (37% vs. 27% and 19%, p < 0.001) than the PTC-low and PTC-zero groups. We conclude that in addition to reported complaints, psychological factors such as coping style, depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress symptoms had the highest predictive value and should be taken into account in the identification of at-risk patients for future treatment studies.

  13. Assessing Traumatic Event Exposure: Comparing the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to the Structured Clinical Interview for "DSM-IV"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Jessica M.; Burke, Christopher K.; Stoller, Kenneth B.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Brooner, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis requires first identifying a traumatic event, but very few studies have evaluated methods of potential traumatic event assessment and their impact on PTSD diagnosis. The authors compared a behaviorally specific comprehensive multiple-item traumatic event measure with a single-item measure to…

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  15. [Early childhood violent and sexual traumatization].

    PubMed

    Heigl-Evers, A; Kruse, J

    1991-04-01

    Violent and sexual child abuse represents an extreme traumatization that can continue to influence the lives of affected children into adulthood. Freud (1917) provided a concept of the influence of this extreme form of traumatization in his model of the traumatic neurosis. It is described as an after-the-fact attempt to master the flood of sensations that characterizes the trauma. More recent theoretical models identify a collapse of the ego during trauma as well as the effects of this collapse on the formation of self and object representants at the heart of the traumatic event. As a result of the collapse of the ego during trauma, the traumatized individual does not succeed in forming mature memories of the experience. Immature memories of trauma are marked by, among other things, very diffuse, near physical feelings that cannot be integrated into the ego (Cohen 1980). From the perspective of object relation theories, the lack of integration of "bad" and "good" self of the traumatized individual is emphasized by the abuser. Drawing on case studies, the authors illuminate the importance of the principle of the answer (Heigl-Evers/Heigl 1979, 1983) to the efforts to differentiate and integrate in the treatment of extremely traumatized patients.

  16. [Supporting a teenager confronted with a traumatic experience].

    PubMed

    Merchin, Clara; Benoit de Coignac, Agathe; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Everyone reacts differently to a traumatic event. There is a risk of underestimating a teenager's traumatic experience by considering only the usual post-traumatic stress diagnosis criteria. However, when the trauma has not been able to be sufficiently developed, the adolescent's suffering is revealed through their behaviour. The therapeutic support of the youngster and their family enables them to reposition the traumatic event within the continuity of their history and to relaunch a thought process, often frozen by the traumatic experience.

  17. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Burg, Matthew M; Soufer, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling condition that develops consequent to trauma exposure such as natural disasters, sexual assault, automobile accidents, and combat that independently increases risk for early incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular (CV) mortality by over 50 % and incident hypertension risk by over 30 %. While the majority of research on PTSD and CVD has concerned initially healthy civilian and military veteran samples, emerging research is also demonstrating that PTSD consequent to the trauma of an acute cardiac event significantly increases risk for early recurrence and mortality and that patient experiences in the clinical pathway that are related to the emergency department environment may provide an opportunity to prevent PTSD onset and thus improve outcomes. Future directions for clinical and implementation science concern broad PTSD and trauma screening in the context of primary care medical environments and the testing of PTSD treatments with CVD-related surrogates and endpoints.

  18. Acknowledging the Risk for Traumatic Brain Injury in Women Veterans.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Timothy; Iverson, Katherine M

    2017-04-01

    Since the Iraq and Afghanistan wars began, an unprecedented number of women have been engaging in combat operations. Likewise, the number of women using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) services has doubled since 2001. Military service, and deployment to combat in particular, poses certain risks for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-for all service members. However, women may have additional military and nondeployment risk factors such as intimate partner violence (IPV). We briefly review the definition and classification issues related to TBI, as well as common acute and chronic health symptoms after TBI. Specific sex differences in prognosis after TBI, in particular the neurobehavioral symptoms, are also reviewed. We then focus on the emerging literature regarding TBI in women veterans including the etiologies, outcomes, and unique challenges this population faces. The article concludes with suggestions for enhanced screening by VA and non-VA providers alike, as well as directions for future research and clinical inquiry.

