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Sample records for acute unilateral vestibular

  1. Vestibular Perception following Acute Unilateral Vestibular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sian; Kaski, Diego; Cutfield, Nicholas; Seemungal, Barry; Golding, John F.; Gresty, Michael; Glasauer, Stefan; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP) system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO) and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) acutely (2 days after onset) and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks). Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s2). We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any ‘perceptual noise’ added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced – asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  2. Why acute unilateral vestibular cortex lesions mostly manifest without vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-04-21

    The aim of the current study was, first, to determine the critical causative vestibular areas that in exceptional cases manifest with transient vertigo or dizziness in acute strokes of the middle cerebral artery, and second, to try to explain why in most cases unilateral lesions of these areas manifest without vertigo. We determined the ischemic areas of the 10 published cases by overlapping the CT/MRI lesions and attributed them to the temporoparietal vestibular network. These overlap areas were located either in the posterior retroinsular cortex (n = 8), i.e., the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, or the separate parietal vestibular cortex (n = 2). Thus, rare vestibular cortical vertigo is mostly elicited by acute lesions of the core region of the retroinsular vestibular network. However, the more interesting question is related to the lack of cortical vertigo when this area is affected. We propose a concept to explain how the unaffected opposite hemisphere can suppress vertigo. This is based on visual-vestibular interaction for motion perception and orientation. It is the hemisphere in which vestibular and visual inputs are in agreement, which is the more reliable and determines the global perception of body orientation and motion. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Vestibular perceptual thresholds to angular rotation in acute unilateral vestibular paresis and with galvanic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Cousins, Sian; Seemungal, Barry M; Gresty, Michael A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2011-09-01

    Studies of compensation of injury to the human vestibular system have, in the main, focused on the vestibular-ocular reflex. Probing vestibular perception allows more of the sensory pathway to be assessed. We present a novel paradigm for simultaneously testing vestibular perceptual and nystagmic thresholds to angular acceleration around an earth vertical axis. The perceptual thresholds can be modulated asymmetrically in normal subjects by DC galvanic stimulation with the head flexed in the roll plane, as expected from the main torsional plane of action of the galvanic stimulus. The perceptual and nystagmic thresholds were bilaterally elevated in acute vestibular neuritis, a unilateral condition, possibly due to central suppression of vestibular input. The degree of asymmetry in thresholds was small in comparison with the large caloric asymmetry present in the patients, indicating a relatively preserved capacity for near-threshold performance of the non-damaged labyrinth both in the "on" and "off" directions.

  4. [Acute unilateral total deafness and vestibular findings after gunshot noise].

    PubMed

    Psillas, G; Constantinidis, J; Triaridis, S; Vital, V

    2007-12-01

    Acute acoustic trauma is usually acquired during military service after exposure to impulse or blast wave noise. The typical audiometric shape is a notch centered at about 4 kHz with some recovery above this frequency. This is the first case of an immediate induced unilateral total hearing loss in a young soldier following exposure to gunfire noise. A 25-year-old right-handed army officer during military training, after realizing a series of five shots with a rifle (G3), immediately experienced on the right ear otalgia, tinnitus and severe hearing loss, without imbalance or dizziness. The pure tone audiogram revealed a cophosis on the right ear without any residual remnants. In order to estimate the extent of the labyrinth damage, a caloric test and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were performed, which were both abnormal. The possible mechanical and metabolic damage effects on the cochlea from the intense gunfire noise were discussed. As the caloric test showed directional preponderance and the VEMPs were totally abolished, it has been concluded that the saccule and to a lesser degree the posterior labyrinth have been also found affected. The importance of wearing hearing protectors such as ear plugs and ear muffs during exposure to intense noise was underlined.

  5. Postural responses without versus with acute external cervical spine fixation: a comparative study in healthy subjects and patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Bohne, Silvia; Heine, Sabrina; Volk, G Fabian; Stadler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Using a diagnostic prospective cohort single center study design, the influence of a cervical collar on standing balance during dynamic postural perturbations in healthy adults and patients with acute unilateral vestibular dysfunction was measured in 31 healthy subjects and 27 patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss. The main outcome measures were completed standard protocols on the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and Motor Control Test (MCT) of the NeuroCom Equitest(®) computerized posturography platform measured without and with acute cervical fixation, respectively. Paired t test showed no significant difference during the six conditions of neither the SOT scores nor analyzing the SOT strategies or during the MCT between the non-fixed and fixed neck in healthy subjects and in the patients (all p > 0.05). Older healthy subjects showed decreased SOT scores but equal MCT results. The age effect was more dominant in the patients when wearing the collar. Gender had no influence whether in healthy individuals nor in patients. In almost all conditions of the SOT but only in some MCT subtests patients had significantly lower scores than healthy subjects without collar and with collar (all p < 0.05). In conclusion, the SOT but only some subtest of the MCT could clearly distinguish between healthy adults and patient with acute unilateral vestibular loss. Equilibrium scores did not change significantly when the cervical spine was fixed with a collar. Acute fixation of the neck with a collar seems not to affect standing balance, even not when vestibular, visual and/or somatosensory input are also reduced.

  6. Relation between head impulse tests, rotating chair tests, and stance and gait posturography after an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    PubMed

    Allum, John H J; Honegger, Flurin

    2013-08-01

    Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) deficits and balance instability during stance and gait are typical for an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (AUPVD). The relation between different VOR measures with recovery is unknown, as is the relation of VOR measures to balance control. To answer these questions, we examined changes over time in caloric canal paresis (CP), head impulse tests (HIT), whole body rotation (ROT) tests of the horizontal VOR, and changes in trunk sway during stance and gait tests, for cases of presumed vestibular neuritis. HIT was performed with short ca. 200 degrees per second head turns, ROT with triangular 24-second velocity profiles (peak 120 degrees per second, acceleration 20 degrees per second squared). To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes measured pitch (anterior-posterior) and roll (lateral) sway angles and angular velocities at lumbar 1 to 3. Changes during recover in ROT and HIT responses to the deficit side were equally well related (R = 0.8, p < 0.001) to changes in caloric CP values. ROT but not HIT responses to the normal side were also related to CP responses (R = 0.53, p = 0.02). Spontaneous nystagmus levels were related to changes instance balance control (R = 0.52, p = 0.001). Balance during gait improved over time but was not well correlated with changes in VOR measures (R = 0.26 max., p > 0.05). Both HIT and ROT track VOR recovery on the deficit side due to central compensation and peripheral recovery. However, only ROT track changes in the central compensation of normal side responses. The weak correlations between VOR and stance and gait tests suggest that the latter should also be tested to judge the effect of an AUPVD on balance control.

  7. Postural Compensation for Unilateral Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Robert J.; Statler, Kennyn D.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Horak, Fay B.

    2011-01-01

    Postural control of upright stance was investigated in well-compensated, unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) subjects compared to age-matched control subjects. The goal was to determine how sensory weighting for postural control in UVL subjects differed from control subjects, and how sensory weighting related to UVL subjects’ functional compensation, as assessed by standardized balance and dizziness questionnaires. Postural control mechanisms were identified using a model-based interpretation of medial–lateral center-of-mass body-sway evoked by support-surface rotational stimuli during eyes-closed stance. The surface-tilt stimuli consisted of continuous pseudorandom rotations presented at four different amplitudes. Parameters of a feedback control model were obtained that accounted for each subject’s sway response to the surface-tilt stimuli. Sensory weighting factors quantified the relative contributions to stance control of vestibular sensory information, signaling body-sway relative to earth-vertical, and proprioceptive information, signaling body-sway relative to the surface. Results showed that UVL subjects made significantly greater use of proprioceptive, and therefore less use of vestibular, orientation information on all tests. There was relatively little overlap in the distributions of sensory weights measured in UVL and control subjects, although UVL subjects varied widely in the amount they could use their remaining vestibular function. Increased reliance on proprioceptive information by UVL subjects was associated with their balance being more disturbed by the surface-tilt perturbations than control subjects, thus indicating a deficiency of balance control even in well-compensated UVL subjects. Furthermore, there was some tendency for UVL subjects who were less able to utilize remaining vestibular information to also indicate worse functional compensation on questionnaires. PMID:21922014

  8. Compensation of Vestibular Function and Plasticity of Vestibular Nucleus after Unilateral Cochleostomy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Hyun, Jaihwan; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Kim, Dong Woon; Park, Sung Jae; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo frequently occur after cochlear implantation (CI) surgery, particularly during the early stages. It could recover over time but some of the patients suffered from delayed or sustained vestibular symptoms after CI. This study used rat animal models to investigate the effect of unilateral cochleostomy on the vestibular organs over time. Twenty-seven Sprague Dawley rats underwent cochleostomy to evaluate the postoperative changes in hearing threshold, gain and symmetry of the vestibular ocular response, overall balance function, number of hair cells in the crista, and the c-Fos activity in the brainstem vestibular nucleus. Loss of vestibular function was observed during the early stages, but function recovered partially over time. Histopathological findings demonstrated a mild decrease in vestibular hair cells numbers. Increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the vestibular nucleus, observed in the early stages after cochleostomy, decreased over time. Cochleostomy is a risk factor for peripheral vestibular organ damage that can cause functional impairment in the peripheral vestibular organs. Altered vestibular nucleus activity may be associated with vestibular compensation and plasticity after unilateral cochleostomy. PMID:26881130

  9. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional Plasticity after Unilateral Vestibular Midbrain Infarction in Human Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Baier, Bernhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bartenstein, Peter; Zwergal, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to uncover mechanisms of central compensation of vestibular function at brainstem, cerebellar, and cortical levels in patients with acute unilateral midbrain infarctions presenting with an acute vestibular tone imbalance. Eight out of 17 patients with unilateral midbrain infarctions were selected on the basis of signs of a vestibular tone imbalance, e.g., graviceptive (tilts of perceived verticality) and oculomotor dysfunction (skew deviation, ocular torsion) in F18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET at two time points: A) in the acute stage, and B) after recovery 6 months later. Lesion-behavior mapping analyses with MRI verified the exact structural lesion sites. Group subtraction analyses and comparisons with healthy controls were performed with Statistic Parametric Mapping for the PET data. A comparison of PET A of acute-stage patients with that of healthy controls showed increases in glucose metabolism in the cerebellum, motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, and inferior temporal lobe, but none in vestibular cortex areas. At the supratentorial level bilateral signal decreases dominated in the thalamus, frontal eye fields, and anterior cingulum. These decreases persisted after clinical recovery in contrast to the increases. The transient activations can be attributed to ocular motor and postural recovery (cerebellum) and sensory substitution of vestibular function for motion perception (visual cortex). The persisting deactivation in the thalamic nuclei and frontal eye fields allows alternative functional interpretations of the thalamic nuclei: either a disconnection of ascending sensory input occurs or there is a functional mismatch between expected and actual vestibular activity. Our data support the view that both thalami operate separately for each hemisphere but receive vestibular input from ipsilateral and contralateral midbrain integration centers. Normally they have gatekeeper functions for multisensory input to the cortex and automatic

  11. Acute peripheral vestibular deficit increases redundancy in random number generation.

    PubMed

    Moser, Ivan; Vibert, Dominique; Caversaccio, Marco D; Mast, Fred W

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit leads to broad cognitive difficulties and biases in spatial orientation. More specifically, vestibular patients typically show a spatial bias toward their affected ear in the subjective visual vertical, head and trunk orientation, fall tendency, and walking trajectory. By means of a random number generation task, we set out to investigate how an acute peripheral vestibular deficit affects the mental representation of numbers in space. Furthermore, the random number generation task allowed us to test if patients with peripheral vestibular deficit show evidence of impaired executive functions while keeping the head straight and while performing active head turns. Previous research using galvanic vestibular stimulation in healthy people has shown no effects on number space, but revealed increased redundancy of the generated numbers. Other studies reported a spatial bias in number representation during active and passive head turns. In this experiment, we tested 43 patients with acute vestibular neuritis (18 patients with left-sided and 25 with right-sided vestibular deficit) and 28 age-matched healthy controls. We found no bias in number space in patients with peripheral vestibular deficit but showed increased redundancy in patients during active head turns. Patients showed worse performance in generating sequences of random numbers, which indicates a deficit in the updating component of executive functions. We argue that RNG is a promising candidate for a time- and cost-effective assessment of executive functions in patients suffering from a peripheral vestibular deficit.

  12. Feasibility of the simultaneous ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chen-Han; Wang, Shou-Jen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2009-09-01

    This study compared the results of combined and individual ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests in healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction to confirm the effectiveness of the combined oVEMP and cVEMP test. Twenty healthy volunteers and 12 patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction underwent individual oVEMP and cVEMP tests in a random order, and combined oVEMP and cVEMP test on another day. Twenty healthy subjects had 100% response rates for oVEMPs and cVEMPs in both individual and combined stimulation modes. Significant positive correlations exist between individual and combined oVEMPs/cVEMPs in terms of latencies and amplitudes. In 12 patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction, differences in abnormal percentages of oVEMPs or cVEMPs were non-significant. Additionally, the characteristic parameters of oVEMP/cVEMP among ears of healthy subjects, good and pathological ears of patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction did not differ significantly, regardless of whether the individual or combined mode was used. The combined oVEMP and cVEMP test generates similar information to that obtained by individual mode, regardless of whether subjects are healthy or have unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Simultaneous oVEMP and cVEMP tests may be a convenient screening tool for assessing crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex and ipsilateral sacculo-collic reflex, which definitely shortens the diagnostic test time. Thus, it may favor the large diffusion of these techniques.

  13. Cold shivering activity after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of muscles (flexors and extensors of the forelimbs and hindlimbs) during cold shivering after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus. It was found, that unilateral delabyrinthing produces bilateral facilitation of cold shivering in the flexor extremities more pronounced on the ipsilateral side. In the extensor muscles there was an absence of bioelectric activity both before and after delabyrinthing. Enhancement of cold shivering in the flexor extremities following intervention was evidently conditioned by removal of the inhibiting effect of the vestibulary apparatus on the function of special centers.

  14. Unilateral vestibular schwannoma associated with a Jacobson's schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, G; Iannella, G; Ciniglio Appiani, M; Re, M

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of unilateral vestibular schwannoma and Jacobson's schwannoma growing in the same intracranial site is rarely observed. We present the case of 36-year-old woman with primary diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma and subsequent appearance of schwannoma to the Jacobson's nerve. Initial wait and see strategy was performed offered us the opportunity to describe Jacobson's lesion features at computed tomography over a period of 4 years. Subtotal petrosectomy with infralabyrinthine approach was subsequently executed to remove the growing mass of the temporal bone. The Jacobson's schwannoma increased its size from 0.4 cm for years whereas vestibular schwannoma size was unchanged after 7 years observation. The concomitant removal of both schwannomas is still associated with the size of the CPA lesion and to patient's symptoms.

  15. What is the most effective vestibular rehabilitation technique in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders?

    PubMed

    Rossi-Izquierdo, Marcos; Santos-Pérez, Sofia; Soto-Varela, Andrés

    2011-11-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation has been found to be effective and safe in patients with instability. There is insufficient evidence, however, for distinguishing between the efficacies of different rehabilitation techniques. The objective of this study is to verify whether there are differences between two instrumental vestibular rehabilitation techniques, computerised dynamic posturography (CDP) and optokinetic stimulation (OKN), in order to establish the optimal strategy for each patient. We conducted a prospective, comparative study of the two techniques (CDP and OKN) in patients with instability due to chronic unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder. We randomly included 12 patients in each group, performing the evaluation with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and the CDP with the sensorial organisation test (SOT), rhythmic weight shift and limits of stability (LOS). We found a statistically significant improvement in both groups in average balance score according to the SOT. In the OKN group, however, improvement was greater in visual preference. The CDP group showed greater benefits in the visual and vestibular input and LOS. Patients with poor vestibular and visual input or with reduced LOS will benefit more from an exercise protocol with CDP. Patients with poor visual preference, however, are ideal candidates for rehabilitation with OKN.

  16. Unilateral Head Impulses Training in Uncompensated Vestibular Hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    Binetti, Ana Carolina; Varela, Andrea Ximena; Lucarelli, Dana Lucila

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a case of a young woman with unilateral vestibular chronic failure with a poorly compensated vestibuloocular reflex during rapid head rotation. Additionally, she developed migraine symptoms during the treatment with associated chronic dizzy sensations and blurred vision. Her report of blurred vision only improved after she completed a rehabilitation program using fast head impulse rotations towards the affected side for 5 consecutive days. We discuss why we elected this form of treatment and how this method may be useful for different patients. PMID:28243476

  17. Cognitive requirements for vestibular and ocular motor processing in healthy adults and patients with unilateral vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Talkowski, M E; Redfern, M S; Jennings, J R; Furman, J M

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the role of cognition in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and ocular pursuit using a dual-task paradigm in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss and healthy adults. We hypothesized that cognitive resources are involved in successful processing and integration of vestibular and ocular motor sensory information, and this requirement would be greater in patients with vestibular dysfunction. Sixteen well-compensated patients with surgically confirmed absent unilateral peripheral vestibular function and 16 healthy age- and sex-matched controls underwent seven combinations of vestibular-only, visual-only, and visual-vestibular stimuli while performing three different information processing tasks. Visual-vestibular stimuli included a semicircular canal and an otolith stimulus provided through seated chair rotations; fixation on a laser target and sinusoidal smooth pursuit while still; and fixation on a head-fixed laser target during chair rotations. The information processing tasks were three different auditory reaction time (RT) tasks: (1) simple RT, (2) disjunctive RT, and (3) choice RT. Our results showed increases in RTs in both patients and controls under all vestibular-only stimulation conditions and during ocular pursuit. Patients showed greater increases in RTs during vestibular stimulation and the more complex disjunctive and choice RT tasks. No differences between the groups were found during the visual-only or visual-vestibular interaction conditions. These results reveal interference between vestibulo-ocular processing and a concurrent RT task, suggesting that the VOR and the ocular motor system are dependent upon cognitive resources to some extent, and thus, are not fully automatic systems. We speculate that this interference with cognition occurs as a result of the sensory integration required for resolving inputs from multiple sensory streams. The particularly large decrement in information processing task performance

  18. Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders in the emergency room of the ENT Department of Cluj-Napoca, Romania

    PubMed Central

    PETRI, MARIA; CHIRILA, MAGDALENA; BOLBOACA, SORANA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2015-01-01

    Objective To asses the management of unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders in the emergency room of the ENT Department of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Material and method The study was prospective, non-randomized, and included the patients presented for dizziness or balance disorders at the emergency room of the ENT Department between March 2012 and March 2013. Demographic characteristics, specific clinical history, the onset of peripheral vestibular disorders, and co-morbidities were recorded. The patients charts included the type of onset and the treatment (medical, surgical, and rehabilitation) performed in the emergency room or, in case of hospital admission, the relieving measures for the vestibular symptoms with or without hearing recovery. Results One hundred and fifty-two subjects were included in our study, 97 with pure peripheral vestibular dysfunction (VD), 34 with cochlear-vestibular dysfunction (CVD), and 21 with Ménière’s disease (MD). No significant differences were identified when the proportion of patients with a certain onset (acute, subacute or chronic) were compared. Hypertension was the most frequent co-morbidity in all investigated groups. No significant difference was observed when the relief of vertigo or hearing recovery were compared between all groups. Conclusion This first Romanian report on the management of unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders showed that early corticosteroids treatment associated with electrolytes, antiemetic, and vasodilation drugs led to the recovery of the vestibular function without any differences between the types of peripheral vestibular dysfunction. In addition, we obtained the complete recovery of the vestibular and acoustic dysfunction in the cases treated with metylprednisolone intratympanic injection. PMID:26528069

  19. Vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2013-07-01

    Vestibular neuritis is the most common cause of acute spontaneous vertigo. Vestibular neuritis is ascribed to acute unilateral loss of vestibular function, probably due to reactivation of herpes simplex virus in the vestibular ganglia. The diagnostic hallmarks of vestibular neuritis are spontaneous horizontal-torsional nystagmus beating away from the lesion side, abnormal head impulse test for the involved semicircular canals, ipsilesional caloric paresis, decreased responses of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials during stimulation of the affected ear, and unsteadiness with a falling tendency toward the lesion side. Vestibular neuritis preferentially involves the superior vestibular labyrinth and its afferents. Accordingly, the function of the posterior semicircular canal and saccule, which constitute the inferior vestibular labyrinth, is mostly spared in vestibular neuritis. However, because the rare subtype of inferior vestibular neuritis lacks the typical features of vestibular neuritis, it may be misdiagnosed as a central vestibular disorder. Even in the patient with the typical pattern of spontaneous nystagmus observed in vestibular neuritis, brain imaging is indicated when the patient has unprecedented headache, negative head impulse test, severe unsteadiness, or no recovery within 1 to 2 days. Symptomatic medication is indicated only during the acute phase to relieve the vertigo and nausea/vomiting. Vestibular rehabilitation hastens the recovery. The efficacy of topical and systemic steroids requires further validation.

  20. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  1. Visual field dependence-independence before and after unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe; Lacour, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2006-05-29

    To investigate whether visual field dependence-independence changed after unilateral vestibular loss, Menière's patients were tested before and after unilateral vestibular neurotomy and compared with controls. Using the rod and frame test, visual vertical perception was tested under four visual contexts (with a frame tilted either clockwise or counterclockwise, with a vertical frame, and without visual reference). Both controls and Menière's patients before unilateral vestibular loss split into visual field dependent and independent subpopulations. Unilateral vestibular loss did not change this partition but, for both subpopulations, it induced asymmetrical visual field dependence with a reduced or abolished contralesional dependence. Finally, when vertical/horizontal references were provided, visual vertical perception was improved in both subpopulations, suggesting that all patients relied on the same allocentric strategy.

  2. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner’s syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. PMID:25564592

  3. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies. PMID:27065839

  4. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  5. Galvanic ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials provide new insight into vestibulo-ocular reflexes and unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M; Jombik, Peter; Halmagyi, G Michael; Colebatch, James G

    2009-03-01

    Synchronous extraocular muscle activity can be recorded from around the eyes at the beginning of a vestibular-evoked eye movement (ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, OVEMPs). As galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) evokes the vestibulo-ocular reflex, we wished to investigate GVS-evoked OVEMPs. We stimulated 10 normals and 6 patients with unilateral vestibular loss (uVL) with bi/unipolar 4 mA, 2 ms current steps at the mastoid. OVEMPs were recorded from electrodes placed superior and inferior to the eyes. OVEMPs were present beneath both eyes in all normal subjects: an initial positivity ipsilateral to the cathodal electrode (peak latency 9.9 ms, amplitude 1.3 microV) and an initial negativity contralateral to the cathode (8.8 ms, 2.4 microV). In the patients, stimulation of the affected side produced little or no response. Stimulation of the intact side produced only contralateral responses. The infra-orbital response is likely produced primarily by the inferior obliques, producing conjugate torsion away from the cathode. The projection to the ipsilateral eye depends upon normal vestibular function on the contralateral side. OVEMPs can be evoked by GVS. While bilateral effects are obtained with unilateral stimulation in normals, the primary vestibular pathway to the inferior oblique in humans is crossed.

  6. Impaired mental rotation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and acute vestibular neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Candidi, Matteo; Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Aglioti, Salvatore M.; Minio-Paluello, Ilaria; Alessandrini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular processing is fundamental to our sense of orientation in space which is a core aspect of the representation of the self. Vestibular information is processed in a large subcortical–cortical neural network. Tasks requiring mental rotations of human bodies in space are known to activate neural regions within this network suggesting that vestibular processing is involved in the control of mental rotation. We studied whether mental rotation is impaired in patients suffering from two different forms of unilateral vestibular disorders (vestibular neuritis – VN – and Benign Paroxysmal positional Vertigo – BPPV) with respect to healthy matched controls (C). We used two mental rotation tasks in which participants were required to: (i) mentally rotate their own body in space (egocentric rotation) thus using vestibular processing to a large extent and (ii) mentally rotate human figures (allocentric rotation) thus using own body representations to a smaller degree. Reaction times and accuracy of responses showed that VN and BPPV patients were impaired in both tasks with respect to C. Significantly, the pattern of results was similar in the three groups suggesting that patients were actually performing the mental rotation without using a different strategy from the control individuals. These results show that dysfunctional vestibular inflow impairs mental rotation of both own body and human figures suggesting that unilateral acute disorders of the peripheral vestibular input massively affect the cerebral processes underlying mental rotations. PMID:24324422

  7. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality-based balance exercises in vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Dara; Herdman, Susan; Vance, Roisin; Murray, Deirdre; Malone, Kareena; Duffy, Douglas; Glennon, Aine; McConn-Walsh, Rory

    2015-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of virtual reality-based balance exercises to conventional balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss (UVL). Assessor-blind, randomized controlled trial. Two acute care university teaching hospitals. Patients with UVL (N=71) who had dizziness/vertigo, and gait and balance impairment. Patients with UVL were randomly assigned to receive 6 weeks of either conventional (n=36) or virtual reality-based (n=35) balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation. The virtual reality-based group received an off-the-shelf virtual reality gaming system for home exercise, and the conventional group received a foam balance mat. Treatment comprised weekly visits to a physiotherapist and a daily home exercise program. The primary outcome was self-preferred gait speed. Secondary outcomes included other gait parameters and tasks, Sensory Organization Test (SOT), dynamic visual acuity, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Vestibular Rehabilitation Benefits Questionnaire, and Activities Balance Confidence Questionnaire. The subjective experience of vestibular rehabilitation was measured with a questionnaire. Both groups improved, but there were no significant differences in gait speed between the groups postintervention (mean difference, -.03m/s; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.09 to .02m/s). There were also no significant differences between the groups in SOT scores (mean difference, .82%; 95% CI, -5.00% to 6.63%) or on any of the other secondary outcomes (P>.05). In both groups, adherence to exercise was high (∼77%), but the virtual reality-based group reported significantly more enjoyment (P=.001), less difficulty with (P=.009) and less tiredness after (P=.03) balance exercises. At 6 months, there were no significant between-group differences in physical outcomes. Virtual reality-based balance exercises performed during vestibular rehabilitation were not superior to conventional balance

  8. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  9. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible.

  10. Disrupted functional connectivity of the default mode network due to acute vestibular deficit.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is defined as a sudden unilateral partial failure of the vestibular nerve that impairs the forwarding of vestibular information from the labyrinth. The patient suffers from vertigo, horizontal nystagmus and postural instability with a tendency toward ipsilesional falls. Although vestibular neuritis is a common disease, the central mechanisms to compensate for the loss of precise vestibular information remain poorly understood. It was hypothesized that symptoms following acute vestibular neuritis originate from difficulties in the processing of diverging sensory information between the responsible brain networks. Accordingly an altered resting activity was shown in multiple brain areas of the task-positive network. Because of the known balance between the task-positive and task-negative networks (default mode network; DMN) we hypothesize that also the DMN is involved. Here, we employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state to investigate changes in the functional connectivity between the DMN and task-positive networks, in a longitudinal design combined with measurements of caloric function. We demonstrate an initially disturbed connectedness of the DMN after vestibular neuritis. We hypothesize that the disturbed connectivity between the default mode network and particular parts of the task-positive network might be related to a sustained utilization of processing capacity by diverging sensory information. The current results provide some insights into mechanisms of central compensation following an acute vestibular deficit and the importance of the DMN in this disease.

  11. Disrupted functional connectivity of the default mode network due to acute vestibular deficit

    PubMed Central

    Klingner, Carsten M.; Volk, Gerd F.; Brodoehl, Stefan; Witte, Otto W.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is defined as a sudden unilateral partial failure of the vestibular nerve that impairs the forwarding of vestibular information from the labyrinth. The patient suffers from vertigo, horizontal nystagmus and postural instability with a tendency toward ipsilesional falls. Although vestibular neuritis is a common disease, the central mechanisms to compensate for the loss of precise vestibular information remain poorly understood. It was hypothesized that symptoms following acute vestibular neuritis originate from difficulties in the processing of diverging sensory information between the responsible brain networks. Accordingly an altered resting activity was shown in multiple brain areas of the task-positive network. Because of the known balance between the task-positive and task-negative networks (default mode network; DMN) we hypothesize that also the DMN is involved. Here, we employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state to investigate changes in the functional connectivity between the DMN and task-positive networks, in a longitudinal design combined with measurements of caloric function. We demonstrate an initially disturbed connectedness of the DMN after vestibular neuritis. We hypothesize that the disturbed connectivity between the default mode network and particular parts of the task-positive network might be related to a sustained utilization of processing capacity by diverging sensory information. The current results provide some insights into mechanisms of central compensation following an acute vestibular deficit and the importance of the DMN in this disease. PMID:25379422

  12. Earth horizontal axis rotational responses in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular deficits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, Joseph M. R.; Kamerer, Donald B.; Wall, Conrad, III

    1989-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of five patients with surgically confirmed unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions is evaluated. Testing used both earth vertical axis (EVA) and earth horizontal axis (EHA) yaw rotation. Results indicated that the patients had short VOR time constants, asymmetric responses to both EVA and EHA rotation, and normal EHA modulation components. These findings suggest that unilateral peripheral vestibular loss causes a shortened VOR time constant even with the addition of dynamic otolithic stimulation and causes an asymmetry in semicircular canal-ocular reflexes and one aspect of otolith-ocular reflexes.

  13. Earth horizontal axis rotational responses in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular deficits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, Joseph M. R.; Kamerer, Donald B.; Wall, Conrad, III

    1989-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of five patients with surgically confirmed unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions is evaluated. Testing used both earth vertical axis (EVA) and earth horizontal axis (EHA) yaw rotation. Results indicated that the patients had short VOR time constants, asymmetric responses to both EVA and EHA rotation, and normal EHA modulation components. These findings suggest that unilateral peripheral vestibular loss causes a shortened VOR time constant even with the addition of dynamic otolithic stimulation and causes an asymmetry in semicircular canal-ocular reflexes and one aspect of otolith-ocular reflexes.

  14. Unilateral vestibular deafferentation-induced changes in calcium signaling-related molecules in the rat vestibular nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Masumura, Chisako; Horii, Arata; Mitani, Kenji; Kitahara, Tadashi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Kubo, Takeshi

    2007-03-23

    Inquiries into the neurochemical mechanisms of vestibular compensation, a model of lesion-induced neuronal plasticity, reveal the involvement of both voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC) and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Indeed, our previous microarray analysis showed an up-regulation of some calcium signaling-related genes such as the alpha2 subunit of L-type calcium channels, calcineurin, and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase 1 (PMCA1) in the ipsilateral vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD). To further elucidate the role of calcium signaling-related molecules in vestibular compensation, we used a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to confirm the microarray results and investigated changes in expression of these molecules at various stages of compensation (6 h to 2 weeks after UVD). We also investigated the changes in gene expression during Bechterew's phenomenon and the effects of a calcineurin inhibitor on vestibular compensation. Real-time PCR showed that genes for the alpha2 subunit of VGCC, PMCA2, and calcineurin were transiently up-regulated 6 h after UVD in ipsilateral VNC. A subsequent UVD, which induced Bechterew's phenomenon, reproduced a complete mirror image of the changes in gene expressions of PMCA2 and calcineurin seen in the initial UVD, while the alpha2 subunit of VGCC gene had a trend to increase in VNC ipsilateral to the second lesion. Pre-treatment by FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, decelerated the vestibular compensation in a dose-dependent manner. Although it is still uncertain whether these changes in gene expression are causally related to the molecular mechanisms of vestibular compensation, this observation suggests that after increasing the Ca(2+) influx into the ipsilateral VNC neurons via up-regulated VGCC, calcineurin may be involved in their synaptic plasticity. Conversely, an up-regulation of PMCA2, a brain-specific Ca(2+) pump, would increase an efflux of Ca

  15. How body position changes visual vertical perception after unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe; Lacour, Michel; Léonard, Jacques; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2008-01-01

    Visual vertical perception, posture and equilibrium are impaired in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss. The present study was designed to investigate whether body position (standing upright, sitting on a chair and lying supine) influences the visual vertical perception in Menière's patients tested before and after a unilateral vestibular neurotomy. Data were compared with sex- and age-matched healthy participants. During the first postoperative month the body position strongly influences the visual vertical perception. The ipsilesional deviation of the visual vertical judgment gradually increased from standing upright to sitting and to lying supine. The present data indicate that visual vertical perception improves when postural control is more demanding. This suggests that postural balance is a key reference for vertical perception, at least up to one month after vestibular loss.

  16. Early rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders: a prospective, randomized investigation using computerized posturography.

    PubMed

    Marioni, Gino; Fermo, Salvatore; Zanon, Davide; Broi, Nadia; Staffieri, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Patients with unilateral vestibular lesions have a set of deficits requiring compensation based on the inherent plasticity of the central nervous system. In the 1940s, it was reported that patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunctions who exercised recovered faster than those who did not. The present prospective, randomized investigation aimed to assess the role of a computerized posturography-assisted early vestibular rehabilitation protocol combined with a home-based exercise program in the treatment of patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders occurring 2 weeks previously. Fifteen patients were randomly assigned to a 5-week posturography-assisted vestibular rehabilitation protocol and a home-based exercise program (Group A), while 15 simply awaited spontaneous compensation (Group B). All patients underwent computerized posturography approximately 2 weeks after their vestibular disorder was diagnosed and again after 6 weeks. Ten healthy volunteers were also studied (Group C). After rehabilitation, Group A patients improved significantly in most sensory measures [modified clinical test of sensory organization and balance (mCTSIB)] and motor parameters [limits of stability (LOS)] by comparison with preliminary outcomes, and there were no significant differences in sensory (mCTSIB) and motor (LOS) findings between Group A and the healthy volunteers. At the same time point, several motor (LOS) parameters were still altered in Group B by comparison with the healthy volunteers. These preliminary outcomes support the hypothesis that the compensation achievable after 6 weeks with a customized program of posturography-assisted vestibular rehabilitation and home-based exercises is superior to the results of physiological spontaneous compensation.

  17. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Newlands, Shawn D; Wei, Min

    2013-10-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1-2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5-210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL.

  18. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min

    2013-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1–2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5–210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL. PMID:23864379

  19. Asymmetric vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral Menière patients.

    PubMed

    Kingma, C M; Wit, H P

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured in 22 unilateral Menière patients with monaural and binaural stimulation with 250 and 500 Hz tone bursts. For all measurement situations significantly lower VEMP amplitudes were on average measured at the affected side compared to the unaffected side. Unilateral Menière patients have, in contrast to normal subjects, asymmetric VEMPs, indicating a permanently affected vestibular (most likely otolith) system at the side of hearing loss. The diagnostic value of VEMP amplitude asymmetry measurement in individual patients is low, because of the large overlap of the VEMP amplitude asymmetry range for unilateral Menière patients with that for normal subjects.

  20. Asymmetric vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral Menière patients

    PubMed Central

    Wit, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured in 22 unilateral Menière patients with monaural and binaural stimulation with 250 and 500 Hz tone bursts. For all measurement situations significantly lower VEMP amplitudes were on average measured at the affected side compared to the unaffected side. Unilateral Menière patients have, in contrast to normal subjects, asymmetric VEMPs, indicating a permanently affected vestibular (most likely otolith) system at the side of hearing loss. The diagnostic value of VEMP amplitude asymmetry measurement in individual patients is low, because of the large overlap of the VEMP amplitude asymmetry range for unilateral Menière patients with that for normal subjects. PMID:20665043

  1. Degeneration of the vestibular nerve in unilateral Meniere's disease evaluated by galvanic vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Ming; Young, Yi-Ho; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, Chi-Te; Cheng, Po-Wen

    2017-09-01

    The staging system of Meniere's disease utilizes audiograms to probe cochlear dysfunction. We explored the addition of galvanic vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) to further explore vestibular function. Seventy patients with unilateral Meniere's disease were enrolled in this study. Within 2weeks of diagnosis, all subjects underwent pure tone audiometry, cervical and ocular VEMP, and caloric test. The prevalence of abnormal tests and the VEMP characteristic parameters such as latencies and amplitudes were analyzed. In affected ears, the abnormal rate of acoustic cVEMPs, galvanic cVEMPs, vibratory oVEMPs and galvanic oVEMPs was 37%, 17%, 20%, and 9%, respectively. No significant differences existed in VEMP latencies and amplitudes between affected ears and unaffected ears. The impairment of otolithic organs was found to be more than that of vestibular afferents. The deterioration of the saccule was more than that of the utricle, whereas retrolabyrinthine degeneration of sacculo-collic reflex and vestibulo-ocular reflex was similar. This study is the first to use an electrophysiological test to evaluate the retrolabyrinthine function of patients with unilateral Meniere's disease. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term deficits in motion detection thresholds and spike count variability after unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Thomassen, Jakob S.; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system operates in a push-pull fashion using signals from both labyrinths and an intricate bilateral organization. Unilateral vestibular lesions cause well-characterized motor deficits that are partially compensated over time and whose neural correlates have been traced in the mean response modulation of vestibular nuclei cells. Here we compare both response gains and neural detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei and semicircular canal afferent neurons in intact vs. unilateral-lesioned macaques using three-dimensional rotation and translation stimuli. We found increased stimulus-driven spike count variability and detection thresholds in semicircular canal afferents, although mean responses were unchanged, after contralateral labyrinth lesion. Analysis of trial-by-trial spike count correlations of a limited number of simultaneously recorded pairs of canal afferents suggests increased noise correlations after lesion. In addition, we also found persistent, chronic deficits in rotation detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei neurons, which were larger in the ipsilesional than the contralesional brain stem. These deficits, which persisted several months after lesion, were due to lower rotational response gains, whereas spike count variability was similar in intact and lesioned animals. In contrast to persistent deficits in rotation threshold, translation detection thresholds were not different from those in intact animals. These findings suggest that, after compensation, a single labyrinth is sufficient to recover motion sensitivity and normal thresholds for the otolith, but not the semicircular canal, system. PMID:24848470

  3. Dual task interference during gait in patients with unilateral vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vestibular patients show slower and unsteady gait; they have also been shown to need greater cognitive resources when carrying out balance and cognitive dual tasks (DT). This study investigated DT interference during gait in a middle-aged group of subjects with dizziness and unsteadiness after unilateral vestibular neuronitis and in a healthy control group. Methods Fourteen individuals with subacute unilateral vestibular impairment after neuronitis and seventeen healthy subjects performed gait and cognitive tasks in single and DT conditions. A statistical gait analysis system was used and spatio-temporal parameters were considered. The cognitive task, consisting of backward counting by three, was tape recorded and the number of right figures was then calculated. Results Both patients and controls showed a more conservative gait during DT and between groups significant differences were not found. A significant decrease in cognitive performance during DT was found only in the vestibular group. Conclusions Results suggest that less attentional resources are available during gait in vestibular patients compared to controls, and that a priority is given in keeping up the motor task to the detriment of a decrease of the cognitive performance during DT. PMID:20854671

  4. [Studies on the largest Lyapunov exponents of the standing posture in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Keisuke; Tokita, Takashi; Ito, Yatsuji; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the body sway in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction by the largest Lyapunov exponents using a chaotic time series analysis. The largest Lyapunov exponent is regarded as a parameter indexing an orbital instability. Subjects consisted of 55 normal healthy subjects, 11 patients diagnosed as having vestibular neuritis (VN), 6 patients diagnosed as having sudden deafness (SD) with vertigo, 23 patients diagnosed as having Meniere disease (MD), 11 patients diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and 14 patients diagnosed as having other vestibular disorders. Using a stabilometer, the sway of the body center of gravity in an upright standing position was recorded with eyes open and closed for 60 seconds under each condition. From the time series data obtained, the largest Lyapunov exponents were calculated using a chaos analysis program. In normal healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction, the largest Lyapunov exponents on right-left sway were larger than those on forward-backward sway with eyes open and closed. The largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction on forward-backward sway with eyes closed were significantly larger than those in normal healthy subjects. A few patients with the instability of standing posture judged from conventional analysis (area of sway, locus length per time) showed higher values of the LLE. We investigated the variation of the values of the largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction at each stage during recovery from their vestibular damage. The largest Lyapunov exponents at the early stage with stable standing posture were significantly higher than those at the late stable stage with stable standing posture. Some patients at the very early stage had lower values of the largest Lyapunov exponents. We speculate that the orbital instability indicated by the values of the

  5. Changes in TNFα, NFκB and MnSOD protein in the vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unilateral vestibular deafferentation results in strong microglial and astroglial activation in the vestibular nuclei (VN) that could be due to an inflammatory response. This study was aimed at determining if markers of inflammation are upregulated in the VN after chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) in the rat, and if the inflammatory response, if any, induces the expression of neuroprotective factors that could promote the plasticity mechanisms involved in the vestibular compensation process. The expressions of inflammatory and neuroprotective factors after chemical or mechanical UL were also compared to verify that the inflammatory response was not due to the toxicity of sodium arsanilate. Methods Immunohistological investigations combined the labeling of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), as a marker of the VN inflammatory response, and of nuclear transcription factor κB (NFκB) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), as markers of neuroprotection that could be expressed in the VN because of inflammation. Immunoreactivity (Ir) of the VN cells was quantified in the VN complex of rats. Behavioral investigations were performed to assess the functional recovery process, including both static (support surface) and dynamic (air-righting and landing reflexes) postural tests. Results Chemical UL (arsanilate transtympanic injection) induced a significant increase in the number of TNFα-Ir cells in the medial and inferior VN on both sides. These changes were detectable as early as 4 h after vestibular lesion, persisted at 1 day, and regained nearly normal values at 3 days. The early increase in TNFα expression was followed by a slightly delayed upregulation of NFκB 8 h after chemical UL, peaking at 1 day, and regaining control values 3 days later. By contrast, upregulation of MnSOD was more strongly delayed (1 day), with a peak at 3 days, and a return to control values at 15 days. Similar changes of TNFα, NFκB, and MnSOD expression were found in

  6. Betahistine treatment improves the recovery of static symptoms in patients with unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Redon, Christine; Lopez, Christophe; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular loss induces a combination of postural, oculomotor, and perceptive symptoms that are compensated over time. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of betahistine dihydrochloride on vestibular compensation. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in Menière's disease patients who underwent a curative unilateral vestibular neurotomy (UVN). The effects of betahistine treatment were investigated on a broad spectrum of vestibular-induced changes resulting from vestibular loss: body sway, head orientation, ocular cyclotorsion, spontaneous nystagmus, verticality perception, and self-evaluation of the postural stability. The time course of the recovery was compared in 16 patients who received either a placebo or betahistine (24 mg b.i.d.) from 3 days up to 3 months after UVN. Patients were examined before (day -1) and after UVN (days 7, 30, and 90). Results indicate that betahistine reduces the time to recovery by 1 month or more depending on the tested functions. Betahistine was effective as soon as 4 days after treatment administration, and the effect remained during the whole compensation period (up to 3 months). The observed clinical effects may be attributed to an action of betahistine in rebalancing the neuronal activity between contralateral vestibular nuclei.

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of the NF2 gene in young patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Mohyuddin, A; Neary, W; Wallace, A; Wu, C; Purcell, S; Reid, H; Ramsden, R; Read, A; Black, G; Evans, D

    2002-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) must be suspected in patients presenting with a unilateral vestibular schwannoma at a young age who are therefore at theoretical risk of developing bilateral disease. We identified 45 patients aged 30 years or less at the onset of symptoms of a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. Molecular genetic analysis of the NF2 gene was completed on peripheral blood samples in all 45 and on 28 tumour samples. No pathogenic NF2 mutations were identified in any of the blood samples. NF2 point mutations were identified in 21/28 (75%) tumour samples and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 21/28 (75%) tumour samples. Both mutational hits were identified in 18/28 (65%) tumour samples. In one multilobular tumour, one (presumably first hit) mutation was confirmed which was common to different foci of the tumour, while the second mutational event differed between foci. The molecular findings in this patient were consistent with somatic mosaicism for NF2 and the clinical diagnosis was confirmed with the presence of two meningiomas on a follow up MRI scan. A further patient developed a contralateral vestibular schwannoma on a follow up MRI scan in whom neither of the truncating mutations in the vestibular schwannoma were present in blood. It is important when counselling patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas to identify (1) those at risk of bilateral disease, (2) those at risk of developing other tumours, and (3) other family members at risk of developing NF2. Comparing tumour and blood DNA cannot exclude mosaicism in the index case and cannot, therefore, be used to predict those at risk of developing further tumours. However, identification of both mutations or one mutation plus LOH in the tumour and exclusion of those mutations in the blood samples of the sibs or offspring of the affected case may be sufficient to render further screening unnecessary in these relatives. PMID:12011146

  8. Trunk sway measures of postural stability during clinical balance tests: effects of a unilateral vestibular deficit.

    PubMed

    Allum, J H; Adkin, A L; Carpenter, M G; Held-Ziolkowska, M; Honegger, F; Pierchala, K

    2001-12-01

    This research evaluated whether quantified measures of trunk sway during clinical balance tasks are sensitive enough to identify a balance disorder and possibly specific enough to distinguish between different types of balance disorder. We used a light-weight, easy to attach, body-worn apparatus to measure trunk angular velocities in the roll and pitch planes during a number of stance and gait tasks similar to those of the Tinetti and CTSIB protocols. The tasks included standing on one or two legs both eyes-open and closed on a foam or firm support-surface, walking eight tandem steps, walking five steps while horizontally rotating or pitching the head, walking over low barriers, and up and down stairs. Tasks were sought, which when quantified might provide optimal screening for a balance pathology by comparing the test results of 15 patients with a well defined acute balance deficit (sudden unilateral vestibular loss (UVL)) with those of 26 patients with less severe chronic balance problems caused by a cerebellar-pontine-angle-tumour (CPAT) prior to surgery, and with those of 88 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. The UVL patients demonstrated significantly greater than normal trunk sway for all two-legged stance tasks especially those performed with eyes closed on a foam support surface. Sway was also greater for walking while rotating or pitching the head, and for walking eight tandem steps on a foam support surface. Interestingly, the patients could perform gait tasks such as walking over barriers almost normally, however took longer. CPAT patients had trunk sway values intermediate between those of UVL patients and normals. A combination of trunk sway amplitude measurements (roll angle and pitch velocity) from the stance tasks of standing on two legs eyes closed on a foam support, standing eyes open on a normal support surface, as well as from the gait tasks of walking five steps while rotating, or pitching the head, and walking eight tandem steps on foam

  9. Role of vestibular input in triggering and modulating postural responses in unilateral and bilateral vestibular loss patients.

    PubMed

    Mbongo, F; Qu'hen, C; Vidal, P P; Tran Ba Huy, P; de Waele, C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the greater medial-lateral (ML) instability observed in patients with compensated unilateral vestibular loss (UVL), tested on a seesaw platform with eyes closed, is task-dependent. UVL patients, categorized into three groups according to time since lesion (1 week, 1 month and 1 year), bilateral vestibular loss patients and age-matched healthy control subjects were tested in three dynamic postural tasks. These tasks involved different supports - a seesaw platform (Satel), a platform generating horizontal linear translations (Synapsys) and foam rubber placed on a static platform - each requiring different somatosensory cues to maintain equilibrium. Displacements of the subjects' center of pressure in both the anterior-posterior (AP) and ML directions were recorded by strain gauges within the platforms. Only tests performed with eyes closed were analyzed. Bilateral vestibular loss patients fell during foam and seesaw trials but not on the platform generating translations. We previously reported that UVL patients had greater postural oscillations on the seesaw platform in the ML compared to AP direction. In this study, we show similar ML/AP differences in patient performance on foam when standing with 'feet close together'. In contrast, these differences were not found when patients were tested on linear translation or on foam standing with feet apart. In conclusion, the postural performance of patients with vestibular loss depends on the exact task used to measure postural stability. UVL patients are less stable when subjected to movement in the ML direction because of the biomechanical constraints of the tasks and/or the availability of proprioceptive information.

  10. Multimodal Integration After Unilateral Labyrinthine Lesion: Single Vestibular Nuclei Neuron Responses and Implications for Postural Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Minor, Lloyd B.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in neuronal responses is necessary for compensation following brain lesions and adaptation to new conditions and motor learning. In a previous study, we showed that compensatory changes in the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) following unilateral vestibular loss were characterized by dynamic reweighting of inputs from vestibular and extravestibular modalities at the level of single neurons that constitute the first central stage of VOR signal processing. Here, we studied another class of neurons, i.e., the vestibular-only neurons, in the vestibular nuclei that mediate vestibulospinal reflexes and provide information for higher brain areas. We investigated changes in the relative contribution of vestibular, neck proprioceptive, and efference copy signals in the response of these neurons during compensation after contralateral vestibular loss in Macaca mulata monkeys. We show that the time course of recovery of vestibular sensitivity of neurons corresponds with that of lower extremity muscle and tendon reflexes reported in previous studies. More important, we found that information from neck proprioceptors, which did not influence neuronal responses before the lesion, were unmasked after lesion. Such inputs influenced the early stages of the compensation process evidenced by faster and more substantial recovery of the resting discharge in proprioceptive-sensitive neurons. Interestingly, unlike our previous study of VOR interneurons, the improvement in the sensitivity of the two groups of neurons did not show any difference in the early or late stages after lesion. Finally, neuronal responses during active head movements were not different before and after lesion and were attenuated relative to passive movements over the course of recovery, similar to that observed in control conditions. Comparison of compensatory changes observed in the vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways provides evidence for similarities and differences between the two classes of

  11. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  12. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  13. Characterization of Head-Trunk Coordination Deficits After Unilateral Vestibular Hypofunction Using Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Paul, Serene S; Dibble, Leland E; Walther, Raymond G; Shelton, Clough; Gurgel, Richard Klaus; Lester, Mark E

    2017-08-31

    Individuals with vestibular hypofunction acutely restrict head motion to reduce symptoms of dizziness and nausea. This restriction results in abnormal decoupling of head motion from trunk motion, but the character, magnitude, and persistence of these deficits are unclear. To use wearable inertial sensors to quantify the extent of head and trunk kinematic abnormalities in the subacute stage after resection of vestibular schwannoma (VS) and the particular areas of deficit in head-trunk motion. This cross-sectional observational study included a convenience sample of 20 healthy adults without vestibular impairment and a referred sample of 14 adults 4 to 8 weeks after resection of a unilateral VS at a university and a university hospital outpatient clinic. Data were collected from November 12, 2015, through November 17, 2016. Functional gait activities requiring angular head movements, including items from the Functional Gait Assessment (FGA; range, 1-30, with higher scores indicating better performance), the Timed Up & Go test (TUG; measured in seconds), and a 2-minute walk test (2MWT; measured in meters). Primary outcomes included peak head rotation amplitude (in degrees), peak head rotation velocity (in degrees per second), and percentage of head-trunk coupling. Secondary outcomes were activity and participation measures including gait speed, FGA score, TUG time, 2MWT distance, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory score (range, 0-100, with higher scores indicating worse performance). A total of 34 participants (14 men and 20 women; mean [SD] age, 39.3 [13.6] years) were included. Compared with the 20 healthy participants, the 14 individuals with vestibular hypofunction demonstrated mean (SD) reduced head turn amplitude (84.1° [15.5°] vs 113.2° [24.4°] for FGA-3), reduced head turn velocities (195.0°/s [75.9°/s] vs 358.9°/s [112.5°/s] for FGA-3), and increased head-trunk coupling (15.1% [6.5%] vs 5.9% [5.8%] for FGA-3) during gait tasks requiring angular head

  14. Tonic eye movements induced by bilateral and unilateral galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juno

    2013-01-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) stimulates primary vestibular afferents innervating the semicircular canals (SCCs) and otoliths found in the inner ear of humans and other mammals, including guinea pigs. To determine which pathways contribute to eye movements generated by this artificial vestibular stimulation in guinea pigs, low current intensities of GVS were passed either bilaterally between the tensor-tympani muscles of the two ears (up to 30 μA) or unilaterally between one tensor-tympani electrode and an indifferent on the back of the neck (up to 60 μA). Both forms of GVS were found to selectively generate tonic eye movements without nystagmus, characteristic of the otolith-ocular reflex; the axis of eye rotation did not align with any semicircular canal plane, but was oriented close to the expected axis of eye rotation that would occur in response to the net stimulation of otolith afferents. The induced eye rotation was predominantly vertical with a smaller horizontal deviation and very little torsion. Consistent with the results of previous human studies, the tonic eye movements were found to exhibit bilateral gain enhancement, whereby bilateral GVS generated twice the amplitude of eye rotation as unilateral anodal or cathodal stimulation alone. Eye movement responses to unilateral GVS were symmetrical in amplitude during equivalent intensities of anodal and cathodal stimulation, consistent with the known responses of more regularly and intermediately discharging primary vestibular afferents to GVS. These results together suggest that more regularly discharging otolith-ocular projections may mediate the tonic changes in eye position induced during maintained, low-intensity GVS in guinea pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical evaluation of dynamic visual acuity in subjects with unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Dannenbaum, Elizabeth; Paquet, Nicole; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Fung, Joyce

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: 1) to examine the effect of frequency of head motion on the clinical dynamic visual acuity (DVA) score in subjects with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH); 2) to compare DVA scores between subjects with UVH and subjects with a complete unilateral vestibular deficit; and 3) to establish whether a relationship exists between the extent of the vestibular deficit and the DVA score. Experimental study. Vestibular outpatient rehabilitation program. A convenience sample of 10 subjects with UVH. Dynamic visual acuity scores were recorded using 2 standard acuity charts: Snellen and E-chart. The DVA scores were obtained at slow (0.5 Hz), moderate (1 and 1.5 Hz), and fast (2.0 Hz) frequencies of head motion in the horizontal and the vertical planes. Percentage of caloric weakness was compared with DVA scores in each subject to test whether a relationship exists between the two. As the frequency of head motion increased, the number of UVH subjects with an abnormal DVA score increased. Subjects with an abnormal DVA score at 1 Hz had the same or higher score as the frequency of the head motion was increased. Spearman correlation analyses revealed low-correlation coefficients between percentage of vestibular paresis at the caloric test and DVA scores (horizontal direction: r = 0.31, p = 0.38 for Snellen chart and r = -0.33, p = 0.35 for the E-chart; vertical: r = 0.05, p = 0.91 for the Snellen chart and r = -0.28, p = 0.50 for the E-chart). Subjects with UVH manifest impaired DVA. The frequency of head motion has an impact on clinical DVA scores in UVH subjects.

  16. Short-term galvanic vestibular stimulation promotes functional recovery and neurogenesis in unilaterally labyrinthectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shaabani, Moslem; Lotfi, Yones; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Hooshmandi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Current experimental research on the therapeutic effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has mainly focused on neurodegenerative disorders. However, it primarily stimulates the vestibular nuclei and could be potentially effective in modulating imbalance between them in the case of unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Fifty male Wistar rats (180-220g) were used in 5 groups of 10: intact, sham, right-UL (RUL; without intervention), and two other right-UL groups with GVS intervention [one group treated with low rate GVS (GVS.LF; 6-7Hz), and the other treated with high rate GVS (GVS.HF; 17-18Hz)]. The UL models were prepared by intratympanic injection of sodium arsanilate. GVS protocols were implemented 30min/day and continued for 14 days via ring-shaped copper electrodes inserted subcutaneously over each mastoid. Functional recovery was assessed by several postural tests including support surface area, landing and air-righting reflexes, and rotarod procedure. Immunohistochemical investigations were performed on ipsi- and contra-lesional medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki67, as markers of cell proliferation. Behavioral evaluations showed significant functional recovery of GVS-treated groups compared to RUL group. The percent of marked cells with BrdU and Ki67 were significantly higher in the ipsilesional MVN of both GVS-treated groups compared with other groups. Our findings confirmed the effectiveness of GVS-intervention in accelerating static and dynamic vestibular compensation. This could be explained by the cell proliferation in ipsilesional MVN cells and rapid rebalancing of the VNs and the modulation of their motor outputs. Therefore, GVS could be promising for rehabilitating patients with unilateral vestibular weakness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Relation of video-head-impulse test and caloric irrigation: a study on the recovery in unilateral vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Zellhuber, Stephanie; Mahringer, Andrea; Rambold, Holger A

    2014-09-01

    The head-impulse test (HIT) is an important test for examining unilateral vestibular hypofunction. The new video-head-impulse test (vHIT) is more sensitive and specific than the clinical bedside-head-impulse test. Alternatively, one can test for vestibular hypofunction with the caloric irrigation test. Various studies have shown that both tests may not always identify vestibular hypofunction; instead, the results of the tests might be contradictory. To further explore the question, of whether vHIT and caloric irrigation test the same part of the angular horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), we examined patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis at different points in time. The tonic vestibular imbalance (e.g., subjective-visual-vertical, ocular torsion and spontaneous nystagmus) and dynamic dysfunction of VOR (vHIT and bithermal caloric irrigation) were measured and quantified. While parameters of the tonic vestibular imbalance were well described by single exponential decay functions, dynamic parameters were less well defined. Therefore, to better compare the time course of pairs of two different parameters, we used a linear regression analysis. No linear correlation was found in the group and individually for the gain asymmetry and the ipsilesional gain of the vHIT with the unilateral weakness of the bithermal caloric irrigation tests. Linear correlation was found for most parameters of tonic vestibular imbalance. These findings are further evidence that vHIT and caloric irrigation test different parts of the angular VOR.

  18. Nystagmus induced by high frequency vibrations of the skull in total unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sebastien

    2008-03-01

    The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) is a useful complementary test to the caloric test, which evaluates very low frequencies, and the head shaking test (HST), which explores medium range frequencies. These three tests are fully correlated in total unilateral vestibular lesions (tUVL) with a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 94% for the SVINT. The results of the interference of the SVINT with the cold caloric test on the intact ear suggest that different vestibular sensory cells are involved in these two tests. The stimulus location optimization suggests that vibrations directly stimulate the inner ear on the intact side. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of a rapid, non-invasive test used to detect vestibular asymmetry at 30, 60 and 100 Hz stimulation in tUVL. The high frequency vibration test applied to the skull using the SVINT was compared to the results of HST and caloric test in 134 patients and 95 normal subjects: 131 patients had a total unilateral vestibular dysfunction and 3 had a bilateral total lesion (tBVL). The effects of stimulus frequency, topography and head position were studied using a video-nystagmograph. In tUVL, the SVINT always revealed a lesional nystagmus beating toward the healthy side at all frequencies. The mastoid site was more efficient than the cervical and vertex sites (p0.005). The mean skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) slow phase velocity (SPV) is 10.7 degrees (SD =7.5; n=20). Mastoid stimulation efficiency was not correlated with the side of stimulation. SVN SPV was correlated with the total caloric efficiency on the healthy ear (p=0.03). The interference of the SVINT during the cold caloric test on the intact ear demonstrated a reversal of the caloric nystagmus at each application of the vibrator. In tBVL, SVINT revealed no nystagmus.

  19. Effects of practicing tandem gait with and without vibrotactile biofeedback in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Dozza, Marco; Wall, Conrad; Peterka, Robert J.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with unilateral vestibular loss exhibit motor control impairments as shown by body and limb deviation during gait. Biofeedback devices have been shown to improve stance postural control, especially when sensory information is limited by environmental conditions or pathologies such as unilateral vestibular loss. However, the extent to which biofeedback could improve motor performance or learning while practicing a dynamic task such as narrow gait is still unknown. In this cross-over design study, 9 unilateral vestibular loss subjects practiced narrow gait with and without wearing a trunk-tilt, biofeedback device in 2 practice sessions. The biofeedback device informed the subjects of their medial-lateral angular tilt and tilt velocity during gait via vibration of the trunk. From motion analysis and tilt data, the performance of the subjects practicing tandem gait were compared over time with and without biofeedback. By practicing tandem gait, subjects reduced their trunk-tilt, center of mass displacement, medial-lateral feet distance, and frequency of stepping error. In both groups, use of tactile biofeedback consistently increased postural stability during tandem gait, beyond the effects of practice alone. However, one single session of practice with biofeedback did not result in conclusive short-term after-effects consistent with short-term retention of motor performance without this additional biofeedback. Results from this study support the hypothesis that tactile biofeedback acts similar to natural sensory feedback to improve dynamic motor performance but does not facilitate a recalibration of motor performance to improve function after short-term use. PMID:18525145

  20. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential to air conducted sound stimulation and video head impulse test in acute vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Leif Erik; Blödow, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Air-conducted (ACS) cervical VEMP (cVEMP) reflect both saccular and inferior vestibular nerve function. Ocular VEMP (oVEMP) to air and bone-conducted vibration (BCV) are critically discussed, whether they reflect predominantly utricular and superior vestibular nerve function. The video head impulse test (vHIT) accurately detects changes in the high frequency range (5-7 Hz) of the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) in all 3 planes and can be used to assess semicircular canals (SCC) impairment. To evaluate oVEMP and cVEMP in response to 500 Hz ACS stimulation and to compare these with vHIT results in acute unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) to classify the probable involvement of SCC and otolith organs. Patients with VN were studied. ACS oVEMP and ACS cVEMP (100 dB nHL 500 Hz tone burst stimulation) were recorded. The vHIT for the 3 SCC were performed simultaneously. ACS oVEMP and ACS cVEMP in combination with vHIT allows the differentiation of 4 types of VN: entire VN (EVN), superior VN (SVN), inferior VN (IVN), and ampullary VN (AVN). Lesions of EVN, SVN, and IVN may be either complete or partial. ACS oVEMP and ACS cVEMP to 500 Hz stimulation together with the vHIT allows a better differentiation of receptor involvement in VN. Results suggest a different origin of AC oVEMP and AC cVEMP to 500 Hz in complete SVN and IVN. Partial SVN and IVN may indicate a role of saccular fibers in oVEMP.

  1. Vibrotactile Biofeedback Improves Tandem Gait in Patients with Unilateral Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Fay B; Dozza, Marco; Peterka, Robert; Chiari, Lorenzo; Wall, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-over design, subjects with unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) practiced tandem gait with eyes closed on two days, two weeks apart, with and without vibrotactile biofeedback (BF) applied to the lateral trunk. Results showed an immediate improvement in postural stability (reduction of lateral center of mass displacement, trunk tilt and medial-lateral step width), that was significantly larger than effects of practice alone. However, BF did not increase the rate of improvement or retention of improved stability during gait. PMID:19645912

  2. [Effects of acetyl-DL-leucine on the recovery of the locomotor equilibrium and spontaneous discharge of lateral vestibular nucleus neurons in unilateral vestibular neurectomized cats].

    PubMed

    Sun, J

    1997-08-01

    The effects of acetyl-DL-leucine (AL) treatment (28 mg/kg.day, p.o.) on the vestibular compensation were studied over period of 6 weeks in unilateral vestibular neurectomized cats. This investigation was performed by measuring the recovery time of locomotor equilibrium in the rotating beam test and recording the unitary extracellular activity of single neurons of lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) in totally awake cats. The results showed that AL treatment strongly accelerated the recovery of locomotor equilibrium and significantly inhibited the recovery of resting spontaneous firing rate within the deafferented LVN neurons (n = 506) but improved the sensitivity and recovery of relative amount and proportion of neurons (n = 454) in response to head roll tilts in frontal plane. The neurophysiological mechanisms of AL role in the vestibular compensation were discussed.

  3. Medical and Nonstroke Neurologic Causes of Acute, Continuous Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-08-01

    Most patients with the acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) have vestibular neuritis or stroke or, in the setting of trauma, a posttraumatic vestibular cause. Some medical and nonstroke causes of the AVS must also be considered. Multiple sclerosis is the most common diagnosis in this group. Other less common causes include cerebellar masses, inflammation and infection, mal de debarquement, various toxins, Wernicke disease, celiac-related dizziness, and bilateral vestibulopathy. Finally, there may be unmasking of prior posterior circulation events by various physiologic alterations such as alterations of temperature, blood pressure, electrolytes, or various medications, especially sedating agents.

  4. Subjective assessment of visual verticality in follow-up of patients with acute vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez García, Angélica; Jáuregui-Renaud, Kathrine

    2003-06-01

    We conducted a study of 10 patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure in order to assess their ability to perceive visual verticality during the acute stage of their disease and during recovery. We also evaluated 31 healthy volunteers to test the reproducibility of our assessment methods. The 10 patients were first evaluated within 4 days of the onset of their vestibular failure, and follow-up tests were conducted 2 and 4 weeks later. The healthy subjects were similarly tested at 2 and 4 weeks following their baseline evaluation. All patients and subjects were tested 10 times during each evaluation session, and results from each as well as from the groups as a whole were calculated as a mean of all responses. The mean visual vertical tilt (the amount of deviation from true verticality) among the 10 patients declined from 8.4 degrees (+/- 2.4 degrees) at the first examination to 3.2 degrees (+/- 1.6 degrees) at week 2 and to 1.4 degrees (+/- 0.7 degree) at week 4. These decreases coincided with the pace of the resolution of their vestibular symptoms. The rates of reproducibility among the 31 healthy volunteers at 2 and 4 weeks following their initial assessment were 95 and 97%, respectively. We concluded that repeated measurements of the static visual vertical can be useful as a follow-up tool for patients with vestibular neuritis.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of vestibular bed-side examination in detecting VIII cranial nerve schwannoma with sensorineural sudden unilateral hearing loss as presenting symptom.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify signs of vestibular nerve suffering through a bedside vestibular examination protocol in case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss without spontaneous signs of vestibular impairment and to propose a bed-side vestibular examination based protocol for the focused execution of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only if a vestibular schwannoma is suspected. 96 patients, 52 men, 44 women, mean age 57.73 +/- 12.85 years, suffering from sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, which presented neither vertigo nor spontaneous nystagmus, were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, measurement of acoustic reflexes and Anderson test to detect adaptation, bedside vestibular examination through head shaking test, vibration test, head impulse test, hyperventilation test and detection of nystagmus in supine and lateral decubitus to search for signs of vestibular impairment were performed. Patients with signs of vestibular impairment and pure tone audiometry threshold at high frequencies better than 70 dB nHL were subjected to auditory brainstem responses. Gadolinium enhanced MRI centred on internal acoustic canals was carried out in all patients with sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. Main outcome measures were signs of vestibular impairment at vestibular bedside examination and presence of vestibular schwannoma on MRI. Signs of vestibular impairment were detected in 22/96 cases (22.9%); a vestibular schwannoma was detected by MRI in 5/96 cases (5.2%), always when vestibular impairment was present. In case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, vestibular bedside examination seems to be useful to restrict the suspicion of a vestibular schwannoma to cases with signs of vestibular impairment, reducing the number of MRI exams, with considerable economic savings. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  6. Vestibular function following unilateral cochlear implantation for profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    le Nobel, Gavin J; Hwang, Euna; Wu, Adrian; Cushing, Sharon; Lin, Vincent Y

    2016-06-14

    Many Canadians are affected by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and those with severe or profound hearing loss may have poor hearing function despite optimized hearing aids. Cochlear implants (CI) offer effective hearing rehabilitation for these patients, however, concern continues to exist regarding possible effects of CI on the vestibular system and balance. The objective of this study was to conduct a pilot study assessing the effects of unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) on balance and the vestibular system in post-lingually deafened adults. Twelve patients were included in this pilot study and were assessed pre-operatively and at immediate, 1 week, and 1 month post-operative intervals. Assessments consisted of the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), subjective visual vertical (SVV), and timed up-and-go testing (TUG). When applicable, testing was repeated with the CI on and off. Many patients were found to have deviated SVV at pre-operative and post-operative assessments. However, statistically significant changes were not seen when comparing pre-operative and post-operative SVV or when comparing SVV with the CI on and with the CI off. DHI was found to improve in five patients and worsen in two patients, however, no statistically significant change was found in DHI scores or with TUG testing. This current pilot study does not indicate that CI surgery or implant activity influence vestibular or balance function, however, this pilot study is underpowered and greater numbers of patients would need be assessed to confirm these findings.

  7. New mouse model for inducing and evaluating unilateral vestibular deafferentation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassel, R; Bordiga, P; Pericat, D; Hautefort, C; Tighilet, B; Chabbert, C

    2017-09-11

    Unilateral vestibular deafferentation syndrome (uVDS) holds a particular place in the vestibular pathology domain. Due to its suddenness, the violence of its symptoms that often result in emergency hospitalization, and its associated original neurophysiological properties, this syndrome is a major source of questioning for the otoneurology community. Also, its putative pathogenic causes remain to be determined. There is currently a strong medical need for the development of targeted and effective countermeasures to improve the therapeutic management of uVDS. The present study reports the development of a new mouse model for inducing and evaluating uVDS. Both the method for generating controlled excitotoxic-type peripheral vestibular damages, through transtympanic administration of the glutamate receptors agonist kainate (TTK), and the procedure for evaluating the ensuing clinical signs are detailed. Through extensive analysis of the clinical symptoms characteristics, this new animal model provides the opportunity to better follow the temporal evolution of various uVDS specific symptoms, while better appreciating the different phases that composed this syndrome. The uVDS evoked in the TTK mouse model displays two main phases distinguishable by their kinetics and amplitudes. Several parameters of the altered vestibular behaviour mimic those observed in the human syndrome. This new murine model brings concrete information about how uVDS develops and how it affects global behaviour. In addition, it opens new opportunity to decipher the etiopathological substrate of this pathology by authorizing the use of genetically modified mouse models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes of some amino acid concentrations in the medial vestibular nucleus of conscious rats following acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Lan; An, Ying; Jin, Qing-Hua; Kim, Min Sun; Park, Byung Rim; Jin, Yuan-Zhe

    2010-06-14

    Microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to measure the changes of certain amino acids in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) of conscious rats in order to understand whether those amino acids are involved in the regulation of blood pressure. Acute hypotension was induced by infusing sodium nitroprusside (SNP) into the femoral vein. In the control group, glutamate (Glu) release increased, though gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine (Tau) release decreased in the MVN following acute hypotension. In the unilateral labyrinthectomy group, the levels of Glu, GABA, and Tau were unchanged in the ipsilateral MVN to the lesion following acute hypotension. Furthermore, in the contralateral MVN to the lesion, Glu release increased, and GABA and Tau release decreased following acute hypotension. These results suggest that SNP-induced acute hypotension can influence the activity of neurons in the MVN through afferent signals from peripheral vestibular receptors, and that certain amino acid transmitters in the MVN are involved in this process.

  9. [Vestibular neuritis: treatment and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Reinhard, A; Maire, R

    2013-10-02

    Vestibular neuritis is a sudden unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit of unknown origin without associated hearing loss. It is the second cause of peripheral vertigo after Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). The etiology remains unclear and some treatments are still controversial. The prognosis is good. The differential diagnosis of the disease mainly includes an acute vertigo of central origin. This article summarizes the management and prognosis of vestibular neuritis.

  10. [Timed balance test and static posturography in the patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Kong, Wei-Jia; Lai, Chang-Qin; Hu, Yu-Juan

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the balance function of the patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) by timed balance tests and static posturography (SPG). Sixty-five subjects with UVH and 92 healthy subjects were taken the timed balance tests under differential stance including (1) standard Romberg test, (2) feet apart stance test, (3) tandem and (4) unilateral standing tests with eyes open and eyes closed. The average timing that subjects kept balance before falling in each standing conditions was recorded by stopwatch as the timed result. The body sway velocity during the test (1) and (2) were also recorded by the SPG. The timed results of the tandem and unilateral standing with eyes open and eyes closed in the UVH group were decreased (P < 0.001) compared with the control group. The body sway velocity of the standard Romberg test and foot apart stance with eyes open was not different between the UVH group and control group (P-value was 0.118 and 0.110 for the two tests respectively), and the difference was significant in the eyes closed condition (P < 0.001). For the two groups, the body sway velocity of foot apart standing was decreased than that of the standard Romberg test with eyes open and eyes closed (P < 0.05 or P < 0.001). Significant correlations were not found between the timed results and sway velocity results in both two groups respectively (P > 0.05). According to clinical assessment of balance function in UVH, the tandem and unilateral stance test could provide the additional information about the upright stance to the SPG measurement. The effect of foot position on the results of SPG should been considered in clinic.

  11. Expression of glycine receptors and gephyrin in rat medial vestibular nuclei and flocculi following unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Liu-Qing; Shi, Hong; Leng, Yang-Ming; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the cerebellar flocculus have been known to be the key areas involved in vestibular compensation (VC) following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). In this study, we examined the role of gephyrin and glycine receptor (GlyR) in VC using Sprague-Dawley rats, in an aim to gain deeper insight into the mechanisms responsible for VC. The expression of the α1 and β subunits of GlyR and gephyrin was immunohistochemically localized in rat MVN and flocculi. The mRNA and protein expression of GlyR (α1 and β subunits) and gephyrin was quantitatively determined by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis at 8 h, and at 1, 3 and 7 days following UL. It was found that in the ipsilateral MVN, the mRNA and protein expression of the β subunit of GlyR was significantly increased in comparison to the sham-operated (P<0.01) rats, and in comparison to the contralateral side (P<0.01) at 8 h following UL. In the ipsilateral flocculi, GlyR β protein expression was significantly elevated (P<0.01 for all), as compared to the sham-operated rats at 8 h, and at 1 and 3 days and to the contralateral side 8 h, 1 and 3 days following UL. No significant differences were observed in the mRNA and protein expression of GlyR α1 and gephyrin in the MVN or flocculi between the two sides (ipsilateral and contralateral) in the UL group, and between the sham-operated group and the UL group at any time point. The findings of our study thus suggest that GlyR plays a major role in the recovery of the resting discharge of the deafferented MVN neurons in the central vestibular system. PMID:28026001

  12. Influence of the stimulus parameters of galvanic vestibular stimulation on unilateral spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junji; Kita, Yorihiro; Ikuno, Koki; Kojima, Kosuke; Okada, Yohei; Shomoto, Koji

    2015-05-27

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) stimulates the vestibular system electrically with low-amplitude direct current through surface electrodes applied to the left and right mastoids. The effects of GVS on unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in poststroke patients were recently reported, but the influence of the current intensity and application duration of GVS on USN has not been sufficiently investigated. Here we explored the influence of these stimulus parameters on USN. We recruited seven patients with right-hemisphere stroke and left-sided USN (four female) for this single-blind, sham-controlled cross-over trial. Their scores on the line cancellation test were measured under three stimulation conditions [left-cathodal/right-anodal GVS (L-GVS), right-cathodal/left-anodal GVS, and sham] at three time points (before the start of GVS, 10 min after the start of GVS, and 20 min after the start of GVS). The GVS intensity was set below the sensory threshold and differed among the patients (0.4-2.0 mA). The cancellation scores were significantly increased after 10 and 20 min L-GVS, with a greater increase observed after the latter (P<0.0001). The other stimulus conditions had no significant effect. There was a significant positive correlation between the change in the increase in the cancellation score with L-GVS and the total charge (r=0.81, P=0.0004). The effect of GVS on USN may depend on its application duration, current intensity, and polarity.

  13. Examination and treatment of patients with unilateral vestibular damage, with focus on the musculoskeletal system: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kjersti; Kvåle, Alice

    2014-07-01

    Persistent dizziness and balance problems have been reported in some patients with unilateral vestibular pathology. The purpose of this case series was to address the examination and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunction in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. The musculoskeletal system was evaluated with the Global Physiotherapy Examination, dynamic balance was measured during walking with triaxial accelerometers positioned on the lower and upper trunk, and symptoms and functional limitations were assessed with standardized self-report measures. The 4 included patients had symptoms of severe dizziness that had lasted more than 1 year after the onset of vestibular dysfunction and a moderate level of perceived disability. Musculoskeletal abnormalities typically included postural misalignment, restricted abdominal respiration, restricted trunk movements, and tense muscles of the upper trunk and neck. The patients attended a modified vestibular rehabilitation program consisting of body awareness exercises addressing posture, movements, and respiration. After the intervention, self-reported symptoms and perceived disability improved. Improvements in mobility and positive physical changes were found in the upper trunk and respiratory movements. The attenuation of mediolateral accelerations (ie, body oscillations) in the upper trunk changed; a relatively more stable upper trunk and a concomitantly more flexible lower trunk were identified during walking in 3 patients. The recovery process may be influenced by self-inflicted rigid body movements and behavior strategies that prevent compensation. Addressing physical dysfunction and enhancing body awareness directly and dizziness indirectly may help patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction break a self-sustaining cycle of dizziness and musculoskeletal problems. Considering the body as a functional unit and including both musculoskeletal and vestibular systems in examination and treatment may be

  14. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, In Kyung; Song, Sang Woo; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: The actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.

  15. Responses of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal horizontal translation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2014-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral deficits partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of the macaque vestibular system in the compensated state (>7 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Three groups of vestibular nucleus neurons were included: pre-UL control neurons, neurons ipsilateral to the lesion, and neurons contralateral to the lesion. The firing responses of neurons sensitive to linear acceleration in the horizontal plane were recorded during sinusoidal horizontal translation directed along six different orientations (30° apart) at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration (196 cm/s2). This data defined the vector of best response for each neuron in the horizontal plane, along which sensitivity, symmetry, detection threshold, and variability of firing were determined. Additionally, the responses of the same cells to translation over a series of frequencies (0.25–5.0 Hz) either in the interaural or naso-occipital orientation were obtained to define the frequency response characteristics in each group. We found a decrease in sensitivity, increase in threshold, and alteration in orientation of best responses in the vestibular nuclei after UL. Additionally, the phase relationship of the best neural response to translational stimulation changed with UL. The symmetry of individual neuron responses in the excitatory and inhibitory directions was unchanged by UL. Bilateral central utricular neurons still demonstrated two-dimension tuning after UL, consistent with spatio-temporal convergence from a single vestibular end-organ. These neuronal data correlate with known behavioral deficits after unilateral vestibular compromise. PMID:24717349

  16. Can an electro-tactile vestibular substitution system improve balance in patients with unilateral vestibular loss under altered somatosensory conditions from the foot and ankle?

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, N; Hlavackova, P; Franco, C; Diot, B; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study aimed at assessing the feasibility and the effectiveness of an electro Electro-tactile Vestibular Substitution System (EVSS) in patients with unilateral vestibular loss under normal and altered somatosensory conditions from the foot and ankle. Four unilateral vestibular-defective patients voluntarily participated in the experiment. They were asked to stand upright as still as possible with their eyes closed in two Normal and Altered foot and ankle sensory conditions. In the Normal condition, the postural task was executed on a firm support surface constituted by the force platform. In the Altered condition, a 2-cm thick foam support surface was placed under the participants' feet. These two foot and ankle sensory conditions were executed under two No EVSS and EVSS experimental conditions. The No EVSS condition served as a control condition. In the EVSS condition, participants executed the postural task using a biofeedback system whose underlying principle consisted of supplying them with additional information about their head orientation/motion with respect to gravitational vertical through electro-tactile stimulation of their tongue. Centre of foot pressure displacements (CoP) were recorded using the force platform. Results showed that, relative to the No EVSS condition, the EVSS condition decreased CoP displacements in both the Normal and the Altered foot and ankle sensory conditions. Interestingly, the stabilizing effect was more pronounced in the Altered than in the Normal foot and ankle sensory condition. These preliminary results suggest that patients with unilateral vestibular loss were able to take advantage to a head position-based electro-tactile tongue biofeedback to mitigate the postural perturbation induced by alteration of somatosensory input from the foot and the ankle.

  17. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  18. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  19. Changes in Histamine Receptors (H1, H2, and H3) Expression in Rat Medial Vestibular Nucleus and Flocculus after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy: Histamine Receptors in Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Kong, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is the process of behavioral recovery following peripheral vestibular lesion. In clinics, the histaminergic medicine is the most widely prescribed for the treatment of vertigo and motion sickness, however, the molecular mechanisms by which histamine modulates vestibular function remain unclear. During recovery from the lesion, the modulation of histamine receptors in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the flocculus may play an important role. Here with the means of quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry, we studied the expression of histamine receptors (H1, H2, and H3) in the bilateral MVN and the flocculus of rats on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th day following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Our results have shown that on the ipsi-lesional flocculus the H1, H2 and H3 receptors mRNA and the protein increased significantly on the 1st and 3rd day, with compare of sham controls and as well the contralateral side of UL. However, on the 7th day after UL, this expression returned to basal levels. Furthermore, elevated mRNA and protein levels of H1, H2 and H3 receptors were observed in the ipsi-lesional MVN on the 1st day after UL compared with sham controls and as well the contralateral side of UL. However, this asymmetric expression was absent by the 3rd post-UL. Our findings suggest that the upregulation of histamine receptors in the MVN and the flocculus may contribute to rebalancing the spontaneous discharge in bilateral MVN neurons during vestibular compensation. PMID:23840519

  20. [Built-in emergency brake in the balance system. Animal experiment research shows that a hierarchy of mechanisms compensate after acute peripheral vestibular decline].

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Anna K; Tham, Richard

    A sudden unilateral loss of peripheral vestibular input results in the onset of acute dizziness and imbalance associated with spontaneous nystagmus, postural instability and nausea. Fortunately, these symptoms ameliorate rapidly, even without treatment, due to central nervous plastic changes which are collectively termed "vestibular compensation". This concept has become a widely accepted research model for studying lesion-induced plasticity. Recent research has dealt in particular with the plasticity of the medial vestibular nuclei that mediate the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex. Studies range from a cellular level in vitro to a functional level in vivo. Taken together, results from such studies have contributed greatly to what is known of vestibular compensation today. This article summarises evidence for several plasticity mechanisms that drive the recovery of spontaneous nystagmus, one of which is dependent on an endocrine stress-response. In the long run, such knowledge might influence the management and treatment of patients with balance disorders.

  1. The effects of habituation and gaze-stability exercises in the treatment of unilateral vestibular hypofunction – preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Clendaniel, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The efficacy of both habituation and adaptation exercise interventions in the treatment of unilateral vestibular hypofunction has been demonstrated by prior studies. The purpose of this paper is to describe the preliminary results of an ongoing study that compares the effects of these two different exercise approaches on outcomes related to vestibular function. Methods Seven participants with unilateral vestibular hypofunction have completed a 6-week exercise intervention after randomize assignment to either habituation (H) exercises, or gaze-stability (GS) adaptation exercises. The following measures were taken pre-treatment and post-treatment: Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) to measure the symptom impact, motion sensitivity quotient (MSQ) to assess sensitivity to head movements, and the dynamic visual acuity test (DVA) as a measure of gaze-stability during head movements. Results Following the 6-week intervention there was an overall improvement in the DHI, the MSQ, and both the active and passive DVA. The H and GS intervention group participants each demonstrated similar improvements in both the MSQ, as well as the active and passive DVA measures. Discussion and Conclusions The improvement in the MSQ for the GS group and the improvement in the DVA measures for the H group were unexpected findings. Head movement, which is required by both exercise interventions, rather than the specific type of exercise may be the critical factor underlying the observed improvements in motion sensitivity and dynamic visual acuity. PMID:20588098

  2. Modifications of muscle synergies and spinal maps due to absence of visual feedback in patients with unilateral vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Monaco, V; Martelli, D; Nacci, A; Fattori, B; Berrettini, S; Micera, S

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed at describing the modifications of muscle synergies and spinal activity due to the absence of visual feedback, in patients affected by unilateral vestibular disease. Patients were tested both during unperturbed quite stance and walking while the activity of 7 bilateral muscles, from the leg to the trunk, were recorded for the estimation of muscle synergies and spinal activity. Results showed that during locomotion the absence of visual feedback did not significantly modify either the principal roles underlying muscle activity (i.e., synergies) or the spinal bursts. Conversely, during the upright stance, the absence of visual feedback involved a significant coupling of ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscle groups with a consequent shift of the motoneuronal (MN) activity toward most caudal segments. Results revealed that the muscle synergies are able to document an increased activity of sensory-motor afferences leading a more intense role of the forward based mechanism underlying balance control in vestibular patients.

  3. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  4. Skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in unilateral superior canal dehiscence and otosclerosis: a vestibular Weber test.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Karkas, Alexandre; Perrin, Philippe; Perottino, Flavio; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) acts as a vestibular Weber test and reveals a vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN), elicited mainly on the vertex location, with a horizontal or torsional component beating more often toward the side of the lesion in superior canal dehiscence (SCD) than in otosclerosis (OS). In SCD, the VIN vertical component is most often up-beating. These results suggest more a global vestibular contribution than the sole stimulation of the superior semicircular canal. This study aimed to evaluate the possible occurrence of nystagmus during SVINT in unilateral conductive hearing loss related to SCD or OS. The slow-phase velocities (SPVs) of the VIN horizontal, torsional, and vertical components were recorded in patients with a unilateral otologic lesion (17 SCD, 38 OS) and 12 control subjects. Vibratory stimulations (60 Hz, 100 Hz) were applied on the vertex and on each mastoid. In SCD, VIN was observed in 82% of patients with a primarily torsional, horizontal, and vertical (up-beating) component in 40%, 30%, and 30%, respectively. Horizontal and torsional components beat toward the side of the lesion more often than in OS. Higher SPVs were observed after vertex stimulation. In OS, VIN was sparse with low amplitude and was not systematically lateralized to a specific side.

  5. Neurogenic Potential of the Vestibular Nuclei and Behavioural Recovery Time Course in the Adult Cat Are Governed by the Nature of the Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Sophie; Lacour, Michel; Tighilet, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Functional and reactive neurogenesis and astrogenesis are observed in deafferented vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular nerve section in adult cats. The newborn cells survive up to one month and contribute actively to the successful recovery of posturo-locomotor functions. This study investigates whether the nature of vestibular deafferentation has an incidence on the neurogenic potential of the vestibular nuclei, and on the time course of behavioural recovery. Three animal models that mimic different vestibular pathologies were used: unilateral and permanent suppression of vestibular input by unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN), or by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL, the mechanical destruction of peripheral vestibular receptors), or unilateral and reversible blockade of vestibular nerve input using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Neurogenesis and astrogenesis were revealed in the vestibular nuclei using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a newborn cell marker, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) were used to identify astrocytes and GABAergic neurons, respectively. Spontaneous nystagmus and posturo-locomotor tests (static and dynamic balance performance) were carried out to quantify the behavioural recovery process. Results showed that the nature of vestibular loss determined the cellular plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei and affected the time course of behavioural recovery. Interestingly, the deafferented vestibular nuclei express neurogenic potential after acute and total vestibular loss only (UVN), while non-structural plastic processes are involved when the vestibular deafferentation is less drastic (UL, TTX). This is the first experimental evidence that the vestibular complex in the brainstem can become neurogenic under specific injury. These new data are of interest for understanding the factors favouring the expression of functional neurogenesis in adult mammals in a brain repair perspective, and are of

  6. [Some characteristics of optokinetic nystagmus in patients with unilateral vestibular neuronitis].

    PubMed

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Dukor, D M

    2002-01-01

    Optokinetic reflex was studied in 20 patients aged 20-58 years with vestibular neuronitis. In 16 decompensated patients the direction of the optokinetic nystagmus was inversed. This inversion disappeared in development of the compensation. Mean values of the amplitude and speed of the slow phase of optokinetic nystagmus are presented for patients with vestibular neuronitis and 20 healthy subjects in mono- and binocular optokinetic stimulation of various intensity.

  7. Nonlinear Analysis of Sensory Organization Test for Subjects with Unilateral Vestibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Chang, Fu-Ling; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular disorder is the cause of approximately 50% of dizziness in older people. The vestibular system is a critical postural control mechanism, and posturography analysis is helpful for diagnosing vestibular disorder. In clinical practice, the sensory organization test (SOT) is used to quantify postural control in an upright stance under different test conditions. However, both aging and vestibular disorder cause declines of postural control mechanisms. The aim of this study was to enhance the performance of the SOT using a nonlinear algorithm of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and to verify the differences of effects caused by aging and/or illnesses benefits to clinical diagnosis. A total of 51 subjects belonging to 3 groups—healthy-young, healthy-elderly and dizzy—were recruited for this study. New dynamic parameters of the SOT were derived from the center of pressure (COP) signals. EMD served as an adaptive filter bank to derive the low- and high-frequency components of the COP. The effects on four ratios of sensory analysis caused by aging and vestibular disorder can be investigated for the specific frequency bands. According to our findings, new SOT parameters derived from the component with the specific frequency band more sensitively reflect the functional condition of vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, both aging and vestibular dysfunction caused an increase in magnitude for the low-frequency component of the AP-direction COP time series. In summary, the low-frequency fluctuation reflects the stability of postural control, while the high-frequency fluctuation is sensitive to the functional condition of the sensory system. EMD successfully improved the accuracy of SOT measurements in this investigation. PMID:24632582

  8. Nonlinear analysis of sensory organization test for subjects with unilateral vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Hsu, Li-Chi; Lin, Chen; Chang, Fu-Ling; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular disorder is the cause of approximately 50% of dizziness in older people. The vestibular system is a critical postural control mechanism, and posturography analysis is helpful for diagnosing vestibular disorder. In clinical practice, the sensory organization test (SOT) is used to quantify postural control in an upright stance under different test conditions. However, both aging and vestibular disorder cause declines of postural control mechanisms. The aim of this study was to enhance the performance of the SOT using a nonlinear algorithm of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and to verify the differences of effects caused by aging and/or illnesses benefits to clinical diagnosis. A total of 51 subjects belonging to 3 groups--healthy-young, healthy-elderly and dizzy--were recruited for this study. New dynamic parameters of the SOT were derived from the center of pressure (COP) signals. EMD served as an adaptive filter bank to derive the low- and high-frequency components of the COP. The effects on four ratios of sensory analysis caused by aging and vestibular disorder can be investigated for the specific frequency bands. According to our findings, new SOT parameters derived from the component with the specific frequency band more sensitively reflect the functional condition of vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, both aging and vestibular dysfunction caused an increase in magnitude for the low-frequency component of the AP-direction COP time series. In summary, the low-frequency fluctuation reflects the stability of postural control, while the high-frequency fluctuation is sensitive to the functional condition of the sensory system. EMD successfully improved the accuracy of SOT measurements in this investigation.

  9. Correlation between the dizziness handicap inventory and balance performance during the acute phase of unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Son, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) is widely used to evaluate self-perceived handicap due to dizziness, and is known to correlate with vestibular function tests in chronic dizziness. However, whether DHI reflects subjective symptoms during the acute phase has not been studied. This study aims to investigate the correlations of subjective and objective measurements to highlight parameters that reflect the severity of dizziness during the first week of acute unilateral vestibulopathy. Thirty-seven patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy were examined. Patients' subjective perceptions of dizziness were measured using the DHI, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale (VVAS), Disability Scale (DS), and Activity-Specific Balance Scale (ABC). Additionally, the oculomotor tests, Romberg and sharpened Romberg tests, functional reach test, and dynamic visual acuity tests were performed. The correlation between the DHI and other tests was evaluated. DHI-total scores exhibited a moderately positive correlation with VVAS and DS, and a moderately negative correlation with ABC. However, DHI-total score did not correlate with results of the Romberg, sharpened Romberg, or functional reach tests. When compared among four groups divided according to DHI scores, VVAS and DS scores exhibited statistically significant differences, but no significant differences were detected for other test results. Our findings revealed that the DHI correlated significantly with self-perceived symptoms measured by VVAS and DS, but not ABC. There was no significant correlation with other balance function tests during the first week of acute vestibulopathy. The results suggest that DHI, VVAS and DS may be more useful to measure the severity of acute dizziness symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Esthetic Management of Unilateral Cross Bite with Dento-vestibular Enhancement Prosthetic Appliance.

    PubMed

    Dhanraj, M; Ariga, Padma; Anand, S; Jain, Ashish R

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral crossbite is a commonly encountered condition in clinical practice. The most frequently employed treatment protocol to manage unilateral crossbite is orthodontic correction or orthognathic surgery or combination of both. When the clinical situation less favours both these modalities of management, a transitional prosthetic appliance--dentovestibular enhancement prosthetic appliance- can be effectively used to manage this condition.

  11. Deficient recovery response and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic gait stability in unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    McCrum, Christopher; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2014-12-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder (UPVD) causes deficient locomotor responses to novel environments due to a lack of accurate vestibular sensory information, increasing fall risk. This study aimed to examine recovery response (stability recovery actions) and adaptive feedback potential in dynamic stability of UPVD-patients and healthy control subjects during perturbed walking. 17 UPVD-patients (>6 months since onset) and 17 matched healthy control participants walked on a treadmill and were subjected to eight unexpected perturbations during the swing phase of the right leg. For each perturbation, the margin of stability (MS; state of body's centre of mass in relation to the base of support), was determined at touchdown of the perturbed leg and during the following six recovery steps. The first perturbation caused a reduced MS at touchdown for the perturbed leg compared to baseline, indicating an unstable position, with controls requiring five recovery steps to return to MS baseline and UPVD-patients not returning to baseline level within the analyzed six recovery steps. By the eighth perturbation, control subjects needed two steps, and UPVD-patients required three recovery steps, both thereby improving their recovery response with practice. However, MS at touchdown of the perturbed leg increased only for the controls after repeated perturbations, indicating adaptive feedback-driven locomotor improvements for the controls, but not for the UPVD-patients. We concluded that UPVD-patients have a diminished ability to control dynamic gait stability during unexpected perturbations, increasing their fall risk, and that vestibular dysfunction may inhibit the neuromotor system adapting the reactive motor response to perturbations.

  12. Plasticity of the histamine H3 receptors after acute vestibular lesion in the adult cat

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Mourre, Christiane; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    After unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) many molecular and neurochemical mechanisms underlie the neurophysiological reorganizations occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) complex, as well as the behavioral recovery process. As a key regulator, the histaminergic system appears to be a likely candidate because drugs interfering with histamine (HA) neurotransmission facilitate behavioral recovery after vestibular lesion. This study aimed at analyzing the post-lesion changes of the histaminergic system by quantifying binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3R; mediating namely histamine autoinhibition) using a histamine H3 receptor agonist ([3H]N-α-methylhistamine). Experiments were done in brain sections of control cats (N = 6) and cats submitted to UVN and killed 1 (N = 6) or 3 (N = 6) weeks after the lesion. UVN induced a bilateral decrease in binding density of the agonist [3H]N-α-methylhistamine to H3R in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN) at 1 week post-lesion, with a predominant down-regulation in the ipsilateral TMN. The bilateral decrease remained at the 3 weeks survival time and became symmetric. Concerning brainstem structures, binding density in the VN, the prepositus hypoglossi, the subdivisions of the inferior olive decreased unilaterally on the ipsilateral side at 1 week and bilaterally 3 weeks after UVN. Similar changes were observed in the subdivisions of the solitary nucleus only 1 week after the lesion. These findings indicate vestibular lesion induces plasticity of the histamine H3R, which could contribute to vestibular function recovery. PMID:24427120

  13. Effects of acetyl-DL-leucine in vestibular patients: a clinical study following neurotomy and labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferber-Viart, C; Dubreuil, C; Vidal, P P

    2009-01-01

    For 40 years, the amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine (or isoleucine - Tanganil) has been used in clinical practice to reduce imbalance and autonomic manifestations associated with acute vertigo crises. In animal models, acetyl-DL-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy, and has only minor effects on normal vestibular function. Our work in animal models suggested that acetyl-DL-leucine acted mainly on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized vestibular neurons by restoring their membrane potential towards a mean value of -65 to -60 mV. Acute vestibular disorders are associated with asymmetrical spontaneous activities of vestibular neurons, so this previous study suggested that acetyl-DL-leucine may reduce acute, vestibular-related imbalances in humans. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine during the acute stage following neurotomy or labyrinthectomy in patients undergoing surgery for unilateral vestibular acoustic neurinoma, or suffering from unilateral and intractable Ménière's disease. By clinical testing of the vestibular function, patients were categorized according to the degree of compensation of the vestibular deafferentation prior to surgery. For patients who had achieved a close to perfect compensation before surgery, acetyl-DL-leucine had minor or no effect after surgery. For patients who displayed residual vestibular function before surgery, acetyl-DL-leucine eased the static vestibular syndromes, which followed neurotomy. Our findings tend to confirm the view that acetyl-DL-leucine mainly acts, in humans, on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized vestibular neurons by restoring their membrane potential towards normal values; this is consistent with findings in guinea pigs following unilateral labyrinthectomy. Moreover, it suggests that the degree of caloric paresis of the patients before neurotomy is useful both to predict the outcome of any acute vestibular syndrome

  14. Acute, unilateral transient blepharoptosis of unknown etiology: a review.

    PubMed

    Arat, Yonca Ozkan; Yazici, Bülent; Hekimhan-Kaynak, Pelin; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A; Wladis, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    To describe 5 patients with transient, acute, unilateral blepharoptosis of unknown etiology. Medical records of 5 patients, which were seen in 5 different clinics between 1998 and 2011, were reviewed. The ages of the patients were 7, 7, 32, 44, and 75 years (2 women and 3 men). Four patients had partial (1.5-3.5 mm) and 1 patient had total ptosis. Levator function was normal in 2 patients, and 3 patients had only 2 to 3 mm decreased levator function on the affected side. None of the patients had limited motility or any pupil abnormalities. All patients had a history of flu-like illness preceding the development of blepharoptosis. The ptosis completely resolved in 3 to 14 days in all patients and did not recur during the follow-up period (range: 2 months-7 years). Transient, acute, unilateral blepharoptosis is a very rare condition. Patients presenting with acute ptosis should be questioned about a recent history of flu-like syndrome, and if workup is negative with this history, the clinicians should suspect this rare condition.