  19. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Characteristic Features, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    ARAKI, Takashi; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki; MORITA, Akio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. Pediatric TBI is associated with several distinctive characteristics that differ from adults and are attributable to age-related anatomical and physiological differences, pattern of injuries based on the physical ability of the child, and difficulty in neurological evaluation in children. Evidence suggests that children exhibit a specific pathological response to TBI with distinct accompanying neurological symptoms, and considerable efforts have been made to elucidate their pathophysiology. In addition, recent technical advances in diagnostic imaging of pediatric TBI has facilitated accurate diagnosis, appropriate treatment, prevention of complications, and helped predict long-term outcomes. Here a review of recent studies relevant to important issues in pediatric TBI is presented, and recent specific topics are also discussed. This review provides important updates on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and age-appropriate acute management of pediatric TBI. PMID:28111406

  20. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  1. Traumatic Labyrinthine Concussion in a Patient with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramonte, R.; Bonfiglio, M.; D'Amore, A.; Viglianesi, A.; Cavallaro, T.; Chiaramonte, I.

    2013-01-01

    Blunt head trauma without any temporal bone fracture or longitudinal temporal bone fracture, with an associated fracture of the labyrinth may cause labyrinthine injury with sensor neural hearing loss and vertigo because of a concussive injury to the membranous labyrinth. Sudden sensory neural hearing loss is relatively frequent. In most cases, the etiology is not discovered. One of the possible causes for sudden deafness is inner labyrinth bleeding or concussion, which were difficult to diagnose before the advent of magnetic resonance imaging. Vertigo without a demonstrable fracture may also be the result of labyrinthine concussion, cupololithiasis and perilymphatic fistula. We describe the clinical case of a patient with acute traumatic hearing loss and vertigo, without skull base fracture detected on computed tomography. Magnetic resonance study was also performed. We have integrated the discussion with features that allow the differential diagnosis from other similar conditions. PMID:23859168

  2. SCiP at 35: an idiosyncratic history of the society for computers in psychology.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Christopher R

    2006-05-01

    SCiP history may be divided into three eras: the Paleozoic (1971-1982), the Mesozoic (1982-1994), and the Cenozoic (1994-present). Following a list of Secretary-Treasurers, a list of all SCiP Presidents is provided in Table 1. Next I present personal highlights, including the first symposium on psychology and the World-Wide Web; David Rumelhart's mathematical explanation of connectionism; and Stevan Hamad's discussion of "freeing" the journal literature. I observe that a small conference is becoming more intimate and that much of our mission involves figuring out how to conduct high-quality scientific research with consumer-grade electronics. I argue that we are an increasingly international organization, that graduate students are welcome, and that we should become more inclusive in the areas of gender and ethnicity and should make membership more meaningful I conclude by looking ahead and attempting to predict the future.

  3. Simulations with SCI as a data carrier in data acquisition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, E.H. Univ. of Oslo . Dept. of Physics); Bothner, J.W.; Hulaas, T.I.; Skaali, T.B. ); Rongved, E. )

    1994-02-01

    Detailed simulations of processor networks based on the Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) show that SCI is suitable as data carrier in data acquisition systems where the total bandwidth need is in the multi GBytes/s range and a low latency is required. The objective of these simulations was to find topologies with low latency and high bandwidth, but also with the cost of implementation in mind. A ring-to-ring bridge has been used as the building element for the networks. The simulations have been performed on regular k-ary n-cubes type topologies from a few tens of nodes and up to about 500 nodes under different load conditions. Among the parameters which has been manipulated in the simulations are the number of nodes, topology structure, number of outstanding requests and load in the system.