  15. Horizontal otolith-ocular responses in humans after unilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Lempert, T; Gianna, C; Brookes, G; Bronstein, A; Gresty, M

    1998-02-01

    We studied horizontal eye movements evoked by lateral whole body translation in nine patients who underwent vestibular nerve section. Preoperatively, all had preserved caloric function on both sides. Testing was performed before, 1 week and 6-10 weeks after surgery. Patients were seated upright in an electrically powered car running on a linear track. The car executed acceleration steps of 0.24 g, randomly to the left and right in the dark. The normal response consisted of a bidirectionally symmetrical nystagmus with compensatory slow phases. Response asymmetry of the slow-phase velocity of the desaccaded and averaged eye position signal was less than 13% in normals (n = 21). Before surgery, patients' responses were mostly symmetrical. Postoperatively, responses were diminished or absent with head acceleration towards the operated ear in all patients, causing a marked asymmetry which averaged 56% after correction for spontaneous nystagmus. On follow-up, responses regained symmetry. Thus, early after vestibular nerve section, a single utricle produces a normal LVOR only with ipsilateral head translation. Therefore, afferents for the LVOR seem to originate from the mid-lateral area of the macula, where hair cells are stimulated in their on-direction during ipsilateral head translation. Compensation may depend on recovery of the off-directional responses from lateral hair cells of the remaining utricle.

  16. Differentiating malingering balance disorder patients from healthy controls, compensated unilateral vestibular loss, and whiplash patients using stance and gait posturography.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Jaap; Horlings, Corinne G C; Allum, John H J

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating balance disorder patients who are malingering from those with organic balance disorders is difficult and costly. We used trunk sway measured during several stance and gait tasks in 18 patients suspected of malingering in order to differentiate these from 20 patients who had suffered unilateral vestibular loss 3 months earlier, 20 patients with documented whiplash injuries, and 34 healthy controls. Classification results ranged from 72 to 96% and were equally accurate for task or criteria variables based on 90% sway values. The tasks yielding the best discrimination were: standing with eyes closed on a foam and firm surface; standing with eyes open on a firm surface; standing on 1 leg; and walking tandem steps. The criteria yielding the best discrimination were: standing with eyes open on a firm surface; the difference between standing with eyes closed on foam and firm surfaces; the difference between walking tandem steps and standing on 1 leg with eyes open; and the difference between roll and pitch velocity when walking 8 tandem steps. We conclude that discriminating suspected malingering balance disorder patients is possible using variables or criteria based on objective measures of trunk sway during several stance and gait tasks.

  17. Acute Cortical Transhemispheric Diaschisis after Unilateral Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Le Prieult, Florie; Thal, Serge C; Engelhard, Kristin; Imbrosci, Barbara; Mittmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Focal neocortical brain injuries lead to functional alterations, which can spread beyond lesion-neighboring brain areas. The undamaged hemisphere and its associated disturbances after a unilateral lesion, so-called transhemispheric diaschisis, have been progressively disclosed over the last decades; they are strongly involved in the pathophysiology and, potentially, recovery of brain injuries. Understanding the temporal dynamics of these transhemispheric functional changes is crucial to decipher the role of the undamaged cortex in the processes of functional reorganization at different stages post-lesion. In this regard, little is known about the acute-subacute processes after 24-48 h in the brain hemisphere contralateral to injury. In the present study, we performed a controlled cortical impact to produce a unilateral traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the motor and somatosensory cortex of mice. In vitro extracellular multi-unit recordings from large neuronal populations, together with single-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cortical network contralateral to the lesion, revealed a strong, but transient, neuronal hyperactivity as early as 24-48 h post-TBI. This abnormal excitable state in the intact hemisphere was not accompanied by alterations in neuronal intrinsic properties, but it was associated with an impairment of the phasic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic transmission and an increased expression of GABAA receptor subunits related to tonic inhibition exclusively in the contralateral hemisphere. These data unravel a series of early transhemispheric functional alterations after diffuse unilateral cortical injury, which may compensate and stabilize the disrupted brain functions. Therefore, our findings support the hypothesis that the undamaged hemisphere could play a significant role in early functional reorganization processes after a TBI.

  18. Cerebellar Infarction Presenting with Acute Vestibular Syndrome in Two U.S. Air Force Pilots.

    PubMed

    Hesselbrock, Roger R

    2017-09-01

    Cerebellar infarction is an uncommon but serious cause of isolated acute vestibular symptoms, particularly in young, healthy individuals, and can easily be overlooked. We present two cases of cerebellar infarction in U.S. Air Force pilots, one of which occurred during flight. A 41-yr-old man developed acute vertigo, disequilibrium, nausea, and headache, with progressive slow symptomatic improvement, and presented to medical attention 4 d after symptom onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right inferomedial cerebellar infarction. Echocardiography discovered patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm. A 40-yr-old man developed severe vertigo, nausea, and vomiting during initial aircraft descent. Head computed tomography scan was performed acutely and was normal. Initial assessment was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Brain magnetic resonance imaging 1 mo after symptom onset showed a small right inferior cerebellar infarction. Patent foramen ovale and bilateral atrial enlargement were seen on echocardiography. Both pilots made full neurological recoveries and were eventually returned to flight status. Central causes of isolated acute vestibular symptoms are uncommon and are often not considered in otherwise healthy individuals. Cerebellar infarction is one of these uncommon but increasingly recognized causes of acute vestibular symptoms. As evaluation and management of central causes are much different from peripheral conditions, prompt localization confirmation is paramount. Accurate evidence-based bedside screening methods are available for rapid localization. Awareness of the possibility of central etiologies and careful clinical evaluation with application of bedside screening methods in patients with acute vestibular symptoms will reduce the number of inaccurate diagnoses.Hesselbrock RR. Cerebellar infarction presenting with acute vestibular syndrome in two U.S. Air Force pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):880-883.

  19. Vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The key signs and symptoms of vestibular neuritis are rotatory vertigo with an acute onset lasting several days, horizontal spontaneous nystagmus (with a rotational component) toward the unaffected ear, a pathologic head-impulse test toward the affected ear, a deviation of the subjective visual vertical toward the affected ear, postural imbalance with falls toward the affected ear, and nausea. The head-impulse test and caloric irrigation show an ipsilateral deficit of the vestibuloocular reflex. Vestibular neuritis is the third most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo. It has an annual incidence of 3.5 per 100,000 population and accounts for 7% of the patients at outpatient clinics specializing in the treatment of vertigo. The reactivation of a latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is the most likely cause, as HSV-1 DNA and RNA have been detected in human vestibular ganglia. Vestibular neuritis is a diagnosis of exclusion. Relevant differential diagnoses are vestibular pseudoneuritis due to acute pontomedullary brainstem lesions or cerebellar nodular infarctions, vestibular migraine, and monosymptomatically beginning Ménière's disease. Recovery from vestibular neuritis is due to a combination of (a) peripheral restoration of labyrinthine function, usually incomplete but can be improved by early treatment with corticosteroids, which cause a recovery rate of 62% within 12 months; (b) mainly somatosensory and visual substitution; and (c) central compensation, which can be improved by vestibular exercise.

  20. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, Susan J.; Whitney, Susan L.; Cass, Stephen P.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Fife, Terry D.; Furman, Joseph M.; Getchius, Thomas S. D.; Goebel, Joel A.; Shepard, Neil T.; Woodhouse, Sheelah N.

    2016-01-01

    patient to understand the goals of the program and how to manage and progress themselves independently. As a general guide, persons without significant comorbidities that affect mobility and with acute or subacute unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week supervised sessions for 2 to 3 weeks; persons with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 4 to 6 weeks; and persons with bilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 8 to 12 weeks. In addition to supervised sessions, patients are provided a daily home exercise program. Disclaimer: These recommendations are intended as a guide for physical therapists and clinicians to optimize rehabilitation outcomes for persons with peripheral vestibular hypofunction undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Video Abstract available for more insights from the author (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A124). PMID:26913496

  1. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  2. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  3. Impaired modulation of the otolithic function in acute unilateral cerebellar infarction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo Young; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-06-01

    To define the cerebellar contribution in modulating the otolithic signals, we investigated the otolithic function in 27 patients with acute unilateral cerebellar infarctions in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA, n = 17, 63%), combined PICA and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) (n = 7, 30%), SCA (n = 2, 7%), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1, 4%) from 2010 to 2012. The patients had evaluation of the ocular tilt reaction [head tilt, ocular torsion (OT), and skew deviation], tilt of the subjective visual vertical (SVV), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in response to air conducted tone bursts, and ocular VEMPs induced by tapping the head at AFz. The evaluation was completed within 2 weeks after symptom onset. Patients often showed OT or SVV tilt (15/27, 55.6%) that was either ipsi- (n = 6) or contraversive (n = 9). Overall, there were no differences in the amplitudes and latencies of cervical and ocular VEMPs between the ipsi- and contralesional sides. However, individual analyses revealed frequent abnormalities of cervical (11/27, 41%) and/or ocular (9/27, 33%) VEMPs. While 11 (73%) of the 15 patients with the OTR/SVV tilt showed abnormalities of cervical (n = 9) and/or ocular (n = 7) VEMP responses, only three (25%) of the 12 patients without the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal cervical (n = 2) and/or ocular (n = 2) VEMPs (73% vs. 25%, Fisher's exact test, p = 0.021). The concordance rate in the results of cervical and ocular VEMPs was marginally significant (19/27, 70%, p = 0.052, binominal). Unilateral cerebellar lesions may generate otolithic imbalances, as evidenced by the OTR/SVV tilt and asymmetric ocular or cervical VEMP responses, but without directionality according to the lesion side. Patients with the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal VEMPs more often than those without.

  4. Multimodality Diagnostic Imaging in Unilateral Acute Idiopathic Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Cecilia S.; Payne, John F.; Bergstrom, Chris S.; Cribbs, Blaine E.; Yan, Jiong; Hubbard, G. Baker; Olsen, Timothy W.; Yeh, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical features and imaging characteristics in unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM). Methods This is a retrospective review of four patients diagnosed with UAIM. Clinical characteristics (age, symptoms, Snellen visual acuity (VA), and funduscopic features) and images from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein (FA), and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography were analyzed. Results The median age at presentation was 31 years (range 27–52 years). The median interval between symptom onset and presentation was four weeks (range 1–20 weeks). Associated systemic findings included a viral prodrome (50%), orchitis (50%), hand-foot-mouth disease (25%), and positive Coxsackie virus titers (50%). The median presenting VA was 20/400 (range 20/70–1/400), which improved to 20/30 (range 20/20–20/60) at final follow-up. The median follow-up time was 6 weeks (range 0–8 weeks). Early in the disease course, the central macula developed irregular, circular areas of white-grey discoloration. Following recovery, the macula had a stippled retinal pigment epithelium characterized by rarefaction and hyperplasia. FA demonstrated irregular early hyperfluorescence and late subretinal hyperfluorescence. SD-OCT showed a partially reversible disruption of the outer photoreceptor layer. FAF initially revealed stippled autofluorescence that eventually became more hypoautofluorescent. ICG showed “moth-eaten” appearing choroidal vasculature, suggestive of choroidal inflammation. Conclusions The imaging characteristics highlight the structural changes during the active and resolution phases of UAIM. The visual recovery correlates with structural changes and suggests that the pathogenesis involves inflammation of the inner choroid, retinal pigment epithelium, and outer photoreceptor complex that is partially reversible. PMID:22232475

  5. Vestibular compensation: the neuro-otologist's best friend.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel; Helmchen, Christoph; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Why vestibular compensation (VC) after an acute unilateral vestibular loss is the neuro-otologist's best friend is the question at the heart of this paper. The different plasticity mechanisms underlying VC are first reviewed, and the authors present thereafter the dual concept of vestibulo-centric versus distributed learning processes to explain the compensation of deficits resulting from the static versus dynamic vestibular imbalance. The main challenges for the plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) during a post-lesion critical period are neural protection, structural reorganization and rebalance of VN activity on both sides. Data from animal models show that modulation of the ipsilesional VN activity by the contralateral drive substitutes for the normal push-pull mechanism. On the other hand, sensory and behavioural substitutions are the main mechanisms implicated in the recovery of the dynamic functions. These newly elaborated sensorimotor reorganizations are vicarious idiosyncratic strategies implicating the VN and multisensory brain regions. Imaging studies in unilateral vestibular loss patients show the implication of a large neuronal network (VN, commissural pathways, vestibulo-cerebellum, thalamus, temporoparietal cortex, hippocampus, somatosensory and visual cortical areas). Changes in gray matter volume in these multisensory brain regions are structural changes supporting the sensory substitution mechanisms of VC. Finally, the authors summarize the two ways to improve VC in humans (neuropharmacology and vestibular rehabilitation therapy), and they conclude that VC would follow a "top-down" strategy in patients with acute vestibular lesions. Future challenges to understand VC are proposed.

  6. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute endolymphatic hydrops has no direct effect on the vestibular evoked potential in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kingma, C M; Wit, H P

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of an acute endolymphatic hydrops on the functioning of the vestibular system a hydrops was created by microinjection of artificial endolymph through the basilar membrane into scala media in 10 guinea pigs. To control for the effect of perforation of the basilar membrane, the same procedure was performed in 9 other guinea pigs, but without injection of endolymph. Contralateral ears served as control ears. Vestibular evoked potentials, evoked by vertical acceleration pulses applied to the guinea pig's head, were measured in all ears before, immediately after, and 2, 4, and 5 hours after perforation/injection. Acute endolymphatic hydrops did not affect the amplitude of the VsEP immediately after injection. After 4 to 5 hours VsEP was significantly reduced in both hydrops and perforated-only ears, compared to control ears. However, no significant difference was found between VsEP of the hydrops ears and perforated-only ears. Reduction of VsEP is not caused by a direct hydromechanical effect on the vestibular system, but possibly by leakage of perilymph through the perforation hole, supporting the membrane rupture theory for Menière-attacks.

  8. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by bone-conducted vibration in patients with unilateral inner ear disease.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriko; Ogawa, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Akira; Otsuka, Koji; Inagaki, Taro; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2014-02-01

    Patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) with complete canal paresis (CP) showed a higher rate of abnormal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) than those with partial CP. From these results, it is speculated that the superior vestibular nerve function mainly affects oVEMP. Significant correlation was found between the grades of the hearing outcome and oVEMP in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). We attempted to correlate the results of oVEMP with the results of cervical VEMP (cVEMP), results of subjective visual vertical (SVV), and clinical course in patients with various vestibular disorders. Twenty-two patients with VN, 65 with SSHL, and 22 with Meniere's disease (MD), were enrolled in this study. We compared the results of oVEMP with those of cVEMP, SVV, and the caloric test. Furthermore, the oVEMP results were compared with the initial hearing threshold, presence of vertigo, and hearing recovery in the patients with SSHL. The patients with VN with complete CP showed a higher rate of abnormal oVEMP than those with partial CP. In the patients with SSHL, the hearing recovery rate was lower in the patients with abnormal oVEMP than in those with normal oVEMP.

  9. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by bone-conducted vibration in patients with unilateral inner ear disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Akira; Otsuka, Koji; Inagaki, Taro; Shimizu, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion Patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) with complete canal paresis (CP) showed a higher rate of abnormal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) than those with partial CP. From these results, it is speculated that the superior vestibular nerve function mainly affects oVEMP. Significant correlation was found between the grades of the hearing outcome and oVEMP in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). Objective We attempted to correlate the results of oVEMP with the results of cervical VEMP (cVEMP), results of subjective visual vertical (SVV), and clinical course in patients with various vestibular disorders. Methods Twenty-two patients with VN, 65 with SSHL, and 22 with Meniere's disease (MD), were enrolled in this study. We compared the results of oVEMP with those of cVEMP, SVV, and the caloric test. Furthermore, the oVEMP results were compared with the initial hearing threshold, presence of vertigo, and hearing recovery in the patients with SSHL. Results The patients with VN with complete CP showed a higher rate of abnormal oVEMP than those with partial CP. In the patients with SSHL, the hearing recovery rate was lower in the patients with abnormal oVEMP than in those with normal oVEMP. PMID:24215219

  10. Video Head Impulse Test for Early Diagnosis of Vestibular Neuritis Among Acute Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiongfeng; Zhang, Lisan; Hong, Wenke; Yang, Yi; Chen, Zhaoying; Lu, Peilin; Zhang, Dan; Hu, Xingyue

    2017-09-01

    This study assesses the value of the video head impulse test (vHIT) for early diagnosis of vestibular neuritis (VN) among acute vertigo. Thirty-three cases of vestibular neuritis (VN), 96 patients with other acute vertigo (AV), and 50 cases of normal controls used vHIT to quantitatively test a pair of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflection (VOR) gains, two pairs of vertical VOR gains, and the corresponding three pairs of VOR gain asymmetry. The peculiarity of VOR gains in VN and the differences between VN and other AV, normal controls by vHIT, were collected and analyzed. There were statistically significant differences in the three pairs of VOR gains asymmetry between VN and other AV, and normal controls (P<0.01). The sensitivity was 87.9% and specificity was 94.3% in differentiating VN from normal and other acute vertigo by vHIT. This study shows vHIT has advantages in the diagnosis of VN in acute vertigo with good sensitivity and specificity and indicates a widespread clinical application.

  11. The Changes in mGluR2 and mGluR7 Expression in Rat Medial Vestibular Nucleus and Flocculus Following Unilateral Labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Liu-Qing; Zhang, Su-Lin; Liu, Bo; Leng, Yang-Ming; Zhou, Ren-Hong; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the cerebellar flocculus are the key areas, which contribute to the behavioral recovery (“vestibular compensation”) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). In these areas, how the genetic activities of the metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2 and mGluR7 performance after UL is unknown. With the means of quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry, we analyzed the expression of mGluR2 and mGluR7 in the bilateral MVN and the flocculus of rats in different stages after UL (the 1st, 3rd, and 7th day). Our results show that in the MVN, the mRNA, and protein expressions of mGluR7 were ipsilaterally decreased at the 1st day following UL. However, in the MVN, no change was observed in the mRNA and protein expressions of mGluR2. On the other hand, the mRNA and protein expression of mGluR2 were enhanced in the ipsilateral flocculus at the 1st day following UL, while in the flocculus no change was shown in mGluR7 mRNA and protein expressions. Our results suggest that mGluR2 and mGluR7 may contribute to the early rebalancing of spontaneous resting activity in the MVN. PMID:24264036

  12. Effects of Acute Administration of Ketorolac on Mammalian Vestibular Sensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP. PMID:23562034

  13. Effects of acute administration of ketorolac on mammalian vestibular sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gaines, G Christopher; Jones, Timothy A

    2013-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) ketorolac is a candidate for use as a supplemental analgesic during major surgery in anesthetized rodents. The use of ketorolac during surgery is believed to reduce the anesthetic dose required to achieve and maintain an adequate surgical plane, thus improving the physiologic condition and survival of animals during long experimental procedures. Ketorolac has reported side effects that include dizziness, ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo in humans, but ketorolac has not been reported to affect the vestibular system in animals. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the acute effects of ketorolac on vestibular compound action potentials in C57BL/6 mice. Linear vestibular sensory-evoked potentials (VsEP) were recorded during the administration of ketorolac at doses 3 to 14 times the effective analgesic dose. VsEP results for ketorolac were compared with those from a control group maintained under anesthesia for the same period. Ketorolac did not significantly affect the temporal profiles of response latencies and amplitudes or the rate of change in response measures over time between controls and ketorolac-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that ketorolac can be used as an analgesic to supplement anesthesia in mice without concerns of modifying the amplitudes and latencies of the linear VsEP.

  14. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  15. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate.

  16. Role of CYP2E1-mediated metabolism in the acute and vestibular toxicities of nineteen nitriles in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ruíz, Sandra; Soler-Martín, Carla; Llorens, Jordi

    2012-01-25

    Allylnitrile, cis-crotononitrile, and 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile are known to cause vestibular toxicity in rodents, and evidence is available indicating that cis-2-pentenenitrile shares this effect. We evaluated nineteen nitriles for vestibular toxicity in wild type (129S1) and CYP2E1-null mice, including all the above, several neurotoxic nitriles, and structurally similar nitriles. A new acute toxicity test protocol was developed to facilitate evaluation of the vestibular toxicity by a specific behavioral test battery at doses up to sub-lethal levels while using a limited number of animals. A mean number of 8.5±0.3 animals per nitrile, strain and sex was necessary to obtain evidence of vestibular toxicity and optionally an estimation of the lethal dose. For several but not all nitriles, lethal doses significantly increased in CYP2E1-null mice. The protocol revealed the vestibular toxicity of five nitriles, including previously identified ototoxic compounds and one nitrile (trans-crotononitrile) known to have a different profile of neurotoxic effects in the rat. In all five cases, both sexes were affected and no decrease in susceptibility was apparent in CYP2E1-null mice respect to 129S1 mice. Fourteen nitriles caused no vestibular toxicity, including six nitriles tested in CYP2E1-null mice at doses significantly larger than the maximal doses that can be tested in wild type animals. We conclude that only a subset of low molecular weight nitriles is toxic to the vestibular system, that species-dependent differences exist in this vestibular toxicity, and that CYP2E1-mediated metabolism is not involved in this effect of nitriles although it has a role in the acute lethality of some of these compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Corticosteroids and vestibular exercises in vestibular neuritis. Single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Goudakos, John K; Markou, Konstantinos D; Psillas, George; Vital, Victor; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE The management of patients with unilateral acute vestibular neuritis (VN) has not been established to date. OBJECTIVE To compare the use of vestibular exercises vs corticosteroid therapy in the recovery of patients with acute VN. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective, single-blind, randomized clinical trial at a primary referral center. Among all patients with acute vertigo, those having VN were eligible for inclusion in the study. INTERVENTIONS Forty patients with acute VN were randomly assigned to perform vestibular exercises or to receive corticosteroid therapy. After a baseline examination, follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 6, and 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Efficacy outcomes included clinical, canal, and otolith recovery. Scores on the European Evaluation of Vertigo Scale and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory were used for the evaluation of clinical recovery. Findings of caloric irrigation and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials indicated canal and otolith improvement, respectively. RESULTS Comparing the 2 treatment groups, no statistically significant differences were found in clinical, canal, or otolith recovery. At the 6-month examination, the number of patients with complete disease resolution in the corticosteroids group was significantly higher than that in the vestibular exercises group. However, at the end of the follow-up period, 45%(9 of 20) of patients in the vestibular exercises group and 50% (10 of 20) of patients in the corticosteroids group had complete disease resolution (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Treating patients who have acute VN with vestibular exercises seems equivalently effective as treating them with corticosteroid therapy in clinical, caloric, and otolith recovery. Corticosteroid therapy seems to enhance earlier complete acute VN resolution, with no added benefit in the long-term prognosis.

  18. Melatonin protects kidney against apoptosis induced by acute unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Badem, Hüseyin; Cakmak, Muzaffer; Yilmaz, Hakki; Kosem, Bahadir; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Bayrak, Reyhan; Cimentepe, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate whether there was a protective effect of melatonin on apoptotic mechanisms after an acute unilateral obstruction of the kidney. Material and methods A total of 25 rats consisting of five groups were used in the study, designated as follows: Group 1: control, Group 2: sham, Group 3: unilateral ureteral obstruction treated with only saline, Group 4: unilateral ureteral obstruction treated with melatonin immediately, and Group 5: unilateral obstruction treated with melatonin one day after obstruction. Melatonin was administered as a 10 mg/kg dose intraperitoneally. The kidneys were evaluated according to the apoptotic index and Ki-67 scores. Results Comparison of all obstruction groups (Group 3, 4, and 5), revealed that the apoptotic index was significantly higher in Groups 1 and 2. Despite melatonin reduced apoptotic mechanisms in Groups 4 and 5, there was no significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 in terms of the reduction of apoptosis. However, the reduction of apoptosis in the melatonin treated group did not decrease to the level of Groups 1 and 2. Conclusions Despite melatonin administration, which significantly reduces the apoptotic index occurring after acute unilateral ureteral obstruction, the present study did not observe a return to normal renal histology in the obstruction groups. PMID:27551563

  19. The Effect of Observation versus Microsurgical Excision on Quality of Life in Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Sandooram, Dosh; Hornigold, Rachael; Grunfeld, Beth; Thomas, Nicholas; Kitchen, Neil D; Gleeson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    With the emergence of three effective management options for vestibular schwannoma and the drastic reduction in mortality rate, the last two decades have seen increasing attention being paid to health-related quality of life. The vast majority of quality of life studies have been retrospective. We prospectively assessed quality of life of vestibular schwannoma patients before and after conservative or microsurgical management. We performed a prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary referral center between October 2001 and October 2003. Patients were divided into two groups: conservative management and microsurgery. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) and Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). The questionnaires were administered at initial assessment, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months in both groups. Thirty-three patients completed the study, 18 in the conservative group and 15 in the microsurgical group. One month after microsurgery, SF-36 scores were significantly reduced within three of eight domains; however, 3 months after microsurgery, no significant difference existed in patients' scores on any of the SF-36 domains compared with preoperatively, and at 6 months there was a significant improvement in one domain compared with preoperatively. There was no significant difference in overall quality of life alteration (GBI total score) between microsurgery and conservative management. The improved quality of life of patients 6 months after microsurgery (relative to preoperatively, and in comparison with an age- and sex- matched population) is a new finding that has not been previously documented in the literature.

  20. Analysis of audio-vestibular assessment in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Im, Gi Jung; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study demonstrated excellent hearing recovery following the combined treatment of diuretic and oral steroid, and electrocochleography (ECoG) was significantly higher than normal side. This study reports characteristics of acute low-tone hearing loss (ALHL) that show the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG, and excellent recovery, even-though low-tone hearing loss is worse, which can be different compared with sudden deafness. Objective To analyze ALHL without vertigo, this study compared the ALHL group with all patients exhibiting low-tone hearing loss and ear fullness. Hearing changes and vestibular functions were analyzed. Materials and methods ALHL was defined as a mean hearing loss of ≥ 30 dB at 125, 250, and 500 Hz, and ≤ 20 dB at 2, 4, and 8 kHz. From 156 cases of low-tone hearing loss of more than 10 dB without vertigo, 31 met the ALHL criteria and were subjected to audio-vestibular assessments including PTA, ECoG, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and caloric testing. Results In ALHL, low-tone hearing loss was 42.7 ± 9.5 dB, and 83.9% of ALHL significantly recovered by more than 10 dB. The ECoG in ALHL was 0.334 ± 0.11 (higher than 0.25 ± 0.08 on the normal side) and ECoG abnormality was 35.5% (the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG value).

  1. Acute clinical adverse radiation effects after Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Tuleasca, Constantin; George, Mercy; Faouzi, Mohamed; Schiappacasse, Luis; Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Zeverino, Michele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Maire, Raphael; Levivier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) represent a common indication of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). While most studies focus on the long-term morbidity and adverse radiation effects (AREs), none describe the acute clinical AREs that might appear on a short-term basis. These types of events are investigated, and their incidence, type, and outcomes are reported in the present paper. METHODS The included patients were treated between July 2010 and March 2016, underwent at least 6 months of follow-up, and presented with a disabling symptom during the first 6 months after GKS that affected their quality of life. The timing of appearance, as well as the type of main symptom and outcome, were noted. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy at the margin. RESULTS Thirty-five (22%) of 159 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria had acute clinical AREs. The mean followup period was 30 months (range 6-49.2 months). The mean time of appearance was 37.9 days (median 31 days; range 3-110 days). In patients with de novo symptoms, the more frequent symptoms were vertigo (n = 4; 11.4%) and gait disturbance (n = 3; 8.6%). The exacerbation of a preexisting symptom was more frequently related to hearing loss (n = 10; 28.6%), followed by gait disturbance (n = 7; 20%) and vertigo (n = 3, 8.6%). In the univariate logistic regression analysis, the following factors were statistically significant: age (p = 0.002; odds ratio [OR] 0.96), hearing at baseline by Gardner-Robertson (GR) class (p = 0.006; OR 0.21), pure tone average at baseline (p = 0.006; OR 0.97), and Koos grade at baseline (with Koos Grade I used as a reference) (for Koos Grade II, OR 0.17 and p = 0.002; for Koos Grade III, OR 0.42 and p = 0.05). The following were not statistically significant but showed a tendency toward significance: the number of isocenters (p = 0.06; OR 0.94) and the maximal dose received by the cochlea (p = 0.07; OR 0.74). Fractional polynomial regression analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the

  2. [CHARACTERIZATION OF VESTIBULAR DISORDERS IN THE INJURED PERSONS WITH THE BRAIN CONCUSSION IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Skobska, O E; Kadzhaya, N V; Andreyev, O A; Potapov, E V

    2015-04-01

    There were examined 32 injured persons, ageing (34.1 ± 1.3) yrs at average, for the brain commotion (BC). The adopted protocol SCAT-3 (Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool, 3rd ed.), DHI (Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire), computer stabilography (KS) were applied for the vestibular disorders diagnosis. There was established, that in acute period of BC a dyssociation between regression of objective neurological symptoms and permanence of the BC indices occurs, what confirms a latent disorder of the balance function. Changes of basic indices of statokinesiography, including increase of the vibration amplitude enhancement in general centre of pressure in a saggital square and the BC square (235.3 ± 13.7) mm2 in a modified functional test of Romberg with the closed eyes is possible to apply as objective criteria for the BC diagnosis.

  3. Acute Unilateral Vision Loss in a Female Adolescent Due to Ocular Bartonellosis.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Douglas S

    2017-04-11

    Acute worsening of visual acuity with optic disc edema is commonly assumed to be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Bartonella henselae is an unusual cause to abrupt vision loss that is associated with optic disc edema and exudative macular stars seen on examination. It is an important cause to be aware of because it responds very well to antibiotic treatment. We present a case of a female adolescent with unilateral vision loss cause by cat-scratch neuroretinitis.

  4. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline: FROM THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION NEUROLOGY SECTION.

    PubMed

    Hall, Courtney D; Herdman, Susan J; Whitney, Susan L; Cass, Stephen P; Clendaniel, Richard A; Fife, Terry D; Furman, Joseph M; Getchius, Thomas S D; Goebel, Joel A; Shepard, Neil T; Woodhouse, Sheelah N

    2016-04-01

    and how to manage and progress themselves independently. As a general guide, persons without significant comorbidities that affect mobility and with acute or subacute unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week supervised sessions for 2 to 3 weeks; persons with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 4 to 6 weeks; and persons with bilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 8 to 12 weeks. In addition to supervised sessions, patients are provided a daily home exercise program. These recommendations are intended as a guide for physical therapists and clinicians to optimize rehabilitation outcomes for persons with peripheral vestibular hypofunction undergoing vestibular rehabilitation.Video Abstract available for more insights from the author (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A124).

  5. Vestibular rehabilitation: rationale and indications.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Kang, Christian M; Tusa, Ronald J

    2013-07-01

    Treatment options of the patient with dizziness include medication, rehabilitation with physical therapy, surgery, counseling, and reassurance. Here the authors discuss vestibular rehabilitation for patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), unilateral vestibular loss or hypofunction, and bilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction. They describe the different mechanisms for recovery with vestibular rehabilitation, the exercises that are used, and which ones are best. An exhaustive literature review on clinical outcomes with the best research publications for BPPV, unilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction, and bilateral vestibular loss/hypofunction is presented. For BPPV, the authors also summarize the evidence-based review practice parameters published in Neurology by Fife et al. (2008) and review all relevant articles published since then.

  6. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  7. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  8. Modulation of Memory by Vestibular Lesions and Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Geddes, Lisa H.; Baek, Jean-Ha; Darlington, Cynthia L.; Zheng, Yiwen

    2010-01-01

    For decades it has been speculated that there is a close association between the vestibular system and spatial memories constructed by areas of the brain such as the hippocampus. While many animal studies have been conducted which support this relationship, only in the last 10 years have detailed quantitative studies been carried out in patients with vestibular disorders. The majority of these studies suggest that complete bilateral vestibular loss results in spatial memory deficits that are not simply due to vestibular reflex dysfunction, while the effects of unilateral vestibular damage are more complex and subtle. Very recently, reports have emerged that sub-threshold, noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation can enhance memory in humans, although this has not been investigated for spatial memory as yet. These studies add to the increasing evidence that suggests a connection between vestibular sensory information and memory in humans. PMID:21173897

  9. Unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) causes permanent asymmetry in the gain of the yaw VOR to high acceleration head impulses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Topple, A N; Halmagyi, G M

    1995-01-01

    Using an acute scleral search coil technique for measuring eye position in alert animals we have shown that after UVD the yaw VOR in the guinea pig shows a permanent gain asymmetry. There is a reduced gain during the first 100 ms of brief, high acceleration horizontal head rotations ("yaw head impulses") towards the operated side, but only a small loss in gain for similar rotations towards the intact side. This result confirms that the horizontal E response during the first 100 ms of an abrupt high acceleration head rotation is a clear indicator of the function of the horizontal canal. These results are similar to those in human patients after unilateral acoustic neuroma operations. The asymmetry in response is large shortly after UVD and decreases over time but is permanent.

  10. A Rare Case of Unilateral Acute Idiopathic Maculopathy in Young Male

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral Acute Idiopathic Maculopathy (UAIM) is a rare disorder of Retinal Pigmentary Epithelium (RPE) that mainly affects the young healthy male. The variability of this disease can masquerade different entity, so diagnosis becomes cumbersome. We are reporting a case of young healthy male, who has reported to us with gross diminution of vision from right eye. Right eye examination showed a grayish yellow lesion with fluffy margins on the macula. Based on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) findings, he was diagnosed as a case of UAIM. He was started on topical anti-inflammatory eye drops with subsequent improvement of his vision.

  11. [Inferior vestibular neuritis: diagnosis using VEMP].

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Repik, I

    2012-02-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a new method to establish the functional status of the otolith organs. The sacculocollic reflex of the cervical VEMP to air conduction (AC) reflects predominantly saccular function due to saccular afferents to the inferior vestibular nerve. We describe a case of inferior vestibular neuritis as a rare differential diagnosis of vestibular neuritis. Clinical signs were a normal caloric response, unilaterally absent AC cVEMPs and bilaterally preserved ocular VEMPs (AC oVEMPs).

  12. MRI assessment of paraspinal muscles in patients with acute and chronic unilateral low back pain.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q; Lin, C; Li, X; Zeng, W; Ma, C

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the changes in paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and composition, using the digital data from lumbar spine MRIs of patients with acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 178 patients with unilateral LBP who had lumbar MRI examination were recruited. The data were obtained by a retrospective documentation audit. The CSAs and mean signal intensities of the bilateral paraspinal muscles [psoas major (PM), quadratus lumborum, multifidus (MF) and erector spinae (ES)] were measured, and the percentage of fat infiltration was calculated. The data between the painful side and non-painful side were compared, and between-group comparisons were tested. 42 patients with chronic unilateral LBP could indicate the problem level, and the CSA and mean signal intensity of the MF muscle were analysed at the problem level, and one vertebral above and one vertebral level below the problem level. The CSAs of the PM and ES muscles were significantly decreased in the acute LBP group, while in the chronic LBP group, significant reduction in CSA was found in the MF and ES muscles on the painful side compared with the non-painful side. The mean signal intensity and fat content of the ES muscle on the painful side in the chronic LBP group was significantly higher than that on the painful side in the acute LBP group. The significant decrease of CSA in the MF muscle was found at multiple levels on the painful side. The present findings show that there is selective ipsilateral atrophy of paraspinal muscles, specific to the symptomatic side, in patients with acute and chronic LBP. The reduction of the muscle CSA and increased fatty infiltration occurred synchronously, and the extent of change is significantly greater in chronic LBP in the ES muscle. Atrophy of the MF muscle appears to be at multiple levels but side specific in relation to symptoms in patients with chronic LBP, and the decreased muscle CSA may occur prior to fatty infiltration. There are specific

  13. Acute unilateral visual loss due to a single intranasal methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, J; Salu, P; Leblanc, A; Bervoets, S

    1999-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 35 year old male with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) presented himself three days after a single intranasal methamphetamine abusus. Directly upon awakening the day after the recreational use of this drug, he discovered an acute and severe visual loss of his right eye. This unilateral loss of vision was permanent and eventually lead to a pale and atrophic optic nerve head. The characteristics of this visual loss, together with the aspect of the optic nerve head was very similar to the classical non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We suggest a direct ischemic episode to the short posterior ciliary arteries due to this single intranasal abuse of methamphetamine as the underlying pathogenesis of this acute and permanent visual loss.

  14. Acute Response to Unilateral Unipolar Electrical Carotid Sinus Stimulation in Patients With Resistant Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Brinkmann, Julia; Menne, Jan; Kaufeld, Jessica; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Beige, Joachim; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Diedrich, André; Haller, Hermann; Jordan, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral bipolar electric carotid sinus stimulation acutely reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension but is no longer available. The second-generation device uses a smaller unilateral unipolar disk electrode to reduce invasiveness while saving battery life. We hypothesized that the second-generation device acutely lowers BP and MSNA in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Eighteen treatment-resistant hypertensive patients (9 women/9 men; 53±11 years; 33±5 kg/m(2)) on stable medications have been included in the study. We monitored finger and brachial BP, heart rate, and MSNA. Without stimulation, BP was 165±31/91±18 mm Hg, heart rate was 75±17 bpm, and MSNA was 48±14 bursts per minute. Acute stimulation with intensities producing side effects that were tolerable in the short term elicited interindividually variable changes in systolic BP (-16.9±15.0 mm Hg; range, 0.0 to -40.8 mm Hg; P=0.002), heart rate (-3.6±3.6 bpm; P=0.004), and MSNA (-2.0±5.8 bursts per minute; P=0.375). Stimulation intensities had to be lowered in 12 patients to avoid side effects at the expense of efficacy (systolic BP, -6.3±7.0 mm Hg; range, 2.8 to -14.5 mm Hg; P=0.028 and heart rate, -1.5±2.3 bpm; P=0.078; comparison against responses with side effects). Reductions in diastolic BP and MSNA (total activity) were correlated (r(2)=0.329; P=0.025). In our patient cohort, unilateral unipolar electric baroreflex stimulation acutely lowered BP. However, side effects may limit efficacy. The approach should be tested in a controlled comparative study.

  15. Endocrine response patterns to acute unilateral and bilateral resistance exercise in men.

    PubMed

    Migiano, Matthew J; Vingren, Jakob L; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M; Fragala, Maren S; Ho, Jen-Yu; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Hatfield, Disa L; Häkkinen, Keijo; Ahtiainen, Juha; Earp, Jacob E; Kraemer, William J

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation programs and research experiments use single-arm protocols in which the contralateral arm is not functional or used as a control limb. This study was interested in determining the hormonal signal impacts of such one- versus two-arm exercise responses that might have an impact on adaptational changes with training. The purpose was to examine the acute hormonal responses to a unilateral and a bilateral upper-body resistance exercise (RE) protocol. A balanced randomized treatment intervention with series time frame for blood collections before and after exercise was used as the basic experimental design. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (18-25 years, 20.4 +/- 1.2 years, 175.6 +/- 4.5 cm, 81.7 +/- 9.3 kg) gave informed consent to participate in the investigation. Each subject performed unilateral (dominant arm only) and bilateral upper-body RE protocol separated by 1 week in a balanced randomized fashion. The RE protocol consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions of 5 different dumbbell upper-body exercises at 80% of 1-repetition maximum, and blood samples were obtained before and 5, 15, and 30 minutes immediately postexercise (IP). Blood was obtained and analyzed for lactate, immunoreactive growth hormone (iGH), cortisol (C), total testosterone (T), and insulin concentrations. Total volume of work also was determined for the 2 exercise sessions. Total volume of work performed during the unilateral protocol was 52.1% of that for the bilateral protocol. Both RE protocols elicited a significant (p < or = 0.05) increase in lactate and iGH, but the increase for the bilateral condition was significantly greater. Cortisol decreased significantly during recovery for the unilateral condition. Testosterone was not affected by either protocol. Insulin was significantly increased at IP and 5 minutes postexercise for both conditions.These results indicate that the hormonal responses to dominant-arm unilateral RE is blunted compared to that for bilateral RE. This

  16. Out-of-Body Experiences and Other Complex Dissociation Experiences in a Patient with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Damage and Deficient Multisensory Integration.

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Vibert, Dominique; Grivaz, Petr; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-body experiences (OBEs) are illusory perceptions of one's body from an elevated disembodied perspective. Recent theories postulate a double disintegration process in the personal (visual, proprioceptive and tactile disintegration) and extrapersonal (visual and vestibular disintegration) space as the basis of OBEs. Here we describe a case which corroborates and extends this hypothesis. The patient suffered from peripheral vestibular damage and presented with OBEs and lucid dreams. Analysis of the patient's behaviour revealed a failure of visuo-vestibular integration and abnormal sensitivity to visuo-tactile conflicts that have previously been shown to experimentally induce out-of-body illusions (in healthy subjects). In light of these experimental findings and the patient's symptomatology we extend an earlier model of the role of vestibular signals in OBEs. Our results advocate the involvement of subcortical bodily mechanisms in the occurrence of OBEs.

  17. Final diagnosis of patients with clinically suspected vestibular neuritis showing normal caloric response.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2017-07-01

    Vestibular neuritis is one of the most common peripheral causes of acute vestibular syndrome, of which the diagnosis is generally based on a comprehensive interpretation of clinical and laboratory findings following reasonable exclusion of other disorders. This study aimed to investigate the final diagnosis of patients admitted to hospital under the clinical impression of vestibular neuritis who showed no unilateral caloric paresis. Forty-five patients who visited the emergency department with isolated acute spontaneous vertigo were included. Among them, six patients (13%) developed definitive spontaneous vertigo lasting longer than 20min again after discharge from hospital, accompanied by hearing loss, which was audiometrically documented, leading to a final diagnosis of definite Ménière's disease. Nine patients (20%) revisited our clinic with recurrent episodic vertigo without any documented hearing loss or auditory symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus or ear fullness, which led to a final diagnosis of possible Ménière's disease. In four patients (9%), initial spontaneous vertigo and nystagmus changed to positional vertigo and nystagmus on the second hospital day. In 26 patients (58%), neither another episode of vertigo nor auditory symptoms developed during follow-up period (7-92months), a condition to which the authors gave an arbitrary diagnosis of "mild unilateral vestibular deficit". In conclusion, patients admitted to hospital under clinical impression of vestibular neuritis may have various final diagnoses, and "mild unilateral vestibular deficit" was the most common final diagnosis among patients who did not meet the diagnostic criteria of vestibular neuritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unilateral Renal Ischemia as a Model of Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Fibrosis in Cats.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, C W; Brainard, B M; Hinson, W; Brown, S A; Brown, C A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the acute and chronic effects of 1-hour unilateral in vivo renal ischemia on renal function and histology in cats. Twenty-one adult purpose-bred research cats were anesthetized, and 1 kidney underwent renal artery and vein occlusion for 1 hour. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations, urine protein:creatinine ratio, urine-specific gravity, glomerular filtration rate, hematocrit, platelet concentration and function, and white blood cell count were measured at baseline and variable time points after ischemia. Renal histopathology was evaluated on days 3, 6, 12, 21, 42, and 70 postischemia; changes in smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen were examined. Following ischemia, whole animal glomerular filtration rate was significantly reduced (57% of baseline on day 6; P < .05). At the early time points, the ischemic kidneys exhibited severe acute epithelial necrosis accompanied by evidence of regeneration of tubules predominantly within the corticomedullary junction. At later periods, postischemic kidneys had evidence of tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation with significantly more smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen staining and interstitial fibrosis when compared with the contralateral control kidneys. This study characterizes the course of ischemic acute kidney injury in cats and demonstrates that ischemic acute kidney injury triggers chronic fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and tubular atrophy in feline kidneys. These late changes are typical of those observed in cats with naturally occurring chronic kidney disease.

  19. Vestibular Hyperacusis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular Disorders Diagnosis & Treatment Types of Vestibular Disorders Acoustic Neuroma/Vestibular Schwannoma Age-related dizziness and imbalance ... significant information. Cochlear hyperacusis can be treated with acoustic therapies such as tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT). The ...

  20. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders.

  1. Early and Phasic Cortical Metabolic Changes in Vestibular Neuritis Onset

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients’ cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients’ subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  2. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  3. The Interaction of Fatigue and Potentiation Following an Acute Bout of Unilateral Squats

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha K.; Horodyski, Jesse M.; MacLeod, Daniel A.; Whitten, Joseph; Behm, David G.

    2016-01-01

    A prior conditioning resistance exercise can augment subsequent performance of the affected muscles due to the effects of post-activation potentiation (PAP). The non-local muscle fatigue literature has illustrated the global neural effects of unilateral fatigue. However, no studies have examined the possibility of acute non-local performance enhancements. The objective of the study was to provide a conditioning stimulus in an attempt to potentiate the subsequent jump performance of the affected limb and determine if there were performance changes in the contralateral limb. Using a randomized allocation, 14 subjects (6 females, 8 males) completed three conditions on separate days: 1) unilateral, dominant leg, Bulgarian split squat protocol with testing of the exercised leg, 2) unilateral, dominant leg, Bulgarian split squat protocol with testing of the contralateral, non-exercised leg and 3) control session with testing of the non-dominant leg. Pre- and post-testing consisted of countermovement (CMJ) and drop jumps (DJ). The exercised leg exhibited CMJ height increases of 3.5% (p = 0.008; d = 0.28), 4.0% (p = 0.011; d = 0.33) and 3.2% (p = 0.013; d = 0.26) at 1, 5, and 10 min post-intervention respectively. The contralateral CMJ height had 2.0% (p = 0.034; d = 0.18), 1.2% (p = 0.2; d = 0.12), and 2.1% (p = 0.05; d = 0.17) deficits at 1, 5, and 10 min post-intervention respectively. Similar relative results were found for CMJ power. There were no significant interactions for DJ measures or control CMJ measures. The findings suggest that PAP effects were likely predominant for the exercised leg whereas the conditioning exercise provided trivial magnitude although statistically significant neural impairments for the contralateral limb. Key points Post-activation potentiation of unilateral CMJ height was achieved following 5 sequential squats at 50% 1RM, 2 squats at 70% 1RM, 1 squat at 90% 1RM with 3 min rest periods. The conditioning exercises did not elicit

  4. [The influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in the patients presenting with an unilateral lesion in a peripheral vestibular neuron].

    PubMed

    Likhac, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in 20 patients with vestibular neuronitis (at the stages of decompensation and subcompensation) and in 30 healthy subjects by the electronystagmographic technique. The sinusoidal (program 1) and eccentric (program 2) rotation was applied with the angular velocity of 10 degrees/s (stimulus 1, rotation rate 0.04 Hz), 30 degrees/s (stimulus II, rotation rate 0.12 Hz), 60 degrees/s (stimulus III) and oscillation periods of 18, 6, and 3 s respectively. No significant changes in the parameters of the vesicular reflex were observed in the patients with vestibular neuronitis and control subjects studied in the phase of decompensation under programs 1 and 2 . The study of the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis in the subcompensation phase (program 2) revealed a significant increase of nystagmus intensity on the affected side compared with the respective parameters estimated in the framework of program 1 (p<0.001). The enhancement of stimulation did not result in any significant changes in the character of vestibuloocular interactions. The results of the study indicate that otolithic afferentation influences the process of compensation of peripheral vestibular labyrinth dysfunction in the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis at the stage of decompensation.

  5. Unilateral pulmonary edema: a rare initial presentation of cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Jinkyu; Lim, Young-Hyo; Park, Hwan-Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Shin, Jinho; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Gil; Hong, Mun K; Lee, Jae Ung

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary edema (UPE) is a rare clinical entity that is often misdiagnosed at first. Most cases of cardiogenic UPE occur in the right upper lobe and are caused by severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We present an unusual case of right-sided UPE in a patient with cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without severe MR. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary intervention and medical therapy for heart failure. Follow-up chest Radiography showed complete resolution of the UPE. This case reminds us that AMI can present as UPE even in patients without severe MR or any preexisting pulmonary disease affecting the vasculature or parenchyma of the lung.

  6. Acute-onset unilateral psychogenic hearing loss in adults: report of six cases and diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Kataoka, Chinatsu; Tazoe, Mami; Takei, Yasuhiko; Nagai, Keiichi; Kohno, Naoyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    We encountered 6 rare cases of acute-onset unilateral psychogenic hearing loss in adults. All were women in their 20s and 30s. Three cases had severe hearing impairment characterized by hearing loss at every frequency; 2 cases had profound hearing impairment, and 1 case had low-frequency hearing impairment. Of the 6 cases, 3 had a history of hearing loss, and 1 had a history of psychogenic visual disturbance. All 6 cases were initially diagnosed as having idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss; all subsequently received steroid therapy. Three cases were not diagnosed as being psychogenic in origin until otoacoustic emissions and auditory brain responses were performed. Although the presence of distinctive clinical features (age, gender, and past history) is important for suspecting psychogenic hearing loss, objective audiological tests such as otoacoustic emissions are essential for diagnosing some cases. Compared to the existing reports of similar cases, our cases had a poorer prognosis (only 2 cases were cured).

  7. Alveolar macrophage depletion increases the severity of acute inflammation following nonlethal unilateral lung contusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Machado-Aranda, David; V Suresh, Madathilparambil; Yu, Bi; Dolgachev, Vladislov; Hemmila, Mark R; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2014-04-01

    Lung contusion (LC) is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. LC is an important risk factor for the development acute lung injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, all of which increase mortality from trauma. LC produces a nonspecific immune cellular response. Neutrophil recruitment is known to increase the severity of inflammation during LC. However, the exact role of macrophages in modulating the response to LC has not been well described. We used a cortical contusion impactor to induce unilateral LC in mice. Thoracic micro computed tomographic scans of these animals were obtained to document radiologic changes over time following LC. To understand the role of macrophages during LC, liposomal clodronate was used to deplete macrophage levels before traumatic insult. Acute inflammatory attributes after LC were assessed, by measuring pressure-volume mechanics; quantifying bronchial alveolar lavage levels of leukocytes, albumin, and cytokines; and finally examining lung specimen histopathology at 5, 24, 48, and 72 hours after injury. After LC, alveolar macrophage numbers were significantly reduced and exhibited slowed recovery. Simultaneously, there was a significant increase in bronchial alveolar lavage neutrophil counts. The loss of macrophages could be attributed to both cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Pretreatment with clodronate increased the severity of lung inflammation as measured by worsened pulmonary compliance, increased lung permeability, amplification of neutrophil recruitment, and increases in early proinflammatory cytokine levels. The presence of regulatory alveolar macrophages plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute inflammation following LC.

  8. Alveolar macrophage depletion increases the severity of acute inflammation following nonlethal unilateral lung contusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Aranda, David; Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Yu, Bi; Dolgachev, Vladislov; Hemmila, Mark R.; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lung contusion (LC) is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. LC is an important risk factor for the development acute lung injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, all of which increase mortality from trauma. LC produces a nonspecific immune cellular response. Neutrophil recruitment is known to increase the severity of inflammation during LC. However, the exact role of macrophages in modulating the response to LC has not been well described. METHODS We used a cortical contusion impactor to induce unilateral LC in mice. Thoracic micro computed tomographic scans of these animals were obtained to document radiologic changes over time following LC. To understand the role of macrophages during LC, liposomal clodronate was used to deplete macrophage levels before traumatic insult. Acute inflammatory attributes after LC were assessed, by measuring pressure-volume mechanics; quantifying bronchial alveolar lavage levels of leukocytes, albumin, and cytokines; and finally examining lung specimen histopathology at 5, 24, 48, and 72 hours after injury. RESULTS After LC, alveolar macrophage numbers were significantly reduced and exhibited slowed recovery. Simultaneously, there was a significant increase in bronchial alveolar lavage neutrophil counts. The loss of macrophages could be attributed to both cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Pretreatment with clodronate increased the severity of lung inflammation as measured by worsened pulmonary compliance, increased lung permeability, amplification of neutrophil recruitment, and increases in early proinflammatory cytokine levels. CONCLUSION The presence of regulatory alveolar macrophages plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute inflammation following LC. PMID:24662861

  9. The relative contribution of urine extravasation to elevate plasma creatinine levels in acute unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Barak; Pinthus, Jehonathan H.; Kleinmann, Nir; Joffe, Erel; Erlich, Tomer; Fridman, Eddie; Winkler, Harry; Mor, Yoram; Ramon, Jacob; Dotan, Zohar A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rising levels of plasma creatinine in the setting of acute unilateral ureteral obstruction (AUUO) often reflects acute renal failure, mandating kidney drainage. We hypothesize that re-absorption of peri-renal urine extravasation (PUE), a common result of UUO, contributes significantly to the elevation in plasma creatinine, rendering the latter an inaccurate benchmark for renal function. We explored this hypothesis in a rat model of AUUO and PUE. Methods: In total, 20 rats were equally divided into 4 groups. Groups 1 and 2 underwent unilateral ligation of the ureter with infiltration of rat’s urine (index group) or saline (control) into the peri-renal space. Two additional control groups underwent peri-renal injection of either urine or saline without AUUO. Plasma creatinine levels were determined immediately prior to the procedure (T0), and hourly for 3 hours (T1, T2 and T3). Renal histology was investigated after 3 hours. Results: Rats in the index group had a significantly greater increase in plasma creatinine levels over 3 hours compared to all other groups (p < 0.05). At T3, average plasma creatinine levels for the index group increased by 96% (0.49 ± 0.18 mg/dL) compared to 46% (0.23 ± 0.06 mg/dL increase) in the AUUO and saline group, and less than 15% rise in both the non-obstructed control groups. Our study limitations includes lack of spontaneous PUE and intraperitoneal surgical approach. Conclusions: Absorption of peri-renal urine in the presence of AUUO is a significant contributor to rising plasma creatinine levels, beyond those attributable to the obstruction alone, and may overestimate the extent of the true renal functional impairment. PMID:26279711

  10. Vertical eye movements during horizontal head impulse test: a new clinical sign of superior vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, F

    2013-12-01

    In some patients suffering from acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit, the head impulse test performed towards the affected side reveals the typical catch-up saccade in the horizontal plane, and an oblique, mostly vertical, upward catch-up saccade after the rotation of the head towards the healthy side. Three cases are reported herein, which have been studied using slow motion video analysis of the eye movements captured by a high-speed webcam (90 fps). The clinical evidence is discussed and a pathophysiological explanation is proposed, consisting in a selective hypofunction of the superior semicircular canal during superior vestibular neuritis.

  11. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  12. Mastoid Vibration Reduces Ipsilesional Shift of Subjective Visual Horizontal in Patients with Acute Stage of Unilateral Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Woo; Lee, Min Young; Jung, Jae Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives To investigate effect of the vibration on subjective visual horizontal (SVH) in patients with acute stage of unilateral vestibulopathy. Subjects and Methods Twenty-five unilateral vestibulopathy patients which analyzed into 42 cases at different time points and suffered from spinning vertigo for more than 24 hours without hearing loss and neurologic abnormality were enrolled. Thirteen subjects with spontaneous nystagmus (>3 degree/sec; averaged symptom onset <1 week) at the time of SVH measurement were classified into the acute unilateral vestibulopathy group (aVU). The other 29 subjects without spontaneous nystagmus were classified into the compensated vestibulopathy group (cVU). SVH was performed with vibration at either mastoid or sterocleidomastoid muscle. Results In the analysis of overall subjects, vibration did not significantly change the degree of shift of SVH. However, analyzed by group, the shift of SVH with vibration at ipsilesional mastoid was significantly decreased than baseline in aVU (p<0.05). The shift of SVH with vibration at contralesional mastoid was significantly increased than baseline in cVU (p=0.05). Conclusions The shift of SVH due to vibration in acute stage of unilateral vestibulopathy showed reduction of the shift, while in compensated stage it showed increase of the shift. PMID:28704891

  13. The dizzy patient: don't forget disorders of the central vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common complaints in neurology clinics, and they account for about 13% of the patients entering emergency units. In this Review, we focus on central vestibular disorders, which are mostly attributable to acute unilateral lesions of the bilateral vestibular circuitry in the brain. In a tertiary interdisciplinary outpatient dizziness unit, central vestibular disorders, including vestibular migraine, comprise about 25% of the established diagnoses. The signs and symptoms of these disorders can mimic those of peripheral vestibular disorders with sustained rotational vertigo. Bedside examinations, such as the head impulse test and ocular motor testing to determine spontaneous and gaze-evoked nystagmus or skew deviation, reliably differentiate central from peripheral syndromes. We also consider disorders of 'higher vestibular functions', which involve more than one sensory modality as well as cognitive domains (for example, orientation, spatial memory and navigation). These disorders include hemispatial neglect, the room tilt illusion, pusher syndrome, and impairment of spatial memory and navigation associated with hippocampal atrophy in cases of peripheral bilateral vestibular loss.

  14. [A study on the mechanism of severe hypoxemia associated with acute unilateral atelectasis in dogs].

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Ding, D; Li, M

    1996-02-01

    To study the mechanism of severe hypoxemia associated with acute unilateral atelectasis (AUA). Six dogs with acute left side atelectasis were studied during the period of rest and exercise. The pulmonary shunt and PaO2 were measured at different levels of ventilation of right lung. After the left side ateloctasis during resting condition, the right lung could compensate to produce only mild hypoxemia (PaO2 9 kPa). But with further increased ventilation by exercise the shunt increased (from 19% to 29%) and led to severe hypoxemia (PaO2 8 kPa). When an artificial pneumothorax was instituted on the left lung, the shunt decreased (from 29% to 18%) and PaO2 increased (from 8 kPa to 9 kPa). After AUA, whether severe hypoxemia would occur is determined by the volume of ventilation of the normal side lung. The excess increase of ventilation of the normal side lung by any reason may result in severe hypoxemia.

  15. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  16. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy for the dizzy patient.

    PubMed

    Tee, L H; Chee, N W C

    2005-05-01

    A customised vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) programme is an important treatment modality in patients with vestibular dysfunction resulting in motion-provoked vertigo, oscillopsia (gaze instability), disequilibrium and gait disturbances. We discuss in this paper the patient selection criteria for VRT, rehabilitation strategies for unilateral and bilateral vestibular deficits, and some of the compelling evidence to support the use of VRT in treating such patients.

  17. Prevention of reflex natriuresis after acute unilateral nephrectomy by neonatal administration of MSG

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.Y.; Wiedemann, E.; Deschepper, C.F.; Alper, R.H.; Humphreys, M.H.

    1987-02-01

    Acute unilateral nephrectomy (AUN) results in natriuresis from the remaining kidney through reflex pathways involving the central nervous system and requiring an intact pituitary gland. The natriuresis is accompanied by an increase in the plasma concentration of a peptide or peptides derived from the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of proopiomelanocortin. The authors measured plasma immunoreactive NTF-like material (IR-NTF) by radioimmunoassay, before and after AUN in control rats and rats treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG), a procedure that produces neuroendocrine dysfunction by destroying cell bodies in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, median eminence, and other brain regions. In control rats, IR-NTF increased from 85.8 +/- 54.9 (SD) to 207 +/- 98.1 fmol/ml after AUN as sodium excretion (U/sub Na/V) doubled. In MSG-treated rats, AUN produced no change in plasma IR-NTF concentration, nor did U/sub Na/V increase. Tissue content of IR-NTF was reduced in the arcuate nucleus and anterior lobe of pituitaries from MSG-treated rats compared with controls, but was no different in the neurointermediate lobe. These results indicate that the hypothalamic lesion produced by neonatal administration of MSG prevents both the increase in plasma IR-NTF concentration and the natruiuresis after AUN, and therefore lend further support to the concept of a casual relationship between these two consequences of AUN.

  18. Acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on single leg vertical jump height and symmetry in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungho; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on height and symmetry of the single leg vertical jump in healthy men. [Subjects] Thirty males with no history of lower limb dysfunction participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the unilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), bilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), and, no vibratory stimulation group (n=10). The subjects in the unilateral and bilateral stimulation groups participated in one session of whole body vibration training at 26 Hz for 3 min. The no vibratory stimulation group subjects underwent the same training for 3 min without whole body vibration. All participants performed the single leg vertical jump for each lower limb, to account for the strong and weak sides. The single leg vertical jump height and symmetry were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The single leg vertical jump height of the weak lower limb significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump height of the strong lower limb significantly improved in the bilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump symmetry significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. [Conclusion] Therefore, the present study found that the effects of whole body vibration training were different depending on the type of application. To improve the single leg vertical jump height in the weak lower limbs as well as limb symmetry, unilateral vibratory stimulation might be more desirable. PMID:26834381

  19. Acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on single leg vertical jump height and symmetry in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungho; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on height and symmetry of the single leg vertical jump in healthy men. [Subjects] Thirty males with no history of lower limb dysfunction participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the unilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), bilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), and, no vibratory stimulation group (n=10). The subjects in the unilateral and bilateral stimulation groups participated in one session of whole body vibration training at 26 Hz for 3 min. The no vibratory stimulation group subjects underwent the same training for 3 min without whole body vibration. All participants performed the single leg vertical jump for each lower limb, to account for the strong and weak sides. The single leg vertical jump height and symmetry were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The single leg vertical jump height of the weak lower limb significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump height of the strong lower limb significantly improved in the bilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump symmetry significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. [Conclusion] Therefore, the present study found that the effects of whole body vibration training were different depending on the type of application. To improve the single leg vertical jump height in the weak lower limbs as well as limb symmetry, unilateral vibratory stimulation might be more desirable.

  20. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted sound in patients with acute brainstem lesions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Jong-Min; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Hwang, Seung-Bae; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Kim, Chanmi; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2013-04-01

    The ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), a recently documented otolith-ocular reflex, is considered to reflect the central projections of the primary otolithic afferent fibers to the oculomotor nuclei. The aim of our study is to define air-conducted sound oVEMP abnormality in patients with acute brainstem lesions and to determine the brainstem structures involved in the generation of oVEMPs. In response to air-conducted tone burst sounds (ACS), oVEMP was measured in 52 patients with acute brainstem lesions. Individualized brainstem lesions were analyzed by means of MRI-based voxel-wise lesion-behavior mapping, and the probabilistic lesion maps were constructed. More than half (n=28, 53.8%) of the patients with acute brainstem lesions showed abnormal oVEMP in response to ACS. The majority of patients with abnormal oVEMPs had lesions in the dorsomedial brainstem that contains the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF), the crossed ventral tegmental tract (CVTT), and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves. MLF, CVTT, and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves appear to be responsible for otolith-ocular responses in the brainstem. Complemented to cervical VEMP for the uncrossed otolith-spinal function, oVEMP to ACS may be applied to evaluate the crossed otolith-ocular function in central vestibulopathies. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  2. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  3. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstring eccentric isokinetic strength and unilateral hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz De Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to investigate the acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines: (a) on peak torque, total external work and joint angle at peak torque of the hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic leg flexion; (b) on unilateral hamstring to quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios; as well as (c) to determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 49 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching, and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, eccentric isokinetic peak torque, the angle of peak torque and total external work were assessed with participants prone at 1.04 and 3.14 rad · s(-1). Unilateral strength ratios of the knee were also recorded. Measures were compared via a fully-within-groups factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no main effects for eccentric isokinetic peak torque, angle of peak torque, total external work and unilateral H/Q strength ratios. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on eccentric strength profile and unilateral H/Q strength ratios and hence both forms of stretching do not reduce these two primary risk factors for muscle injury.

  4. Differential evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage cells and leukotrienes in unilateral acute lung injury and ARDS patients.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Lenti, L; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A; Vivino, G; Conti, G; Pelaia, P; Zicari, A; Pontieri, G; Gasparetto, A

    1989-01-01

    Patients with unilateral acute lung injury (UALI; n = 6) and ARDS (n = 4) were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage, as controls we used 5 patients suffering from cerebral hemorrhage and without pulmonary, cardiac or infectious disease who were mechanically ventilated. For each group of patients two independent bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed. The BAL fluid recovered from the two lungs was immediately analyzed for leukotrienes (LTS) by means of RP-HPLC and stained for cell counts. The BAL from the control group did not show any LTS and the percentage of neutrophils was within the normal range: 1 +/- 0.2% right lung and 1.2 +/- 0.4% left lung. The BAL fluid from UALI patients showed two different patterns, the injured lung showed high levels of LTS (39.1 +/- 8 ng ml-1 LTB4; 25 +/- 6 ng ml-1 LTD4 and 27.8 +/- 8.2 ng ml-1 11-trans LTC4) and an increased percentage of neutrophils (74.2 +/- 7%) compared to controls. Only 2 out of the 6 patients from the UALI group showed small amounts of LTB4 (4 ng ml-1) and LTD4 (3.2 ng ml-1). The BAL obtained from the "healthy lung" in both cases showed values of LTS almost eight fold lower than those present in the injured lung. The percentage of neutrophils from the unaffected lungs (4.3 +/- 7%) was not significantly different from controls. Lavage fluid from ARDS patients showed a similar picture to that of the affected lung from UALI patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  6. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  7. Changes in resting-state fMRI in vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Helmchen, Christoph; Ye, Zheng; Sprenger, Andreas; Münte, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is a sudden peripheral unilateral vestibular failure with often persistent head movement-related dizziness and unsteadiness. Compensation of asymmetrical activity in the primary peripheral vestibular afferents is accomplished by restoration of impaired brainstem vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, but presumably also by changing cortical vestibular tone imbalance subserving, e.g., spatial perception and orientation. The aim of this study was to elucidate (i) whether there are changes of cerebral resting-state networks with respect to functional interregional connectivity (resting-state activity) in VN patients and (ii) whether these are related to neurophysiological, perceptual and functional parameters of vestibular-induced disability. Using independent component analysis (ICA), we compared resting-state networks between 20 patients with unilateral VN and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Patients were examined in the acute VN stage and after 3 months. A neural network (component 50) comprising the parietal lobe, medial aspect of the superior parietal lobule, posterior cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, insular cortex, caudate nucleus, thalamus and midbrain was modulated between acute VN patients and healthy controls and in patients over time. Within this network, acute VN patients showed decreased resting-state activity (ICA) in the contralateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS), in close vicinity to the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which increased after 3 months. Resting-state activity in IPS tended to increase over 3 months in VN patients who improved with respect to functional parameters of vestibular-induced disability (VADL). Resting-state activity in the IPS was not related to perceptual (subjective visual vertical) or neurophysiological parameters of vestibular-induced disability (e.g., gain of vestibulo-ocular reflex, caloric

  8. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-04-01

    Vestibular migraine is now considered a distinct diagnostic entity by both the Barany Society and the International Headache Society. The recognition of vestibular migraine as a diagnostic entity required decades and was presaged by several reports indicating that a large proportion of patients with migraine headaches have vestibular symptoms and that a large proportion of patients with undiagnosed episodic vestibular symptoms have migraine headache. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, challenges to diagnosis include variability in terms of the character of dizziness, the presence or absence of clearly defined attacks, the duration of attacks, and the temporal association between headache or other migrainous features and vestibular symptoms. Also, symptoms of vestibular migraine often overlap with symptoms of other causes of dizziness, especially Ménière's disease and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This article will discuss the demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, physical examination findings, laboratory testing, comorbidities, treatment options, and pathophysiology of vestibular migraine. Future research in the field of vestibular migraine should include both clinical and basic science efforts to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. Controlled treatment trials for vestibular migraine are desperately needed.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of head-shaking nystagmus in patients with vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Jin; Shin, Jung Eun; Park, Mun Su; Kim, Jae Myeong; Na, Bo Ra; Kim, Chang-Hee; Park, Hong Ju

    2012-01-01

    Although biphasic head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) is a basic response to head shaking in patients with unilateral vestibular loss, monophasic HSN is commonly seen in patients with dizziness of undetermined etiology. Since the clinical significance of HSN remains unclear, we sought to characterize different types of HSN in patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) during the acute stage (within 7 days after the onset of vertigo) and at follow-up (about 2 months after the onset of vertigo), and to compare HSN and caloric responses. We analyzed HSN, spontaneous nystagmus and caloric tests in 66 patients with VN. Overall, HSN showed high abnormal rates (94 and 89%) during the acute and follow-up stages and could detect vestibular hypofunction even when canal paresis (CP) had normalized at follow-up. All patients in the acute stage and most patients at follow-up showed HSN with the slow phase to the lesioned side (paretic). Biphasic HSN was common at follow-up, and many patients with a monophasic paretic pattern during the acute stage had evolved to a biphasic paretic pattern at follow-up. Initial slow-phase eye velocities (SPVs) in biphasic HSN were larger than those in monophasic HSN at follow-up. Absence of HSN or reversal of its direction was closely related to normalized caloric responses, but SPVs of HSN did not correlate with the severity of CP. These findings indicate that the HSN test is a sensitive detector of vestibular hypofunction upon 2-Hz head rotation. HSN may reveal previous vestibular hypofunction in the 2-Hz frequency range even at follow-up, when caloric responses detecting vestibular hypofunction in the low-frequency range had normalized. The two tests utilize different mechanisms to assess vestibular hypofunction and are complementary. Biphasic paretic HSN is the most common pattern at follow-up and occurs when the initial SPVs induced by head rotation are large enough to induce the adaptation of primary vestibular afferent activity. Monophasic HSN

  10. Clinical effect of intratympanic dexamethasone injection in acute unilateral tinnitus: A prospective, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Min-Beom; Yoo, Shin-Young; Park, Shi Nae; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Moon, In Seok; Lee, Ho-Ki

    2017-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injection (ITDI) in acute tinnitus of presumed cochlear origin. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, multicenter study. Between August 2013 and December 2015, 54 patients with unilateral tinnitus were enrolled at four different centers. Patients were assigned either to an ITDI (n = 27) or an intratympanic normal saline injection (ITNI; n = 27) group through block randomization. Intratympanic injections were administered four times over 2 weeks. At 4 weeks after initial injection, we analyzed the improvement rates of tinnitus using the tinnitus handicap Inventory (THI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) for loudness, awareness, and annoyance. We defined improvement as the reduction of more than 7 points or of more than 20% in the final THI score compared to the initial THI score. The initial mean hearing thresholds and VAS and THI scores of the two groups did not differ significantly. At 4 weeks after initial injection, the mean VAS and THI scores of both groups had significantly reduced. However, the improvement rate did not differ significantly between the groups (ITDI, 51.9%; ITNI, 59.3%). The results indicate that ITDI might not be more effective than ITNI for the treatment of acute unilateral tinnitus. Therefore, ITDI should not be considered as the main treatment for patients presenting with acute tinnitus as the primary symptom. 1b. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Inferior vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Hyo Jung

    2012-08-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) mostly involves the superior portion of the vestibular nerve and labyrinth. This study aimed to describe the clinical features of VN involving the inferior vestibular labyrinth and its afferents only. Of the 703 patients with a diagnosis of VN or labyrinthitis at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2004 to 2010, we retrospectively recruited 9 patients (6 women, age range 15-75) with a diagnosis of isolated inferior VN. Diagnosis of isolated inferior VN was based on torsional downbeating spontaneous nystagmus, abnormal head-impulse test (HIT) for the posterior semicircular canal (PC), and abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the presence of normally functioning horizontal and anterior semicircular canals, as determined by normal HIT and bithermal caloric tests. All patients presented with acute vertigo with nausea, vomiting, and imbalance. Three patients also had tinnitus and hearing loss in the involved side. The rotation axis of torsional downbeating spontaneous nystagmus was best aligned with that of the involved PC. HIT was also positive only for the involved PC. Cervical VEMP was abnormal in seven patients, and ocular VEMP was normal in all four patients tested. Ocular torsion and subjective visual vertical tests were mostly within the normal range. Since isolated inferior VN lacks the typical findings of much more prevalent superior VN, it may be mistaken for a central vestibular disorder. Recognition of this rare disorder may help avoid unnecessary workups in patients with acute vestibulopathy.

  12. Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    AKDAL, Gülden

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence between migraine and vertigo has been noticed for a long time ago. In recent years, however, growing numbers of epidemiological and clinical studies have definitely shown the significant relation between these two diseases. Recently, the term “vestibular migraine” is used commonly in studies. Vestibular migraine has taken place in appendix in the latest International Headache Society Classification. In this review, epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic criteria and treatment of vesti-bular migraine will be discussed.

  13. Unilateral acute maculopathy associated with adult onset hand, foot and mouth disease: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Bhan, Kanchan; Balaggan, Kam; Lee, Richard Wj; Pavesio, Carlos E; Addison, Peter Kf

    2015-01-01

    Acute maculopathy is a rare condition of unknown aetiology and Coxsackie virus is known to be associated with this macular chorioretinitis. We report a case of acute unilateral maculopathy in a 35-year-old woman with concurrent hand foot and mouth disease. Furthermore, we display multimodal imaging (colour fundus photographs, autofluorescence, spectral domain ocular coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography) charting the course of the disease. The source of the virus was thought to be the patient's child. Empirical treatment with oral corticosteroids was commenced and the inflammation resolved, leaving a residual macular scar. We present this case combined with the review of literature of adult onset Coxsackie-virus-associated retinitis. This case reiterates the fact that Coxsackie virus is an uncommon but important consideration in the differential diagnosis of chorioretinitis and posterior uveitis with atypical retinopathy.

  14. Using Acute Performance on a Comprehensive Neurocognitive, Vestibular, and Ocular Motor Assessment Battery to Predict Recovery Duration After Sport-Related Concussions.

    PubMed

    Sufrinko, Alicia M; Marchetti, Gregory F; Cohen, Paul E; Elbin, R J; Re, Valentina; Kontos, Anthony P

    2017-04-01

    A sport-related concussion (SRC) is a heterogeneous injury that requires a multifaceted and comprehensive approach for diagnosis and management, including symptom reports, vestibular/ocular motor assessments, and neurocognitive testing. To determine which acute (eg, within 7 days) vestibular, ocular motor, neurocognitive, and symptom impairments predict the duration of recovery after an SRC. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-nine patients with a mean age of 15.3 ± 1.9 years completed a neurocognitive, vestibular/ocular motor, and symptom assessment within 7 days of a diagnosed concussion. Patients were grouped by recovery time: ≤14 days (n = 27, 39.1%), 15-29 days (n = 25, 36.2%), and 30-90 days (n = 17, 24.6%). Multinomial regression was used to identify the best subset of predictors associated with prolonged recovery relative to ≤14 days. Acute visual motor speed and cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms were associated with an increased likelihood of recovery times of 30-90 days and 15-29 days relative to a recovery time of ≤14 days. A model with visual motor speed and cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms within the first 7 days of an SRC was 87% accurate at identifying patients with a recovery time of 30-90 days. The current study identified cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms and visual motor speed as the most robust predictors of protracted recovery after an SRC according to the Post-concussion Symptom Scale, Immediate Post-concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, and Vestibular/Ocular Motor Screening (VOMS). While VOMS components were sensitive in identifying a concussion, they were not robust predictors for recovery. Clinicians may consider particular patterns of performance on clinical measures when providing treatment recommendations and discussing anticipated recovery with patients.

  15. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Sebastian Felix; Fasser, Mariette; Polzer, Hans; Sieb, Michael; Regauer, Markus; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias; Blauth, Michael

    2013-01-14

    Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. 60 patients, aged 18-40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV is a promising treatment method for

  16. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV

  17. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    PubMed

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people.

  18. Behavioral aspects of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Staab, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral factors are an integral part of the overall morbidity of patients with vertigo, dizziness, and balance disorders. Anxiety, depression, and more importantly, loss of balance confidence and sense of debility and handicap beleaguer patients with acute and chronic vestibular symptoms. Vestibular rehabilitation originated as a physical therapy, but a careful look at its research development and clinical applications show it to be as much, or perhaps more, a behavioral intervention. More patients referred for vestibular rehabilitation require habituation to chronic vestibular symptoms and motion sensitivity than compensation for active peripheral or central vestibular deficits. Vestibular rehabilitation may exert a positive effect on behavioral morbidity, but the benefits are somewhat uneven and do not always correlate with physical improvements. Health anxiety (i.e., excessive worry about the cause and consequences of physical symptoms) is an emerging concept in clinical psychiatry and psychology. It may offer an important key to understanding the debility and handicap experienced by many patients with vestibular symptoms and enhance the ability of vestibular rehabilitation to ameliorate their suffering.

  19. Acute management of a unilateral incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a patient with bilateral Spigelian hernias.

    PubMed

    Vannahme, M; Monkhouse, S J W

    2013-09-01

    Spigelian hernias were first described by Joseph Klinkosch in the 18th century, and have since posed a diagnostic and surgical problem owing to their non-specific presentation and rarity. While the management of unilateral hernias is fairly well described in today's literature, bilateral Spigelian hernias are very rare. We describe the emergency management of a patient with bilateral Spigelian hernias, diagnosed on computed tomography.

  20. Acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss associated with anabolic steroids and polycythaemia: case report.

    PubMed

    Tikka, T; Mistry, N; Janjua, A

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss due to an infarct in the vertebrobasilar system has been widely reported. Most patients have a background of traditional coronary risk factors related to these cerebrovascular episodes. A 32-year-old male, a regular user of anabolic steroids, presented to the emergency department with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and symptoms suggestive of an infarct of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery but in the absence of risk factors for ischaemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of infarction in the region supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Polycythaemia was found on haematological analysis, which we believe was secondary to the use of anabolic steroids. The patient was commenced on aspirin as per the stroke management protocol. There was resolution of neurological symptomatology six weeks after the episode, but no improvement in hearing. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to the use of anabolic steroids causing polycythaemia. This cause should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss, especially in young males, when no other risk factors can be identified.

  1. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials versus vestibular test battery in patients with Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Steven D; Silveira, M Beatriz; Zhou, Guangwei; Kujawa, Sharon G; Wall, Conrad; Guinan, John J; Herrmann, Barbara S

    2004-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the sensitivity of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials testing to side-of-disease in Meniere's disease patients and to test the hypothesis that information supplied by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials is complementary to that provided by a conventional vestibular test battery. Prospective cohort study. Large specialty hospital, department of otolaryngology. Twenty consenting adults (9 men and 11 women) with unilateral Meniere's disease by American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery diagnostic criteria. All subjects underwent bilateral vestibular evoked myogenic potentials testing using ipsilateral broadband click and short-toneburst stimuli at 250, 500, and 1,000 Hz. All subjects also underwent electronystagmography and sinusoidal vertical axis rotation testing. Accuracy of side-of-disease assignment by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, caloric asymmetry, and multivariate analysis. Side-of-disease assignment was most accurate using caloric asymmetry with a 5% interaural difference criterion, achieving 85% correct assignment. The next best method was vestibular evoked myogenic potentials using 250-Hz toneburst stimuli, achieving 80% correct assignment. The least accurate method was caloric asymmetry using a traditional 30% interaural difference limen, achieving 55% correct assignment. Comparison of 5% interaural difference criterion and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials using 250-Hz toneburst stimuli showed discordant results, but in no case did both 5% interaural difference criterion and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials using 250-Hz toneburst stimuli make an incorrect assignment. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials threshold was shown to be highly sensitive to side-of-disease in unilateral Meniere's disease. We observed instances of discordance in side-of-disease assignment by caloric asymmetry and vestibular evoked myogenic potential methods but no case in which both methods were

  2. Off-center yaw rotation: effect of naso-occipital linear acceleration on the nystagmus response of normal human subjects and patients after unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Haslwanter, T; Black, R A; Burgess, A M; Halmagyi, G M; Topple, A N; Todd, M J

    1998-12-01

    ) of around 12 degrees]. The linear acceleration decreased the time constant of decay of the horizontal component of the post-rotatory nystagmus: from an average of 24.8 degrees/s facing-in to an average of 11.3 degrees/s facing-out. The linear acceleration dumps torsional eye velocity in an manner analogous to, but independent of, the dumping of horizontal eye velocity. Patients with UVD had dramatically reduced torsional eye velocities for both facing-in and facing-out headings, and there was little if any shift of the AEV in UVD patients. The relatively small effects of linear acceleration on human canal-induced nystagmus found here confirms other recent studies in humans (Fetter et al. 1996) in contrast to evidence from monkeys and emphasizes the large and important differences between humans and monkeys in otolith-canal interaction. Our results confirm the vestibular control of the axis of eye velocity of humans is essentially head-referenced whereas in monkeys that control is essentially space-referenced.

  3. In vitro effects of acetyl-DL-leucine (tanganil) on central vestibular neurons and vestibulo-ocular networks of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Vibert, N; Vidal, P P

    2001-02-01

    For 40 years, the amino acid acetyl-DL-leucine (or isoleucine/Tanganil) has been used in clinical practice to reduce the imbalance and autonomic signs associated with acute vertigo crises. In animal models, acetyl-DL-leucine was shown to accelerate vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy, while having only minor effects on normal vestibular function. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, the effect of acetyl-DL-leucine on the activity of central vestibular neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and/or the overall activity of vestibular-related networks was electrophysiologically measured in brainstem slices and in the isolated, in vitro whole brain (IWB) of guinea-pig. Only moderate effects were obtained in normal animals, where both excitatory and inhibitory actions of acetyl-DL-leucine were obtained. However, intracellular recordings from MVN neurons revealed that the nature of the response depended on the resting membrane potential. The neurons excited by acetyl-DL-leucine were significantly hyperpolarized compared to nonsensitive cells, whereas the neurons inhibited by this compound tended to display higher than normal membrane potentials. In accordance with these data, acetyl-DL-leucine reduced the prominent asymmetry characterizing the vestibular-related networks of IWBs taken from previously labyrinthectomized animals, by decreasing the activity of the abnormally depolarized neurons on the hyperactive side. Altogether, our results suggest that acetyl-DL-leucine might act mainly on abnormally hyperpolarized and/or depolarized MVN neurons, by bringing back their membrane potential towards a mean value of -65 to -60 mV. Since in animal models, acute vestibular disorders are associated with asymmetrical spontaneous activities of MVN neurons, this study suggests how acetyl-DL-leucine may reduce acute, vestibular-related imbalances in humans.

  4. Unilateral Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion as a Robust Model for Acute to Chronic Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Clef, Nathalie; Verhulst, Anja; D’Haese, Patrick C.; Vervaet, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an underestimated, yet important risk factor for development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Even after initial total recovery of renal function, some patients develop progressive and persistent deterioration of renal function and these patients are more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Animal models are indispensable for unravelling the mechanisms underlying this progression towards CKD and ESRD and for the development of new therapeutic strategies in its prevention or treatment. Ischemia (i.e. hypoperfusion after surgery, bleeding, dehydration, shock, or sepsis) is a major aetiology in human AKI, yet unilateral ischemia-reperfusion is a rarely used animal model for research on CKD and fibrosis. Here, we demonstrate in C57Bl/6J mice, by both histology and gene expression, that unilateral ischemia-reperfusion without contralateral nephrectomy is a very robust model to study the progression from acute renal injury to long-term tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, i.e. the histopathological hallmark of CKD. Furthermore, we report that the extent of renal fibrosis, in terms of Col I, TGFβ, CCN2 and CCN3 expression and collagen I immunostaining, increases with increasing body temperature during ischemia and ischemia-time. Thus, varying these two main determinants of ischemic injury allows tuning the extent of the long-term fibrotic outcome in this model. Finally, in order to cover the whole practical finesse of ischemia-reperfusion and allow model and data transfer, we provide a referenced overview on crucial technical issues (incl. anaesthesia, analgesia, and pre- and post-operative care) with the specific aim of putting starters in the right direction of implementing ischemia in their research and stimulate them, as well as the community, to have a critical view on ischemic literature data. PMID:27007127

  5. Unilateral Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion as a Robust Model for Acute to Chronic Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Clef, Nathalie; Verhulst, Anja; D'Haese, Patrick C; Vervaet, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an underestimated, yet important risk factor for development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Even after initial total recovery of renal function, some patients develop progressive and persistent deterioration of renal function and these patients are more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Animal models are indispensable for unravelling the mechanisms underlying this progression towards CKD and ESRD and for the development of new therapeutic strategies in its prevention or treatment. Ischemia (i.e. hypoperfusion after surgery, bleeding, dehydration, shock, or sepsis) is a major aetiology in human AKI, yet unilateral ischemia-reperfusion is a rarely used animal model for research on CKD and fibrosis. Here, we demonstrate in C57Bl/6J mice, by both histology and gene expression, that unilateral ischemia-reperfusion without contralateral nephrectomy is a very robust model to study the progression from acute renal injury to long-term tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, i.e. the histopathological hallmark of CKD. Furthermore, we report that the extent of renal fibrosis, in terms of Col I, TGFβ, CCN2 and CCN3 expression and collagen I immunostaining, increases with increasing body temperature during ischemia and ischemia-time. Thus, varying these two main determinants of ischemic injury allows tuning the extent of the long-term fibrotic outcome in this model. Finally, in order to cover the whole practical finesse of ischemia-reperfusion and allow model and data transfer, we provide a referenced overview on crucial technical issues (incl. anaesthesia, analgesia, and pre- and post-operative care) with the specific aim of putting starters in the right direction of implementing ischemia in their research and stimulate them, as well as the community, to have a critical view on ischemic literature data.

  6. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, S.; Freed, L.M.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-{sup 14}C]arachidonic acid ([{sup 14}C]AA) and [1-{sup 14}C]docosahexaenoic acid ([{sup 14}C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-{sup 3}H]palmitic acid ([{sup 3}H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR{sub glc}) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose ([{sup 14}C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [{sup 14}C]DG was injected as a bolus. [{sup 14}C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [{sup 14}C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMR{sub glc} values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMR{sub glc} was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Reduced fatty acid incorporation likely reflects reduced activity of phospholipases A{sub 2} and/or phospholipase C. 65 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. [The application of subjective visual gravity in assessment of vestibular compensation: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Taisheng; Wang, Wei; Xu, Kaixu; Wen, Chao; Liu, Qiang; Han, Xi; Li, Shanshan; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Peng

    2016-05-01

    To discuss the characteristics of subjective visual gravity (subjective visual vertical/horizontal, SVV/SVH) and assess its clinical application for peripheral unilateral vestibular compensation. 69 cases of acute peripheral unilateral vestibular dysfunction patients (case group) accepted SVV/SVH, spontaneous nystagmus (SN), caloric test (CT) and other vestibular function tests. 49 healthy people (control group) accepted SVV/SVH only. SVV/SVH, SN and unilateral weakness (UW) were selected as for the observation indicators. The correlations between SVV/SVH, SN, UW and courses were investigated respectively, as well as the characteristic of SVV/SVH, SN in period of vestibular compensation. Among case group SVV, SVH positive in 42 patients(60.9%) and 44 patients(63.8%), the absolute values of the skew angle were in the range between 2.1°-20.0°, 2.1°-22.2°. Skew angles of SVV/SVH in control were in the range between -1.5°-2.0° and -2.0°-1.6°, and had no statistical significance with case group(t=5.336 and 5.864, P<0.05). SN-positive 28 cases (40.6%), the range of intensities at 2.4°-17.1°; UW-positive 50 cases (72.5%). In case group, positive correlation between SVV and SVH(r=0.948, P=0.00), negatively correlated between SVV/SVH and SN respectively(r values were -0.720, -0.733, P values were 0.00), no correlation between the skew angle of SVV/SVH, strength of SN and UW value(r values were 0.191, 0.189, and 0.179, P>0.05), there was no correlation between the absolute value of SVV, SVH, SN, UW with the duration (rs values were -0.075, -0.065, -0.212, and 0.126, P>0.05). Subjective visual gravity can be used not only to assess the range of unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction, but also help assess the static compensatory of otolithic, guidance and assessment of vestibular rehabilitation.

  8. Bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis with iritis induced by unilateral topical application of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Langford, Marlyn P; Foreman, Bridgett D; Srur, Lana; Ganley, James P; Redens, Thomas B

    2013-11-01

    The factors responsible for the conjunctivitis and iritis associated with acute ocular infection and post enteric inflammatory disease are not fully known. The pro-inflammatory activity of unilateral topical application of muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the smallest bio-active Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component) was investigated in adult rabbits. The resultant bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and pyogenic responses were characterized. Bilateral symptoms were graded by slit lamp examinations; tear fluid, Schirmer tests (tear production), blood and aqueous humor (AH) samples were obtained from MDP-treated and untreated rabbits. MDP concentration, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (GGT; key enzyme in glutathione recapture, xenobiotic detoxification, eicosanoid synthesis and neutrophil function), protein concentration, and tear cell density, cytology, and immunofluorescent antibody reactivity to GGT and calreticulin (CRT; MDP-binding protein) were determined. MDP was cleared from ipsilateral tears and serum by 6 h, but was undetected in mock-treated contralateral tears. Bilateral signs of acute transient pyogenic conjunctivitis, characterized by tearing, lid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis and leukocytic infiltrate with iritis (erythema and aqueous flare) were detected. Milder symptoms occurred in the mock-treated contralateral eyes. Bilateral symptoms, tear production, tear protein, GGT activity, and mucopurulent discharge (containing up to 2.5-5.0 × 10(6) cells/mL) were elevated 4-8 h post MDP and resolved to near pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Tear GGT activity and protein levels were higher in MDP-treated and mock-treated contralateral eyes than in eyes of untreated adult rabbits (p's < 0.001). Elevated tear GGT activity was associated with histopathology and increased vascular and epithelial permeability to serum protein, GGT-positive epithelia cells, macrophages and heterophils. Repeat MDP applications induced recurrent

  9. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2016-02-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are short latency manifestations of vestibulo-ocular and vestibulocollic reflexes that originate from the utricle and saccule. Although cervical and ocular VEMPs have mostly been applied to peripheral vestibular disorders, the characteristics and the diagnostic values of VEMPs have been expanded to assess the function of the central otolithic pathways. In the central nervous system, the cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) are mediated by the vestibular nuclei and uncrossed medial vestibulospinal tract descending in the lower brainstem and spinal cord. In contrast, the ocular VEMPs (oVEMPs) reflect the function of the vestibular nuclei and the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) pathways, mostly contained in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Therefore, lesions involving the vestibular nuclei can present abnormalities of both cVEMPs and oVEMPs. The medullary lesions involving the descending MLF or the spinal accessory nucleus impair cVEMPs. In contrast, the lesions involving the MLF, the crossed ventral tegmental tract, oculomotor nuclei and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal can impair oVEMPs. Patients with unilateral cerebellar infarctions may show abnormal VEMPs especially when they have the ocular tilt reaction. Delayed responses of VEMPs are characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). Reduced VEMP responses can be observed in patients with vestibular migraine. VEMPs are useful in evaluating central as well as peripheral otolithic function that are not readily defined by conventional vestibular function tests, and can aid in detecting and localizing central lesions, especially silent brainstem lesions such as tiny infarctions or MS plaques.

  10. The effect of acute unilateral inflammation of the equine temporomandibular joint on the kinematics of mastication.

    PubMed

    Smyth, T T; Carmalt, J L; Treen, T T; Lanovaz, J L

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are well reported in man and some domestic animals other than the horse. The pathophysiology of equine TMJ disease and the effects of disease on the kinematics of mastication are unknown. To determine whether transient unilateral inflammation of the equine TMJ results in alterations in the masticatory cycle. An experimental controlled study utilising 6 horses of various ages with normal dentition. Each horse was equipped with an optical motion tracking (kinematic) system. Horses were observed chewing grass hay over 3 min intervals. Regardless of the initial side of the power stroke in the masticatory cycle, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected in the left TMJ in each horse and the horses were reassessed after 6 h. Four horses developed effusion of the injected TMJs; 2 of these also began quidding. All horses injected on the original side of the power stroke switched sides while the 2 injected on the contralateral side did not. All horses developed reduced vertical pitch (vertical opening) of the mandible. Overall, rostrocaudal movement of the mandible did not change; however, the timing of this movement relative to the phase of the masticatory cycle did. Injection with LPS did not affect the amount of lateral movement of the mandible. Injection of LPS into the TMJ significantly altered the masticatory cycle compared with baseline values representing avoidance behaviour due to inflammation of the joint, despite which the horses continued to eat using the contralateral mandible. Lipopolysaccharide administration also led to quidding and a loss of feed efficiency (in some individuals). © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  11. Asymmetric Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy With Unilateral Tongue Swelling Mimicking Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chi, Man Sum; Ng, Shi Hon; Chan, Lok Yiu

    2016-11-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with acute onset of left hemiparesis and left hypoglossal nerve palsy with ipsilateral tongue swelling. He then progressed to tetraparesis in a few days. Cerebrospinal fluid showed cell protein dissociation. A nerve conduction study showed motor axonal neuropathy with sensory sparing. A subsequent blood test revealed anti-GD1b IgG antibody positivity. He was diagnosed to have acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) and treated with a course of intravenous immunoglobulin with slow improvement. This is probably the first AMAN with asymmetrical presentation mimicking stroke reported in the literature in detail. The anti-GD1b IgG antibody is also not commonly associated with AMAN.

  12. Inferior vestibular neuritis in a fighter pilot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xie, Su Jiang; Jia, Hong Bo; Xu, Po; Zheng, Ying Juan

    2013-06-01

    Spatial disorientation in airplane pilots is a leading factor in many fatal flying accidents. Spatial orientation is the product of integrative inputs from the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems. One condition that can lead to sudden pilot incapacitation in flight is vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis is commonly diagnosed by a finding of unilateral vestibular failure, such as a loss of caloric response. However, because caloric response testing reflects the function of only the superior part of the vestibular nerve, it cannot detect cases of neuritis in only the inferior part of the nerve. We describe the case of a Chinese naval command fighter pilot who exhibited symptoms suggestive of vestibular neuritis but whose caloric response test results were normal. Further testing showed a unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We believe that this pilot had pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. VEMP testing plays a major role in the diagnosis of inferior nerve vestibular neuritis in pilots. We also discuss this issue in terms of aeromedical concerns.