  4. Assembling Large, Multi-Sensor Climate Datasets Using the SciFlo Grid Workflow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Fetzer, E.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is the world's most ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the A-Train platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over periods of years to decades. However, moving from predominantly single-instrument studies to a multi-sensor, measurement-based model for long-duration analysis of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and data fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another instrument (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the cloud scenes from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over years of AIRS data. To perform such an analysis, one must discover & access multiple datasets from remote sites, find the space/time matchups between instruments swaths and model grids, understand the quality flags and uncertainties for retrieved physical variables, and assemble merged datasets for further scientific and statistical analysis. To meet these large-scale challenges, we are utilizing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data query, access, subsetting, co-registration, mining, fusion, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a semantically-enabled ("smart") Grid Workflow system that ties together a peer-to-peer network of computers into an efficient engine for distributed computation. The SciFlo workflow engine enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling remotely-invokable Web Services (SOAP or http GET URLs), native executables, command-line scripts, and Python codes into a distributed computing flow. A scientist visually authors the graph of operation in the VizFlow GUI, or uses a

  5. Assembling Large, Multi-Sensor Climate Datasets Using the SciFlo Grid Workflow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B.; Manipon, G.; Xing, Z.; Fetzer, E.

    2009-04-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is an ambitious facility for studying global climate change. The mandate now is to combine measurements from the instruments on the "A-Train" platforms (AIRS, AMSR-E, MODIS, MISR, MLS, and CloudSat) and other Earth probes to enable large-scale studies of climate change over periods of years to decades. However, moving from predominantly single-instrument studies to a multi-sensor, measurement-based model for long-duration analysis of important climate variables presents serious challenges for large-scale data mining and data fusion. For example, one might want to compare temperature and water vapor retrievals from one instrument (AIRS) to another instrument (MODIS), and to a model (ECMWF), stratify the comparisons using a classification of the "cloud scenes" from CloudSat, and repeat the entire analysis over years of AIRS data. To perform such an analysis, one must discover & access multiple datasets from remote sites, find the space/time "matchups" between instruments swaths and model grids, understand the quality flags and uncertainties for retrieved physical variables, assemble merged datasets, and compute fused products for further scientific and statistical analysis. To meet these large-scale challenges, we are utilizing a Grid computing and dataflow framework, named SciFlo, in which we are deploying a set of versatile and reusable operators for data query, access, subsetting, co-registration, mining, fusion, and advanced statistical analysis. SciFlo is a semantically-enabled ("smart") Grid Workflow system that ties together a peer-to-peer network of computers into an efficient engine for distributed computation. The SciFlo workflow engine enables scientists to do multi-instrument Earth Science by assembling remotely-invokable Web Services (SOAP or http GET URLs), native executables, command-line scripts, and Python codes into a distributed computing flow. A scientist visually authors the graph of operation in the Viz

  6. (18)F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury.

    PubMed

    von Leden, Ramona E; Selwyn, Reed G; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2016-05-16

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel biomarker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [(18)F] Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24h and 15days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6h post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24h and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target.

  7. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  8. Psychosocial and Behavioral Factors Associated with Bowel and Bladder Management after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    family in the Jersey Shore and we stopped in Hershey, Pennsylvania. We stopped there for the night and we were thinking we’d go tour the chocolate ... mood , going out into the community and taking care of bowel and bladder dysfunction. The study is asking persons with SCI (civilians and veterans) and...You will also complete a series of questionnaires about your mood , the quality of care you get, and you bowel and bladder program and any specific

  9. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    loss or to induce new bone formation following SCI, although the risk is high in this population of osteoporosis -related bone fracture. This study...aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower extremities caused by spinal cord injuries can be slowed or reversed with a combination of an... exercise that simulates weight-bearing and a bisphosphonate medication. 70 Individuals with T3-12 spinal cord injuries will be enrolled in a 12-month

  10. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  11. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  12. Improvement in student science proficiency through InSciEd out.

    PubMed

    Pierret, Chris; Sonju, James D; Leicester, Jean E; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K-8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5(th) and 8(th) grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools.