  13. What is the minimal vestibular function required for compensation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Wade, S. W.; Nashner, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Living with an uncompensated, abnormal vestibular system requires oppressive modification of life style and often prevents return to work and activities of daily living. Patients with vestibular abnormalities were studied to determine the minimal residual vestibular function required to achieve compensation. Three groups of patients with (a) complete unilateral loss of vestibular function with normal horizontal canal-vestibulo-ocular (HCVOR) function in the opposite ear, (b) complete unilateral loss with abnormal HCVOR function in the opposite ear, and (c) bilateral reduction of vestibular function from aminoglycoside toxicity underwent vestibuloocular (VOR), optokinetic (OKN), visual-VOR (VVOR), and computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) tests before and after therapeutic procedures. Results suggest that a minimal VOR response amplitude must be present for compensation of VVOR function to occur. The roles of VOR and OKN phase shifts in vestibular compensation are more complicated and require further study. Compensation of vestibulospinal function does not necessarily accompany VOR or VVOR compensation. Ascending and descending vestibular compensatory mechanisms may involve different spatial sensory inputs. Results of these studies have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with vestibular disorders, including selection and monitoring of patients for therapeutic regimens such as vestibular nerve section and streptomycin therapy.

  14. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Piras, Gianluca; Brandolini, Cristina; Castellucci, Andrea; Modugno, Giovanni Carlo

    2013-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of vestibular testing in patients with acoustic neuroma, considering two main aspects: to compare diagnostic sensitivity of the current vestibular tests, especially considering ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) and to identify pre-operative localization of the tumor (inferior vestibular nerve vs. superior vestibular nerve) only with the help of vestibular electrophysiological data. Twenty-six patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma (mainly intracanalicular type) were studied with a full audio-vestibular test battery (pure tone and speech audiometry, caloric bithermal test, vibration-induced nystagmus test (VIN), cervical and OVEMPs). 18 patients (69 %) showed abnormal caloric responses. 12 patients (46.2 %) showed a pattern of VIN test suggestive of vestibular asymmetry. 16 patients (61.5 %) showed abnormal OVEMPs (12 only to AC, 4 both to AC and BC). 10 patients (38.5 %) showed abnormal cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (5 both to AC and BC, 5 only to AC). In one case, results of vestibular evoked potentials and caloric test were confirmed by intra-operative and post-operative findings. Results of electrophysiological tests in AN patients could be helpful for planning the proper surgical approach, considering that sensitivity of every exam is quite low in intracanalicular lesion; clinical data allow a better interpretation of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

  15. Acute unilateral vision loss with optic disc oedema in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Tyagi, Mudit; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Narayanan, Raja

    2015-08-03

    A 36-year-old woman presented with acute vision loss and was found to have disc oedema and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). She presented with a history of acute, painless vision loss in her left eye over a period of 10 days. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 20/50, N6 in the right eye (OD) and 20/160, N6 in the left eye (OS). She was found to have a swollen optic disc and the examination of her fundus showed changes suggestive of RP. The diagnosis of RP was confirmed by electroretinogram, and after ruling out demyelinating changes in the central nervous system and other possible infectious causes of papillitis, she was treated with intravenous steroids followed by a course of oral steroid therapy. Following treatment, her visual acuity improved to 20/60. Acute vision loss may occur in patients with RP and prompt steroid therapy may result in partial visual recovery. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Cross-sectional study of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness at 7 years after an acute episode of unilateral primary acute angle closure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacky W Y; Woo, Tiffany T Y; Yau, Gordon S K; Yip, Stan; Yick, Doris W F; Wong, Jasper; Wong, Raymond L M; Wong, Ian Y H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the long-term retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) status and determinants of RNFL thinning after an episode of unilateral primary acute angle closure (AAC). This cross-sectional study analyzed the medical records of consecutive patients with a single episode of unilateral AAC from 1999 to 2009 in Hong Kong. The peripapillary RNFL thickness was correlated with age, gender, presenting intraocular pressure (IOP), time to laser iridotomy, time to cataract extraction, follow-up duration, as well as the last IOP, vertical cup-to-disc ratio (CDR), and vision. The fellow uninvolved eye was used as a proxy comparison of RNFL loss in the attack eye. In 40 eligible patients, the mean age was 68.3 ± 8.7 years with a male-to-female ratio of 1:7. The mean presenting IOP was 49.2 ± 14.0 mm Hg and the time from presentation to laser iridotomy was 6.7 ± 6.9 days. Forty percent of subjects received a cataract extraction at 3.2 ± 2.9 years after the attack. The last IOP, CDR, and LogMAR vision were 16.0 ± 3.8 mm Hg, 0.6 ± 0.2, and 0.6 ± 0.6 LogMAR units, respectively, at 7.9 ± 2.4 years. The RNFL thickness in the attack eye (69.2 ± 19.1 μm) was 25.2 ± 17.9% thinner than the fellow eye (93.0 ± 17.8 μm) at 7.5 ± 2.9 years post-AAC. Using univariate analysis, the last vertical CDR (odds ratio [OR] = 17.2, P = 0.049) and LogMAR visual acuity (VA) (OR = 6.6, P = 0.03) were the only significant predictors for RNFL thinning whereas none of the other covariates showed significant associations (P > 0.1). At 7.5 years following unilateral AAC, the RNFL thickness was 25% thinner than the fellow eye. CDR enlargement and poor VA were the only significant predictors for RNFL loss.

  17. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  18. Basic Concepts in Understanding Recovery of Function in Vestibular Reflex Networks during Vestibular Compensation.

    PubMed

    Peusner, Kenna D; Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input-output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation.

  19. Restoration of 3D Vestibular Sensation in Rhesus Monkeys Using a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Davidovics, Natan; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, Joong Ho; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    profoundly low gain [(mean eye velocity amplitude)/(mean head velocity amplitude) < 0.1] and large misalignment between ideal and actual eye movements. In contrast, motion-modulated sinusoidal MVP stimuli elicited a 3D VOR with gain 0.4–0.7 and axis misalignment of 21–38°, and responses to high-acceleration transient head rotations exhibited gain and asymmetry closer to those of unilaterally gentamicin-treated animals (i.e., with one intact labyrinth) than to bilaterally gentamicin-treated animals without MVP stimulation. In comparison to responses observed under similar conditions in chinchillas, acute responses to MVP stimulation in rhesus macaque monkeys were slightly better aligned to the desired rotation axis. Responses during combined rotation and prosthetic stimulation were greater than when either stimulus was presented alone, suggesting that the central nervous system uses MVP input in the context of multisensory integration. Considering the similarity in temporal bone anatomy and VOR performance between rhesus monkeys and humans, these observations suggest that an MVP will likely restore a useful level of vestibular sensation and gaze stabilization in humans. PMID:21888961

  20. Aphasia and unilateral spatial neglect due to acute thalamic hemorrhage: clinical correlations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages are associated with a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is well known that such cognitive changes constitute a limiting factor of recovery of the activities of daily living (ADL). The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and hematomas is unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aphasia/neglect and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. One hundred fifteen patients with thalamic hemorrhage (70 men and 45 women) were studied. Their mean age was 68.9 ± 10.3 years, and patients with both left and right lesions were included. We calculated hematoma volume and examined the presence or absence of aphasia/neglect and the relationships between these dysfunctions and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. Fifty-nine patients were found to have aphasia and 35 were found to have neglect. Although there was no relationship between hematoma type and cognitive dysfunction, hematoma volume showed a correlation with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. The ADL score and ratio of patient discharge for patients with aphasia/neglect were lower than those for patients without aphasia/neglect. We observed a correlation between the hematoma volume in thalamic hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction. Aphasia/neglect is found frequently in patients with acute thalamic hemorrhage and may influence the ADL.

  1. Acute unilateral ischemic renal injury induces progressive renal inflammation, lipid accumulation, histone modification, and "end-stage" kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2011-12-01

    There is an emerging concept in clinical nephrology that acute kidney injury (AKI) can initiate chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, potential mechanisms by which this may occur remain elusive. Hence, this study tested the hypotheses that 1) AKI triggers progressive activation of selected proinflammatory genes, 2) there is a relative failure of compensatory anti-inflammatory gene expression, 3) proinflammatory lipid accumulation occurs, 4) these changes correspond with "gene-activating" histone acetylation, and 5) in concert, progressive renal disease results. CD-1 mice were subjected to 30 min of unilateral renal ischemia. Assessments were made 1 day, 1 wk, or 3 wk later. Results were contrasted to those observed in uninjured contralateral kidneys or in kidneys from normal mice. Progressive renal injury occurred throughout the 3-wk postischemic period, as denoted by stepwise increases in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin gene induction and ongoing histologic damage. By 3 wk postischemia, progressive renal disease was observed (massive tubular dropout; 2/3rds reduction in renal weight). These changes corresponded with progressive increases in proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression (MCP-1, TNF-α, TGF-β1), a relative failure of anti-inflammatory enzyme/cytokine (heme oxygenase-1; IL-10) upregulation, and progressive renal lipid (cholesterol/triglyceride) loading. Stepwise increases in collagen III mRNA and collagen deposition (Sirius red staining) indicated a progressive profibrotic response. Postischemic dexamethasone treatment significantly preserved renal mass, indicating functional significance of the observed proinflammatory state. Progressive gene-activating H3 acetylation was observed by ELISA, rising from 5% at baseline to 75% at 3 wk. This was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay of target genes. In sum, these results provide experimental support for the clinical concept that AKI can trigger CKD, this is partially

  2. Vestibular tests in the selection of cosmonauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiczkowa, Janusza

    Vestibulo-vegetative disorders in cosmonauts and astronauts occurring during space flight compel otolaryngologists to search for vestibular tests enabling a precise evaluation of the activity of the vestibular apparatus and showing disposition to motion sickness. Otoneurological investigation of Polish candidates for cosmonaut status consisted of the following vestibular tests: caloric, rotatory, optokinetic, swinging torsion, statokinesimetric and vestibulo-vegetative. The value of various vestibular tests for aviation and space medicine is presented in this paper, taking into account the results of investigations of the equilibrium system with the group of pilots selected for space flight as well as extensive experience with candidates for the air service and also trained pilots and patients. The relatively frequent lack of correlation between the results of the applied tests, which renders difficult the proper evaluation of the equilibrium system, is emphasized in the paper. Finally, the results of investigations of acute habituation of the vestibular apparatus are discussed.

  3. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  4. HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND VESTIBULAR DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Monzani, Fabio; Petrolo, Claudio; Fattori, Bruno; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Cassandro, Ettore; Costante, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to analyze the existing literature concerning the relationship between Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and vestibular dysfunction. We used electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library) to search and collect all published articles about the association between HT and vestibular disorders. Several observational and retrospective studies have postulated a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and vestibular disorders. In most cases, an appropriate control group was lacking, and the impact of thyroid functional status could not precisely be established. In recent years, two well-designed prospective studies have provided convincing evidence that the association is not random. One article reported that patients with Ménière disease (MD) had a significantly higher prevalence of positive anti-thyroid autoantibody as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, more than half of MD patients had either positive anti-thyroid or non-organ-specific autoantibody titers, compared to less than 30% of both patients with unilateral vestibular paresis without cochlear involvement and healthy controls. Another study found that patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) had significantly higher serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and antithyroid autoantibody levels than healthy controls. Additionally, almost one-fifth of euthyroid patients with HT had signs of BPPV. The published results indicate that patients with MD or BPPV are potential candidates to also develop HT. Thus, in HT patients, the presence of even slight symptoms or signs potentially related to vestibular lesions should be carefully investigated. AITD = autoimmune thyroid disease; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; EH = endolymphatic hydrops; HT = Hashimoto thyroiditis; L-T4 = L-thyroxine; MD = Ménière disease; PS = Pendred syndrome; Tg = thyroglobulin; TPO = thyroid peroxidase; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  5. The vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The end organs, central nervous system connections, and static and dynamic characteristics of the vestibular system are presented. Vestibular servation in man and vestibular side effect prevention from space missions involving artificial gravity generation are also considered. Vestibular models and design criteria for rotating space vehicles are appended.

  6. The vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The end organs, central nervous system connections, and static and dynamic characteristics of the vestibular system are presented. Vestibular servation in man and vestibular side effect prevention from space missions involving artificial gravity generation are also considered. Vestibular models and design criteria for rotating space vehicles are appended.

  7. Vestibular assessment in patients with vestibular schwannomas: what really matters?

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Franzin, A; Spatola, G; Boari, N; Picozzi, P; Bailo, M; Piccioni, L O; Gagliardi, F; Mortini, P; Bussi, M

    2014-04-01

    Vestibular function is often underdiagnosed in vestibular schwannomas (VS). To evaluate it in a selected group of patients harbouring vestibular schwannomas, 64 patients were included in this study, recruited between March 2008 and June 2011 at our institution. All patients underwent Gd-enhanced MRI and complete neurotological evaluation before gamma knife surgery. Morphological measurements included Koos Classification and quantification of internal acoustic canal filling in length and diameter. Cochlear and vestibular functions were assessed considering pure tone and speech audiometry, bedside examination and caloric test by videonystagmography. A statistical analysis was performed to find possible correlations between morphological and cochleovestibular data. Patients with a higher intracanalicular length (ICL, mean value 8.59 and median 8.8 mm) of the tumour presented a higher value of UW than the subgroup with a lower length (51.9 ± 24.3% and 38.8 ± 18.1% respectively, p = 0.04), while no difference was detected for pure tone audiometry (PTA) values (50.9 ± 22.3 db and 51.1 ± 28.9 db respectively). Patients with a higher ICL also presented a higher rate of positive HIT (88% and 60% respectively, p = 0.006). Patients with a higher value of intracanalicular diameter (ICD, mean value 5.22 and median 5.15 mm) demonstrated higher values of UW (50.2 ± 29.1% and 39.3 ± 21% respectively, p = 0.03), but not different PTA (50.2 ± 29.1 db and 51.9 ± 29.9 db respectively). Finally, patients with a positive head impulse test (HIT) demonstrated significantly higher values of unilateral weakness (UW) (p = 0.001). Vestibular disorders are probably underdiagnosed in patients with VS. ICL and ICD seem to be the main parameters that correlate with vestibular function. Also, in case of small intracanalar T1 VS a slight increase of these variables can result in significant vestibular impairment. The data reported in the present study are not inconsistent with the

  8. [The incidence of vestibular disorders among the patients suffering from otosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Vartanian, M S; Banashek-Meshchiarkova, T V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the incidence of vestibular symptoms among the patients presenting with otosclerosis and their relationship with the form of this pathology. A total of 90 patients had the confirmed diagnosis of otosclerosis in the absence of concomitant diseases known to cause vestibular disorders. The patients were interviewed and underwent thorough examination. It turned out that 16.7% of them exhibited vestibular asymmetry; in other words, the frequency of this condition was higher than the incidence of vestibular disbalance in the general population. Most patients with vestibular symptoms and complaints were referred to the group with unilateral sensorineural hearing impairment that, however, can not be a marker of unilateral vestibular deficiency.

  9. Current treatment of nasal vestibular stenosis with CO2-laser surgery: prolonged vestibular stenting versus intraoperative mitomycin application. A case series of 3 patients.

    PubMed

    van Schijndel, Olaf; van Heerbeek, Niels; Ingels, Koen J A O

    2014-12-01

    These case studies describe three cases of unilateral nasal vestibular stenoses caused by chemical cauterization. Each case was treated with CO2-laser surgery together with intraoperative topic application of mitomycin or prolonged vestibular stenting for prevention of restenosis. Two patients received intraoperative mitomycin application and one patient received prolonged vestibular stenting. Results were documented using high-resolution photographs. The follow up period ranged from 1 year and 3 months to 4 years and 9 months. All patients improved after CO2-laser surgery. No complications were reported. We consider CO2-laser surgery for relief of nasal vestibular stenosis as a feasible surgical technique for relieve of nasal vestibular stenosis. Prolonged vestibular stenting seems to be an important factor for the prevention of restenosis in which the value of intraoperative mitomycin application without prolonged vestibular stenting remains uncertain.

  10. Comparative analysis of pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-DL-leucine (Tanganil) and its two isomers (N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine) on vestibular compensation: Behavioral investigation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Tighilet, Brahim; Leonard, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Lacour, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Head roll tilt, postural imbalance and spontaneous nystagmus are the main static vestibular deficits observed after an acute unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). In the UVL cat model, these deficits are fully compensated over 6 weeks as the result of central vestibular compensation. N-Acetyl-dl-leucine is a drug prescribed in clinical practice for the symptomatic treatment of acute UVL patients. The present study investigated the effects of N-acetyl-dl-leucine on the behavioral recovery after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the cat, and compared the effects of each of its two isomers N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine. Efficacy of these three drug treatments has been evaluated with respect to a placebo group (UVN+saline water) on the global sensorimotor activity (observation grids), the posture control (support surface measurement), the locomotor balance (maximum performance at the rotating beam test), and the spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (recorded in the light). Whatever the parameters tested, the behavioral recovery was strongly and significantly accelerated under pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine and N-acetyl-L-leucine. In contrast, the N-acetyl-D-leucine isomer had no effect at all on the behavioral recovery, and animals of this group showed the same recovery profile as those receiving a placebo. It is concluded that the N-acetyl-L-leucine isomer is the active part of the racemate component since it induces a significant acceleration of the vestibular compensation process similar (and even better) to that observed under treatment with the racemate component only. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  12. Functional organization of primate translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes and effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (trVORs) are characterized by distinct spatio-temporal properties and sensitivities that are proportional to the inverse of viewing distance. Anodal (inhibitory) labyrinthine stimulation (100 microA, < 2 s) during motion decreased the high-pass filtered dynamics, as well as horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance. Cathodal (excitatory) currents had opposite effects. Translational VORs were also affected after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Animals lost their ability to modulate trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance acutely after the lesion. These deficits partially recovered over time, albeit a significant reduction in trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance remained in compensated animals. During fore-aft motion, the effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy were more dramatic. Both acute and compensated animals permanently lost their ability to modulate fore-aft trVOR responses as a function of target eccentricity. These results suggest that (1) the dynamics and viewing distance-dependent properties of the trVORs are very sensitive to changes in the resting firing rate of vestibular afferents and, consequently, vestibular nuclei neurons; (2) the most irregularly firing primary otolith afferents that are most sensitive to labyrinthine electrical stimulation might contribute to reflex dynamics and sensitivity; (3) inputs from both labyrinths are necessary for the generation of the translational VORs.

  13. Functional organization of primate translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes and effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (trVORs) are characterized by distinct spatio-temporal properties and sensitivities that are proportional to the inverse of viewing distance. Anodal (inhibitory) labyrinthine stimulation (100 microA, < 2 s) during motion decreased the high-pass filtered dynamics, as well as horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance. Cathodal (excitatory) currents had opposite effects. Translational VORs were also affected after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Animals lost their ability to modulate trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance acutely after the lesion. These deficits partially recovered over time, albeit a significant reduction in trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance remained in compensated animals. During fore-aft motion, the effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy were more dramatic. Both acute and compensated animals permanently lost their ability to modulate fore-aft trVOR responses as a function of target eccentricity. These results suggest that (1) the dynamics and viewing distance-dependent properties of the trVORs are very sensitive to changes in the resting firing rate of vestibular afferents and, consequently, vestibular nuclei neurons; (2) the most irregularly firing primary otolith afferents that are most sensitive to labyrinthine electrical stimulation might contribute to reflex dynamics and sensitivity; (3) inputs from both labyrinths are necessary for the generation of the translational VORs.

  14. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Andrei M; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a functional architecture, system level design, and electronic evaluation of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing unit of the prosthesis is a custom-designed one-axis micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope. Similar to the natural semicircular canal, the MEMS gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular acceleration. The voltage is then converted into electric current pulses according to the physiological data relating angular acceleration to the spike count in the vestibular nerve. The current pulses can be delivered to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Electronic properties of the vestibular prosthesis prototype have been systematically evaluated and found to meet the design specifications. A unique feature of the present vestibular implant prototype is the scalability: the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology.

  15. Nystagmus in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Krakovitz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is one of the commonly identified congenital temporal bone abnormalities associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be unilateral or bilateral, and typically presents at birth or in early childhood. Vestibular symptoms have been reported in up to 50% of affected individuals, and may be delayed in onset until adulthood. The details of nystagmus in patients with EVA have not been previously reported. The objectives were to describe the clinical history, vestibular test findings and nystagmus seen in a case series of patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct anomaly. Chart review, included computed tomography temporal bones, infrared nystagmography with positional and positioning testing, caloric testing, rotary chair and vibration testing. Clinical history and nystagmus varied among the five patients in this series. All patients were initially presumed to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but repositioning treatments were not effective, prompting referral, further testing and evaluation. In three patients with longstanding vestibular complaints, positional nystagmus was consistently present. One patient had distinct recurrent severe episodes of positional nystagmus. Nystagmus was unidirectional and horizontal. In one case horizontal nystagmus was consistently reproducible with seated head turn to the affected side, and reached 48 d/s. Nystagmus associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct is often positional, and can be confused with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Unexplained vestibular symptoms in patients with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should prompt diagnostic consideration of EVA. PMID:26557362

  16. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lee, Daniel J; Wall, Conrad; Merfeld, Daniel M; Lewis, Richard F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly integrative behaviors, such as the perception of head orientation and posture have remained unclear. We tested a one-dimensional, unilateral prosthesis in a rhesus monkey with bilateral vestibular loss and found that chronic electrical stimulation partially restored the compensatory VOR and also that percepts of head orientation relative to gravity were improved. However, the one-dimensional prosthetic stimulation had no clear effect on postural stability during quiet stance, but sway evoked by head-turns was modestly reduced. These results suggest that not only can the implementation of a vestibular prosthesis provide partial restitution of VOR but may also improve perception and posture in the presence of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH). In this review, we provide an overview of our previous and current work directed towards the eventual clinical implementation of an implantable vestibular prosthesis.

  17. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in three patients with large vestibular aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Schmerber, Sébastien; Habiby Kermany, Mohammad; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2004-04-01

    An enlarged vestibular aqueduct (LVA) is a common congenital inner ear anomaly responsible for some unusual vestibular and audiological symptoms. Most of the cases show bilateral early onset and progressive hearing loss in children. The gross appearance on CT scan of the inner ear is generally normal. However, precise measurements of the inner ear components reveal abnormal dimensions, which may account for the accompanying auditory and vestibular dysfunction. Despite extensive studies on hearing and the vestibular apparatus, saccular function is not studied. To our knowledge this is the first report of saccular malfunction in three patients with LVA by means of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Conventional audiograms revealed bilateral severe sensorineural hearing loss in two patients and mixed type hearing loss in one patient. Two of the patients complained about vertigo and dizziness but vestibular assessments of the patients showed normal results. The diagnosis had been made by high-resolution CT scans and MR images of the skull that showed LVA in the absence of other anomalies. The VEMP threshold measured from the ear with LVA in two patients with unilateral enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct was 75-80 dB nHL whereas the threshold from normal ears was 95 dB nHL. The third patient with mixed type hearing loss and bilateral LVA had VEMP responses despite a big air-bone gap in the low frequency range. The VEMP in this patient was greater in amplitude and lower in threshold in the operated ear (the patient had a tympanoplasty which did not improve her hearing). These findings and results of other patients with Tullio phenomenon and superior semicircular canal dehiscence, who also showed lower VEMP threshold, confirmed the theory of a 'third window' that allows volume and pressure displacements, and thus larger deflection of the vestibular sensors, which would cause the vestibular organ to be more responsive to sound and pressure changes.

  18. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Decrease Neurotransmitter Release in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons During Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral damage to the peripheral vestibular receptors precipitates a debilitating syndrome of oculomotor and balance deficits at rest, which extensively normalize during the first week after the lesion due to vestibular compensation. In vivo studies suggest that GABAB receptor activation facilitates recovery. However, the presynaptic or postsynaptic sites of action of GABAB receptors in vestibular nuclei neurons after lesions have not been determined. Accordingly, here presynaptic and postsynaptic GABAB receptor activity in principal cells of the tangential nucleus, a major avian vestibular nucleus, was investigated using patch-clamp recordings correlated with immunolabeling and confocal imaging of the GABAB receptor subunit-2 (GABABR2) in controls and operated chickens shortly after unilateral vestibular ganglionectomy (UVG). Baclofen, a GABAB agonist, generated no postsynaptic currents in principal cells in controls, which correlated with weak GABABR2 immunolabeling on principal cell surfaces. However, baclofen decreased miniature excitatory (mEPSC) and GABAergic inhibitory (mIPSC) events in principal cells in controls, compensating and uncompensated chickens three days after UVG, indicating the presence of functional GABAB receptors on presynaptic terminals. Baclofen decreased GABAergic mIPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side of compensating chickens, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in synaptotagmin2 (Syt2)-labeled terminals. In uncompensated chickens, baclofen decreased mEPSC frequency to the greatest extent in principal cells on the intact side, with concurrent increases in GABABR2 pixel brightness and percentage overlap in Syt1-labeled terminals. Altogether, these results revealed changes in presynaptic GABAB receptor function and expression which differed in compensating and uncompensated chickens shortly after UVG. This work supports an important role for GABAB autoreceptor

  19. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or "à la carte" VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life.

  20. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or “à la carte” VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  1. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  2. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M; Golding, John F; Staab, Jeffrey P; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

  3. Visual Dependency and Dizziness after Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M.; Golding, John F.; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36–80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques. PMID:25233234

  4. A tiny infarct on the dorsolateral pons mimicking vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Pu; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of a tiny infarct on the left dorsolateral pons in a 50-year-old man who presented with prolonged and isolated vertigo. The clinical features mimic vestibular neuritis and can easily lead to misdiagnosis. Selective involvement of the left superior vestibular nucleus might explain the resemblance to acute peripheral vestibulopathy.

  5. Case report: ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block for outpatient acute pain management of multilevel unilateral rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Salviz, Emine Aysu; Chen, Stephanie; Vandepitte, Catherine; Hadzic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple unilateral rib fractures (T3-T8) gained the ability to breathe deeply and to ambulate after ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block and was discharged home after being observed for 15 hours after the block. The ultrasound guidance was helpful in determining the site of rib fractures and the optimal level for catheter placement. This report also discusses the management of analgesia using continuous paravertebral block in an outpatient with trauma.

  6. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness: a new disorder?

    PubMed

    Dikkers, Frederik G; Verheij, Joke B G M; van Mechelen, Monique

    2005-04-01

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral deafness must have a lower prevalence. The purpose of this research was to present a new disorder, hereditary congenital unilateral deafness. A pedigree is presented in which both male and female members display symptoms of congenital unilateral deafness. Two affected persons and a normal-hearing member of the family have vestibular abnormalities without dysequilibrium. The inheritance pattern of this new syndrome is not clear. We hypothesize that the disorder might be new. A family like this has never before been presented in the medical literature.

  7. State Anxiety Subjective Imbalance and Handicap in Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Saman, Yougan; Mclellan, Lucie; Mckenna, Laurence; Dutia, Mayank B; Obholzer, Rupert; Libby, Gerald; Gleeson, Michael; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for a significant clinical and neuroanatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety, and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. (1) To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit. (2) To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. Two separate cohorts of vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and caloric responses) and questionnaire assessments [vertigo handicap questionnaire (VHQ), vertigo symptom scale (VSS), and state-trait anxiety inventory (STAIY)]. Fifteen post-resection VS patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1). Forty-five patients with VS in situ formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2). Experiment 1: VS subjects (N = 15) with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a state anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterward with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1). Experiment 2: state anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of patients with VS in situ presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1, N = 26) and without balance symptoms (Group 2, N = 11) (Aim 2). The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER. In Experiment 1, a significant difference (p < 0.01) was found when comparing STAIY

  8. Clinical verification of a unilateral otolith test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzig, J.; Hofstetter-Degen, K.; Maurer, J.; von Baumgarten, R. J.

    In a previous study 13 we reported promising results for a new test to differentiate in vivo unilateral otolith functions. That study pointed to a need for further validation on known pathological cases. In this presentation we will detail the results gathered on a group of clinically verified vestibular defectives (verum) and a normal (control) group. The subjects in the verum group were former patients of the ENT clinic of the university hospital. These subjects had usually suffered from neurinoma of the VIIth cranial nerve or inner ear infections. All had required surgical intervention including removal of the vestibular system. The patients were contacted usually two or more years postoperatively. A group of students from the pre- and clinical phase of medical training served as control. Both groups were subjected to standardized clinical tests. These tests served to reconfirm the intra- or postoperative diagnosis of unilateral vestibular loss in the verum group. In the control group they had to establish the normalcy of the responses of the vestibular system. Both groups then underwent testing on our exccentric rotary chair in the manner described before 13. Preliminary results of the trials indicate that this test may indeed for the first time offer a chance to look at isolated otolith apparati in vivo.

  9. [Experimental study of vestibular neurectomy].

    PubMed

    Pech, A; Cannoni, M; Appaix, M; Cahier, S; Lacour, M; Roll, J P

    1976-06-01

    The authors describe an experimental study carried out on baboons. After unilateral vestibular neurectomy, the behaviour disorders on the one hand, and on the other, modifications and temporal development of reflex muotatic excitability of the spine using Hoffmann's reflex method are analyzed. As far as behaviour is concerned, a four-day period of motor restriction following the operation causes more marked residual disorders in comparison with controls. From the neurophysiological point of view, neurectomy results in seriously disordered spinal reflexes characterized by ipsilateral hypo-excitability developing in there stages: a tw-day initial critical phase during which the disorders are at their worst, a four-day recuperative stage with partial regression of the disorders, finally a chronic compensation stage in which spinal excitability returns to normal after several months.

  10. Vestibular function outcomes after vestibular neurectomy in Meniere disease: can vestibular neurectomy provide complete vestibular deafferentation?

    PubMed

    Leveque, M; Seidermann, L; Tran, H; Langagne, T; Ulmer, E; Chays, A

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular neurectomy is considered the reference treatment of incapacitating vertigo accompanying Meniere disease, with an efficiency rate of 85-95% in most literature reports. The aim of this study is to evaluate if vestibular neurectomy can provide a complete vestibular deafferentation by investigating complete vestibular function after surgery. Prospective study. Twenty-four patients suffering from incapacitated Meniere vertigo crisis beneficiated from a vestibular neurectomy by retrosigmoid approach. The average time between surgery and vestibular evaluation was 1 year. We performed (i) kinetic test, (ii) caloric test and (iii) vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) at 30, 60 and 100Hz under videonystagmography recording, (iv) vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), (v) video head impulsed test (VHIT) for each semicircular canals and (vi) an evaluation of visual vertical and horizontal subjective (VVS and HVS). On clinical evaluation, all the patients except one had never experienced any recurrence of vertigo crisis after surgery. The 24 patients would definitely undergo the surgery again. On vestibular evaluation, on the operated side, all patients showed a total areflexia at caloric test; 23 patients had no VEMP response; 23 patients had abolished canals response to VHIT. All the patients had VVS and HVS deviated towards the operated side; 23 patients had a high velocity VIN from 30 to 60Hz. This study proves that vestibular neurectomy can provide a complete vestibular deafferentation. We discuss this vestibular evaluation protocol and the main difficulties encounter during surgery, which could lead to partial nerve section and partial relief, and explain residual vestibular function after vestibular neurectomy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Susceptibility genes for gentamicin-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M; Williams, Scott M; Jiang, Lan; Menon, Kalapurakkal S; Jeka, John J

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 5% of patients administered gentamicin (GM), an aminoglycoside antibiotic, experience vestibular ototoxicity resulting in balance dysfunction. In the present study, we sought to identify susceptibility genes associated with GM-induced vestibular dysfunction using a case/control design. White cases (n=137; 55 men, 82 women) were recruited based on physician-confirmed unilateral or bilateral vestibular dysfunction attributed to GM administration. Controls (n=126; 54 men, 72 women) were healthy, age-matched individuals without vestibular dysfunction or balance impairment. Buccal cell samples were obtained from all subjects and DNA was genotyped for 15 polymorphisms in 9 genes. Candidate genes were identified primarily for their roles in oxidative stress based on predicted mechanisms of gentamicin-induced ototoxicity. Statistical analyses included the multi-dimensionality reduction (MDR) method for identifying gene x gene interactions across multiple candidate genes. Both single gene and MDR analyses revealed the NOS3 (ENOS) p.Glu298Asp polymorphism as significantly associated with GM-induced vestibular dysfunction (both p vestibular dysfunction (64% accuracy; p=0.009). The results indicate that carriers of risk alleles at three oxidative stress-related genes have increased susceptibility to GM-induced vestibular dysfunction.

  12. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  13. Review of book vestibular crises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical practice, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with vestibular crises is discussed. Classifications for vestibular disorders are given. Information on the frequency of vestibular crises is given.

  14. Effects of acute unilateral ovariectomy to pre-pubertal rats on steroid hormones secretion and compensatory ovarian responses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we analyzed the existence of asymmetry in the secretion of steroid hormones in pre-pubertal female rats treated with unilateral ovariectomy (ULO) or unilateral perforation of the abdominal wall (sham-surgery). Treated rats were sacrificed at different times after surgery. Since sham-surgery had an apparent effect on the age of first vaginal estrous (FVE) and serum levels hormone, the results of the sham surgery groups were used to assess the effects of their respective surgery treatment groups. On the day of FVE, compensatory ovulation (CO) and compensatory ovarian hypertrophy (COH) were similar in animals with ULO, regardless of the ovary remaining in situ. In ULO treated animals, progesterone (P4) levels were higher than in animals with sham-surgery one hour after treatment but lower in rats sacrificed at FEV. Left-ULO resulted in lower testosterone (T) concentration 48 and 72 hours after surgery. In rats with Right-ULO lower T concentrations were observed in rats sacrificed one or 72 hours after surgery, and at FVE. ULO (left or right) resulted in lower estradiol (E2) concentrations one or 72 hours after treatment. In rats with Left-ULO, E2 levels were higher 48 hours after surgery and at FVE. Left-ULO resulted in higher levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) five hours after surgery and at FVE. FSH levels were higher in rats with Right-ULO sacrificed on FVE. The present results suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat both ovaries have similar capacities to secrete P4, and that the right ovary has a higher capacity to secrete E2. Taken together, the present results support the idea that the effects of ULO result from the decrease in glandular tissue and changes in the neural information arising from the ovary. PMID:21450102

  15. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  16. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  17. Vestibular Schwannoma Atypically Invading Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Jeong; Yang, Na-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) usually present the widening of internal auditory canal (IAC), and these bony changes are typically limited to IAC, not extend to temporal bone. Temporal bone invasion by VS is extremely rare. We report 51-year-old man who revealed temporal bone destruction beyond IAC by unilateral VS. The bony destruction extended anteriorly to the carotid canal and inferiorly to the jugular foramen. On histopathologic examination, the tumor showed typical benign schwannoma and did not show any unusual vascularity or malignant feature. Facial nerve was severely compressed and distorted by tumor, which unevenly eroded temporal bone in surgical field. Vestibular schwannoma with atypical invasion of temporal bone can be successfully treated with combined translabyrinthine and lateral suboccipiral approach without facial nerve dysfunction. Early detection and careful dissection of facial nerve with intraoperative monitoring should be considered during operation due to severe adhesion and distortion of facial nerve by tumor and eroded temporal bone. PMID:25932298

  18. Deficient high-acceleration vestibular function in patients with polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palla, A; Schmid-Priscoveanu, A; Studer, A; Hess, K; Straumann, D

    2009-06-09

    Unsteadiness during standing and walking is a frequent complaint of patients with polyneuropathy (PNP). To determine whether balance disorders in patients with PNP may be caused by reduced proprioceptive input from the feet alone or whether impaired vestibular input, resulting from involvement of the vestibular nerve, can be an additional factor. A total of 37 patients (mean age 65 years +/- 12 SD; 12 women) with electrodiagnostically confirmed PNP (predominantly axonal: 18; predominantly demyelinating: 19) underwent horizontal search-coil head-impulse testing, which assesses the high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Relative to a healthy comparison group, the gains (eye velocity divided by head velocity) of the horizontal VOR were reduced in 27 of 37 patients (unilateral: 13; bilateral: 14). The percentages of patients with unilateral or bilateral VOR deficits were not significantly different between patients with axonal or demyelinating PNP. Two thirds of patients with axonal or demyelinating polyneuropathy (PNP) showed unilateral (approximately 50%) or bilateral (approximately 50%) gain reductions of the horizontal high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex. This finding suggests that, in many patients with PNP, the neuropathic process includes the vestibular nerve. Such information is highly relevant for subsequent physical therapy, since vestibular exercise improves balance control and reduces disability.

  19. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  20. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  1. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes.

  2. A Case of Psychogenic Dizziness Mimicking Vestibular Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Baek, In Chul; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old patient presented with frequent episodes of clockwise whirling vertigo, with no ear symptoms or anxiety. He had a previous history of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis from Moyamoya disease 3 years ago. We assumed that the ictus was a manifestation of vestibular epilepsy. Although the patient was monitored continuously with video and computerized electroencephalography equipment for 24 hours, his vertigo was not accompanied by electroencephalographic discharges. And thorough vestibular evaluation was normal. His symptom was alleviated by psychological support. Psychogenic dizziness may also manifest as recurrent whirling vertigo with unilateral directionality. PMID:24649463

  3. Management of vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Brandt, T

    2000-07-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are not disease entities but rather the outcome of many pathological or physiological processes. The prevailing good prognosis of vestibular disorders that manifest with vertigo must be emphasized. Most forms of vertigo have a benign cause and are characterized by spontaneous recovery of vestibular function or central compensation of a peripheral or central vestibular tone imbalance. Vertigo can be effectively relieved by pharmacological treatment (e.g., antiepileptic drugs for vestibular paroxysms), physical therapy (e.g., deliberate maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo), surgery (e.g., decompression of the eighth nerve), or psychotherapy (e.g., behavioral therapy for agoraphobia). There is, however, no common treatment, and vestibular suppressants provide only symptomatic relief of vertigo and nausea. A specific therapeutic approach thus requires recognition of the numerous particular pathomechanisms involved. Such therapy can include causative, symptomatic, or preventive approaches.

  4. Vestibular information is necessary for maintaining metric properties of representational space: evidence from mental imagery.

    PubMed

    Péruch, Patrick; Lopez, Christophe; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Escoffier, Guy; Zeitoun, Alain; Sanjuan, Mélanie; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2011-09-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions, from postural and oculomotor reflexes to spatial representation and cognition. Vestibular signals are important to maintain an internal, updated representation of the body position and movement in space. However, it is not clear to what extent they are also necessary to mentally simulate movement in situations that do not involve displacements of the body, as in mental imagery. The present study assessed how vestibular loss can affect object-based mental transformations (OMTs), i.e., imagined rotations or translations of objects relative to the environment. Participants performed one task of mental rotation of 3D-objects and two mental scanning tasks dealing with the ability to build and manipulate mental images that have metric properties. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (1 week and 1 month). They were compared to healthy participants tested at similar time intervals and to bilateral vestibular-defective patients tested after the recovery period. Vestibular loss impaired all mental imagery tasks. Performance varied according to the extent of vestibular loss (bilateral patients were frequently the most impaired) and according to the time elapsed after unilateral vestibular neurotomy (deficits were stronger at the early stage after neurotomy and then gradually compensated). These findings indicate that vestibular signals are necessary to perform OMTs and provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in processing metric properties of mental representations. They suggest that vestibular loss disorganizes brain structures commonly involved in mental imagery, and more generally in mental representation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in patients with and without vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Vitkovic, Jessica; Winoto, Arimbi; Rance, Gary; Dowell, Richard; Paine, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation programs do appear to play a beneficial role in the treatment of dizziness in patients with vestibular migraine. Anecdotally, however, patients with vestibular migraine may report persistent significant symptoms at the end of a standard treatment period where other non-migrainous patients are accomplishing their treatment goals. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation in patients with vestibular migraine compared to patients with vestibular symptoms without migraine. Thirty-six patients (vestibular migraine = 20, vestibular impairment = 16) with significant daily vestibular symptoms received a nine week customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Each subject attended five therapy appointments occurring at initial, two, five, nine and six months. A range of subjective and physical performance outcome measures were taken at baseline, nine weeks and six months. The vestibular migraine group showed poorer subjective performance at the onset of therapy, which was not reflected in the difference in physical performance between the groups. Both groups benefitted equally from rehabilitation. The same degree of improvement was observed in the migraine group regardless of medication regime. This study has validated vestibular rehabilitation as an effective treatment in dizzy patients both with and without vestibular migraine where the use of medication did not preclude benefit from therapy. However, further research is required to clarify the role of specific vestibular suppressant medications and the scheduling of their use in relation to physical therapy.

  7. The impact of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of neurofibromatosis type 2-related vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Although there is an ongoing debate about the ideal management of vestibular schwannomas, radiosurgical treatment has become popular in the past decade with good to excellent results reported. Given the young age at presentation, the bilateral nature of vestibular schwanomas, the presence of other associated central nervous system tumors, patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) are very complex and present significant management challenges. Although results do not seem to be as good as for patients with sporadic unilateral tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery has proven a safe, attractive, and effective management modality for NF2 vestibular schwannomas. An overview of the impact stereotactic radiosurgery has had in the management of these tumors is discussed.

  8. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkel, Andrei M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports our progress toward development of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope. Similarly to the natural semicircular canal, the microscopic gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular accelerations. Then, voltages are sent to the pulse generating unit where angular motion is translated into voltage pulses. The voltage pulses are converted into current pulses and are delivered through specially designed electrodes, conditioned to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Our preliminary experimental evaluations of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular neurons to those in animal models reported in the literature. The proposed design is scalable; the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology.

  9. Enlarged vestibular aqueduct in pediatric SNHL

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Wippold, Franz J.; Lieu, Judith E C

    2010-01-01

    Objective Comparison of the Cincinnati criteria (midpoint >0.9 mm or operculum >1.9 mm) to the Valvassori criterion (midpoint ≥ 1.5 mm) for enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) in pediatric cochlear implant patients. Study Design Cohort study Subjects 130 Pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods We reviewed temporal bone CT scans to measure the vestibular aqueduct midpoint and opercular width. Results The Cincinnati criteria identified 44% of patients with EVA versus 16% with the Valvassori criterion (P<0.01). Of those with EVA, 45% were unilateral and 55% were bilateral using Cincinnati criteria; 64% were unilateral and 36% bilateral using Valvassori criterion (P<0.01). The Cincinnati criteria diagnosed 70 ears with EVA classified as normal using the Valvassori criterion (P<0.01);59 lacked another medical explanation for their hearing loss. Conclusion The Cincinnati criteria identified a large percentage of pediatric cochlear implant patients with EVA who might otherwise have no known etiology for their deafness. PMID:19328346

  10. The treatment of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Cesarani, A; Alpini, D; Monti, B; Raponi, G

    2004-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are very common symptoms in the general population. The aim of this paper is to describe the physical and pharmacological treatment of symptoms characterized by sudden onset of rotatory vertigo. Acute vertigo can be subdivided into two main groups: (1) spontaneous vertigo and (2) provoked vertigo, usually by postural changes, generally called paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Sudden onset of acute vertigo is usually due to acute spontaneous unilateral vestibular failure. It can be also fluctuant as, e.g., in recurrent attacks of Ménière's disease. Pharmacotherapy of acute spontaneous vertigo includes Levo-sulpiride i.v., 50 mg in 250 physiologic solution, once or twice a day, methoclopramide i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, or triethilperazine rectally, once or twice a day, to reduce neurovegetative symptoms; diazepam i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, to decrease internuclear inhibition, sulfate magnesium i.v., two ampoules in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, or piracetam i.v., one ampoule in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, to decrease vestibular damage. At the onset of the acute symptoms, patients must lie on their healthy side with the head and trunk raised 20 degrees. The room must be quiet but not darkened. If the patient is able to swallow without vomiting, it is important to reduce nystagmus and stabilize the visual field with gabapentine, per os, 300 mg twice or three times a day. The first step of the physical therapy of acute vertigo is vestibular electrical stimulation, that is to say, a superficial paravertebral electrical stimulation of neck muscles, aimed to reduce antigravitary failure and to increase proprioceptive cervical sensory substitution. PPV is a common complaint and represents one of the most common entities in peripheral vestibular pathology. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, the etiopathogenesis of PPV is still a matter of debate. Despite the different

  11. Types of Vestibular Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include complications from aging, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. Acoustic Neuroma Acoustic neuroma (also called a vestibular schwannoma) is a ... This nerve is also referred to as the acoustic nerve, hence the name.) As an acoustic neuroma ...

  12. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  13. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  14. Plasticity of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity in morphologically defined vestibular nuclei neurons during early vestibular compensation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Hirsch, June C.

    2012-01-01

    After unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions, the brain plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus offer a subset of morphologically defined vestibular nuclei neurons to study functional changes after vestibular lesions. Chickens show posture and balance deficits immediately after unilateral vestibular ganglionectomy (UVG), but by 3 days most subjects begin to recover, although some remain uncompensated. With the use of whole cell voltage-clamp, spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) and miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs) were recorded from principal cells in brain slices 1 and 3 days after UVG. One day after UVG, sEPSC frequency increased on the lesion side and remained elevated at 3 days in uncompensated chickens only. Also by 3 days, sIPSC frequency increased on the lesion side in all operated chickens due to major increases in GABAergic events. Significant change also occurred in decay time of the events. To determine whether fluctuations in frequency and kinetics influenced overall excitatory or inhibitory synaptic drive, synaptic charge transfer was calculated. Principal cells showed significant increase in excitatory synaptic charge transfer only on the lesion side of uncompensated chickens. Thus compensation continues when synaptic charge transfer is in balance bilaterally. Furthermore, excessive excitatory drive in principal cells on the lesion side may prevent vestibular compensation. Altogether, this work is important for it defines the time course and excitatory and inhibitory nature of changing spontaneous synaptic inputs to a morphologically defined subset of vestibular nuclei neurons during critical early stages of recovery after UVG. PMID:21957228

  15. The Role of Cervical and Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials in the Assessment of Patients with Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Darlington, Cynthia; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Lamas, Georges; de Waele, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical utility of VEMPs in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to determine the optimal stimulation parameter (air conducted sound, bone conducted vibration) for evaluating the function of the vestibular nerve. Methods Data were obtained in 63 patients with non-operated VS, and 20 patients operated on VS. Vestibular function was assessed by caloric, cervical and ocular VEMP testing. 37/63 patients with conclusive ACS ocular VEMPs responses were studied separately. Results In the 63 non-operated VS patients, cVEMPs were abnormal in 65.1% of patients in response to AC STB and in 49.2% of patients to AC clicks. In the 37/63 patients with positive responses from the unaffected side, oVEMPs were abnormal in 75.7% of patients with ACS, in 67.6% with AFz and in 56.8% with mastoid BCV stimulation. In 16% of the patients, VEMPs were the only abnormal test (normal caloric and normal hearing). Among the 26 patients who did not show oVEMP responses on either side with ACS, oVEMPs responses could be obtained with AFz (50%) and with mastoid stimulation (89%). Conclusions The VEMP test demonstrated significant clinical value as it yielded the only abnormal test results in some patients suffering from a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. For oVEMPs, we suggest that ACS stimulation should be the initial test. In patients who responded to ACS and who had normal responses, BCV was not required. In patients with abnormal responses on the affected side using ACS, BCV at AFz should be used to confirm abnormal function of the superior vestibular nerve. In patients who exhibited no responses on either side to ACS, BCV was the only approach allowing assessment of the function of the superior vestibular nerve. We favor using AFz stimulation first because it is easier to perform in clinical practice than mastoid stimulation. PMID:25137289

  16. The role of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in the assessment of patients with vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Darlington, Cynthia; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Lamas, Georges; de Waele, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical utility of VEMPs in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to determine the optimal stimulation parameter (air conducted sound, bone conducted vibration) for evaluating the function of the vestibular nerve. Data were obtained in 63 patients with non-operated VS, and 20 patients operated on VS. Vestibular function was assessed by caloric, cervical and ocular VEMP testing. 37/63 patients with conclusive ACS ocular VEMPs responses were studied separately. In the 63 non-operated VS patients, cVEMPs were abnormal in 65.1% of patients in response to AC STB and in 49.2% of patients to AC clicks. In the 37/63 patients with positive responses from the unaffected side, oVEMPs were abnormal in 75.7% of patients with ACS, in 67.6% with AFz and in 56.8% with mastoid BCV stimulation. In 16% of the patients, VEMPs were the only abnormal test (normal caloric and normal hearing). Among the 26 patients who did not show oVEMP responses on either side with ACS, oVEMPs responses could be obtained with AFz (50%) and with mastoid stimulation (89%). The VEMP test demonstrated significant clinical value as it yielded the only abnormal test results in some patients suffering from a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. For oVEMPs, we suggest that ACS stimulation should be the initial test. In patients who responded to ACS and who had normal responses, BCV was not required. In patients with abnormal responses on the affected side using ACS, BCV at AFz should be used to confirm abnormal function of the superior vestibular nerve. In patients who exhibited no responses on either side to ACS, BCV was the only approach allowing assessment of the function of the superior vestibular nerve. We favor using AFz stimulation first because it is easier to perform in clinical practice than mastoid stimulation.

  17. Effects of acute altered gravity during parabolic flight and/or vestibular loss on cell proliferation in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Gliddon, Catherine M; Aitken, Phillip; Stiles, Lucy; Machado, Marie-Laure; Philoxene, Bruno; Denise, Pierre; Smith, Paul F; Besnard, Stephane

    2017-07-27

    Both parabolic flight, i.e. a condition of altered gravity, and loss of vestibular function, have been suggested to affect spatial learning and memory, which is known to be influenced by neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In this study we investigated whether short alternated micro- and hyper-gravity stimulations during parabolic flight and/or loss of vestibular function, would alter cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats, by measuring the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporated cells. Rats were randomly allocated to the following experimental groups: (1) sham transtympanic saline injection only (n=5); (2) bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) by sodium arsanilate transtympanic injection only (n=5); (3) sham treatment and parabolic flight (n=5); (4) BVD and parabolic flight (n=6). Forty-two days following transtympanic injection, the animals were subjected to parabolic flight in an awake restrained condition after habituation. A modified Airbus A300 aircraft was flown on a parabolic path, creating 20s of 1.8G during both climbing and descending and 22s of 0G at the apex of each parabola. The no flight animals were subjected to the same housing for the same duration. Immediately after the parabolic flight or control ground condition, animals were injected with BrdU (300mg/kg, i.p). Twenty-four hs after BrdU injection, rats were sacrificed. BrdU immunolabelling was performed and the number of BrdU(+ve) cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was quantified using a modified fractionator method. BVD caused a large and significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive cells compared to sham animals (P≤0.0001); however, flight and all interactions were non-significant. These results indicate that BVD significantly decreased cell proliferation irrespective of the short exposure to altered/modified gravity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in response to air-conducted sound and bone-conducted vibration in vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Chisato; Inoue, Aki; Egami, Naoya; Chihara, Yasuhiro; Ushio, Munetaka; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the origin and pathways of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) to air-conducted sound (ACS), we compared the results of oVEMPs with ACS, with oVEMPs with bone-conducted vibration (BCV), cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) with ACS, and the caloric test in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS). Retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. Forty-five patients with untreated unilateral VS. Each patient underwent vestibular tests, including oVEMPs to ACS, oVEMPs to BCV, cVEMPs to ACS, and caloric tests. The correlations among these tests were evaluated. Of the 45 patients recruited, 28 patients (63%) showed reduced or absent oVEMPs to ACS solely on the affected side. There were no significant differences in abnormal response ratios among oVEMPs to ACS, oVEMPs to BCV, cVEMPs to ACS, or the caloric test. The results of oVEMPs to ACS had a significant correlation with those of oVEMPs to BCV and the caloric test (p < 0.05) but not with those of cVEMPs to ACS (p > 0.05). These findings support the hypothesis that oVEMP in response to ACS are predominantly mediated by the superior vestibular nerve and probably reflect the function of the utricle.

  19. Is Alteration of Tuning Property in Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potential Specific for Ménière's Disease?

    PubMed

    Murofushi, Toshihisa; Tsubota, Masahito; Suizu, Ryota; Yoshimura, Eriko

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show sensitivity and specificity of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) tuning property test to Ménière's disease (MD) in comparison with healthy controls (HC) and patients with other vestibular diseases. Totally 92 subjects (50 women and 42 men, 20-77 years of age) were enrolled in this study. Subjects were composed of 38 definite unilateral MD patients, 11 unilateral benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients, 14 vestibular migraine patients, 19 unilateral vestibular neuritis patients, and 10 HC. The subjects underwent cVEMP testing to 500 and 1,000 Hz short tone bursts (125 dBSPL). The corrected amplitudes of the first biphasic responses (p13-n23) (cVEMP) were measured. Then, a tuning property index (the 500-1,000 Hz cVEMP slope) was calculated. The area of under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.75 in comparison with other vestibular disease patients, while AUC was 0.77 in comparison with other vestibular disease patients plus HC. The best cutoff point of the 500-1,000 Hz cVEMP slope was -19.9. Sensitivity of the tuning property test to MD was 0.74, while specificity was 0.76 to other vestibular disease patients. The tuning property test of cVEMP is useful as a screening test of MD.

  20. Unilateral diplophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Stefani, F H; Hausmann, N; Lund, O E

    1991-11-15

    In a child born of a full-term pregnancy, unilateral diplophthalmos without proboscis was observed along with other craniocervical abnormalities (ipsilateral temporoparietal porencephaly, supernumerary teeth, and cervical cyst). A globe almost normal in shape and size was observed within the left orbit. The upper quadrant of this globe was attached to a smaller, pear-shaped, supernumerary eye containing a small lens, normal vitreous humor, ciliary body structures, avascular retina, choroid, and a rudimentary optic disk. When a two-peaked and enlarging intraocular mass was observed clinically, the eye was enucleated because of suspected neoplasm. The enlarging prominence had been caused by the growing second globe. Our findings indicated that a single primary optic vesicle was formed (globe I with an optic fasciculus), and some unknown damage was caused when this single primary optic vesicle induced the lens formation by contacting the ectoderm. Although the conception and early embryonal life of this child had taken place during a period of increased radiation exposure caused by the explosion of the nuclear plant at Chernobyl, U.S.S.R., in the spring of 1986, it seemed unlikely that the abnormality could have been caused by radioactive fallout in the mountains of Austria.

  1. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  2. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  3. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  4. Cognitive deficits in patients with a chronic vestibular failure.

    PubMed

    Popp, Pauline; Wulff, Melanie; Finke, Kathrin; Rühl, Maxine; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2017-03-01

    Behavioral studies in rodents and humans have demonstrated deficits of spatial memory and orientation in bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). Our aim was to explore the functional consequences of chronic vestibular failure on different cognitive domains including spatial as well as non-spatial cognitive abilities. Sixteen patients with a unilateral vestibular failure (UVF), 18 patients with a BVF, and 17 healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. To assess the cognitive domains of short-term memory, executive function, processing speed and visuospatial abilities the following tests were used: Theory of Visual Attention (TVA), TAP Alertness and Visual Scanning, the Stroop Color-Word, and the Corsi Block Tapping Test. The cognitive scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction and the duration of the disease, respectively. Groups did not differ significantly in age, sex, or handedness. BVF patients were significantly impaired in all of the examined cognitive domains but not in all tests of the particular domain, whereas UVF patients exhibited significant impairments in their visuospatial abilities and in one of the two processing speed tasks when compared independently with HC. The degree of vestibular dysfunction significantly correlated with some of the cognitive scores. Neither the side of the lesion nor the duration of disease influenced cognitive performance. The results demonstrate that vestibular failure can lead to cognitive impairments beyond the spatial navigation deficits described earlier. These cognitive impairments are more significant in BVF patients, suggesting that the input from one labyrinth which is distributed into bilateral vestibular circuits is sufficient to maintain most of the cognitive functions. These results raise the question whether BVF patients may profit from specific cognitive training in addition to physiotherapy.

  5. Horizontal linear vestibulo-ocular reflex testing in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Lempert, T; Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M

    1999-05-28

    Horizontal eye movements in response to lateral head translation [linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)] in normal subjects and in patients with bilateral vestibular failure (n = 14), unilateral vestibular nerve section (n = 9), and benign positional vertigo (n = 14), were studied. LVORs were elicited in darkness by step acceleration (0.24 g) of the whole body along the interaural axis. (1) In patients with bilateral vestibular failure, LVORs were either absent or abnormal with asymmetries, diminished velocities, and prolonged latencies. Measurements of dynamic visual acuity during linear self-motion showed decreased performance in patients at 1.0 and 1.5 Hz, which correlated with absent or delayed LVORs. These findings demonstrate the functional role of LVORs for dynamic visual acuity. (2) Early after vestibular nerve section, LVORs were diminished or absent with head acceleration toward the operated ear and normal in the opposite direction. After 6-10 weeks, responses were symmetrical again. Thus, a single utricle appears to be polarized with respect to the LVOR early after unilateral vestibular loss generating mostly contraversive responses. (3) Patients with benign positional vertigo showed mostly normal LVORs, which can be explained by minor utricular damage or central compensation of a chronic unilateral deficit.

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation after mild traumatic brain injury with vestibular pathology.

    PubMed

    Gottshall, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular complaints are the most frequent sequelae of mTBI. Vestibular physical therapy has been established as the most important treatment modality for this group of patients. Nevertheless there is little work objectively documenting the impact of vestibular physical therapy on this group of patients. Studies have been completed in the past examining clinical measures like the GCS on overall recovery pattern after TBI. But outcomes measures specifically aimed at examining the adequacy of vestibular tests to track vestibular recoveryhave remained lacking. Scherer and Schubert reinforced the need for best practice vestibular assessment for formulation of appropriate vestibular physical therapy treatment strategies. Now the application of vestibular testing and rehabilitation in this patient population is needed to provide information on objective outcome measures. Vestibular physical therapy is most effective when applied in a customized fashion. While we and others have developed vestibular physical therapy procedures that are applied in best practices for mTBI vestibular patients, these therapies must be customized for the patient entry level of function and expectation level of recovery. Knowledge of the patient's disability and diagnosis is critical to build the foundation for return to activity, work, or sport.

  7. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Unilateral adaptation of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C

    2013-02-01

    A recent study showed that the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) can be better adaptively increased using an incremental retinal image velocity error signal compared with a conventional constant large velocity-gain demand (×2). This finding has important implications for vestibular rehabilitation that seeks to improve the VOR response after injury. However, a large portion of vestibular patients have unilateral vestibular hypofunction, and training that raises their VOR response during rotations to both the ipsilesional and contralesional side is not usually ideal. We sought to determine if the vestibular response to one side could selectively be increased without affecting the contralateral response. We tested nine subjects with normal vestibular function. Using the scleral search coil and head impulse techniques, we measured the active and passive VOR gain (eye velocity / head velocity) before and after unilateral incremental VOR adaptation training, consisting of self-generated (active) head impulses, which lasted ≈ 15 min. The head impulses consisted of rapid, horizontal head rotations with peak-amplitude 15°, peak-velocity 150°/s and peak-acceleration 3,000°/s(2). The VOR gain towards the adapting side increased after training from 0.92 ± 0.18 to 1.11 ± 0.22 (+22.7 ± 20.2 %) during active head impulses and from 0.91 ± 0.15 to 1.01 ± 0.17 (+11.3 ± 7.5 %) during passive head impulses. During active impulses, the VOR gain towards the non-adapting side also increased by ≈ 8 %, though this increase was ≈ 70 % less than to the adapting side. A similar increase did not occur during passive impulses. This study shows that unilateral vestibular adaptation is possible in humans with a normal VOR; unilateral incremental VOR adaptation may have a role in vestibular rehabilitation. The increase in passive VOR gain after active head impulse adaptation suggests that the training effect is robust.

  9. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  10. Vestibular Impairment in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Aisha; Oh, Esther S.; Bigelow, Robin T.; Studenski, Stephanie; Agrawal, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    Objective Recent studies suggest an association between vestibular and cognitive function. The goal of the study was to investigate whether vestibular function was impaired in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) compared to cognitively normal individuals. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Outpatient memory clinic and longitudinal observational study unit. Patients Older individuals ≥ 55 years with MCI or AD. Age, gender and education-matched normal controls were drawn from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Intervention Saccular and utricular function was assessed with cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (c- and oVEMPs) respectively, and horizontal semicircular canal function was assessed with video head impulse testing. Main Outcome Measures Presence or absence of VEMP responses, VEMP amplitude and vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain were measured. Results Forty-seven individuals with cognitive impairment (MCI N=15 and AD N=32) underwent testing and were matched with 94 controls. In adjusted analyses, bilaterally absent cVEMPs were associated with an over three-fold odds of AD (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.33–8.91, p=0.011). One microvolt increases in both cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes were associated with decreased odds of AD (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09–0.93, p=0.038 and OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85–0.99, p=0.036, respectively). There was no significant difference in VOR gain between the groups. Conclusions These findings confirm and extend emerging evidence of an association between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Further investigation is needed to determine the causal direction for the link between peripheral vestibular loss and cognitive impairment. PMID:27466890

  11. Vestibular Impairment in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Harun, Aisha; Oh, Esther S; Bigelow, Robin T; Studenski, Stephanie; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest an association between vestibular and cognitive function. The goal of the study was to investigate whether vestibular function was impaired in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared with cognitively normal individuals. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient memory clinic and longitudinal observational study unit. Older individuals ≥55 years with MCI or AD. Age, sex, and education-matched normal controls were drawn from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Saccular and utricular function was assessed with cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (c- and oVEMPs) respectively, and horizontal semicircular canal function was assessed with video head impulse testing. Presence or absence of VEMP responses, VEMP amplitude, and vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain were measured. Forty-seven individuals with cognitive impairment (MCI N = 15 and AD N = 32) underwent testing and were matched with 94 controls. In adjusted analyses, bilaterally absent cVEMPs were associated with an over three-fold odds of AD (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.33-8.91, p = 0.011). One microvolt increases in both cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes were associated with decreased odds of AD (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.93, p = 0.038 and OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-0.99, p = 0.036, respectively). There was no significant difference in VOR gain between the groups. These findings confirm and extend emerging evidence of an association between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Further investigation is needed to determine the causal direction for the link between peripheral vestibular loss and cognitive impairment.

  12. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  13. [Comparative studies on the vestibular and lingual osteotomy in the removal of lower wisdom teeth].

    PubMed

    Strukmeier, A; Pape, H D

    1980-01-01

    Retained third molars and/or buds in the left and right mandible were removed unilaterally via a vestibular and lingual osteotomy in 50 patients at the department for oral surgery. Postoperative edema in addition to the operative course was registered with a measurement technique developed by the authors: wound healing and general subjective complaints were also compared.

  14. Modern vestibular function testing.

    PubMed Central

    Baloh, R W; Furman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Current tests of vestibular function concentrate on the horizontal semicircular canal-ocular reflex because it is the easiest reflex to stimulate (calorically and rotationally) and record (using electro-oculography). Tests of the other vestibulo-ocular reflexes (vertical semicircular canal and otolith) and of the vestibulospinal reflexes have yet to be shown useful in the clinical setting. Digital video recording of eye movements and vestibular-evoked responses are promising new technologies that may affect clinical testing in the near future. PMID:2660408

  15. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Balatková, Zuzana; Chovanec, Martin; Čakrt, Ondřej; Hrubá, Silvie; Jeřábek, Jaroslav; Zvěřina, Eduard; Profant, Oliver; Fík, Zdeněk; Komarc, Martin; Kluh, Jan; Černý, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p < 0.05). This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896. PMID:28053986

  16. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation.

    PubMed

    Čada, Zdeněk; Balatková, Zuzana; Chovanec, Martin; Čakrt, Ondřej; Hrubá, Silvie; Jeřábek, Jaroslav; Zvěřina, Eduard; Profant, Oliver; Fík, Zdeněk; Komarc, Martin; Betka, Jan; Kluh, Jan; Černý, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p < 0.05). This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  17. Decreased vestibular signal intensity on 3D-FIESTA in vestibular schwannomas differentiating from meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Haneda, Jun; Okamoto, Kouichirou

    2013-02-01

    With reported characteristic MR features, it is difficult to differentiate vestibular schwannomas (VSs) from cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas (CPAMs) in some cases. This study aimed to evaluate vestibular signal intensity changes in patients with VS and those with CPAM on three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA), and to test the effectiveness of the signal intensity change to differentiate these two common CPA tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 21 patients with unilateral VS, six patients with unilateral CPAM, and 25 control subjects. Setting regions of interest in the bilateral vestibules and cerebellar white matter on 3D-FIESTA, we compared the ratio of the signal intensity (SIR) of the vestibule to that of the cerebellar white matter (SIRv) among the VS, CPAM, and control subject groups. We also compared the ratio of SIRv on the affected side (a-SIRv) to that on the unaffected side (AURv) between the VS and CPAM. The a-SIRv in the VS group was significantly lower than the overall SIRv in the control subjects (pre-contrast, P < 0.001; post-contrast, P < 0.001) and the a-SIRv in the CPAM group (pre-contrast, P = 0.001; post-contrast, P = 0.001). The AURv in the VS group was significantly lower than that in the CPAM groups (pre-contrast, P < 0.001; post-contrast, P < 0.001). Decreased vestibular signal intensity on the affected side on 3D-FIESTA was observed in patients with VS, but not in those with CPAM or in normal subjects. The signal intensity change has the potential to be used in differentiating VS from CPAM.

  18. The effects of the cerebral, cerebellar and vestibular systems on the head stabilization reflex.

    PubMed

    Bademkiran, Fikret; Uludag, Burhanettin; Guler, Ayse; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-05-01

    The head stabilization reflex (HSR) is a brain stem reflex which appears in the neck muscles in response to sudden head position changes and brings the head to its previous position. The reflex mechanism has not been understood. The afferent fibers come from cervical muscle spindles, vestibular structures, and the accessory nerve, the efferents from the accessory nerve. In this study, we aim to investigate the roles of supraspinal neural structures and the vestibular system on the HSR. The patient group consisted of 86 patients (33 cerebral cortical lesion, 14 cerebellar syndrome and 39 vestibular inexcitability or hypoexcitability); the control group was composed of 32 healthy volunteers. Concentric needle electrodes were inserted into the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the accessory nerves were stimulated with the electrical stimulator. A reflex response of about 45-55 ms was obtained from the contralateral SCM muscle. 50 % of cases had bilateral loss whereas 37 % of cases with unilateral cerebellar lesions had an ipsilateral reflex loss. Bilateral HSR loss was detected in 84 % of cases with bilateral cerebellar lesions. Bilateral reflex loss was observed in 70 % of patients with unilateral cortical lesions and 94 % of those with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Ipsilateral HSR loss was observed in 55 % of cases with unilateral vestibular dysfunction. It was discovered that supraspinal structures and the vestibular system may have an excitatory effect on HSR. This effect may be lost in supra-segmental and vestibular dysfunctions. The localization value of HSR was found to be rather poor in our study.

  19. [Multifrequency vestibular study after vestibular neurotomy and chemical labyrinthectomy].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Dumas, G; Righini, C; Karkas, A; Hitter, A; Schmerber, S

    2008-06-01

    Vestibular neurotomy (VN) and chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) are the two most common techniques of vestibular deafferention to treat patients with intractable vertigo. A long-term evaluation of vestibular function has been performed with a variety of vestibular tests to find out whether there persisted any residual vestibular function after each technique. We called in all patients who have been treated for the last 10 years and have no known vestibular disease in the non treated ear. Low frequencies were analyzed with caloric tests, medium frequencies with the head-shaking test and head-impulse test, and high frequencies with the skull vibration test. The otolithic function was explored with the subjective vertical visual analysis and otolithic myogenic evoked potentials. Nine patients treated with VN and 12 with CL presented to our department. We were thus able to compare VN and CL patients with a group of 10 normal patients and another group of nine patients that had had a translabyrinthine approach for an acoustic neuroma. We found out that vestibular responses did persist in seven out of nine (78 %) patients after VN and 11 out of 12 (92 %) patients after CL. On the other hand, no vestibular response was detected following resection of vestibular schwannoma through a translabyrinthine approach. We came to the conclusion that the two latter techniques, unlike vestibulocochlear nerve section via the translabyrinthine approach, are only incomplete methods of vestibular deafferention.

  20. Does impulse noise induce vestibular disturbances?

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, I; Aalto, H; Ylikoski, J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of impulse noise on postural stability was evaluated in 54 subjects from the Finnish army, who were suffering from acute hearing loss caused by exposure to firearms noise. For referents we used 20 non-exposed army recruits and 39 civilian volunteers. The effects of vision, pressoreceptor function and proprioception were stepwise excluded or altered, leaving mainly the vestibular guidance of postural control intact. Since the postural perturbation was fairly smooth during these instances we assume that the condition evaluates mainly the function of the otolith organs in guiding stance. We found no difference in any of the test conditions used, between normal controls, army controls and impulse noise exposed subjects. Furthermore, there was no dose response with body sway and severity of hearing loss. The results indicate that impulse noise may not be the cause of significant functional changes in the vestibular system that can account for noise-induced postural instability.

  1. Vestibular Disorders Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... get started on your journey to diagnosis and recovery. VEDA Resource Library Visit VEDA's Resource Library to get more information about your vestibular disorder and download one of VEDA's many short ... the first step toward recovery! Use VEDA's free provider directory to search for ...

  2. Unilateral ureteral obstruction: beyond obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Izquierdo, Maria C; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction is a popular experimental model of renal injury. However, the study of the kidney response to urinary tract obstruction is only one of several advantages of this model. Unilateral ureteral obstruction causes subacute renal injury characterized by tubular cell injury, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. For this reason, it serves as a model both of irreversible acute kidney injury and of events taking place during human chronic kidney disease. Being a unilateral disease, it is not useful to study changes in global kidney function, but has the advantage of a low mortality and the availability of an internal control (the non-obstructed kidney). Experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction has illustrated the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, all three key processes in kidney injury of any cause, thus providing information beyond obstruction. Recently this model has supported key concepts on the role in kidney fibrosis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tubular epithelial cell G2/M arrest, the anti-aging hormone Klotho and renal innervation. We now review the experimental model and its contribution to identifying novel therapeutic targets in kidney injury and fibrosis, independently of the noxa.

  3. Influence of body laterality on recovery from subjective visual vertical tilt after vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Toupet, Michel; Van Nechel, Christian; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) is an indicator of vestibular otolithic function and mainly processed by the nondominant parietal cortex. We investigated the hypothesis that recovery from SVV tilt after vestibular neuritis can be influenced by the body's lateral preference. This prospective cohort follow-up study included 254 consecutive adult patients with vestibular neuritis. The recovery from SVV tilt was faster in patients with a left hand or eye dominance than in those with a right dominance. While in left-handers the side of the neuritis did not affect the speed of recovery, in right-handed subjects, the recovery from a right-sided neuritis was significantly slower than from a left-sided affection. These observations suggest that subjects with a left sensorimotor dominance have developed more significant midline-crossing projections to the parietal cortex, allowing them to cope faster with a unilateral vestibular deficit.

  4. Role of the flocculus in mediating vestibular nucleus neuron plasticity during vestibular compensation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Alex R; Seckl, Jonathan R; Dutia, Mayank B

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the role of the cerebellar flocculus in mediating the adaptive changes that occur in the intrinsic properties of brainstem medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons during vestibular compensation. Ipsi-lesional, but not contra-lesional, flocculectomy prevented the compensatory increase in intrinsic excitability (CIE) that normally occurs in the de-afferented MVN neurons within 4 h after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Flocculectomy did not, however, prevent the down-regulation of efficacy of GABA receptors that also occurs in these neurons after UL, indicating that these responses of the MVN neurons to deafferentation are discrete, parallel processes. CIE was also abolished by intra-floccular microinjection of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist AIDA, and the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolymaleimide I (BIS-I). The serene-threonine kinase inhibitor H-7 had no effect when microinjected at the time of de-afferentation, but abolished CIE if microinjected 2 h later. These cellular effects are in line with the recently reported retardatory effects of BIS-I and H-7 on behavioural recovery after UL. They demonstrate that the increase in intrinsic excitability in MVN neurons during vestibular compensation is cerebellum dependent, and requires mGluR activation and protein phosphorylation in cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, microinjection of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU38486 into the ipsi-lesional flocculus also abolished CIE in MVN neurons. Thus an important site for glucocorticoids in facilitating vestibular compensation is within the cerebellar cortex. These observations ascribe functional significance to the high levels of GR and 11-β-HSD Type 1 expression in cerebellum. PMID:12482895

  5. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Morris, Rachael; Milberg, William; Sakel, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for four consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and 1-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy. PMID:24391559

  6. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  7. Vibration-induced nystagmus in patients with vestibular schwannoma: Characteristics and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Kim, Mi Joo; Kim, Jin Won; Shim, Dae Bo; Kim, Jinna; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) in unilateral vestibular asymmetry and vestibular schwannoma. Thirteen patients with vestibular schwannoma underwent the VIN test, in which stimulation was applied to the mastoid processes and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of lesions. Preoperative VIN was measured, and changes in VIN were followed up for 6months after tumor removal. Significance of VIN was determined by evaluation of its sensitivity, correlation with vestibular function tests and tumor volume, and postoperative changes. The overall pre and postoperative sensitivities of VIN were 92.3% and 100%, respectively, considering stimulation at all four sites. Maximum slow-phase velocity (MSPV) of VIN was linearly correlated with caloric weakness and tumor volume, especially when stimulation was applied to the SCM muscle. Postoperative MSPV of VIN exhibited stronger linear correlation with postoperative changes in canal paresis value and inverse correlation with tumor size upon stimulation of the ipsilateral SCM muscle than upon stimulation of other sites. During the 6-month follow-up period, persistence of VIN without changes in MSPV was observed even after vestibular compensation. Evoking VIN by stimulation of the mastoid processes and SCM muscles is effective for detecting vestibular asymmetry. It could also help determine the degree of vestibular asymmetry and volume of vestibular schwannoma if stimulation is applied to the SCM muscle. The results of this study could provide clues for the basic application of VIN in patients with vestibular loss and vestibular schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Does betahistine treatment have additional benefits to vestibular rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Karapolat, Hale; Celebisoy, Nese; Kirazli, Yesim; Bilgen, Cem; Eyigor, Sibel; Gode, Sercan; Akyuz, Aycan; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-dose betahistine treatment added to vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on the disability, balance and postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. The VR group (group 1, n = 24) and the VR + betahistine group (group 2, n = 23) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were evaluated before and after an 8-week customized VR in terms of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory, DHI), dynamic balance [Dynamic Gait Index (DGI)] and postural stability (static posturography). In group 1 and group 2, differences between DHI, DGI and falling index score on static posturography before and after the exercise program were significant (p < 0.05). In addition, a significant difference was detected only in group 2 in the variables evaluated in static posturography-Fourier 4 analysis (p < 0.05). Both VR and betahistine + VR have a positive effect on disability and balance in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. Betahistine treatment added to VR was effective in increasing postural stability.

  9. Functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Staab, J P

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years. Even their nomenclature has had different meanings in different eras. This chapter will review functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders. Terminology will follow the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, beta draft and the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. Anxiety plays a central role in behavioral vestibular morbidity. Anxiety, traumatic stress, obsessive, and depressive disorders may be primary causes of episodic and chronic vestibular symptoms or secondary complications of other vestibular disorders. These psychiatric illnesses affect 30-50% of patients who consult neurologists or otologists for vestibular symptoms. Coexisting psychiatric disorders adversely affect treatment for patients with structural vestibular diseases, especially when unrecognized. Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness is the leading cause of long-term vestibular disability. Fortunately, pharmacologic, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitative treatments of these illnesses have improved in recent years.

  10. Vestibular system paresis due to emergency endovascular catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Simoceli, Lucinda; Sguillar, Danilo Anunciatto; Santos, Henrique Mendes Paiva; Caputti, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective: The objective of this story of case is to describe an uncommon cause of associated peripheral Vestibulopathy to the unilateral auditory loss in aged patient after catheterization of urgency. Story of case: Patient of the masculine sort, 82 years, submitted to the correction of abdominal ragged aneurism of aorta, in the intra-operative suffered heart attack acute from the myocardium needing primary angioplasty. High after hospital it relates to complaint of accented hearing loss to the right and crippling vertigo, without focal neurological signals. To the otorhinolaryngological clinical examination it presented: Test of Weber lateralized for the left, spontaneous nystagmus for the left, marches rocking, has taken normal disbasia and ataxia, index-nose and diadochokinesia, Test of Romberg with oscillation without fall and Fukuda with lateral shunting line for the right. The audiometric examination evidenced deafness to the right and sensorineural loss to the left in sharps, areflexia initial to the right in caloric test e, the computerized tomography of the secular bones and brainstem, presence of metallic connecting rod crossing the right secular bone, from the vein internal jugular vein and bulb jugular vein, crossing the posterior, superior and vestibule semicircular canals, projecting itself in temporal lobe. The radiological diagnoses was traumatic injury for guide to endovascular metallic during catheterization of urgency and the behavior, considering that the patient had not compensated the balance, it was vestibular rehabilitation. Conclusion: Complaints of giddiness in the aged patient must be closely evaluated of its pathological clinical description because the antecedents of illnesses and previous treatments, in general, direct the diagnostic hypotheses however they can bring unexpected alterations. PMID:25991947

  11. The vestibular body: Vestibular contributions to bodily representations.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are integrated with signals from other sensory modalities. This convergence could reflect an important mechanism for maintaining the perception of the body. Here we review the current literature in order to develop a framework for understanding how the vestibular system contributes to body representation. According to recent models, we distinguish between three processes for body representation, and we look at whether vestibular signals might influence each process. These are (i) somatosensation, the primary sensory processing of somatic stimuli, (ii) somatoperception, the processes of constructing percepts and experiences of somatic objects and events and (iii) somatorepresentation, the knowledge about the body as a physical object in the world. Vestibular signals appear to contribute to all three levels in this model of body processing. Thus, the traditional view of the vestibular system as a low-level, dedicated orienting module tends to underestimate the pervasive role of vestibular input in bodily self-awareness.

  12. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-04-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1-2 deg s(-1). After unilateral vestibular injury patients' direction-discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s(-1), and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s(-1)). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s(-1)), they never recovered to control values - a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues.

  13. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T. A. K.; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of “optimal” stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high

  14. Linear Path Integration Deficits in Patients with Abnormal Vestibular Afference

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Joeanna C.; Kortte, Kathleen B.; Shelhamer, Mark; Schubert, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Effective navigation requires the ability to keep track of one’s location and maintain orientation during linear and angular displacements. Path integration is the process of updating the representation of body position by integrating internally-generated self-motion signals over time (e.g., walking in the dark). One major source of input to path integration is vestibular afference. We tested patients with reduced vestibular function (unilateral vestibular hypofunction, UVH), patients with aberrant vestibular function (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, BPPV), and healthy participants (controls) on two linear path integration tasks: experimenter-guided walking and target-directed walking. The experimenter-guided walking task revealed a systematic underestimation of self-motion signals in UVH patients compared to the other groups. However, we did not find any difference in the distance walked between the UVH group and the control group for the target-directed walking task. Results from neuropsychological testing and clinical balance measures suggest that the errors in experimenter-guided walking were not attributable to cognitive and/or balance impairments. We conclude that impairment in linear path integration in UVH patients stem from deficits in self-motion perception. Importantly, our results also suggest that patients with a UVH deficit do not lose their ability to walk accurately without vision to a memorized target location. PMID:22726251

  15. Tests of walking balance for screening vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Few reliable tests are available for screening people rapidly for vestibular disorders although such tests would be useful for a variety of testing situations. Balance testing is widely performed but of unknown value for screening. The goal of this study was to determine the value of tests of walking balance for screening people with vestibular impairments. We tested three groups of patients with known vestibular impairments: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, unilateral vestibular weakness, and post-acoustic neuroma resection. We compared them to normal subjects. All subjects were independently ambulatory without gait aids. Subjects were tested on tandem walking (TW) with eyes open and eyes closed for 10 steps, walking with no additional head motions and with augmented head rotations in yaw for 7 m (WwHT), and an obstacle avoidance task, the Functional Mobility Test (FMT). Subjects wore a 3-D motion sensor centered at mid-torso to capture kinematic measures. Patients and normals differed significantly on some behavioral measures, such as the number of steps to perform TW, and on some but not all kinematic measures. ROC analyses, however, were at best only moderate, and failed to find strong differences and cut-points that would differentiate the groups. These findings suggest that although patients and normals differ in performance of these tests in some interesting ways the groups are not sufficiently different on these tests for easy use as screening tests to differentiate the populations.

  16. Caffeine effect in vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Alleluia Lima Losno; Barreto, Monique Antunes de Souza Chelminski; Bahmad, Fayez

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine benefits and harms in health is a very controversial subject for a scientific research. This is a systematic literature using PubMed database linking caffeine with the following keywords: 'vestibular', 'vertigo', 'vestibular function', 'caloric tests' e 'electronystagmography". Thirty articles were found and ten were analyzed for fulfill the inclusion criteria. These ten articles were grouped and then a separated in four groups, according to the approach. There is a need of further randomized and controlled studies to understand the vestibular system.

  17. Vestibular Lesion-Induced Developmental Plasticity in Spinal Locomotor Networks during Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  18. Vestibular lesion-induced developmental plasticity in spinal locomotor networks during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  19. Malignant Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, B.; Petchenik, L.; Williams, M.; Thomas, C.; Luken, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent a translabyrinthine resection of a right intracanulicular acoustic neuroma, which had been detected in the work-up of sudden hearing loss. At the time of surgery, the tumor was roughly twice as large as indicated by the magnetic resonance scan taken only 2 months previously. The tumor eroded the vertical and transverse crests and extended well into the cerebellopontine angle. It was impossible to distinguish the facial nerve proximal to the geniculate ganglion. All visible tumor was resected, along with the facial nerve. Histological evaluation showed a highly cellular tumor, with many mitoses and areas of necrosis, meeting the criteria for malignant schwannoma. The patient has no stigmata of neurofibromatosis, and has no known relatives with that condition. This case is only the fourth reported of a malignant vestibular schwannoma. The relationships between vestibular schwannoma, neurofibromatosis, and malignancy are discussed. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171176

  20. An overview of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S L; Alghwiri, A A; Alghadir, A

    2016-01-01

    Data related to the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation and its evolution as an intervention are provided. Concepts and various treatment strategies are described, with explanations of why people with uncompensated peripheral and central vestibular disorders might improve with rehabilitation. Various tests and measures are described that are commonly used to examine patients and determine their level of ability to participate in their environment. Factors that affect recovery, both positively and negatively, are described in order to better prognosticate recovery. A case utilizing many of the principles discussed is included to provide insight into how to utilize vestibular rehabilitation with a person with an uncompensated peripheral vestibular loss.

  1. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  2. A new vestibulo-ocular reflex recording system designed for routine vestibular clinical use.

    PubMed

    Funabiki, K; Naito, Y; Matsuda, K; Honjo, I

    1999-01-01

    A new vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) recording system was developed, which consists of an infrared eye camera, a small velocity sensor and a frequency modulator. Using this system, the head velocity signal was frequency modulated and simultaneously recorded as a sound signal on the audio track of a Hi8 video recorder with eye images. This device enabled recording of the VOR response in routine vestibular clinical practice. The reliability and effectiveness of this system were estimated by recording and analysing the VOR response against manually controlled rotation in normal subjects (n = 22) and in patients with unilateral severe vestibular hypofunction (n = 11). VOR gain on clockwise rotation viewed from the top was defined as R gain, and counterclockwise rotation as L gain. Directional preponderance (DP%) was also calculated. VOR gain towards the diseased side was significantly lower than that towards the intact side, and also significantly lower than that of normal subjects. DP% of unilateral vestibular hypofunction cases was significantly larger than that of normal subjects. These findings indicate that this VOR recording system reliably detects severe unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  3. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David G; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle

    2015-09-15

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chronic unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine depletion with 6-OHDA results in decreased intensity, bandwidth, and complexity of ultrasonic vocalizations. However, it is unclear if mild/acute dopamine depletion, paralleling earlier stages of PD, results in vocalization deficits, or to what degree vocalization parameters are correlated with other dopamine-dependent indicators of lesion severity or percent of tyrosine hydroxylase (%TH) loss. Here, we assayed ultrasonic vocalizations, forelimb asymmetry, and apomorphine rotations in rats with a range of unilateral dopamine loss resulting from 6-OHDA or vehicle control infusions to the medial forebrain bundle at acute (72 h) and chronic (4 weeks) time points post-infusion. The %TH loss was evaluated at 4 weeks. At 72 h, forelimb asymmetry and %TH loss were significantly correlated, while at 4 weeks, all measures of lesion severity were significantly correlated with each other. Call complexity was significantly correlated with all measures of lesion severity at 72 h but only with %TH loss at 4 weeks. Bandwidth was correlated with forelimb asymmetry at both time points. Duration was significantly correlated with all dopamine depletion measures at 4 weeks. Notably, not all parameters were affected universally or equally across time. These results suggest that vocalization deficits may be a sensitive index of acute and mild catecholamine loss and further underscores the need to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying vocal deficits in PD.

  4. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David GS; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle R

    2015-01-01

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chronic unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine depletion with 6-OHDA results in decreased intensity, bandwidth, and complexity of ultrasonic vocalizations. However, it is unclear if mild/acute dopamine depletion, paralleling earlier stages of PD, results in vocalization deficits, or to what degree vocalization parameters are correlated with other dopamine-dependent indicators of lesion severity or percent of tyrosine hydroxylase (%TH) loss. Here, we assayed ultrasonic vocalizations, forelimb asymmetry, and apomorphine rotations in rats with a range of unilateral dopamine loss resulting from 6-OHDA or vehicle control infusions to the medial forebrain bundle at acute (72 hours) and chronic (4 weeks) time points post-infusion. The %TH loss was evaluated at 4 weeks. At 72 hours, forelimb asymmetry and %TH loss were significantly correlated, while at 4 weeks, all measures of lesion severity were significantly correlated with each other. Call complexity was significantly correlated with all measures of lesion severity at 72 hours but only with %TH loss at 4 weeks. Bandwidth was correlated with forelimb asymmetry at both time points. Duration was significantly correlated with all dopamine depletion measures at 4 weeks. Notably, not all parameters were affected universally or equally across time. These results suggest that vocalization deficits may be a sensitive index of acute and catecholamine loss and further underscores the need to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying vocal deficits in PD. PMID:26026785

  5. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 μm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle, and crista ampullaris of the lateral ampulla were examined by light microscopy and computer-generated three-dimensional imaging. In the second group, ultrathin sections including venules and VDCs were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A microvascular network was observed in close relation to the VDCs in the utricle and the crista ampullaris of the lateral semicircular canal in the vestibular apparatus. One major vein emanated from these networks, which emptied into the vein of the vestibular aqueduct. Veins draining the saccule and the common crus of the superior and posterior semicircular canals were likewise observed to merge with the vein of the vestibular aqueduct.

  6. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common…

  7. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  8. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common…

  9. Investigation of Betaserc in auditory and vestibular disturbances.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Dorina; Sachansca, Teodora; Datcov, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Vestibular vertigo is a primary symptom in neurootological clinical practice and is common among cerebrovascular diseases. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of betahistine dihydrochloride (Betaserc), 8 and 16 mg, on patients who were transport system workers with vascular auditory and vestibular disturbances. We examined 50 patients, 30 of whom were treated with 16-mg doses and 20 of whom received 8-mg doses of Betaserc. The mean age of the patients was 37+/-2.3 years. The following evaluative methods were used: questionnaire including detailed neurootological history; ear, nose, and throat and neurological examinations; tonal threshold audiometry; and examination of the vestibular system (spontaneous and provoked reactions). On the basis of the investigations carried out, we recommend 16 mg Betaserc three times daily in the acute phase. The medication is very well tolerated, has no sedative effect and is suitable for long-term treatment.

  10. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: review.

    PubMed

    Mudduwa, R; Kara, N; Whelan, D; Banerjee, Anirvan

    2010-10-01

    Disorders of balance often pose a diagnostic conundrum for clinicians, and a multitude of investigations have emerged over the years. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing is a diagnostic tool which can be used to assess vestibular function. Over recent years, extensive study has begun to establish a broader clinical role for vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing. To provide an overview of vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, and to present the evidence for its clinical application. REVIEW TYPE: Structured literature search according to evidence-based medicine guidelines, performed between November 2008 and April 2009. No restrictions were applied to the dates searched. The benefits of vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing have already been established as regards the diagnosis and monitoring of several clinical conditions. Researchers continue to delve deeper into potential new clinical applications, with early results suggesting promising future developments.

  11. Vestibular blueprint in early vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Hans; Baker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Central vestibular neurons form identifiable subgroups within the boundaries of classically outlined octavolateral nuclei in primitive vertebrates that are distinct from those processing lateral line, electrosensory, and auditory signals. Each vestibular subgroup exhibits a particular morpho-physiological property that receives origin-specific sensory inputs from semicircular canal and otolith organs. Behaviorally characterized phenotypes send discrete axonal projections to extraocular, spinal, and cerebellar targets including other ipsi- and contralateral vestibular nuclei. The anatomical locations of vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal neurons correlate with genetically defined hindbrain compartments that are well conserved throughout vertebrate evolution though some variability exists in fossil and extant vertebrate species. The different vestibular subgroups exhibit a robust sensorimotor signal processing complemented with a high degree of vestibular and visual adaptive plasticity. PMID:24312016

  12. Role of the Insula and Vestibular System in Patients with Chronic Subjective Dizziness: An fMRI Study Using Sound-Evoked Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Indovina, Iole; Riccelli, Roberta; Chiarella, Giuseppe; Petrolo, Claudio; Augimeri, Antonio; Giofrè, Laura; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Passamonti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence), long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD. We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC. We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients with CSD

  13. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    PubMed

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  14. Recent Advances in the Understanding of Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population and 10% of patients with migraine suffer from vestibular migraine (VM). However, this condition remains relatively unknown; therefore, it is often underdiagnosed despite the recent adoption of international diagnostic criteria for VM. The diagnosis of VM is based on the symptoms, degree, frequency, and duration of the vestibular episodes, a history of migraine, the temporal association of migraine symptoms with vestibular episodes in at least 50% of cases, and the exclusion of other causes. Physical examination and laboratory findings are usually normal in patients with VM but can be used to rule out other vestibular disorders with similar symptoms. The pathophysiology of VM remains incompletely understood; however, several mechanisms link the trigeminal system, which is activated during migraine attacks, and the vestibular system. Because few controlled trials have specifically investigated VM, the treatment options for this order are largely the same as those for migraine and include antiemetics for severe acute attacks, pharmacological migraine prophylaxis, and lifestyle changes. PMID:27821976

  15. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  16. Radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Régis, Jean; Carron, Romain; Delsanti, Christine; Porcheron, Denis; Thomassin, Jean-Marc; Murracciole, Xavier; Roche, Pierre-Hugues

    2013-10-01

    This article investigates the role of radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of vestibular schwannomas (VS), reviewing the authors' own prospective cohort and the current literature. For patients with large Stage IV VS (according to the Koos classification), a combined approach with deliberate partial microsurgical removal followed by radiosurgery to the residual tumor is proposed. The authors' cohort is unique with respect to the size of the population and the length of the follow-up, and demonstrates the efficacy and safety of VS radiosurgery, with particular regard to its high rate of hearing preservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vestibular Rehabilitation Outcomes in the Elderly with Chronic Vestibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. Materials and Methods A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Results Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. PMID:23396380

  18. Preoperative vestibular assessment protocol of cochlear implant surgery: an analytical descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Sato, Eduardo Setsuo; Ribeiro, Douglas Jósimo Silva; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    Cochlear implants are undeniably an effective method for the recovery of hearing function in patients with hearing loss. To describe the preoperative vestibular assessment protocol in subjects who will be submitted to cochlear implants. Our institutional protocol provides the vestibular diagnosis through six simple tests: Romberg and Fukuda tests, assessment for spontaneous nystagmus, Head Impulse Test, evaluation for Head Shaking Nystagmus and caloric test. 21 patients were evaluated with a mean age of 42.75±14.38 years. Only 28% of the sample had all normal test results. The presence of asymmetric vestibular information was documented through the caloric test in 32% of the sample and spontaneous nystagmus was an important clue for the diagnosis. Bilateral vestibular areflexia was present in four subjects, unilateral arreflexia in three and bilateral hyporeflexia in two. The Head Impulse Test was a significant indicator for the diagnosis of areflexia in the tested ear (p=0.0001). The sensitized Romberg test using a foam pad was able to diagnose severe vestibular function impairment (p=0.003). The six clinical tests were able to identify the presence or absence of vestibular function and function asymmetry between the ears of the same individual. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Familial unilateral ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Simon, John W; Cotliar, Jeremy M; Burke, Leah W

    2007-12-01

    Ectopia lentis is almost always a bilateral condition, although it may be asymmetric in some cases of Marfan syndrome. Unilateral ectopia lentis has been associated with trauma and with intraocular tumors. We report two siblings with isolated unilateral ectopia lentis who had no evidence of underlying abnormality or of trauma.

  20. An update on vestibular physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Iqbal, Zaheen A; Whitney, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular physical therapy is a specialized exercise based intervention for management of symptoms associated with vestibular dysfunction that manifests itself as dizziness and imbalance related to position or movement of the body. The aim of this review is to evaluate and summarize the efficacy of vestibular physical therapy for the treatment of vestibular disorders. A literature review was conducted to identify references related to vestibular disorders plus rehabilitation. Articles ranged from descriptions of vestibular dysfunction, its diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation in various populations. Case studies, case series with no controls, and controlled studies support the use of vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy for persons with peripheral vestibular disorders. There are emerging data that support vestibular rehabilitation physical therapy for persons with central vestibular disorders.

  1. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Stieber, N; Dieterich, M

    2009-09-01

    Sound-induced vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) can be used to investigate saccular function, measured from the tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) in response to loud sound stimuli. The aim of the present study was to assess VEMPs in patients with vestibular migraine and to determine whether saccular function is affected by the disease. Furthermore, tests such as tilts of subjective visual vertical (SVV) and caloric testing were conducted to test whether deficits in the various tests are associated with each other. The amplitude and latency of VEMPs were measured from the SCM in 63 patients with vestibular migraine (median age 47 years; range 24-70 years) and compared with those of 63 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (median age 46 years; range 17-73 years). Of the 63 patients with vestibular migraine, 43 (68%) had reduced EMG-corrected VEMP amplitudes compared to the controls. Thus, the mean of the p13-n23 amplitudes of the vestibular migraine patients were 1.22 (SE +/-0.09) for the right and 1.21 (SE +/-0.09) for the left side, whereas the averaged amplitudes of the 63 healthy controls showed a mean of 1.79 (SE +/-0.09) on the right and of 1.76 (SE +/-0.09) on the left. No difference was seen in the latencies and there was no correlation between VEMP amplitudes, tilts of SVV and caloric testing. Our data on patients with vestibular migraine indicate that the VEMP amplitudes are significantly and bilaterally reduced compared to those of controls. This electrophysiological finding suggests that both peripheral vestibular structures, such as the saccule, but also central vestibular structures are affected. Thus, beside the brainstem, structures in the inner ear also seem to contribute to vertigo in vestibular migraine.