  13. Improvement in Student Science Proficiency Through InSciEd Out

    PubMed Central

    Sonju, James D.; Leicester, Jean E.; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K–8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5th and 8th grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools. PMID:23244687

  14. The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and the Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, T.; Imamura, H.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Takagi, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shirai, K.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hayabusa2 is a sample return mission of JAXA launched on 3 December 2014. Hayabusa2 is the successor of Hayabusa, which returned samples from the asteroid Itokawa to the Earth. Although the design of Hayabusa2 follows that of Hayabusa, the former is equipped with some new components. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) is one of those components. The SCI is a compact kinetic impactor designed to remove the asteroid surface regolith locally and create an artificial crater. One of the most important scientific objectives of Hayabusa2 is to investigate the chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures of the target body, asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 will attempt to observe the resultant crater with some scientific instruments and to get samples from around the crater. High kinetic energy is required to create a meaningful crater, however, the impact system design needs to fit within strict constraints. Complicated functions, such as a guidance and control system, are not permitted. A special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impactor of the SCI in order to make system simpler. Using this explosion technique makes it possible to accelerate the impactor very quickly and to hit the asteroid without a guidance system. However, the impact operation will be complicated because the explosive is very powerful and it scatters high-speed debris at the detonation. This paper describes an overview of the SCI system, the results of the development testing and an outline of the impact experiment of the Hayabusa2 mission.

  15. Obesity/Overweight in Persons With Early and Chronic SCI: A Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Lifestyle Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    modeled after the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) on obesity and component disease risks. The TLI consists of a 6-month clinical program...clinical trial (RCT) conducted at 2 SCI rehabilitation research centers and a Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. The study is modeled after the Diabetes ...Prevention Program (DPP), an NIH-sponsored 27-center RCT that reported a sustained 7% body weight reduction in pre- diabetic individuals accompanied by

  16. Pressure Relief Behaviors and Weight Shifting Activities to Prevent Pressure Ulcers in Persons with SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen Sprigle, PhD, PT CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Tech Research Corporation Atlanta GA 30332-0001 REPORT DATE...AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Georgia Tech Research Corporation 505 10th St NW Atlanta GA 30332-0001 9...activities in persons with SCI Submitted to and Approved by: - Georgia Tech , Shepherd Center, Kessler have each approved the protocol - HRPO

  17. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support. From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73–26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006). Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic and non-traumatic brachial plexopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yiru Lorna; Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Dubey, Niraj; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset brachial plexopathy can be classified into traumatic and non-traumatic aetiologies. Traumatic brachial plexopathies can affect the pre- or postganglionic segments of the plexus. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies may be due to neoplasia, radiotherapy, thoracic outlet syndrome and idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to localise the area of injury or disease, and identify the likely cause. This review discusses some of the common causes of adult-onset brachial plexopathy and their imaging features on MRI. We also present a series of cases to illustrate some of these causes and their MRI findings. PMID:27779278

  20. Neuroprotection by Estrogen and Progesterone in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Boyko, Matthew; Kutz, Ruslan; Zlotnik, Alexander; Klein, Moti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence demonstrating the neuroprotective effects of estrogen and progesterone after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). In humans, women have been shown to have a lower incidence of morbidity and mortality after TBI compared with age-matched men. Similarly, numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated that estrogen and progesterone administration is associated with a mortality reduction, improvement in neurological outcomes, and a reduction in neuronal apoptosis after TBI and SCI. Here, we review the evidence that supports hormone-related neuroprotection and discuss possible underlying mechanisms. Estrogen and progesterone-mediated neuroprotection are thought to be related to their effects on hormone receptors, signaling systems, direct antioxidant effects, effects on astrocytes and microglia, modulation of the inflammatory response, effects on cerebral blood flow and metabolism, and effects on mediating glutamate excitotoxicity. Future laboratory research is needed to better determine the mechanisms underlying the hormones’ neuroprotective effects, which will allow for more clinical studies. Furthermore, large randomized clinical control trials are needed to better assess their role in human neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26955967