  2. Using acoustic reflex threshold, auditory brainstem response and loudness judgments to investigate changes in neural gain following acute unilateral deprivation in normal hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Hannah; Plack, Christopher J; Schaette, Roland; Munro, Kevin J

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral auditory deprivation induces a reduction in the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) and an increase in loudness. These findings have been interpreted as a compensatory change in neural gain, governed by changes in excitatory and inhibitory neural inputs. There is also evidence to suggest that changes in neural gain can be measured using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The present study extended Munro et al. (2014) [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 315-322] by investigating changes after 4 days of unilateral earplug use to: (i) ART, (ii) ABR and (iii) loudness. Because changes may occur during the post-deprivation test session (day 4), ART measurements were taken 1 h and 2 h post-earplug removal. There was a significant reduction in ART in the treatment ear immediately after the removal of the earplug, which is consistent with a compensatory increase in neural gain. A novel finding was the significant return of ARTs to baseline within 2 h of earplug removal. A second novel finding was a significant decrease in the mean amplitude of ABR wave V in the treatment ear, but a significant increase in the control ear, both after 4 days of deprivation. These changes in the ABR are in the opposite direction to those predicted. We were unable to replicate the change in loudness reported in previous deprivation studies; however, the short period of earplug use may have contributed to this null finding.

  3. Effects of Vestibular Prosthesis Electrode Implantation and Stimulation on Hearing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/sec, with pulse frequency modulated from 48–222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5–10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ~5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2–14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  4. The impact of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of neurofibromatosis type 2-related vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Lustgarten, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Although there is an ongoing debate about the ideal management of vestibular schwannomas, radiosurgical treatment has become popular in the past decade with good to excellent results reported. Given the young age at presentation, the bilateral nature of vestibular schwanomas, the presence of other associated central nervous system tumors, patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) are very complex and present significant management challenges. Although results do not seem to be as good as for patients with sporadic unilateral tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery has proven a safe, attractive, and effective management modality for NF2 vestibular schwannomas. An overview of the impact stereotactic radiosurgery has had in the management of these tumors is discussed. PMID:23682341

  5. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental group) or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p>0.005) regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p<0.05) in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p<0.05) in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. High-frequency skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in partial vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Karkas, Alexandre; Perrin, Philippe; Chahine, Karim; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2011-10-01

    To establish the effectiveness of the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) as a rapid high-frequency stimulation test, in the evaluation of partial unilateral vestibular lesions (pUVL). SVINT (30, 60, and 100 Hz), caloric, and head-shaking tests were performed in 99 patients with pUVL. These results were compared with those in 9 patients with symmetrical partial bilateral labyrinthine malformations, 131 patients with total unilateral vestibular lesions (tUVL), and 95 control subjects. A skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) was found in 75% of patients with pUVL and 98% with tUVL. In pUVL: SVINT revealed asymmetric responses in 20% of patients where other tests were normal; SVN direction at 100 Hz was opposite to the head-shaking nystagmus direction in 30% and opposite to SVN at 30 Hz in 10% of cases. At 100 Hz, SVN beat toward the safe side in 91% of cases; SVN values at 60 and 100 Hz were higher than those at 30 Hz (p < 0.005). SVN was found in unilateral superior canal dehiscences. Partial bilateral labyrinthine malformations revealed no nystagmus. SVINT complements head-shaking and caloric tests in multifrequency assessment of patients with pUVL, as a global vestibular test. In contrast with tUVL results, SVINT does not always indicate the side of partial lesions, neither does it locate their level on the vestibulo-ocular pathway. This test is useful to reveal a vestibular asymmetry as a bedside examination test and may be used as a "vestibular Weber."

  7. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  8. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  10. Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery due to parasympathetic hypersensitive syndrome: differentiation from cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Huy, Patrice Tran Ba; Sauvaget, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular or facial schwannoma usually suggests cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and requires specific measures, including revision surgery. To draw attention to the possibility of postoperative unilateral rhinorrhea with concomitant hyperlacrimation and hypersialorrhea without a CSF origin and reflecting more a neuroplastic phenomenon. Retrospective study in a tertiary care center university clinic. For 1 case of intratemporal facial schwannoma and 2 cases of vestibular schwannoma, surgery was by a translabyrinthine approach with sacrifice of the facial nerve and hypoglossofacial anastomosis in the first case. Postoperative unilateral hydrorhinorrhea associated with various degrees of lacrimation and/or salivary hypersecretion occurred mainly during exercise or under stressful situations. With unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular or facial schwannoma, concomitant symptoms such as lacrimation or hypersialorrhea may not be explained by CSF leakage through the eustachian tube. Misinterpretation may lead to detrimental revision surgery. The pathophysiogenetic mechanism suggests a neuroplastic phenomenon involving a denervation hypersensitivity reaction of the autonomous system. A simple diagnostic test with a nasal anticholinergic agent may be beneficial.

  11. Vestibular results after intratympanic gentamicin therapy in disabling Menière's disease.

    PubMed

    Junet, Philippe; Karkas, Alexandre; Dumas, Georges; Quesada, Jean Louis; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Intratympanic injection of gentamicin is increasingly used in the treatment of unilateral disabling Menière's disease (MD). Several objective functional and subjective tests have been developed to assess the control of vertigo after gentamicin treatment. The aim of this study was to show that subjective results require a vestibular deafferentation as profound as possible, evidenced with multifrequency vestibular assessment. Sixty four patients with intractable MD in situation of medical treatment failure longer than 6 months were included between 1998 and 2013 in this case control study. A 2-year follow-up was performed after the last intratympanic gentamicin performed with the titration technique. A vestibular assessment was applied before and after 2 years of treatment with a functional level score using the AAOHNS vertigo scale and multifrequency vestibular assessment: skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT), head-shaking test (HST) and caloric test (CaTe). The correlation between the results of the questionnaire and the level of the deafferentation as evaluated by the tests was analyzed with the Spearman test. Among the 64 included patients, 56 (87.5 %) described vertigo control. There was a correlation (=-0.33 [-0.53; -0.09], p = 0.008) between subjective improvement (AAO -HNS 1 or 2) and the degree of vestibular deafferentation as evidenced by a destructive nystagmus (beating toward the safe side) with the HST and the SVINT, as well as a caloric hypofunction >90 % with the CaTe. The present study demonstrates that a profound vestibular deafferentation confirmed with multifrequency test evaluation is needed to have a subjective improvement in the treatment of unilateral disabling MD with intratympanic gentamicin.

  12. Effects of vestibular nerve transection on the calcium incorporation of fish otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, Ralf H.; Edelmann, Elke; Rahmann, Hinrich

    2001-08-01

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths (otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was transected unilaterally in neonate swordtail fish ( Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transected head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated.

  13. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  14. Sensory substitution in bilateral vestibular a-reflexic patients

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Bart B G T; Selen, Luc P J; Verhagen, Wim I M; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have balance problems in darkness, but maintain spatial orientation rather effectively in the light. It has been suggested that these patients compensate for vestibular cues by relying on extravestibular signals, including visual and somatosensory cues, and integrating them with internal beliefs. How this integration comes about is unknown, but recent literature suggests the healthy brain remaps the various signals into a task-dependent reference frame, thereby weighting them according to their reliability. In this paper, we examined this account in six patients with bilateral vestibular a-reflexia, and compared them to six age-matched healthy controls. Subjects had to report the orientation of their body relative to a reference orientation or the orientation of a flashed luminous line relative to the gravitational vertical, by means of a two-alternative-forced-choice response. We tested both groups psychometrically in upright position (0°) and 90° sideways roll tilt. Perception of body tilt was unbiased in both patients and controls. Response variability, which was larger for 90° tilt, did not differ between groups, indicating that body somatosensory cues have tilt-dependent uncertainty. Perception of the visual vertical was unbiased when upright, but showed systematic undercompensation at 90° tilt. Variability, which was larger for 90° tilt than upright, did not differ between patients and controls. Our results suggest that extravestibular signals substitute for vestibular input in patients’ perception of spatial orientation. This is in line with the current status of rehabilitation programs in acute vestibular patients, targeting at recognizing body somatosensory signals as a reliable replacement for vestibular loss. PMID:25975644

  15. Sensory substitution in bilateral vestibular a-reflexic patients.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Bart B G T; Selen, Luc P J; Verhagen, Wim I M; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-05-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have balance problems in darkness, but maintain spatial orientation rather effectively in the light. It has been suggested that these patients compensate for vestibular cues by relying on extravestibular signals, including visual and somatosensory cues, and integrating them with internal beliefs. How this integration comes about is unknown, but recent literature suggests the healthy brain remaps the various signals into a task-dependent reference frame, thereby weighting them according to their reliability. In this paper, we examined this account in six patients with bilateral vestibular a-reflexia, and compared them to six age-matched healthy controls. Subjects had to report the orientation of their body relative to a reference orientation or the orientation of a flashed luminous line relative to the gravitational vertical, by means of a two-alternative-forced-choice response. We tested both groups psychometrically in upright position (0°) and 90° sideways roll tilt. Perception of body tilt was unbiased in both patients and controls. Response variability, which was larger for 90° tilt, did not differ between groups, indicating that body somatosensory cues have tilt-dependent uncertainty. Perception of the visual vertical was unbiased when upright, but showed systematic undercompensation at 90° tilt. Variability, which was larger for 90° tilt than upright, did not differ between patients and controls. Our results suggest that extravestibular signals substitute for vestibular input in patients' perception of spatial orientation. This is in line with the current status of rehabilitation programs in acute vestibular patients, targeting at recognizing body somatosensory signals as a reliable replacement for vestibular loss.

  16. Anchoring the Self to the Body in Bilateral Vestibular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Toupet, Michel; van Nechel, Christian; Duquesne, Ulla; Hautefort, Charlotte; Lopez, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that vestibular information plays a significant role in anchoring the self to the body. Out-of-body experiences of neurological origin are frequently associated with vestibular sensations, and galvanic vestibular stimulation in healthy participants anchors the self to the body. Here, we provide the first objective measures of anchoring the self to the body in chronic bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). We compared 23 patients with idiopathic BVF to 23 healthy participants in a series of experiments addressing several aspects of visuo-spatial perspective taking and embodiment. In Experiment 1, participants were involved in a virtual “dot-counting task” from their own perspective or the perspective of a distant avatar, to measure implicit and explicit perspective taking, respectively. In both groups, response times increased similarly when the avatar’s and participant’s viewpoint differed, for both implicit and explicit perspective taking. In Experiment 2, participants named ambiguous letters (such as “b” or “q”) traced on their forehead that could be perceived from an internal or external perspective. The frequency of perceiving ambiguous letters from an internal perspective was similar in both groups. In Experiment 3, participants completed a questionnaire measuring the experienced self/body and self/environment “closeness”. Both groups reported a similar embodied experience. Altogether, our data show that idiopathic BVF does not change implicit and explicit perspective taking nor subjective anchoring of the self to the body. Our negative findings offer insight into the multisensory mechanisms of embodiment. Only acute peripheral vestibular disorders and neurological disorders in vestibular brain areas (characterized by strong multisensory conflicts) may evoke disembodied experiences. PMID:28107424

  17. Correlation between caloric and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential test results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Hsuan; Wang, Shou-Jen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2012-02-01

    The ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (o-VEMP) test results correlate significantly with caloric test results for patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), but not for patients with Meniere's disease (MD), indicating that the o-VEMP test may replace the caloric test for evaluating the vestibular nerve from which the AN arises. Conversely, the caloric, o-VEMP, and cervical VEMP (c-VEMP) tests should be performed to map lesion sites in the vestibular labyrinth. This study performed caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP tests on patients with central and peripheral vestibular disorders to investigate their relationships. In all, 66 patients comprising 16 with unilateral AN and 50 with unilateral definite MD were enrolled. All patients underwent caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP tests. In the AN group, the caloric test identified canal paresis and caloric areflexia in 10 ears, while the o-VEMP and c-VEMP tests identified abnormal (absent or delayed) responses in 12 and 11 ears, respectively. A significant correlation existed between caloric and o-VEMP test results, but not between caloric and c-VEMP test results, or between o-VEMP and c-VEMP test results. For the MD group, abnormal caloric, o-VEMP, and c-VEMP test results were obtained for 24%, 44%, and 38% of hydropic ears, respectively. No correlation existed between any two test results.

  18. What is the optimal number of treatment sessions of vestibular rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Rossi-Izquierdo, M; Santos-Pérez, S; Rubio-Rodríguez, J P; Lirola-Delgado, A; Zubizarreta-Gutiérrez, A; San Román-Rodríguez, E; Juíz-López, P; Soto-Varela, A

    2014-02-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation is effective and safe in patients with instability. However, there is insufficient evidence for distinguishing between efficacies of different dosage of therapies. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to verify whether there were differences between two computerised dynamic posturography (CDP) therapies of different numbers of sessions, in order to establish the optimal strategy. We conducted a prospective, comparative study of two different dosage of CDP therapy (a 5-session group and another of 10-session group) in patients with instability due to chronic unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder. We used balanced block randomisation to include 13 patients in each group. Improvement was assessed using the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and the CDP with the sensorial organisation test (SOT) and limits of stability (LOS). We found a statistically significant improvement in both groups in composite score, visual and vestibular input (SOT); and in reaction time, distance and directional control (LOS). If we compare the groups regarding these improvements, we found that 10-session group showed a greater benefit in distance covered and directional control of LOS. Since significant improvement is obtained with only five sessions, we believe this to be the optimal number of treatment sessions for most patients with chronic unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder. Nevertheless, those patients with more reduced limits of stability, and consequently greater likelihood of falling as a result of their diminished base of support, are candidates for rehabilitation protocols with a greater number of sessions.

  19. [Kinesitherapy in patients with the peripheral vestibular system disorders].

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Marcin; Walak, Jarosław; Woszczak, Marek; Józefowicz-Korczyńska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Kinesitherapy is widely accepted management in patients with vertigo and imbalance, but there has been inadequate evidence that one form of therapy is superior to another. of the study was to compare effectiveness of two kinesitherapy protocols in patients with the peripheral vestibular system disorders. Fifty patients (mean age 46.0±13.1 year) with vertigo and balance instability lasting over 3 months with unilateral vestibular disorder, confirmed in Videnystagmography, were included in the study. Thirty patients underwent supervised and 20 patients home-based exercise programs. All of them were assessed three times at the baseline, after 4 weeks and 3 months, on vertigo intensity and frequency with the Vertigo Syndrome Scale (VSS), Vertigo Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and clinical unsteadiness with tests (Romberg, Amended Motor Club Assesment (AMCA), Eurofit test - standing on one leg. In both groups the clinical tasks and the intensity of vertigo in VAS significantly decreased. The mean value of VSS (part physical and emotional)score significantly decreased only in supervised group at the end of 4 weeks and 3 months (p=ns). Recovery was more dynamic in supervised group than home-based exercises group, in AMCA test (3.9 vs. 1.3 s, p<0.05) in Eurofit tests eye open (14.1 vs. 0.9 s, p<0.05) and eye closed (3.5 vs. 1 s, p<0.05). In patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction supervised and home-based group kinesitherapy is an effective treatment method. In supervised group patients recovery has been faster. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults. PMID:26779116

  1. Vestibular Interactions in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Rajiv; Protti, Dario A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the vast majority of all information en route to the cerebral cortex must first pass through the thalamus. The long held view that the thalamus serves as a simple hi fidelity relay station for sensory information to the cortex, however, has over recent years been dispelled. Indeed, multiple projections from the vestibular nuclei to thalamic nuclei (including the ventrobasal nuclei, and the geniculate bodies)- regions typically associated with other modalities- have been described. Further, some thalamic neurons have been shown to respond to stimuli presented from across sensory modalities. For example, neurons in the rat anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei of the thalamus respond to visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory stimuli and integrate this information to compute heading within the environment. Together, these findings imply that the thalamus serves crucial integrative functions, at least in regard to vestibular processing, beyond that imparted by a “simple” relay. In this mini review we outline the vestibular inputs to the thalamus and provide some clinical context for vestibular interactions in the thalamus. We then focus on how vestibular inputs interact with other sensory systems and discuss the multisensory integration properties of the thalamus. PMID:26696836

  2. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function.

    PubMed

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2015-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults.

  3. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  4. Neuropharmacology of Vestibular System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and drug mechanisms of action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulator receptors and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. A critical review of the pharmacology and highlights of the major advances are discussed in each case. PMID:20808544

  5. Vestibular Deficits Following Youth Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Master, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence and recovery of pediatric patients with concussion who manifest clinical vestibular deficits, and to describe the correlation of these deficits with neurocognitive function, based on computerized neurocognitive testing, in a sample of pediatric patients with concussion. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients age 5–18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from 7/1/2010–12/31/2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits was obtained, and all related visits for those patients were reviewed. Results 247 patients were chosen from 3740 eligible visits for detailed review and abstraction. 81% showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical exam. Those patients with vestibular signs on initial exam took a significantly longer time to return to school (median 59 days vs. 6 days, p=0.001) or to be fully cleared (median 106 days vs. 29 days, p=0.001). They additionally scored more poorly on initial computerized neurocognitive testing, and took longer for neurocognitive deficits to recover. Those patients with three or more prior concussions had a higher prevalence of vestibular deficits and took longer for those deficits to resolve. Conclusion Vestibular deficits in children and adolescents with a history of concussion are highly prevalent. These deficits appear to be associated with extended recovery times and poorer performance on neurocognitive testing. Further studies evaluating the effectiveness of vestibular therapy on improving such deficits are warranted. PMID:25748568

  6. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  7. Predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Ivan; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Ozretić, David; Habek, Mario

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the role of clinical parameters, MRI and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) as predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis. Twenty-six patients with vestibular neuritis were included: 15 patients (58%) showed complete clinical recovery, and 11 patients (41%) were diagnosed with the syndrome of chronic vestibular insufficiency. Clinical parameters (vomiting, nystagmus, postural stability, and nausea) were assessed at diagnosis. MRI was performed within 3 months and VEMP within 6 days and at 1 year after the initial presentation. The amplitude asymmetry ratio (AR) was calculated using the following formula: AR=((healthy side-affected side)/(healthy side+affected side) × 100). Of all studied parameters, only chronic white matter supratentorial lesions present on brain MRI negatively correlated with clinical recovery (Phi coefficient=-0.637, p=0.001). The logistic regression analysis showed that positive brain MRI and older age reduced odds for clinical recovery. There was no correlation between clinical recovery and oVEMP AR recovery between groups (p=0.781). Seven patients showed improvement, and 19 showed worsening on oVEMP AR after a 1-year follow-up. Statistical regression model for predicting the outcome of clinical recovery using asymmetry score recovery, as an independent variable, was not statistically significant. Older age and chronic white matter lesions on brain MRI are positive predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis. VEMPs are not useful in predicting the development of chronic vestibular insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of vestibular training on motion sickness, nystagmus, and subjective vertical.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Deguine, Olivier; Bourg, Mathieu; Pavy-LeTraon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Pitch head-and-trunk movements during constant velocity rotation are a provocative vestibular stimulus that produces vertigo and nausea. When exposed to this stimulus repeatedly, motion sickness symptoms diminish as the subjects habituate. Acetylleucine is a drug that is used to treat acute vestibular vertigo. In this study, we wanted to ascertain whether this drug (a) lessened motion sickness or delayed habituation; (b) accelerated the recovery following habituation; and (c) whether changes in the subjective vertical accompanied habituation. Twenty subjects were administered acetylleucine or placebo in a double-blind study during a five-day vestibular training. Horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus, smooth pursuit, and subjective visual vertical were evaluated before, during, and up to two months after the vestibular training. Based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria, motion sickness decreased steadily in each vestibular training session, and there was no difference between the scores in the acetylleucine and placebo groups. Post-rotatory nystagmus peak velocity and time constant also declined in both groups at the same rate. Thus, acetylleucine neither reduced the nausea associated with this provocative stimulus, nor hastened the acquisition or retention of vestibular habituation of motion sickness and nystagmus. There was no difference in optokinetic nystagmus and smooth pursuit between the acetylleucine and placebo groups. However, subjects showed larger error in the subjective visual vertical after habituation, which indicates that spatial orientation is also affected by vestibular training.

  9. Relative diagnostic value of ocular vestibular evoked potentials and the subjective visual vertical during tilt and eccentric rotation.

    PubMed

    Valko, Yulia; Hegemann, Stefan C A; Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik; Bockisch, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    We compared vibration-induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) with the visual vertical during whole-body roll tilt and eccentric rotation in healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular loss, to determine which test was most sensitive in discriminating impaired utricle function. OVEMPs and the visual vertical were measured in 11 patients and 11 healthy subjects. Visual vertical was measured during roll tilts between -9.6° and 9.6°, and during rotation at 400°/s with the head upright and the vertical rotation axis located between ±3.5 cm from the head center. OVEMPs in patients were strikingly asymmetric, whereas they were approximately symmetric in healthy subjects. Patients showed impaired visual vertical gain during eccentric rotation and increased errors for both roll tilt and eccentric rotation tests. OVEMPs were superior at discriminating between patients and healthy subjects, although eccentric rotation performed nearly as well. OVEMPs provide a powerful test for discriminating between healthy subjects and patients with chronic unilateral vestibular loss, and testing the visual vertical testing during eccentric rotation was superior to testing during whole-body roll tilt. OVEMPs are easier to administer, less demanding on patients, and in general are more effective at identifying chronic unilateral vestibular loss than visual vertical measurements. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dissociations between behavioural recovery and restoration of vestibular activity in the unilabyrinthectomized guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Ris, L; Capron, B; de Waele, C; Vidal, P P; Godaux, E

    1997-01-01

    1. In the guinea-pig, a unilateral labyrinthectomy induces postural disturbances and an ocular nystagmus which abate or disappear over time. These behavioural changes are accompanied by an initial collapse and a subsequent restoration of the spontaneous activity in the neurones of the ipsilateral vestibular nuclei. Recently, it has been shown that the vestibular neuronal activity remained collapsed over at least 10 h whereas its restoration was complete 1 week after the lesion. The aims of this study were to determine when restoration of spontaneous activity in the partially deafferented vestibular neurones started and to compare the time courses of the behavioural and neuronal recoveries in guinea-pigs that had undergone a unilateral labyrinthectomy. 2. Neuronal discharge measurements were made using chronic extracellular recording of single unit activity. After a left labyrinthectomy, electrodes, were placed on the site of the destroyed labyrinth to enable stimulation of the left vestibular nerve. Behavioural measurements included chronic recording of eye movements by the scleral search coli technique. After a left labyrinthectomy, lateral deviation of the head, twisting of the head, and eye velocity of the slow phases of the nystagmus were measured. 3. The neuronal activity of the rostral part of the vestibular nuclear complex on the lesioned side was recorded in alert guinea-pigs over 4 h recording sessions between 12 and 72 h after the lesion. 4. The criterion used to select vestibular neurones for analysis was their recruitment by an electric shock on the vestibular nerve. In addition, in order to explore a uniform population, we focused on neurones recruited at monosynaptic latencies (0.85-1.15 ms). 5. For each recording period, the mean resting rate was calculated animal by animal and the grand mean of these individual resting rate means was calculated. Previously, a decline in the grand mean resting rate from 35.8 +/- 6.0 spikes s-1 (control state) to 7

  11. Ocular and cervical VEMPs: a study of 74 patients suffering from peripheral vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Zamith, Franck; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    This study compared the results of ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) tests for healthy subjects with those for patients suffering from vestibular diseases to try to determine the clinical usefulness of combined ocular and cervical STB VEMP testing. Thirty-two healthy volunteers and 74 patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction underwent tests for ocular and cervical VEMPs induced by AC 100 dB nHL 500 Hz STB combined with caloric and audiometric tests. In healthy subjects, the mean P13-N23 peak-to-peak amplitude of cervical VEMPs was much larger than the mean n1-p1 peak-to-peak amplitude of ocular VEMPs. In patients, cervical and ocular VEMPs may be dissociated. The peak-to-peak amplitude of both cervical and ocular tests was abnormally in most of patients suffering from vestibular lesions. No correlations were found between VEMPs, the degree of hearing loss and/or of horizontal canalar paresis. Ocular and cervical VEMPs provide complementary information about saccular and utricular otolithic function. Testing of ocular and cervical VEMPs allows the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex and ipsilateral sacculo-collic reflex to be determined. These tests can help describe vestibular lesions and assess the effects of treatment and should therefore be used clinically. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimizing the sensitivity of the head thrust test for identifying vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael C; Tusa, Ronald J; Grine, Lawrence E; Herdman, Susan J

    2004-02-01

    The head thrust test (HTT) is used to assess the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) in patients following vestibular ablation is excellent (100%), although sensitivity is lower (35%-39%) for patients with nonsurgically induced UVH. The variability of the test results may be from moving the subject's head outside the plane of the lateral semicircular canals as well as using a head thrust of predictable timing and direction. The purpose of this study was to examine sensitivity and specificity of the horizontal HTT in identifying patients with UVH and bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) when the head was flexed 30 degrees in attempt to induce acceleration primarily in the lateral semicircular canal and the head was moved unpredictably. The medical records of 176 people with and without vestibular dysfunction (n=79 with UVH, n=32 with BVH, and n=65 with nonvestibular dizziness) were studied. Data were retrospectively tabulated from a de-identified database (ie, with health information stripped of all identifiers). Sensitivity of the HTT for identifying vestibular hypofunction was 71% for UVH and 84% for BVH. Specificity was 82%. Ensuring the head is pitched 30 degrees down and thrust with an unpredictable timing and direction appears to improve sensitivity of the HTT.

  13. Vestibular disorders and dual task performance: Impairment when walking a straight path

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jess C.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2013-01-01

    Locomotion is impaired in some people with vestibular disorders. Performance on cognitive tasks is also impaired in many people with vestibular disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if patients with vestibular disorders have decreased ability to complete a dual task performance involving a cognitive task, an additional motor task or both tasks, combined along a linear path. Subjects were normal, had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or had various vestibular disorders that caused unilateral weakness. They were asked to walk 7.62 m in a straight line with eyes open or closed, without extra tasks, and while nodding the head, naming things, and both nodding and naming. The patients walked significantly slower than controls, especially when performing the cognitive task. Patients had greater ataxia and began veering sooner than normals. The subjects’ veering increased significantly with the addition of cognitive tasks. The patient groups did not differ significantly from each other. The changes in velocity did not affect the veering. These data suggest that patients with vestibular disorders are impaired in their ability to complete a linear path when cognitive tasks are added. PMID:21558642

  14. Management of vestibular schwannomas with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Demiral, Selcuk; Uysal, Bora; Gamsiz, Hakan; Oysul, Kaan; Dirican, Bahar; Sirin, Sait

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of treatment for vestibular schwannoma is to achieve local control without comprimising regional cranial nerve function. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a viable therapeutic option for vestibular schwannoma. The aim of the study is to report our 15-year single center experience using linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of patients with vestibular schwannoma. Between July 1998 and January 2013, 68 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were treated using stereotactic radiosurgery at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy. All patients underwent high-precision stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator with 6-MV photons. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range, 9-107). Median age was 45 years (range, 20-77). Median dose was 12 Gy (range, 10-13) prescribed to the 85%-95% isodose line encompassing the target volume. Local tumor control in patients with periodic follow-up imaging was 96.1%. Overall hearing preservation rate was 76.5%. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery offers a safe and effective treatment for patients with vestibular schwannoma by providing high local control rates along with improved quality of life through well-preserved hearing function.

  15. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) Can Detect Asymptomatic Saccular Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Yee; Timmer, Ferdinand C. A.; Oriel, Brad S.; Zhou, Guangwei; Guinan, John J.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Herrmann, Barbara S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rauch, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the useful of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing for detecting endolymphatic hydrops, especially in the second ear of patients with unilateral Ménière disease (MD). Methods This study was performed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Part I consisted of postmortem temporal bone specimens from the temporal bone collection of the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary; part II consisted of consecutive consenting adult patients (n = 82) with unilateral MD by American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery criteria case histories. Out-come measures consisted of VEMP thresholds in patients and histologic saccular endolymphatic hydrops in postmortem temporal bones. Results Saccular hydrops was observed in the asymptomatic ear in six of 17 (35%) of temporal bones from donors with unilateral MD. Clinic patients with unilateral MD showed elevated mean VEMP thresholds and altered VEMP tuning in their symptomatic ears and, to a lesser degree, in their asymptomatic ears. Specific VEMP frequency and tuning criteria were used to define a “Ménière-like” response. This “Ménière-like” response was seen in 27% of asymptomatic ears of our patients with unilateral MD. Conclusions Bilateral involvement is seen in approximately one third of MD cases. Saccular hydrops appears to precede symptoms in bilateral MD. Changes in VEMP threshold and tuning appear to be sensitive to these structural changes in the saccule. If so, then VEMP may be useful as a detector of asymptomatic saccular hydrops and as a predictor of evolving bilateral MD. PMID:16735912

  16. Downbeat nystagmus associated with damage to the medial longitudinal fasciculus of the pons: a vestibular balance control mechanism via the lower brainstem paramedian tract neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Fujizuka, Natsu; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Tamaoka, Akira

    2013-05-15

    The paramedian tract (PMT) neurons, a group of neurons associated with eye movement that project into the cerebellar flocculus, are present in or near the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) in the paramedian region of the lower brainstem. A 66-year-old man with multiple sclerosis in whom downbeat nystagmus appeared along with right MLF syndrome due to a unilateral pontomedullary lesion is described. In light of these findings, a possible schema for the vestibular balance control mechanism circuit of the PMT neurons via the flocculus is presented. Damage to the PMT neurons impaired the elective inhibitory control mechanism of the anterior semicircular canal neural pathway by the flocculus. This resulted in the appearance of anterior semicircular canal-dominant vestibular imbalance and the formation of downbeat nystagmus. From the pathogenesis of this vertical vestibular nystagmus, the action of the PMT neurons in the vestibular eye movement neuronal pathway to maintain vestibular balance was conjectured to be as follows. PMT neurons transmit vestibular information from the anterior semicircular canals to the cerebellum, forming a cerebellum/brainstem feedback loop. Vestibular information from that loop is integrated in the cerebellum, inhibiting only the anterior semicircular canal neuronal pathway via the flocculus and controlling vestibular balance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints.

    PubMed

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-08-01

    This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints.

  18. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints

    PubMed Central

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. METHODS: A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. RESULTS: Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints. PMID:28954005

  19. Vestibular function in superficial siderosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Superficial siderosis (SS) is caused by repeated or continuous bleeding into the subarachnoid space that results in iron from hemoglobin (hemosiderin) being deposited on the surface of the brain. Clinically, the condition is characterized by sensorineural deafness, ataxia, and pyramidal signs. However the mechanism of peripheral vestibular disturbance was not revealed. We show the vestibular function of SS patients, and shed light on saccule-inferior vestibular nerve. Methods Over the past 9 years, 5 patients were definitively diagnosed with SS by MRI in our department. These patients were subjected to balance testing. Results Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) was observed in patients who had suffered from SS for a short period but tended to be diminished or absent in patients who had suffered from the condition for a longer period. Conclusions These findings in SS patients suggest that saccule-inferior vestibular function is maintained at early stages of the disorder. Our study may help to clarify the mechanism of SS. PMID:23617695

  20. Vestibular modulation of spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Elisa R.; Longo, Matthew R.; Fiori, Federico; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular inputs make a key contribution to the sense of one’s own spatial location. While the effects of vestibular stimulation on visuo-spatial processing in neurological patients have been extensively described, the normal contribution of vestibular inputs to spatial perception remains unclear. To address this issue, we used a line bisection task to investigate the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on spatial perception, and on the transition between near and far space. Brief left-anodal and right-cathodal GVS or right-anodal and left-cathodal GVS were delivered. A sham stimulation condition was also included. Participants bisected lines of different lengths at six distances from the body using a laser pointer. Consistent with previous results, our data showed an overall shift in the bisection bias from left to right as viewing distance increased. This pattern suggests leftward bias in near space, and rightward bias in far space. GVS induced strong polarity dependent effects in spatial perception, broadly consistent with those previously reported in patients: left-anodal and right-cathodal GVS induced a leftward bisection bias, while right-anodal and left-cathodal GVS reversed this effect, and produced bisection bias toward the right side of the space. Interestingly, the effects of GVS were comparable in near and far space. We speculate that vestibular-induced biases in space perception may optimize gathering of information from different parts of the environment. PMID:24133440

  1. Components of vestibular cortical function.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Volk, Gerd F; Flatz, Claudia; Brodoehl, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne; Witte, Otto W; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the functional response (e.g., nystagmus) to caloric vestibular stimulation is delayed and prolonged compared with the stimulus-response timing of other sensory systems. Imaging studies have used different models to predict cortical responses and to determine the areas of the brain that are involved. These studies have revealed a widespread network of vestibular brain regions. However, there is some disagreement regarding the brain areas involved, which may partly be caused by differences in the models used. This disagreement indicates the possible existence of multiple cortical components with different temporal characteristics that underlie cortical vestibular processing. However, data-driven methods have yet to be used to analyze the underlying hemodynamic components during and after vestibular stimulation. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 12 healthy subjects during caloric stimulation and analyzed these data using a model-free analysis method (ICA). We found seven independent stimulus-induced components that outline a robust pattern of cortical activation and deactivation. These independent components demonstrated significant differences in their time courses. No single-modeled response function was able to cover the entire range of these independent components. The response functions determined in the present study should improve model-based studies investigating vestibular cortical processing.

  2. Principles of vestibular physical therapy rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Susan L; Sparto, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    The use of vestibular rehabilitation for persons with balance and vestibular disorders is used to improve function and decrease dizziness symptoms. Principles of a vestibular rehabilitation program are described including common exercises and outcome measures used to report change. A review of negative and positive predictive factors related to recovery is also provided.

  3. Unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiograph: the congenital Poland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tomos, Ioannis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Vlami, Aikaterini; Apollonatou, Vasiliki; Manali, Effrosyni D; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral hypertransparent hemithorax requires a particular diagnostic approach as it can be the result of diverse pulmonary diseases, including pneumothorax, large pulmonary embolus, unilateral large bullae, mucous plag, airway obstruction and contralateral pleural effusion. Congenital syndromes with chest wall abnormalities, are rare, but often underdiagnosed causes. Poland Syndrome consists of such a rare, congenital anomaly and is characterized by the absence of the pectoralis major muscle and upper limb ipsilateral abnormalities. We present a case of a patient with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiology, attributed to the underlying Poland Syndrome.

  4. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  5. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders. PMID:27507932

  6. Asymmetries in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in chronic stroke survivors with spastic hypertonia: evidence for a vestibulospinal role

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Derek M.; Klein, Cliff S.; Suresh, Nina L.; Rymer, William Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Indirect evidence suggests that lateralized changes in motoneuron behavior post-stroke are potentially due to a depolarizing supraspinal drive to the motoneuron pool, but the pathways responsible are unknown. In this study, we assessed vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in the neck muscles of hemispheric stroke survivors with contralesional spasticity to quantify the relative levels of vestibular drive to the spastic-paretic and contralateral motoneuron pools. Methods VEMPs were recorded from each sternocleidomastoid muscle in chronic stroke survivors. Side-to-side differences in cVEMP amplitude were calculated and expressed as an asymmetry ratio, a proxy for the relative amount of vestibular drive to each side. Results Spastic-paretic VEMPs were larger than contralateral VEMPs in 13/16 subjects. There was a strong positive relationship between the degree of asymmetry and the severity of spasticity in this subset of subjects. Remaining subjects had larger contralateral responses. Conclusion Vestibular drive to cervical motoneurons is asymmetric in spastic stroke survivors, supporting our hypothesis that there is an imbalance in descending vestibular drive to motoneuron pools post-stroke. We speculate this imbalance is a consequence of the unilateral disruption of inhibitory corticobulbar projections to the vestibular nuclei. Significance This study sheds new light on the underlying mechanisms of post-stroke spasticity. PMID:24680197

  7. Vestibular system changes in sudden deafness with and without vertigo: a human temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Taro; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Morita, Norimasa; Terao, Kyoichi; Sato, Teruyuki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Paparella, Michael M

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the vestibular system changes in sudden deafness with vertigo (SDwV) and sudden deafness without vertigo (SDwoV) and the cause of persistent canal paresis (CP) in SDwV patients. Retrospective study. Four temporal bones from the affected ear in 4 patients with unilateral sudden deafness (SD), 2 SDwV and 2 SDwoV, were selected. Four contralateral temporal bones with normal-hearing ears were defined as the control. Morphologic findings of the labyrinth, the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells, and the density of vestibular hair cells were investigated in all temporal bones. Clinical data and the results of vestibular tests of 11 patients with unilateral SD, as a separate group, also were investigated. Atrophic change of the organ of Corti, tectorial membrane, and stria vascularis in cochlea, and deposits and atrophic otoconial membrane in vestibular sense organs were seen on affected ears more than control ears. The density of Type I hair cells seemed to decrease on the saccular macula and the posterior semicircular canal crista on affected ears, and there was no remarkable difference between SDwV and SDwoV. In 1 patient with SDwoV who died 10 months after the onset of SD, there were large amount of deposits on the cupula, the atrophied otoconial membrane was peeling off from the saccular macula, and the saccular membrane collapsed to the saccular macula in the affected ear. In the clinical data, all SDwV who were examined within 2 years from the onset had CP, and all SDwV had profound hearing loss. There is no remarkable difference between SDwV and SDwoV in the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells and the density of vestibular hair cells. The damage of the extracellular superstructure is seen in SD with or without vertigo. The damage of extracellular superstructure is potentially one of the causes of persistent CP in patients with SD.

  8. Unilateral multisegmental morphea.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kristy F; Wu, Jashin J; Dyson, Senait W; Tsuchiya, Arline M

    2011-07-01

    There are 5 subtypes of morphea that are based on disease distribution and presentation, including plaque, localized, generalized, linear, and deep morphea. We report a case of a young patient with morphea lesions in scattered locations confined to 1 side of the body, which we have termed unilateral multisegmental morphea.

  9. Unilateral optic disk edema with central retinal artery and vein occlusions as the presenting signs of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salazar Méndez, R; Fonollá Gil, M

    2014-11-01

    A 39-year-old man with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (LAL Ph+) developed progressive vision loss to no light perception in his right eye. He had optic disk edema and later developed central artery and vein occlusions. Pan-photocoagulation, as well as radiotherapy of the whole brain were performed in several fractions. Unfortunately the patient died of hematological relapse 4 months later. Optic nerve infiltration may appear as an isolated sign of a leukemia relapse, even before a hematological relapse occurs. Leukemic optic neuropathy is a critical sign, not only for vision, but also for life, and radiotherapy should be immediately performed before irreversible optic nerve damage occurs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A connection between neurovascular conflicts within the cerebellopontine angle and vestibular neuritis, a case controlled cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loader, B; Linauer, I; Korkesch, S; Krammer-Effenberger, I; Zielinski, V; Schibany, N; Kaider, A; Vyskocil, E; Tscholakoff, D; Franz, P

    2016-10-01

    This retrospective, observer blinded case-control study aims to compare the prevalence of neurovascular conflicts (NVCs) of the vestibulocochlear nerve and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in patients presenting with clinical signs of acute vestibular neuritis with and without subsequent objective vestibular function loss (VFL). 58 acute cases of clinically suspected acute vestibular neuritis were investigated with same day cranial MRI at a tertiary referral centre and compared to 61 asymptomatic controls. The prevalence of NVCs in cases with objective VFL were also compared to cases without VFL. Radiologists described the NVC as "no contact" (Grade 0), "contact < 2 mm" (Grade 1), "contact > 2 mm" (Grade 2) and "vascular loop presence" (Grade 3) without knowledge of neurotological data. Neurotological data was collected without knowledge of MRI findings. Vestibular function was tested by bithermic caloric irrigation. 26 cases (45%) showed caloric VFL (Group A), whereas 32 (55%) exhibited no VFL (Group B). Group A included 13 cases with NVCs (50%), Group B included 26 NVC cases (82%) (p = 0.012) and the control group included 16 individuals (26%) (p < 0.001 for comparison of all 3 groups). Group B had a significantly higher NVC-Grading than Group A (p = 0.009). There was no statistically significant association between NVCs and either SNHL or tinnitus (p > 0.05). Our results suggest that patients presenting with clinical signs of acute vestibular neuritis who show symmetrical caloric vestibular function test results have a significantly higher NVC prevalence in the cerebellopontine angle.

  11. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information.

  12. Clinical Application of 3D-FIESTA Image in Patients with Unilateral Inner Ear Symptom.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae Ho; Chung, Jae Ho; Min, Hyun Jung; Cho, Seok Hyun; Park, Chul Won; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Unilateral auditory dysfunction such as tinnitus and hearing loss could be a warning sign of a retrocochlear lesion. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and internal auditory canal magnetic resonance image (MRI) are suggested as novel diagnostic tools for retrocochlear lesions. However, the high cost of MRI and the low sensitivity of the ABR test could be an obstacle when assessing patients with unilateral ear symptoms. The purpose of this study was to introduce the clinical usefulness of three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) MRI in patients with unilateral ear symptoms. Two hundred and fifty-three patients with unilateral tinnitus or unilateral hearing loss who underwent 3D-FIESTA temporal bone MRI as a screening test were enrolled. We reviewed the abnormal findings in the 3D-FIESTA images and ear symptoms using the medical records. In patients with unilateral ear symptoms, 51.0% of the patients had tinnitus and 32.8% patients were assessed to have sudden sensory neural hearing loss. With 3D-FIESTA imaging, twelve patients were diagnosed with acoustic neuroma, four with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, and two with posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Inner ear anomalies and vestibulocochlear nerve aplasia could be diagnosed with 3D-FIESTA imaging. 3D-FIESTA imaging is a highly sensitive method for the diagnosis of cochlear or retrocochlear lesions. 3D-FIESTA imaging is a useful screening tool for patients with unilateral ear symptoms.

  13. The vestibular implant: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Stokroos, Robert J; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman

    2011-01-01

    To assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant (VI) and its feasibility short-term. A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, and Embase. Key words used were "vestibular prosth*" and "VI." The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation. All studies about the VI and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the VI. Data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. To use a basic VI in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation), complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  14. The Vestibular Implant: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Stokroos, Robert J.; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant (VI) and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, and Embase. Key words used were “vestibular prosth*” and “VI.” The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation. Study selection: All studies about the VI and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the VI. Data extraction and synthesis: Data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: To use a basic VI in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation), complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt. PMID:21991260

  15. Vision and vestibular adaptation.

    PubMed

    Demer, J L; Crane, B T

    1998-07-01

    This article summarizes six recent degree-of-freedom studies of visual-vestibular interaction during natural activities and relates the findings to canal-otolith interactions evaluated during eccentric axis rotations. Magnetic search coils were used to measure angular eye and head movements of young and elderly subjects. A flux gate magnetometer was used to measure three-dimensional head translation. Three activities were studied: standing quietly, walking in place, and running in place. Each activity was evaluated with three viewing conditions: a visible target viewed normally, a remembered target in darkness, and a visible target viewed with x2 binocular telescopic spectacles. Canal-otolith interaction was assessed with passive, whole-body, transient, and steady-state rotations in pitch and yaw at multiple frequencies about axes that were either oculocentric or eccentric to the eyes. For each rotational axis, subjects regarded visible and remembered targets located at various distances. Horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were demonstrable in all subjects during standing, walking, and running. When only angular gains were considered, gains in both darkness and during normal vision were less than 1.0 and were generally lower in elderly than in young subjects. Magnified vision with x2 telescopic spectacles produced only small gain increases as compared with normal vision. During walking and running all subjects exhibited significant mediolateral and dorsoventral head translations that were antiphase locked to yaw and pitch head movements, respectively. These head translations and rotations have mutually compensating effects on gaze in a target plane for typical viewing distances and allow angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gains of less than 1.0 to be optimal for gaze stabilization during natural activities. During passive, whole-body eccentric pitch and yaw head rotations, vestibulo-ocular reflex gain was modulated as appropriate to stabilize

  16. Comparison of behavioral, vestibular, and axonal effects of subchronic IDPN in the rat.

    PubMed

    Llorens, J; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of subchronic 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) were characterized in the adult Long-Evans male rat. In a preparatory experiment, acute IDPN (890 mg/kg, IP) and intratympanic arsanilic acid caused similar alterations in locomotor activity, rearings, and scores for vestibular impairment. In a second preparatory experiment, IDPN in the drinking water (0%, 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.4%) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in water intake, but a effective increase in IDPN intake. In the subchronic experiment, rats were exposed to the above concentrations of IDPN for 15 weeks, except the 0.4% group, exposed for only 7 weeks. Effects on body weight, motor activity, vestibular scores, vestibular morphology, and axonal diameter were observed after 0.2% and 0.4% IDPN. Proximal axonopathies but little or no clinical signs or vestibular toxicity followed 0.05% and 0.1% IDPN. We concluded that vestibular hair cell loss can be induced by subchronic IDPN at doses larger than the axonopathic doses, and that the vestibular toxicity, not the axonopathy, is responsible for the gross changes in behavior characterizing IDPN exposure.

  17. Vestibular Stimulation for Stress Management in Students

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although several methods are developed to alleviate stress among college students, logistic limitations in adopting them have limited their utility. Aim Hence, we aimed to test a very practical approach to alleviate stress among college students by achieving vestibular stimulation using swings. Materials and Methods In this study 60 male and female participants were randomly assigned into vestibular stimulation or control groups. Depression, anxiety, stress scores, sleep quality, heart rate, blood pressure, Autonomic functions, respiratory, haematological, cognitive function, Quality of life were recorded before and after 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th days of vestibular stimulation. Results STAI S and STAI T scores were significantly improved on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were significantly decreased and remained within normal limits in vestibular group on day 28th following vestibular stimulation. Postural fall in blood pressure was significantly improved on day 14 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. Respiratory rate was significantly improved on day 7 onwards, following vestibular stimulation. PSQI sleep disturbance, PSQI sleep latency, PSQI total score and bleeding time was significantly improved following vestibular stimulation. Conclusion Our study supports the adoption of vestibular stimulation for stress management. Hence, placement of swings in college campuses must be considered, which may be a simple approach to alleviate stress among college students. PMID:27042457

  18. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076

  19. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent—even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  20. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function-A Review.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent-even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  1. Unilateral paralysis associated with profound hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Yeh, Fu-Chiang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral paralysis is rarely reported to be primary presentation of severe hypokalemia. We describe a 24-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of right-sided weakness. Neurologic examination revealed diminished muscle strength and tendon reflexes over the right limbs. Computed tomography of the brain showed no organic brain lesion. However, laboratory data showed hypokalemia (K+ 2.0 mmol/L) with metabolic acidosis (HCO3 − 19 mmol/L). She needed a total of 260 mmol K+ to achieve complete recovery of muscle strength at a serum K+ level of 3.2 mmol/L and was proved to have distal renal tubular acidosis. Severe hypokalemia must be kept in mind as a cause of acute unilateral paralysis without organic lesions to avoid unnecessary examination and potentially life-threatening complications.

  2. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients.

  3. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian T.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients’ scores were significantly worse than normals’ scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  4. Unilateral demodectic rosacea.

    PubMed

    Shelley, W B; Shelley, E D; Burmeister, V

    1989-05-01

    A unilateral rosacea-like chronic dermatitis of the right side of the face was shown to harbor innumerable Demodex folliculorum and D. brevis. Treatment with oral metronidazole suppressed the dermatitis but did not significantly reduce the Demodex population. Treatment with topical crotamiton eliminated the Demodex and was curative. These observations support the view that D. folliculorum and D. brevis may be pathogenic when they are present in extremely large numbers.

  5. DARA vestibular equipment onboard MIR.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, P; Kellig, A; Hoffmann, H U; Ruyters, G

    1998-01-01

    In space, the weightless environment provides a different stimulus to the otolith organs of the vestibular system, and the resulting signals no longer correspond with the visual and other sensory signals sent to the brain. This signal conflict causes disorientation. To study this and also to understand the vestibular adaptation to weightlessness, DARA has developed scientific equipment for vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric investigations. Especially, two video-oculography systems (monocular--VOG--and binocular--BIVOG, respectively) as well as stimuli such as an optokinetic stimulation device have successfully been employed onboard MIR in the frame of national and European missions since 1992. The monocular VOG was used by Klaus Flade during the MIR '92 mission, by Victor Polyakov during his record 15 months stay onboard MIR in 1993/94 as well as by Ulf Merbold during EUROMIR '94. The binocular version was used by Thomas Reiter and Sergej Avdeyev during the 6 months EUROMIR '95 mission. PIs of the various experiments include H. Scherer and A. Clarke (FU Berlin), M. Dieterichs and S. Krafczyk (LMU Munchen) from Germany as well as C.H. Markham and S.G. Diamond from the United States. Video-Oculography (VOG) is a technique for examining the function of the human balance system located in the inner ear (vestibular system) and the visio-oculomotor interactions of the vestibular organ. The human eye movements are measured, recorded and evaluated by state-of-the-art video techniques. The method was first conceived and designed at the Vestibular Research Laboratory of the ENT Clinic in Steglitz, FU Berlin (A. Clarke, H. Scherer). Kayser-Threde developed, manufactured and tested the facilities for space application under contract to DARA. Evaluation software was first provided by the ENT Clinic, Berlin, later by our subcontractor Sensomotoric Instruments (SMI), Teltow. Optokinetic hardware to support visuo-oculomotoric investigations, has been shipped to MIR for EUROMIR '95

  6. Vestibular neuronitis: a review of a common cause of vertigo in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, C W

    1993-01-01

    Vestibular neuronitis is an interesting condition characterized by the acute onset of vertigo, nausea and vomiting, in the absence of hearing loss or tinnitus. There is often evidence of a recent or concurrent upper respiratory tract infection. The disease follows a benign course of between two days and six weeks. It often occurs in epidemics. Following the acute attack, mild transitory episodes of dizziness may recur over a period of 12 to 18 months. Clinical and histopathological evidence suggests that it is caused by an isolated lesion of the vestibular nerve, although the exact aetiology remains obscure. Vestibular neuronitis is a relatively common condition in general practice, but has lacked clear definition, partly as a result of confusion over its nomenclature. Current knowledge of vestibular neuronitis is reviewed. Clinical diagnostic criteria are described, and the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the syndrome in general practice are outlined. There remains a need to describe the occurrence of vestibular neuronitis in general practice in greater detail. PMID:8323804

  7. The effect of betahistine on vestibular habituation: comparison of rotatory and sway habituation training.

    PubMed

    Mierzwinski, J; Kazmierczak, H; Pawlak-Osinska, K; Piziewicz, A

    2001-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of histaminergic agonists and antagonists on the acquisition of vestibular habituation. The experimental animals, pigeons, were subjected to unilateral rotatory and sway habituation training sessions. The habituation of postural reflexes and post-rotatory head nystagmus was assessed. Vestibular habituation in the control group was achieved by adopting the kinetic reflex posture after approximately 9 training sessions, and after 10 and 14 training sessions, respectively for 50% reduction of the total number of beats (TNB) and the duration of post-rotatory head nystagmus. In the sway adaptation test control pigeons needed nearly 15 training sessions while pigeons receiving betahistine adapted after approximately 8 sessions. Administration of histamine and, most notably, betahistine accelerated the process, while both H1 and H2 antagonists (clemastine, cimetidine) tended to retard it, indicating a less significant contribution of H2 receptors. The cholinergic agent physostigmine strongly retarded habituation while the anticholinergic agent scopolamine markedly accelerated it. In addition the adrenomimetic agent ephedrine also accelerated habituation while the adrenolytic agent droperidol retarded reduction of nystagmus beats. The results indicate that histaminergic receptors play a significant role in the vestibular habituation mechanism but are intricately involved with other types of receptors. Betahistine is clearly the agent of choice for attenuating vestibular effects.

  8. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  9. General History of Vestibular Disorders in Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    Reprinted from Undersea Biomedical Research, Vol. I. No. I, March, 1974 ^» General history of vestibular disorders in diving ’ Eß ö w’w...Maryland 20014 Cmt Kennedy K. S. 1974. General history ot vestibular disorders in diving. Undersea Biomed. Res. ^rC ’(I): 73-81.-The history of...vestibular symptomatology, history of compressed air sickness otolaryngologic problems in divers caisson disease diving medicine Many disorders

  10. Interaction of somatoform and vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Best, C; Eckhardt‐Henn, A; Diener, G; Bense, S; Breuer, P; Dieterich, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The high coincidence of organic vestibular and somatoform vertigo syndromes has appeared to support pathogenic models showing a strong linkage between them. It was hypothesised that a persisting vestibular dysfunction causes the development of anxiety disorders. Objective To determine the relation between vestibular deficits and somatoform vertigo disorders in an interdisciplinary prospective study. Methods Participants were divided into eight diagnostic groups: healthy volunteers (n = 26) and patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV, n = 11), vestibular neuritis (n = 11), Menière's disease (n = 7), vestibular migraine (n = 15), anxiety (n = 23), depression (n = 12), or somatoform disorders (n = 22). Neuro‐otological diagnostic procedures included electro‐oculography with rotatory and caloric testing, orthoptic examination with measurements of subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, and a neurological examination. Psychosomatic diagnostic procedures comprised interviews and psychometric instruments. Results Patients with BPPV (35.3%) and with vestibular neuritis (52.2%) had pathological test values on caloric irrigation (p<0.001). Otolith dysfunction with pathological tilts of SVV and ocular torsion was found only in patients with vestibular neuritis (p<0.001). Patients with Menière's disease, vestibular migraine, and psychiatric disorders showed normal parameters for vestibular testing but pathological values for psychometric measures. There was no correlation between pathological neurological and pathological psychometric parameters. Conclusions High anxiety scores are not a result of vestibular deficits or dysfunction. Patients with Menière's disease and vestibular migraine but not vestibular deficits showed the highest psychiatric comorbidity. Thus the course of vertigo syndromes and the possibility of a pre‐existing psychopathological personality should be considered pathogenic

  11. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  12. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  13. Prosthetic implantation of the human vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Justin S.; Ling, Leo; Nie, Kaibao; Nowack, Amy; Shepherd, Sarah J.; Bierer, Steven M.; Jameyson, Elyse; Kaneko, Chris R. S.; Phillips, James O.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis A functional vestibular prosthesis can be implanted in human such that electrical stimulation of each semicircular canal produces canal-specific eye movements while preserving vestibular and auditory function. Background A number of vestibular disorders could be treated with prosthetic stimulation of the vestibular end organs. We have previously demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that a vestibular neurostimulator, based on the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant, can produce canal-specific electrically evoked eye movements while preserving auditory and vestibular function. An investigational device exemption has been obtained from the FDA to study the feasibility of treating uncontrolled Ménière’s disease with the device. Methods The UW/Nucleus vestibular implant was implanted in the perilymphatic space adjacent to the three semicircular canal ampullae of a human subject with uncontrolled Ménière’s disease. Pre and postoperative vestibular and auditory function were assessed. Electrically evoked eye movements were measured at two time points postoperatively. Results Implantation of all semicircular canals was technically feasible. Horizontal canal and auditory function were largely, but not totally, lost. Electrode stimulation in two of three canals resulted in canal-appropriate eye movements. Over time, stimulation thresholds increased. Conclusions Prosthetic implantation of the semicircular canals in humans is technically feasible. Electrical stimulation resulted in canal-specific eye movements, although thresholds increased over time. Preservation of native auditory and vestibular function, previously observed in animals, was not demonstrated in a single subject with advanced Ménière’s disease. PMID:24317220

  14. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  15. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Darlington, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalization and derealization symptoms such as feeling “spaced out”, “body feeling strange” and “not feeling in control of self”. We propose in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). PMID:24194706

  16. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  17. Vestibular loss disrupts daily rhythm in rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, T; Mauvieux, B; Bulla, J; Quarck, G; Davenne, D; Denise, P; Philoxène, B; Besnard, S

    2015-02-01

    Hypergravity disrupts the circadian regulation of temperature (Temp) and locomotor activity (Act) mediated through the vestibular otolithic system in mice. In contrast, we do not know whether the anatomical structures associated with vestibular input are crucial for circadian rhythm regulation at 1 G on Earth. In the present study we observed the effects of bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) on the daily rhythms of Temp and Act in semipigmented rats. Our model of vestibular lesion allowed for selective peripheral hair cell degeneration without any other damage. Rats with BVL exhibited a disruption in their daily rhythms (Temp and Act), which were replaced by a main ultradian period (τ <20 h) for 115.8 ± 68.6 h after vestibular lesion compared with rats in the control group. Daily rhythms of Temp and Act in rats with BVL recovered within 1 wk, probably counterbalanced by photic and other nonphotic time cues. No correlation was found between Temp and Act daily rhythms after vestibular lesion in rats with BVL, suggesting a direct influence of vestibular input on the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Our findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system has an influence on daily rhythm homeostasis in semipigmented rats on Earth, and raise the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Vestibular insights into cognition and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gurvich, Caroline; Maller, Jerome J; Lithgow, Brian; Haghgooie, Saman; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2013-11-06

    The vestibular system has traditionally been thought of as a balance apparatus; however, accumulating research suggests an association between vestibular function and psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, even when balance is measurably unaffected. There are several brain regions that are implicated in both vestibular pathways and psychiatric disorders. The present review examines the anatomical associations between the vestibular system and various psychiatric disorders. Despite the lack of direct evidence for vestibular pathology in the key psychiatric disorders selected for this review, there is a substantial body of literature implicating the vestibular system in each of the selected psychiatric disorders. The second part of this review provides complimentary evidence showing the link between vestibular dysfunction and vestibular stimulation upon cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. In summary, emerging research suggests the vestibular system can be considered a potential window for exploring brain function beyond that of maintenance of balance, and into areas of cognitive, affective and psychiatric symptomology. Given the paucity of biological and diagnostic markers in psychiatry, novel avenues to explore brain function in psychiatric disorders are of particular interest and warrant further exploration.

  19. Improvement of a face perception deficit via subsensory galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Ko, Philip; Kilduff, Patrick; McGlinchey, Regina; Milberg, William

    2005-11-01

    The remediative effect of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was investigated in a patient who, following right hemisphere damage, is profoundly unable to recognize faces. We administered a two-alternative forced choice match-to-sample task in which the patient had to choose which of two faces matched a sample face presented directly above, while bipolar, transcutaneous current was applied to the left and right vestibular nerves at a level below the patient's sensory threshold. Performance improved beyond the chance-level observed prestimulation, and relied on reversing the electrode polarity across two separate blocks of trials, such that each mastoid received positive current for one block and then negative charge for the next. Although our study involved only a single case, the data provide preliminary evidence that a deficit in perceptual face matching can be reduced by GVS. This raises the intriguing possibility that other unilateral visual disorders may also respond in such a manner.

  20. Effects of Chlorpheniramine and L-histidine on vestibular compensation in goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Piratello, Aline Cristina; Mattioli, Rosana

    2004-09-02

    Histamine is thought to be involved in the recovery of vestibular function after damage to the vestibular receptors of the inner ear. This study evaluated the effects of post-operative treatment using Chlorpheniramine (H1 histamine antagonist) and L-histidine, (a histaminergic precursor), after hemilabyrinthectomy in goldfish. In this lesion model, the unilateral removal of the labyrinth induces a transient postural imbalance in response to light. After the lesion, the animals were injected intraperitoneally, during 12 consecutive days, with Chlorpheniramine, L-histidine and saline. All the substances were administered in a volume of 1 ml/kg body weight. Another group, which served as a non-lesion control, did not receive hemilabyrinthectomy or systemic injections. Chlorpheniramine accelerated the functional recovery when compared with that of the saline group. These data suggest that the inhibition of the histaminergic system facilitates the functional recovery in goldfish.

  1. Labyrinthectomy changes T-type calcium channels in vestibular neurones of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Ris, Laurence; Capron, Brigitte; Nonclercq, Denis; Alexandre, Henri; Sindic, Christian; Toubeau, Gérard; Godaux, Emile

    2003-08-26

    In the vestibular nuclei of the awake guinea pig, all neurones are spontaneously active. After unilateral labyrinthectomy, this activity virtually disappears on the ipsilateral side, but is completely restored one week later. In a recent study, we observed that the restoration of spontaneous activity was correlated with an increase in pacemaker activity. In the current study, we found that the ratio of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurones endowed with one of the currents known to play a role in pacemaker activity (i.e. low-threshold calcium current; LTCC) increased from 29% in control guinea pigs to 65% in animals labyrinthectomised on the ipsilateral side one week earlier. Yet this change was not correlated with a modification of the ratio of neurones expressing any of the three related protein-channels (alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I).

  2. Neural substrates underlying vestibular compensation: contribution of peripheral versus central processing.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Minor, Lloyd B; Beraneck, Mathieu; Sadeghi, Soroush G

    2009-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which functions to stabilize gaze and ensure clear vision during everyday activities, shows impressive adaptation in response to environmental requirements. In particular, the VOR exhibits remarkable recovery following the loss of unilateral labyrinthine input as a result of injury or disease. The relative simplicity of the pathways that mediate the VOR, make it an excellent model system for understanding the changes (learning) that occur in the brain following peripheral vestibular loss to yield adaptive changes. This mini review considers the findings of behavioral, single unit recording and lesion studies of VOR compensation. Recent experiments have provided evidence that the brain makes use of multiple plasticity mechanisms (i.e., changes in peripheral as well as central processing) during the course of vestibular compensation to accomplish the sensory-motor transformations required to accurately guide behavior.

  3. [The diagnostic value of vertical nystagmus in the simultaneous bilateral calibrated caloric vestibular test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toupet, M; Pialoux, P

    1981-01-01

    Vertical nystagmus provoked by simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation has been known since 1907 (Bàràny). However, if a controlled and calibrated injection os water at 44 degrees C or 30 degrees C for 30 seconds at a flow rate of 250 ml/minute is given in normal subjects, this stimulus is insufficient to provoke a response, whilst in subjects with a central vestibular disorder there appear upward vertical movements with hot stimulation and downward movements with cold stimulation. The degree of this response is proportional to the degree of horizontal nystagmic responses to classical unilateral caloric tests. The authors feel that vertical nystagmic responses to simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation reflect a loss of control of the vestibular reflex activity of the superior semicircular canals.

  4. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    PubMed

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  5. Unilateral Poliosis of Eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Vainstein, Gabriel; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with significant, asymptomatic, unilateral eyelash poliosis, not associated with any ophthalmic or systemic conditions. He reported that this started about 40 years ago with a few lashes in the central portion of his eyelid and that adjacent eyelashes subsequently became involved over the next 4 to 5 days. He had normal ophthalmologic and neurologic examinations with no other relevant medical history reported. The case might be an unusual presentation of a halo nevus. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case reported regarding the eyelashes. The case and relevant literature are presented.

  6. Vestibular neuronitis in pilots: follow-up results and implications for flight safety.

    PubMed

    Shupak, Avi; Nachum, Zohar; Stern, Yoram; Tal, Dror; Gil, Amnon; Gordon, Carlos R

    2003-02-01

    OBJECTIVES To report our experience over the past 12 years with the evaluation and follow-up of pilots with vestibular neuronitis and to discuss points relevant to flight safety and the resumption of flying duties. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective, consecutive case series.METHODS Eighteen military pilots with vestibular neuronitis were examined and followed up. A complete otoneurological workup was performed, including both physical examination and laboratory evaluation. The latter included electro-oculography (EOG) and a rotatory chair test using the smooth harmonic acceleration protocol. RESULTS The mean patient age was 35 +/- 6 years (range, 23 to 42 y), and the average follow-up period was 20.5 +/- 12.8 months (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]; (range, 11 to 48 mo). Electro-oculography caloric test on presentation documented significant unilateral hypofunction in all patients. Thirteen of the 18 patients (72%) had abnormal smooth harmonic acceleration test results. None of the pilots reported any symptoms on follow-up. However, five (28%) had positive otoneurological examination findings, and eight (44%) still had significant caloric lateralization (>25%). The average caloric hypofunction was reduced from 67.8% +/- 29.3% at onset to 40% +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, <.05, paired test). Seven of the patients (39%) had additional electro-oculography findings beyond caloric hypofunction. These included spontaneous, positional, and positioning nystagmus. Smooth harmonic acceleration disease on follow-up was documented in eight patients (44%), five of whom had canal paresis. Eleven patients (61%) demonstrated residual vestibular damage on follow-up. In 6 of these 11 cases (55%), the laboratory evaluation revealed vestibular deficits otherwise undiagnosed by the bedside test battery. CONCLUSIONS The vestibular system plays a central role in orientation awareness and is often challenged by flying conditions. The finding that approximately 60% of pilots who have had vestibular

  7. Effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and stimulation on hearing in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post-implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/s, with pulse frequency modulated from 48 to 222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5-10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ∼5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2-14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  8. Changing perspective: The role of vestibular signals.

    PubMed

    Deroualle, Diane; Borel, Liliane; Devèze, Arnaud; Lopez, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Social interactions depend on mechanisms such as the ability to take another person's viewpoint, i.e. visuo-spatial perspective taking. However, little is known about the sensorimotor mechanisms underpinning perspective taking. Because vestibular signals play roles in mental rotation and spatial cognition tasks and because damage to the vestibular cortex can disturb egocentric perspective, vestibular signals stand as important candidates for the sensorimotor foundations of perspective taking. Yet, no study merged natural full-body vestibular stimulations and explicit visuo-spatial perspective taking tasks in virtual environments. In Experiment 1, we combined natural vestibular stimulation on a rotatory chair with virtual reality to test how vestibular signals are processed to simulate the viewpoint of a distant avatar. While they were rotated, participants tossed a ball to a virtual character from the viewpoint of a distant avatar. Our results showed that vestibular signals influence perspective taking in a direction-specific way: participants were faster when their physical body rotated in the same direction as the mental rotation needed to take the avatar's viewpoint. In Experiment 2, participants realized 3D object mental rotations, which did not involve perspective taking, during the same whole-body vestibular stimulation. Our results demonstrated that vestibular stimulation did not affect 3D object mental rotations. Altogether, these data indicate that vestibular signals have a direction-specific influence on visuo-spatial perspective taking (self-centered mental imagery), but not a general effect on mental imagery. Findings from this study suggest that vestibular signals contribute to one of the most crucial mechanisms of social cognition: understanding others' actions.

  9. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN), and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles. PMID:28824449

  10. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  11. Effects of vestibular nerve transection on the calcium incorporation of fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Edelmann, E; Rahmann, H

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths (otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was transacted unilaterally in neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transacted head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated. Grant numbers: 50 WB 9533, 50 WB 9997. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fish inner ear otoliths stop calcium incorporation after vestibular nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Anken, R H; Edelmann, E; Rahmann, H

    2000-09-11

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths (otolith size and calcium incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In a search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was unilaterally transected in neonatal swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation and thus otolith growth ceased on the operated head sides, indicating that the brain is significantly involved in regulating otolith growth.

  13. Temporoparietal encoding of space and time during vestibular-guided orientation

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, Diego; Quadir, Shamim; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Malhotra, Paresh A.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2016-01-01

    When we walk in our environment, we readily determine our travelled distance and location using visual cues. In the dark, estimating travelled distance uses a combination of somatosensory and vestibular (i.e. inertial) cues. The observed inability of patients with complete peripheral vestibular failure to update their angular travelled distance during active or passive turns in the dark implies a privileged role for vestibular cues during human angular orientation. As vestibular signals only provide inertial cues of self-motion (e.g. velocity, °/s), the brain must convert motion information to distance information (a process called ‘path integration’) to maintain our spatial orientation during self-motion in the dark. It is unknown, however, what brain areas are involved in converting vestibular-motion signals to those that enable such vestibular-spatial orientation. Hence, using voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping techniques, we explored the effect of acute right hemisphere lesions in 18 patients on perceived angular position, velocity and motion duration during whole-body angular rotations in the dark. First, compared to healthy controls’ spatial orientation performance, we found that of the 18 acute stroke patients tested, only the four patients with damage to the temporoparietal junction showed impaired spatial orientation performance for leftward (contralesional) compared to rightward (ipsilesional) rotations. Second, only patients with temporoparietal junction damage showed a congruent underestimation in both their travelled distance (perceived as shorter) and motion duration (perceived as briefer) for leftward compared to rightward rotations. All 18 lesion patients tested showed normal self-motion perception. These data suggest that the cerebral cortical regions mediating vestibular-motion (‘am I moving?’) and vestibular-spatial perception (‘where am I?’) are distinct. Furthermore, the congruent contralesional deficit in time (motion duration

  14. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  15. Vestibular rehabilitation of older adults with dizziness.

    PubMed

    Alrwaily, Muhammad; Whitney, Susan L

    2011-04-01

    The role of rehabilitation for treatment of older adults with dizziness and balance disorders is reviewed. Theories related to functional recovery from peripheral and central vestibular disorders are presented. Suggestions on which older adults might benefit from vestibular rehabilitation therapy are presented. Promising innovative rehabilitation strategies and technologies that might enhance recovery of the older adult with balance dysfunction are discussed.

  16. Effects of Sound on the Vestibular System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    differs significantly for the two types of vestibular receptors . Displacement of the statolith mass stimulates the sensory hair cells of the utricle... receptors and directly affects central nervous system nuclei. Visual, olfactory, and gustatory responses would be expected if sound directly affected the...are responses that result from activation of vestibular system receptors . PURPOSE We are interested in describing the biomechanical and physiological

  17. Vestibular Function and Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Harun, Aisha; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vestibular dysfunction increases with age and is associated with mobility difficulties and fall risk in older individuals. We evaluated whether vestibular function influences the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Method: We analyzed the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged older than 40 years (N = 5,017). Vestibular function was assessed with the Modified Romberg test. We evaluated the association between vestibular function and difficulty level in performing specific basic and instrumental ADLs, and total number of ADL impairments. Results: Vestibular dysfunction was associated with significantly higher odds of difficulty with nine ADLs, most strongly with difficulty managing finances (odds ratio [OR] = 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.18, 5.90]). In addition, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a significantly greater number of ADL impairments (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.09, 0.33]). This effect size was comparable with the influence of heavy smoking (β = .21, 95% CI = [0.06, 0.36]) and hypertension (β = .10, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.18]) on the number of ADL impairments. Conclusion: Vestibular dysfunction significantly influences ADL difficulty, most strongly with a cognitive rather than mobility-based task. These findings underscore the importance of vestibular inputs for both cognitive and physical daily activities. PMID:26753170

  18. Short-term retention effect of rehabilitation using head position-based electrotactile feedback to the tongue: influence of vestibular loss and old-age.

    PubMed

    Ghulyan-Bedikian, Vénéra; Paolino, Michel; Paolino, Fabien

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether the severity of vestibular loss and old-age (>65) affect a patient's ability to benefit from training using head-position based, tongue-placed electrotactile feedback. Seventy-one chronic dizzy patients, who had reached a plateau with their conventional rehabilitation, followed six 1-h training sessions during 4 consecutive days (once on days 1 and 4, twice on days 2 and 3). They presented bilateral vestibular areflexia (BVA), bilateral vestibular losses (BVL), unilateral vestibular areflexia or unilateral vestibular losses and were divided into two age-subgroups (≤65 and >65). Posturographic assessments were performed without the device, 4h before and after the training. Patients were tested with eyes opened and eyes closed (EC) on static and dynamic (passively tilting) platforms. The studied posturographic scores improved significantly, especially under test conditions restricting either visual or somatosensory input. This 4-h retention effect was greater in older compared to younger patients and was proportional to the degree of vestibular loss, patients with increased vestibular losses showing greater improvements. In bilateral patients, who constantly fell under dynamic-EC condition at the baseline, the therapy effect was expressed by disappearance of falls in BVL and significant prolongation in time-to-fall in BVA subgroups. Globally, our data showed that short training with head-position based, tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback improves balance in chronic vestibulopathic patients some 16.74% beyond that achieved with standard balance physiotherapy. Further studies with longer use of this biofeedback are needed to investigate whether this approach could have long-lasting retention effect on balance and quality of life.

  19. [The phenomenon of the fixation suppression of caloric nystagmus in the diagnosis of vestibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Levashov, M M; Lilenko, S V; Samoĭlova, I G

    1998-01-01

    Fixation nystagmus suppression in caloric tests was used in examination of 56 patients suffering from chronic remittent labyrinthopathy, acute labyrinthopathy, vestibular neuronitis, otosclerosis, adhesive otitis media, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, motor disease, chronic remittent vestibulopathy and neurinoma of the VIII nerve. The bithermal test (BT) with electronystagmography was made to calculate the fixation suppression index (FSI). Complete suppression of the caloric nystagmus in at least one BT test appeared to be the most frequent variant of the response (24 cases). This was not dependent on the severity of the vestibular analyzer lesion. In 3 cases FSI of the caloric nystagmus was rather high (> 0.50). Introduction of the period of glance fixation in performance of all the 4 BT tests may serve an additional method in differential diagnosis of the vestibular disorders. The fixation test results should be compared to findings obtained in the other vestibulometric tests.

  20. Vestibular Function and Depersonalization/Derealization Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui Renaud, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    Patients with an acquired sensory dysfunction may experience symptoms of detachment from self or from the environment, which are related primarily to nonspecific symptoms of common mental disorders and secondarily, to the specific sensory dysfunction. This is consistent with the proposal that sensory dysfunction could provoke distress and a discrepancy between the multi-sensory frame given by experience and the actual perception. Both vestibular stimuli and vestibular dysfunction can underlie unreal experiences. Vestibular afferents provide a frame of reference (linear and angular head acceleration) within which spatial information from other senses is interpreted. This paper reviews evidence that symptoms of depersonalization/derealization associated with vestibular dysfunction are a consequence of a sensory mismatch between disordered vestibular input and other sensory signals of orientation.

  1. Effects of Unilateral Cochlear Implantation on Balance Control and Sensory Organization in Adult Patients with Profound Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Montaut-Verient, Bettina; Grosjean, Rémy; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2015-01-01

    Many studies were interested in the consequence of vestibular dysfunction related to cochlear implantation on balance control. This pilot study aimed to assess the effects of unilateral cochlear implantation on the modalities of balance control and sensorimotor strategies. Posturographic and vestibular evaluations were performed in 10 patients (55 ± 20 years) with profound hearing loss who were candidates to undergo unilateral multichannel cochlear implantation. The evaluation was carried out shortly before and one year after surgery. Posturographic tests were also performed in 10 age-matched healthy participants (63 ± 16 years). Vestibular compensation was observed within one year. In addition, postural performances of the patients increased within one year after cochlear implantation, especially in the more complex situations, in which sensory information is either unavailable or conflicting. Before surgery, postural performances were higher in the control group compared to the patients' group. One year after cochlear implantation, postural control was close to normalize. The improvement of postural performance could be explained by a mechanism of vestibular compensation. In addition, the recovery of auditory information which is the consequence of cochlear implantation could lead to an extended exploration of the environment possibly favoring the development of new balance strategies.

  2. [The significance of directional preponderance in the evaluation of vestibular function in patients with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhou, Y J; Yu, J; Gu, J

    2017-03-07

    Objective: To analyze the relationship between directional preponderance (DP), spontaneous nystagmus(SN) and vestibular disorders, and to investigate the significance of DP in directing peripheral vestibular function in patients with vertigo. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 394 cases diagnosed with peripheral vestibular disease accompanied by vertigo from March 2012 to June 2014 in the Outpatient Department of the Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University. Results of static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests, SN, unilateral weakness(UW), and DP in videonystagmography(VNG) were analyzed and compared. Results: The mean interval time between the last vertigo attack and examination in patients with SN or DP in caloric test were 4.4 d and 7.3 d respectively, and those without SN or DP were 18.3 d and 17.5 d respectively. The patients were divided into two groups according to DP results of caloric test. DP-normal group had 203 cases and DP-abnormal group had 191 cases. Spontaneous nystagmus was presented in 44 cases in the DP-normal group (21.67%) and four in the DP-abnormal group (2.09%). A significant difference was found between the two groups (χ(2)=35.27, P=0.000). Deficiency of vestibular function was noted in 165 cases in the DP-normal group (81.28%) and 123 (64.40%) in the DP-abnormal group in static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (χ(2)=14.26, P=0.000). Conclusion: Compared with DP-normal patients, DP-abnormal patients are more likely to have spontaneous nystagmus and balance disorders due to vestibular dysfunction.

  3. Interactive wiimote gaze stabilization exercise training system for patients with vestibular hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral vestibular hypofunction is a major cause of dizziness. When complicated with postural imbalance, this condition can lead to an increased incidence of falls. In traditional clinical practice, gaze stabilization exercise is commonly used to rehabilitate patients. In this study, we established a computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation system by coupling infrared LEDs to an infrared receiver. This system enabled the subjects’ head-turning actions to be quantified, and the training was performed using vestibular exercise combined with computer games and interactive video games that simulate daily life activities. Methods Three unilateral and one bilateral vestibular hypofunction patients volunteered to participate in this study. The participants received 30 minutes of computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation training 2 days per week for 6 weeks. Pre-training and post-training assessments were completed, and a follow-up assessment was completed 1 month after the end of the training period. Results After 6 weeks of training, significant improvements in balance and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were observed in the four participants. Self-reports of dizziness, anxiety and depressed mood all decreased significantly. Significant improvements in self-confidence and physical performance were also observed. The effectiveness of this training was maintained for at least 1 month after the end of the training period. Conclusion Real-time monitoring of training performance can be achieved using this rehabilitation platform. Patients demonstrated a reduction in dizziness symptoms after 6 weeks of training with this short-term interactive game approach. This treatment paradigm also improved the patients’ balance function. This system could provide a convenient, safe and affordable treatment option for clinical practitioners. PMID:23043886

  4. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, D; Paudel, N; Adhikari, P; Gnyawali, S; Joshi, S N

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare case of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and to present the clinical features, and findings of multifocal ERG and visual field of this case. A 70-year-old-female diagnosed as Retinitis Pigmentosa in right eye 7 years back, presented with further gradual painless diminution of vision in the very eye and without any similar symptoms in left eye. On examination, the findings (including multifocal ERG and visual field) suggested the features of retinitis pigmentosa in her right eye, while the other eye being unaffected. In this rare case, the distinct features of retinitis pigmentosa are seen only in one eye, and this can be further confirmed from multifocal ERG and visual field. © NEPjOPH.

  6. Bedside Assessment of Acute Dizziness and Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Welgampola, Miriam S; Bradshaw, Andrew Phillip; Lechner, Corinna; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael

    2015-08-01

    Dizziness is a common symptom in emergency departments, general practice, and outpatient clinics. Faced with an acutely dizzy patient, the frontline physician must determine whether or not the symptoms are vestibular in origin and, if they are, which vestibular disorder they best fit. A focused history provides useful clues to the likely cause of dizziness, yet it is the clinical examination that yields the final answer. This article summarizes history and examination techniques that are useful in the assessment of acutely dizzy patients and discusses oculomotor signs that accompany common vestibular disorders.

  7. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Cibele; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Greters, Mário Edvin; Basta, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard™ biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS) of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG), which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard™ for ten days, and a control group (CG), which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), were used. After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p=0.007) and C6 (p=0.01). On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p=0.04). The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p=0.04). The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard™ system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of the Clinical Utility of Cervical and Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Testing in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Piker, Erin G; Baloh, Robert W; Witsell, David L; Garrison, Doug B; Lee, Walter T

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether patient age or sex was predictive of a bilaterally absent cervical or ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP or oVEMP). Retrospective case review. Tertiary center. Patients presenting with normal vestibular tests (i.e. normal caloric and rotational chair) who underwent cVEMP and/or oVEMP testing. Patients with conductive hearing loss were excluded as were those with unilaterally abnormal VEMP results because they presented with evidence of a possible unilateral vestibular impairment. A total of 895 patients met criteria for cVEMPs and 297 for oVEMPs. The presence or absence of cVEMP and oVEMP responses elicited with a 500-Hz 125-dB pSPL air conduction stimulus. A logistic regression was performed including odd ratios and confidence intervals. Compared with adults in their 20s, the odds of bilaterally absent cVEMP responses are 6 times greater for patients in their 50s and 60s and over 22 times greater for patients in their 70s and 80s. A bilaterally absent oVEMP response is 6 times more likely for patients in their 40s, 50s, and 60 and 13 times greater for patients in their 70s. VEMPs in response to air conduction stimuli are bilaterally absent in a large percentage of older patients complaining of dizziness who otherwise have normal vestibular and auditory testing for their age. In combination with other abnormal vestibular findings, an absence of VEMP responses may be of value. However, the functional consequence of an isolated bilaterally absent VEMP is not known and may provide minimal information to an older patient's diagnostic picture. In cases where the response is bilaterally absent, a more intense AC stimulus should be used or bone conducted vibration should be considered.

  9. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with vestibular schwannoma using video head-impulses and vestibular-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachael L; Kong, Jonathan; Flanagan, Sean; Pogson, Jacob; Croxson, Glen; Pohl, David; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to investigate the utility of new non-invasive tests of semicircular-canal and otolith function that are usable in the neuro-otology office practice in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Fifty patients with vestibular schwannoma were assessed using a 5-item battery consisting of air-conducted cervical- and bone conducted ocular-vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (AC cVEMPs and BC oVEMPs) and video head impulse testing (vHIT) in all three canal planes. VEMP asymmetry ratios, latencies, and vHIT gains were used to determine the test sensitivity, relationship with tumour size and the pattern of vestibular nerve involvement. The percentage of abnormalities for each of the five tests for the entire sample ranged between 36.2-61.7%. In 58.3 % of patients, test abnormalities were referable to both superior and inferior vestibular nerve divisions. Selective inferior nerve dysfunction was identified in 10.4% and superior nerve dysfunction in 12.5%. The remaining 18.8% of patients demonstrated a normal test profile. The sensitivity of the 5-item battery increased with tumour size and all patients with medium to large (>14 mm) schwannoma had at least two abnormal vestibular test result. Our results indicate that dysfunction of the superior and inferior vestibular nerve evolves in parallel for most patients with schwannoma. Unexplained vHIT and VEMP asymmetry should alert otologists and neurologists to undertake imaging in patients presenting with non-specific disequilibrium or vertigo.

  10. Subtotal petrosectomy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in unilateral anacusis.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Re, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis.

  11. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  12. Clinical significance of unilateral sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In general, the etiologic factors of chronic paranasal sinusitis are systemic conditions such as nutrition, predisposition, allergy, and local factors such as nasal anatomic conditions. Among these factors, the development of unilateral sinusitis is a model case verifying the influence of local factors. In my study of 640 cases over a certain period of time, a comparison was made between 161 cases of unilateral sinusitis and 479 cases of bilateral sinusitis in order to verify the effects of local factors in the development of this disease. Patients with a history of previous sinus surgery or tumors were eliminated from the cases. 1. The male-female incidence rate, and the age distribution of the patients at the initial visit showed no prominent differences between unilateral and bilateral cases. 2. It was found that a larger number of cases of unilateral sinusitis had a duration of less than one year as compared to bilateral sinusitis which were longer than and year. Therefore it can be said that the duration of unilateral sinusitis is usually shorter than that of bilateral sinusitis. 3. In unilateral cases the patients with moderate to severe nasal septal deviation, one number of patients with septal deviation towards the diseased side was twice as high as that on the non-affected side. 4. The incidence rate of polyps occurring in the middle meatus was shown to be about twice as high in bilateral cases as in unilateral cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2856589

  13. Conservative management of vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    González-Orús Álvarez-Morujo, Ricardo José; Alvarez-Palacios, Itziar; Martin-Oviedo, Carlos; Scola-Yurrita, Bartolomé; Arístegui-Ruiz, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is a benign, slow-growing tumour originating in the 8th cranial nerve. The treatment includes microsurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy and conservative management of tumours with periodic radiological tests. This was a retrospective study of patients with VS following conservative management in a tertiary hospital between 1993 and 2013. A total of 73 patients were enrolled in our protocol. The mean age at diagnosis was 59.7 years. The average size was 11.9mm (4-27mm); 58.9% of the tumours were intracanalicular and 41.1%, extracanalicular. The mean follow-up period was 35.75 months. In 87.7% of patients there was no evidence of tumour growth. A total of 9 tumours (12.3%) increased in size. The average growth rate was 0.62mm/year. The percentage of extracanalicular tumours that grew (20%) was higher than that of intracanalicular tumours (7%). Seven patients (9.5%) experienced significant changes in their symptoms and 6 of these (8.2%) experienced a loss of useful hearing. Six patients (8.2%) left follow-up and underwent surgery. Periodic monitoring of vestibular schwannomas with magnetic resonance imaging represents an option for management, because most small tumours experience little or no growth over time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  14. The anatomy of the vestibular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Highstein, Stephen M; Holstein, Gay R

    2006-01-01

    The vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve informs the brain about the linear and angular movements of the head in space and the position of the head with respect to gravity. The termination sites of these eighth nerve afferents define the territory of the vestibular nuclei in the brainstem. (There is also a subset of afferents that project directly to the cerebellum.) This chapter reviews the anatomical organization of the vestibular nuclei, and the anatomy of the pathways from the nuclei to various target areas in the brain. The cytoarchitectonics of the vestibular brainstem are discussed, since these features have been used to distinguish the individual nuclei. The neurochemical phenotype of vestibular neurons and pathways are also summarized because the chemical anatomy of the system contributes to its signal-processing capabilities. Similarly, the morphologic features of short-axon local circuit neurons and long-axon cells with extrinsic projections are described in detail, since these structural attributes of the neurons are critical to their functional potential. Finally, the composition and hodology of the afferent and efferent pathways of the vestibular nuclei are discussed. In sum, this chapter reviews the morphology, chemoanatomy, connectivity, and synaptology of the vestibular nuclei.

  15. Genetic disorders of the vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Eppsteiner, Robert W.; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights the current body of literature related to the genetics of inherited vestibular disorders and provides a framework for the characterization of these disorders. We emphasize peripheral causes of vestibular dysfunction and highlight recent advances in the field, point out gaps in understanding, and focus on key areas for future investigation. Recent findings The discovery of a modifier gene that leads to a more severe Usher syndrome phenotype calls into question the assumption that Usher syndrome is universally a monogenic disorder. Despite the use of several investigational approaches, the genetic basis of Menière’s disease remains poorly understood. Evidence for a vestibular phenotype associated with DFNB1 suggests that mutations in other genes causally related to nonsyndromic hearing loss also may have an unrecognized vestibular phenotype. Summary Our understanding of the genetic basis for vestibular disorders is superficial. Significant challenges include defining the genetics of inherited isolated vestibular dysfunction and understanding the pathological basis of Menière’s disease. However, improved characterization of inherited vestibular dysfunction, coupled with advanced genetic techniques such as targeted genome capture and massively parallel sequencing, provides an opportunity to investigate these diseases at the genetic level. PMID:21825995

  16. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  17. Recovery from unilateral labyrinthectomy in rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Fetter, M; Zee, D S

    1988-02-01

    1. We recorded eye movements in six rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral labyrinthectomy and quantified the compensation for both the static and the dynamic disturbances of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR). 2. When first recorded after labyrinthectomy (18-20 h postlesion), all animals had a spontaneous nystagmus with mean slow-phase velocities ranging from 24 to 54 degrees/s measured in darkness and 0-4 degrees/s measured in the light. The level of nystagmus diminished quickly, and by postoperative day 25 mean values ranged from 4 to 22 degrees/s, measured in darkness. The waveform of individual slow phases was variable, but in the first postoperative week its trajectory usually showed an increasing, or an increasing then decreasing, velocity. This finding indicates that peripheral vestibular lesions can alter the function of the ocular motor eye-position integrator. 3. The VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity, corrected for spontaneous nystagmus) during rotations (30-300 degrees/s) in the dark was diminished from nearly 1.0 preoperatively to approximately 0.5 when first measured after labyrinthectomy, except for rotations toward the lesioned side at high speeds for which the gain was even lower. Within the first few postoperative days, for rotations toward the intact side, the VOR gain increased rapidly, to approximately 0.8. For rotations toward the lesioned side similar behavior was noted for stimuli of 30-60 degrees/s, but at higher velocities compensation proceeded more slowly. By 3 mo postoperatively gains had reached values ranging from 0.77 to 1.03 for rotations toward the intact side and from 0.61 to 0.98 for rotations toward the lesioned side. Values were higher for lower-velocity stimuli. 4. Caloric testing with ice water in the unoperated ear elicited nystagmus with a mean value of maximum slow-phase velocity of 129 degrees/s preoperatively and 195 degrees/s 3 mo postoperatively. There was no caloric response on the lesioned side. From the

  18. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  19. Progress toward development of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis for treatment of bilateral vestibular deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation-inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  20. Unilateral opercular infarction presenting with Foix-Chavany-Marie Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Ryo; Iwata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with a history of pontine, cerebellar infaction suddenly became speechless during the procedure of percutaneous coronary intervention. On examination, he was unable to close his mouth voluntarily, but spontaneous closing was preserved when smiling. He had anarthria and hypophonia, although his comprehension was preserved. He also had a severe dysphagia. Radiological studies revealed an acute stroke in the left anterior operculum, indicating Foix-Chavany-Marie Syndrome (FCMS) caused by a unilateral opercular lesion. Pathophysiology of the previous cases reported as unilateral FCMS remains controversial, but in our case, it could be delineated by the combination of the new lesion in the unilateral operculum and the old one in the contralateral pons. Since FCMS is not only related to biopercular lesions, we should consider thorough radiologic examination to clarify its anatomic basis.

  1. Unilateral facial paralysis after treatment of secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Emily M; Galadari, Hassan I; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2008-06-01

    Bell's palsy is an acute facial paralysis of unknown etiology. Infections including syphilis have been implicated as causes for peripheral facial paresis. The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction is an acute worsening of skin manifestations and systemic symptoms occurring after administration of antimicrobial therapy for spirochetal infections. Although rare, neurological signs can present as part of the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction. The authors report a case of Bell's palsy experienced by a patient shortly after treatment with penicillin for secondary syphilis and propose that this acute unilateral peripheral facial paralysis was a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in response to therapy.

  2. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  3. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  4. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  5. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  6. Effects of bilateral vestibular deafferentation in rat on hippocampal theta response to somatosensory stimulation, acetylcholine release, and cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Phillip; Zheng, Yiwen; Smith, Paul F

    2017-03-27

    Vestibular dysfunction has been shown to cause spatial memory impairment. Neurophysiological studies indicate that bilateral vestibular loss (BVL), in particular, is associated with an impairment of the response of hippocampal place cells and theta rhythm. However, the specific neural pathways through which vestibular information reaches the hippocampus are yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the hypothesised 'theta-generating pathway' from the brainstem vestibular nucleus to the hippocampus. BVL, and in some cases, unilateral vestibular loss (UVL), induced by intratympanic sodium arsanilate injections in rats, were used to investigate the effects of vestibular loss on somatosensory-induced type 2 theta rhythm, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the hippocampus, and the number of cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), an important part of the theta-generating pathway. Under urethane anaesthesia, BVL was found to cause a significant increase in the maximum power of the type 2 theta (3-6 Hz) frequency band compared to UVL and sham animals. Rats with BVL generally exhibited a lower basal level of ACh release than sham rats; however, this difference was not statistically significant. The PPTg of BVL rats exhibited significantly more choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons than that of sham animals, as did the contralateral PPTg of UVL animals; however, the number of ChAT-positive neurons on the ipsilateral side of UVL animals was not significantly different from sham animals. The results of these studies indicate that parts of the theta-generating pathway undergo a significant reorganisation following vestibular loss, which suggests that this pathway is important for the interaction between the vestibular system and the hippocampus.

  7. Altered Contralateral Auditory Cortical Morphology in Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xueyan; Mella, Grace; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong; Xu, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the cerebral gray matter volume alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period by the voxel-based morphometry method, and to determine if hearing impairment is associated with regional gray matter alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Prospective case study. Tertiary class A teaching hospital. Thirty-nine patients with left-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and 47 patients with right-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Diagnostic. To compare the regional gray matter of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and healthy control participants. Compared with control groups, patients with left side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss had significant gray matter reductions in the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus, whereas patients with right side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss showed gray matter decreases in the left superior temporal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus. A significant negative correlation with the duration of the sudden sensorineural hearing loss (R = -0.427, p = 0.012 for left-side unilateral SSNHL and R = -0.412, p = 0.013 for right-side unilateral SSNHL) was also found in these brain areas. There was no region with increased gray matter found in both groups of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. This study confirms that detectable decreased contralateral auditory cortical morphological changes have occurred in unilateral SSNHL patients within the acute period by voxel-based morphometry methods. The gray matter volumes of these brain areas also perform a negative correlation with the duration of the disease, which suggests a gradual brain structural impairment after the progression of the disease.

  8. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  9. [Skull vibratory test in partial vestibular lesions--influence of the stimulus frequency on the nystagmus direction].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; Perrin, P; Morel, N; N'Guyen, D Q; Schmerber, S

    2005-01-01

    Results of the skull vibratory test (SVT) in partial unilateral vestibular peripheral lesions (PUVL) are different from the results in total vestibular lesions (TUVL). To reveal a correlation between the results of the analysis of the skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) horizontal component and the side of the lesion; to correlate these results with the stimulus frequency. To find out a predictive correlation between the SVN horizontal and vertical components and the topography of a vestibular lesion. To appreciate the degree of vestibular deafferentation (extended to high frequencies) provoked by gentamicin labyrinthectomy and its efficiency in Meniere's disease. 53 patients with a SVN and a PUVL were included and compared with 10 TUVL and 10 normal subjects. Protocol included a HST (2 Hz), a SVT at 30, 60 and 100 Hz and a caloric test. Recordings were performed with a 2D and 3D VNG device. In PUVL, SVN at 30, 60 and 100 Hz was obtained in 80, 90 and 90% of cases respectively. SVN is correlated with the side of the lesion at 30, 60 and 100 Hz respectively in 65%, 63%, 80% of cases. SVN is not correlated with the side of the lesion in 20% of Meniere's disease, in 8% of vestibular neuritis and in 6% of vestibular schwannoma. In PUVL HSN is correlated with the side of the lesion in 69% of cases. The direction of the HSN and of the SVN was different in 23% when the nystagmus attended at the same time for both tests. In PUVL the direction of the SVN is different at 100 Hz and 30 Hz in 16% of cases when they are concomittant on the same patient. After Gentamicine labyrinthectomy, the coherence of the results in caloric test, HSN and SVN (areflexy and lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side) was correlated with the efficiency of the therapy. A SVN vertical component was met in 10% of PUVL (essentially in anterior canal dehiscence and few cases of partial labyrinthitis). The horizontal SVN SPV is significantly slower in PUVL than in TUVL patients (p=0.0004). The SVT

  10. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to vertex low frequency vibration as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, Luca; Westin, Magnus; Duan, Maoli; Brantberg, Krister

    2016-04-01

    To explore ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) to low-frequency vertex vibration (125 Hz) as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. The oVEMP using 125 Hz single cycle bone-conducted vertex vibration were tested in 15 patients with unilateral superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome, 15 healthy controls and in 20 patients with unilateral vestibular loss due to vestibular neuritis. Amplitude, amplitude asymmetry ratio, latency and interaural latency difference were parameters of interest. The oVEMP amplitude was significantly larger in SCD patients when affected sides (53 μVolts) were compared to non-affected (17.2 μVolts) or compared to healthy controls (13.6 μVolts). Amplitude larger than 33.8 μVolts separates effectively the SCD ears from the healthy ones with sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 93%. The other three parameters showed an overlap between affected SCD ears and non-affected as well as between SCD ears and those in the two control groups. oVEMP amplitude distinguishes SCD ears from healthy ones using low-frequency vibration stimuli at vertex. Amplitude analysis of oVEMP evoked by low-frequency vertex bone vibration stimulation is an additional indicator of SCD syndrome and might serve for diagnosing SCD patients with coexistent conductive middle ear problems. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocoll