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Sample records for acute unilateral vestibular

  1. Acute unilateral loss of vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Fetter, M

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function is the most severe condition that can occur in the vestibular system. The clinical syndrome is caused by the physiologic properties of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) arc. In the normal situation, the two peripheral vestibular end organs are connected to a functional unit in coplanar pairs of semicircular canals working in a push-pull mode. "Push-pull" mode means that, when one side is excited, the other side is inhibited, and vice versa due to two mechanisms. First, first-order vestibular afferents are bipolar cells. They have a tonic firing rate that is modulated up or down depending on the direction of rotation. Second, via inhibitory neural connections of second-order vestibular neurons between the vestibular nuclei (vestibular commissural system), the excited side inhibits further the contralateral side. The neural signals are encoded as the difference of the change in firing rate of the vestibular neurons modulating the tonic firing rate on both sides in opposite directions (one side up, the contralateral side down). When the head is not moving, the two peripheral vestibular end organs generate a resting firing rate, which is exactly equal on both sides. When the head is rotated, for example, to the right, the right-sided first-order vestibular afferents increase their discharge rate and the left-sided ones decrease their firing rate. This leads to increase in firing rate of also the type I second-order vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei, which synapse with inhibitory type II neurons on the contralateral side, further decreasing the firing rate in the second-order vestibular neurons in the contralateral vestibular nucleus. When the direction of head rotation is reversed, the behavior of the type I neurons on the two sides of the head is reversed. The same relation exists between the coplanar vertical canal afferents on the two sides of the head. When there is unilateral damage to the end organ or the

  2. Vestibular perceptual thresholds to angular rotation in acute unilateral vestibular paresis and with galvanic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Cousins, Sian; Seemungal, Barry M; Gresty, Michael A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2011-09-01

    Studies of compensation of injury to the human vestibular system have, in the main, focused on the vestibular-ocular reflex. Probing vestibular perception allows more of the sensory pathway to be assessed. We present a novel paradigm for simultaneously testing vestibular perceptual and nystagmic thresholds to angular acceleration around an earth vertical axis. The perceptual thresholds can be modulated asymmetrically in normal subjects by DC galvanic stimulation with the head flexed in the roll plane, as expected from the main torsional plane of action of the galvanic stimulus. The perceptual and nystagmic thresholds were bilaterally elevated in acute vestibular neuritis, a unilateral condition, possibly due to central suppression of vestibular input. The degree of asymmetry in thresholds was small in comparison with the large caloric asymmetry present in the patients, indicating a relatively preserved capacity for near-threshold performance of the non-damaged labyrinth both in the "on" and "off" directions. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. About the pathophysiology of acute unilateral vestibular deficit - vestibular neuritis (VN) or peripheral vestibulopathy (PVP)?

    PubMed

    Uffer, Denis S; Hegemann, Stefan C A

    2016-07-02

    To determine whether patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy (PVP), often called "vestibular neuritis/neuronitis or neuropathy" (VN) have a vestibular lesion pattern consistent with the distribution of the neurological afferents. Much is known about the clinical nature of PVP, however less so about its etiology and pathogenesis. Due to the frequency with which VN is used to describe the syndrome, an inflammation of the vestibular nerve or of one of its branches is often assumed to be the cause of PVP, though there is insufficient data so far to support this assumption. We conducted a retrospective study of 25 patients who had presented to our clinic with PVP and had all vestibular receptor organs tested shortly after start of symptoms. We analysed their vestibular lesion patterns in order to determine whether they were consistent with the neuritis hypothesis (NH). The lesion patterns varied conspicuously. 76% did not follow an innervation pattern, thereby contradicting the NH and only 24% had a lesion pattern that either definitely (16%) or probably (8%) supported the NH. These results should remind us to be careful before jumping to quick conclusions about the pathogenetic nature of PVP. With any reason to question VN as the only cause of PVP, we should reconsider the treatment approach to PVP. If the cause probably or even possibly lies inside the vestibular labyrinth, an intratympanic steroid injection might prove to be a more effective measure, even in first-line treatment. If the etiology is unsure, a combination of systemic and intratympanic steroid treatment may be adequate.

  4. Assessment of skin microvascular endothelial function in patients with acute unilateral vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Casani, Augusto Pietro; Pesce, Margherita; Cerchiai, Niccolò; Santoro, Gino; Franceschini, Stefano Sellari

    2013-01-01

    Abnormalities in labyrinth vasculature, resulting in labyrinth ischemia may be responsible for acute unilateral vestibular syndrome (AVS). However, since no tools for the study of the labyrinth microvasculature are available in clinical settings, labyrinth microvascular abnormalities in AVS patients (AVS-pts) can only be hypothesized on the basis of the their cardiovascular risk profile. Considering that skin microcirculation may mirror vascular function in other body districts, we examined skin endothelial function in 20AVS-pts and in 20 healthy control subjects (CS), with the aim of predicting labyrinth microvascular abnormalities in the same AVS-pts, potentially involved in the pathogenesis of their AVS. AVS-pts and CS underwent laser-Doppler flowmetry measurement of the skin forearm vasodilator response (SVR) to iontophoresis of the endothelial-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh) and to the endothelial-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). SVR to ACh was significantly lower than to SNP in AVS patients (p < 0.005, ANOVA for repeated measures), consistent with skin endothelial dysfunction, while no significant differences in SVR between ACh and SNP were observed in CS. Accordingly with an arbitrary cut-off of 30% or greater reduction in SVR to ACh compared to SNP, endothelial dysfunction was found in 4 (20%) of CS, and in 14 (70%) of AVS-pts (6 with associated co-morbidities potentially responsible for endothelial dysfunction, and 8 without these co-morbodities). This study shows that the investigation of skin endothelial function in AVS-pts may be helpful in identifying AVS-pts in whom an ischemic origin of AVS might be more probable, in spite of their low cardiovascular risk profile.

  5. Effects of home training and additional physical therapy on recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss--a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi C; Ledin, Torbjörn E A; Odkvist, Lars M; Skargren, Elisabeth I B

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of additional physical therapy on recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss given to patients receiving home training. Randomized controlled trial. Ear, nose and throat departments in three hospitals. Fifty-four patients (mean age 52 years) with acute unilateral vestibular loss within the last week confirmed with electronystagmography testing were included. Patients with central neurologic or auditory symptoms or other vertigo disease were excluded. Home training with or without additional physical therapy 12 times during 10 weeks. Electronystagmography testing was performed before and after the training period. Clinical static (Romberg's test, sharpened Romberg's test, standing on foam and standing on one leg) and dynamic (walking forward and backward on a line) balance tests and subjective ratings of vertigo and balance problems on a visual analogue scale were done one week, 10 weeks and six months after the start of training. Similar changes were seen in the two training groups. No significant differences in outcome regarding balance function or perceived symptoms were found between home training with or without additional physical therapy.

  6. The Effect of Peripheral Vestibular Recovery on Improvements in Vestibulo-ocular Reflexes and Balance Control After Acute Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Loss.

    PubMed

    Allum, John H J; Scheltinga, Alja; Honegger, Flurin

    2017-12-01

    Patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (aUPVD), presumed to be caused by vestibular neuritis, show asymmetrical vestibular ocular reflexes (VORs) that improve over time. Questions arise regarding how much of the VOR improvement is due to peripheral recovery or central compensation, and whether differences in peripheral recovery influence balance control outcomes. Thirty patients were examined at aUPVD onset and 3, 6, and 13 weeks later with four different VOR tests: caloric tests; rotating (ROT) chair tests performed in yaw with angular accelerations of 5 and 20 degrees/s; and video head impulse tests (vHIT) in the yaw plane. ROT and vHIT responses and balance control of 11 patients who had a caloric canal paresis (CP) more than 90% at aUPVD onset and no CP recovery (no-CPR) at 13 weeks in caloric tests were compared with those of 19 patients with CP recovery (CPR) to less than 30%, on average. Balance control was measured with a gyroscope system (SwayStar) recording trunk sway during stance and gait tasks. ROT and vHIT asymmetries of no-CPR and CPR patients reduced over time. The reduction was less at 13 weeks (36.2% vs. 83.5% on average) for the no-CPR patients. The no-CPR group asymmetries at 13 weeks were greater than those of CPR patients who had normal asymmetries. The greater asymmetries were caused by weaker deficit side responses which remained deficient in no-CPR patients at 13 weeks. Contra-deficit side vHIT and ROT responses remained normal. For all balance tests, sway was slightly greater for no-CPR compared with CPR patients at aUPVD onset and 3 weeks later. At 13 weeks, only sway during walking eyes closed was greater for the no-CPR group. A combination of 5 degrees/s ROT and balance tests could predict at onset (90% accuracy) which patients would have no-CPR at 13 weeks. These results indicate that for ROT and vHIT tests, central compensation is observed in CPR and no-CPR patients. It acts primarily by increasing deficit

  7. Efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation on chronic unilateral vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Oya; Topuz, Bülent; Ardiç, F Necdet; Sarhuş, Merih; Ogmen, Gülsen; Ardiç, Füsun

    2004-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation exercises on patients with chronic unilateral vestibular dysfunction. Prospective study. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic and Otolaryngology Clinic of a tertiary referral hospital. One-hundred and twenty-five patients with unilateral chronic vestibular dysfunction were included in the study. Eight-week, two-staged (clinic and home) vestibular rehabilitation programme with components of Cawthorne-Cooksey and Norre exercises was applied. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were completed three times (at the beginning, end of the second week and end of the treatment). Data for 112 patients in the first stage and 93 patients in the second stage were evaluated because of insufficient compliance of the other patients. The mean DHI score was decreased from 50.42 +/- 24.12 points to 21.21 +/- 15.97 points (p < 0.001) at the end of first two weeks, and to 19.93 +/- 19.33 points at the end of the whole treatment. The mean VAS score was decreased from 5.87 +/- 2.27 to 2.02 +/- 1.75 (p < 0.001) at the end of second week, and to 1.51 +/- 1.29 at the end of eighth week. In respect to both VAS and DHI scores, improvement was noted in 67 patients (77.4%). Age, gender and disability level had no predictive value about therapy outcome. There was a fast recovery in the supervised exercise session, whereas there was no significant difference in the home exercise session. These findings suggest that either supervised exercise is better than home exercise or that 10 supervised sessions are sufficient to get the end result.

  8. Evaluation of patients with acute vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Elsaeid

    2008-03-01

    Acute vestibular syndrome is characterized by a rapid unilateral injury to either peripheral or central vestibular structures. It consists of severe vertigo, nausea and vomiting, spontaneous nystagmus, and postural instability. In many cases, a peripheral etiology is considered although it may be due to an underlying serious central pathology. The present study was designed to investigate the feasibility of differentiating the cause of acute vestibular syndrome in such patients using clinical, audiovestibular and radiologic tools. We performed a case series study of patients complaining of acute vertigo at a university referring center for hearing and balance disorders. Thirty patients with history of acute vertigo within 3 days onset with no history of previous otological or neurological disorders. Eighteen patients were due to acute peripheral vestibular lesion, 1 due to psychiatric illness under antidepressant drugs and 11 were of central vestibular lesion. The most important step in the diagnosis of acute vertigo is a thorough and detailed history. The common error of carrying out investigations in place of a detailed history is to be avoided. The clinical evaluation has the highest sensitivity and specificity in differentiating central from peripheral vestibular lesions.

  9. Asymmetric vestibular stimulation reveals persistent disruption of motion perception in unilateral vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Panichi, R; Faralli, M; Bruni, R; Kiriakarely, A; Occhigrossi, C; Ferraresi, A; Bronstein, A M; Pettorossi, V E

    2017-11-01

    Self-motion perception was studied in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions (UVL) due to acute vestibular neuritis at 1 wk and 4, 8, and 12 mo after the acute episode. We assessed vestibularly mediated self-motion perception by measuring the error in reproducing the position of a remembered visual target at the end of four cycles of asymmetric whole-body rotation. The oscillatory stimulus consists of a slow (0.09 Hz) and a fast (0.38 Hz) half cycle. A large error was present in UVL patients when the slow half cycle was delivered toward the lesion side, but minimal toward the healthy side. This asymmetry diminished over time, but it remained abnormally large at 12 mo. In contrast, vestibulo-ocular reflex responses showed a large direction-dependent error only initially, then they normalized. Normalization also occurred for conventional reflex vestibular measures (caloric tests, subjective visual vertical, and head shaking nystagmus) and for perceptual function during symmetric rotation. Vestibular-related handicap, measured with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) at 12 mo correlated with self-motion perception asymmetry but not with abnormalities in vestibulo-ocular function. We conclude that 1 ) a persistent self-motion perceptual bias is revealed by asymmetric rotation in UVLs despite vestibulo-ocular function becoming symmetric over time, 2 ) this dissociation is caused by differential perceptual-reflex adaptation to high- and low-frequency rotations when these are combined as with our asymmetric stimulus, 3 ) the findings imply differential central compensation for vestibuloperceptual and vestibulo-ocular reflex functions, and 4 ) self-motion perception disruption may mediate long-term vestibular-related handicap in UVL patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A novel vestibular stimulus, combining asymmetric slow and fast sinusoidal half cycles, revealed persistent vestibuloperceptual dysfunction in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. The compensation of

  10. Complete and irreversible unilateral vestibular loss: A novel rat model of vestibular pathology.

    PubMed

    Péricat, David; Farina, Anne; Agavnian-Couquiaud, Emilie; Chabbert, Christian; Tighilet, Brahim

    2017-05-01

    Both basic and applied studies on the pathophysiology of vestibular disorders are currently impaired by the lack of animal models of controlled vestibular damages. In the present study, we describe the procedure to achieve a surgical unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the rat and evaluate its functional consequences. This procedure is suitable for reproducing a unilateral, sudden and definitive vestibular areflexia. Proper induction of a UVN induces a severe vestibular syndrome, which mimics vestibular disorders encountered in humans. This model is also used clinically in the surgical treatment of pharmacological intractable Meniere's disease. Comparison with existing methods unilateral vestibular neurectomy has been essentially used in other species such as cats, monkeys and humans. The current study describes this technique in rats. This experimental model is particularly adapted to study the restoration kinetics of vestibular function after removal of peripheral inputs. It is also suitable for determining the neurochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying central compensation processes, as well as to check for the efficacy of drugs with potent antivertigo properties. Finally, UVN is an acknowledged model of postlesional plasticity involving original processes such as reactive neurogenesis in the vestibular nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Plasticity after Unilateral Vestibular Midbrain Infarction in Human Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Baier, Bernhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bartenstein, Peter; Zwergal, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to uncover mechanisms of central compensation of vestibular function at brainstem, cerebellar, and cortical levels in patients with acute unilateral midbrain infarctions presenting with an acute vestibular tone imbalance. Eight out of 17 patients with unilateral midbrain infarctions were selected on the basis of signs of a vestibular tone imbalance, e.g., graviceptive (tilts of perceived verticality) and oculomotor dysfunction (skew deviation, ocular torsion) in F18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET at two time points: A) in the acute stage, and B) after recovery 6 months later. Lesion-behavior mapping analyses with MRI verified the exact structural lesion sites. Group subtraction analyses and comparisons with healthy controls were performed with Statistic Parametric Mapping for the PET data. A comparison of PET A of acute-stage patients with that of healthy controls showed increases in glucose metabolism in the cerebellum, motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, and inferior temporal lobe, but none in vestibular cortex areas. At the supratentorial level bilateral signal decreases dominated in the thalamus, frontal eye fields, and anterior cingulum. These decreases persisted after clinical recovery in contrast to the increases. The transient activations can be attributed to ocular motor and postural recovery (cerebellum) and sensory substitution of vestibular function for motion perception (visual cortex). The persisting deactivation in the thalamic nuclei and frontal eye fields allows alternative functional interpretations of the thalamic nuclei: either a disconnection of ascending sensory input occurs or there is a functional mismatch between expected and actual vestibular activity. Our data support the view that both thalami operate separately for each hemisphere but receive vestibular input from ipsilateral and contralateral midbrain integration centers. Normally they have gatekeeper functions for multisensory input to the cortex and automatic

  13. Cold shivering activity after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of muscles (flexors and extensors of the forelimbs and hindlimbs) during cold shivering after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus. It was found, that unilateral delabyrinthing produces bilateral facilitation of cold shivering in the flexor extremities more pronounced on the ipsilateral side. In the extensor muscles there was an absence of bioelectric activity both before and after delabyrinthing. Enhancement of cold shivering in the flexor extremities following intervention was evidently conditioned by removal of the inhibiting effect of the vestibulary apparatus on the function of special centers.

  14. Cost-effective analysis of unilateral vestibular weakness investigation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Michele M; Reilly, Erin K; Galatioto, Jessica; Judson, Randy B; Kim, Ana H

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of obtaining a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with abnormal electronystagmography (ENG) or videonystagmography (VNG) results. Retrospective chart review. Academic specialty center. Patients presenting with vertigo between January 1, 2010, and August 30, 2013. Patients who fit the following abnormal criteria were included in the study: unilateral caloric weakness (≥20%), abnormal ocular motor testing, and nystagmus on positional testing. Patients with abnormal findings who then underwent MRI with gadolinium were evaluated. Of the 1,996 charts reviewed, there were 1,358 patients who met the inclusion criteria. The average age of these patients was 62 years (12-94 yr). The male:female ratio was approximately 1:2. Of the 1,358 patients, 253 received an MRI with the following pathologies: four vestibular schwannomas, three subcortical/periventricular white matter changes suspicious for demyelinating disease, four acute cerebellar/posterior circulation infarct, two vertebral artery narrowing, one pseudomeningocele of internal auditory canal, and two white matter changes indicative of migraines. The positive detection rate on MRI was 5.5% based on MRI findings of treatable pathologies causing vertigo. Average cost of an MRI is $1,200, thereby making the average cost of identifying a patient with a positive MRI finding $15,180. In our study, those patients with a positive MRI had a constellation of symptoms and findings (asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, and abnormal ENG/VNG). Cost-effectiveness can be improved by ordering an MRI only when clinical examination and VNG point toward a central pathology. Clinical examination and appropriate testing should be factored when considering the cost-effectiveness of obtaining an MRI in patients with abnormal ENG/VNG findings.

  15. Unilateral Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome and Bilateral Endolymphatic Hydrops.

    PubMed

    Ralli, Massimo; Nola, Giuseppe; Sparvoli, Luca; Ralli, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) syndrome is a common congenital inner ear malformation characterized by a vestibular aqueduct with a diameter larger than 1.5 mm, mixed or sensorineural hearing loss that ranges from mild to profound, and vestibular disorders that may be present with a range from mild imbalance to episodic objective vertigo. In our study, we present the case of a patient with unilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct and bilateral endolymphatic hydrops (EH). EH was confirmed through anamnestic history and audiological exams; EVA was diagnosed using high-resolution CT scans and MRI images. Therapy included intratympanic infusion of corticosteroids with a significant hearing improvement, more evident in the ear contralateral to EVA. Although most probably unrelated, EVA and EH may present with similar symptoms and therefore the diagnostic workup should always include the proper steps to perform a correct diagnosis. Association between progression of hearing loss and head trauma in patients with a diagnosis of EVA syndrome is still uncertain; however, these individuals should be advised to avoid activities that increase intracranial pressure to prevent further hearing deterioration. Intratympanic treatment with steroids is a safe and well-tolerated procedure that has demonstrated its efficacy in hearing, tinnitus, and vertigo control in EH.

  16. [The acute vestibular paralysis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Meran, A; Pfaltz, C R

    1975-07-08

    Acute vestibular paralysis may not be considered as a nosologic entity but as a syndrome. Symptomatology (vertigo, spontaneous and provoked vestibular nystagmus, absence of cochlear signs) shows an uniform picture. The results of the caloric test as well as the nystagmic responses induced by galvanic stimulation and the development of central vestibular compensation however indicate that the site of the lesion is not only confined to the labyrinth but may also occur at the level of the peripheral neuron or even the vestibular nuclei. Etiology and pathology are still vague. Our own clinical observations as well as the scarce data in literature about morphological and experimental studies suggest in a way that vascular and infectious disorders are of importance as primary releasing factors. Hypothetically, vestibular loss of function may either be caused by a disturbance of labyrinthine microcirculation, initiated in a great majority of cases by infection, or by a direct lesion of the peripheral neuron as well as the vestibular nuclei. Retrolabyrinthine lesions may be due to menigoencephalitis, caused by a neurotropic virus or other infectious agents such as Toxoplasma gondii. Acute vestibular paralysis should be strictly distinguished from vestibular neuronitis. While vestibular paralysis is a syndrome, vestibular neuronitis must be considered as a nosologic entity, including a lesion of the peripheral neuron as well as evidence of an infectious event.

  17. Optimal visuo-vestibular integration for self-motion perception in patients with unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Gale, Steven; Prsa, Mario; Maire, Raphael; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-03-01

    Unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) is accompanied by deficits in processing of visual and vestibular self-motion cues. The present study examined whether multisensory integration of these two types of information is, nevertheless, intact in such patients. Patients were seated on a rotating platform with a screen simulating 3D rotation in front of them and asked to judge the relative magnitude of two successive rotations in the yaw plane in three conditions: vestibular stimulation, visual stimulation and bimodal stimulation (congruent stimuli from both modalities together). Similar to findings in healthy controls, UVL patients exhibited optimal multisensory integration during both ipsi- and contralesional rotations. The benefit of multisensory integration was more pronounced on the ipsilesional side. These results show that visuo-vestibular integration for passive self-motion is automatic and suggests that it functions without additional cognitive mechanisms, unlike more complex multisensory tasks such as postural control and spatial navigation, previously shown to be impaired in UVL patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis.

    PubMed

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-05

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner's syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV.

  20. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality-based balance exercises in vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Dara; Herdman, Susan; Vance, Roisin; Murray, Deirdre; Malone, Kareena; Duffy, Douglas; Glennon, Aine; McConn-Walsh, Rory

    2015-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of virtual reality-based balance exercises to conventional balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss (UVL). Assessor-blind, randomized controlled trial. Two acute care university teaching hospitals. Patients with UVL (N=71) who had dizziness/vertigo, and gait and balance impairment. Patients with UVL were randomly assigned to receive 6 weeks of either conventional (n=36) or virtual reality-based (n=35) balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation. The virtual reality-based group received an off-the-shelf virtual reality gaming system for home exercise, and the conventional group received a foam balance mat. Treatment comprised weekly visits to a physiotherapist and a daily home exercise program. The primary outcome was self-preferred gait speed. Secondary outcomes included other gait parameters and tasks, Sensory Organization Test (SOT), dynamic visual acuity, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Vestibular Rehabilitation Benefits Questionnaire, and Activities Balance Confidence Questionnaire. The subjective experience of vestibular rehabilitation was measured with a questionnaire. Both groups improved, but there were no significant differences in gait speed between the groups postintervention (mean difference, -.03m/s; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.09 to .02m/s). There were also no significant differences between the groups in SOT scores (mean difference, .82%; 95% CI, -5.00% to 6.63%) or on any of the other secondary outcomes (P>.05). In both groups, adherence to exercise was high (∼77%), but the virtual reality-based group reported significantly more enjoyment (P=.001), less difficulty with (P=.009) and less tiredness after (P=.03) balance exercises. At 6 months, there were no significant between-group differences in physical outcomes. Virtual reality-based balance exercises performed during vestibular rehabilitation were not superior to conventional balance

  1. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  2. Impairment and recovery on a food foraging task following unilateral vestibular deafferentation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that the vestibular system may contribute to the development of higher cognitive function, especially spatial learning and memory that uses idiothetic cues (e.g., dead reckoning). However, few studies have been done using behavioral tasks that could potentially separate the animals' ability for dead reckoning from piloting. The food foraging task requires the animal to continuously monitor and integrate self-movement cues and generate an accurate return path. It has been shown that bilateral vestibular-lesioned rats were impaired on this task. The present study used the same task to further examine the contribution of vestibular information to spatial navigation by comparing unilateral and bilateral lesions and by testing the animals at different time points following the lesion. The results demonstrated that animals with unilateral vestibular deafferentation were impaired in performing the task in the dark at 3 months after the lesion, and this impairment disappeared at 6 months after the lesion. This supports the notion that vestibular information contributes to dead reckoning and suggests possible recovery of function over time after the lesion. Animals with bilateral vestibular deafferentation were not able to be tested on the foraging task because they exhibited behavior distinct from the unilateral-lesioned animals, with significant hesitation in leaving their home cage for as long as 6 months after the lesion. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Earth horizontal axis rotational responses in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular deficits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, Joseph M. R.; Kamerer, Donald B.; Wall, Conrad, III

    1989-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of five patients with surgically confirmed unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions is evaluated. Testing used both earth vertical axis (EVA) and earth horizontal axis (EHA) yaw rotation. Results indicated that the patients had short VOR time constants, asymmetric responses to both EVA and EHA rotation, and normal EHA modulation components. These findings suggest that unilateral peripheral vestibular loss causes a shortened VOR time constant even with the addition of dynamic otolithic stimulation and causes an asymmetry in semicircular canal-ocular reflexes and one aspect of otolith-ocular reflexes.

  4. [Emergency diagnosis of the acute vestibular syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tamás, T László; Garai, Tibor; Király, István; Mike, Andrea; Nagy, Csaba; Paukovics, Ágnes; Schmidt, Péter; Szatmári, Ferenc; Tompos, Tamás; Vadvári, Árpád; Szirmai, Ágnes

    2017-12-01

    To diagnose acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) in a prospective study by a new bedside test (providing 1A evidence) based on oculomotor analysis and assessment of hearing loss. To assess the frequency of central and peripheral causes of acute vestibular syndrome in the emergency room. To establish the diagnostic accuracy of acute cranial computed tomography as compared to oculomotor analysis done by video oculography goggles and audiometry. Between 1st March 2016 and 1st March 2017 we documented 125 patients (62 women, 63 men, average age 53 years) in the emergency room of the Petz Aladár County Teaching Hospital using the above bedside and instrumental testing. Diagnosis was verified by cranial magnetic resonance imaging. According to the results of the instrumental examination in AVS in 67% we found a peripheral cause and in 33% a central pathology. In 62% isolated posterior circulation stroke manifested itself by isolated vertigo without additional focal signs and the acute cranial computed tomography showed negative results in 96%. The instrumental examination increased diagnostic accuracy by making the diagnosis of isolated inferior semicircular canal vestibular neuritis possible. The new bedside oculomotor test is suitable for the diagnosis of posterior circulation stroke manifesting with isolated vertigo in early cases, when the routine neuroradiologic methods have a lower sensitivity or are not available. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(51): 2029-2040.

  5. Prediction of fall risk reduction as measured by dynamic gait index in individuals with unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Courtney D; Schubert, Michael C; Herdman, Susan J

    2004-09-01

    To determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on reduction of fall risk in individuals with unilateral vestibular hypofunction and to identify those factors that predict fall risk reduction. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary referral center. Forty-seven patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction, aged 28 to 86 years, who were at risk for falls on initial assessment. All patients underwent vestibular rehabilitation including adaptation exercises, designed to improve gaze stability, and gait and balance exercises. Fall risk (Dynamic Gait Index), visual acuity during head movements (Dynamic Visual Acuity), and subjective complaints were measured initially, at 2-week intervals, and at completion of physical therapy. As a group, the patients had significantly reduced risk for falls (p <0.001) after rehabilitation. Time from onset of symptoms did not affect the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation. Both older (> or = 65 yr) and younger (< 65 yr) adults showed significant reductions in fall risk with vestibular rehabilitation (p <0.001). However, a significantly greater proportion (Chi2= 0.016) of older adults remained at risk for falls at discharge compared with young adults (45% versus 11%). Initial Dynamic Gait Index and Dynamic Visual Acuity scores predicted fall risk reduction in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction. A model was developed using initial Dynamic Gait Index and Dynamic Visual Acuity scores to predict fall risk reduction. Vestibular rehabilitation is effective in significantly reducing fall risk in individuals with unilateral vestibular deficit. The model predicts fall risk reduction with good sensitivity (77%) and specificity (90%).

  6. Long-term deficits in motion detection thresholds and spike count variability after unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Thomassen, Jakob S.; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system operates in a push-pull fashion using signals from both labyrinths and an intricate bilateral organization. Unilateral vestibular lesions cause well-characterized motor deficits that are partially compensated over time and whose neural correlates have been traced in the mean response modulation of vestibular nuclei cells. Here we compare both response gains and neural detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei and semicircular canal afferent neurons in intact vs. unilateral-lesioned macaques using three-dimensional rotation and translation stimuli. We found increased stimulus-driven spike count variability and detection thresholds in semicircular canal afferents, although mean responses were unchanged, after contralateral labyrinth lesion. Analysis of trial-by-trial spike count correlations of a limited number of simultaneously recorded pairs of canal afferents suggests increased noise correlations after lesion. In addition, we also found persistent, chronic deficits in rotation detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei neurons, which were larger in the ipsilesional than the contralesional brain stem. These deficits, which persisted several months after lesion, were due to lower rotational response gains, whereas spike count variability was similar in intact and lesioned animals. In contrast to persistent deficits in rotation threshold, translation detection thresholds were not different from those in intact animals. These findings suggest that, after compensation, a single labyrinth is sufficient to recover motion sensitivity and normal thresholds for the otolith, but not the semicircular canal, system. PMID:24848470

  7. Deviation of the subjective vertical in long-standing unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Tabak, S; Collewijn, H; Boumans, L J

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated changes in the subjectively perceived gravitational vertical as an index of imbalance in the function of the right and left otolith organs. In addition to normal subjects (n = 25), we measured patients with a longstanding (mean 4.5 year +/- 3.2 SD; range 0.5-11.5 years) unilateral vestibular loss after surgery for acoustic neuroma (n = 32), patients with partial unilateral vestibular loss (n = 7) and patients with bilateral vestibular hyporeflexia (n = 8). Normal subjects could accurately align a vertical luminous bar to the gravitational vertical in an otherwise completely dark room (mean setting -0.14 degree +/- 1.11 SD). Patients with left-sided (complete; n = 13) or right-sided (complete; n = 19 and partial; n = 7) unilateral vestibular loss made mean angular settings at 2.55 degrees +/- 1.57 (SD) leftward and 2.22 degrees (+/-1.96 SD) rightward, respectively. These means differed highly significantly from the normal mean (p < 0.00001). In the time interval investigated (0.5-11.5 years) the magnitude of the tilt angle showed no correlation with the time elapsed since the operation. The mean setting by patients with clinically bilateral vestibular loss (-1.17 degrees +/- 1.96 SD; n = 8) did not significantly differ from the control group. The systematic tilts of the subjective vertical in patients with a unilateral vestibular impairment were correlated with their imbalance in canal-ocular reflexes, as reflected by drift during head-oscillation at 2 Hz (r2 = 0.44) and asymmetries in VOR-gain for head-steps (r2 = 0.48-0.67). These correlations were largely determined, by the signs of the asymmetries; correlation between the absolute values of the VOR gain asymmetries and subjective vertical angles proved to be virtually absent. We conclude that the setting of the subjective vertical is a very sensitive tool in detecting a left-right imbalance in otolith function, and that small but significant deviations towards the defective side may persist for many

  8. Betahistine treatment improves the recovery of static symptoms in patients with unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Redon, Christine; Lopez, Christophe; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular loss induces a combination of postural, oculomotor, and perceptive symptoms that are compensated over time. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of betahistine dihydrochloride on vestibular compensation. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in Menière's disease patients who underwent a curative unilateral vestibular neurotomy (UVN). The effects of betahistine treatment were investigated on a broad spectrum of vestibular-induced changes resulting from vestibular loss: body sway, head orientation, ocular cyclotorsion, spontaneous nystagmus, verticality perception, and self-evaluation of the postural stability. The time course of the recovery was compared in 16 patients who received either a placebo or betahistine (24 mg b.i.d.) from 3 days up to 3 months after UVN. Patients were examined before (day -1) and after UVN (days 7, 30, and 90). Results indicate that betahistine reduces the time to recovery by 1 month or more depending on the tested functions. Betahistine was effective as soon as 4 days after treatment administration, and the effect remained during the whole compensation period (up to 3 months). The observed clinical effects may be attributed to an action of betahistine in rebalancing the neuronal activity between contralateral vestibular nuclei.

  9. Effects of practicing tandem gait with and without vibrotactile biofeedback in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Dozza, Marco; Wall, Conrad; Peterka, Robert J; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B

    2007-01-01

    Subjects with unilateral vestibular loss exhibit motor control impairments as shown by body and limb deviation during gait. Biofeedback devices have been shown to improve stance postural control, especially when sensory information is limited by environmental conditions or pathologies such as unilateral vestibular loss. However, the extent to which biofeedback could improve motor performance or learning while practicing a dynamic task such as narrow gait is still unknown. In this cross-over design study, 9 unilateral vestibular loss subjects practiced narrow gait with and without wearing a trunk-tilt, biofeedback device in 2 practice sessions. The biofeedback device informed the subjects of their medial-lateral angular tilt and tilt velocity during gait via vibration of the trunk. From motion analysis and tilt data, the performance of the subjects practicing tandem gait were compared over time with and without biofeedback. By practicing tandem gait, subjects reduced their trunk-tilt, center of mass displacement, medial-lateral feet distance, and frequency of stepping error. In both groups, use of tactile biofeedback consistently increased postural stability during tandem gait, beyond the effects of practice alone. However, one single session of practice with biofeedback did not result in conclusive short-term after-effects consistent with short-term retention of motor performance without this additional biofeedback. Results from this study support the hypothesis that tactile biofeedback acts similar to natural sensory feedback to improve dynamic motor performance but does not facilitate a recalibration of motor performance to improve function after short-term use.

  10. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  11. Bedside vestibular examination in patients with unilateral definite Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Santos; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Although vestibular clinical examinations are quite variable in Ménière's disease (MD), when used in a grouped fashion they attach valuable information to the understanding of MD. Evaluation of unilateral MD vestibular bedside examination. This was a retrospective study of patients with definite unilateral MD at a tertiary care facility. Assessment of spontaneous nystagmus (SN), head-shaking nystagmus (HSN), head impulse test (HIT) and vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) was carried out. Clinical manifestations and auditory and vestibular function were studied. The study included 97 patients: 47 presented SN, 75 a positive HSN (biphasic in 14) and in 73 a VIN was observed. After excluding patients with biphasic HSN, a homogeneous response was observed in 43.4%: no nystagmus in 15.7%; nystagmus of similar direction in 27.8% (paretic, 14.5%; irritative, 13.3%). There were no significant differences in duration of the disease, functional level and vertigo index, although a trend towards a shorter time since last crisis was observed in patients with an irritative nystagmus. In 36.1% nystagmus was revealed with a consistent direction in at least one of the tests and in 20.5% it was non-coherent, something more frequently observed closer to the crisis. Independently only in VIN an irritative response was associated with a higher functional level and a shorter time from last attack.

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of vestibular bed-side examination in detecting VIII cranial nerve schwannoma with sensorineural sudden unilateral hearing loss as presenting symptom.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify signs of vestibular nerve suffering through a bedside vestibular examination protocol in case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss without spontaneous signs of vestibular impairment and to propose a bed-side vestibular examination based protocol for the focused execution of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only if a vestibular schwannoma is suspected. 96 patients, 52 men, 44 women, mean age 57.73 +/- 12.85 years, suffering from sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, which presented neither vertigo nor spontaneous nystagmus, were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, measurement of acoustic reflexes and Anderson test to detect adaptation, bedside vestibular examination through head shaking test, vibration test, head impulse test, hyperventilation test and detection of nystagmus in supine and lateral decubitus to search for signs of vestibular impairment were performed. Patients with signs of vestibular impairment and pure tone audiometry threshold at high frequencies better than 70 dB nHL were subjected to auditory brainstem responses. Gadolinium enhanced MRI centred on internal acoustic canals was carried out in all patients with sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. Main outcome measures were signs of vestibular impairment at vestibular bedside examination and presence of vestibular schwannoma on MRI. Signs of vestibular impairment were detected in 22/96 cases (22.9%); a vestibular schwannoma was detected by MRI in 5/96 cases (5.2%), always when vestibular impairment was present. In case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, vestibular bedside examination seems to be useful to restrict the suspicion of a vestibular schwannoma to cases with signs of vestibular impairment, reducing the number of MRI exams, with considerable economic savings. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  13. Characterizing Patients with Unilateral Vestibular Hypofunction Using Kinematic Variability and Local Dynamic Stability during Treadmill Walking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Huang, Qiuhong; Ou, Yongkang; Chen, Ling; Song, Rong; Zheng, Yiqing

    2017-01-01

    Here, we aimed to compare the unstable gait caused by unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) with the normal gait. Twelve patients with UVH and twelve age-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. Thirty-four markers were attached to anatomical positions of each participant, and a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis system was used to capture marker coordinates as the participants walked on a treadmill. The mean standard deviation of the rotation angles was used to represent gait variability. To explore gait stability, local dynamic stability was calculated from the trunk trajectory. The UVH group had wider step width and greater variability of roll rotation at the hip than the control group ( P < 0.05). Also, the UVH group had lower local dynamic stability in the medial-lateral (ML) direction than the control group ( P < 0.05). By linear regression analysis, we identified a linear relationship between the short-term Lyapunov exponent and vestibular functional asymmetry. The result implies that UVH-induced asymmetry can increase posture variability and gait instability. This study demonstrates the potential for using kinematic parameters to quantitatively evaluate the severity of vestibular functional asymmetry. Further studies will be needed to explore the clinical effectiveness of such approaches.

  14. Rapid compensatory changes in GABA receptor efficacy in rat vestibular neurones after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Him, Aydin; Cameron, Susan A; Dutia, Mayank B

    2000-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the GABAA agonist muscimol and the GABAB agonist baclofen on tonically active medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurones were recorded in slices of the rat dorsal brainstem in vitro, to determine whether any changes occurred in the functional efficacy of GABAergic inhibition in these cells during the initial rapid stage of ‘vestibular compensation’, the behavioural recovery that takes place after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). These experiments were carried out in preparations where the midline was cut, severing all commissural connections between the two vestibular nuclei. Slices of the MVN were prepared from normal animals and animals that had been unilaterally labyrinthectomised 4 h earlier. The mean in vitro discharge rate of MVN neurones in the rostral region of the ipsi-lesional nucleus after UL was significantly higher than that in control slices, confirming our earlier reports of an increase in intrinsic excitability of these cells in the early stage of vestibular compensation. The in vitro discharge rates of caudal ipsi-lesional MVN cells, and rostral and caudal contra-lesional MVN cells, were not different from controls. Muscimol and baclofen caused reversible, dose-related inhibition of the tonic discharge rate of MVN cells in control slices. In slices prepared from UL animals, MVN cells in the rostral region of the ipsi-lesional nucleus showed a marked downregulation of their response to both muscimol and baclofen, seen as a rightward shift and a decrease in slope of the dose-response relationships for the two agonists. In the contra-lesional nucleus, there was a small but significant upregulation of the responsiveness of both rostral and caudal MVN cells to baclofen, and a marked upregulation of the responsiveness of caudal MVN cells to muscimol. In slices from animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy 4 h earlier, the downregulation of the functional efficacy of GABA receptors in the rostral MVN cells did not

  15. New mouse model for inducing and evaluating unilateral vestibular deafferentation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassel, R; Bordiga, P; Pericat, D; Hautefort, C; Tighilet, B; Chabbert, C

    2018-01-01

    Unilateral vestibular deafferentation syndrome (uVDS) holds a particular place in the vestibular pathology domain. Due to its suddenness, the violence of its symptoms that often result in emergency hospitalization, and its associated original neurophysiological properties, this syndrome is a major source of questioning for the otoneurology community. Also, its putative pathogenic causes remain to be determined. There is currently a strong medical need for the development of targeted and effective countermeasures to improve the therapeutic management of uVDS. The present study reports the development of a new mouse model for inducing and evaluating uVDS. Both the method for generating controlled excitotoxic-type peripheral vestibular damages, through transtympanic administration of the glutamate receptors agonist kainate (TTK), and the procedure for evaluating the ensuing clinical signs are detailed. Through extensive analysis of the clinical symptoms characteristics, this new animal model provides the opportunity to better follow the temporal evolution of various uVDS specific symptoms, while better appreciating the different phases that composed this syndrome. The uVDS evoked in the TTK mouse model displays two main phases distinguishable by their kinetics and amplitudes. Several parameters of the altered vestibular behaviour mimic those observed in the human syndrome. This new murine model brings concrete information about how uVDS develops and how it affects global behaviour. In addition, it opens new opportunity to decipher the etiopathological substrate of this pathology by authorizing the use of genetically modified mouse models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the Vestibular System and Etiology in Children with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Birdane, Leman; İncesulu, Armağan; Özüdoğru, Erkan; Cingi, Cemal; Caklı, Hamdi; Gürbüz, Melek Kezban; Adapınar, Baki

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vestibular system of children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL), investigate the etiological factors of USNHL and analyze whether a genetic predisposition exists. Thirty-three children aged less than 18 years with USNHL, who visited the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) department between January 2004 and December 2012, were included in this study. Cases with conductive hearing loss were excluded from the study. The patients were subjected to etiologic, genetic, and ophthalmologic evaluation; radiologic imaging; electronystagmography (ENG); and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests. The control group, which included 25 healthy children (13 males and 12 females), had undergone audiological assessment and were subjected to ENG and VEMP tests. All of the patients had severe-to-profound hearing loss. Mumps immunoglobulin G was positive in 22 (66.7%) of 33 patients. The 35delG mutation was not found in any of the patients. All of the patients underwent temporal computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Inner ear anomaly was present in 51.5% of the patients. Overall, 21 of 31 ENG patients had canal paresis in the affected ear. The VEMP response was absent on the affected side in three patients. The n23 latency average of the patient group was longer than that of the control group. Because USNHL causes irreversible problems in children, early diagnosis and auditory rehabilitation are very important. As USNHL is accompanied by inner ear anomaly, children with USNHL should undergo temporal bone CT and MRI. To evaluate the vestibular system, ENG and VEMP are non-invasive and diagnostic tests.

  17. Compensatory saccade differences between outward versus inward head impulses in chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Newman-Toker, David E; Zee, David S; Schubert, Michael C

    2014-10-01

    The horizontal head impulse test (HIT) is a valuable clinical tool that can help identify peripheral vestibular hypofunction by the refixation (compensatory) saccade that returns the eyes to the target of interest after the head has stopped. We asked if there were differences in the compensatory saccade responses during the HIT when the head was rotated away or toward straight ahead (outward versus inward). We also investigated the influence of a fixation target. Using scleral search-coils, we tested five patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) and three healthy control subjects. In UVH patients, the latencies of both overt and covert saccades were longer when the head was rotated inward from an initially eccentric position, regardless of a visual target. The proportion of HIT with covert saccades was independent of a visual target. In control subjects no compensatory saccades were observed and there were no differences in either angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain or latency between inward and outward HIT. Our data suggest that inward applied HIT in chronic UVH is more likely to include an overt compensatory saccade based on its lengthened latency. Neither latency nor the occurrence of covert compensatory saccades during HIT depended on a visual target, suggesting they have become a learned behavior in response to chronic UVH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul; Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: Themore » actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.« less

  19. Can an electro-tactile vestibular substitution system improve balance in patients with unilateral vestibular loss under altered somatosensory conditions from the foot and ankle?

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, N; Hlavackova, P; Franco, C; Diot, B; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study aimed at assessing the feasibility and the effectiveness of an electro Electro-tactile Vestibular Substitution System (EVSS) in patients with unilateral vestibular loss under normal and altered somatosensory conditions from the foot and ankle. Four unilateral vestibular-defective patients voluntarily participated in the experiment. They were asked to stand upright as still as possible with their eyes closed in two Normal and Altered foot and ankle sensory conditions. In the Normal condition, the postural task was executed on a firm support surface constituted by the force platform. In the Altered condition, a 2-cm thick foam support surface was placed under the participants' feet. These two foot and ankle sensory conditions were executed under two No EVSS and EVSS experimental conditions. The No EVSS condition served as a control condition. In the EVSS condition, participants executed the postural task using a biofeedback system whose underlying principle consisted of supplying them with additional information about their head orientation/motion with respect to gravitational vertical through electro-tactile stimulation of their tongue. Centre of foot pressure displacements (CoP) were recorded using the force platform. Results showed that, relative to the No EVSS condition, the EVSS condition decreased CoP displacements in both the Normal and the Altered foot and ankle sensory conditions. Interestingly, the stabilizing effect was more pronounced in the Altered than in the Normal foot and ankle sensory condition. These preliminary results suggest that patients with unilateral vestibular loss were able to take advantage to a head position-based electro-tactile tongue biofeedback to mitigate the postural perturbation induced by alteration of somatosensory input from the foot and the ankle.

  20. Prediction of Vestibular Imbalance in Acute Peripheral Vestibulopathy by Measuring Horizontal Ocular Deviation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Kun Woo; Choi, Ji Eun; Lee, Min Young; Yoo, Dong Soo; Jung, Jae Yun

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate whether horizontal ocular deviation (OD) from MR imaging in the emergency room (ER) reflects vestibular imbalance, by comparing the horizontal OD in patients with acute vestibulopathy to controls. Retrospective review. A total of 69 patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy and 30 healthy subjects were included. Horizontal OD was quantified by using the axial T2-weighted fast-spin echo (FSE) images of the brain at 1.5 T. In the study group, the results of VFTs (videonystagmography [VNG], caloric test, rotary chair test, and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials [cVEMP]) were also reviewed. The averaged angle of right and left horizontal ODs was compared between patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy and healthy controls. Also, the correlation between horizontal OD and results of VFTs was analyzed in the study group. The averaged angle of horizontal OD in study group (23.7° ± 11.6°) was significantly greater than that of control group (4.27° ± 3.7°) (p < 0.05). Horizontal OD significantly correlated with slow phase velocity of spontaneous nystagmus (SN), the value of caloric paresis (CP) on caloric testing, rotary chair gain, asymmetry ratio of rotary chair test and interaural difference (IAD) of cVEMP, regardless of time intervals between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and VFTs. Horizontal OD significantly correlated with parameters of VFT which reflect the vestibular imbalance. Therefore, horizontal OD can be used as an indicator of unilateral peripheral vestibular weakness.

  1. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  2. Acute vestibular syndrome: clinical head impulse test versus video head impulse test.

    PubMed

    Celebisoy, Nese

    2018-03-05

    HINTS battery involving head impulse test (HIT), nystagmus, and test of skew is the critical bedside examination to differentiate acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy from posterior circulation stroke (PCS) in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The highest sensitivity component of the battery has been reported to be the horizontal HIT, whereas skew deviation is defined as the most specific but non-sensitive sign for PCS. Video-oculography-based HIT (vHIT) may have an additional power in making the differentiation. If vHIT is undertaken, then both gain and gain asymmetry should be taken into account as anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) strokes are at risk of being misclassified based on VOR gain alone. Further refinement in video technology, increased operator proficiency and incorporation with saccade analysis will increase the sensitivity of vHIT for PCS diagnosis. For the time being, clinical examination seems adequate in frontline diagnostic evaluation of AVS.

  3. Unilateral cardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with acute mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Kashiura, Masahiro; Tateishi, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Taro; Jujo, Mioko; Tanabe, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Akiko; Hamabe, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    Two cases of cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary edema are reported. Both patients presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, and chest radiography revealed unilateral infiltration, which mimics pulmonary disease. However, the patients were diagnosed with cardiogenic pulmonary edema, because echocardiography showed severe mitral regurgitation with an eccentric jet. The patients underwent mitral valve replacement and were discharged without complications. Unilateral cardiogenic pulmonary edema is rare, and early diagnosis and treatment are difficult. Delayed treatment leads to high mortality. The major cause of unilateral pulmonary edema is acute mitral regurgitation, and the direction of the jet is suggested as a mechanism of laterality.

  4. VOR gain by head impulse video-oculography differentiates acute vestibular neuritis from stroke.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Tehrani, Ali S Saber; Wozniak, Amy; Eibenberger, Karin; Kattah, Jorge C; Guede, Cynthia I; Zee, David S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-03-01

    Vestibular neuritis is often mimicked by stroke (pseudoneuritis). Vestibular eye movements help discriminate the two conditions. We report vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain measures in neuritis and stroke presenting acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Prospective cross-sectional study of AVS (acute continuous vertigo/dizziness lasting >24 h) at two academic centers. We measured horizontal head impulse test (HIT) VOR gains in 26 AVS patients using a video HIT device (ICS Impulse). All patients were assessed within 1 week of symptom onset. Diagnoses were confirmed by clinical examinations, brain magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted images, and follow-up. Brainstem and cerebellar strokes were classified by vascular territory-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) or anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). Diagnoses were vestibular neuritis (n = 16) and posterior fossa stroke (PICA, n = 7; AICA, n = 3). Mean HIT VOR gains (ipsilesional [standard error of the mean], contralesional [standard error of the mean]) were as follows: vestibular neuritis (0.52 [0.04], 0.87 [0.04]); PICA stroke (0.94 [0.04], 0.93 [0.04]); AICA stroke (0.84 [0.10], 0.74 [0.10]). VOR gains were asymmetric in neuritis (unilateral vestibulopathy) and symmetric in PICA stroke (bilaterally normal VOR), whereas gains in AICA stroke were heterogeneous (asymmetric, bilaterally low, or normal). In vestibular neuritis, borderline gains ranged from 0.62 to 0.73. Twenty patients (12 neuritis, six PICA strokes, two AICA strokes) had at least five interpretable HIT trials (for both ears), allowing an appropriate classification based on mean VOR gains per ear. Classifying AVS patients with bilateral VOR mean gains of 0.70 or more as suspected strokes yielded a total diagnostic accuracy of 90%, with stroke sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 92%. Video HIT VOR gains differ between peripheral and central causes of AVS. PICA strokes were readily separated from neuritis using gain measures

  5. Modification of tenascin-R expression following unilateral labyrinthectomy in rats indicates its possible role in neural plasticity of the vestibular neural circuit

    PubMed Central

    Gaal, Botond; Jóhannesson, Einar Örn; Dattani, Amit; Magyar, Agnes; Wéber, Ildikó; Matesz, Clara

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found that unilateral labyrinthectomy is accompanied by modification of hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan staining in the lateral vestibular nucleus of rats and the time course of subsequent reorganization of extracellular matrix assembly correlates to the restoration of impaired vestibular function. The tenascin-R has repelling effect on pathfinding during axonal growth/regrowth, and thus inhibits neural circuit repair. By using immunohistochemical method, we studied the modification of tenascin-R expression in the superior, medial, lateral, and descending vestibular nuclei of the rat following unilateral labyrinthectomy. On postoperative day 1, tenascin-R reaction in the perineuronal nets disappeared on the side of labyrinthectomy in the superior, lateral, medial, and rostral part of the descending vestibular nuclei. On survival day 3, the staining intensity of tenascin-R reaction in perineuronal nets recovered on the operated side of the medial vestibular nucleus, whereas it was restored by the time of postoperative day 7 in the superior, lateral and rostral part of the descending vestibular nuclei. The staining intensity of tenascin-R reaction remained unchanged in the caudal part of the descending vestibular nucleus bilaterally. Regional differences in the modification of tenascin-R expression presented here may be associated with different roles of individual vestibular nuclei in the compensatory processes. The decreased expression of the tenascin-R may suggest the extracellular facilitation of plastic modifications in the vestibular neural circuit after lesion of the labyrinthine receptors. PMID:26604908

  6. Vibration-induced nystagmus after acute peripheral vestibular loss: comparative study with other vestibule-ocular reflex tests in the yaw plane.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Won; Kim, Ji-Soo; Hong, Sung Kwang

    2011-04-01

    To validate the role of vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) detecting vestibular asymmetry by comparing several vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) parameters in the yaw plane. Prospective validation study for diagnostic test. Tertiary referral center. Seventy-four patients with unilateral vestibular loss of acute onset without a history of fluctuating vestibular function and 24 healthy volunteers. Spontaneous nystagmus, head-shaking nystagmus (HSN), and VIN using a 100 Hz handheld vibrator were recorded using a videonystagmography system. Canal paresis on the caloric test and the time constant (TC) on the step velocity test were examined as parameters of the laboratory test. Correlation analysis between horizontal VOR parameters was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of these parameters were plotted, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was compared according to the lower limiting value of TC on step velocity test as well as the presence of unilateral vestibular loss. VIN was observed in 64 (86%) of 74 patients, and it was directed toward the contralesional side in 98%. VIN showed a significant positive correlation with the canal paresis (r=0.416, p<0.001) and a negative correlation with the TC (r=-0.351, p<0.005). ROC curves of several VOR parameters were compared according to the presence of unilateral vestibular loss. The AUC of VIN was 0.882, and the cutoff intensity of VIN was 2.5 degrees per second. The AUCs of the HSN and spontaneous nystagmus were 0.774 and 0.661, respectively. The lateralization value of VIN was comparable with caloric test and superior to HSN. VIN is a useful vestibular test detecting vestibular asymmetry in the evaluation of dizziness. © 2011, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

  7. Acute peripheral vestibular syndrome of a vascular cause.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Seong-Ryong; Lee, Hyung

    2007-03-15

    Acute peripheral vestibular syndrome (APVS) is an idiopathic peripheral vestibulopathy characterized by prolonged vertigo (over 24 h), nausea, vomiting, and postural instability. There has been no previous report of APVS presumably of a vascular cause. To describe APVS presumably resulting from a vascular disturbance with embolic cerebral infarction. A 67-year-old woman developed sudden onset of severe isolated vertigo, nausea, and vomiting, which lasted for 3 days. Ten days earlier, she had had 4 episodes of transient vertigo lasting a few minutes. She had a spontaneous right-beating horizontal nystagmus with a torsional component, in the primary position and on gaze to the right or left. Caloric test showed a decreased response on the left side. Diffusion-weighted brain MRI showed 2 tiny acute infarcts in the left hippocampus and basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance angiogram showed no abnormalities. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring for 24 h showed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In this patient, clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with APVS. Considering the simultaneous onset of acute silent infarcts on brain MRI, the definite cardioembolic source with atrial fibrillation, and the episodic transient vertigo attacks before APVS, we speculate that small emboli arising from the heart may have lodged selectively in the anterior vestibular artery, producing APVS.

  8. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  9. Multiple sclerosis as a cause of the acute vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pula, J H; Newman-Toker, D E; Kattah, J C

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes dizziness and vertigo. Reports suggest responsible lesions are often in the intra-pontine 8th nerve fascicle. We sought to determine frequency and clinical features of demyelinating acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). This is a prospective observational study (1999-2011). Consecutive AVS patients (vertigo, nystagmus, nausea/vomiting, head-motion intolerance, unsteady gait) with a risk for central localization underwent structured bedside examination and neuroimaging. When applicable, we identified MS based on clinical, imaging, and laboratory features. Of 170 AVS presentations, 4% (n = 7) were due to demyelinating disease. Five had an acute MS plaque likely responsible for the clinical syndrome. Lesion location varied-1 medulla; 1 inferior cerebellar peduncle; 1 middle cerebellar peduncle; 1 posterior pontine tegmentum; 1 in the intrapontine 8th nerve fascicle; 1 superior cerebellar peduncle; 1 midbrain. Only two had a lesion in or near the intra-pontine 8th nerve fascicle. Three were first presentations (i.e., clinically isolated demyelinating syndrome), while the others were known MS. All had central oculomotor signs. In two patients, the only central sign was a normal horizontal head impulse test (h-HIT) of vestibular function. All patients improved with steroid therapy. Demyelinating disease was an uncommon cause of AVS in our series. Symptomatic lesions were not restricted to the 8th nerve fascicle. Five patients had relatively obvious oculomotor signs, making differentiation from vestibular neuritis straightforward. Two patients had unidirectional, horizontal nystagmus that followed Alexander's law and was suppressed with fixation (true pseudoneuritis). The presence of a normal h-HIT in these suggested central localization.

  10. Skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in unilateral superior canal dehiscence and otosclerosis: a vestibular Weber test.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Karkas, Alexandre; Perrin, Philippe; Perottino, Flavio; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) acts as a vestibular Weber test and reveals a vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN), elicited mainly on the vertex location, with a horizontal or torsional component beating more often toward the side of the lesion in superior canal dehiscence (SCD) than in otosclerosis (OS). In SCD, the VIN vertical component is most often up-beating. These results suggest more a global vestibular contribution than the sole stimulation of the superior semicircular canal. This study aimed to evaluate the possible occurrence of nystagmus during SVINT in unilateral conductive hearing loss related to SCD or OS. The slow-phase velocities (SPVs) of the VIN horizontal, torsional, and vertical components were recorded in patients with a unilateral otologic lesion (17 SCD, 38 OS) and 12 control subjects. Vibratory stimulations (60 Hz, 100 Hz) were applied on the vertex and on each mastoid. In SCD, VIN was observed in 82% of patients with a primarily torsional, horizontal, and vertical (up-beating) component in 40%, 30%, and 30%, respectively. Horizontal and torsional components beat toward the side of the lesion more often than in OS. Higher SPVs were observed after vertex stimulation. In OS, VIN was sparse with low amplitude and was not systematically lateralized to a specific side.

  11. Medial vestibular nucleus lesions in Wallenberg's syndrome cause decreased activity of the contralateral vestibular cortex.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Bense, Sandra; Stephan, Thomas; Brandt, Thomas; Schwaiger, Markus; Bartenstein, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Three patients with the clinical diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome caused by acute unilateral ischemic infarctions, which included the vestibular nucleus in the medullary brain stem and afferent vestibular pathways, were examined by positron emission tomography (PET) during caloric vestibular stimulation. They all had typical signs of vestibular dysfunction such as transient rotatory vertigo with vomiting at the onset, ipsiversive body and ocular lateropulsion, and a complete ocular tilt reaction with tilts of the subjective visual vertical. Compared with healthy volunteers, who show activation in a network of temporoparietal vestibular areas within both hemispheres, especially in the posterior insula and retroinsular region that contains the human homologue of the parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC) in monkeys, the activation pattern of the patients with Wallenberg's syndrome was typically changed. During caloric irrigation of the ear ipsilateral to the side of the lesion, they showed no or significantly reduced activation in the contralateral hemisphere, whereas the activation pattern in the ipsilateral hemisphere appeared "normal." These results are compatible with bilateral ascending vestibular pathways from the vestibular nuclei to the vestibular cortex. The novel finding in all three patients was that the activation patterns were compatible with the assumption that only the crossing fibers from the medial vestibular subnucleus to the contralateral medial longitudinal fascicle were affected, but the ipsilateral vestibular thalamocortical projections via the superior vestibular subnucleus were spared. Thus, the activation pattern in the PET study may reflect the vestibular tonic imbalance within the vestibular nuclei circuitry at the cortical level.

  12. Neurogenic Potential of the Vestibular Nuclei and Behavioural Recovery Time Course in the Adult Cat Are Governed by the Nature of the Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Sophie; Lacour, Michel; Tighilet, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Functional and reactive neurogenesis and astrogenesis are observed in deafferented vestibular nuclei after unilateral vestibular nerve section in adult cats. The newborn cells survive up to one month and contribute actively to the successful recovery of posturo-locomotor functions. This study investigates whether the nature of vestibular deafferentation has an incidence on the neurogenic potential of the vestibular nuclei, and on the time course of behavioural recovery. Three animal models that mimic different vestibular pathologies were used: unilateral and permanent suppression of vestibular input by unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN), or by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL, the mechanical destruction of peripheral vestibular receptors), or unilateral and reversible blockade of vestibular nerve input using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Neurogenesis and astrogenesis were revealed in the vestibular nuclei using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a newborn cell marker, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) were used to identify astrocytes and GABAergic neurons, respectively. Spontaneous nystagmus and posturo-locomotor tests (static and dynamic balance performance) were carried out to quantify the behavioural recovery process. Results showed that the nature of vestibular loss determined the cellular plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei and affected the time course of behavioural recovery. Interestingly, the deafferented vestibular nuclei express neurogenic potential after acute and total vestibular loss only (UVN), while non-structural plastic processes are involved when the vestibular deafferentation is less drastic (UL, TTX). This is the first experimental evidence that the vestibular complex in the brainstem can become neurogenic under specific injury. These new data are of interest for understanding the factors favouring the expression of functional neurogenesis in adult mammals in a brain repair perspective, and are of

  13. Correlation between the dizziness handicap inventory and balance performance during the acute phase of unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Son, Eun Jin; Lee, Dong-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) is widely used to evaluate self-perceived handicap due to dizziness, and is known to correlate with vestibular function tests in chronic dizziness. However, whether DHI reflects subjective symptoms during the acute phase has not been studied. This study aims to investigate the correlations of subjective and objective measurements to highlight parameters that reflect the severity of dizziness during the first week of acute unilateral vestibulopathy. Thirty-seven patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy were examined. Patients' subjective perceptions of dizziness were measured using the DHI, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale (VVAS), Disability Scale (DS), and Activity-Specific Balance Scale (ABC). Additionally, the oculomotor tests, Romberg and sharpened Romberg tests, functional reach test, and dynamic visual acuity tests were performed. The correlation between the DHI and other tests was evaluated. DHI-total scores exhibited a moderately positive correlation with VVAS and DS, and a moderately negative correlation with ABC. However, DHI-total score did not correlate with results of the Romberg, sharpened Romberg, or functional reach tests. When compared among four groups divided according to DHI scores, VVAS and DS scores exhibited statistically significant differences, but no significant differences were detected for other test results. Our findings revealed that the DHI correlated significantly with self-perceived symptoms measured by VVAS and DS, but not ABC. There was no significant correlation with other balance function tests during the first week of acute vestibulopathy. The results suggest that DHI, VVAS and DS may be more useful to measure the severity of acute dizziness symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Laboral outcome after acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, A; Kupchik, M; Gilad, R; Lampl, Y; Sadeh, M

    2001-01-01

    Sixty-five adult patients who had acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV) were followed-up to determine their functional outcome. During the acute phase, they were treated with betahistine and mobilization. In the entire study population, APV was not significantly associated with a change in occupational activities, physical work or driving ability. Older individuals had significantly attributed a change in work to disease other than APV. Change attributed to APV occurred significantly more frequently in women than in men. The therapeutic approach seems beneficial.

  15. A video-oculographic study of acute vestibular syndromes.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H N; McGuigan, S; Infeld, B; Sultana, R V; Gerraty, R P

    2016-10-01

    To quantitate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain in patients with acute vestibular neuritis (VN) and repeat this daily using a portable video head impulse test device to assess vestibular recovery in the acute stage of VN. We enrolled adults with symptoms and signs of VN presenting to the emergency department within 48 h of symptom onset. We recorded the eye movement response to rapid head impulses using the ICS Impulse(™) video head impulse test device on each day of their hospital admission. There were eight patients (75% men, aged 35-85 years) who had marked variation in their initial vestibulo-ocular reflex gains. Three patients had vestibulo-ocular reflex gains in the normal range initially, despite having physical signs of VN. Two patients had initial contralesional gains below the normal range, associated with markedly reduced ipsilesional gains. Most patients' vestibulo-ocular reflex gains increased during admission, but four patients' ipsilesional gains remained in the abnormal range. Patients with lower vestibulo-ocular reflex gains were less likely to improve into the normal range. No patient with initially abnormal VOR gain recovered normal vestibulo-ocular reflex gain along with resolution of physical signs. Early video head impulse testing in the emergency department and each day of admission is feasible and well tolerated. There is marked variation in VOR gain in patients with symptoms and signs of VN, and low initial VOR gains are a predictor for low VOR gains on subsequent days. Improvement in VOR gains was seen in most patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nonlinear analysis of sensory organization test for subjects with unilateral vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Hsu, Li-Chi; Lin, Chen; Chang, Fu-Ling; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular disorder is the cause of approximately 50% of dizziness in older people. The vestibular system is a critical postural control mechanism, and posturography analysis is helpful for diagnosing vestibular disorder. In clinical practice, the sensory organization test (SOT) is used to quantify postural control in an upright stance under different test conditions. However, both aging and vestibular disorder cause declines of postural control mechanisms. The aim of this study was to enhance the performance of the SOT using a nonlinear algorithm of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and to verify the differences of effects caused by aging and/or illnesses benefits to clinical diagnosis. A total of 51 subjects belonging to 3 groups--healthy-young, healthy-elderly and dizzy--were recruited for this study. New dynamic parameters of the SOT were derived from the center of pressure (COP) signals. EMD served as an adaptive filter bank to derive the low- and high-frequency components of the COP. The effects on four ratios of sensory analysis caused by aging and vestibular disorder can be investigated for the specific frequency bands. According to our findings, new SOT parameters derived from the component with the specific frequency band more sensitively reflect the functional condition of vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, both aging and vestibular dysfunction caused an increase in magnitude for the low-frequency component of the AP-direction COP time series. In summary, the low-frequency fluctuation reflects the stability of postural control, while the high-frequency fluctuation is sensitive to the functional condition of the sensory system. EMD successfully improved the accuracy of SOT measurements in this investigation.

  17. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality based vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness, gait and balance impairment in adults with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Dara; Herdman, Susan; Moloney, Roisin; Murray, Deirdre; Duffy, Douglas; Malone, Kareena; French, Helen; Hone, Stephen; Conroy, Ronan; McConn-Walsh, Rory

    2012-03-26

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular loss results in gait and balance impairment, dizziness and oscillopsia. Vestibular rehabilitation benefits patients but optimal treatment remains unknown. Virtual reality is an emerging tool in rehabilitation and provides opportunities to improve both outcomes and patient satisfaction with treatment. The Nintendo Wii Fit Plus® (NWFP) is a low cost virtual reality system that challenges balance and provides visual and auditory feedback. It may augment the motor learning that is required to improve balance and gait, but no trials to date have investigated efficacy. In a single (assessor) blind, two centre randomised controlled superiority trial, 80 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss will be randomised to either conventional or virtual reality based (NWFP) vestibular rehabilitation for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure is gait speed (measured with three dimensional gait analysis). Secondary outcomes include computerised posturography, dynamic visual acuity, and validated questionnaires on dizziness, confidence and anxiety/depression. Outcome will be assessed post treatment (8 weeks) and at 6 months. Advances in the gaming industry have allowed mass production of highly sophisticated low cost virtual reality systems that incorporate technology previously not accessible to most therapists and patients. Importantly, they are not confined to rehabilitation departments, can be used at home and provide an accurate record of adherence to exercise. The benefits of providing augmented feedback, increasing intensity of exercise and accurately measuring adherence may improve conventional vestibular rehabilitation but efficacy must first be demonstrated. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01442623.

  18. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality based vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness, gait and balance impairment in adults with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unilateral peripheral vestibular loss results in gait and balance impairment, dizziness and oscillopsia. Vestibular rehabilitation benefits patients but optimal treatment remains unkown. Virtual reality is an emerging tool in rehabilitation and provides opportunities to improve both outcomes and patient satisfaction with treatment. The Nintendo Wii Fit Plus® (NWFP) is a low cost virtual reality system that challenges balance and provides visual and auditory feedback. It may augment the motor learning that is required to improve balance and gait, but no trials to date have investigated efficacy. Methods/Design In a single (assessor) blind, two centre randomised controlled superiority trial, 80 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss will be randomised to either conventional or virtual reality based (NWFP) vestibular rehabilitation for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure is gait speed (measured with three dimensional gait analysis). Secondary outcomes include computerised posturography, dynamic visual acuity, and validated questionnaires on dizziness, confidence and anxiety/depression. Outcome will be assessed post treatment (8 weeks) and at 6 months. Discussion Advances in the gaming industry have allowed mass production of highly sophisticated low cost virtual reality systems that incorporate technology previously not accessible to most therapists and patients. Importantly, they are not confined to rehabilitation departments, can be used at home and provide an accurate record of adherence to exercise. The benefits of providing augmented feedback, increasing intensity of exercise and accurately measuring adherence may improve conventional vestibular rehabilitation but efficacy must first be demonstrated. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01442623 PMID:22449224

  19. Acute Transient Vestibular Syndrome: Prevalence of Stroke and Efficacy of Bedside Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Park, Min-Gyu; Choi, Seo Young; Park, Kyung-Pil; Baik, Seung Kug; Kim, Ji-Soo; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of stroke and efficacy of bedside evaluation in diagnosing stroke in acute transient vestibular syndrome (ATVS). We performed a prospective, single-center, observational study that had consecutively recruited 86 patients presenting with ATVS to the emergency department of Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital from January to December 2014. All patients received a constructed evaluation, including HINTS plus (head impulse, nystagmus patterns, test of skew, and finger rubbing) and brain magnetic resonance imagings. Patients without an obvious cause further received perfusion-weighted imaging. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine clinical parameters to identify stroke in ATVS. The prevalence of stroke was 27% in ATVS. HINTS plus could not be applied to the majority of patients because of the resolution of the vestibular symptoms, and magnetic resonance imagings were falsely negative in 43% of confirmed strokes. Ten patients (12%) showed unilateral cerebellar hypoperfusion on perfusion-weighted imaging without an infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging, and 8 of them had a focal stenosis or hypoplasia of the corresponding vertebral artery. The higher risk of stroke in ATVS was found in association with craniocervical pain (odds ratio, 9.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-45.2) and focal neurological symptoms/signs (odds ratio, 15.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-93.8). Bedside examination and routine magnetic resonance imagings have a limitation in diagnosing strokes presenting with ATVS, and perfusion imaging may help to identify strokes in ATVS of unknown cause. Associated craniocervical pain and focal neurological symptoms/signs are the useful clues for strokes in ATVS. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Plasticity of the histamine H3 receptors after acute vestibular lesion in the adult cat

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Mourre, Christiane; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    After unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) many molecular and neurochemical mechanisms underlie the neurophysiological reorganizations occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) complex, as well as the behavioral recovery process. As a key regulator, the histaminergic system appears to be a likely candidate because drugs interfering with histamine (HA) neurotransmission facilitate behavioral recovery after vestibular lesion. This study aimed at analyzing the post-lesion changes of the histaminergic system by quantifying binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3R; mediating namely histamine autoinhibition) using a histamine H3 receptor agonist ([3H]N-α-methylhistamine). Experiments were done in brain sections of control cats (N = 6) and cats submitted to UVN and killed 1 (N = 6) or 3 (N = 6) weeks after the lesion. UVN induced a bilateral decrease in binding density of the agonist [3H]N-α-methylhistamine to H3R in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN) at 1 week post-lesion, with a predominant down-regulation in the ipsilateral TMN. The bilateral decrease remained at the 3 weeks survival time and became symmetric. Concerning brainstem structures, binding density in the VN, the prepositus hypoglossi, the subdivisions of the inferior olive decreased unilaterally on the ipsilateral side at 1 week and bilaterally 3 weeks after UVN. Similar changes were observed in the subdivisions of the solitary nucleus only 1 week after the lesion. These findings indicate vestibular lesion induces plasticity of the histamine H3R, which could contribute to vestibular function recovery. PMID:24427120

  1. Unilateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion induces serotonin increase in medial vestibular nuclei: a study using microdialysis in vivo coupled with HPLC-ECD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Qian; Xu, Jia; Liu, Junxiu; Ke, Jia; Kang, Wei; Li, Tao; Ma, Furong

    2015-06-07

    Unilateral single semicircular canal occlusion (USSCO) is an effective treatment for some cases of intractable vertigo. All patients suffer behavioural imbalance caused by surgery, and then recover with a resumption of vestibular function. However, the compensation mechanism has not been fully evaluated. Findings suggest that serotonin (5-HT) is released from nerve terminals, and plays a vital role in the plasticity of the central nervous system. In this study, we performed surgery of unilateral single semicircular canal occlusion (USSCO) on guinea pigs, and investigated the change of 5-HT by in vivo microdialysis of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). A total of 12 guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, namely the USSCO group and the control group. Animals in the USSCO group underwent surgery of lateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion, and those in the control group experienced the same operation but just to expose the horizontal semicircular canal without occlusion. Vestibular disturbance symptoms were observed in the case of the USSCO group, e.g. head tilting, and forced circular movements and spontaneous nystagmus at postoperative days 1 and 3. The basal level of 5-HT was determined to be 316.78 ± 16.62 nM. It elevated to 448.85 ± 24.56 nM at one day following occlusion (P = 0.001). The increase was completely abolished with the vestibular dysfunction recovery. The results showed that unilateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion could increase the 5-HT level in MVN. 5-HT may play a significant role in the process of central vestibular compensation with residual vestibular function.

  2. Unilateral acute foot drop due to diffuse axonal injury after head trauma.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Nail; Gelal, Mustafa Fazil; Oğuzoğlu, Serdar; Minoğlu, Mustafa

    2008-09-01

    Acute foot drop due to diffuse axonal injury (DAI) has not been previously described in the literature. In this report, we present a patient with unilateral acute foot drop caused by a DAI lesion after head trauma.

  3. Effects of primary caregiver participation in vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral neglect patients with right hemispheric stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chin-Ying; Huang, Yu-Hui; Chou, Li-Wei; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Wang, Ray-Yau; Lin, Li-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The current study aims to investigate the effects of primary caregiver participation in vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on improving the measures of neglect, activities of daily living (ADL), balance, and falls of unilateral neglect (UN) patients. Methods This study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Both experimental (n = 24) and control groups (n = 24) received conventional rehabilitation. The experimental group undertook VR for a month. During the first and second weeks, a registered nurse trained the experimental group in VR. The primary caregivers in the experimental group supervised and guided their patients in VR during the third and fourth weeks. The outcome measures were neglect, ADL, balance, and falls. Results The two groups of UN patients showed a significant improvement in neglect, ADL, and balance over time. Based on the generalized estimating equations model, an interaction was observed between groups and times. Significant interactions were observed between the VR group at days 14 and 28 in the areas of neglect, ADL, and balance. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the number of falls. Conclusion Neglect, ADL, and balance among UN patients with right hemispheric stroke can be improved through the participation of primary caregivers in VR. Trained informal caregivers were recommended to provide VR guidance and supervision to patients who suffer from UN. PMID:23630423

  4. Cerebellar Infarction Presenting with Acute Vestibular Syndrome in Two U.S. Air Force Pilots.

    PubMed

    Hesselbrock, Roger R

    2017-09-01

    Cerebellar infarction is an uncommon but serious cause of isolated acute vestibular symptoms, particularly in young, healthy individuals, and can easily be overlooked. We present two cases of cerebellar infarction in U.S. Air Force pilots, one of which occurred during flight. A 41-yr-old man developed acute vertigo, disequilibrium, nausea, and headache, with progressive slow symptomatic improvement, and presented to medical attention 4 d after symptom onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right inferomedial cerebellar infarction. Echocardiography discovered patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm. A 40-yr-old man developed severe vertigo, nausea, and vomiting during initial aircraft descent. Head computed tomography scan was performed acutely and was normal. Initial assessment was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Brain magnetic resonance imaging 1 mo after symptom onset showed a small right inferior cerebellar infarction. Patent foramen ovale and bilateral atrial enlargement were seen on echocardiography. Both pilots made full neurological recoveries and were eventually returned to flight status. Central causes of isolated acute vestibular symptoms are uncommon and are often not considered in otherwise healthy individuals. Cerebellar infarction is one of these uncommon but increasingly recognized causes of acute vestibular symptoms. As evaluation and management of central causes are much different from peripheral conditions, prompt localization confirmation is paramount. Accurate evidence-based bedside screening methods are available for rapid localization. Awareness of the possibility of central etiologies and careful clinical evaluation with application of bedside screening methods in patients with acute vestibular symptoms will reduce the number of inaccurate diagnoses.Hesselbrock RR. Cerebellar infarction presenting with acute vestibular syndrome in two U.S. Air Force pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):880-883.

  5. An unusual stroke-like clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: acute vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-04-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are common neurological symptoms in general practice. Most patients have benign peripheral vestibular disorders, but some have dangerous central causes. Recent research has shown that bedside oculomotor examinations accurately discriminate central from peripheral lesions in those with new, acute, continuous vertigo/dizziness with nausea/vomiting, gait unsteadiness, and nystagmus, known as the acute vestibular syndrome. A 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute vestibular syndrome for 1 week. The patient had no focal neurological symptoms or signs. The presence of direction-fixed, horizontal nystagmus suppressed by visual fixation without vertical ocular misalignment (skew deviation) was consistent with an acute peripheral vestibulopathy, but bilaterally normal vestibuloocular reflexes, confirmed by quantitative horizontal head impulse testing, strongly indicated a central localization. Because of a long delay in care, the patient left the emergency department without treatment. He returned 1 week later with progressive gait disturbance, limb ataxia, myoclonus, and new cognitive deficits. His subsequent course included a rapid neurological decline culminating in home hospice placement and death within 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed restricted diffusion involving the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex. Spinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was elevated. The rapidly progressive clinical course with dementia, ataxia, and myoclonus plus corroborative neuroimaging and spinal fluid findings confirmed a clinicoradiographic diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an initial presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease closely mimicking vestibular neuritis, expanding the known clinical spectrum of prion disease presentations. Despite the initial absence of neurological signs, the central lesion location was differentiated from a benign peripheral vestibulopathy at the first visit

  6. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, Susan J.; Whitney, Susan L.; Cass, Stephen P.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Fife, Terry D.; Furman, Joseph M.; Getchius, Thomas S. D.; Goebel, Joel A.; Shepard, Neil T.; Woodhouse, Sheelah N.

    2016-01-01

    patient to understand the goals of the program and how to manage and progress themselves independently. As a general guide, persons without significant comorbidities that affect mobility and with acute or subacute unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week supervised sessions for 2 to 3 weeks; persons with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 4 to 6 weeks; and persons with bilateral vestibular hypofunction may need once a week sessions for 8 to 12 weeks. In addition to supervised sessions, patients are provided a daily home exercise program. Disclaimer: These recommendations are intended as a guide for physical therapists and clinicians to optimize rehabilitation outcomes for persons with peripheral vestibular hypofunction undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Video Abstract available for more insights from the author (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A124). PMID:26913496

  7. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul; Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV),more » defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.« less

  8. [Metastasis to the temporal bone may cause acute peripheral vestibular syndrome and impaired hearing].

    PubMed

    Grubbe Gregersen, Kristine; Hansen, Søren

    2013-05-27

    Metastasis to the petrous apex of the temporal bone may cause acute peripheral vestibular syndrome and impaired hearing or be asymptomatic. Contrast computed tomography should be performed to exclude pathology in the temporal bone in patients with vestibulocochlear deficit, a history of cancer and no findings on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a case of a 61-year-old man with metastatic prostatic carcinoma to the temporal bone.

  9. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. IV, Responses to angular acceleration and to bilateral caloric stimulation following unilateral caloric habituation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1967-01-01

    The paper provides information that angular acceleration tests of the vestibular system transcend clinical caloric tests in revealing adaptation to angular accelerations as experienced in rotary motions, including flight situations. The caloric test ...

  10. Acute unilateral hip pain in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP).

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Frederick S; Al Mukaddam, Mona; Pignolo, Robert J

    2018-04-01

    Flare-ups of the hips are among the most feared and disabling complications of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) and are poorly understood. In order to better understand the nature of hip flare-ups in FOP, we evaluated 25 consecutive individuals with classic FOP (14 males, 11 females; 3-56years old, median age, 17years old) who presented with acute unilateral hip pain. All 25 individuals were suspected of having a flare-up of the hip based on clinical history and a favorable response to a four day course of high-dose oral prednisone. Ten individuals (40%) experienced rebound symptoms of pain and/or stiffness within seven days after discontinuation of prednisone and all ten subsequently developed heterotopic ossification (HO) or decreased mobility of the affected hip. None of the 14 individuals who experienced sustained relief of symptoms following a course of oral prednisone experienced HO or decreased mobility. Incidental radiographic findings at the time of presentation were multifactoral and included osteochondromas of the proximal femur (18/25; 72%), degenerative arthritis (17/25; 68%), developmental hip dysplasia (15/25; 60%), previously existing heterotopic ossification (12/25; 48%), intra-articular synovial osteochondromatosis (8/25; 32%) or traumatic fractures through pre-existing heterotopic bone (1/25; 4%). Developmental joint pathology may confound clinical evaluation of hip pain in FOP. The most useful modality for suspecting an ossification-prone flare-up of the hip was lack of sustained response to a brief course of oral prednisone. Evaluation of soft tissue edema by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging showed promise in identifying ossification-prone flare-ups and warrants further analysis in prospective studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of artifacts on VOR gain measures by video-oculography in the acute vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Wozniak, Amy; Eibenberger, Karin; Kattah, Jorge C; Guede, Cynthia I; Zee, David S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2016-11-03

    The video head impulse test (HIT) measures vestibular function (vestibulo-ocular reflex [VOR] gain - ratio of eye to head movement), and, in principle, could be used to make a distinction between central and peripheral causes of vertigo. However, VOG recordings contain artifacts, so using unfiltered device data might bias the final diagnosis, limiting application in frontline healthcare settings such as the emergency department (ED). We sought to assess whether unfiltered data (containing artifacts) from a video-oculography (VOG) device have an impact on VOR gain measures in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). This cross-sectional study compared VOG HIT results 'unfiltered' (standard device output) versus 'filtered' (artifacts manually removed) and relative to a gold standard final diagnosis (neuroimaging plus clinical follow-up) in 23 ED patients with acute dizziness, nystagmus, gait disturbance and head motion intolerance. Mean VOR gain assessment alone (unfiltered device data) discriminated posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) strokes from vestibular neuritis with 91% accuracy in AVS. Optimal stroke discrimination cut points were bilateral VOR gain >0.7099 (unfiltered data) versus >0.7041 (filtered data). For PICA stroke sensitivity and specificity, there was no clinically-relevant difference between unfiltered and filtered data-sensitivity for PICA stroke was 100% for both data sets and specificity was almost identical (87.5% unfiltered versus 91.7% filtered). More impulses increased gain precision. The bedside HIT remains the single best method for discriminating between vestibular neuritis and PICA stroke in patients presenting AVS. Quantitative VOG HIT testing in the ED is associated with frequent artifacts that reduce precision but not accuracy. At least 10-20 properly-performed HIT trials per tested ear are recommended for a precise VOR gain estimate.

  13. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate.

  14. Corticosteroids and vestibular exercises in vestibular neuritis. Single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Goudakos, John K; Markou, Konstantinos D; Psillas, George; Vital, Victor; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE The management of patients with unilateral acute vestibular neuritis (VN) has not been established to date. OBJECTIVE To compare the use of vestibular exercises vs corticosteroid therapy in the recovery of patients with acute VN. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective, single-blind, randomized clinical trial at a primary referral center. Among all patients with acute vertigo, those having VN were eligible for inclusion in the study. INTERVENTIONS Forty patients with acute VN were randomly assigned to perform vestibular exercises or to receive corticosteroid therapy. After a baseline examination, follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 6, and 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Efficacy outcomes included clinical, canal, and otolith recovery. Scores on the European Evaluation of Vertigo Scale and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory were used for the evaluation of clinical recovery. Findings of caloric irrigation and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials indicated canal and otolith improvement, respectively. RESULTS Comparing the 2 treatment groups, no statistically significant differences were found in clinical, canal, or otolith recovery. At the 6-month examination, the number of patients with complete disease resolution in the corticosteroids group was significantly higher than that in the vestibular exercises group. However, at the end of the follow-up period, 45%(9 of 20) of patients in the vestibular exercises group and 50% (10 of 20) of patients in the corticosteroids group had complete disease resolution (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Treating patients who have acute VN with vestibular exercises seems equivalently effective as treating them with corticosteroid therapy in clinical, caloric, and otolith recovery. Corticosteroid therapy seems to enhance earlier complete acute VN resolution, with no added benefit in the long-term prognosis.

  15. [Acute vestibular syndrome : Clinical examination outperforms MRI in the detection of central lesions].

    PubMed

    Thömke, F

    2017-12-12

    A significant number of patients who seek medical treatment in an emergency department because of vertigo or dizziness, suffer from acute vestibular syndrome. This is characterized by sustained vertigo, horizontal or horizontal rotatory jerk nystagmus, and unsteady stance and gait. In the acute situation it is crucial to differentiate patients with a peripheral vestibular disorder from those with a central disease. A number of recent studies have shown that a structured clinical examination enables a reliable differential diagnosis of central or peripheral disorders. Such an examination includes the head impulse test, an alternating cover test to detect a skew deviation of the eyes, and observation of nystagmus in different positions of gaze and using Frenzel goggles. This examination is more sensitive for the detection of brainstem stroke than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at least within 48 h after symptom onset. As these facts are still little known, in practice there is an overuse of cost-intensive imaging with computed tomography and MRI, and a number of patient brainstem strokes in the vertebrobasilar circulation may be missed. This paper describes the relevant studies on this topic.

  16. [Unilateral acute pulmonary edema and ischemic myocardial process: a case report].

    PubMed

    Bentaleb, A; Tagu, P; Vascaut, L

    2008-08-01

    Unilateral acute pulmonary oedema (APO) is a rare radioclinical finding. It occurs secondary to multiple specific and rare pathological processes. Functional ischemic mitral regurgitation (FIMR) secondary to myocardial necrosis is one of the rare aetiologies involved in its pathogenesis. This concerns a 94-year-old male patient with a history of myocardial infarction who presented with a clinical picture of unilateral APO secondary to functional mitral regurgitation as a complication of myocardial necrosis. In addition to the clinical presentation and unilateral radiological findings, the diagnosis was based essentially on the electrocardiographic tracing, as well as changes in cardiac enzyme levels and transthoracic echocardiogram coupled with Doppler tissue imaging. This resulted after ruling out many differential diagnoses. Unilateral APO secondary to functional mitral regurgitation often presents diagnostic challenges and problems of initial management for the clinician. There are multiple aetiologies of acute unilateral pulmonary oedema, namely mechanical (re-expansion), lesional, vascular, bronchial obstructions, as well as iatrogenic causes, as is the case with some lung transplantations. As with all cases of APO, the treatment is based mainly on diuretics with high-flow oxygen therapy in association with an anticoagulant, which is usually effectively combined with a platelet aggregation inhibiting drug and sometimes with vasodilators and beta-blockers. Surgical treatment with valvuloplasty or valvular replacement appears to be the most effective means for preventing relapse.

  17. [Influence of betahistine on the expression of histamine H3 receptor in the medial vestibular nucleus following unilateral labyrinthectomy in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingcheng; Yin, Shihua; Liu, Yuan; Rao, Xiuli; Wei, Shunlian

    2014-12-01

    To observe the influence of betahistine on the expression of histamine H3 receptor in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Fifty-six healthy guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups:the sham-operated group (group I), the UL group[group II, and UL+betahistine (BET) group (group III)], BET was intraperitoneally injection at 2.17 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1) for 7 days. The expression of histamine H3 receptor was analyzed by immunohistochemistry at 1 day, 3 days and 7 days after UL. H3 receptors were presented in the MVN and the expression of histamine H3 receptor were increased significantly in the ipsilateral MVN at 1 and 3 days after UL(P < 0.05), the change turned into the normal value at 7 days(P > 0.05). In the UL+BET group, the intensity of histamine H3 receptor was lower than that in the UL at 1 day and 3 days(4.25 ± 0.71, 3.50 ± 0.92 vs 5.75 ± 0.71, 5.50 ± 0.93, P < 0.05). However, the changes turned into the normal values at 3 and 7 days (P > 0.05). The early stage of the vestibular compensation process may be associated with the change of H3 receptor expression in MVN. In the UL+BET group the histamine H3 receptor recovered quickly.

  18. Nitric oxide production after acute, unilateral hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Lee, K H; Rico, P; Billiar, T R; Pinsky, M R

    1998-12-01

    To determine if acute unilateral lung injury induces only local or systemic inflammatory effects by measuring the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its metabolites (nitrites and nitrates) in the injured and the contralateral lung and the blood initially and 4 hrs after injury. Unilateral hydrochloric acid instillation in split lung intubated subject studied over time. Animal physiology laboratory. Five mongrel dogs. Instillation of 10 mL of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid into one lung via a plastic catheter. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was done at 4 hrs. Unilateral acid instillation did not alter systemic blood pressure or cardiac output, nor did it induce arterial hypoxemia. The BAL nitrite and nitrate level on the side of injury was higher than the control side (3.6+/-1.36 vs. 1.5+/-1.58 mM, p < .05), and serum nitrites and nitrates levels also decreased from the levels before acid instillation levels (p < .05). Exhaled NO levels were measured only in three animals. The levels increased acutely on hydrochloric acid instillation from only the injured lung and returned to baseline over several minutes. However, the level of exhaled NO from the injured lung failed to increase 4 hrs after injury, despite the increase in BAL nitrites and nitrates. Acute unilateral lung injury in the dog results in increased NO production that is compartmentalized to the injured lung. The increase in exhaled NO after injury is transient and does not allow one to monitor the progress of lung injury.

  19. Analysis of audio-vestibular assessment in acute low-tone hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Im, Gi Jung; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study demonstrated excellent hearing recovery following the combined treatment of diuretic and oral steroid, and electrocochleography (ECoG) was significantly higher than normal side. This study reports characteristics of acute low-tone hearing loss (ALHL) that show the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG, and excellent recovery, even-though low-tone hearing loss is worse, which can be different compared with sudden deafness. Objective To analyze ALHL without vertigo, this study compared the ALHL group with all patients exhibiting low-tone hearing loss and ear fullness. Hearing changes and vestibular functions were analyzed. Materials and methods ALHL was defined as a mean hearing loss of ≥ 30 dB at 125, 250, and 500 Hz, and ≤ 20 dB at 2, 4, and 8 kHz. From 156 cases of low-tone hearing loss of more than 10 dB without vertigo, 31 met the ALHL criteria and were subjected to audio-vestibular assessments including PTA, ECoG, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and caloric testing. Results In ALHL, low-tone hearing loss was 42.7 ± 9.5 dB, and 83.9% of ALHL significantly recovered by more than 10 dB. The ECoG in ALHL was 0.334 ± 0.11 (higher than 0.25 ± 0.08 on the normal side) and ECoG abnormality was 35.5% (the greater low-tone hearing loss, the higher ECoG value).

  20. Eye movement responses to active, high-frequency pitch and yaw head rotations in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss or posterior semicircular canal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Gianna-Poulin, Claire C; Stallings, Valerie; Black, F Owen

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the eye movement responses to active head rotation in six subjects with complete unilateral vestibular loss (UVL), five subjects with posterior canal plugging (PCP) and age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Subjects performed head rotations in the pitch and yaw planes at frequencies ranging from 2 to 6 Hz, while looking at an earth-fixed target. Vertical eye movement gains obtained in UVL, PCP and normal subjects were not significantly different. Vertical phases decreased with increasing head movement frequencies in both UVL and PCP subjects. Although this decrease produced significantly different vertical phases between UVL and normal subjects for head movements above 3.9 Hz, vertical phases in some normal subjects were similar to those obtained in UVL subjects. We conclude that active head oscillations in the pitch plane are not clinically useful for the detection of vertical canal impairment limited to one ear. As expected, UVL subjects showed reduced horizontal gains, and eye velocity asymmetries during active head rotation in the yaw plane. Results in some PCP subjects suggested possible minor impairments of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflexes.

  1. [CHARACTERIZATION OF VESTIBULAR DISORDERS IN THE INJURED PERSONS WITH THE BRAIN CONCUSSION IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Skobska, O E; Kadzhaya, N V; Andreyev, O A; Potapov, E V

    2015-04-01

    There were examined 32 injured persons, ageing (34.1 ± 1.3) yrs at average, for the brain commotion (BC). The adopted protocol SCAT-3 (Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool, 3rd ed.), DHI (Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire), computer stabilography (KS) were applied for the vestibular disorders diagnosis. There was established, that in acute period of BC a dyssociation between regression of objective neurological symptoms and permanence of the BC indices occurs, what confirms a latent disorder of the balance function. Changes of basic indices of statokinesiography, including increase of the vibration amplitude enhancement in general centre of pressure in a saggital square and the BC square (235.3 ± 13.7) mm2 in a modified functional test of Romberg with the closed eyes is possible to apply as objective criteria for the BC diagnosis.

  2. Pitfalls and Rewards for Implementing Ocular Motor Testing in Acute Vestibular Syndrome: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Dumitrascu, Oana M; Torbati, Sam; Tighiouart, Mourad; Newman-Toker, David E; Song, Shlee S

    2017-03-01

    Isolated acute vestibular syndrome (iAVS) presentations to the emergency department (ED) pose management challenges, given the concerns for posterior circulation strokes. False-negative brain imaging may erroneously reassure clinicians, whereas HINTS-plus examination outperforms imaging to screen for strokes in iAVS. We studied the feasibility of implementing HINTS-plus testing in the ED, aiming to reduce neuroimaging in patients with iAVS. We launched an institutional Quality Improvement initiative, using DMAIC methodology. The outcome measures [proportion of iAVS subjects who had HINTS-plus examinations and underwent neuroimaging by computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI)] were compared before and after the established intervention. The intervention consisted of formal training for neurologists and emergency physicians on how to perform, document, and interpret HINTS-plus and implementation of novel iAVS management algorithm. Neuroimaging was not recommended if HINTS-plus suggested peripheral vestibular etiology. If a central process was suspected, brain MRI/MR angiogram was performed. Head CT was reserved only for thrombolytic time-window cases. In the first 2 months postimplementation, HINTS-plus testing performance by neurologists increased from 0% to 80% (P=0.007), and by ED providers from 0% to 9.09% (P=0.367). Head CT scans were reduced from 18.5% to 6.25%. Brain MRI use was reduced from 51.8% to 31.2%. About 60% of the iAVS subjects were discharged from the ED; none were readmitted or had another ED presentation in the ensuing 30 days. Implementation of HINTS-plus evaluation in the ED is valuable and feasible for neurologists, but challenging for emergency physicians. Future studies should determine the "dose-response" curve of educational interventions.

  3. [Objective assessment of disorders of visual perception following unilateral vestibular loss. Studies of the so-called Dandy symptom].

    PubMed

    Stoll, W; Werner, F; Kauffmann, G

    1991-02-01

    Visual ability and compensatory eye movements during defined vertical oscillation were investigated in 20 patients with unilateral lesions of labyrinthine function and in 20 normal subjects. Oscillation frequencies were performed at the rate of 1 to 1.5 Hz with an amplitude of 5 cm, comparative to head locomotions of a running person. In synchronism with this, the visual function was tested with Landolt rings. Patients complaining of subjective visual disturbance during walking and running, also presented a measurable blur of vision under test conditions. In addition, eye movements were recorded and classified into three types. However, these eye movements showed no relation to gaze function. Our results suggest that the otolith-ocular reflex may participate in adjusting the vertical eye position during vertical stimulations at low frequencies. The effect of visual disturbances in patients with labyrinthine lesions is explained by the "efference-copy" initially described by von Holst. The efference-copy is responsible for the neutralisation of provoked retinal perceptions.

  4. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  5. The Short-Term and Intermediate-Term Risk of Second Neoplasms After Diagnosis and Treatment of Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: Analysis of 9460 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Matthew L., E-mail: carlson.matthew@mayo.edu; Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; Glasgow, Amy E.

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second intracranial neoplasms after the diagnosis and treatment of sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database including all patients identified with a diagnosis of VS and a second intracranial tumor. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the incidence of second tumors while allowing for censoring at loss to follow-up or death. Multivariable associations between treatment modality and second tumor formation were explored using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Two illustrative cases are also presented. Results: In all, 9460 patients with unilateral VS weremore » identified between 2004 and 2012. Overall, 66 (0.7%) patients experienced a separate intracranial tumor, benign or malignant, after treatment of VS. Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to second neoplasm at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.3%, 0.7%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable comparison between VS treatment modalities revealed that the risk of second tumor formation was similar between radiation and surgery (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-1.51; P=.93) but greater for tumors managed with observation alone compared with radiation (HR 2.48; 95% CI 1.31-4.71; P<.01). A total of 6 (0.06%) intracranial malignancies were diagnosed after VS treatment. Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to malignancy at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0%, 0.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. After adjustment for age at diagnosis, sex, and treatment modality, the probability of malignancy after radiation was not greater than after observation alone or microsurgery (HR 4.88; 95% CI 0.85-28.14; P=.08) during the study period. Conclusions: The risk for the development of a second intracranial neoplasm, benign or malignant, at 5 years after treatment of unilateral VS is approximately 0.8%, whereas the risk of acquiring a separate malignancy is 0.1%, or approximately 1 per 1000

  6. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  7. [Management experience of acute renal failure induced by unilateral ureteral calculi obstruction].

    PubMed

    Tan, Fu-qing; Shen, Bo-hua; Xie, Li-ping; Meng, Hong-zhou; Fang, Dan-bo; Wang, Chao-jun

    2013-05-28

    To explore the causes and treatment options of acute renal failure induced by unilateral ureteral calculi obstruction. The clinical data of 12 cases of acute renal failure induced by unilateral ureteral calculi obstruction between August 2008 and July 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 5 males and 7 females with an average age of 65.7 years. Their clinical data and treatment options were retrospectively analyzed and summarized. Seven cases showed right side ureteral calculus with hydronephrosis while another 5 presented left side ureteral calculus with hydronephrosis. Serum creatinine was higher than 310 µmol/L in 12 cases. Anuria appeared in 4 cases for 1-7 days while oliguria in 8 cases for 2-10 days. High fever was present in 11 cases, the highest of whom was 40 °C. White blood cell count increased in 10 cases (>10×10(9)/L) and decreased in 2 cases (<4 × 10(9)/L). The therapeutic options included insertion of double J stent for internal drainage (n = 1), percutaneous nephrostomy for external drainage (n = 10) and open operation (n = 1). Traditional treatments were performed to manage ureteral calculus in the above 11 cases with drainage. All cases had improved renal function after comprehensive treatment of anti-infection, antishock, rinsing stones and relieving obstruction. All 12 cases were treated successfully. Unilateral ureteral calculus may impair contralateral renal function and cause acute renal failure due to the absorption of toxin at obstructive side. The keys of management are eliminating toxin and relieving obstruction.

  8. Ocular lateropulsion as a central oculomotor sign in acute vestibular syndrome is not posturally dependent.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Jorge C; Pula, John; Newman-Toker, David E

    2011-09-01

    Horizontal conjugate gaze deviation (h-CGD) in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) may be detected clinically or radiographically. While upright clinical ocular lateropulsion (OL) predicts central lesions, supine radiographic h-CGD does not. We sought to investigate the cause for this discordance by comparing upright to supine OL in AVS. We prospectively recorded clinical and radiographic h-CGD in 17 AVS patients. Horizontal eye position after brief eyelid closure was tested clinically following postural shifts. Radiographic h-CGD was assessed on axial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computerized tomography (CT) images. All maintained central fixation with eyes open in light. OL was present in 8 (7 strokes, one central demyelination) and radiographic h-CGD in 14 (including all 6 with peripheral lesions). OL was unchanged after static postural testing. OL predicts central pathology and does not vary with postural shifts, regardless of lesion location. Radiographic h-CGD does not help localize, and this is not a positional effect. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Dizziness and the Acute Vestibular Syndrome at the Emergency Department: A Population-Based Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Ljunggren, Micaela; Persson, Julia; Salzer, Jonatan

    2018-01-01

    Dizziness is a common occurrence witnessed at emergency departments (EDs). This study aims to describe the epidemiology and management of dizzy patients with and without an acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) in the ED at Umeå University Hospital. A total of n = 2,126 ED dizziness visits during 3 years were identified. Data were obtained through retrospective review of medical records. Cases were stratified based on presentation, including AVS and neurological deficits. The outcomes analyzed included cerebrovascular causes of dizziness. A Poisson distribution was assumed when calculating incidence CIs. Dizziness accounted for 2.1% of all ED visits, incidence 477/100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 457-498). Among dizzy patients, 19.2% had an AVS, incidence 92/100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 74-113). Top medical diagnostic groups were otovestibular (15.1%), cardiovascular (8.7%) and neurological diseases (7.7%), including stroke and transitory ischemic attack (4.8%). Cerebrovascular causes of dizziness were more common among those with an AVS (10.0%) vs. those without (3.6%), p < 0.01. The risk for cerebrovascular causes of dizziness, although low in an unselected cohort, increases with the presence of neurological signs and an AVS. These population-based data may be useful when planning and implementing dizziness and AVS management algorithms at EDs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Inferior cerebellar peduncular lesion causes a distinct vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-H; Seo, J-D; Choi, Y R; Kim, M-J; Kim, H-J; Kim, J S; Choi, K-D

    2015-07-01

    The inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP) contains various fibres to and from the cerebellum relating to the integration of the proprioceptive and vestibular functions. However, the full clinical features of isolated unilateral ICP lesions have not been defined in humans. Eight consecutive patients with isolated unilateral ICP lesions at the pontine level (six with stroke, one with multiple sclerosis and one with brainstem encephalitis) received bedside neurological and neuro-otological evaluations and underwent laboratory tests including measurements of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, bithermal caloric tests and pure tone audiometry. All patients developed isolated acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) with ipsilesional spontaneous nystagmus (n = 7) and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (OTR) and/or SVV tilt (n = 7). In view of the normal head impulse test in all patients and skew deviation in one, our patients met the criteria for AVS from central lesions. Five patients showed a directional dissociation between the OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion that fell to the lesion side whilst the OTR/SVVtilt was contraversive. A unilateral ICP lesion at the pontine level leads to the development of isolated AVS. However, a negative head impulse test and directional dissociation between OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion may distinguish lesions involving unilateral ICP at the pontine level from those affecting other vestibular structures. © 2015 EAN.

  11. MRI assessment of paraspinal muscles in patients with acute and chronic unilateral low back pain.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q; Lin, C; Li, X; Zeng, W; Ma, C

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the changes in paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and composition, using the digital data from lumbar spine MRIs of patients with acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 178 patients with unilateral LBP who had lumbar MRI examination were recruited. The data were obtained by a retrospective documentation audit. The CSAs and mean signal intensities of the bilateral paraspinal muscles [psoas major (PM), quadratus lumborum, multifidus (MF) and erector spinae (ES)] were measured, and the percentage of fat infiltration was calculated. The data between the painful side and non-painful side were compared, and between-group comparisons were tested. 42 patients with chronic unilateral LBP could indicate the problem level, and the CSA and mean signal intensity of the MF muscle were analysed at the problem level, and one vertebral above and one vertebral level below the problem level. The CSAs of the PM and ES muscles were significantly decreased in the acute LBP group, while in the chronic LBP group, significant reduction in CSA was found in the MF and ES muscles on the painful side compared with the non-painful side. The mean signal intensity and fat content of the ES muscle on the painful side in the chronic LBP group was significantly higher than that on the painful side in the acute LBP group. The significant decrease of CSA in the MF muscle was found at multiple levels on the painful side. The present findings show that there is selective ipsilateral atrophy of paraspinal muscles, specific to the symptomatic side, in patients with acute and chronic LBP. The reduction of the muscle CSA and increased fatty infiltration occurred synchronously, and the extent of change is significantly greater in chronic LBP in the ES muscle. Atrophy of the MF muscle appears to be at multiple levels but side specific in relation to symptoms in patients with chronic LBP, and the decreased muscle CSA may occur prior to fatty infiltration. There are specific

  12. Out-of-Body Experiences and Other Complex Dissociation Experiences in a Patient with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Damage and Deficient Multisensory Integration.

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Vibert, Dominique; Grivaz, Petr; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-body experiences (OBEs) are illusory perceptions of one's body from an elevated disembodied perspective. Recent theories postulate a double disintegration process in the personal (visual, proprioceptive and tactile disintegration) and extrapersonal (visual and vestibular disintegration) space as the basis of OBEs. Here we describe a case which corroborates and extends this hypothesis. The patient suffered from peripheral vestibular damage and presented with OBEs and lucid dreams. Analysis of the patient's behaviour revealed a failure of visuo-vestibular integration and abnormal sensitivity to visuo-tactile conflicts that have previously been shown to experimentally induce out-of-body illusions (in healthy subjects). In light of these experimental findings and the patient's symptomatology we extend an earlier model of the role of vestibular signals in OBEs. Our results advocate the involvement of subcortical bodily mechanisms in the occurrence of OBEs.

  13. Unilateral Renal Ischemia as a Model of Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Fibrosis in Cats.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, C W; Brainard, B M; Hinson, W; Brown, S A; Brown, C A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the acute and chronic effects of 1-hour unilateral in vivo renal ischemia on renal function and histology in cats. Twenty-one adult purpose-bred research cats were anesthetized, and 1 kidney underwent renal artery and vein occlusion for 1 hour. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations, urine protein:creatinine ratio, urine-specific gravity, glomerular filtration rate, hematocrit, platelet concentration and function, and white blood cell count were measured at baseline and variable time points after ischemia. Renal histopathology was evaluated on days 3, 6, 12, 21, 42, and 70 postischemia; changes in smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen were examined. Following ischemia, whole animal glomerular filtration rate was significantly reduced (57% of baseline on day 6; P < .05). At the early time points, the ischemic kidneys exhibited severe acute epithelial necrosis accompanied by evidence of regeneration of tubules predominantly within the corticomedullary junction. At later periods, postischemic kidneys had evidence of tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation with significantly more smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen staining and interstitial fibrosis when compared with the contralateral control kidneys. This study characterizes the course of ischemic acute kidney injury in cats and demonstrates that ischemic acute kidney injury triggers chronic fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and tubular atrophy in feline kidneys. These late changes are typical of those observed in cats with naturally occurring chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolated vestibular nuclear infarction: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Seung-Han; Park, Jae Han; Choi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral infarction presenting with isolated vertigo remains a diagnostic challenge. To define the clinical characteristics of unilateral infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, two patients with isolated unilateral vestibular nuclear infarction had bedside and laboratory evaluation of the ocular motor and vestibular function, including video-oculography, bithermal caloric irrigation, the head impulse test (HIT) using magnetic scleral coils, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We also reviewed the literature on isolated vertigo from lesions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, and analyzed the clinical features of seven additional patients. Both patients showed spontaneous torsional-horizontal nystagmus that beat away from the lesion side, and direction-changing gaze-evoked nystagmus. Recording of HIT using a magnetic search coil system documented decreased gains of the vestibular-ocular reflex for the horizontal and posterior semicircular canals on both sides, but more for the ipsilesional canals. Bithermal caloric tests showed ipsilesional canal paresis in both patients. Cervical and ocular VEMPs showed decreased or absent responses during stimulation of the ipsilesional ear. Initial MRIs including diffusion-weighted images were normal or equivocal, but follow-up imaging disclosed a circumscribed acute infarction in the area of the vestibular nuclei. Infarctions restricted to the vestibular nuclei may present with isolated vertigo with features of both peripheral and central vestibulopathies. Central signs should be sought even in patients with spontaneous horizontal-torsional nystagmus and positive HIT. In patients with combined peripheral and central vestibulopathy, a vestibular nuclear lesion should be considered especially when hearing is preserved.

  16. Clinically isolated syndrome manifested as acute vestibular syndrome: bedside neuro-otological examination and suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Veros, Konstantinos; Blioskas, Sarantis; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Psillas, Georgios; Markou, Konstantinos; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis

    2014-01-01

    A case of a 34-year old woman with acute vestibular syndrome caused by a demyelinating lesion in the root entry zone of the 8th cranial nerve is presented. Neuro-otological bedside examination and suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions provided objective clinical evidence of a retrolabyrinthine lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and the presence of oligoclonal IgG bands in cerebrospinal fluid analysis established the diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome. This case report highlights the clinical information provided by the neuro-otologist in the differential diagnosis of the acute vestibular syndrome and the diagnosis of possible multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolated central vestibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Isolated vestibular syndrome may occur all along the vestibular pathways from the peripheral labyrinth to the brain. By virtue of recent developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging, however, diagnosis of isolated central vestibulopathy is increasing. Here, we review five distinct syndromes of isolated central vestibular syndrome from lesions restricted to the vestibular nuclei, the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, the flocculus, the tonsil, and the nodulus, and introduce a new vestibular syndrome from isolated involvement of the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Decreased responses to head impulses do not exclude a central lesion as a cause of isolated vestibular syndrome. Brain imaging, including diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may be falsely negative during the acute phase in patients with isolated vestibular syndrome because of a stroke. Central signs should be sought carefully in patients with isolated vertigo, even when the patients show the features of peripheral vestibulopathy and negative MRIs. Recognition of these isolated central vestibular syndromes would aid in defining the lesions responsible for various vestibular manifestations in central vestibulopathy. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Unilateral pulmonary edema: a rare initial presentation of cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Jinkyu; Lim, Young-Hyo; Park, Hwan-Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Shin, Jinho; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Gil; Hong, Mun K; Lee, Jae Ung

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary edema (UPE) is a rare clinical entity that is often misdiagnosed at first. Most cases of cardiogenic UPE occur in the right upper lobe and are caused by severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We present an unusual case of right-sided UPE in a patient with cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without severe MR. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary intervention and medical therapy for heart failure. Follow-up chest Radiography showed complete resolution of the UPE. This case reminds us that AMI can present as UPE even in patients without severe MR or any preexisting pulmonary disease affecting the vasculature or parenchyma of the lung.

  19. [Successful steroid pulse therapy for acute unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy associated with norovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Okazaki, Shin; Ikeda, Hiroko; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka

    2008-07-01

    We report a 4-year-old boy who developed acute unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy following Norovirus infection. He visited our hospital because of diplopia three weeks after Norovirus gastroenteritis. Physical examination showed only the left oculomotor nerve palsy. Enhanced MRI of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed no abnormality. Anti GQlb antibody was negative. Because blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia progressed rapidly, we performed three courses of steroid pulse therapy (methylpredonisolone 30 mg/kg x 3 day/course) combined with vitamin B6. Autonomic dysfunction (isocorea, light reflex) began to improve in several days and subsequently extraocular movements (blepharoptosis, infraduction supraduction, adducent in order) resolved completely in one month. Idiopathic oculomotor paralysis is usually believed to be selflimited, but steroid pulse therapy should to be considered in cases ocular paralysis is so severe or progressive that immune-mediated mechanism was presumed.

  20. The Vestibular Effects of Repeated Low-Level Blasts.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Philip D; Pinto, Robin L; Burrows, Holly L; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a prospective cohort of United States Marine Corps (USMC) instructors to identify any acute or long-term vestibular dysfunction following repeated blast exposures during explosive breaching training. They were assessed in clinic and on location during training at the USMC Methods of Entry School, Quantico, VA. Subjects received comprehensive baseline vestibular assessments and these were repeated in order to identify longitudinal changes. They also received shorter assessments immediately following blast exposure in order to identify acute findings. The main outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, vestibular Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of subjective vestibular function, videonystagmography (VNG), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), rotary chair (including the unilateral centrifugation test), computerized dynamic posturography, and computerized dynamic visual acuity. A total of 11 breachers and 4 engineers were followed for up to 17 months. No acute effects or longitudinal deteriorations were identified, but there were some interesting baseline group differences. Upbeat positional nystagmus was common, and correlated (p<0.005) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several instructors had abnormally short low-frequency phase leads on rotary chair testing. This study evaluated breaching instructors over a longer test period than any other study, and the results suggest that this population appears to be safe from a vestibular standpoint at the current exposure levels. Upbeat positional nystagmus correlated with a history of mTBI in this population, and this has not been described elsewhere. The data trends also suggest that this nystagmus could be an acute blast effect. However, the reasons for the abnormally short phase leads seen in rotary chair testing are unclear at this time. Further investigation seems warranted.

  1. A review of unilateral acute idiopatic maculopathy related to hand-foot-mouth disease with a representative case.

    PubMed

    Duman, Reşat; Duman, Nilay; Kutluksaman, Bünyamin; Çetinkaya, Ersan; İnan, Sibel; İnan, Ümit Übeyt

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review unilateral acute maculopathy associated with hand-foot-mouth disease with a representative case. Clinical course of a 24-year-old male case with unilateral acute idiopatic maculopathy documented by multimodal imaging is presented, and a review of similar cases is given. On initial examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/200 in the left eye. Fundoscopy revealed grayish-yellowish subretinal exudate, and fluorescein angiography demonstrated irregular mottled hyperfluorescence at the central macula. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated disruption of ellipsoid layer, which partially resolved on follow-up examinations. Best-corrected visual acuity increased to 20/20 at 3 months, with persistent retinal changes, and mild disruption of ellipsoid layer and persistent mild metamorphopsia. Although hand-foot-mouth disease is usually benign and self-limited in childhood, it may be rarely associated with unilateral vision loss due to maculopathy, especially at early adulthood in both sexes. Vision loss associated with this eruption is acute and reversible in most cases, despite some residual pigmentary and scarring changes in all cases and persistent mild visual loss in some cases. Exact pathophysiology, the causes of variability of clinical features, adulthood onset, unilateral involvement, and role of multimodal imaging are issues which need to be clarified with further research.

  2. Vestibular Dysfunction in Patients with Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Chris K; Chien, Wade W; King, Kelly A; Muskett, Julie A; Baron, Rachel E; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Brewer, Carmen C

    2015-08-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the most common inner ear malformation. While a strong correlative relationship between EVA and hearing loss is well established, its association with vestibular dysfunction is less well understood. In this study, we examine the effects of EVA on the vestibular system in patients with EVA. Prospective, cross-sectional study of a cohort ascertained between 1999 and 2013. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, a federal biomedical research facility. In total, 106 patients with unilateral or bilateral EVA, defined as a midpoint diameter greater than 1.5 mm, were referred or self-referred to participate in a study of the clinical and molecular aspects of EVA. Clinical history was ascertained with respect to the presence or absence of various vestibular signs and symptoms and history of head trauma. Videonystagmography (VNG), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP), and rotational vestibular testing (RVT) were performed to assess the vestibular function. Of the patients with EVA, 45% had vestibular signs and symptoms, and 44% of tested patients had abnormal VNG test results. An increased number of vestibular signs and symptoms was correlated with the presence of bilateral EVA (P = .008) and a history of head injury (P < .001). Abnormal VNG results also correlated with a history of head injury (P = .018). Vestibular dysfunction is common in patients with EVA. However, not all patients with vestibular signs and symptoms have abnormal vestibular test results. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with EVA. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  3. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  4. Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy on Acute Unilateral Stroke Patients: Initial Observations regarding Differences between Sides

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Fernando; Tomner, Jens; Kostulas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Monitoring is assessment in real time of health of brain tissue through study of passive dielectric properties of brain. During the last two decades theory and technology have been developed in parallel with animal experiments aiming to confirm feasibility of using bioimpedance-based technology for prompt detection of brain damage. Here, for the first time, we show that electrical bioimpedance measurements for left and right hemispheres are significantly different in acute cases of unilateral stroke within 24 hours from onset. Methods. Electrical BIS measurements have been taken in healthy volunteers and patients suffering from acute stroke within 24 hours of onset. BIS measurements have been obtained using SFB7 bioimpedance spectrometer manufactured by Impedimed ltd. and 4-electrode method. Measurement electrodes, current, and voltage have been placed according to 10–20 EEG system obtaining mutual BIS measurements from 4 different channels situated in pairs symmetrically from the midsagittal line. Obtained BIS data has been analyzed, assessing for symmetries and differences regarding healthy control data. Results. 7 out of 10 patients for Side-2-Side comparisons and 8 out 10 for central/lateral comparison presented values outside the range defined by healthy control group. When combined only 1 of 10 patients exhibited values within the healthy range. Conclusions. If these initial observations are confirmed with more patients, we can foresee emerging of noninvasive monitoring technology for brain damage with the potential to lead to paradigm shift in treatment of brain stroke and traumatic brain damage. PMID:26557680

  5. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  6. Acute vestibular syndrome: a critical review and diagnostic algorithm concerning the clinical differentiation of peripheral versus central aetiologies in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Venhovens, J; Meulstee, J; Verhagen, W I M

    2016-11-01

    Almost 20 % of cerebral ischaemic strokes occur in the posterior circulation. Estimates are that 20 % of these patients present with isolated vertigo. In approximately one-sixth to one-third of these patients, this symptom is wrongly diagnosed to be peripheral vestibular in origin. As a result, these missed stroke patients are withheld from therapeutic and secondary prophylactic treatment, which may result in unnecessary morbidity and mortality. We therefore propose a diagnostic algorithm concerning the clinical differentiation of acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) patients based on a critical review of the available literature.

  7. Inter-joint coordination strategies during unilateral stance following first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain: A brief report.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-07-01

    This investigation combined measures of inter-joint coordination and stabilometry to evaluate eyes-open (condition 1) and eyes-closed (condition 2) static unilateral stance performance in a group of participants with an acute, first-time lateral ankle sprain injury in comparison to a control group. Sixty-six participants with an acute first-time lateral ankle sprain and 19 non-injured controls completed three 20-second unilateral stance task trials in conditions 1 and 2. An adjusted coefficient of multiple determination statistic was used to compare stance limb 3-D kinematic data for similarity in the aim of establishing patterns of inter-joint coordination for these groups. Between-group analyses revealed significant differences in stance limb inter-joint coordination strategies for conditions 1 and 2. Injured participants displayed increases in ankle-hip linked coordination compared to controls in condition 1 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.12 [0.09] vs 0.06 [0.04]; η(2)=.16) and condition 2 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.18 [0.13] vs 0.08 [0.06]; η(2)=0.37). Participants with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain exhibit a hip-dominant coordination strategy for static unilateral stance compared to non-injured controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on single leg vertical jump height and symmetry in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungho; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on height and symmetry of the single leg vertical jump in healthy men. [Subjects] Thirty males with no history of lower limb dysfunction participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the unilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), bilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), and, no vibratory stimulation group (n=10). The subjects in the unilateral and bilateral stimulation groups participated in one session of whole body vibration training at 26 Hz for 3 min. The no vibratory stimulation group subjects underwent the same training for 3 min without whole body vibration. All participants performed the single leg vertical jump for each lower limb, to account for the strong and weak sides. The single leg vertical jump height and symmetry were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The single leg vertical jump height of the weak lower limb significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump height of the strong lower limb significantly improved in the bilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump symmetry significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. [Conclusion] Therefore, the present study found that the effects of whole body vibration training were different depending on the type of application. To improve the single leg vertical jump height in the weak lower limbs as well as limb symmetry, unilateral vibratory stimulation might be more desirable.

  9. Acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on single leg vertical jump height and symmetry in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungho; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral whole body vibration training on height and symmetry of the single leg vertical jump in healthy men. [Subjects] Thirty males with no history of lower limb dysfunction participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: the unilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), bilateral vibratory stimulation group (n=10), and, no vibratory stimulation group (n=10). The subjects in the unilateral and bilateral stimulation groups participated in one session of whole body vibration training at 26 Hz for 3 min. The no vibratory stimulation group subjects underwent the same training for 3 min without whole body vibration. All participants performed the single leg vertical jump for each lower limb, to account for the strong and weak sides. The single leg vertical jump height and symmetry were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The single leg vertical jump height of the weak lower limb significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump height of the strong lower limb significantly improved in the bilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. The single leg vertical jump symmetry significantly improved in the unilateral vibratory stimulation group, but not in the other groups. [Conclusion] Therefore, the present study found that the effects of whole body vibration training were different depending on the type of application. To improve the single leg vertical jump height in the weak lower limbs as well as limb symmetry, unilateral vibratory stimulation might be more desirable. PMID:26834381

  10. Aqueous humor concentration of VEGF and retinal oxygen saturation after unilateral acute primary angle closure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiawei; Gao, Xinbo; Du, Shaolin; Li, Xingyi; Huang, Wenbin; Zhou, Minwen; Wang, Wei; Chen, Sida; Zhang, Yichi; Gao, Qianying; Zhang, Xiulan

    2016-06-01

    To measure the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in aqueous humor in patients with unilateral acute primary angle closure (APAC) and retinal oxygen saturation (SO2 ) after trabeculectomy. Twelve patients, with unilateral trabeculectomy-required APAC, were recruited as the study group. Aqueous humor samples were collected prospectively for every subject. VEGF concentrations were analysed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and retinal SO2 was measured using oximeter (Reykjavik, Iceland) at 1 month after trabeculectomy. In the APAC eyes, the mean aqueous humor concentration of VEGF was 388.4 ± 260.1 pg/ml and positively correlated with preoperative intraocular pressure (ρ = 0.658, p = 0.020). In the normal controls, the mean SO2 levels in the larger arterioles and venules were 93.0 ± 5.9% and 59.5 ± 5.4% and the arteriovenous [A-V] difference was 33.5 ± 6.3%. In the study group, the arteriolar SO2 at 1 month after surgery (97.6 ± 19.4%, p = 0.147) did not differ significantly from the values in the control group. However, the mean venular SO2 was significantly lower than the control eyes (50.0 ± 9.1% versus 59.5 ± 5.4%, p = 0.004), and a remarkable increased A-V difference (47.6 ± 22.7% versus 33.5 ± 6.3%) was found in the APAC eyes (p = 0.037). Lower venular SO2 and increased A-V difference existed in the APAC eyes after surgery, and it is possible that the saturation was even lower during the attack. Together with the elevated VEGF concentrations in aqueous humor, these provided indirect evidence that ocular hypoxia was constantly present during APAC attack. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstring eccentric isokinetic strength and unilateral hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz De Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to investigate the acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines: (a) on peak torque, total external work and joint angle at peak torque of the hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic leg flexion; (b) on unilateral hamstring to quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios; as well as (c) to determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 49 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching, and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, eccentric isokinetic peak torque, the angle of peak torque and total external work were assessed with participants prone at 1.04 and 3.14 rad · s(-1). Unilateral strength ratios of the knee were also recorded. Measures were compared via a fully-within-groups factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no main effects for eccentric isokinetic peak torque, angle of peak torque, total external work and unilateral H/Q strength ratios. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on eccentric strength profile and unilateral H/Q strength ratios and hence both forms of stretching do not reduce these two primary risk factors for muscle injury.

  12. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  13. Moderate Versus Deep Hypothermia With Unilateral Selective Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion for Acute Type A Dissection.

    PubMed

    Leshnower, Bradley G; Thourani, Vinod H; Halkos, Michael E; Sarin, Eric L; Keeling, William B; Lamias, Mark J; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2015-11-01

    Despite improved results with surgical therapy for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD), there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulation management during ATAAD. The purpose of this study is to determine whether in the setting of antegrade cerebral perfusion, moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest (MHCA) provides equivalent cerebral and visceral protection as deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for patients undergoing emergent ATAAD repair. A review of the Emory aortic surgery database from 2004 to 2014 identified 288 patients who underwent ATAAD with right axillary artery cannulation, unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (uSACP), and hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). In all, 88 patients underwent HCA at 24 °C or lower (DHCA), and 206 patients underwent HCA at more than 24 °C (MHCA). Major adverse outcomes of death, stroke, temporary neurologic dysfunction, and dialysis-dependent renal failure were examined. The groups were well matched for age and major comorbidities. The DHCA patients underwent HCA at lower temperatures (DHCA 21.6 ± 3.1 °C vs MHCA 27.4 ± 1.6 °C, p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp, or HCA times. Mortality was 14.6% for DHCA patients, and 9.2% for MHCA patients (p = 0.17). There was no significant difference in stroke, temporary neurologic dysfunction, or dialysis-dependent renal failure. There was no association with either MHCA plus uSACP or DHCA plus uSACP and any of the major adverse outcomes (p > 0.05). Moderate HCA with uSACP is an effective circulation management strategy that provides excellent cerebral and visceral protection during emergent ATAAD repair. In the setting of antegrade cerebral perfusion, deep hypothermia does not provide any additional benefit. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectral domain OCT and autofluorescence imaging of unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Milani, Paolo; Cacioppo, Viviana; Raimondi, Giulia; Scialdone, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    To report imaging findings of unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM). In this observational case report, the Spectralis acquisition system (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany), which includes spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), multiple autofluorescence (AF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography, was used for monitoring onset and evolution of UAIM. A well-defined, bullous macular lesion was evident on color pictures, infrared imaging (IR), and AF. Fluorescein angiography and ICG similarly showed early hypofluorescence of the lesion and, exclusively on FA, mild staining. Notably, the definition and limits of the detachment were clearly identifiable on late-phase ICG, and formed a hypocyanescent area. Spectral domain OCT disclosed severe retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) but not neurosensory detachment; the distinction between the photoreceptors inner/outer segment line was nonapparent for the entire length of the lesion. At 7-week follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/20, with resolution of the exudative detachment. Autofluorescence and FA imaging indicated normalization, and only IR showed the boundaries of the lesion as still identifiable. Infrared imaging also showed a central granular feature, suggesting persistent choroid and pigment alteration. Indocyanine green angiography still evidenced the early hypofluorescent halo that became more evident in the late phases without any staining of the dye. Tomography depicted a reconstituted fovea, in which the outer limiting membrane and the inner/outer segment junction returned detectable. Comprehensive evaluation of UAIM by AF, FA, ICG, and spectral domain OCT disclosed involvement of RPE, the neuroretina, and the choroid in the pathogenesis of the disease. Despite functional recovery, choroidal rather than retinal alteration could persist.

  15. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  16. Compensatory saccades benefit from prediction during head impulse testing in early recovery from vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Agrawal, Yuri; Newman-Toker, David E; Xie, Li; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Wong, Aaron; Schubert, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The head impulse test (HIT) can identify a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) by the compensatory saccade (CS) generated once the head stops moving. The inward HIT is considered safer than the outward HIT, yet might have an oculomotor advantage given that the subject would presumably know the direction of head rotation. Here, we compare CS latencies following inward (presumed predictable) and outward (more unpredictable) HITs after acute unilateral vestibular nerve deafferentation. Seven patients received inward and outward HITs delivered at six consecutive postoperative days (POD) and again at POD 30. All head impulses were recorded by portable video-oculography. CS included those occurring during (covert) or after (overt) head rotation. Inward HITs included mean CS latencies (183.48 ms ± 4.47 SE) that were consistently shorter than those generated during outward HITs in the first 6 POD (p = 0.0033). Inward HITs induced more covert saccades compared to outward HITs, acutely. However, by POD 30 there were no longer any differences in latencies or proportions of CS and direction of head rotation. Patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss likely use predictive cues of head direction to elicit early CS to keep the image centered on the fovea. In acute vestibular hypofunction, inwardly applied HITs may risk a preponderance of covert saccades, yet this difference largely disappears within 30 days. Advantages of inwardly applied HITs are discussed and must be balanced against the risk of a false-negative HIT interpretation.

  17. Clinical effect of intratympanic dexamethasone injection in acute unilateral tinnitus: A prospective, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Min-Beom; Yoo, Shin-Young; Park, Shi Nae; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Moon, In Seok; Lee, Ho-Ki

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injection (ITDI) in acute tinnitus of presumed cochlear origin. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, multicenter study. Between August 2013 and December 2015, 54 patients with unilateral tinnitus were enrolled at four different centers. Patients were assigned either to an ITDI (n = 27) or an intratympanic normal saline injection (ITNI; n = 27) group through block randomization. Intratympanic injections were administered four times over 2 weeks. At 4 weeks after initial injection, we analyzed the improvement rates of tinnitus using the tinnitus handicap Inventory (THI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) for loudness, awareness, and annoyance. We defined improvement as the reduction of more than 7 points or of more than 20% in the final THI score compared to the initial THI score. The initial mean hearing thresholds and VAS and THI scores of the two groups did not differ significantly. At 4 weeks after initial injection, the mean VAS and THI scores of both groups had significantly reduced. However, the improvement rate did not differ significantly between the groups (ITDI, 51.9%; ITNI, 59.3%). The results indicate that ITDI might not be more effective than ITNI for the treatment of acute unilateral tinnitus. Therefore, ITDI should not be considered as the main treatment for patients presenting with acute tinnitus as the primary symptom. 1b. Laryngoscope, 128:184-188, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Acute effects of unilateral static stretching on handgrip strength of the stretched and non-stretched limb.

    PubMed

    Jelmini, Jacob D; Cornwell, Andrew; Khodiguian, Nazareth; Thayer, Jennifer; Araujo, And John

    2018-02-16

    To determine the effects of an acute bout of unilateral static stretching on handgrip strength of both the stretched and non-stretched limb. It was reasoned that if the non-stretched limb experienced a decrease in force output, further evidence for a neural mechanism to explain a post-stretch force reduction would be obtained as no mechanical adaptation would have occurred. Thirty participants performed maximum voluntary unilateral handgrip contractions of both limbs before and after stretching the finger flexors of the strength-dominant side only. Each trial was assessed for peak force, muscle activity (iEMG), and rate of force generation. Following the stretching bout, peak force and iEMG decreased by 4.4% (p = 0.001) and 6.4% (p = 0.000) respectively in the stretched limb only. However, rate of force generation was significantly impaired in both the stretched (- 17.3%; p = 0.000) and non-stretched limbs (- 10.8%; p = 0.003) 1 min post-stretch, and remained similarly depressed for both limbs 15 min later. Acute stretching negatively impacts rate of force generation more than peak force. Moreover, a reduced rate of force generation from the non-stretched limb indicates the presence of a cross-over inhibitory effect through the nervous system, which provides additional evidence for a neural mechanism.

  19. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. Methods/Design 60 patients, aged 18–40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. Discussion This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV

  20. Study protocol: the effect of whole body vibration on acute unilateral unstable lateral ankle sprain- a biphasic randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Sebastian Felix; Fasser, Mariette; Polzer, Hans; Sieb, Michael; Regauer, Markus; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias; Blauth, Michael

    2013-01-14

    Ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely caused by damage to passive structures and neuromuscular impairment. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a neuromuscular training method improving those impaired neurologic parameters. The aim of this study is to compare the current gold standard functional treatment to functional treatment plus WBV in patients with acute unilateral unstable inversion ankle sprains. 60 patients, aged 18-40 years, presenting with an isolated, unilateral, acute unstable inversion ankle sprain will be included in this bicentric, biphasic, randomized controlled trial. Samples will be randomized by envelope drawing. All patients will be allowed early mobilization and pain-dependent weight bearing, limited functional immobilization by orthosis, PRICE, NSARDs as well as home and supervised physiotherapy. Supervised physical therapy will take place twice a week, for 30 minutes for a period of 6 weeks, following a standardized intervention protocol. During supervised physical therapy, the intervention group will perform exercises similar to those of the control group, on a side-alternating sinusoidal vibration platform. Two time-dependent primary outcome parameters will be assessed: short-term outcome after six weeks will be postural control quantified by the sway index; mid-term outcome after one year will be assessed by subjective instability, defined by the presence of giving-way attacks. Secondary outcome parameters include: return to pre-injury level of activities, residual pain, recurrence, objective instability, energy/coordination, Foot and Ankle Disability Index and EQ 5D. This is the first trial investigating the effects of WBV in patients with acute soft tissue injury. Inversion ankle sprains often result in ankle instability, which is most likely due to damage of neurological structures. Due to its unique, frequency dependent, influence on various neuromuscular parameters, WBV is a promising treatment method for

  1. Quantification of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after unilateral acute primary angle closure in Asian Indian eyes.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Tarannum; Viswanath, Kalluri; Balakrishna, Nagalla

    2013-01-01

    To determine retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) using Spectral optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscope (Spectral OCT/SLO) in Asian Indian eyes after single, unilateral attack of acute primary angle closure (APAC). Thirty-two patients with unilateral attack of APAC with normal optic disc and normal visual field, unaffected fellow eyes, and 35 age-matched normal control eyes were enrolled for the study. Six weeks after the remission of acute attack, peripapillary average, quadrant, and clock-hour RNFLT were compared between 3 groups using Spectral OCT/SLO. APAC patients had mean IOP of 51.3±13.3 mm Hg (range, 40-74) at the time of presentation with acute attack in the affected eye and 14.9±2.9 mm Hg at 6 weeks after resolution of APAC. Duration of symptoms of acute attack was 35.9±23.8 hours. Significant differences were found between RNFLT in APAC and fellow eyes for most the parameters except for 1, 4, 6, and 7-o'clock-hour sector. Most of the RNFLT parameters showed statistically significant difference between APAC and normal control eyes except for temporal quadrant, 6, 7-o'clock-hour sectors. Statistically significant differences were found between RNFLT in unaffected fellow and normal control eyes for most of the parameters except for 6, 7, 11 o'clock-hour sectors. RNFLT was found to be significantly thinner in APAC and unaffected fellow eyes when compared with normal age-matched controls. Hence, patients with APAC should be monitored carefully to determine its long-term effects on optic disc, RNFLT, and visual fields. Longitudinal studies can determine whether the RNFLT measurements remained stable or showed progression in these patients.

  2. Using Acute Performance on a Comprehensive Neurocognitive, Vestibular, and Ocular Motor Assessment Battery to Predict Recovery Duration After Sport-Related Concussions.

    PubMed

    Sufrinko, Alicia M; Marchetti, Gregory F; Cohen, Paul E; Elbin, R J; Re, Valentina; Kontos, Anthony P

    2017-04-01

    A sport-related concussion (SRC) is a heterogeneous injury that requires a multifaceted and comprehensive approach for diagnosis and management, including symptom reports, vestibular/ocular motor assessments, and neurocognitive testing. To determine which acute (eg, within 7 days) vestibular, ocular motor, neurocognitive, and symptom impairments predict the duration of recovery after an SRC. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-nine patients with a mean age of 15.3 ± 1.9 years completed a neurocognitive, vestibular/ocular motor, and symptom assessment within 7 days of a diagnosed concussion. Patients were grouped by recovery time: ≤14 days (n = 27, 39.1%), 15-29 days (n = 25, 36.2%), and 30-90 days (n = 17, 24.6%). Multinomial regression was used to identify the best subset of predictors associated with prolonged recovery relative to ≤14 days. Acute visual motor speed and cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms were associated with an increased likelihood of recovery times of 30-90 days and 15-29 days relative to a recovery time of ≤14 days. A model with visual motor speed and cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms within the first 7 days of an SRC was 87% accurate at identifying patients with a recovery time of 30-90 days. The current study identified cognitive-migraine-fatigue symptoms and visual motor speed as the most robust predictors of protracted recovery after an SRC according to the Post-concussion Symptom Scale, Immediate Post-concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, and Vestibular/Ocular Motor Screening (VOMS). While VOMS components were sensitive in identifying a concussion, they were not robust predictors for recovery. Clinicians may consider particular patterns of performance on clinical measures when providing treatment recommendations and discussing anticipated recovery with patients.

  3. Effects of Head Position on Perception of Gravity in Vestibular Neuritis and Lateral Medullary Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2018-01-01

    Internal representation of gravity can be quantified by measuring the subjective visual vertical (SVV). Modulation of verticality perception during head tilts may be perturbed in vestibular disorders causing SVV tilts in the upright head position. This study aimed to determine the influence of head tilts on the estimation of SVV in acute vestibular disorders. We measured the SVV in 37 patients with acute vestibular symptoms due to unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) ( n  = 28) and lateral medullary infarction (LMI) ( n  = 9). Measurements of the SVV were performed under head upright, head tilt 30° and 60° in each direction. Seventeen normal subjects served as the control. In controls, head tilt of 30° produced a contraversive shift of the SVV (the E-effect), and head tilt of 60° generated an ipsiversive shift (the A-effect). Patients with VN showed only the A-effect irrespective of the direction and amplitude of head tilt. Patients with LMI could estimate earth verticality accurately during head tilts. Patients with VN during the recovery phase showed the patterns of SVV modulation similar to those observed in the controls either with head upright or tilted. Given the absence of the E-effect in acute VN, the peripheral otolithic inputs appear to be essential in the perception of earth vertical during small static head tilts.

  4. [Metavestibular disorders and disorders of higher vestibular function].

    PubMed

    Zamergrad, M V; Levin, O S

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo, instability, oscillopsia and concomitant autonomic disorders are classical and well-known symptoms of vestibular disorders. At the same time, recent studies suggest that there are more complicated vestibular dysfunctions caused by the cortical projections of the vestibular system. The central vestibular system includes parietal temporal cortex and insular, anterior intraparietal sulcus, posterior parietal and medial parts of the superior temporal gyrus, singular gyrus retrosplenial cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal area. The central part of the vestibular system closely interacts with other afferent systems forming a multisensory structure of higher brain functions. Dysfunctions of higher vestibular function play an important role in the development of clinical syndromes including pusher syndrome, room tilt illusion, unilateral spatial neglect syndrome, impairment of spatial memory and navigation. These syndromes can develop due to the direct damage of the cortical vestibular system or as a result of disconnection between the vestibular cortex and other parts of the sensory cortex.

  5. Acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss associated with anabolic steroids and polycythaemia: case report.

    PubMed

    Tikka, T; Mistry, N; Janjua, A

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss due to an infarct in the vertebrobasilar system has been widely reported. Most patients have a background of traditional coronary risk factors related to these cerebrovascular episodes. A 32-year-old male, a regular user of anabolic steroids, presented to the emergency department with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and symptoms suggestive of an infarct of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery but in the absence of risk factors for ischaemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of infarction in the region supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Polycythaemia was found on haematological analysis, which we believe was secondary to the use of anabolic steroids. The patient was commenced on aspirin as per the stroke management protocol. There was resolution of neurological symptomatology six weeks after the episode, but no improvement in hearing. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to the use of anabolic steroids causing polycythaemia. This cause should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss, especially in young males, when no other risk factors can be identified.

  6. Off-center yaw rotation: effect of naso-occipital linear acceleration on the nystagmus response of normal human subjects and patients after unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Haslwanter, T; Black, R A; Burgess, A M; Halmagyi, G M; Topple, A N; Todd, M J

    1998-12-01

    ) of around 12 degrees]. The linear acceleration decreased the time constant of decay of the horizontal component of the post-rotatory nystagmus: from an average of 24.8 degrees/s facing-in to an average of 11.3 degrees/s facing-out. The linear acceleration dumps torsional eye velocity in an manner analogous to, but independent of, the dumping of horizontal eye velocity. Patients with UVD had dramatically reduced torsional eye velocities for both facing-in and facing-out headings, and there was little if any shift of the AEV in UVD patients. The relatively small effects of linear acceleration on human canal-induced nystagmus found here confirms other recent studies in humans (Fetter et al. 1996) in contrast to evidence from monkeys and emphasizes the large and important differences between humans and monkeys in otolith-canal interaction. Our results confirm the vestibular control of the axis of eye velocity of humans is essentially head-referenced whereas in monkeys that control is essentially space-referenced.

  7. Unilateral Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion as a Robust Model for Acute to Chronic Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Clef, Nathalie; Verhulst, Anja; D'Haese, Patrick C; Vervaet, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an underestimated, yet important risk factor for development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Even after initial total recovery of renal function, some patients develop progressive and persistent deterioration of renal function and these patients are more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Animal models are indispensable for unravelling the mechanisms underlying this progression towards CKD and ESRD and for the development of new therapeutic strategies in its prevention or treatment. Ischemia (i.e. hypoperfusion after surgery, bleeding, dehydration, shock, or sepsis) is a major aetiology in human AKI, yet unilateral ischemia-reperfusion is a rarely used animal model for research on CKD and fibrosis. Here, we demonstrate in C57Bl/6J mice, by both histology and gene expression, that unilateral ischemia-reperfusion without contralateral nephrectomy is a very robust model to study the progression from acute renal injury to long-term tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, i.e. the histopathological hallmark of CKD. Furthermore, we report that the extent of renal fibrosis, in terms of Col I, TGFβ, CCN2 and CCN3 expression and collagen I immunostaining, increases with increasing body temperature during ischemia and ischemia-time. Thus, varying these two main determinants of ischemic injury allows tuning the extent of the long-term fibrotic outcome in this model. Finally, in order to cover the whole practical finesse of ischemia-reperfusion and allow model and data transfer, we provide a referenced overview on crucial technical issues (incl. anaesthesia, analgesia, and pre- and post-operative care) with the specific aim of putting starters in the right direction of implementing ischemia in their research and stimulate them, as well as the community, to have a critical view on ischemic literature data.

  8. Bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis with iritis induced by unilateral topical application of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Langford, Marlyn P; Foreman, Bridgett D; Srur, Lana; Ganley, James P; Redens, Thomas B

    2013-11-01

    The factors responsible for the conjunctivitis and iritis associated with acute ocular infection and post enteric inflammatory disease are not fully known. The pro-inflammatory activity of unilateral topical application of muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the smallest bio-active Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component) was investigated in adult rabbits. The resultant bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and pyogenic responses were characterized. Bilateral symptoms were graded by slit lamp examinations; tear fluid, Schirmer tests (tear production), blood and aqueous humor (AH) samples were obtained from MDP-treated and untreated rabbits. MDP concentration, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (GGT; key enzyme in glutathione recapture, xenobiotic detoxification, eicosanoid synthesis and neutrophil function), protein concentration, and tear cell density, cytology, and immunofluorescent antibody reactivity to GGT and calreticulin (CRT; MDP-binding protein) were determined. MDP was cleared from ipsilateral tears and serum by 6 h, but was undetected in mock-treated contralateral tears. Bilateral signs of acute transient pyogenic conjunctivitis, characterized by tearing, lid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis and leukocytic infiltrate with iritis (erythema and aqueous flare) were detected. Milder symptoms occurred in the mock-treated contralateral eyes. Bilateral symptoms, tear production, tear protein, GGT activity, and mucopurulent discharge (containing up to 2.5-5.0 × 10(6) cells/mL) were elevated 4-8 h post MDP and resolved to near pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Tear GGT activity and protein levels were higher in MDP-treated and mock-treated contralateral eyes than in eyes of untreated adult rabbits (p's < 0.001). Elevated tear GGT activity was associated with histopathology and increased vascular and epithelial permeability to serum protein, GGT-positive epithelia cells, macrophages and heterophils. Repeat MDP applications induced recurrent

  9. [The application of subjective visual gravity in assessment of vestibular compensation: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Taisheng; Wang, Wei; Xu, Kaixu; Wen, Chao; Liu, Qiang; Han, Xi; Li, Shanshan; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Peng

    2016-05-01

    To discuss the characteristics of subjective visual gravity (subjective visual vertical/horizontal, SVV/SVH) and assess its clinical application for peripheral unilateral vestibular compensation. 69 cases of acute peripheral unilateral vestibular dysfunction patients (case group) accepted SVV/SVH, spontaneous nystagmus (SN), caloric test (CT) and other vestibular function tests. 49 healthy people (control group) accepted SVV/SVH only. SVV/SVH, SN and unilateral weakness (UW) were selected as for the observation indicators. The correlations between SVV/SVH, SN, UW and courses were investigated respectively, as well as the characteristic of SVV/SVH, SN in period of vestibular compensation. Among case group SVV, SVH positive in 42 patients(60.9%) and 44 patients(63.8%), the absolute values of the skew angle were in the range between 2.1°-20.0°, 2.1°-22.2°. Skew angles of SVV/SVH in control were in the range between -1.5°-2.0° and -2.0°-1.6°, and had no statistical significance with case group(t=5.336 and 5.864, P<0.05). SN-positive 28 cases (40.6%), the range of intensities at 2.4°-17.1°; UW-positive 50 cases (72.5%). In case group, positive correlation between SVV and SVH(r=0.948, P=0.00), negatively correlated between SVV/SVH and SN respectively(r values were -0.720, -0.733, P values were 0.00), no correlation between the skew angle of SVV/SVH, strength of SN and UW value(r values were 0.191, 0.189, and 0.179, P>0.05), there was no correlation between the absolute value of SVV, SVH, SN, UW with the duration (rs values were -0.075, -0.065, -0.212, and 0.126, P>0.05). Subjective visual gravity can be used not only to assess the range of unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction, but also help assess the static compensatory of otolithic, guidance and assessment of vestibular rehabilitation.

  10. Compensation Following Bilateral Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Yates, Bill J.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained. PMID:22207864

  11. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage.

    PubMed

    McCall, Andrew A; Yates, Bill J

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  12. [The pharmacology of vestibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Yacovino, D A; Hain, T C

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in the physiology and the pharmacology of vestibular disorders. It is now possible to elaborate an approximation of the mechanisms of action of the drugs used in the symptomatic treatment of vertigo. These drugs usually have a number of different pharmacological actions and overlapping effects. They can modify the intensity of the symptoms (e.g. vestibular suppressants) or prevent recurrences (e.g. calcium blockers in the case of vestibular migraine). Most of the drugs used for the acute treatment of vertigo can have a negative effect on the central compensation mechanisms. Vestibular rehabilitation exercises and certain drugs can speed up compensation. Choice of medication and the method of administration depend on the severity of the clinical symptoms, the pattern of temporal evolution, the underlying vestibular disease, the associated clinical conditions and the profile of the collateral effects of the drugs utilised. Vestibular suppressants and antiemetic drugs are still the basis of the acute treatment of vertigo.

  13. Unilateral nephrectomy diminishes ischemic acute kidney injury through enhanced perfusion and reduced pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Haiyun; Damgaard, Mads; Laustsen, Christoffer; Pedersen, Michael; Krag, Søren; Birn, Henrik; Nørregaard, Rikke; Jespersen, Bente

    2017-01-01

    While unilateral nephrectomy (UNx) is suggested to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in the remaining kidney, the mechanisms underlying this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, functional MRI was employed in a renal IRI rat model to reveal global and regional changes in renal filtration, perfusion, oxygenation and sodium handling, and microarray and pathway analyses were conducted to identify protective molecular mechanisms. Wistar rats were randomized to either UNx or sham UNx immediately prior to 37 minutes of unilateral renal artery clamping or sham operation under sevoflurane anesthesia. MRI was performed 24 hours after reperfusion. Blood and renal tissue were harvested. RNA was isolated for microarray analysis and QPCR validation of gene expression results. The perfusion (T1 value) was significantly enhanced in the medulla of the post-ischemic kidney following UNx. UNx decreased the expression of fibrogenic genes, i.a. Col1a1, Fn1 and Tgfb1 in the post-ischemic kidney. This was associated with a marked decrease in markers of activated myofibroblasts (Acta2/α-Sma and Cdh11) and macrophages (Ccr2). This was most likely facilitated by down-regulation of Pdgfra, thus inhibiting pericyte-myofibroblast differentiation, chemokine production (Ccl2/Mcp1) and macrophage infiltration. UNx reduced ischemic histopathologic injury. UNx may exert renoprotective effects against IRI through increased perfusion in the renal medulla and alleviation of the acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses possibly through decreased myofibroblast activation. The identified pathways involved may serve as potential therapeutic targets and should be taken into account in experimental models of IRI. PMID:29267404

  14. [Differential diagnostics of peripheral vestibular and brainstem-cerebellar syndrome].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Tarasevich, N M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for differential diagnostics of peripheral vestibular and brainstem-cerebellar syndrome based on the analysis of characteristics of evoked vestibular myogenic potentials. A total of 59 patients presenting with unilateral peripheral vestibular syndrome (PVS), 60 patients with demyelinizing disease of CNS, and 20 healthy subjects were available for the examination by the method of evoked vestibular myogenic potentials. The values of representativity and latency parameters PI, N1, PINI and amplitude parameters PI, NI, PINI were obtained. It was shown that latency PI in the patients with demyelinizing disease of CNS is higher than in those with PVS.

  15. The effect of acute unilateral inflammation of the equine temporomandibular joint on the kinematics of mastication.

    PubMed

    Smyth, T T; Carmalt, J L; Treen, T T; Lanovaz, J L

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are well reported in man and some domestic animals other than the horse. The pathophysiology of equine TMJ disease and the effects of disease on the kinematics of mastication are unknown. To determine whether transient unilateral inflammation of the equine TMJ results in alterations in the masticatory cycle. An experimental controlled study utilising 6 horses of various ages with normal dentition. Each horse was equipped with an optical motion tracking (kinematic) system. Horses were observed chewing grass hay over 3 min intervals. Regardless of the initial side of the power stroke in the masticatory cycle, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected in the left TMJ in each horse and the horses were reassessed after 6 h. Four horses developed effusion of the injected TMJs; 2 of these also began quidding. All horses injected on the original side of the power stroke switched sides while the 2 injected on the contralateral side did not. All horses developed reduced vertical pitch (vertical opening) of the mandible. Overall, rostrocaudal movement of the mandible did not change; however, the timing of this movement relative to the phase of the masticatory cycle did. Injection with LPS did not affect the amount of lateral movement of the mandible. Injection of LPS into the TMJ significantly altered the masticatory cycle compared with baseline values representing avoidance behaviour due to inflammation of the joint, despite which the horses continued to eat using the contralateral mandible. Lipopolysaccharide administration also led to quidding and a loss of feed efficiency (in some individuals). © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  16. What is the minimal vestibular function required for compensation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Wade, S. W.; Nashner, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Living with an uncompensated, abnormal vestibular system requires oppressive modification of life style and often prevents return to work and activities of daily living. Patients with vestibular abnormalities were studied to determine the minimal residual vestibular function required to achieve compensation. Three groups of patients with (a) complete unilateral loss of vestibular function with normal horizontal canal-vestibulo-ocular (HCVOR) function in the opposite ear, (b) complete unilateral loss with abnormal HCVOR function in the opposite ear, and (c) bilateral reduction of vestibular function from aminoglycoside toxicity underwent vestibuloocular (VOR), optokinetic (OKN), visual-VOR (VVOR), and computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) tests before and after therapeutic procedures. Results suggest that a minimal VOR response amplitude must be present for compensation of VVOR function to occur. The roles of VOR and OKN phase shifts in vestibular compensation are more complicated and require further study. Compensation of vestibulospinal function does not necessarily accompany VOR or VVOR compensation. Ascending and descending vestibular compensatory mechanisms may involve different spatial sensory inputs. Results of these studies have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with vestibular disorders, including selection and monitoring of patients for therapeutic regimens such as vestibular nerve section and streptomycin therapy.

  17. Basic Concepts in Understanding Recovery of Function in Vestibular Reflex Networks during Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Peusner, Kenna D.; Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input–output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation. PMID:22363316

  18. Unilateral Microinjection of Acrolein into Thoracic Spinal Cord Produces Acute and Chronic Injury and Functional Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24 hours (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with cresyl violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8 weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  19. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aphasia and unilateral spatial neglect due to acute thalamic hemorrhage: clinical correlations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages are associated with a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is well known that such cognitive changes constitute a limiting factor of recovery of the activities of daily living (ADL). The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and hematomas is unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aphasia/neglect and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. One hundred fifteen patients with thalamic hemorrhage (70 men and 45 women) were studied. Their mean age was 68.9 ± 10.3 years, and patients with both left and right lesions were included. We calculated hematoma volume and examined the presence or absence of aphasia/neglect and the relationships between these dysfunctions and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. Fifty-nine patients were found to have aphasia and 35 were found to have neglect. Although there was no relationship between hematoma type and cognitive dysfunction, hematoma volume showed a correlation with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. The ADL score and ratio of patient discharge for patients with aphasia/neglect were lower than those for patients without aphasia/neglect. We observed a correlation between the hematoma volume in thalamic hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction. Aphasia/neglect is found frequently in patients with acute thalamic hemorrhage and may influence the ADL.

  1. Unilateral eyelid swelling, proptosis and diplopia as initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.; Alaraj, Ahmad M.; Alkatan, Hind M.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor of immature myeloid cells occurring in many extramedullary sites, orbit being one of them where the tumor may occur prior to or after the diagnosis of underlying disease. We report a case of a 17-year-old male who presented with upper eyelid swelling, proptosis and diplopia after presumed blunt trauma without any other clinical signs and symptoms. Initial imaging suggested possibility of subperiosteal hematoma. Magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated a solid tumor. Complete excision of the tumor and histopathologic diagnosis revealed evidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). There were no other sites indicating any tumoral process; however, bone marrow aspirate revealed an evidence of systemic disease. After chemotherapy and allogenic bone marrow transplant, the patient had complete remission of his disease. An episode of graft vs host reaction resulting in severe dry eyes along with skin eruptions was treated successfully by immunosuppression and topical lubrication without any visual or systemic sequela. This case emphasizes on the need for an aggressive work-up for any unusual orbital lesion in the absence of any explainable etiology. Further, AML may be suspected in the cases of orbital tumors even in the absence of systemic manifestations of leukemia at any age. PMID:23960999

  2. Restoration of 3D Vestibular Sensation in Rhesus Monkeys Using a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Davidovics, Natan; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, Joong Ho; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    profoundly low gain [(mean eye velocity amplitude)/(mean head velocity amplitude) < 0.1] and large misalignment between ideal and actual eye movements. In contrast, motion-modulated sinusoidal MVP stimuli elicited a 3D VOR with gain 0.4–0.7 and axis misalignment of 21–38°, and responses to high-acceleration transient head rotations exhibited gain and asymmetry closer to those of unilaterally gentamicin-treated animals (i.e., with one intact labyrinth) than to bilaterally gentamicin-treated animals without MVP stimulation. In comparison to responses observed under similar conditions in chinchillas, acute responses to MVP stimulation in rhesus macaque monkeys were slightly better aligned to the desired rotation axis. Responses during combined rotation and prosthetic stimulation were greater than when either stimulus was presented alone, suggesting that the central nervous system uses MVP input in the context of multisensory integration. Considering the similarity in temporal bone anatomy and VOR performance between rhesus monkeys and humans, these observations suggest that an MVP will likely restore a useful level of vestibular sensation and gaze stabilization in humans. PMID:21888961

  3. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound during galvanic labyrinth polarization depicts central vestibular processing, demonstrating bilateral vestibular projection.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Hans-Georg; Guldin, Wolfgang; Fritzsche, Danny; Clarke, Andrew H

    2008-07-01

    The combination of galvanic labyrinth polarization and transcranial Doppler ultrasound was employed to depict the neurovascular coupling in the cerebral vestibular areas. For galvanic stimulation, surface electrodes were attached to the right and left mastoid and two further electrodes were fixed near to each shoulder blade. Thus, each pair of electrodes (mastoid to shoulder) facilitated unilateral stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular labyrinth. Blood flow in the middle cerebral artery and the internal carotid artery in both hemispheres was measured by means of Doppler ultrasound. The transcranial Doppler ultrasound system was head-fixed and allowed continuous monitoring of the blood flow throughout the trials. Using a series of different stimulation modes (bilateral, unilateral left, unilateral right and sham), the changes in mean blood flow velocity were evaluated by comparing baseline blood flow under resting conditions to blood flow during stimulation. A total of 18 trials were performed with each of seven volunteer subjects. Galvanic labyrinth polarization elicited a clear sensation of pendular body movement in all subjects. Significant blood flow increase (P < 0.05) in both hemispheres was observed during bilateral stimulation. Of more interest is that unilateral stimulation also elicited a significant increase in flow in both the ipsilateral and the contralateral hemispheres, demonstrating the existence of bilateral projections from each vestibular labyrinth. The combination of galvanic labyrinth polarization with transcranial Doppler ultrasound blood flow measurement provides a novel approach to the functional assessment of the vestibular system (deep cerebral structures and cortical areas). This novel technique provides a useful tool for clinical examinations.

  4. Risk factors associated with vestibular nerve schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Corona, Ana Paula; Ferrite, Silvia; Lopes, Marcia da Silva; Rêgo, Marco Antônio Vasconcelos

    2012-04-01

    Vestibular nerve schwannoma is a benign tumor that originates in the sheath of Schwann of the eighth cranial nerve. It is considered one of the most common benign intracranial tumors, and its cause is unclear. To identify the risk factors associated with vestibular nerve schwannomas. A hospital-based exploratory case-control study was conducted between 2006 and 2010 in 2 municipalities in the northeast region of Brazil. We included individuals with unilateral vestibular nerve schwannomas confirmed by imaging. The controls, selected from the same institutions as the cases, exhibited unilateral hearing loss or tinnitus and had undergone investigatory examinations similar to those of the cases, but the presence of tumor had been excluded. A pretested structured questionnaire, administered by trained interviewers who were blind to the condition of the individual being interviewed, was used to obtain sociodemographic data and data on potential risk factor exposure. We performed a multivariate analysis using unconditional logistic regression. A total of 44 patients with vestibular nerve schwannomas and 104 controls participated in the study. A history of chicken pox (odds ratio, 6.59; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-20.9) and the exposure to more than 1 cranial x-ray procedure (odds ratio, 4.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-19.2) were identified as potential risk factors. This exploratory study brings new hypotheses to be tested and thus works toward clarifying the causes and mechanisms involved in the cause and development of vestibular nerve schwannoma.

  5. Symptomatic Recovery in Miller Fisher Syndrome Parallels Vestibular-Perceptual and not Vestibular-Ocular Reflex Function.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M; Masaoutis, Panos; Green, David A; Plant, Gordon T; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2011-01-01

    Unpleasant visual symptoms including oscillopsia and dizziness may occur when there is unexpected motion of the visual world across the subject's retina ("retinal slip") as in an acute spontaneous nystagmus or on head movement with an acute ophthalmoplegia. In contrast, subjects with chronic ocular dysmotility, e.g., congenital nystagmus or chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, are typically symptom free. The adaptive processes that render chronic patients asymptomatic are obscure but may include a suppression of oscillopsia perception as well as an increased tolerance to perceived oscillopsia. Such chronic asymptomatic patients display an attenuation of vestibular-mediated angular velocity perception, implying a possible contributory role in the adaptive process. In order to assess causality between symptoms, signs (i.e., eye movements), and vestibular-perceptual function, we prospectively assessed symptom ratings and ocular-motor and perceptual vestibular function, in a patient with acute but transient ophthalmoplegia due to Miller Fisher Syndrome (as a model of visuo-vestibular adaptation). The data show that perceptual measures of vestibular function display a significant attenuation as compared to ocular-motor measures during the acute, symptomatic period. Perhaps significantly, both symptomatic recovery and normalization of vestibular-perceptual function were delayed and then occurred in a parallel fashion. This is the first report showing that symptomatic recovery of visuo-vestibular symptoms is better paralleled by vestibular-perceptual testing than vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) measures. The findings may have implications for the understanding of patients with chronic vestibular symptoms where VOR testing is often unhelpful.

  6. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  7. The vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The end organs, central nervous system connections, and static and dynamic characteristics of the vestibular system are presented. Vestibular servation in man and vestibular side effect prevention from space missions involving artificial gravity generation are also considered. Vestibular models and design criteria for rotating space vehicles are appended.

  8. [Ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Xu, Xinda; Xu, Min; Hu, Juan; Liang, Jianmin; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    To observe the ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) in patients with vestibular diseases. From March, 2011 to March, 2012, 13 patients (14 ears) with peripheral vestibular diseases were recruited. Each patient underwent conventional oVEMP and cVEMP examinations elicited by intensive air conducted sound (short tone burst, 500 Hz) in bilateral ears. Thirteen cases (14 ears) were included in this study. They were 3 cases (3 ears) with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 3 cases (4 ears) with acoustic neuroma, 1 case (1 ear) with VII and VIII cranial nerve trauma after head injury, 2 cases (2 ears) with vestibular neuritis, 3 cases (3 ears) with Meniere's disease, and Icase (1 ear) with unilateral hypoplasia of the internal auditory canal. Altogether, oVEMP could be elicited in only 2 ears (14. 3%) and cVEMP were found abnormal in 11 ears (78. 6%). The otolithic vestibular end organs and their input pathways could be examined by cVEMP and oVEMP examinations in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  9. Asymmetry of vestibular function induced by unidirectional visual-vestibular conflict.

    PubMed

    Aoki, M; Burchill, P; Ito, Y; Gresty, M

    1998-09-01

    We describe an attempt to model unilateral vestibular dysfunction in normal man by inducing vestibular asymmetry with exposure to long-term, unidirectional, visual-vestibular conflict. Subjects were exposed to pseudo-random (0.13, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3Hz; 77 degrees/s peak) oscillation in Yaw for 30 min whilst viewing a surrounding, whole field optokinetic drum which rotated with them when they were rotating rightwards and remained earth stationary when they rotated leftwards. Adaptation to this stimulus was assessed by combined tests of "goal-directed" vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) and vestibular memory contingent saccades (VMCS) in 5 subjects and in a further 4 subjects by combined tests of perception of reorientation (a "navigation" task) and sinusoidal VOR at 0.1 and 0.32 Hz. The exposure induced a reduction in the gain of the VMCS and an underestimation of perceived amplitude of displacement when subjects were turned rightwards. VOR gain for rightwards movement was reduced more markedly at 0.1 Hz. No change was found in the goal-directed VOR gain. Thirty minutes after adaptation, the asymmetry of the VOR gain remained at 0.1 Hz, but vestibular perception recovered to normal. Asymmetrical adaptation can be achieved with short exposures and is more marked for low frequency stimuli. Modification reflex of vestibular functions endures longer than of perception of reorientation.

  10. Vestibular Restoration and Adaptation in Vestibular Neuritis and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome With Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Rueda, Almudena; Esteban-Sanchez, Jonathan; Yanes, Joaquin; Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Sanz-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate vestibular restoration and the evolution of the compensatory saccades in acute severe inflammatory vestibular nerve paralysis, including vestibular neuritis and Ramsay Hunt syndrome with vertigo. Prospective. Tertiary referral center. Vestibular neuritis (n = 18) and Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients with vertigo (n = 13) were enrolled. After treatment with oral corticosteroids, patients were followed up for 6 months. Functional recovery of the facial nerve was scored according to the House-Brackman grading system. Caloric and video head impulse tests were performed in every patient at the time of enrolment. Subsequently, successive video head impulse test (vHIT) exploration was performed at the 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up. Eighteen patients with vestibular neuritis and 13 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and associated vertigo were included. Vestibular function was significantly worse in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome than in those with vestibular neuritis. Similar compensatory saccades velocity and latency values were observed in both groups, in both the caloric and initial vHIT tests. Successive vHIT results showed a significantly higher vestibulo-ocular reflex gain recovery in vestibular neuritis patients than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. A significantly faster reduction in the latency, velocity, and organization of the compensatory saccades was observed in neuritis than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. In addition to the recovery of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the reduction of latency, velocity and the organization of compensatory saccades play a role in vestibular compensation.

  11. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  12. Functional organization of primate translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes and effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Translational vestibulo-ocular reflexes (trVORs) are characterized by distinct spatio-temporal properties and sensitivities that are proportional to the inverse of viewing distance. Anodal (inhibitory) labyrinthine stimulation (100 microA, < 2 s) during motion decreased the high-pass filtered dynamics, as well as horizontal trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance. Cathodal (excitatory) currents had opposite effects. Translational VORs were also affected after unilateral labyrinthectomy. Animals lost their ability to modulate trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance acutely after the lesion. These deficits partially recovered over time, albeit a significant reduction in trVOR sensitivity as a function of viewing distance remained in compensated animals. During fore-aft motion, the effects of unilateral labyrinthectomy were more dramatic. Both acute and compensated animals permanently lost their ability to modulate fore-aft trVOR responses as a function of target eccentricity. These results suggest that (1) the dynamics and viewing distance-dependent properties of the trVORs are very sensitive to changes in the resting firing rate of vestibular afferents and, consequently, vestibular nuclei neurons; (2) the most irregularly firing primary otolith afferents that are most sensitive to labyrinthine electrical stimulation might contribute to reflex dynamics and sensitivity; (3) inputs from both labyrinths are necessary for the generation of the translational VORs.

  13. Prevalence of hearing and vestibular loss in cystic fibrosis patients exposed to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, Jaynee A; Nasr, Samya Z; Pitts, Crystal; King, William M

    2017-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients frequently use aminoglycosides (AGS) to treat CF exacerbation due to colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although AGS can cause vestibular and auditory sensory losses that can negatively impact quality of life, little is known about the prevalence of vestibular loss in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hearing loss and/or vestibular dysfunction in CF patients treated with AGS. The relationship between hearing status and vestibular status was also investigated. Hearing was determined to be normal or abnormal based on pure tone air and bone conduction thresholds. Vestibular outcome was divided into four categories; normal, non-lateralized vestibular dysfunction, unilateral loss, and bilateral loss based on results of post head shaking testing, positional and positioning testing, bithermal calorics, sinusoidal, and rotational step testing. Of our cohort of 71 patients, 56 (79%) patients have vestibular system dysfunction while only 15 (21%) have normal vestibular system function. Overall, 16 patients (23%) have hearing loss. In considering the relationship between auditory and vestibular function, 12 (17%) demonstrated both normal hearing and normal vestibular function and 13 (18%) have both hearing loss and abnormal vestibular function. Of the 55 (78%) patients with normal hearing, 43 (61%) have vestibular dysfunction, while 3 (4%) of patients with normal vestibular function have hearing loss. These results suggest that monitoring hearing alone is insufficient to detect ototoxicity in CF patients being treated with systemic AGS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical and video head impulse test in the diagnosis of posterior circulation stroke presenting as acute vestibular syndrome in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ayse; Karbek Akarca, Funda; Eraslan, Cenk; Tarhan, Ceyda; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun; Celebisoy, Nese

    2017-01-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is the critical bedside examination which differentiates vestibular neuritis (VN) from posterior circulation stroke (PCS) in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Video-oculography based HIT (vHIT) may have aadditional strength in making the differentiation. Patients admitted to the emergency department of a tertiary-care medical center with AVS were studied. An emergency specialist and a neurologist performed HIT. vHIT was conducted by an neuro-otology research fellow. Forty patients 26 male, 14 female with a mean age of 49 years were included in the analyses. Final diagnoses were VN in 24 and PCS in 16 patients.In the VN group, clinical HIT was assessed as abnormal in 19(80%) cases by the emergency specialist and in 20(83%) by the neurologist. In all PCS patients, HIT was recorded as normal both by the emergency specialist and the neurologist (100%).On vHIT, patients with VN had significantly low gain values for both the ipsilesional and contralesional sides when compared with the healthy controls, with significantly lower figures for the ipsilesional side (p < 0.001). All patients in this group had normal DWI-MRI.PCS patients had bilaterally low gain (p < 0.05) on vHIT. However, gain asymmetry was not significant. Subgroup analyses according to presence of brainstem involvement revealed bilateral low gain (p < 0.05) in patients with brainstem infarction (anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery stroke, AICA-PICA stroke) whereas patients with pure cerebellar infarction (posterior inferior cerebellar artery-superior cerebellar artery stroke, PICA-SCA stroke) had gain values similar to healthy controls.With a gain cut-off ≤0.75 and gain asymmetry cut-off ≥17%, as determined by ROC analysis, 100% of PCS patients and 80% of VN patients were correctly diagnosed. Clinical HIT, either performed by an emergency specialist or neurologist is equivalent to vHIT gain and gain asymmetry analysis as conducted

  15. Paroxysmal positional vertigo despite complete vestibular impairment: the role of instrumental assessment.

    PubMed

    Casani, A P; Cerchiai, N; Navari, E

    2018-02-28

    Lindsay and Hemenway syndrome is characterised by a posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following a partial unilateral vestibular loss affecting the same side. The syndrome is caused by damage of structures innervated by the superior division of the vestibular nerve and perfused by the anterior vestibular artery; the detached otoconia can cause vertigo in the still intact posterior semicircular canal. The most recent vestibular instrumental techniques allow reaching an accurate topodiagnosis in case of peripheral vestibular failure. We report on two cases of Lindsay-Hemenway syndrome despite complete vestibular failure demonstrated by vestibular instrumental assessment. After making some critical considerations on these findings, we underline the importance of not disregarding the diagnosis of paroxysmal positional vertigo in an established complete labyrinthine loss of function. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  16. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or “à la carte” VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  17. Neurophysiology of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hain, Timothy C

    2011-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sophisticated human control system. Accurate processing of sensory input about rapid head and postural motion is critical. Not surprisingly, the body uses multiple, partially redundant sensory inputs and motor outputs, combined with a very competent central repair capability. The system as a whole can adapt to substantial peripheral vestibular dysfunction. The Achilles' heel of the vestibular system is a relative inability to repair central vestibular dysfunction.

  18. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    PubMed Central

    Adenwalla, H. S.; Narayanan, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web. PMID:19884683

  19. Current Evidence of Peripheral Vestibular Symptoms Secondary to Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Rafael Costa; Kasemodel, Ana Luiza Papi; Tomaz, Andreza; Paparella, Michael M; Penido, Norma O

    2018-04-26

    The association between otitis media and vestibular symptoms has been hypothesized in the past. Thus, in this study, we aimed to critically analyze (based in a systematic review of the literature) whether patients who have otitis media are at greater risk of developing vestibular impairment or not. We performed a systematic review of the literature, and identified potentially relevant articles reporting vestibular symptoms and results of vestibular function tests in patients with otitis media through searches of the PubMED, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The quality of the final set of records was assessed using the "Newcaste-Ottawa Scale". Of 2334 records searched, 43 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and those included 2250 patients. The records comprised 20 longitudinal studies, 21 cross-sectional studies, and 2 case reports. Regarding the type of otitis media studied, 25 examined vestibular impairment in otitis media with effusion, 6 acute otitis media, and 12 chronic otitis media. Results of anamnesis, clinical exams, and several vestibular function tests are reported and critically discussed. most studies evaluating the association between otitis media and vestibular symptoms have potential methodological flaws. Clinical evidence suggests that patients with otitis media have increased chances for having vestibular symptoms, delayed acquisition of developmental milestones, and abnormalities in several vestibular function tests as compared with controls. Future studies with rigorous methodology aiming to assess the clinical significance (and prognostic factors) of the association between otitis media and vestibular impairment are warranted.

  20. State Anxiety Subjective Imbalance and Handicap in Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Saman, Yougan; Mclellan, Lucie; Mckenna, Laurence; Dutia, Mayank B; Obholzer, Rupert; Libby, Gerald; Gleeson, Michael; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for a significant clinical and neuroanatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety, and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. (1) To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit. (2) To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. Two separate cohorts of vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and caloric responses) and questionnaire assessments [vertigo handicap questionnaire (VHQ), vertigo symptom scale (VSS), and state-trait anxiety inventory (STAIY)]. Fifteen post-resection VS patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1). Forty-five patients with VS in situ formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2). Experiment 1: VS subjects (N = 15) with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a state anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterward with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1). Experiment 2: state anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of patients with VS in situ presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1, N = 26) and without balance symptoms (Group 2, N = 11) (Aim 2). The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER. In Experiment 1, a significant difference (p < 0.01) was found when comparing STAIY

  1. [The large vestibular aqueduct syndrome: a cause of neurosensory dysacusia].

    PubMed

    Camargo da Silva, Daniela Polo; Montovani, Jair Cortez; Oliveira, Danielle Tavares; Fioravanti, Marisa Portes; Tamashiro, Ivanira Ayako

    2008-01-01

    the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) is characterized by the enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct associated with sensorioneural hearing loss. The level of hearing loss varies and may be fluctuant, progressive or sudden. Vestibular symptoms may be present. The diagnosis is reached by imaging methods. To report an LVAS case. a female infant was submitted to a computerized tomography of the ears and to audiologic tests. enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct of more than 1.5mm and sensorioneural hearing loss in the right ear were observed. with an early hearing evaluation it is possible to diagnose hearing loss, even in children were this loss is unilateral. Although the literature indicates that the diagnosis of LVAS occurs at a later age, in this case the etiologic diagnosis was enabled by computerized tomography.

  2. Clinical verification of a unilateral otolith test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzig, J.; Hofstetter-Degen, K.; Maurer, J.; von Baumgarten, R. J.

    In a previous study 13 we reported promising results for a new test to differentiate in vivo unilateral otolith functions. That study pointed to a need for further validation on known pathological cases. In this presentation we will detail the results gathered on a group of clinically verified vestibular defectives (verum) and a normal (control) group. The subjects in the verum group were former patients of the ENT clinic of the university hospital. These subjects had usually suffered from neurinoma of the VIIth cranial nerve or inner ear infections. All had required surgical intervention including removal of the vestibular system. The patients were contacted usually two or more years postoperatively. A group of students from the pre- and clinical phase of medical training served as control. Both groups were subjected to standardized clinical tests. These tests served to reconfirm the intra- or postoperative diagnosis of unilateral vestibular loss in the verum group. In the control group they had to establish the normalcy of the responses of the vestibular system. Both groups then underwent testing on our exccentric rotary chair in the manner described before 13. Preliminary results of the trials indicate that this test may indeed for the first time offer a chance to look at isolated otolith apparati in vivo.

  3. Clinical evaluation of elderly people with chronic vestibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Juliana Maria; Ganança, Fernando Freitas; Aratani, Mayra Cristina; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi

    2006-01-01

    Dizziness is common among the elderly. To characterize social, demographic, clinical, functional and otoneurological data in elderly patients with chronic vestibular disorder. A sequential study of 120 patients with chronic vestibular disorder. Simple descriptive analyses were undertaken. Most of the patients were female (68.3%) with a mean age of 73.40+/-5.77 years. The average number of illnesses associated with the vestibular disorder was 3.83+/-1.84; the patients were taking on average 3.86+/-2.27 different medications. The most prevalent diagnosis on the vestibular exam was unilateral vestibular loss (29.8%) and the most prevalent etiology was metabolic vestibulopathy (40.0%) followed by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (36.7%). Fifty-two patients (43.3%) had experienced dizziness for 5 years or more. Sixty-four patients (53.3%) had at least one fall in the last year and thirty-five (29.2%) had recurrent falls. Most of the sample included females with associated diseases, and using many different drugs. The most prevalent vestibular diseases were metabolic and vascular labyrinth conditions. Dizziness is a chronic symptom in elderly patients. The association of two vestibular diseases is common. Falls are prevalent in chronic dizzy elderly patients.

  4. Assessment of vestibular ototoxicity of ear drops by recording of vestibular evoked potentials to acceleration impulses.

    PubMed

    Sichel, J Y; Eliashar, R; Plotnik, M; Sohmer, H; Elidan, J

    2000-03-01

    The cochlear ototoxicity of several ear drops is well documented in the literature, but very few studies exist on the vestibular ototoxicity of these topical drugs. To develop an animal model for the assessment of the vestibular ototoxicity of ear drops. Two animal groups, consisting of five fat sand rats (FSRs) each, underwent unilateral labyrinthectomy. Normal saline was topically applied into the middle ear cavity of rats in the first group for 7 days (control group). Rats in the second group were treated in the same way by topical gentamicin solution. Cochlear function was assessed by the recording of auditory evoked potential (ABPs) thresholds, and vestibular function was assessed by the recording of vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) to angular accelerations. In the control group, except for the amplitude of the first wave, there was no significant difference in the VsEPs recorded before and after topical application. In the gentamicin group, VsEPs could not be recorded after 7 days, and ABPs were recorded in one case only, with a threshold of 100 dB sound pressure level (SPL). VsEPs seem to be a reliable measure for evaluating the vestibular ototoxicity of topical ear drops.

  5. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  6. Acute effects of unilateral temporary stellate ganglion block on human atrial electrophysiological properties and atrial fibrillation inducibility.

    PubMed

    Leftheriotis, Dionyssios; Flevari, Panayota; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Katsaras, Dimitrios; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Arvaniti, Chrysa; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Lekakis, John

    2016-11-01

    In experimental models, stellate ganglion block (SGB) reduces the induction of atrial fibrillation (AF), while data in humans are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of unilateral SGB on atrial electrophysiological properties and AF induction in patients with paroxysmal AF. Thirty-six patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized in a 2:1 order to temporary, transcutaneous, pharmaceutical SGB with lidocaine or placebo before pulmonary vein isolation. Lidocaine was 1:1 randomly infused to the right or left ganglion. Before and after randomization, atrial effective refractory period (ERP) of each atrium, difference between right and left atrial ERP, intra- and interatrial conduction time, AF inducibility, and AF duration were assessed. After SGB, right atrial ERP was prolonged from a median (1st-3rd quartile) of 240 (220-268) ms to 260 (240-300) ms (P < .01) and left atrial ERP from 235 (220-260) ms to 245 (240-280) ms (P < .01). AF was induced by atrial pacing in all 24 patients before SGB, but only in 13 patients (54%) after the intervention (P < .01). AF duration was shorter after SGB: 1.5 (0.0-5.8) minutes from 5.5 (3.0-12.0) minutes (P < .01). Intra- and interatrial conduction time was not significantly prolonged. No significant differences were observed between right and left SGB. No changes were observed in the placebo group. Unilateral temporary SGB prolonged atrial ERP, reduced AF inducibility, and decreased AF duration. An equivalent effect of right and left SGB on both atria was observed. These findings may have a clinical implication in the prevention of drug refractory and postsurgery AF and deserve further clinical investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review of book vestibular crises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical practice, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with vestibular crises is discussed. Classifications for vestibular disorders are given. Information on the frequency of vestibular crises is given.

  8. [Functional anatomy of the vestibular nerve].

    PubMed

    Tilikete, C; Vighetto, A

    2009-04-01

    The vestibular system detects head movements such as angular rotation, translation, and head position relative to gravity. It acts to stabilize the eyes and posture through subcortical reflexes. Its signals are also integrated at the cortical level to participate in the elaboration of a body scheme, used for different functions such as spatial orientation and motor control. The vestibular nerve shows a resting discharge rate that is modulated up or down according to head motion or position. Central functioning depends on the detection of an asymmetry between signals coming from a pair of peripheral sensors, one on either side. In pathological cases, unilateral peripheral dysfunction is interpreted by the central system as an asymmetry resulting from a change in head position leading to nystagmus, postural disturbances, and vertigo. The dysfunction can be either a deficit, such as observed in vestibular neuronitis, or hyperactivity such as observed in neurovascular compression syndrome of the VIIIth nerve. Anatomically, the VIIIth nerve has a long Root Entry Zone (REZ) that extends over 10mm before entering the brainstem. The VIIIth nerve is also physiologically close to numerous vessels at the pontocerebellar angle and internal auditory meatus. Therefore, vestibular syndrome resulting from neurovascular compression syndrome of the VIIIth nerve may exist, but it is very difficult to prove using radiological imagery.

  9. Principles of vestibular pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chabbert, C

    2016-01-01

    Ideally, vestibular pharmacotherapy is intended, through specific and targeted molecular actions, to significantly alleviate vertigo symptoms, to protect or repair the vestibular sensory network under pathologic conditions, and to promote vestibular compensation, with the eventual aim of improving the patient's quality of life. In fact, in order to achieve this aim, considerable progress still needs to be made. The lack of information on the etiology of vestibular disorders and the pharmacologic targets to modulate, as well as the technical challenge of targeting a drug to its effective site are some of the main issues yet to be overcome. In this review, my intention is to provide an account of the therapeutic principles that have shaped current vestibular pharmacotherapy and to further explore crucial questions that must be taken into consideration in order to develop targeted and specific pharmacologic therapies for each type and stage of vestibular disorders. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Vestibular humanoid postural control.

    PubMed

    Mergner, Thomas; Schweigart, Georg; Fennell, Luminous

    2009-01-01

    Many of our motor activities require stabilization against external disturbances. This especially applies to biped stance since it is inherently unstable. Disturbance compensation is mainly reactive, depending on sensory inputs and real-time sensor fusion. In humans, the vestibular system plays a major role. When there is no visual space reference, vestibular-loss clearly impairs stance stability. Most humanoid robots do not use a vestibular system, but stabilize upright body posture by means of center of pressure (COP) control. We here suggest using in addition a vestibular sensor and present a biologically inspired vestibular sensor along with a human-inspired stance control mechanism. We proceed in two steps. First, in an introductory review part, we report on relevant human sensors and their role in stance control, focusing on own models of transmitter fusion in the vestibular sensor and sensor fusion in stance control. In a second, experimental part, the models are used to construct an artificial vestibular system and to embed it into the stance control of a humanoid. The robot's performance is investigated using tilts of the support surface. The results are compared to those of humans. Functional significance of the vestibular sensor is highlighted by comparing vestibular-able with vestibular-loss states in robot and humans. We show that a kinematic body-space sensory feedback (vestibular) is advantageous over a kinetic one (force cues) for dynamic body-space balancing. Our embodiment of human sensorimotor control principles into a robot is more than just bionics. It inspired our biological work (neurorobotics: 'learning by building', proof of principle, and more). We envisage a future clinical use in the form of hardware-in-the-loop simulations of neurological symptoms for improving diagnosis and therapy and designing medical assistive devices.

  11. Observations on the elicitation of secondary and inverted primary nystagmus from the cat by unilateral caloric irrigation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-02-01

    Vestibular stimulation by repeated unilateral caloric irrigation of cats occasioned the appearance of secondary, tertiary, and inverted primary nystagmus in some animals. These inverse responses were recorded with stimulus temperatures of 5, 23.5, an...

  12. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes.

  13. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  14. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  15. Vestibular syndrome: a change in internal spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Borel, L; Lopez, C; Péruch, P; Lacour, M

    2008-12-01

    The vestibular system contributes to a wide range of functions from reflexes to spatial representation. This paper reviews behavioral, perceptive, and cognitive data that highlight the role of changes in internal spatial representation on the vestibular syndrome. Firstly, we review how visual vertical perception and postural orientation depend on multiple reference frames and multisensory integration and how reference frames are selected according to the status of the peripheral vestibular system (i.e., unilateral or bilateral hyporeflexia), the environmental constraints (i.e., sensory cues), and the postural constraints (i.e., balance control). We show how changes in reference frames are able to modify vestibular lesion-induced postural and locomotor deficits and propose that fast changes in reference frame may be considered as fast-adaptive processes after vestibular loss. Secondly, we review data dealing with the influence of vestibular loss on higher levels of internal representation sustaining spatial orientation and navigation. Particular emphasis is placed on spatial performance according to task complexity (i.e., the required level of spatial knowledge) and to the sensory cues available to define the position and orientation within the environment (i.e., real navigation in darkness or visual virtual navigation without any actual self-motion). We suggest that vestibular signals are necessary for other sensory cues to be properly integrated and that vestibular cues are involved in extrapersonal space representation. In this respect, vestibular-induced changes would be based on a dynamic mental representation of space that is continuously updated and that supports fast-adaptive processes.

  16. Episodic vestibular disruption following ablation of the inferior olive in rats: behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Dale W; White, Gary

    2006-11-25

    The experiments herein investigate whether the behavioral responses to transient and episodic vestibular disruption and permanent ablation are distinct in the absence of climbing fiber input. Subjects in group 1 received an IP injection of PBS followed by an IP injection of niacinamide. Seven days later these rats received the first of 3 serial transtympanic injections of TTX on the same side with 7 days between each injection. Following each TTX injection rats displayed unilateral vestibular symptoms that persisted beyond 48h. Spontaneous barrel rolling behavior was not observed. Group 2 subjects received an IP injection of 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP)+niacinamide followed by the same TTX regimen as group 1. Following each TTX injection vestibular symptoms (severe body twisting and persistent spontaneous barrel rolling) emerged rapidly (<15min) and resolved by 72h. Group 3 subjects received an IP injection of 3-AP+niacinamide and 7 days later a single unilateral transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate. Rats in group 3 developed vestibular symptoms similar to those observed in group 2 although there was no resolution of these symptoms. The results indicate that TTX has a rapid rate of infiltration and blockade of the VIIIth nerve that persists for >48h and then completely resolves. The contrast in vestibular symptoms between groups 1 and 2 suggest that climbing fibers are recruited soon after onset of vestibular disruption and play a role in attenuating the severity of vestibular symptoms associated with transient/episodic vestibular disruption.

  17. Vestibular neuronitis. An otoneurological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Silvoniemi, P

    1988-01-01

    Eighty-one cases with vestibular neuronitis were examined. The diagnostic criteria were a sudden onset of vertigo without previous symptoms, spontaneous nystagmus towards the healthy side, totally extinguished caloric responses with 44 degrees C and 30 degrees C water irrigation and no involvement of hearing associated with the onset of the disease. The series was divided into a prospective and a retrospective group. The prospective group A was examined at the acute stage, about 1 month and 1 year afterwards. The retrospective group B fulfilled the same criteria as group A and was examined 1-8 years after the acute stage. The results of the acute stage in group B were analysed from the case history reports, electronystagmo- and audiograms. The preceding and predisposing factors and symptoms were inquired. The examination scheme included the clinical otoneurological examination, the nystagmographic, audiological and clinical neurophysiological measurements and the serological and hematological specimens were collected at the acute stage of group A to examine the role of virus infections in the etiology of vestibular neuronitis. The liquor specimens of 16 cases available in group A were analysed. A recent respiratory infection was reported by 9 cases (27.3 percent) in group A and by 18 cases (37.5 percent) in group B. The serological evidence (increase of IgM-antibodies) was observed in 1 case against influenza A and in 1 case against parainfluenza 3 and the hematological examinations revealed clues of virus infection in 6 cases (18.2 percent) of group A. Cell counts and protein analyses of the liquor specimens were within normal limits. Cases with arterial hypertension under medical control were observed in 15.2 percent of group A and 14.6 percent in group B. These figures do not exceed the age- and sex-correlated prevalence of arterial hypertension in Finnish population. The clinical symptoms included an acute chiefly rotatory vertigo associated with nausea and

  18. Comfrey extract ointment in comparison to diclofenac gel in the treatment of acute unilateral ankle sprains (distortions).

    PubMed

    D'Anchise, Roberto; Bulitta, Michael; Giannetti, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    A previously published study comparing the efficacy of comfrey extract to a commercial diclofenac (CAS 78213-16-8) preparation in the treatment of unilateral ankle sprains is critically re-evaluated. The study was designed to show non-inferiority of the comfrey extract. The data were re-evaluated for superiority according to CPMP guidelines. The study was an observer-blind, randomised, multi-centre clinical trial with two independent treatment groups "comfrey extract" and "diclofenac gel" (parallel group design) and included a total of 164 patients (82 in the comfrey group and 82 in the diclofenac group, intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis). Key variables were the area under the curve (AUC) from Visits 1 to 2 of the difference of the tenderness values contra-lateral minus injured side (primary variable), pain assessment (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS) at rest and on movement by patient, swelling (figure-of-eight method) and ankle movement (neutral zero method). On average (mean difference comfrey extract minus diclofenac), the AUC was +61.1 h x N/cm2 greater for patients treated with comfrey extract compared to diclofenac treated patients (95% confidence interval: 19.08; 103.09 h x N/cm2). The difference between the two treatment groups was statistically significant (analysis of variance with factors "study drug", "centre", and "drug x centre interaction"). Safety was excellent in both treatment groups. The re-evaluation of the data showed superiority of the plant based ointment over the diclofenac gel in the treatment of distortions. It is encouraging and impressive to realize that a natural product seems to be an effective and safe alternative to the standard topical treatment with diclofenac.

  19. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  20. Audiologic and vestibular findings in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus type-1-infected Mexican children under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Gerardo C; Montalvo, Martha S; Fraire, Maria I; Leon, Ernesto; Alvarez, Maria T; Solorzano, Fortino

    2008-11-01

    There is little information about audiologic and vestibular disorders in pediatric patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1). The aim of this study was to evaluate audiologic and vestibular disorders in a sample of HIV-1-infected children receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry, speech discrimination testing, auditory brainstem responses, electronystagmography, and rotatory testing. HIV-1 viral load and absolute CD4+ cell counts were registered. Twenty-three patients were included, aged 4.5 years (median, range 5 months to 16 years). Pure tone audiometry was carried out in 12 children over 4 years of age: 4 (33%) showed hearing loss, 2 were conductive. Auditory brainstem responses were measured in all 23 patients, suggesting conductive hearing loss in 6 and sensorineural hearing loss in 2. Most patients with conductive hearing loss had the antecedent of acute or chronic suppurative otitis media but with dry ears at the time of evaluation (p=0.003). Abnormal prolongations of interwave intervals in auditory brainstem responses were observed in 3 children (13%, 4 ears), an abnormal morphology in different components of auditory brainstem responses in 4 (17.4%, 7 ears), and abnormal amplitude patterns in 11 patients (48%, 17 ears). Vestibular tests were abnormal in all six patients tested, with asymmetries in caloric and rotatory tests. Although differences were not significant, in general, audiologic abnormalities were more frequent in patients with more prolonged HIV-1 infections, higher viral loads, or lower absolute CD4+ cell counts. Conductive hearing loss associated with previous otitis media events, abnormalities in auditory brainstem responses suggesting disorders at different levels of the auditory pathways, and unilateral vestibular hyporeflexia were frequent findings in our sample of HIV-1-infected children under Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. These findings suggest that HIV

  1. Isolated vestibular syndrome in posterior circulation stroke: Frequency and involved structures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Kwang-Dong; Kim, Min-Ji; Choi, Yu Ri; Cho, Han-Jin; Sung, Sang-Min; Kim, Hak-Jin; Kim, Ji-Soo; Jung, Dae-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Dizziness/vertigo is a common symptom of posterior circulation stroke and usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs. Although strokes involving the brainstem or cerebellum may produce isolated vestibular syndrome (isolated vertigo or imbalance), the overall frequency and involved structures of isolated vestibular syndrome in the posterior circulation stroke remain uncertain. Isolated vestibular syndrome occurs in approximately 25% of the patients with posterior circulation stroke, and mostly involves the cerebellum, inferior or superior cerebellar peduncles, and caudal lateral or rostral dorsolateral medulla. The occasional negative neuroimaging in patients with acute isolated vascular vertigo highlights the importance of appropriate bedside evaluation in acute vestibular syndrome.

  2. Recent onset disequilibrium mimicking acute vestibulopathy in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barona-Lleo, Luz; Zulueta-Santos, Cristina; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Pérez-Fernández, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy rests in the proper clinical assessment and use of selected tests of vestibular function. In case of a central nervous system lesion as in Multiple Sclerosis, the case shown here, it is of particular importance to observe congruency between severity of symptoms and signs and, of topographic diagnosis. We report a case of a 37-year-old woman with recent onset disequilibrium that after careful analysis of the different test results several incongruences were found; this prompted a radiological study that provided the clue to diagnosis. After treatment the patient recovered completely not only clinically but also in vestibular deficit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcanal labyrinthectomy for intractable vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Basura, Gregory J; Zwolan, Teresa A; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Telian, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Document the use of transcanal labyrinthectomy to treat disabling attacks of vertigo after unilateral cochlear implantation. A 46-year-old woman with severe-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss secondary to enlarged vestibular aqueducts underwent cochlear implantation for her right ear with a Nucleus Freedom device. The surgery was uneventful, and postoperative imaging confirmed that the electrode was positioned properly. She developed episodic vertigo 10 to 14 days after the implant surgery, which failed to improve with aggressive vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Plugging of the round window for possible perilymphatic fistula did not relieve her symptoms. Right transcanal labyrinthectomy supplemented by filling the vestibule with gentamicin-soaked Gelfoam and then a customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Comparison of vestibular symptoms and cochlear implant performance before and after transcanal labyrinthectomy. The patient had immediate relief of symptoms, and the function of the cochlear implant was not adversely affected. Transcanal labyrinthectomy may be an effective method to ablate the vestibular end organ after unilateral cochlear implantation. It can offer relief of disabling vertigo without adversely affecting the performance of the implant.

  4. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  5. Vestibular signs associated with suspected lightning strike in two horses.

    PubMed

    Bedenice, D; Hoffman, A M; Parrott, B; McDonnel, J

    2001-10-27

    Two previously healthy 14-year-old horses developed right-sided unilateral vestibular signs after they had possibly been struck by lightning. Repeated radiographic and endoscopic evaluations did not reveal any significant changes. A brainstem auditory evoked response test indicated a subtle left to right interaural latency difference of waves I, III and V in the more severely affected pony, but its central conduction time remained normal.

  6. Effects of acute altered gravity during parabolic flight and/or vestibular loss on cell proliferation in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Gliddon, Catherine M; Aitken, Phillip; Stiles, Lucy; Machado, Marie-Laure; Philoxene, Bruno; Denise, Pierre; Smith, Paul F; Besnard, Stephane

    2017-07-27

    Both parabolic flight, i.e. a condition of altered gravity, and loss of vestibular function, have been suggested to affect spatial learning and memory, which is known to be influenced by neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In this study we investigated whether short alternated micro- and hyper-gravity stimulations during parabolic flight and/or loss of vestibular function, would alter cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats, by measuring the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporated cells. Rats were randomly allocated to the following experimental groups: (1) sham transtympanic saline injection only (n=5); (2) bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) by sodium arsanilate transtympanic injection only (n=5); (3) sham treatment and parabolic flight (n=5); (4) BVD and parabolic flight (n=6). Forty-two days following transtympanic injection, the animals were subjected to parabolic flight in an awake restrained condition after habituation. A modified Airbus A300 aircraft was flown on a parabolic path, creating 20s of 1.8G during both climbing and descending and 22s of 0G at the apex of each parabola. The no flight animals were subjected to the same housing for the same duration. Immediately after the parabolic flight or control ground condition, animals were injected with BrdU (300mg/kg, i.p). Twenty-four hs after BrdU injection, rats were sacrificed. BrdU immunolabelling was performed and the number of BrdU +ve cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was quantified using a modified fractionator method. BVD caused a large and significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive cells compared to sham animals (P≤0.0001); however, flight and all interactions were non-significant. These results indicate that BVD significantly decreased cell proliferation irrespective of the short exposure to altered/modified gravity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultured vestibular ganglion neurons demonstrate latent HSV1 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Roehm, Pamela C; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V

    2011-10-01

    Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. basic science study. Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). A total of 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic ICP27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. A new saccadic indicator of peripheral vestibular function based on the video head impulse test.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, Hamish G; McGarvie, Leigh A; Halmagyi, G Michael; Rogers, Stephen J; Manzari, Leonardo; Burgess, Ann M; Curthoys, Ian S; Weber, Konrad P

    2016-07-26

    While compensatory saccades indicate vestibular loss in the conventional head impulse test paradigm (HIMP), in which the participant fixates an earth-fixed target, we investigated a complementary suppression head impulse paradigm (SHIMP), in which the participant is fixating a head-fixed target to elicit anticompensatory saccades as a sign of vestibular function. HIMP and SHIMP eye movement responses were measured with the horizontal video head impulse test in patients with unilateral vestibular loss, patients with bilateral vestibular loss, and in healthy controls. Vestibulo-ocular reflex gains showed close correlation (R(2) = 0.97) with slightly lower SHIMP than HIMP gains (mean gain difference 0.06 ± 0.05 SD, p < 0.001). However, the 2 paradigms produced complementary catch-up saccade patterns: HIMP elicited compensatory saccades in patients but rarely in controls, whereas SHIMP elicited large anticompensatory saccades in controls, but smaller or no saccades in bilateral vestibular loss. Unilateral vestibular loss produced covert saccades in HIMP, but later and smaller saccades in SHIMP toward the affected side. Cumulative HIMP and SHIMP saccade amplitude differentiated patients from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. While compensatory saccades indicate vestibular loss in conventional HIMP, anticompensatory saccades in SHIMP using a head-fixed target indicate vestibular function. SHIMP saccades usually appear later than HIMP saccades, therefore being more salient to the naked eye and facilitating vestibulo-ocular reflex gain measurements. The new paradigm is intuitive and easy to explain to patients, and the SHIMP results complement those from the standard video head impulse test. This case-control study provides Class III evidence that SHIMP accurately identifies patients with unilateral or bilateral vestibulopathies. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  10. Genetic contribution to vestibular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Martinez, Alvaro; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2018-03-26

    Growing evidence supports the contribution of allelic variation to vestibular disorders. Heritability attributed to rare allelic variants is found in familial vestibular syndromes such as enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome or familial Meniere disease. However, the involvement of common allelic variants as key regulators of physiological processes in common and rare vestibular diseases is starting to be deciphered, including motion sickness or sporadic Meniere disease. The genetic contribution to most of the vestibular disorders is still largely unknown. This review will outline the role of common and rare variants in human genome to episodic vestibular syndromes, progressive vestibular syndrome, and hereditary sensorineural hearing loss associated with vestibular phenotype. Future genomic studies and network analyses of omic data will clarify the pathway towards a personalized stratification of treatments.

  11. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  13. Vestibular function is associated with residual low-frequency hearing loss in patients with bi-allelic mutations in the SLC26A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Seo, Young Wook; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2016-05-01

    DFNB4 is non-syndromic, autosomal recessive type of hearing loss with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) caused by mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin. Although the characteristics of hearing loss are well known in DFNB4, vestibular function remains inconclusive. We evaluated the vestibular function of 31 patients with bi-allelic mutations in SLC26A4/pendrin and analyzed genetic, radiological, and audiological correlations with vestibular function. In a caloric test, unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathies were detected in 45.2% and 6.4% of patients, respectively; however, only 22.6% had subjective vertigo symptoms. While vestibular phenotype was not significantly associated with specific mutations in genetic alleles or the sizes of the endolymphatic sac and vestibular aqueduct, a residual hearing threshold at a low frequency (500 Hz) was definitely correlated with vestibular function in DFNB4 (p = 0.005). These findings may indicate that vestibular function in DFNB4 deteriorates unilaterally in ears when hearing loss occurs. In conclusion, DFNB4 shows vestibular dysfunction, which is strongly linked to hearing loss at low frequencies without any allelic or anatomical predisposing factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Morris, Rachael; Milberg, William; Sakel, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for four consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and 1-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy. PMID:24391559

  15. Does betahistine treatment have additional benefits to vestibular rehabilitation?

    PubMed

    Karapolat, Hale; Celebisoy, Nese; Kirazli, Yesim; Bilgen, Cem; Eyigor, Sibel; Gode, Sercan; Akyuz, Aycan; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-dose betahistine treatment added to vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on the disability, balance and postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. The VR group (group 1, n = 24) and the VR + betahistine group (group 2, n = 23) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were evaluated before and after an 8-week customized VR in terms of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory, DHI), dynamic balance [Dynamic Gait Index (DGI)] and postural stability (static posturography). In group 1 and group 2, differences between DHI, DGI and falling index score on static posturography before and after the exercise program were significant (p < 0.05). In addition, a significant difference was detected only in group 2 in the variables evaluated in static posturography-Fourier 4 analysis (p < 0.05). Both VR and betahistine + VR have a positive effect on disability and balance in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. Betahistine treatment added to VR was effective in increasing postural stability.

  16. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Italo R T; Bittar, Roseli S M; Pedalini, Maria Elisabete B; Lorenzi, Maria Cecília; Formigoni, Lázaro G; Bento, Ricardo F

    2005-07-01

    Vestibular disturbances are underdiagnosed in children. However, balance impairment may compromise the normal development of affected children. The appropriate therapeutic approach has not been agreed on for this age group. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy has excellent results in adults, but very few data exist regarding its results in children. We evaluated through clinical assessment and computerized dynamic posturography the outcome of children with peripheral vestibular disturbances undergoing vestibular rehabilitation therapy and observed the influence of learning and of central nervous system maturation on posturography retest results. Sixteen children (10 boys and 6 girls) with peripheral vestibular disorders (mean age, 8 yr 7 mo) constituted the cohort and were consecutively treated with vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Symptomatic children underwent pre- and posttreatment computerized dynamic posturography. Their outcome was clinically assessed. Another 16 asymptomatic children, paired by sex and age, underwent two computerized dynamic posturography procedures with the same time interval as that of the symptomatic group. All children completed the treatment. Total recovery of symptoms occurred in nine (56.3%) patients, whereas a dramatic partial recovery was observed in the remaining seven (43.7%) children. Posturography Conditions 5 and 6, the vestibular ratio of the sensory analysis, and the composite equilibrium score had a significant quantitative improvement after vestibular rehabilitation therapy. No adverse reactions occurred to the exercises. No statistically significant posturography changes were observed in the asymptomatic children. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy seems to be a safe and efficacious therapeutic option in children with peripheral vestibular disturbances.

  17. Vestibular end organ injury induced by middle ear treatment with ferric chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Park, B R

    2017-02-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia, pyramidal signs, and vestibular deficits characterize superficial siderosis of the central nervous system. This study investigated changes in vestibular function, free radical formation, and phosphorylated cJun expression in the vestibular end organs after middle ear treatment with a ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ) solution. A single injection of 70% FeCl 3 solution into the unilateral middle ear cavity caused static vestibular symptoms, such as spontaneous nystagmus and head tilt. Asymmetric expression of c-Fos protein was observed in the bilateral vestibular nuclei and prepositus hypoglossal nuclei within 6 h after injection. Histopathologic examinations revealed partial hair cell loss, degeneration of the supporting stroma, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the neuroepithelial layer of the crista ampullaris in FeCl 3 -treated animals. 5-(And-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester and diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate fluorescence and immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine increased markedly in the sensory neuroepithelial layer and nerve bundles of the crista ampullaris after 2 h. Strong immunoreactivity for phospho-cJun and cJun was observed in the type I hair cells of the crista ampullaris 120 h after injection. Thus, a single short-term treatment with a high concentration of FeCl 3 in the unilateral middle ear cavity can induce activation of intracellular signals for cJun protein and oxidative stress through the formation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in vestibular sensory receptors, resulting in vestibular dysfunction. These results suggest that activation of intracellular signals for cJun protein and oxidative stress may be a key component of the pathogenesis of vestibular deficits in patients with superficial siderosis.

  18. Tests of walking balance for screening vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Few reliable tests are available for screening people rapidly for vestibular disorders although such tests would be useful for a variety of testing situations. Balance testing is widely performed but of unknown value for screening. The goal of this study was to determine the value of tests of walking balance for screening people with vestibular impairments. We tested three groups of patients with known vestibular impairments: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, unilateral vestibular weakness, and post-acoustic neuroma resection. We compared them to normal subjects. All subjects were independently ambulatory without gait aids. Subjects were tested on tandem walking (TW) with eyes open and eyes closed for 10 steps, walking with no additional head motions and with augmented head rotations in yaw for 7 m (WwHT), and an obstacle avoidance task, the Functional Mobility Test (FMT). Subjects wore a 3-D motion sensor centered at mid-torso to capture kinematic measures. Patients and normals differed significantly on some behavioral measures, such as the number of steps to perform TW, and on some but not all kinematic measures. ROC analyses, however, were at best only moderate, and failed to find strong differences and cut-points that would differentiate the groups. These findings suggest that although patients and normals differ in performance of these tests in some interesting ways the groups are not sufficiently different on these tests for easy use as screening tests to differentiate the populations.

  19. Linear Path Integration Deficits in Patients with Abnormal Vestibular Afference

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Joeanna C.; Kortte, Kathleen B.; Shelhamer, Mark; Schubert, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Effective navigation requires the ability to keep track of one’s location and maintain orientation during linear and angular displacements. Path integration is the process of updating the representation of body position by integrating internally-generated self-motion signals over time (e.g., walking in the dark). One major source of input to path integration is vestibular afference. We tested patients with reduced vestibular function (unilateral vestibular hypofunction, UVH), patients with aberrant vestibular function (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, BPPV), and healthy participants (controls) on two linear path integration tasks: experimenter-guided walking and target-directed walking. The experimenter-guided walking task revealed a systematic underestimation of self-motion signals in UVH patients compared to the other groups. However, we did not find any difference in the distance walked between the UVH group and the control group for the target-directed walking task. Results from neuropsychological testing and clinical balance measures suggest that the errors in experimenter-guided walking were not attributable to cognitive and/or balance impairments. We conclude that impairment in linear path integration in UVH patients stem from deficits in self-motion perception. Importantly, our results also suggest that patients with a UVH deficit do not lose their ability to walk accurately without vision to a memorized target location. PMID:22726251

  20. Apollo flight crew vestibular assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Miller, E. F., II

    1975-01-01

    Vestibular function in the weightless state of space flight is examined. Due to the lack of a systematic program to assess quantitatively the effects of space flight on crew vestibular function the analysis is based on qualitative information derived from motion sickness histories and subjective reporting by individual astronauts on the type and magnitude of vestibular disturbances experienced during and following their missions. It is concluded that the increased mobility afforded by the larger volume of the Apollo CM/LM resulted in a higher incidence of vestibular disturbances in the Apollo Program and that it is difficult to predict the likelihood of inflight vestibular problems. Quantitative examination of the effects of weightlessness on the vestibular function is recommended.

  1. Modification of unilateral otolith responses following spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Andrew H; Schönfeld, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to resolve the issue of spaceflight-induced, adaptive modification of the otolith system by measuring unilateral otolith responses in a pre- versus post-flight design. The study represents the first comprehensive approach to examining unilateral otolith function following space flight. Ten astronauts participated in unilateral otolith function tests three times preflight and up to four times after Shuttle flights from landing day through the subsequent 10 days. During unilateral centrifugation, utricular function was examined by the perceptual changes reflected by the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and the otolith-mediated ocular counter-roll, designated as utriculo-ocular response (UOR). Unilateral saccular reflexes were recorded by measurement of collic vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP). The findings demonstrate a general increase in interlabyrinth asymmetry of otolith responses on landing day relative to preflight baseline, with subsequent reversal in asymmetry within 2-3 days. Recovery to baseline levels was achieved within 10 days. This fluctuation in asymmetry was consistent for the utricle tests (SVV and UOR) while apparently stronger for SVV. A similar asymmetry was observed during cVEMP testing. In addition, the results provide initial evidence of a dominant labyrinth. The findings require reconsideration of the otolith asymmetry hypothesis; in general, on landing day, the response from one labyrinth was equivalent to preflight values, while the other showed considerable discrepancy. The finding that one otolith response can return to one-g level within hours after re-entry while the other takes considerably longer demonstrates the importance of considering the otolith response as a result of both peripheral and associated central neural processing.

  2. Vestibular Lesion-Induced Developmental Plasticity in Spinal Locomotor Networks during Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Beyeler, Anna; Rao, Guillaume; Ladepeche, Laurent; Jacques, André; Simmers, John; Le Ray, Didier

    2013-01-01

    During frog metamorphosis, the vestibular sensory system remains unchanged, while spinal motor networks undergo a massive restructuring associated with the transition from the larval to adult biomechanical system. We investigated in Xenopus laevis the impact of a pre- (tadpole stage) or post-metamorphosis (juvenile stage) unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) on young adult swimming performance and underlying spinal locomotor circuitry. The acute disruptive effects on locomotion were similar in both tadpoles and juvenile frogs. However, animals that had metamorphosed with a preceding UL expressed restored swimming behavior at the juvenile stage, whereas animals lesioned after metamorphosis never recovered. Whilst kinematic and electrophysiological analyses of the propulsive system showed no significant differences in either juvenile group, a 3D biomechanical simulation suggested that an asymmetry in the dynamic control of posture during swimming could account for the behavioral restoration observed in animals that had been labyrinthectomized before metamorphosis. This hypothesis was subsequently supported by in vivo electromyography during free swimming and in vitro recordings from isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations. Specifically, animals lesioned prior to metamorphosis at the larval stage exhibited an asymmetrical propulsion/posture coupling as a post-metamorphic young adult. This developmental alteration was accompanied by an ipsilesional decrease in propriospinal coordination that is normally established in strict left-right symmetry during metamorphosis in order to synchronize dorsal trunk muscle contractions with bilateral hindlimb extensions in the swimming adult. Our data thus suggest that a disequilibrium in descending vestibulospinal information during Xenopus metamorphosis leads to an altered assembly of adult spinal locomotor circuitry. This in turn enables an adaptive compensation for the dynamic postural asymmetry induced by the vestibular imbalance

  3. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  4. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) can detect asymptomatic saccular hydrops.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yee; Timmer, Ferdinand C A; Oriel, Brad S; Zhou, Guangwei; Guinan, John J; Kujawa, Sharon G; Herrmann, Barbara S; Merchant, Saumil N; Rauch, Steven D

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the useful of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing for detecting endolymphatic hydrops, especially in the second ear of patients with unilateral Ménière disease (MD). This study was performed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Part I consisted of postmortem temporal bone specimens from the temporal bone collection of the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary; part II consisted of consecutive consenting adult patients (n = 82) with unilateral MD by American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria case histories. Outcome measures consisted of VEMP thresholds in patients and histologic saccular endolymphatic hydrops in postmortem temporal bones. Saccular hydrops was observed in the asymptomatic ear in six of 17 (35%) of temporal bones from donors with unilateral MD. Clinic patients with unilateral MD showed elevated mean VEMP thresholds and altered VEMP tuning in their symptomatic ears and, to a lesser degree, in their asymptomatic ears. Specific VEMP frequency and tuning criteria were used to define a "Ménière-like" response. This "Ménière-like" response was seen in 27% of asymptomatic ears of our patients with unilateral MD. Bilateral involvement is seen in approximately one third of MD cases. Saccular hydrops appears to precede symptoms in bilateral MD. Changes in VEMP threshold and tuning appear to be sensitive to these structural changes in the saccule. If so, then VEMP may be useful as a detector of asymptomatic saccular hydrops and as a predictor of evolving bilateral MD.

  5. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and health-related quality of life in patients with vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Viciana, David; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in subjects with vestibular neuritis (VN) and to determine the impact of the disease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Case series. Tertiary referral center. Fifty patients with VN (episode of sudden onset of prolonged vertigo [>24 h] associated with peripheral vestibular hypofunction, imbalance in absence of hearing loss, or other neurologic symptoms). VEMPs were measured in 41 patients by using an air-conducted 500 Hz tone burst. HRQoL was evaluated in all cases by the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory Short Form (DHI-S) instruments, after the acute episode was resolved. Latencies P1 or N1 peaks, corrected amplitude or the absence of response, for VEMPs; scores obtained in SF-36 and DHI-S instruments. VEMPs showed abnormal results in 21 (51%) of 41 cases, with an increase in ipsilateral latencies for P1 and N1 peaks being the most common finding. Three patients (7%) had ipsilateral abnormal VEMP response with normal caloric response, indicating isolated involvement of inferior vestibular nerve. The total score obtained for the DHI-S was 14.76 +/- 11.07 (range, 0-34/40), suggesting a variable impact among patients with VN. For the SF-36, scores in men with VN were worse than their age-matched controls for all dimensions, except for mental health. However, women only showed lower scores for general health and social function. Abnormal VEMP responses demonstrate the involvement of the inferior vestibular nerve in half of the patients with VN. Moreover, VN has a moderate impact in HRQoL, and it is perceived more disabling by men than women.

  6. Role of the commissural inhibitory system in vestibular compensation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist, Filip; Ludwig, Mike; Dutia, Mayank B

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of the vestibular commissural inhibitory system in vestibular compensation (VC, the behavioural recovery that follows unilateral vestibular loss), using in vivo microdialysis to measure GABA levels in the bilateral medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) at various times after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Immediately after UL, in close correlation with the appearance of the characteristic oculomotor and postural symptoms, there is a marked increase in GABA release in the ipsi-lesional MVN. This is not prevented by bilateral flocculectomy, indicating that it is due to hyperactivity of vestibular commissural inhibitory neurones. Over the following 96 h, as VC occurs and the behavioural symptoms ameliorate, the ipsi-lesional GABA levels return to near-normal. Contra-lesional GABA levels do not change significantly in the initial stages of VC, but decrease at late stages so that when static symptoms have abated there remains a significant difference between the MVNs of the two sides. We also investigated the role of the commissural inhibition in Bechterew's phenomenon, by reversibly inactivating the intact contra-lesional labyrinth in compensating animals through superfusion of local anaesthetic on the round window. Transient inactivation of the intact labyrinth elicited the lateralized behaviour described by Bechterew, but did not alter the GABA levels in either MVN, suggesting the involvement of distinct cellular mechanisms. These findings indicate that an imbalanced commissural inhibitory system is a root cause of the severe oculomotor and postural symptoms of unilateral vestibular loss, and that re-balancing of commissural inhibition occurs in parallel with the subsequent behavioural recovery during VC. PMID:18635647

  7. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID AND MASTICATORY MUSCLES IN PATIENTS WITH VESTIBULAR LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions. PMID:19082397

  8. Electromyographic activity of sternocleidomastoid and masticatory muscles in patients with vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions.

  9. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  10. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common…

  11. Sensitivity of the cochlear nerve to acoustic and electrical stimulation months after a vestibular labyrinthectomy in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, D J; Mukherjee, P; Pastras, C J; Gibson, W P; Curthoys, I S

    2016-05-01

    Single-sided deafness patients are now being considered candidates to receive a cochlear implant. With this, many people who have undergone a unilateral vestibular labyrinthectomy for the treatment of chronic vertigo are now being considered for cochlear implantation. There is still some concern regarding the potential efficacy of cochlear implants in these patients, where factors such as cochlear fibrosis or nerve degeneration following unilateral vestibular labyrinthectomy may preclude their use. Here, we have performed a unilateral vestibular labyrinthectomy in normally hearing guinea pigs, and allowed them to recover for either 6 weeks, or 10 months, before assessing morphological and functional changes related to cochlear implantation. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy was used to assess gross morphology throughout the entire ear. Whole nerve responses to acoustic, vibrational, or electrical stimuli were used as functional measures. Mild cellular infiltration was observed at 6 weeks, and to a lesser extent at 10 months after labyrinthectomy. Following labyrinthectomy, cochlear sensitivity to high-frequency acoustic tone-bursts was reduced by 16 ± 4 dB, vestibular sensitivity was almost entirely abolished, and electrical sensitivity was only mildly reduced. These results support recent clinical findings that patients who have received a vestibular labyrinthectomy may still benefit from a cochlear implant. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  13. Vestibular Rehabilitation Outcomes in the Elderly with Chronic Vestibular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. Materials and Methods A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Results Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. PMID:23396380

  14. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in the elderly with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-11-01

    Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

  15. The limits of stability in patients with unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Otero, Rafael; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    To characterize the stability limits and region in patients with unilateral vestibulopathy according to the side of the lesion and determine if that imposes any bias. To analyze if the stability limits and region depend on the functional deficit as evaluated in the sensory organization test. Forty patients with chronic dizziness and without any vertigo spell for least 6 months prior to testing. In all of them, a unilateral vestibulopathy was diagnosed clinically and at vestibular testing. A computerized dynamic posturography system was used to test for the ability of patients and controls to displace their center of pressure (COP) to the corresponding LOS. The area was calculated and compared to other data from vestibular tests. The area of stability among patients shows a reduction to 35-62% of the expected total. That reduction was not found to be dependent on age. There is a symmetric reduction in the limits of stability (LOS) in patients with unilateral vestibulopathy who suffer chronic instability. None of the areas measured were correlated with the composite score of the sensory organization test and, as such, must be considered as an adjunct measure to characterize the postural limitations in those patients.

  16. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Manso, Andréa; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD) (experimental group) or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p>0.005) regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p<0.05) in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p<0.05) in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  18. Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery due to parasympathetic hypersensitive syndrome: differentiation from cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Huy, Patrice Tran Ba; Sauvaget, Elisabeth

    2010-09-01

    Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular or facial schwannoma usually suggests cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and requires specific measures, including revision surgery. To draw attention to the possibility of postoperative unilateral rhinorrhea with concomitant hyperlacrimation and hypersialorrhea without a CSF origin and reflecting more a neuroplastic phenomenon. Retrospective study in a tertiary care center university clinic. For 1 case of intratemporal facial schwannoma and 2 cases of vestibular schwannoma, surgery was by a translabyrinthine approach with sacrifice of the facial nerve and hypoglossofacial anastomosis in the first case. Postoperative unilateral hydrorhinorrhea associated with various degrees of lacrimation and/or salivary hypersecretion occurred mainly during exercise or under stressful situations. With unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular or facial schwannoma, concomitant symptoms such as lacrimation or hypersialorrhea may not be explained by CSF leakage through the eustachian tube. Misinterpretation may lead to detrimental revision surgery. The pathophysiogenetic mechanism suggests a neuroplastic phenomenon involving a denervation hypersensitivity reaction of the autonomous system. A simple diagnostic test with a nasal anticholinergic agent may be beneficial.

  19. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  20. Anchoring the Self to the Body in Bilateral Vestibular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Toupet, Michel; van Nechel, Christian; Duquesne, Ulla; Hautefort, Charlotte; Lopez, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that vestibular information plays a significant role in anchoring the self to the body. Out-of-body experiences of neurological origin are frequently associated with vestibular sensations, and galvanic vestibular stimulation in healthy participants anchors the self to the body. Here, we provide the first objective measures of anchoring the self to the body in chronic bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). We compared 23 patients with idiopathic BVF to 23 healthy participants in a series of experiments addressing several aspects of visuo-spatial perspective taking and embodiment. In Experiment 1, participants were involved in a virtual “dot-counting task” from their own perspective or the perspective of a distant avatar, to measure implicit and explicit perspective taking, respectively. In both groups, response times increased similarly when the avatar’s and participant’s viewpoint differed, for both implicit and explicit perspective taking. In Experiment 2, participants named ambiguous letters (such as “b” or “q”) traced on their forehead that could be perceived from an internal or external perspective. The frequency of perceiving ambiguous letters from an internal perspective was similar in both groups. In Experiment 3, participants completed a questionnaire measuring the experienced self/body and self/environment “closeness”. Both groups reported a similar embodied experience. Altogether, our data show that idiopathic BVF does not change implicit and explicit perspective taking nor subjective anchoring of the self to the body. Our negative findings offer insight into the multisensory mechanisms of embodiment. Only acute peripheral vestibular disorders and neurological disorders in vestibular brain areas (characterized by strong multisensory conflicts) may evoke disembodied experiences. PMID:28107424

  1. [Kinesitherapy in patients with the peripheral vestibular system disorders].

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Marcin; Walak, Jarosław; Woszczak, Marek; Józefowicz-Korczyńska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Kinesitherapy is widely accepted management in patients with vertigo and imbalance, but there has been inadequate evidence that one form of therapy is superior to another. of the study was to compare effectiveness of two kinesitherapy protocols in patients with the peripheral vestibular system disorders. Fifty patients (mean age 46.0±13.1 year) with vertigo and balance instability lasting over 3 months with unilateral vestibular disorder, confirmed in Videnystagmography, were included in the study. Thirty patients underwent supervised and 20 patients home-based exercise programs. All of them were assessed three times at the baseline, after 4 weeks and 3 months, on vertigo intensity and frequency with the Vertigo Syndrome Scale (VSS), Vertigo Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and clinical unsteadiness with tests (Romberg, Amended Motor Club Assesment (AMCA), Eurofit test - standing on one leg. In both groups the clinical tasks and the intensity of vertigo in VAS significantly decreased. The mean value of VSS (part physical and emotional)score significantly decreased only in supervised group at the end of 4 weeks and 3 months (p=ns). Recovery was more dynamic in supervised group than home-based exercises group, in AMCA test (3.9 vs. 1.3 s, p<0.05) in Eurofit tests eye open (14.1 vs. 0.9 s, p<0.05) and eye closed (3.5 vs. 1 s, p<0.05). In patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction supervised and home-based group kinesitherapy is an effective treatment method. In supervised group patients recovery has been faster. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Vestibular Deficits Following Youth Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Master, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence and recovery of pediatric patients with concussion who manifest clinical vestibular deficits, and to describe the correlation of these deficits with neurocognitive function, based on computerized neurocognitive testing, in a sample of pediatric patients with concussion. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients age 5–18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from 7/1/2010–12/31/2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits was obtained, and all related visits for those patients were reviewed. Results 247 patients were chosen from 3740 eligible visits for detailed review and abstraction. 81% showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical exam. Those patients with vestibular signs on initial exam took a significantly longer time to return to school (median 59 days vs. 6 days, p=0.001) or to be fully cleared (median 106 days vs. 29 days, p=0.001). They additionally scored more poorly on initial computerized neurocognitive testing, and took longer for neurocognitive deficits to recover. Those patients with three or more prior concussions had a higher prevalence of vestibular deficits and took longer for those deficits to resolve. Conclusion Vestibular deficits in children and adolescents with a history of concussion are highly prevalent. These deficits appear to be associated with extended recovery times and poorer performance on neurocognitive testing. Further studies evaluating the effectiveness of vestibular therapy on improving such deficits are warranted. PMID:25748568

  3. Vestibular Hearing and Neural Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Vestibular hearing as an auditory sensitivity of the saccule in the human ear is revealed by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs). The range of the vestibular hearing lies in the low frequency. Also, the amplitude of an auditory brainstem response component depends on the amount of synchronized neural activity, and the auditory nerve fibers' responses have the best synchronization with the low frequency. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate correlation between vestibular hearing using cVEMPs and neural synchronization via slow wave Auditory Brainstem Responses (sABR). Study Design. This case-control survey was consisted of twenty-two dizzy patients, compared to twenty healthy controls. Methods. Intervention comprised of Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA), Impedance acoustic metry (IA), Videonystagmography (VNG), fast wave ABR (fABR), sABR, and cVEMPs. Results. The affected ears of the dizzy patients had the abnormal findings of cVEMPs (insecure vestibular hearing) and the abnormal findings of sABR (decreased neural synchronization). Comparison of the cVEMPs at affected ears versus unaffected ears and the normal persons revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Safe vestibular hearing was effective in the improvement of the neural synchronization. PMID:23724268

  4. Vestibular hearing and neural synchronization.

    PubMed

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Vestibular hearing as an auditory sensitivity of the saccule in the human ear is revealed by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs). The range of the vestibular hearing lies in the low frequency. Also, the amplitude of an auditory brainstem response component depends on the amount of synchronized neural activity, and the auditory nerve fibers' responses have the best synchronization with the low frequency. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate correlation between vestibular hearing using cVEMPs and neural synchronization via slow wave Auditory Brainstem Responses (sABR). Study Design. This case-control survey was consisted of twenty-two dizzy patients, compared to twenty healthy controls. Methods. Intervention comprised of Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA), Impedance acoustic metry (IA), Videonystagmography (VNG), fast wave ABR (fABR), sABR, and cVEMPs. Results. The affected ears of the dizzy patients had the abnormal findings of cVEMPs (insecure vestibular hearing) and the abnormal findings of sABR (decreased neural synchronization). Comparison of the cVEMPs at affected ears versus unaffected ears and the normal persons revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Safe vestibular hearing was effective in the improvement of the neural synchronization.

  5. Vestibular Hearing and Speech Processing

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Pourbakht, Akram; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Kamali, Mohammad; Behnoud, Fatholah; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular hearing in human is evoked as a result of the auditory sensitivity of the saccule to low-frequency high-intensity tone. The objective was to investigate the relationship between vestibular hearing using cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) and speech processing via word recognition scores in white noise (WRSs in wn). Intervention comprised of audiologic examinations, cVEMPs, and WRS in wn. All healthy subjects had detectable cVEMPs (safe vestibular hearing). WRSs in wn were obtained for them (66.9 ± 9.3% in the right ears and 67.5 ± 11.8% in the left ears). Dizzy patients in the affected ears, had the cVEMPs abnormalities (insecure vestibular hearing) and decreased the WRS in wn (51.4 ± 3.8% in the right ears and 52.2 ± 3.5% in the left ears). The comparison of the cVEMPs between the subjects revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Therefore, the vestibular hearing can improve the speech processing in the competing noisy conditions. PMID:23724272

  6. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  7. Bilateral vestibular deficiency: quality of life and economic implications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Daniel Q.; Ward, Bryan K.; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Carey, John P.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Bilateral vestibular deficiency (BVD) causes chronic imbalance, unsteady vision, and greatly increases the risk of falls; however, its effects on quality of life (QOL) and economic impact are not well defined. Objective Quantify disease-specific and health-related quality of life, health care utilization and economic impact suffered by individuals with BVD in comparison to those with unilateral vestibular deficiency (UVD) Design Cross-sectional survey study of BVD, UVD, and healthy individuals Setting Academic medical center Participants Fifteen BVD, 22 UVD and 23 healthy individuals. Vestibular dysfunction was diagnosed by caloric nystagmography Intervention Survey questionnaire Main Outcomes and Measures Health status was measured using the Dizziness Handicap Index (DHI) and Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3). Economic burden was estimated using participant responses to questions on disease-specific health care utilization and lost productivity. Results In comparison to UVD and normal controls, BVD patients had significantly worse DHI and HUI3 scores. Multivariate regression analysis showed UVD, BVD, increasing number of dizziness-related emergency department (ED) visits, and increasing dizziness-related work-place absenteeism were associated with worse HUI3 scores. BVD and UVD patients incurred annual economic burdens of $13,019 and $3,531 per patient, respectively. Conclusions and Relevance BVD significantly decreases quality of life and imposes substantial economic burdens on individuals and society. These results underscore the limits of adaptation and compensation in BVD. Furthermore, they quantify the potential benefits of prosthetic restoration of vestibular function both to these individuals and to society. PMID:24763518

  8. A Cross-sectional Survey and Cross-sectional Clinical Trial to Determine the Prevalence and Management of Eye Movement Disorders and Vestibular Dysfunction in Post-Stroke Patients in the Sub-Acute Phase: Protocol.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Andoret; Eksteen, Carina A; Becker, Piet J; Heinze, Barbara M

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment, specifically eye movement disorders and vestibular dysfunction may have a negative influence on the functional recovery in post-stroke patients. This type of sensory dysfunction may further be associated with poor functional outcome in patients' post-stroke. In phase 1, a cross-sectional survey ( n  = 100) will be conducted to determine the prevalence of eye movement disorders and vestibular dysfunction in patients who sustained a stroke. A cross-sectional clinical trial ( n  = 60) will be conducted during phase 2 of the study to determine the effect of the combination of vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) and visual scanning exercises (VSE) (experimental group) integrated with task-specific activities compared with the effect of task-specific activities as an intervention (control group) on patients who present with eye movement impairment and central vestibular dysfunction post-stroke. An audiologist will assess (a) visual acuity (static and dynamic), (b) nystagmus, (c) saccadic eye movements, (d) smooth pursuit eye movements, (e) vestibulo-ocular reflex, and (f) saccular, utricular, and vestibular nerve function. An independent physiotherapist will assess (1) cognitive function, (2) residual oculomotor visual performance, (3) visual-perceptual system, (4) functional balance, (5) gait, (6) functional ability, (7) presence of anxiety and/or depression, and (8) level of participation in physical activity. Ethics approval has been obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Pretoria (UP) (374/2015). The study will be submitted as fulfillment for the PhD degree at UP. Dissemination will include submission to peer-reviewed professional journals and presentation at congresses. Training of rehabilitation team members on the integration of VSE and VRT into task-specific activities in rehabilitation will be done if the outcome of the experimental group's functional performance is clinically and

  9. Dilated dysplastic vestibule: a new computed tomographic finding in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, Julius V; Fatterpekar, Girish M

    2011-01-01

    Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) is one of the most common anomalies of the inner ear. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the vestibule for associated aberrations. In particular, we assessed the vestibular volume in patients with LVAS, compared it to an age-matched control population, and evaluated the relationship between the size of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibule. We reviewed studies of high-resolution computed tomography of temporal bone of 24 consecutive patients with LVAS (15 girls and 9 boys; average age, 8.1 years). Of these, 21 patients had bilateral LVAS and 3 patients had unilateral LVAS. Each ear was evaluated for the size of the vestibular aqueduct and the volume of the vestibule. Similar measurements were obtained in an age-matched control population (28 girls and 18 boys; average age, 8.3 years). The volume of the vestibule was found to be significantly enlarged in patients with LVAS compared to the control population (right ear, P < 0.0001; left ear, P < 0.0001). A linear correlation could be established between an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and corresponding increase in the volume of the vestibule (right side, P < 0.01; left side, P < 0.01). A dilated dysplastic vestibule is a consistently associated finding in patients with LVAS.

  10. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) Can Detect Asymptomatic Saccular Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Yee; Timmer, Ferdinand C. A.; Oriel, Brad S.; Zhou, Guangwei; Guinan, John J.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Herrmann, Barbara S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rauch, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the useful of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing for detecting endolymphatic hydrops, especially in the second ear of patients with unilateral Ménière disease (MD). Methods This study was performed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Part I consisted of postmortem temporal bone specimens from the temporal bone collection of the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary; part II consisted of consecutive consenting adult patients (n = 82) with unilateral MD by American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery criteria case histories. Out-come measures consisted of VEMP thresholds in patients and histologic saccular endolymphatic hydrops in postmortem temporal bones. Results Saccular hydrops was observed in the asymptomatic ear in six of 17 (35%) of temporal bones from donors with unilateral MD. Clinic patients with unilateral MD showed elevated mean VEMP thresholds and altered VEMP tuning in their symptomatic ears and, to a lesser degree, in their asymptomatic ears. Specific VEMP frequency and tuning criteria were used to define a “Ménière-like” response. This “Ménière-like” response was seen in 27% of asymptomatic ears of our patients with unilateral MD. Conclusions Bilateral involvement is seen in approximately one third of MD cases. Saccular hydrops appears to precede symptoms in bilateral MD. Changes in VEMP threshold and tuning appear to be sensitive to these structural changes in the saccule. If so, then VEMP may be useful as a detector of asymptomatic saccular hydrops and as a predictor of evolving bilateral MD. PMID:16735912

  11. [Vestibular-spinal reflex in patients with vestibular-ataxic syndrome of different genesis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E A; Iakupov, E Z

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of vestibular-spinal reflex (vestibular myogenic evoked potentials) in healthy subjects and patients with vestibular-ataxic syndrome. The inhibition of vestibular-spinal reflex with the P13 latency increase was shown to be the most characteristic of demyelinating and traumatic brain diseases. The P13 latency increase was not pathognomic for any disease of the nervous system but was indicative of conduction delay in vestibular-spinal tracts.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shilton, H; Hodgson, M; Burgess, G

    2014-01-01

    We report the first use in Australia of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden hearing loss following head trauma in a child with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. A 12-year-old boy with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome presented with significant hearing loss following head trauma. He was treated with steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, with good improvement of hearing thresholds on audiography. This case represents the first reported use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for this indication in Australia, following a few previous reports of patients in Japan. We review the literature on management of acute sensorineural hearing loss in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. The reported case demonstrates a potentially beneficial therapy for a rare condition that usually results in an inevitable decline in hearing. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be tolerated well by children, and may represent a potential treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  13. The parietal lobe and the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The vestibular cortex differs in various ways from other sensory cortices. It consists of a network of several distinct and separate temporoparietal areas. Its core region, the parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), is located in the posterior insula and retroinsular region and includes the parietal operculum. The entire network is multisensory (in particular, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory). The peripheral and central vestibular systems are bilaterally organized; there are various pontomesencephalic brainstem crossings and at least two transcallosal connections of both hemispheres, between the PIVC and the motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, which also mediate vestibular input. Structural and functional vestibular dominance characterizes the right hemisphere in right-handers and the left hemisphere in left-handers. This explains why right-hemispheric lesions in right-handers more often generally cause hemispatial neglect and the pusher syndrome, both of which involve vestibular function. Vestibular input also contributes to cognition and may determine individual lateralization of brain functions such as handedness. Bilateral organization is a major key to understanding cortical functions and disorders, for example, the visual-vestibular interaction that occurs in spatial orientation. Although the vestibular cortex is represented in both hemispheres, there is only one global percept of body position and motion. The chiefly vestibular aspects of the multiple functions and disorders of the parietal lobe dealt with in this chapter cannot be strictly separated from various multisensory vestibular functions within the entire brain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Video Head Impulse Test in the Posterior Semicircular Canal Plane and Cervical Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Patients With Vestibular Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Su; Kim, Chang-Hee; Kim, Min-Beom

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the results of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and video head impulse test (p-vHIT) of posterior semicircular canal considered tools of inferior vestibular nerve function in vestibular neuritis. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary otology clinic. Seventy-nine patients with vestibular neuritis participated in this study. We analyzed the interaural amplitude difference in cVEMP with a positive rate of p-vHIT according to gain and corrective saccade in the study population. To evaluate the concordance rate of both tests, we analyzed Fleiss' Kappa value inter-test agreement of cVEMP with p-vHIT. Finally, we performed detailed analysis of the bilaterally absent response on cVEMP according to the p-vHIT results. The inter-test agreement between cVEMP and p-vHIT was 69.8% as we also considered the lesion side. This result indicated a statistically fair to good agreement in both tests. In mostly elderly patients with a bilaterally absent response (11 patients) on cVEMP, as a result of vHIT, nine patients with a bilaterally negative response on p-vHIT showed only canal paresis. Two patients showed canal paresis and a unilaterally positive response on p-vHIT. Inter-test agreement between cVEMP and p-vHIT assessed in vestibular neuritis was relatively lower than we had predicted. Probably, p-vHIT can provide additional information on the differential diagnosis of dysfunction of the inferior vestibular nerve which is composed of the saccular nerve and the posterior ampullary nerve.

  15. [Infrared videonystagmography in vestibular diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Frisina, A; Piazza, F; Quaranta, N

    2000-01-01

    Vestibular examination relied upon electronystagmography (ENG) for more than 50 years. This method is based on recording of nystagmus (Ny) without any possibility to see the ocular movements directly. More recently, infrared videonystagmography (VNG) entered the diagnostic protocol of vestibular disorders. VNG permits to record and visualize Ny, both in the darkness and with open eyes. Aim of the present study was to verify the possible advantages of VNG versus ENG for functional evaluation of the vestibular system in patients suffering from otoneurological disorders. To that purpose, VNG and ENG tracings were recorded in 12 patients. The preliminary results show that there are not significant differences in quantitative evaluation of Ny between the two methods. Anyhow, VNG has some technical and clinical advantages that make it the method of choice.

  16. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  17. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders. PMID:27507932

  18. Unilateral optic disk edema with central retinal artery and vein occlusions as the presenting signs of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salazar Méndez, R; Fonollá Gil, M

    2014-11-01

    A 39-year-old man with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (LAL Ph+) developed progressive vision loss to no light perception in his right eye. He had optic disk edema and later developed central artery and vein occlusions. Pan-photocoagulation, as well as radiotherapy of the whole brain were performed in several fractions. Unfortunately the patient died of hematological relapse 4 months later. Optic nerve infiltration may appear as an isolated sign of a leukemia relapse, even before a hematological relapse occurs. Leukemic optic neuropathy is a critical sign, not only for vision, but also for life, and radiotherapy should be immediately performed before irreversible optic nerve damage occurs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Vestibular disease: anatomy, physiology, and clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for keeping an animal oriented with respect to gravity. It is a sensory system that maintains the position of the eyes, body, and limbs in reference to the position of the head. Proper interpretation of neurologic deficits and precise neuroanatomic localization are essential to diagnose and prognosticate the underlying disorder. Neurologic examination can confirm whether the vestibular dysfunction is of peripheral or central nervous system origin. Idiopathic vestibular syndrome is the most common cause of peripheral vestibular disease in dogs and, despite its dramatic clinical presentation, can improve without intervention. Central vestibular diseases generally have a poorer prognosis.

  20. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Diagnostics and therapy of vestibular schwannomas – an interdisciplinary challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rosahl, Steffen; Bohr, Christopher; Lell, Michael; Hamm, Klaus; Iro, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    the case presentations. Important criteria for decision making are size and growth rate of the tumor, hearing of the patient and the probability of total tumor resection with preservation of hearing and facial nerve function, age and comorbidity of the patient, best possible control of vertigo and tinnitus and last but not least the patient’s preference and choice. In addition to this, the experience and the results of a given center with each treatment modality will figure in the decision making process. We will discuss findings that are reported in the literature regarding facial nerve function, hearing, vertigo, tinnitus, and headache and reflect on recent studies on their influence on the patient’s quality of life. Vertigo plays an essential role in this framework since it is an independent predictor of quality of life and a patient’s dependence on social welfare. Pathognomonic bilateral vestibular schwannomas that occur in patients suffering from neurofibromatosis typ-2 (NF2) differ from spontaneous unilateral tumors in their biologic behavior. Treatment of neurofibromatosis type-2 patients requires a multidisciplinary team, especially because of the multitude of separate intracranial and spinal lesions. Off-label chemotherapy with Bevacizumab can stabilize tumor size of vestibular schwannomas and even improve hearing over longer periods of time. Hearing rehabilitation in NF2 patients can be achieved with cochlear and auditory brainstem implants. PMID:29279723

  2. Calcium concentration in cochlear endolymph after vestibular labyrinth injury.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryoukichi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Takeshi; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2010-06-23

    The endolymphatic calcium concentration [Ca2+] is essential for acoustic transduction. This study investigated the changes in cochlear function caused by vestibular labyrinth destruction in the acute phase by measurement of the endocochlear potential and endolymphatic [Ca2+].Hartley guinea pigs underwent lateral semicircular canal transection with suctioning of the perilymph, ampullectomy, or destruction of the lateral part of the vestibule. The endocochlear potential and endolymphatic [Ca2+] showed mild change after lateral semicircular canal transection with suctioning or ampullectomy. However, the endocochlear potential decreased drastically and permanently, and the endolymphatic [Ca2+] elevated suddenly but finally normalized after vestibulotomy. Elevated endolymphatic [Ca2+] is important in the disturbance of the mechanism of cochlear function caused by vestibular labyrinth destruction.

  3. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: skull taps can cause a stimulus direction dependent double-peak.

    PubMed

    Holmeslet, Berit; Westin, Magnus; Brantberg, Krister

    2011-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms for skull tap induced ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP). An electro-mechanical "skull tapper" was used to test oVEMP in response to four different stimulus sites (forehead, occiput and above each ear) in healthy subjects (n=20) and in patients with unilateral loss of vestibular function (n=10). In normals, the oVEMP in response to forehead taps and the contra-lateral oVEMP to taps above the ears were similar. These responses had typical oVEMP features, i.e. a short-latency negative peak (n10) followed by a positive peak (p15). In contrast, the ipsi-lateral oVEMP to the laterally directed skull taps, as well as the oVEMP to occiput taps, had an initial double negative peak (n10+n10b). In patients with unilateral loss of vestibular function, the crossed responses from the functioning labyrinth were very similar to the corresponding oVEMP in normals. The present data support a theory that skull tapping may cause both a response that is more stimulus direction dependent and one that is less so. Whereas the stimulus direction dependent occurrence of the negative double-peak might reveal the functional status of one part of the labyrinth, the rather stimulus direction-independent response might reveal the functional status of other parts. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076

  5. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent—even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  6. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function-A Review.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent-even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  7. [Clinical research of vestibular autorotation test for patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-sheng; Wang, Wen-hong; Song, Wei; Lu, Hong-hua; Zuo, Xian-hua; Zhang, Jin-mei

    2006-10-01

    To explore the diagnostic values of vestibular autorotation test (VAT) for patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). VAT and videonystagmography ( VNG) were performed on 73 patients with VBI and 48 patients with peripheral vestibular lesions (contrast group). Parameters analyzed included Gain, phase and asymmetry of VAT, as well as the canal paresis (CP) of caloric test and results of optokinetic-pursuit tests in VNG. Positive result of the test could be defined if anyone of the parameters was abnormal. For VAT test, Gain was enhanced in VBI group and was reduced in contrast group. In VBI group and contrast group, Gain enhanced showed in 47 (64.4%) cases and 5 (10.4%) cases, respectively (chi2 = 31.19, P < 0.01). Simultaneity, Gain reduced in 11 cases (15.5%) and 22 cases (45.8%), respectively (chi2 = 13.82, P < 0.01). But there was no statistics significant for results of the parameters of phase, asymmetry and integration between two groups. For VNG test, results with optokinetic-pursuit tests were more abnormal in VBI group than that in contrast group, which showed central lesions characteristics. Forty-four cases (60.3%) in VBI group and 10 cases (20.8%) in control group showed central lesions results with optokinetic-pursuit tests and visual fixation test (chi2 = 15.89, P < 0.01). Unilateral or bilateral CP showed in 33 cases (68.6%) in control group and 51 cases (69.9%) in VBI group with caloric test. Gain of VAT is mostly enhanced in VBI group, and Gain as a main characteristic is reduced in patients with peripheral vestibular lesions. The Gain parameter is availability for assessing characteristics of vestibular lesions. Phase and asymmetry can be used to assess the vestibular function but can not indicate the characteristics of vestibular lesions.

  8. Unilateral paralysis associated with profound hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Yeh, Fu-Chiang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral paralysis is rarely reported to be primary presentation of severe hypokalemia. We describe a 24-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of right-sided weakness. Neurologic examination revealed diminished muscle strength and tendon reflexes over the right limbs. Computed tomography of the brain showed no organic brain lesion. However, laboratory data showed hypokalemia (K+ 2.0 mmol/L) with metabolic acidosis (HCO3 − 19 mmol/L). She needed a total of 260 mmol K+ to achieve complete recovery of muscle strength at a serum K+ level of 3.2 mmol/L and was proved to have distal renal tubular acidosis. Severe hypokalemia must be kept in mind as a cause of acute unilateral paralysis without organic lesions to avoid unnecessary examination and potentially life-threatening complications.

  9. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian T.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients’ scores were significantly worse than normals’ scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  10. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients.

  11. The influence of unilateral saccular impairment on functional balance performance and self-report dizziness.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Devin L; Jacobson, Gary P; Grantham, Sarah L; Piker, Erin G; Verghese, Susha

    2011-09-01

    Postural stability in humans is largely maintained by vestibular, visual, and somatosensory inputs to the central nervous system. Recent clinical advances in the assessment of otolith function (e.g., cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials [cVEMPs and oVEMPs], subjective visual vertical [SVV] during eccentric rotation) have enabled investigators to identify patients with unilateral otolith impairments. This research has suggested that patients with unilateral otolith impairments perform worse than normal healthy controls on measures of postural stability. It is not yet known if patients with unilateral impairments of the saccule and/or inferior vestibular nerve (i.e., unilaterally abnormal cVEMP) perform differently on measures of postural stability than patients with unilateral impairments of the horizontal SCC (semicircular canal) and/or superior vestibular nerve (i.e., unilateral caloric weakness). Further, it is not known what relationship exists, if any, between otolith system impairment and self-report dizziness handicap. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which saccular impairments (defined by a unilaterally absent cVEMP) and impairments of the horizontal semicircular canal (as measured by the results of caloric testing) affect vestibulospinal function as measured through the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) of the computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). A secondary objective of this investigation was to measure the effects, if any, that saccular impairment has on a modality-specific measure of health-related quality of life. A retrospective cohort study. Subjects were assigned to one of four groups based on results from balance function testing: Group 1 (abnormal cVEMP response only), Group 2 (abnormal caloric response only), Group 3 (abnormal cVEMP and abnormal caloric response), and Group 4 (normal control group). Subjects were 92 adult patients: 62 were seen for balance function testing due to complaints

  12. Left Cathodal Trans-Cranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Parietal Cortex Leads to an Asymmetrical Modulation of the Vestibular-Ocular Reflex☆

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Roberts, R. Edward; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Asavarut, Paladd; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-sensory visuo-vestibular cortical areas within the parietal lobe are important for spatial orientation and possibly for descending modulation of the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR). Functional imaging and lesion studies suggest that vestibular cortical processing is localized primarily in the non-dominant parietal lobe. However, the role of inter-hemispheric parietal balance in vestibular processing is poorly understood. Therefore, we tested whether experimentally induced asymmetries in right versus left parietal excitability would modulate vestibular function. VOR function was assessed in right-handed normal subjects during caloric ear irrigation (30 °C), before and after trans-cranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was applied bilaterally over the parietal cortex. Bilateral tDCS with the anode over the right and the cathode over the left parietal region resulted in significant asymmetrical modulation of the VOR, with highly suppressed responses during the right caloric irrigation (i.e. rightward slow phase nystagmus). In contrast, we observed no VOR modulation during either cathodal stimulation of the right parietal cortex or SHAM tDCS conditions. Application of unilateral tDCS revealed that the left cathodal stimulation was critical in inducing the observed modulation of the VOR. We show that disruption of parietal inter-hemispheric balance can induce asymmetries in vestibular function. This is the first report using neuromodulation to show right hemisphere dominance for vestibular cortical processing. PMID:23941985

  13. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. XII, Habituation of vestibular responses : an overview.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1974-03-01

    Vestibular and visual mechanisms are critical sensing systems in spatial orientation and in spatial disorientation. In aviation or space environments in particular, the role of the vestibular system is central to the problems of spatial disorientatio...

  14. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  15. Personality changes in patients with vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Darlington, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved to detect linear and angular acceleration of the head in all planes so that the brain is not predominantly reliant on visual information to determine self-motion. Since the vestibular system first evolved in invertebrate species in order to detect gravitational vertical, it is likely that the central nervous system has developed a special dependence upon vestibular input. In addition to the deficits in eye movement and postural reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is convincing evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive and emotional disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in the sense of spatial orientation. Beyond this, however, patients with vestibular disorders have been reported to experience other personality changes that suggest that vestibular sensation is implicated in the sense of self. These are depersonalization and derealization symptoms such as feeling “spaced out”, “body feeling strange” and “not feeling in control of self”. We propose in this review that these symptoms suggest that the vestibular system may make a unique contribution to the concept of self through information regarding self-motion and self-location that it transmits, albeit indirectly, to areas of the brain such as the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). PMID:24194706

  16. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  17. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  18. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  19. Electrical Stimulation to Restore Vestibular Function – Development of a 3-D Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Patel, Amit H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients who fail to compensate for bilateral loss of vestibular sensory function are disabled by disequilibrium and illusory movement of the visual field during head movement. An implantable prosthesis that restores vestibular sensation could significantly improve quality of life for these patients. To be effective, such a device should encode head rotation in all 3 dimensions. We describe the 3-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex of normal chinchillas and vestibular-deficient chinchillas undergoing functional electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve. We also describe the design and fabrication of a head-mounted, 8 electrode vestibular prosthesis that encodes head movement in 3 dimensions. PMID:17281986

  20. Changes in the histaminergic system during vestibular compensation in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Trottier, Suzanne; Mourre, Christiane; Lacour, Michel

    2006-01-01

    To determine how the histaminergic system is implicated in vestibular compensation, we studied the changes in histidine decarboxylase (HDC; the enzyme synthesizing histamine) mRNA regulation in the tuberomammillary (TM) nuclei of cats killed 1 week, 3 weeks and 3 months after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN). We also used one- and two-step bilateral vestibular neurectomized (BVN) cats to determine whether HDC mRNA regulation depended on the asymmetrical vestibular input received by the TM nuclei neurons. In addition, we analysed the HDC mRNA changes in the TM nuclei and the recovery of behavioural functions in UVN cats treated with thioperamide, a pure histaminergic drug. Finally, we quantified binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) in the medial vestibular nucleus (VN) by means of a histamine H3R agonist ([3H]N-α-methylhistamine) in order to further investigate the sites and mechanisms of action of histamine in this structure. This study shows that UVN increases HDC mRNA expression in the ipsilateral TM nucleus at 1 week. This increased expression persisted 3 weeks after UVN, and regained control values at 3 months. HDC mRNA expression was unchanged in the one-step BVN cats but showed mirror asymmetrical increases in the two-step BVN compared to the 1 week UVN cats. Three weeks' thioperamide treatment induced a bilateral HDC mRNA up-regulation in the UVN cats, which was higher than in the untreated UVN group. Binding to histamine H3Rs in the MVN showed a strong bilateral decrease after thioperamide treatment, while it was reduced ipsilaterally in the UVN cats. That such changes of the histaminergic system induced by vestibular lesion and treatment may play a functional role in vestibular compensation is strongly supported by the behavioural data. Indeed, spontaneous nystagmus, posture and locomotor balance were rapidly recovered in the UVN cats treated with thioperamide. These results demonstrate that changes in histamine levels are related to vestibular

  1. Changing perspective: The role of vestibular signals.

    PubMed

    Deroualle, Diane; Borel, Liliane; Devèze, Arnaud; Lopez, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Social interactions depend on mechanisms such as the ability to take another person's viewpoint, i.e. visuo-spatial perspective taking. However, little is known about the sensorimotor mechanisms underpinning perspective taking. Because vestibular signals play roles in mental rotation and spatial cognition tasks and because damage to the vestibular cortex can disturb egocentric perspective, vestibular signals stand as important candidates for the sensorimotor foundations of perspective taking. Yet, no study merged natural full-body vestibular stimulations and explicit visuo-spatial perspective taking tasks in virtual environments. In Experiment 1, we combined natural vestibular stimulation on a rotatory chair with virtual reality to test how vestibular signals are processed to simulate the viewpoint of a distant avatar. While they were rotated, participants tossed a ball to a virtual character from the viewpoint of a distant avatar. Our results showed that vestibular signals influence perspective taking in a direction-specific way: participants were faster when their physical body rotated in the same direction as the mental rotation needed to take the avatar's viewpoint. In Experiment 2, participants realized 3D object mental rotations, which did not involve perspective taking, during the same whole-body vestibular stimulation. Our results demonstrated that vestibular stimulation did not affect 3D object mental rotations. Altogether, these data indicate that vestibular signals have a direction-specific influence on visuo-spatial perspective taking (self-centered mental imagery), but not a general effect on mental imagery. Findings from this study suggest that vestibular signals contribute to one of the most crucial mechanisms of social cognition: understanding others' actions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  3. Reviewing the Role of the Efferent Vestibular System in Motor and Vestibular Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Efferent circuits within the nervous system carry nerve impulses from the central nervous system to sensory end organs. Vestibular efferents originate in the brainstem and terminate on hair cells and primary afferent fibers in the semicircular canals and otolith organs within the inner ear. The function of this efferent vestibular system (EVS) in vestibular and motor coordination though, has proven difficult to determine, and remains under debate. We consider current literature that implicate corollary discharge from the spinal cord through the efferent vestibular nucleus (EVN), and hint at a potential role in overall vestibular plasticity and compensation. Hypotheses range from differentiating between passive and active movements at the level of vestibular afferents, to EVS activation under specific behavioral and environmental contexts such as arousal, predation, and locomotion. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of EVS circuitry, its effects on vestibular hair cell and primary afferent activity, and discuss its potential functional roles. PMID:28824449

  4. Temporoparietal encoding of space and time during vestibular-guided orientation.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Quadir, Shamim; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Malhotra, Paresh A; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Seemungal, Barry M

    2016-02-01

    When we walk in our environment, we readily determine our travelled distance and location using visual cues. In the dark, estimating travelled distance uses a combination of somatosensory and vestibular (i.e., inertial) cues. The observed inability of patients with complete peripheral vestibular failure to update their angular travelled distance during active or passive turns in the dark implies a privileged role for vestibular cues during human angular orientation. As vestibular signals only provide inertial cues of self-motion (e.g., velocity, °/s), the brain must convert motion information to distance information (a process called 'path integration') to maintain our spatial orientation during self-motion in the dark. It is unknown, however, what brain areas are involved in converting vestibular-motion signals to those that enable such vestibular-spatial orientation. Hence, using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping techniques, we explored the effect of acute right hemisphere lesions in 18 patients on perceived angular position, velocity and motion duration during whole-body angular rotations in the dark. First, compared to healthy controls' spatial orientation performance, we found that of the 18 acute stroke patients tested, only the four patients with damage to the temporoparietal junction showed impaired spatial orientation performance for leftward (contralesional) compared to rightward (ipsilesional) rotations. Second, only patients with temporoparietal junction damage showed a congruent underestimation in both their travelled distance (perceived as shorter) and motion duration (perceived as briefer) for leftward compared to rightward rotations. All 18 lesion patients tested showed normal self-motion perception. These data suggest that the cerebral cortical regions mediating vestibular-motion ('am I moving?') and vestibular-spatial perception ('where am I?') are distinct. Furthermore, the congruent contralesional deficit in time (motion duration) and position

  5. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  6. Advances in Auditory and Vestibular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2010-01-01

    Auditory and Vestibular medicine is becoming more accepted as a specialty of its own, Medical NeurOtology. Recent advances in the field have been instrumental in the understanding of the scientific foundations, pathophysiology, clinical approach and management of patients with hearing and vestibular disorders. This paper will review these advances. PMID:20711412

  7. Adjustment of the dynamic weight distribution as a sensitive parameter for diagnosis of postural alteration in a rodent model of vestibular deficit.

    PubMed

    Tighilet, Brahim; Péricat, David; Frelat, Alais; Cazals, Yves; Rastoldo, Guillaume; Boyer, Florent; Dumas, Olivier; Chabbert, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders, by inducing significant posturo-locomotor and cognitive disorders, can significantly impair the most basic tasks of everyday life. Their precise diagnosis is essential to implement appropriate therapeutic countermeasures. Monitoring their evolution is also very important to validate or, on the contrary, to adapt the undertaken therapeutic actions. To date, the diagnosis methods of posturo-locomotor impairments are restricted to examinations that most often lack sensitivity and precision. In the present work we studied the alterations of the dynamic weight distribution in a rodent model of sudden and complete unilateral vestibular loss. We used a system of force sensors connected to a data analysis system to quantify in real time and in an automated way the weight bearing of the animal on the ground. We show here that sudden, unilateral, complete and permanent loss of the vestibular inputs causes a severe alteration of the dynamic ground weight distribution of vestibulo lesioned rodents. Characteristics of alterations in the dynamic weight distribution vary over time and follow the sequence of appearance and disappearance of the various symptoms that compose the vestibular syndrome. This study reveals for the first time that dynamic weight bearing is a very sensitive parameter for evaluating posturo-locomotor function impairment. Associated with more classical vestibular examinations, this paradigm can considerably enrich the methods for assessing and monitoring vestibular disorders. Systematic application of this type of evaluation to the dizzy or unstable patient could improve the detection of vestibular deficits and allow predicting better their impact on posture and walk. Thus it could also allow a better follow-up of the therapeutic approaches for rehabilitating gait and balance.

  8. Adjustment of the dynamic weight distribution as a sensitive parameter for diagnosis of postural alteration in a rodent model of vestibular deficit

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Péricat, David; Frelat, Alais; Cazals, Yves; Rastoldo, Guillaume; Boyer, Florent; Dumas, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular disorders, by inducing significant posturo-locomotor and cognitive disorders, can significantly impair the most basic tasks of everyday life. Their precise diagnosis is essential to implement appropriate therapeutic countermeasures. Monitoring their evolution is also very important to validate or, on the contrary, to adapt the undertaken therapeutic actions. To date, the diagnosis methods of posturo-locomotor impairments are restricted to examinations that most often lack sensitivity and precision. In the present work we studied the alterations of the dynamic weight distribution in a rodent model of sudden and complete unilateral vestibular loss. We used a system of force sensors connected to a data analysis system to quantify in real time and in an automated way the weight bearing of the animal on the ground. We show here that sudden, unilateral, complete and permanent loss of the vestibular inputs causes a severe alteration of the dynamic ground weight distribution of vestibulo lesioned rodents. Characteristics of alterations in the dynamic weight distribution vary over time and follow the sequence of appearance and disappearance of the various symptoms that compose the vestibular syndrome. This study reveals for the first time that dynamic weight bearing is a very sensitive parameter for evaluating posturo-locomotor function impairment. Associated with more classical vestibular examinations, this paradigm can considerably enrich the methods for assessing and monitoring vestibular disorders. Systematic application of this type of evaluation to the dizzy or unstable patient could improve the detection of vestibular deficits and allow predicting better their impact on posture and walk. Thus it could also allow a better follow-up of the therapeutic approaches for rehabilitating gait and balance. PMID:29112981

  9. Platform tilt perturbation as an intervention for people with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Patricia A; Esses, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    Training to improve responses to perturbations may be beneficial for individuals with unilateral vestibular dysfunction. We evaluated the effects of an incrementally increasing surface tilt perturbation intervention for individuals with chronic vestibular pathology on gait, activities of daily living, and dizziness. Participants (n = 29) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The first group received random surface tilt perturbations of increasing angles and speed, half of the trials with vision-occluding goggles, 3 times weekly for 3 weeks (P group). The second group received tilt perturbation intervention (as above) plus a home program of vestibular rehabilitation exercises (P+EX group). The third group performed only the vestibular rehabilitation exercises (EX group). Outcome measures included temporospatial gait measures, Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and a Perceived Outcomes Scale (POS). The P and P+EX groups showed greater improvement on the PSFS and the POS compared to the EX group. DGI scores indicated decreased fall risk in 8 of 9 individuals who participated in P or P+EX training and who initially scored below the 19-point cutoff score. Both the P and P+EX groups showed significant within-group changes on some gait characteristics, DGI, DHI, PSFS, and POS measures. The EX group showed within-group change only on the DHI. Surface tilt perturbation training appears to be more effective for improving abilities at the activities and participation levels than vestibular exercises alone. In addition, tilt perturbation training reduced fall risk as measured by the DGI.

  10. Interactive wiimote gaze stabilization exercise training system for patients with vestibular hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral vestibular hypofunction is a major cause of dizziness. When complicated with postural imbalance, this condition can lead to an increased incidence of falls. In traditional clinical practice, gaze stabilization exercise is commonly used to rehabilitate patients. In this study, we established a computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation system by coupling infrared LEDs to an infrared receiver. This system enabled the subjects’ head-turning actions to be quantified, and the training was performed using vestibular exercise combined with computer games and interactive video games that simulate daily life activities. Methods Three unilateral and one bilateral vestibular hypofunction patients volunteered to participate in this study. The participants received 30 minutes of computer-aided vestibular rehabilitation training 2 days per week for 6 weeks. Pre-training and post-training assessments were completed, and a follow-up assessment was completed 1 month after the end of the training period. Results After 6 weeks of training, significant improvements in balance and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were observed in the four participants. Self-reports of dizziness, anxiety and depressed mood all decreased significantly. Significant improvements in self-confidence and physical performance were also observed. The effectiveness of this training was maintained for at least 1 month after the end of the training period. Conclusion Real-time monitoring of training performance can be achieved using this rehabilitation platform. Patients demonstrated a reduction in dizziness symptoms after 6 weeks of training with this short-term interactive game approach. This treatment paradigm also improved the patients’ balance function. This system could provide a convenient, safe and affordable treatment option for clinical practitioners. PMID:23043886

  11. [The significance of directional preponderance in the evaluation of vestibular function in patients with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhou, Y J; Yu, J; Gu, J

    2017-03-07

    Objective: To analyze the relationship between directional preponderance (DP), spontaneous nystagmus(SN) and vestibular disorders, and to investigate the significance of DP in directing peripheral vestibular function in patients with vertigo. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 394 cases diagnosed with peripheral vestibular disease accompanied by vertigo from March 2012 to June 2014 in the Outpatient Department of the Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University. Results of static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests, SN, unilateral weakness(UW), and DP in videonystagmography(VNG) were analyzed and compared. Results: The mean interval time between the last vertigo attack and examination in patients with SN or DP in caloric test were 4.4 d and 7.3 d respectively, and those without SN or DP were 18.3 d and 17.5 d respectively. The patients were divided into two groups according to DP results of caloric test. DP-normal group had 203 cases and DP-abnormal group had 191 cases. Spontaneous nystagmus was presented in 44 cases in the DP-normal group (21.67%) and four in the DP-abnormal group (2.09%). A significant difference was found between the two groups (χ 2 =35.27, P =0.000). Deficiency of vestibular function was noted in 165 cases in the DP-normal group (81.28%) and 123 (64.40%) in the DP-abnormal group in static and dynamic posture equilibrium tests. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (χ 2 =14.26, P =0.000). Conclusion: Compared with DP-normal patients, DP-abnormal patients are more likely to have spontaneous nystagmus and balance disorders due to vestibular dysfunction.

  12. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, D; Paudel, N; Adhikari, P; Gnyawali, S; Joshi, S N

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare case of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and to present the clinical features, and findings of multifocal ERG and visual field of this case. A 70-year-old-female diagnosed as Retinitis Pigmentosa in right eye 7 years back, presented with further gradual painless diminution of vision in the very eye and without any similar symptoms in left eye. On examination, the findings (including multifocal ERG and visual field) suggested the features of retinitis pigmentosa in her right eye, while the other eye being unaffected. In this rare case, the distinct features of retinitis pigmentosa are seen only in one eye, and this can be further confirmed from multifocal ERG and visual field. © NEPjOPH.

  13. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vestibular neuritis: Involvement and long-term recovery of individual semicircular canals.

    PubMed

    Büki, Bela; Hanschek, Manuela; Jünger, Heinz

    2017-06-01

    In this retrospective study, the aim of the authors was to examine the frequency of involvement of the individual semicircular canals (SCCs) in vestibular neuritis (VN) and to assess the degree of long-term recovery. A secondary aim was to retrospectively determine the usefulness of a three-step bedside oculomotor test (the HINTS-test) for the differential diagnosis of peripheral VN. 44 cases were evaluated during the acute phase and approximately two months later. The gain of the vestibuloocular reflex was determined using video-head-impulse test, carried out using Otometrics ICS Impulse Otosuite Vestibular V 1.2. In 19 cases (43%), a typical, so called "superior" VN could be diagnosed; in 17 cases (38%), all three SCCs were involved; in 4 cases, an isolated inferior canal involvement was seen; and in another 4 cases, a slight, isolated horizontal canal involvement was registered. Slight, isolated horizontal canal vestibular neuritis causing acute vestibular syndrome has not yet been reported in the literature. A three-step bedside oculomotor examination, the HINTS-test (head-impulse test, examination of gaze evoked nystagmus, and test of skew-deviation), suggested peripheral involvement in all cases with superior pattern VN and in cases when all three SCC were involved. It indicated 'stroke' in cases with inferior pattern and in the cases with isolated involvement of the horizontal canal. At follow-up, the horizontal canal function normalized in 55%, the anterior canal in 38%, and the inferior in 38%. When all cases were pooled, 14 patients recovered completely. In cases with severe initial decrease of gain in the horizontal canal (initial value less than 0.5), the canals had a 50 per cent chance to recover significantly. In vestibular neuritis, in cases with severe decrease of gain in the horizontal canal (initial value less than 0.5), the canal has a 50 per cent chance to recover significantly. The vertical canals have worse prognosis, and especially the

  15. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Cibele; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Greters, Mário Edvin; Basta, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR). To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard™ biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS) of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG), which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard™ for ten days, and a control group (CG), which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), were used. After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p=0.007) and C6 (p=0.01). On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p=0.04). The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p=0.04). The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard™ system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Restricted neural plasticity in vestibulospinal pathways after unilateral labyrinthectomy as the origin for scoliotic deformations.

    PubMed

    Lambert, François M; Malinvaud, David; Gratacap, Maxime; Straka, Hans; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2013-04-17

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in humans is often associated with vestibulomotor deficits. Compatible with a vestibular origin, scoliotic deformations were provoked in adult Xenopus frogs by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) at larval stages. The aquatic ecophysiology and absence of body-weight-supporting limb proprioceptive signals in amphibian tadpoles as a potential sensory substitute after UL might be the cause for a persistent asymmetric descending vestibulospinal activity. Therefore, peripheral vestibular lesions in larval Xenopus were used to reveal the morphophysiological alterations at the cellular and network levels. As a result, spinal motor nerves that were modulated by the previously intact side before UL remained permanently silent during natural vestibular stimulation after the lesion. In addition, retrograde tracing of descending pathways revealed a loss of vestibular neurons on the ipsilesional side with crossed vestibulospinal projections. This loss facilitated a general mass imbalance in descending premotor activity and a permanent asymmetric motor drive to the axial musculature. Therefore, we propose that the persistent asymmetric contraction of trunk muscles exerts a constant, uncompensated differential mechanical pull on bilateral skeletal elements that enforces a distortion of the soft cartilaginous skeletal elements and bone shapes. This ultimately provokes severe scoliotic deformations during ontogenetic development similar to the human syndrome.

  17. Subtotal petrosectomy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in unilateral anacusis.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Re, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis.

  18. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  19. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causing unilateral (one-sided) or asymmetric hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ear), and dizziness/loss of ... schwannoma diagnosed? Unilateral/asymmetric hearing loss and/or tinnitus and loss of balance/dizziness are early signs ...

  20. Recovery from Spatial Neglect with Intra- and Transhemispheric Functional Connectivity Changes in Vestibular and Visual Cortex Areas-A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Julian; Boegle, Rainer; Ertl, Matthias; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Vestibular signals are involved in higher cortical functions like spatial orientation and its disorders. Vestibular dysfunction contributes, for example, to spatial neglect which can be transiently improved by caloric stimulation. The exact roles and mechanisms of the vestibular and visual systems for the recovery of neglect are not yet known. Resting-state functional connectivity (fc) magnetic resonance imaging was recorded in a patient with hemispatial neglect during the acute phase and after recovery 6 months later following a right middle cerebral artery infarction before and after caloric vestibular stimulation. Seeds in the vestibular [parietal operculum (OP2)], the parietal [posterior parietal cortex (PPC); 7A, hIP3], and the visual cortex (VC) were used for the analysis. During the acute stage after caloric stimulation the fc of the right OP2 to the left OP2, the anterior cingulum, and the para/hippocampus was increased bilaterally (i.e., the vestibular network), while the interhemispheric fc was reduced between homologous regions in the VC. After 6 months, similar fc increases in the vestibular network were found without stimulation. In addition, fc increases of the OP2 to the PPC and the VC were seen; interhemispherically this was true for both PPCs and for the right PPC to both VCs. Improvement of neglect after caloric stimulation in the acute phase was associated with increased fc of vestibular cortex areas in both hemispheres to the para-hippocampus and the dorsal anterior cingulum, but simultaneously with reduced interhemispheric VC connectivity. This disclosed a, to some extent, similar but also distinct short-term mechanism (vestibular stimulation) of an improvement of spatial orientation compared to the long-term recovery of neglect.

  1. Chemoreduction for unilateral retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shields, Carol L; Honavar, Santosh G; Meadows, Anna T; Shields, Jerry A; Demirci, Hakan; Naduvilath, Thomas John

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate conservative management of unilateral retinoblastoma using chemoreduction and focal treatment. Prospective nonrandomized single-center clinical trial. Ocular Oncology Service at Wills Eye Hospital of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pa, in conjunction with the Division of Oncology at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Thirty eyes of 30 patients with unilateral retinoblastoma treated with chemoreduction between June 1, 1994, and August 31, 1999, that would otherwise have been managed with enucleation or external beam radiotherapy. All patients received treatment for retinoblastoma with a planned 6 cycles of chemoreduction using vincristine sulfate, etoposide, and carboplatin, combined with focal treatment (cryotherapy or thermotherapy) to each retinal tumor. The main outcome measure was the postchemoreduction need for external beam radiotherapy or enucleation. The cumulative probability of each outcome was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A secondary outcome measure was final visual acuity in the affected eye. The clinical features at the time of patient presentation were analyzed for their impact on the main outcomes using a series of Fisher exact tests and Cox proportional hazards regressions. Eighteen eyes (60%) were classified as having Reese-Ellsworth (RE) groups I through IV retinoblastoma and 12 eyes (40%), group V retinoblastoma. By using Kaplan-Meier estimates, we found a need for either external beam radiotherapy or enucleation in 68% of eyes by 5 years. In fact, 38% of those in groups I through IV required either treatment, whereas all of those in group V required the additional use of either treatment. Specifically, the need for external beam radiotherapy occurred in 27% of eyes by 5 years. Eleven percent of those in groups I through IV and 50% of group V required external beam radiotherapy by 5 years. The factors predictive of the need for external beam radiotherapy included RE group V disease, tumor thickness

  2. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  3. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  4. Progress toward development of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis for treatment of bilateral vestibular deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation-inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  5. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  6. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  7. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Produced by Bone-Conducted Stimuli: A Study on its Basics and Clinical Applications in Patients with Conductive and Sensorineural Hearing Loss and a Group with Vestibular Schawannoma.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Parvane; Amali, Amin; Pourbakht, Akram; Karimi Yazdi, Alireza; Bassam, Ali

    2013-06-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) has recently been broadly studied in vestibular disorders. As it is evoked by loud sound stimulation, even mild conductive hearing loss may affect VEMP results. Bone-conducted (BC) stimulus is an alternative stimulation for evoking this response. This study aims to assess the characteristics of BC-VEMP in different groups of patients. We performed a cross sectional analysis on 20 healthy volunteers with normal pure-tone audiometry as a control group; and on a group of patients consisted of 20 participants with conductive hearing loss, five with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and four with vestibular schawannoma. AC and BC-VEMP were performed in all participants. In control group the VEMP responses to both kinds of stimuli had an acceptable morphology and consisted of p13 and n23 waves. Latency value of these main components in each type of stimulus was not significantly different (P>0.05). However, the mean amplitude was larger in BC modality than AC stimulation (P=0.025). In the group with conductive hearing loss, the VEMP response was absent in fifteen (46.87%) of the 32 ears using the AC method, whereas all (100%) displayed positive elicitability of VEMP by BC method. Normal VEMP responses in both stimuli were evoked in all patients with sensorineural hearing loss. In patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS), 2 (50.00%) had neither AC-VEMP nor BC-VEMP. Auditory stimuli delivered by bone conduction can evoke VEMP response. These responses are of vestibular origin and can be used in vestibular evaluation of patients with conductive hearing loss.

  8. Altered Contralateral Auditory Cortical Morphology in Unilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenliang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Xueyan; Mella, Grace; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong; Xu, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the cerebral gray matter volume alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period by the voxel-based morphometry method, and to determine if hearing impairment is associated with regional gray matter alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Prospective case study. Tertiary class A teaching hospital. Thirty-nine patients with left-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and 47 patients with right-side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Diagnostic. To compare the regional gray matter of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and healthy control participants. Compared with control groups, patients with left side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss had significant gray matter reductions in the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus, whereas patients with right side unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss showed gray matter decreases in the left superior temporal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus. A significant negative correlation with the duration of the sudden sensorineural hearing loss (R = -0.427, p = 0.012 for left-side unilateral SSNHL and R = -0.412, p = 0.013 for right-side unilateral SSNHL) was also found in these brain areas. There was no region with increased gray matter found in both groups of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. This study confirms that detectable decreased contralateral auditory cortical morphological changes have occurred in unilateral SSNHL patients within the acute period by voxel-based morphometry methods. The gray matter volumes of these brain areas also perform a negative correlation with the duration of the disease, which suggests a gradual brain structural impairment after the progression of the disease.

  9. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  10. [Skull vibratory test in partial vestibular lesions--influence of the stimulus frequency on the nystagmus direction].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; Perrin, P; Morel, N; N'Guyen, D Q; Schmerber, S

    2005-01-01

    Results of the skull vibratory test (SVT) in partial unilateral vestibular peripheral lesions (PUVL) are different from the results in total vestibular lesions (TUVL). To reveal a correlation between the results of the analysis of the skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) horizontal component and the side of the lesion; to correlate these results with the stimulus frequency. To find out a predictive correlation between the SVN horizontal and vertical components and the topography of a vestibular lesion. To appreciate the degree of vestibular deafferentation (extended to high frequencies) provoked by gentamicin labyrinthectomy and its efficiency in Meniere's disease. 53 patients with a SVN and a PUVL were included and compared with 10 TUVL and 10 normal subjects. Protocol included a HST (2 Hz), a SVT at 30, 60 and 100 Hz and a caloric test. Recordings were performed with a 2D and 3D VNG device. In PUVL, SVN at 30, 60 and 100 Hz was obtained in 80, 90 and 90% of cases respectively. SVN is correlated with the side of the lesion at 30, 60 and 100 Hz respectively in 65%, 63%, 80% of cases. SVN is not correlated with the side of the lesion in 20% of Meniere's disease, in 8% of vestibular neuritis and in 6% of vestibular schwannoma. In PUVL HSN is correlated with the side of the lesion in 69% of cases. The direction of the HSN and of the SVN was different in 23% when the nystagmus attended at the same time for both tests. In PUVL the direction of the SVN is different at 100 Hz and 30 Hz in 16% of cases when they are concomittant on the same patient. After Gentamicine labyrinthectomy, the coherence of the results in caloric test, HSN and SVN (areflexy and lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side) was correlated with the efficiency of the therapy. A SVN vertical component was met in 10% of PUVL (essentially in anterior canal dehiscence and few cases of partial labyrinthitis). The horizontal SVN SPV is significantly slower in PUVL than in TUVL patients (p=0.0004). The SVT

  11. Large vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in response to bone-conducted sounds in patients with superior canal dehiscence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brantberg, Krister; Löfqvist, Lennart; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2004-01-01

    Dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal is a 'new' vestibular entity. Among these patients, the vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in response to air-conducted sounds are large. In the present study, VEMP in response to bone-conducted sounds were studied in 5 normal subjects, in 3 patients after (unilateral) labyrinthectomy and in 4 patients with (unilateral) superior canal dehiscence syndrome. The bone-conducted sound stimulus was a 250- and a 500- tone burst delivered monaurally on the mastoid using standard bone conductors. Among the normals, bone-conducted sounds delivered monaurally caused VEMP bilaterally. There was, however, a transcranial attenuation for the 500-Hz stimulus, but less so for the 250-Hz stimulus. Among the patients with labyrinthectomy there were VEMP on the healthy side, but not on the lesioned side, irrespective of whether the bone-conducted sounds were presented behind the healthy or the operated ear. Among the patients with superior canal dehiscence syndrome, the VEMP on the affected side were larger than on the healthy side. This suggests that there is also vestibular hypersensitivity for bone-conducted sounds in these patients. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to vertex low frequency vibration as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, Luca; Westin, Magnus; Duan, Maoli; Brantberg, Krister

    2016-04-01

    To explore ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) to low-frequency vertex vibration (125 Hz) as a diagnostic test for superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. The oVEMP using 125 Hz single cycle bone-conducted vertex vibration were tested in 15 patients with unilateral superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome, 15 healthy controls and in 20 patients with unilateral vestibular loss due to vestibular neuritis. Amplitude, amplitude asymmetry ratio, latency and interaural latency difference were parameters of interest. The oVEMP amplitude was significantly larger in SCD patients when affected sides (53 μVolts) were compared to non-affected (17.2 μVolts) or compared to healthy controls (13.6 μVolts). Amplitude larger than 33.8 μVolts separates effectively the SCD ears from the healthy ones with sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 93%. The other three parameters showed an overlap between affected SCD ears and non-affected as well as between SCD ears and those in the two control groups. oVEMP amplitude distinguishes SCD ears from healthy ones using low-frequency vibration stimuli at vertex. Amplitude analysis of oVEMP evoked by low-frequency vertex bone vibration stimulation is an additional indicator of SCD syndrome and might serve for diagnosing SCD patients with coexistent conductive middle ear problems. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of different click stimuli in diagnosing superior canal dehiscence using cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Brantberg, Krister; Verrecchia, Luca

    2012-10-01

    Testing cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) in response to 90 dB nHL clicks can, in contrast to high-intensity 500 Hz tone bursts, be used as a screening test for superior canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. cVEMP testing has its key clinical significance for evaluating saccular and inferior vestibular nerve function, but also for assessment of vestibular hypersensitivity to sounds in patients with SCD syndrome. The routine stimulus used in cVEMP testing is high-intensity 500 Hz tone bursts. The aim of the present study was to compare the high-intensity tone burst stimulation with less intense click stimulations for the diagnosis of SCD syndrome. cVEMP amplitudes in response to 500 Hz tone bursts and clicks were studied in 38 patients with SCD syndrome unilaterally. cVEMP testing using high-intensity 500 Hz tone bursts did not consistently distinguish SCD patients. This nonfunctioning of high-intensity 500 Hz stimulation is most likely due to saturation. With 90 and 80 dB nHL clicks there is low risk for saturation and both these click stimulations were effective. Testing with both 80 and 90 dB nHL clicks did not have any significant advantage over just using 90 nHL dB clicks.

  14. 3D-FLAIR MRI in facial nerve paralysis with and without audio-vestibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Seiichi; Mizuno, Terukazu; Naganawa, Shinji; Sugiura, Makoto; Yoshida, Tadao; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2010-05-01

    Among patients with facial nerve paralysis, significant difference was observed on three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI) between those with and without audio-vestibular disturbance. This MRI technique may contribute to elucidation of the pathology of Ramsay Hunt syndrome and Bell's palsy. To evaluate the 3D-FLAIR MRI findings in patients who have facial nerve paralysis with and without audio-vestibular disturbance. 3D-FLAIR MRI was performed with and without gadolinium enhancement in 15 patients (5 men and 10 women) with unilateral facial nerve paralysis: 3 patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 3 patients having facial nerve paralysis with hearing loss or vertigo without vesicles, and 9 patients with Bell's palsy. Five of the six patients with audio-vestibular disturbance showed high signals in the inner ear on precontrast 3D-FLAIR. In comparison, among nine patients with Bell's palsy, only one patient showed high signals in the inner ear on precontrast 3D-FLAIR (p < 0.05).

  15. A Prototype Head-Motion Monitoring System for In-Home Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Pamela T.; Herdman, Susan J.; Roy, Siddarth Datta; Hall, Courtney D.; Tusa, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the use of a head-motion monitoring system to record patient head movements while completing in-home exercises for vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Based upon a dual-axis gyroscope (yaw and pitch, ± 500-degrees/sec maximum), angular head rotations were measured and stored via an on-board memory card. The system enabled the clinician to document exercises at home. Several measurements were recorded in one patient with unilateral vestibular hypofunction: The total time of exercise for the week (118 minutes) was documented and compared with expected weekly exercise time (140 minutes). For gaze stabilization exercises, execution time of 60 sec was expected, and observed times ranged from 75-100 sec. An absence of rest periods between each exercise instead of the recommended one minute rest period was observed. Maximum yaw head velocities from approximately 100-350 degrees/sec were detected. A second subject provided feedback concerning the ease of use of the HAMMS device. This pilot study demonstrates, for the first time, the capability to capture the head-motion “signature” of a patient while completing vestibular rehabilitation exercises in the home and to extract exercise regime parameters and monitor patient adherence. This emerging technology has the potential to greatly improve rehabilitation outcomes for individuals completing in-home gaze stabilization exercises1. PMID:25866699

  16. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Video-nystagmography and vibration test in the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma. Review of 100 cases].

    PubMed

    Négrevergne, M; Ribeiro, S; Moraes, C L; Maunsell, R; Morata, G Celis; Darrouzet, V

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate informations given by the combination of videonystagmography (VNG) including vibratory tests and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in patients suffering vestibular schwannoma (VS) and try to find the most conclusive test(s). Combination of different functional tests is supposed to improve diagnosis and preoperative evaluation and precise indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facing audiological and vestibular symptoms. A prospective study of 100 patients with VS. All patients underwent a preoperative work-up including complete audiometry, auditory brainstem response (ABR) and videonystagmography (VNG). VNG protocol included caloric testing, rotatory tests, oculometry tests (saccade testing, optokinetic testing) and spontaneous and gaze-evoked nystagmus. From these six tests a score of positivity could be set, from 0 to 6. The vibratory test is non invasive and easy to realize. Were observed: 1/ a good sensitivity in vibratory test to elicit nystagmus in this context. 2/ a good correlation between subliminal rotatory chair tests and vibratory tests 3/ a better control of caloric testing using vibratory test. 4/ a good but deficient sensitivity of ABR alone with regard to VS (95%) 5/ an increase of sensitivity of VNG when coupling it with ABR and using as a criterion the score of positivity: no patient had all tests negative. The vibratory test is a non-invasive, fast examination with an easy execution. It reinforces VNG-ABR association screening power to diagnose VS. It constitutes, combined to caloric testing a good tool to diagnose and evaluate unilateral vestibular weakness.

  18. The Anatomical and Physiological Framework for Vestibular Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Stephen M.; Holstein, Gay R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the structure function of the vestibular system and its pathology with respect to requirements for the design and construction of a functional vestibular prosthesis. The ultimate goal of a vestibular prosthesis is to restore balance and equilibrium through direct activation of vestibular nerve fibers. An overview of the peripheral and central vestibular systems that highlights their most important functional aspects re: the design of a prosthesis is provided. Namely, the peripheral labyrinth faithfully transduces head motion and gravity in both the time and frequency domains. These signals are described in hopes that they may be prosthetically replicated. The peripheral and central connections of the vestibular nerve are also discussed in detail, as are the vestibular nuclei in the brainstem that receive VIIIth nerve innervation. Lastly, the functional effector pathways of the vestibular system, including the vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-spinal, vestibulo-colic, vestibulo-autonomic, and vestibular efferent innervation of the labyrinth are reviewed. PMID:23044714

  19. Connections and oculomotor projections of the superior vestibular nucleus and cell group 'y'.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M B; Cowie, R J

    1985-06-17

    Attempts were made to determine brainstem and cerebellar afferent and efferent projections of the superior vestibular nucleus (SVN) and cell group 'y' ('y') in the cat using axoplasmic tracers. Injections of HRP, WGA-HRP and [3H]amino acids were made into SVN and 'y' using two different infratentorial stereotaxic approaches. Controls were provided by unilateral HRP injections involving the oculomotor nuclear complex (OMC), the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) and the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Large injections of SVN almost invariably involved 'y' and dorsal parts of the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Smaller injections involved central and ventral peripheral parts of SVN. Discrete injections of 'y' involved small dorsal parts of LVN. Afferents to SVN are derived mainly from the vestibular nuclei (VN) and parts of the vestibulocerebellum. SVN receives afferents: bilaterally from caudal portions of the medial (MVN) and inferior (IVN) vestibular nuclei and 'y'; contralaterally from ventral and lateral parts of SVN and rostral MVN; and ipsilaterally from the nodulus, uvula and medial parts of the flocculus. Purkinje cells (PC) in medial parts of the flocculus project to central regions of SVN, while PC in the nodulus and uvula appear to project mainly to dorsal peripheral regions of SVN. SVN receives sparse projections from the ipsilateral INC, the contralateral central cervical nucleus (CCN) and virtually no projections from the reticular formation. SVN projects via the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) to the ipsilateral trochlear nucleus (TN), the inferior rectus subdivision of the OMC, the INC, the nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND) and the rostral interstitial nucleus of the MLF (RiMLF). Contralateral projections of SVN cross in the ventral tegmentum caudal to most of the decussating fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle and terminate in the dorsal rim of the TN and the superior rectus and inferior oblique subdivisions of the OMC; sparse crossed

  20. Diagnostic Value of Gains and Corrective Saccades in Video Head Impulse Test in Vestibular Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chan Joo; Cha, Eun Hye; Park, Jun Woo; Kang, Byung Chul; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Kang, Woo Suk; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2018-04-01

    Objectives We investigated changes in video head impulse test (vHIT) gains and corrective saccades (CSs) at the acute and follow-up stages of vestibular neuritis to assess the diagnostic value of vHIT. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods Sixty-three patients with vestibular neuritis who underwent vHIT at an initial presentation and an approximately 1-month follow-up were included. vHIT gains, gain asymmetry (GA), peak velocities of CS, and interaural difference of CS (CSD) were analyzed. Results Mean vHIT gains increased significantly from the acute stage to the follow-up exam. The mean GA, peak velocities of CS, and CSD had decreased significantly at the follow-up. The incidence of CSs was also significantly decreased at the follow-up. The abnormal rate (87%) considering both gain and CS value was significantly higher than that (62%) considering vHIT gain only at the follow-up, although the abnormal rates did not differ at the acute stage (97% vs 87%). Conclusion The abnormal rates based on both vHIT gains and CS measurements are similar at the acute stage of VN but are considerably higher at the follow-up stage compared with the abnormal rates based on vHIT gains alone. It is thus advisable to check both CS and vHIT gain while performing vHIT to detect vestibular hypofunction.

  1. Primal Terror: A Perspective of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The effects of "primal terror", the emotional experience of one's inability to naturally maintain balance in opposition to gravity and to integrate vestibular input, are discussed for children with learning and perceptual problems. (CL)

  2. [Effectiveness of Self-efficacy Promoting Vestibular Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Vestibular Hypofunction].

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2016-10-01

    In this study an examination was done of the effect of self-efficacy promoting vestibular rehabilitation (S-VR) on dizziness, exercise selfefficacy, adherence to vestibular rehabilitation (VR), subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness in patients with vestibular hypofunction. This was a randomized controlled study. Data were collected 3 times at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after beginning the intervention. Outcome measures were level of dizziness, exercise self-efficacy, and level of adherence to VR. Subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness were also obtained. Data were analyzed using Windows SPSS 21.0 program. After 4 weeks of S-VR, there was no difference between the groups for dizziness, subjective and objective vestibular functions. However, exercise self-efficacy and adherence to VR were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. After 8 weeks of S-VR, dizziness (p=.018) exercise self-efficacy (p<.001), adherence to VR (p<.001), total-dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) (p=.012), vision analysis ratio (p=.046) in the experimental group differ significantly from that of the control group. The number of patients with recurring dizziness were higher in the control group than in the experimental group (p<.001). The results indicate that continuous 8 weeks of S-VR is effective in reducing dizziness, and improving exercise self-efficacy, subjective vestibular function and adherence to VR. Objective vestibular function and vestibular compensation were also improved in the experimental group at the end of 8 weeks of S-VR.

  3. Vestibular modulation of peripersonal space boundaries.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Noel, Jean-Paul; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-04-01

    Human-environment interactions are mediated through the body and occur within the peripersonal space (PPS), the space immediately adjacent to and surrounding the body. The PPS is taken to be a critical interface between the body and the environment, and indeed, body-part specific PPS remapping has been shown to depend on body-part utilization, such as upper limb movements in otherwise static observers. How vestibular signals induced by whole-body movement contribute to PPS representation is less well understood. In a series of experiments, we mapped the spatial extension of the PPS around the head while participants were submitted to passive whole-body rotations inducing vestibular stimulation. Forty-six participants, in three experiments, executed a tactile detection reaction time task while task-irrelevant auditory stimuli approached them. The maximal distance at which the auditory stimulus facilitated tactile reaction time was taken as a proxy for the boundary of peri-head space. The present results indicate two distinct vestibular effects. First, vestibular stimulation speeded tactile detection indicating a vestibular facilitation of somatosensory processing. Second, vestibular stimulation modulated audio-tactile interaction of peri-head space in a rotation direction-specific manner. Congruent but not incongruent audio-vestibular motion stimuli expanded the PPS boundary further away from the body as compared to no rotation. These results show that vestibular inputs dynamically update the multisensory delineation of PPS and far space, which may serve to maintain accurate tracking of objects close to the body and to update spatial self-representations. © 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  5. Outcome analysis of individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Angel, C. R.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Gianna, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of vestibular rehabilitation protocols in subjects with peripheral vestibular disorders compared with normal and abnormal control subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study using repeated measure, matched control design. Subjects were solicited consecutively according to these criteria: vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) sensory organization tests (SOTs) 5 and 6 and underwent rehabilitation; vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of SOTs 5 and 6 and did not undergo rehabilitation; and normal subjects (normal SOTs). SETTING: Tertiary neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Men and women over age 18 with chronic vestibular disorders and chief complaints of unsteadiness, imbalance, and/or motion intolerance, and normal subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Pre- and post-rehabilitation assessment included CDP, vestibular disability, and activities of daily living questionnaires. Individualized rehabilitation plans were designed and implemented to address the subject's specific complaints and functional deficits. Supervised sessions were held at weekly intervals, and self-administered programs were devised for daily home use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CDP composite and SOT scores, number of falls on CDP, and self-assessment questionnaire results. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent rehabilitation (Group A) showed statistically significant improvements in SOTs, overall composite score, and reduction in falls compared with abnormal (Group B) control groups. Group A's performances after rehabilitation were not significantly different from those of normal subjects (Group C) in SOTs 3 through 6, and close to normal on SOTs 1 and 2. Subjects in Group A also reported statistically significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome measures of vestibular protocol physical therapy confirmed objective and subjective improvement in subjects with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders. These

  6. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  7. Decompression in Chiari Malformation: Clinical, Ocular Motor, Cerebellar, and Vestibular Outcome.

    PubMed

    Goldschagg, Nicolina; Feil, Katharina; Ihl, Franziska; Krafczyk, Siegbert; Kunz, Mathias; Tonn, Jörg Christian; Strupp, Michael; Peraud, Aurelia

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of Chiari malformation can include suboccipital decompression with resection of one cerebellar tonsil. Its effects on ocular motor and cerebellar function have not yet been systematically examined. To investigate whether decompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to ocular motor, vestibular, or cerebellar deficits. Ten patients with Chiari malformation type 1 were systematically examined before and after (1 week and 3 months) suboccipital decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy. The work-up included a neurological and neuro-ophthalmological examination, vestibular function, posturography, and subjective scales. Cerebellar function was evaluated by ataxia rating scales. Decompression led to a major subjective improvement 3 months after surgery, especially regarding headache (5/5 patients), hyp-/dysesthesia (5/5 patients), ataxia of the upper limbs (4/5 patients), and paresis of the triceps and interosseal muscles (2/2 patients). Ocular motor disturbances before decompression were detected in 50% of the patients. These symptoms improved after surgery, but five patients had new persisting mild ocular motor deficits 3 months after decompression with unilateral tonsillectomy (i.e., smooth pursuit deficits, horizontally gaze-evoked nystagmus, rebound, and downbeat nystagmus) without any subjective complaints. Impaired vestibular (horizontal canal, saccular, and utricular) function improved in five of seven patients with impaired function before surgery. Posturographic measurements after surgery did not change significantly. Decompression, including resection of one cerebellar tonsil, leads to an effective relief of patients' preoperative complaints. It is a safe procedure when performed with the help of intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, although mild ocular motor dysfunctions were seen in half of the patients, which were fortunately asymptomatic.

  8. A new dynamic visual acuity test to assess peripheral vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Vital, Domenic; Hegemann, Stefan C A; Straumann, Dominik; Bergamin, Oliver; Bockisch, Christopher J; Angehrn, Dominik; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Probst, Rudolf

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate a novel test for dynamic visual acuity (DVA) that uses an adaptive algorithm for changing the size of Landolt rings presented during active or passive head impulses, and to compare the results with search-coil head impulse testing. Prospective study in healthy individuals and patients with peripheral vestibular deficits. Tertiary academic center. One hundred neuro-otologically healthy individuals (age range, 19-80 years) and 15 patients with bilateral (n = 5) or unilateral (n = 10) peripheral vestibular loss (age range, 27-72 years). Testing of static visual acuity (SVA), DVA during active and passive horizontal head rotations (optotype presentation at head velocities >100 degrees/s and >150 degrees/s), and quantitative horizontal head impulse testing with scleral search coils. Difference between SVA and DVA, that is, visual acuity loss (VA loss), gain of the high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex. Passive head impulses and higher velocities were more effective than active impulses and lower velocities. Using passive head impulses and velocities higher than 150 degrees/s, the DVA test discriminated significantly (P < .001) among patients with bilateral vestibulopathy, those with unilateral vestibulopathy, and normal individuals. The DVA test sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 94%, and accuracy was 95%, with search-coil head impulse testing used as a reference. In healthy individuals, VA loss increased significantly with age (P < .001; R(2) = 0.04). Dynamic visual acuity testing with Landolt rings that are adaptively changed in size enables detection of peripheral vestibular dysfunction in a fast and simple way.

  9. Metabolic disorders of the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Rybak, L P

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the impact of metabolic disorders on vestibular function. Diabetes mellitus is a disorder of glucose metabolism that can be associated with vestibular dysfunction. Vertigo can be alleviated by diet management in many cases. Elevated levels of blood lipids have been implicated in cochleovestibular disorders. Treatment with a lipid-lowering drug has resulted in improved auditory and vestibular function in a placebo-controlled trial. Hypothyroidism may affect different parts of the vestibular system depending on the severity and duration of thyroid deficiency. Severe congenital hypothyroidism can cause central vestibular disorders affecting the cerebellum, whereas mild hypothyroidism may result in peripheral vestibulopathy. Endogenous alterations in concentrations of estrogen and progesterone in the premenstrual syndrome or with the use of exogenous hormones such as oral contraceptives may trigger vertigo. Metabolic evaluations for unexplained vertigo should include a lipoprotein profile, with cholesterol and triglyceride levels, glucose tolerance test, and thyroid hormone measurements. Nutritional and drug therapy may be useful to reverse the vestibular dysfunction.

  10. Vestibular Impairment in Frontotemporal Dementia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Kadono, Kotarou; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Takiguchi, Mao; Terada, Makoto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Moriyama, Tetsuya; Yanagiha, Kumi; Nohara, Seitaro; Tozaka, Naoki; Miyake, Zenshi; Aizawa, Satoshi; Furusho, Kentaro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-01-01

    No studies to date have attempted to evaluate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from the perspective of the vestibular system. The present study examined vestibular function in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) clinical syndrome and evaluated whether vestibular disorders are involved in the clinical symptoms due to FTD. Fourteen patients with FTD syndrome, as well as healthy elderly controls without dementia, were included in the present study. All subjects underwent vestibular function tests using electronystagmography, such as caloric tests and visual suppression (VS) tests, in which the induced caloric nystagmus was suppressed by visual stimuli. The association between clinical symptoms and vestibular function in the FTD syndrome group was further examined. In the FTD syndrome group, caloric nystagmus was not necessarily suppressed during VS tests. Furthermore, VS was observed to be significantly impaired in FTD syndrome patients with gait disturbance as compared to those without such disturbance. The present study revealed that impairment of VS in patients with FTD results in an inability to regulate vestibular function by means of visual perception, regardless of multiple presumed neuropathological backgrounds. This could also be associated with gait disturbance in patients with FTD syndrome.

  11. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  12. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  13. Peripheral vestibular system in Down syndrome: quantitative assessment of vestibular histopathology.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Taro; Morita, Norimasa; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Schachern, Patricia A; Nomiya, Shigenobu; Nomiya, Rie; Paparella, Michael M

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the maturity of the peripheral vestibular system in Down syndrome by examining the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells and the density of vestibular hair cells. Case-control study using human temporal bones. Tertiary academic center, otopathology laboratory. Sixteen temporal bones from 8 patients with Down syndrome and 15 control temporal bones from 8 individuals with no history of otologic disease were selected. Hypoplasia of the lateral semicircular canal (LSC) and vestibule was investigated by measuring the dimensions of the structures. Scarpa's ganglion cells were counted under light microscopy. The vestibular hair cells were counted in the LSC crista and the utricular and saccular maculae under differential interference contrast (Nomarski) microscopy and expressed as density. The patients with Down syndrome were divided into 2 groups: with and without LSC hypoplasia. The number of Scarpa's ganglion cells and the density of vestibular hair cells were significantly smaller in both groups of patients with Down syndrome than in the control group. There was no significant difference in the number of Scarpa's ganglion cells or the density of vestibular hair cells between the groups with and without LSC hypoplasia. The peripheral vestibular system, including Scarpa's ganglion cells and vestibular hair cells, is hypoplastic irrespective of the vestibular malformation in Down syndrome.

  14. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  15. Patients with vestibular loss, tullio phenomenon, and pressure-induced nystagmus: vestibular atelectasis?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Angela; Ward, Bryan K; Schubert, Michael C; Kheradmand, Amir; Zee, David S; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Carey, John Patrick

    2014-06-01

    To propose an etiology for a syndrome of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-evoked eye movements with normal hearing thresholds. Retrospective case series. Tertiary care referral center. Four patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction, sound and/or pressure-evoked nystagmus and normal hearing thresholds were identified over a 3-year period. No evidence of other known vestibular disorders was identified. None of these patients presented with a history of exposure to toxins, radiation, aminoglycosides or chemotherapy; head trauma; or a family history of inherited vestibular loss. All patients underwent high-resolution CT scan of the temporal bones to evaluate for labyrinthine dehiscence. Additionally, all individuals underwent audiometric testing to ANSI standards, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) testing using either click stimulus cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs), or tone burst ocular VEMPs (oVEMPs). Bithermal caloric stimulation was used to measure horizontal semicircular canal function, with either videonystagmography (VNG) or electronystagmography (ENG) to record eye movements. Individual responses of each of the 6 semicircular canals (SCC) to rapid head rotations were tested with the bedside head impulse test. We identified 4 patients with a combination of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-induced eye movements, normal-hearing thresholds and no evidence for any other vestibular disorder. We suggest that this unique combination of symptoms should be considered as the clinical presentation of vestibular atelectasis, which has been previously described histologically as collapse of the endolymph-containing portions of the labyrinth.

  16. The Value of Vestibular Rehabilitation in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Ethem; Dinç, Mehmet Emre; Yayla Özker, Berna; Çöpürgensli, Canan; Konaklıoğlu, Mustafa; Özçelik, Tuncay

    2017-12-01

    The value of vestibular rehabilitation in patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction was investigated. This study assessed 17 patients (9 males, 8 females) with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Vestibular rehabilitation continued for 1.5 months. Videonystagmography tests (including oculomotor testing, positional testing, and caloric tests), vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing, and computerized dynamic posturography were performed during the pre-, mid-, and post-treatment periods. The patients underwent cranial and internal acoustic canal MRI. Consultant physicians from the neurology and physical medicine and rehabilitation departments reviewed all patients. The post-treatment anteroposterior somatosensorial (APSO), anteroposterior global (APGLO), mediolateral visual (MLVI), and mediolateral global values and anteroposterior and mediolateral trials and conditions were significantly higher than those measured in the pre-treatment period. Similarly, mid-treatment values of the APSO, APGLO, and the anteroposterior sensory organization test (SOT) 2 were significantly higher than those measured in the pre-treatment period. Vestibular rehabilitation was effective in patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. As the vestibular rehabilitation duration increased, so did the efficacy of the treatment.

  17. Endolymphatic hydrops in superior canal dehiscence and large vestibular aqueduct syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sone, Michihiko; Yoshida, Tadao; Morimoto, Kyoko; Teranishi, Masaaki; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Pathologic third window lesions, such as superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) or large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS), cause several auditory and vestibular symptoms, which might affect perilymphatic pressure and induce endolymphatic hydrops (EH). In this study, the existence of EH in subjects with SCDS or LVAS was investigated using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Case series at university hospital. Seventeen ears from nine subjects who were diagnosed as having SCDS (five ears from three cases) or LVAS (12 ears from six cases) were studied. Ears were evaluated by 3-T MRI performed 4 hours after intravenous injection of gadodiamide hydrate. Imaging data concerning the degree of EH in the cochlea and the vestibule were compared with clinical symptoms and hearing levels for all ears. All ears showed air-bone gaps at low frequencies on pure tone audiometry. None of the subjects with SCDS had episodes of acute sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) or vestibular symptoms, except for one patient who complained of head vibration induced by loud noise. Conversely, five of six subjects with LVAS had episodes of acute SNHL or vestibular symptoms. Four of five ears with SCDS showed severe EH in the cochlea, and two ears showed mild EH in the vestibule. All ears with LVAS showed mild to severe EH in both the cochlea and vestibule. The present study demonstrated the existence of EH in ears with pathologic third window lesions, which might affect patients' auditory or vestibular symptoms. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:1446-1450, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  19. Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannomas: impact on the anterior and posterior labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Massimo; Mesiano, Nazarena; Longhi, Michele; De Simone, Antonio; Foroni, Roberto; Verlicchi, Angela; Zanotti, Bruno; Nicolato, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    During the past decades, in small-to-medium size vestibular schwannomas, Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) has become a reliable therapeutic option because of either excellent local tumor control or minimal morbidity, with cranial neuropathy becoming increasingly rare. Although still insufficiently analyzed in larger cohorts of patients with long-term follow-ups, adequate chances of hearing preservation and vestibular sparing seem clinically guaranteed. However, deeper investigations are needed in this regard, expanding the number of cases and the follow-up period. A small group of patients with vestibular schwannomas (74 patients, including 41 men and 33 women) treated between 2003 and 2009 using GKS at the authors' institution were analyzed--both before and after GKS--with computerized static stabilometry and electronystagmography for balance disorders, vertigo, and ataxia on 1 side and pure tone average, vocal speech discrimination score, auditory brainstem response, and so forth for hearing impairment and tinnitus on the other side. Eligibility criteria for this prospective study included previously untreated unilateral lesions and a Gardner-Robertson hearing class of I-III. Dosimetry plans had been programmed at the lower effective dosages for these tumors (median surface dose 12.4 Gy, range 10-13 Gy), carefully avoiding even minimal toxic dosages on the most vulnerable targets: the cochlea (never > 6 Gy) and the vestibular canals (< 7.5 Gy). To date, tumor growth control rates remain satisfactory; at a mean follow-up of 50 months, the rate was 96%. The overall level of hearing preservation was 72%, with 81% having Gardner-Robertson Class I hearing. Tinnitus decreased, from 52% to 28% of patients (p < 0.01). Significant improvements were also observed in vestibular symptoms, with computerized static stabilometry abnormalities decreasing from 62% to 32% (p < 0.001) and electronystagmography abnormalities reducing from 48% to 14% (p < 0.001). Using appropriate

  20. Vestibular disorders among adults in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Somefun, O A; Giwa, O S; Bamgboye, B A; Okeke-Igbokwe, I Irene; Azeez, A A Abdul

    2010-10-01

    Dizziness is not an uncommon complaint in the Otolaryngological clinics among other symptoms. To a large number of practitioners, the treatment of dizziness remains the same irrespective of the etiology, i.e., anti-vertiginous drugs. The objective of this study was to document the evaluation, causes and treatment of vestibular disorders among our patients. The design includes descriptive prospective study conducted in the Oto-rhino-laryngology and Orthopedic Clinics of Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos and Nigerian Army Audiological Centre, 68 Nigerian Army Reference Hospital, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. Adult patients referred to the audiology clinic for dizziness had detailed history obtained by using structured questionnaire. General physical and neuro-otological examinations were done. Clinical diagnoses were made on standardized criteria. The patients had hearing evaluation, videonystagmography (VNG) evaluation using infrared videonystagmography system. X-ray of the cervical spine and computerized tomogram scan of internal auditory meatus and brain when indicated were done. A total of 102 patients were seen with age range between 21 and 90 years. Thirty patients (29.4%) recorded average duration of episode of vertiginous attacks in seconds, 69 (67.6%) recorded within minutes to hours and 3 (2.9%) with no definite pattern. Clinical signs on neuro-otological examination were elicited on 39 (38.2%) of the patients while on VNG the vestibular subtest mainly caloric test was abnormal unilaterally and bilaterally in 47 (46.1%) while with the oculomotor subtests, smooth pursuit tests were abnormal in 5 (6.9%), saccade tests were abnormal in 8 (7.8%) and OPK were abnormal in 9 (8.8%). Peripheral vestibular disorders are common of which benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) was seen in 29 (28.4%), Meniere's disease in 22 (21.6%), recurrent vestibulopathy in 20 (19.6%), cervical vertigo in 18 (17.6%), psychogenic vertigo in 2 (2%), vestibular schwannoma

  1. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  2. Standing balance tests for screening people with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2014-02-01

    To improve the test standards for a version of the Romberg test and to determine whether measuring kinematic variables improved its utility for screening. Healthy controls and patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, postoperative acoustic neuroma resection, and chronic peripheral unilateral weakness were compared. Subjects wore Bluetooth-enabled inertial motion units while standing on the floor or medium-density, compliant foam, with eyes open or closed, with head still or moving in pitch or yaw. Dependent measures were time to perform each test condition, number of head movements made, and kinematic variables. Patients and controls did not differ significantly with eyes open or with eyes closed while on the floor. With eyes closed, on foam, some significant differences were found between patients and controls, especially for subjects older than 59 years. Head movement conditions were more challenging than with the head still. Significantly fewer patients than controls could make enough head movements to obtain kinematic measures. Kinematics indicated that lateral balance control is significantly reduced in these patients compared to controls. Receiver operator characteristics and sensitivity/specificity analyses showed moderately good differences with older subjects. Tests on foam with eyes closed, with head still or moving, may be useful as part of a screening battery for vestibular impairments, especially for older people. 3b. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Computed tomography findings in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiufang; Yang, Ying; Xia, Ming; Li, Dumin; Xu, Anting

    2009-07-01

    Patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) have disturbed morphogenesis of bony labyrinth. Semicircular canal anomalies are common in LVAS. To describe the additional inner ear anomalies on CT imaging in pediatric patients with LVAS, and to investigate the lateral semicircular canal (LSCC) anomalies associated with LVAS by measurement of the LSCC bony island width. We retrospectively reviewed the digitally stored temporal bone CT imaging obtained for 23 patients with LVAS, additional inner ear anomalies were noted, and measurements of the LSCC bony island width were made on axial CT scans on the workstation. Measurements were compared to the normative data obtained from 20 patients without sensorineural hearing loss. Of the 23 patients (bilateral in 22 and unilateral in 1), additional inner ear malformations were identified in 21 cases presenting either singly or in combination. A small LSCC bony island (<3 mm in diameter) appeared highly typical; vestibule and LSCC anomalies were identified in 13 cases (26 ears) based on visual inspection combined with abnormal measurements. Dehiscence of the superior and/or posterior semicircular canal was identified in 19 ears, and Mondini deformity was identified in 6 ears.

  4. Changes in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials after Meniere attacks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shih-Wei; Yang, Ting-Hua; Young, Yi-Ho

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to apply videonystagmography (VNG) and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests to patients with Meniere attacks, to explore the mechanics of where saccular disorders may affect the semicircular canals. From January 2001 to December 2003, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral definite Meniere's disease with vertiginous attacks underwent VNG for recording spontaneous nystagmus, as well as VEMP tests. At the very beginning of the Meniere attack, the spontaneous nystagmus beat toward the lesion side in 5 patients (42%) and toward the healthy side in 7 patients (58%). Twenty-four hours later, only 6 patients (50%) showed spontaneous nystagmus beating toward the healthy side. Nevertheless, spontaneous nystagmus subsided in all patients within 48 hours. The VEMP test was performed within 24 hours of a Meniere attack; the VEMPs were normal in 4 patients and abnormal in 8 patients (67%). After 48 hours, 4 patients with initially abnormal VEMPs had resolution and return to normal VEMPs, and the other 4 patients still had absent VEMPs. Most patients (67%) with Meniere attacks revealed abnormal VEMPs, indicating that the saccule participates in a Meniere attack. This is an important idea that stimulates consideration of the mechanism of Meniere attacks.

  5. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  6. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith endorgans can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular-deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of one week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2–5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans. PMID:21374081

  7. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  8. Distinct activation of the sympathetic adreno-medullar system and hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis following the caloric vestibular test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cozma, Sebastian; Ghiciuc, Cristina Mihaela; Damian, Lisandra; Pasquali, Vittorio; Saponaro, Angelo; Lupusoru, Elena Catalina; Patacchioli, Francesca Romana; Dima-Cozma, Lucia Corina

    2018-01-01

    The vestibular acute stress induces reversible alert-like reactions that involve the sympathetic adrenal-medullar system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses. The present study aimed to evaluate salivary α-amylase and salivary cortisol production in relation with cardiovascular reactivity induced by acute stress in healthy subjects. Forty-eight young healthy male volunteers were examined under basal conditions and at various times after reaching the maximal nystagmic reaction following air caloric vestibular test. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were recorded at the same time as measurement of the salivary α-amylase and salivary cortisol. At the end of the caloric vestibular test session, perceived stress scale questionnaires were administered to measure the self-perceived stress impact induced by the task, and individual scores were compared with those measured on the enrollment day. Following caloric vestibular test-evoked vertigo, salivary α-amylase and cortisol showed distinct trends in their production after acute stress: Student's t-test was used to compare the α-amylase vs cortisol slopes of the respective interpolated regression lines, and the difference was significant (t = -3.283; p<0.001); an increase in salivary cortisol production corresponded with a decrease in the salivary α-amylase concentration. In addition, salivary biomarker modifications were associated with consistent changes in the heart rate, systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure. Using the air caloric vestibular test task as a stressor, the present study demonstrated a connection between the acute hormonal stress response to vestibular stimulation and cardiovascular output. However, further research is needed before we can define the potential importance of the consistent cardiovascular activity changes evoked by vestibular stimulation and the possible functional consequences for cardiovascular regulation

  9. Vestibular stimulation for management of premenstrual syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johny, Minu; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to observe the effectiveness of vestibular stimulation in the management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The present study was an experimental study; twenty female participants of age group 18-30 years were recruited in the present study. Conventional swing was used to administer vestibular stimulation. Variables were recorded before and after vestibular stimulation and compared. Depression and stress scores are significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Anxiety scores decreased followed by vestibular stimulation. However, it is no statistically significant. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. WHOQOL-BREF-transformed scores were not significantly changed followed by the intervention. However, psychological domain score (T2) and social relationships domain score (T3) were increased followed by intervention. Systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. No significant change was observed in diastolic pressure and pulse rate. Pain score was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Mini mental status examination scores and spatial and verbal memory score were significantly improved followed by intervention. The present study provides preliminary evidence for implementing vestibular stimulation for management of PMS as a nonpharmacological therapy. Hence, we recommend further well-controlled, detailed studies in this area with higher sample size.

  10. Longitudinal performance of an implantable vestibular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Ling, Leo; Oxford, Trey; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Rubinstein, Jay T.; Phillips, James O.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of vestibular function may be treatable with an implantable vestibular prosthesis that stimulates semicircular canal afferents with biphasic pulse trains. Several studies have demonstrated short-term activation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with electrical stimulation. Fewer long-term studies have been restricted to small numbers of animals and stimulation designed to produce adaptive changes in the electrically elicited response. This study is the first large consecutive series of implanted rhesus macaque to be studied longitudinally using brief stimuli designed to limit adaptive changes in response, so that the efficacy of electrical activation can be studied over time, across surgeries, canals and animals. The implantation of a vestibular prosthesis in animals with intact vestibular end organs produces variable responses to electrical stimulation across canals and animals, which change in threshold for electrical activation of eye movements and in elicited slow phase velocities over time. These thresholds are consistently lower, and the slow phase velocities higher, than those obtained in human subjects. The changes do not appear to be correlated with changes in electrode impedance. The variability in response suggests that empirically derived transfer functions may be required to optimize the response of individual canals to a vestibular prosthesis, and that this function may need to be remapped over time. PMID:25245586

  11. Role of otolith endorgans in the genesis of vestibular-visual conflict sickness (pitch) in the squirrel monkey (First report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto; Himi, Tetsuo; Kulecz, Walter B.; Kobayashi, Kazutoyo

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ablation of the macula utriculi and macula sacculi on vestibular-visual conflict emesis in squirrel monkeys are investigated. An optokinetic drum and a turntable were used for the direction conflict experiment. A significant difference between the preoperative condition and postunilateral and postbilateral utriculo-sacculectomy conditions is observed. It is detected that after unilateral sacculectomy the conflict sickness decreases and no emesis occurs; however, 4.5 months after sacculectomy, the animals regain their conflict sickness. The data reveal that macular afferents are important in the genesis of sensory conflict emesis and two submodalities may be needed to cause conflict sickness onset.

  12. Neural Correlates of Sensory Substitution in Vestibular Pathways Following Complete Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory substitution is the term typically used in reference to sensory prosthetic devices designed to replace input from one defective modality with input from another modality. Such devices allow an alternative encoding of sensory information that is no longer directly provided by the defective modality in a purposeful and goal-directed manner. The behavioral recovery that follows complete vestibular loss is impressive and has long been thought to take advantage of a natural form of sensory substitution in which head motion information is no longer provided by vestibular inputs, but instead by extra-vestibular inputs such as proprioceptive and motor efference copy signals. Here we examined the neuronal correlates of this behavioral recovery after complete vestibular loss in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulata). We show for the first time that extra-vestibular inputs substitute for the vestibular inputs to stabilize gaze at the level of single neurons in the VOR premotor circuitry. The summed weighting of neck proprioceptive and efference copy information was sufficient to explain simultaneously observed behavioral improvements in gaze stability. Furthermore, by altering correspondence between intended and actual head movement we revealed a four-fold increase in the weight of neck motor efference copy signals consistent with the enhanced behavioral recovery observed when head movements are voluntary versus unexpected. Thus, taken together our results provide direct evidence that the substitution by extra-vestibular inputs in vestibular pathways provides a neural correlate for the improvements in gaze stability that are observed following the total loss of vestibular inputs. PMID:23077054

  13. Chemical labyrinthectomy: local application of gentamicin for the treatment of unilateral Menière's disease.

    PubMed

    Nedzelski, J M; Schessel, D A; Bryce, G E; Pfleiderer, A G

    1992-01-01

    The use of aminoglycosides for selective vestibular function ablation without hearing alteration is described in the literature. Parenteral administration of streptomycin for the alleviation of vertigo in cases of bilateral Meniere's disease is well accepted. The instillation of aminoglycosides into the middle ear to produce a similar result, has been successfully used in the treatment of unilateral Meniere's disease. However, the use of chemical vestibulectomy has not gained acceptance as a practical means of treatment when compared to vestibular neurectomy. The reason for this is not clear, but may stem from the lack of definitive protocol for the application and lack of treatment results that have been assessed according to an acknowledged standard (i.e., the American Academy of Otolaryngology Criteria). A prospective study was undertaken to examine the efficacy of chemical vestibulectomy as the treatment for vertigo in unilateral, incapacitating Meniere's disease. A standardized drug administration protocol was utilized, and academy criteria for the assessment of treatment were applied. This report details the first group of patients to complete 2 years of post-treatment follow-up. Based on our experience, we conclude that chemical vestibulectomy is an efficient alternative to surgery. A standardized regimen of drug administration that can be carried out on an outpatient basis is put forward.

  14. Video Head Impulse Test (vHIT): The Role of Corrective Saccades in Identifying Patients With Vestibular Loss.

    PubMed

    Janky, Kristen L; Patterson, Jessie; Shepard, Neil; Thomas, Megan; Barin, Kamran; Creutz, Tom; Schmid, Kendra; Honaker, Julie A

    2018-04-01

    1) Characterize corrective saccades (CS) in normal controls, and 2) examine the sensitivity of the video head impulse test (vHIT) for identifying vestibular loss using both gain and CS. Prospective combined with retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. Seventy subjects with normal vestibular function served as controls (mean age, 44.1 yr; range, 10-78) and data from 49 patients with unilateral and bilateral vestibular loss was retrospectively reviewed (mean age, 50; range, 7-81). vHIT; individual horizontal head impulses were then analyzed in MATLAB. Horizontal vHIT gain, CS peak velocity, frequency, and latency. There was not an age effect for CS velocity or latency, and only a weak relationship between CS frequency and age in the control group. Gain and CS latency were the only parameters affected by impulse side, demonstrating higher gain and longer latency on the right. The group with vestibular loss had significantly lower mean vHIT gain, higher mean CS frequency, higher mean CS velocity, earlier CS latency, and smaller mean CS standard deviations of the latency compared with the control group.When all factors were analyzed separately by logistic regression, vHIT gain provided the best classification (83.8%), closely followed by CS frequency (83.1%). Using a two variable approach (both gain and CS frequency) yielded the best diagnostic accuracy (overall classification = 84.6%). Along with gain, incorporating CS frequency in interpreting vHIT improves diagnostic accuracy. A repeatable CS (>81.89%) and/or low gain (<0.78) indicate vestibular loss.

  15. Lateral medullary syndrome following injury of the vestibular pathway to the core vestibular cortex: Diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sang Seok; Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Jung Won

    2018-02-05

    The parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) is a core region of vestibular input into regions of the cortex. The vestibular nuclei have reciprocal connections with the PIVC. However, little is known about injury of the core vestibular pathway to the PIVC in patients with dorsolateral medullary infarctions. In this study, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), we investigated injury of the neural connections between the vestibular nuclei and the PIVC in patients with typical central vestibular disorder. Eight consecutive patients with lateral medullary syndrome and 10 control subjects were recruited for this study. To reconstruct the core vestibular pathway to the PIVC, we defined the seed region of interest (ROI) as the vestibular nuclei of the pons and the target ROI as the PIVC. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and tract volume were measured. The core vestibular pathway to the PIVC showed significantly lower tract volume in patients compared with the control group (p<0.05). By contrast, other DTI parameters did not show significant differences between the patient and control groups (p>0.05). In conclusion, injury of the core vestibular pathway to the PIVC was demonstrated in patients with lateral vestibular syndrome following dorsolateral medullary infarcts. We believe that analysis of the core vestibular pathway to the PIVC using DTT would be helpful in evaluating patients with lateral medullary syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphological correlation between caloric tests and vestibular hydrops in Ménière's disease using intravenous Gd enhanced inner ear MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi-Kyung; Cho, Young Sang; Lee, Kieun; Park, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Chung, Won-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis that caloric response in Ménière's disease (MD) is reduced by hydropic expansion of the vestibular labyrinth, not by vestibular hypofunction, by evaluating the correlation morphologically using an intravenous Gadolinium (IV-Gd) inner ear MRI. In study I, the prevalence of abnormal video Head Impulse Test (vHIT) results among the patients with definite unilateral MD (n = 24) and vestibular neuritis (VN) (n = 22) were investigated. All patients showed abnormal canal paresis (CP) (> 26%) on caloric tests. The prevalence of abnormal vHIT in patients with abnormal CP was significantly lower in MD patients (12.5%) than that in VN patients (81.8%) (p < 0.001). In study II, morphological correlation between caloric tests and vestibular hydrops level was evaluated in unilateral MD patients (n = 16) who had normal vHIT results. Eleven patients (61%) had abnormal CP. After taking the images of IV-Gd inner ear MRI, the vestibular hydrops ratio (endolymph volume/total lymph volume = %VH) was measured. In addition, the relative vestibular hydrops ratio (%RVH = (%VHaffected ear—%VHunaffected ear) / (%VHaffected ear + %VHunaffected ear)) was calculated. Each ratio (%VH and %RVH) was compared with average peak slow phase velocity (PSPV) and CP, respectively. In the MD patients, %VH of the affected ear correlated significantly with mean PSPV on the same side (rs = -0.569, p = 0.024), while %RVH correlated significantly with CP (rs = 0.602, p = 0.014). In most MD patients (87.5%) compared to VN patients, vHIT results were normal even though the caloric function was reduced. In addition, the reduced caloric function with normal vHIT was related to the severity of the vestibular hydrops measured by the IV-Gd inner ear MRI. These findings concluded that the abnormal caloric tests with normal vHIT in MD indicated severe endolymphatic hydrops rather than vestibular hypofunction. PMID:29190293

  17. Audiologic and vestibular findings in Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karzon, Roanne K; Hullar, Timothy E

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of auditory and vestibular function in Wolfram Syndrome (WS) patients, using a standardized protocol. Prospective cohort study of 11 patients using otoscopic inspection, tympanometry, otoacoustic emissions, pure tones, speech in noise (SIN), the Speech Intelligibility Index, and rotational chair testing. Mean SNHL diagnosis was 7.3 years with 55% prevalence. Four patients with a Speech Intelligibility Index less than 0.75 (better ear) routinely used bilateral amplification devices. Two patients with normal-hearing sensitivity exhibited abnormal SIN scores. The only patient with significant vestibular dysfunction also had a distinctive low-frequency component to her SNHL. Hearing loss may occur earlier than previously suspected, and comprehensive testing including SIN testing may reveal deficits not apparent with pure-tone testing. Particular configurations of hearing loss may indicate a need for comprehensive vestibular assessment. Because SNHL can be the first symptom of WS, audiologists and otolaryngologists should be vigilant about referring patients with hearing loss for ophthalmologic examination.

  18. Vestibular function in Lermoyez syndrome at attack.

    PubMed

    Manzari, Leonardo; Burgess, Ann M; Curthoys, Ian S

    2012-02-01

    Lermoyez syndrome (LS) has been regarded as a variant of Ménière's disease (MD), but so far there have been very few cases of LS reported in the literature, so such a conclusion is debatable. Specifying the pattern of auditory and vestibular changes at attack using objective quantitative measures is important for understanding the mechanism responsible for MD and LS. Here we report the first objective measures of dynamic otolith function and dynamic semicircular canal function in an LS patient at the time of the attack as well as at quiescence, documenting the fluctuation in otolith and semicircular canal function in the patient. The very rapid changes in dynamic vestibular function at the time of the LS attack appear to complement some of the rapid changes in auditory and vestibular function at the attack in Ménière's disease, supporting the contention that LS is a variant of MD.

  19. Optical nerve stimulation for a vestibular prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Bierer, Steven M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Phillips, James O.

    2009-02-01

    Infrared Nerve Stimulation (INS) offers several advantages over electrical stimulation, including more precise spatial selectivity and improved surgical access. In this study, INS and electrical stimulation were compared in their ability to activate the vestibular branch of the VIIIth nerve, as a potential way to treat balance disorders. The superior and lateral canals of the vestibular system of Guinea pigs were identified and approached with the aid of precise 3-D reconstructions. A monopolar platinum stimulating electrode was positioned near the ampullae of the canals, and biphasic current pulses were used to stimulate vestibular evoked potentials and eye movements. Thresholds and input/output functions were measured for various stimulus conditions. A short pulsed diode laser (Capella, Lockheed Martin-Aculight, Inc., Bothell WA) was placed in the same anatomical position and various stimulus conditions were evaluated in their ability to evoke similar potentials and eye movements.

  20. Conservative management of vestibular schwannomas - second review of a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Raut, V V; Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L; Guha, A; Tator, C H; Rutka, J A

    2004-10-01

    Vestibular schwannomas have been traditionally managed with microsurgical removal and in recent years, stereotactic radiotherapy. However, there is a group of patients in whom a conservative management approach might represent a desirable alternative. The aim of this study was to determine the natural history and outcome following the conservative management of 72 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas. This is a prospective cohort review of a previously published group of patients [Clin. Otolaryngol. (2000) 25, 28-39] with unilateral vestibular schwannoma that were initially analysed at our institution in 1998 [Walsh R.M., Bath A.P., Bance M.L. et al., Clin. Otolaryngol. (2000) 25, 28]. The mean duration of follow-up was 80 months (range 52-242 months). All the patients in the study underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessment of tumour growth. Patients were deemed to have failed conservative management if there was evidence of rapid radiological tumour growth and/or increasing signs and symptoms, which necessitated active intervention. The mean tumour growth rate for the entire group at the second review was 1 mm/year (range -0.84-9.65 mm/year). The mean growth rate for cerebellopontine angle tumours (1.3 mm/year) was significantly greater than that of internal auditory canal (IAC) tumours (0 mm/year) (P = 0.005). The majority of tumours (87.14%) grew <2 mm/year. There was significant tumour growth seen in 38.9%, no or insignificant growth in 41.7%, and negative growth in 19.4%. Twenty-three patients (32%) failed conservative management at the second review. There was no difference in the outcome of these failed patients in comparison with patients who underwent primary treatment without a period of conservative management. The mean growth rate of tumours in patients that failed conservative management (3.1 mm/year) was significantly greater than that in patients who did not fail (0.2 mm/year) (P < 0.001). No factors predictive of

  1. Physiopathology of peripheral non-Menière's vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Tran Ba Huy, P

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the physiopathological basis of some labyrinthine or vestibular nerve disorders illustrating a particular mode of vestibular dysfunction. The discovery of the physiopathology of these disorders has relied on neuroanatomical data, histopathological observations of human temporal bones, historical principles of vestibular physiology, surgical exploration, blood testing which provides indirect evidence of immune or metabolic disorders, and results from animal experiments. While all data are valid, advances in sensory cell physiology, development of new vestibular tests, and progress in imaging techniques are necessary in order for a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in vestibular end organ dysfunction to be obtained.

  2. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  3. Augmented ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to air-conducted sound in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachael L; Bradshaw, Andrew P; Magnussen, John S; Gibson, William P R; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the value of recording air-conducted ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (oVEMP) in a patient with bilaterally enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Cervical VEMP and oVEMP were recorded from a patient presenting with bilateral hearing loss and imbalance, attributable to large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. The stimuli were air-conducted tone bursts at octave frequencies from 250 to 2000 Hz. Amplitudes and thresholds were measured and compared with the normal response range of 32 healthy control subjects. oVEMP reflexes demonstrated pathologically increased amplitudes and reduced thresholds for low-frequency tone bursts. Cervical VEMP amplitudes and thresholds were within normal limits for both ears across all frequencies of stimulation. This study is the first to describe the augmentation of AC oVEMPs in an adult with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  4. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. X, Modification of vestibular nystagmus and "vertigo" by means of visual stimulation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1968-10-01

    A conflict among sensory signals frequently underlies problems of disorientation, vertigo, and motion sickness. In this study, visual information in conflict with vestibular signals was presented to groups of subjects by illuminating the test room fo...

  5. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. VIII, "Coriolis" vestibular stimulation and the influence of different visual surrounds.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1967-08-01

    Disorientation caused by 'Coriolis' vestibular reactions has been cited frequently as a significant factor in flying safety. In addition, personnel who maintain rotating radar towers may also be adversely affected by 'Coriolis' problems. In the study...

  6. Effects of sleep loss on vestibular response during simple and complex vestibular stimulation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-07-01

    Few data are available concerning the effects of sleep loss on vestibular responses although those responses are significant products of motion in aviation environments. This study assessed periodically throughout approx. 55 hrs. of sleep loss the oc...

  7. Skin temperature response to unilateral training measured with infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Galindo, Víctor L; Estal-Martínez, Alejandro; Adamczyk, Jakub G; Brito, Ciro José; Arnaiz-Lastras, Javier; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to identify the skin temperature (Tsk) behavior to understand the acute cross-effect after unilateral training of lower-limbs. Seventeen healthy young men (weight, 75.2±5.5 kg; height, 1.8±0.1 m; age, 22.5±1.6 years) were divided into two groups: high-trained (n=8) and low-trained (n=9). All participants performed: (a) one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing protocol on the leg press, (b) a unilateral training protocol (4×10 repetitions at 70% of 1RM for leg press and 4×10 repetitions at 50% of 1RM for knee extension). Pre- and posttraining thermal images were recorded. The main results showed that independent of the limb (exercised vs. nonexercised), differences between low- and high-trained were observed for all regions of interest (ROI) except for the anterior knee: posttraining, 30-min and 60-min posttraining in nonexercised limb. The increase of contralateral Tsk was more than 50% on the ROIs corresponding to the exercises muscles 30-min post-training in low-trained but was not so high in high-trained ( P <0.05). Low-trained subjects incremented more the Tsk than high-trained in both legs after exercise. In conclusion, we observed an acute contralateral Tsk effect to unilateral training on the Tsk of the nonexercised limb, reliant on the training level of the subject.

  8. Skin temperature response to unilateral training measured with infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla-Galindo, Víctor L.; Estal-Martínez, Alejandro; Adamczyk, Jakub G.; Arnaiz-Lastras, Javier; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the skin temperature (Tsk) behavior to understand the acute cross-effect after unilateral training of lower-limbs. Seventeen healthy young men (weight, 75.2±5.5 kg; height, 1.8±0.1 m; age, 22.5±1.6 years) were divided into two groups: high-trained (n=8) and low-trained (n=9). All participants performed: (a) one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing protocol on the leg press, (b) a unilateral training protocol (4×10 repetitions at 70% of 1RM for leg press and 4×10 repetitions at 50% of 1RM for knee extension). Pre- and posttraining thermal images were recorded. The main results showed that independent of the limb (exercised vs. nonexercised), differences between low- and high-trained were observed for all regions of interest (ROI) except for the anterior knee: posttraining, 30-min and 60-min posttraining in nonexercised limb. The increase of contralateral Tsk was more than 50% on the ROIs corresponding to the exercises muscles 30-min post-training in low-trained but was not so high in high-trained (P<0.05). Low-trained subjects incremented more the Tsk than high-trained in both legs after exercise. In conclusion, we observed an acute contralateral Tsk effect to unilateral training on the Tsk of the nonexercised limb, reliant on the training level of the subject. PMID:29114526

  9. From ear to uncertainty: vestibular contributions to cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Zheng, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), can modulate cognitive function. PMID:24324413

  10. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  11. Vestibular convergence patterns in vestibular nuclei neurons of alert primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory signal convergence is a fundamental and important aspect of brain function. Such convergence may often involve complex multidimensional interactions as those proposed for the processing of otolith and semicircular canal (SCC) information for the detection of translational head movements and the effective discrimination from physically congruent gravity signals. In the present study, we have examined the responses of primate rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) neurons that do not exhibit any eye movement-related activity using 0.5-Hz translational and three-dimensional (3D) rotational motion. Three distinct neural populations were identified. Approximately one-fourth of the cells exclusively encoded rotational movements (canal-only neurons) and were unresponsive to translation. The canal-only central neurons encoded head rotation in SCC coordinates, exhibited little orthogonal canal convergence, and were characterized with significantly higher sensitivities to rotation as compared to primary SCC afferents. Another fourth of the neurons modulated their firing rates during translation (otolith-only cells). During rotations, these neurons only responded when the axis of rotation was earth-horizontal and the head was changing orientation relative to gravity. The remaining one-half of VN neurons were sensitive to both rotations and translations (otolith + canal neurons). Unlike primary otolith afferents, however, central neurons often exhibited significant spatiotemporal (noncosine) tuning properties and a wide variety of response dynamics to translation. To characterize the pattern of SCC inputs to otolith + canal neurons, their rotational maximum sensitivity vectors were computed using exclusively responses during earth-vertical axis rotations (EVA). Maximum sensitivity vectors were distributed throughout the 3D space, suggesting strong convergence from multiple SCCs. These neurons were also tested with earth-horizontal axis rotations (EHA), which would activate

  12. Central vestibular dysfunction in an otorhinolaryngological vestibular unit: incidence and diagnostic strategy.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Badr E; Kahky, Ayman O El; Kader, Hisham M Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  13. Vestibular neuritis: three-dimensional videonystagmography and vestibular evoked myogenic potential results.

    PubMed

    Chen, C W; Young, Y H; Wu, C H

    2000-10-01

    Eight patients diagnosed with vestibular neuritis received the newly developed three-dimensional videonystagmography (3D VNG) and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) examination in order to localize the lesion site. Two (25%) of the 8 patients exhibited spontaneous nystagmus with 3 components, indicating that both the horizontal semicircular canal (HSCC) and anterior semicircular canal (ASCC) were affected. The remaining 6 patients (75%) displayed only horizontal nystagmus, meaning that only the HSCC was involved. Seven (88%) of the 8 patients had bilateral normal VEMPs, revealing sparing of the posterior semicircular canal (PSCC). In a comparative study, another seven patients with vestibular neuritis 1 year post-treatment also received the caloric test, 3D VNG and VEMP examination. Only one patient exhibited spontaneous nystagmus. An absent caloric response of the lesioned side persisted in 5 (71%) of the 7 patients. However, all patients showed normal VEMPs bilaterally. 3D VNG and VEMP examination indicates that vestibular neuritis mainly affects the superior division of the vestibular nerve, which innervates the HSCC and ASCC. Meanwhile, the function of the PSCC and saccule, innervated by the inferior vestibular nerve, is preserved.

  14. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Badr E.; Kahky, Ayman O. El; Kader, Hisham M. Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions. PMID:25992098

  15. Intrameatal thrombosed anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm mimicking a vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Päsler, Dennis; Baldauf, Jörg; Runge, Uwe; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-04-01

    Aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are a rare entity. Purely intrameatal aneurysms are even rarer. The authors report an intrameatal thrombosed AICA aneurysm mimicking a vestibular schwannoma that was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis. This 22-year-old man presented with acute hearing loss, vertigo, and moderate facial palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an atypical intrameatal lesion with dilation of the internal auditory canal. Microsurgical inspection via a retrosigmoid approach and drilling of the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal revealed a thrombosed AICA aneurysm. The aneurysm was excised, and an end-to-end suture was performed to restore AICA continuity. Intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography as well as postoperative digital substraction angiography showed a good revascularization. Intrameatal AICA aneurysms may present with symptoms similar to vestibular schwannomas. End-to-end reanastomosis after aneurysm resection is a treatment option when clipping is impossible.

  16. Global suppression of electrocortical activity in unilateral perinatal thalamic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Filan, Peter M; Bogue, Conor O; Murray, Deirdre M; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2014-01-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent generalized electroencephalography (EEG) suppression and right-sided clonic seizures in a male infant born at 40+2 weeks' gestation, birthweight 3240g, with an isolated unilateral thalamic stroke. The EEG at 13 hours after birth showed a generalized very low amplitude background pattern, which progressed to frequent electrographic seizures over the left hemisphere. The interictal background EEG pattern remained grossly abnormal over the next 48 hours, showing very low background amplitudes (<10μV). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an isolated acute left-sided thalamic infarction. This is the first description of severe global EEG suppression caused by an isolated unilateral thalamic stroke and supports the role of the thalamus as the control centre for cortical electrical activity. PMID:24410068

  17. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in children.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alcione Botelho; Silva, Gabriela Souza de Melo; Assunção, Aída Regina Monteiro; Atherino, Ciriaco Cristóvão Tavares; Volpe, Fernando Madalena; Felipe, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential is a test used in neurotological examination. It verifies the integrity of vestibular function through a muscular response evoked by an acoustic stimulation which activates the saccular macula. Normal standards in adults have been established, however, there are few published data on the normal responses in children. To establish normal standards for vestibular myogenic responses in children without neurotological complaints. This study's design is a cohort with cross-sectional analysis. The sample consisted of 30 subjects, 15 females (50%) and 15 males (50%). The age of the subjects ranged between 8 and 13 years, with a mean of 10.2 (± 1.7). P1 peak showed an average latency of 17.26 (± 1.78)ms and a mean amplitude of 49.34 (± 23.07)μV, and the N2 peak showed an average latency of 24.78 (± 2.18)ms and mean amplitude of 66.23 (± 36.18)μV. P1-N2 mean amplitude was 115.6 (± 55.7)μV. There were no statistically significant differences when comparing by gender or by laterality. We established normal values of cervical myogenic vestibular responses in children between 8 and 13 years without neurotological complaints. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Vesibulotoxicity and Management of Vestibular Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics for vestibular hair cells has been used to special advantage in the treatment of Meniere's disease. Intratympanic (middle ear) injections of these drugs are being increasingly used to control vertigo in this disorder when it has not responded to medical therapy. The mechanisms by which these drugs…

  19. Peripheral vestibular pathology in Mondini dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Serdar; Hızlı, Ömer; Kaya, Fatıma Kübra; Monsanto, Rafael DaCosta; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, our objective was to histopathologically analyze the peripheral vestibular system in patients with Mondini dysplasia. Comparative human temporal bone study. We assessed the sensory epithelium of the human vestibular system with a focus on the number of type I and type II hair cells, as well as the total number of hair cells. We compared those numbers in our Mondini dysplasia group versus our control group. The loss of type I and type II hair cells in the cristae of the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, as well as in the saccular and utricular macula, was significantly higher in our Mondini dysplasia group than in our control group. The total number of hair cells significantly decreased in the cristae of the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, as well as in the saccular and utricular macula, in our Mondini dysplasia group. Loss of vestibular hair cells can lead to vestibular dysfunction in patients with Mondini dysplasia. NA Laryngoscope, 127:206-209, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  1. Immunological Influences on the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this project were to examine the influence of immune signaling molecules on the survival and replacement of sensory hair cells in the vestibular organs. We have made considerable progress toward that goal, particularly in the characterization of mechanisms that underlie hair cell death.

  2. Pulfrich's phenomenon in unilateral cataract

    PubMed Central

    Scotcher, S.; Laidlaw, D; Canning, C.; Weal, M.; Harrad, R.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether unilateral cataract causes a pathological Pulfrich's phenomenon.
METHODS—29 subjects with unilateral cataract and contralateral pseudophakia were assessed on their ability to perceive the Pulfrich phenomenon. Using a computer generated pendulum image, and graded neutral density filters, a series of forced choice trials were performed in which the subject was required to describe the direction of any apparent pendulum rotation. A pathological Pulfrich effect was said to occur when apparent rotation was perceived in the presence of a zero strength neutral density filter. The size of any pathological Pulfrich effect which was present was quantified by neutralising the perceived pendulum rotation with neutral density filters of varying strength placed before the better seeing eye.
RESULTS—20 out of 29 subjects were able to perceive apparent pendulum rotation when uniocular filtering was performed. In the group (n=12) which was tested both before and after cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation, a statistically significant pathological Pulfrich effect was demonstrated preoperatively, compared with a group of normal control subjects. This effect was abolished after cataract extraction (p=0.009). The median size of the effect was equivalent to a 0.25 log unit neutral density filter over the non-cataractous eye. The subjects who were unable to perceive the Pulfrich phenomenon at all had a significantly greater difference in the visual acuity of each eye (p=0.045) and significantly worse stereoacuity than those who were able to perceive the effect (p=0.002).
CONCLUSIONS—Unilateral cataract can cause a pathological Pulfrich phenomenon. This finding may explain why some patients with unilateral cataract complain of visual symptoms that are not easily accounted for in terms of visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, or stereoacuity.

 PMID:9497463

  3. Anticompensatory quick eye movements after head impulses: A peripheral vestibular sign in spontaneous nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Luis, L; Lehnen, N; Muñoz, E; de Carvalho, M; Schneider, E; Valls-Solé, J; Costa, J

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating central from peripheral origins of spontaneous nystagmus (SN) is challenging. Looking for a simple sign of peripheral disease with the video Head Impulsive Test we noticed anti-compensatory eye movements (AQEM) in patients with peripheral etiologies of spontaneous nystagmus (SN). Here we assess the diagnostic accuracy of AQEM in differentiating peripheral from central vestibular disorders. We recorded the eye movements in response to horizontal head impulses in a group of 43 consecutive patients with acute vestibular syndrome (12 with central, 31 with peripheral disorders), 5 patients after acute vestibular neurectomy (positive controls) and 39 healthy subjects (negative controls). AQEM were defined as quick eye movements (peak velocity above 50°/s) in the direction of the head movement. All patients with peripheral disorders and positive controls had AQEM (latency 231 ± 53 ms, amplitude 3.4 ± 1.4°, velocity 166 ± 55°/s) when their head was moved to the opposite side of the lesion. Central patients did not have AQEM. AQEM occurrence rate was higher in peripheral patients with contralesional (74 ± 4%, mean ± SD) in comparison to ipsilesional (1 ± 4%) impulses (p< 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy for differentiating central from peripheral patients was 96% (95% CI for AUC ROC curve: 0.90 to 1.0) for VOR gain and 100% (95% CI: 1.0 to 1.0) for AQEM occurrence rate. These results suggest that AQEM are a sign of vestibular imbalance in a peripheral deficit. In addition to VOR gain they should be added to the evaluation of the head impulse test.

  4. Association between ambient particulate matter and disorders of vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Han, Changwoo; Lim, Youn-Hee; Jung, Kweon; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals has been suggested to alter the physiologic state of the inner and middle ear. However, it is unknown if particulate matter exposure is associated with acute vestibular dysfunction. To estimate the effects of particulate matter exposure on the number of hospital visits related to three major diseases of vestibular dysfunction, Meniere's disease (MD), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and vestibular neuronitis (VN). Our study subject is from Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort, which is dynamic cohort consist of 1 million participants representing the Korean population. Among total cohort participants, we used the hospital visit data of 210,000 individuals who resided in Seoul from 2007 to 2010. Time series analysis using the Poisson generalized additive model and case-crossover analysis using conditional logistic regression were used to investigate the association between daily particulate matter levels (PM 2.5 , particulate matter <2.5μg/m 3 ; PM 10 , particulate matter <10μg/m 3 ; PM 10-2.5 , PM 10 - PM 2.5 ) and number of MD, BPPV, and VN hospital visits. Time series analysis showed that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM 10 and PM 10-2.5 on lag day 1 was associated with an increased risk of MD hospital visits [relative risk (RR), 95% confidence interval (CI), PM 10 : 1.09 (1.02-1.15); PM 10-2.5 : 1.06 (1.02-1.10)]. In addition, elderly individuals (≥60 years old) showed an increased risk of MD hospital visits after particulate matter exposure when compared to younger individuals. An IQR increase in particulate matter on lag day 1 was associated with a marginally significant increase in VN hospital visits [RR (95%CI), PM 2.5 : 1.11 (0.98-1.25); PM 10 : 1.07 (0.99-1.15); PM 10-2.5 : 1.04 (0.99-1.09)]. However, no association between particulate matter exposure and BPPV hospital visits was noted. Case-crossover analyses showed similar results to the time-series analysis across

  5. Vestibular evaluation in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Kolkaila, E A; Emara, A A; Gabr, T A

    2015-04-01

    Fifty per cent of children with serous otitis media may have some balance disturbances. To evaluate vestibular function in children with otitis media with effusion. The control group comprised 25 children with bilateral normal hearing and middle-ear function. The study group consisted of 30 children with bilateral otitis media with effusion; these were divided into 2 subgroups according to air-bone gap size. Measures included the Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory, an imbalance evaluation sheet for children, vestibular bedside tests for children, and air- and bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing. Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores and some vestibular bedside test results were significantly abnormal, with normal video-nystagmography results, in children with otitis media with effusion. Air-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were recorded in 73 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion, with significantly delayed latencies. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials were successfully detected in 100 per cent of children with otitis media with effusion with similar results to the control group. The Arabic Dizziness Handicap Inventory and vestibular bedside tests are valuable tools for detecting vestibular impairment in children. Bone-conducted vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials are useful for vestibular system evaluation.

  6. Newly Diagnosed Meniere's Disease: Clinical Course With Initiation of Noninvasive Treatment Including an Accounting of Vestibular Migraine.

    PubMed

    Sbeih, Firas; Christov, Florian; Gluth, Michael B

    2018-03-01

    To describe the course of Meniere's disease with noninvasive treatment during the first few years after initial diagnosis. A retrospective review of consecutive patients with newly diagnosed definite Meniere's disease between 2013 and 2016 and a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Patients received a written plan for low sodium, water therapy, and treatment with a diuretic and/or betahistine. Subjects were screened and treated for vestibular migraine as needed. Vertigo control and hearing status at most recent follow-up were assessed. Forty-four subjects had an average follow up of 24.3 months. Thirty-four percent had Meniere's disease and vestibular migraine, and 84% had unilateral Meniere's disease. Seventy-five percent had vertigo well controlled at most recent follow-up, with only noninvasive treatments. Age, gender, body mass index, presence of vestibular migraine, bilateral disease, and duration of follow-up did not predict noninvasive treatment failure. Worse hearing threshold at 250 Hz and lower pure tone average (PTA) at the time of diagnosis did predict failure. Fifty-two percent of ears had improved PTA at most recent visit, 20% had no change, and 28% were worse Conclusions: Encountering excellent vertigo control and stable hearing after a new diagnosis of Meniere's disease is possible with noninvasive treatments. Worse hearing status at diagnosis predicted treatment failure.

  7. Accuracy of the bedside head impulse test in detecting vestibular hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    Jorns‐Häderli, M; Straumann, D; Palla, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy of the bedside head impulse test (bHIT) by direct comparison with results from the quantitative head impulse test (qHIT) in the same subjects, and to investigate whether bHIT sensitivity and specificity changes with neuro‐otological training. Methods Video clips of horizontal bHIT to both sides were produced in patients with unilateral and bilateral peripheral vestibular deficits (n = 15) and in healthy subjects (n = 9). For qHIT, eye and head movements were recorded with scleral search coils on the right eye and the forehead. Clinicians (neurologists or otolaryngologists) with at least 6 months of neuro‐otological training (“experts”: n = 12) or without this training (“non‐experts”: n = 45) assessed video clips for ocular motor signs of vestibular deficits on either side or of normal vestibular function. Results On average, bHIT sensitivity was significantly (t test: p<0.05) lower for experts than for non‐experts (63% vs 72%), while bHIT specificity was significantly higher for experts than non‐experts (78% vs 64%). This outcome was a consequence of the experts' tendency to accept bHIT with corresponding borderline qHIT values as still being normal. Fitted curves revealed that at the lower normal limit of qHIT, 20% of bHIT were rated as deficient by the experts and 37% by the non‐experts. Conclusions When qHIT is used as a reference, bHIT sensitivity is adequate and therefore clinically useful in the hands of both neuro‐otological experts and non‐experts. We advise performing quantitative head impulse testing with search coils or high speed video methods when bHIT is not conclusive. PMID:17220287

  8. Evaluation and management of vestibular migraine in children: Experience from a pediatric vestibular clinic.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jacob R; Cusick, Brandon A; Zhou, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown Vestibular migraine (VM) to be the most common cause of vertigo in children, but little is known about the typical presentation and response to treatment of this disorder in the pediatric population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic features and response to therapy of VM in children managed at a pediatric vestibular clinic. Twenty-eight patients ≤18 years old with a diagnosis of VM were identified from 208 patients seen at the Balance and Vestibular Program at Boston Children's Hospital from July 2012-July 2014, after excluding 12 patients with a history of major otologic or neurologic surgery, recent concussion, or additional vestibular disorders. Patients' electronic medical records and testing results were retrospectively reviewed. Patients ranged in age from 9 to 18 years old (mean 14.48). All included patients met criteria for definite (n = 25) or probable (n = 3) VM as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Rotary chair (n = 17), caloric (n = 8), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (n = 16), and video head impulse (n = 3) tests were normal. Medications effectively reduced reported vestibular symptoms in 88% of those treated with tricyclics (n = 8), 86% of those treated with cyprohepatadine (n = 7), 80% of those treated with topiramate (n = 5), 80% of those treated with triptans (n = 10), and 25% of those treated with gabapentin (n = 4). Vestibular migraine is a common cause of vertigo in the pediatric population that is frequently responsive to medical therapy. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Contrasting results of tests of peripheral vestibular function in patients with bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Juan; Wu, Yong-Zhen; Cong, Ning; Yu, Jing; Gu, Jun; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu

    2017-08-01

    To analyze and summarize the effect of bilateral large vestibular aqueducts in peripheral vestibular organ function. Eighteen patients with bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS; Study Group) and 18 healthy volunteers (Control Group) were investigated using audiometry, caloric test, sensory organization test (SOT), and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests. All 18 patients (36 ears) exhibited sensorineural hearing loss. For cervical VEMP (cVEMP), the Study Group showed lower thresholds (Study Group vs. 71.4vs. 75.3dBnHL; p=0.006), N1 latencies (24.1vs. 25.2ms; p=0.026) and shorter P1 (15.3vs. 16.6ms; p=0.003), and higher amplitudes (400.7vs. 247.2µV; p<0.001) than the Control Group. For ocular VEMP (oVEMP), the Study Group had lower thresholds (79.3vs. 81.8dBnHL; p=0.046) and higher amplitudes (40.6vs. 14.4µV; p<0.001) than the Control Group. Fourteen of 16 patients (87.5%) who completed caloric tests had abnormal results, and 10 of 18 patients (55.6%) exhibited abnormal results in SOTs. The hyperfunction of vestibular test in otolithic organs and the hypofunction of vestibular test in semicircular canals, as well as the dysfunction in the balance test were demonstrated in patients with LVAS. Our findings can help clinicians gain a better understanding of the characteristics of vestibular organ function in patients with LVAS, which can facilitate optimal targeted treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing as an objective measure of vestibular stimulation with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Parkes, William J; Gnanasegaram, Joshua J; Cushing, Sharon L; McKnight, Carmen L; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2017-02-01

    To determine if vestibular potentials could be elicited with electrical stimulation from cochlear implants. Prospective cohort study. Vestibular responsiveness to electrical stimulation from cochlear implants was assessed via vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing in 53 pediatric and young adult patients. Thirty-one participants (58%) showed at least one vestibular potential in response to acoustic stimulation; 33 (62%) had an electrically evoked vestibular response. A cervical VEMP (cVEMP) was present in 45 of the 96 tested ears (47%) in response to acoustic stimulation, and in 34 ears (35%) with electrical stimulation. An ocular VEMP (oVEMP) was elicited acoustically in 25 ears (26%) and electrically in 34 (35%) ears. In the ears with absent responses to acoustic stimuli, electrically evoked cVEMPs and oVEMPs were present in 14 (27%) and 18 (25%) ears, respectively. Electric VEMPs demonstrated shorter latencies than acoustic VEMPs (P < .01). Whereas an increased prevalence of VEMPs was seen at high stimulation levels (P < .01), there was no difference between prevalence proportions with basal (electrode 3) or apical (electrode 20) stimulation (P > .05). VEMPs can be elicited with electrical stimulation in a proportion of children with cochlear implants, demonstrating current spread from the cochlea to the vestibular system. The presence of electric VEMPs in acoustically nonresponsive ears, along with the shorter latencies of electrically driven VEMPs, suggests that electrical current can bypass the otoliths and directly stimulate vestibular neural elements. 4. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:E75-E81, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials Using Head Striker Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Kofman, I. S.; Peters, B. T.; Reschke, M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.; Noohibezanjani, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Seidler, R. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last two decades, several studies have been published on the impact of long-duration (i.e., 22 days or longer) spaceflight on the central nervous system (CNS). In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers in flight and post-flight, we are conducting a controlled prospective longitudinal study to investigate the effects of spaceflight on the extent, longevity and neural bases of sensorimotor, cognitive, and neural changes. Multiple studies have demonstrated the effects of spaceflight on the vestibular system. One of the supporting tests conducted in this protocol is the Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP) test that provides a unilateral measure of otolith (saccule and utricle) function. A different approach was taken for ocular VEMP (oVEMP) testing using a head striker system (Wackym et al. 2012). The oVEMP is generally considered to be a measure of utricle function. The the otolithic input to the inferior oblique muscle is predominately from the utricular macula. Thus, quantitatively, oVEMP tests utricular function. Another practical extension of these relationships is that the oVEMP reflects the superior vestibular nerve function. Methods: Ground testing was administered on 16 control subjects and for 8 subjects over four repeated sessions spanning 70 days. The oVEMP was elicitied via a hand held striker by a vibrotactile pulse presented at the rate of 1 Hz for 24 seconds on the side of the head as subjects lay supine on a gurney. Subjects were directed to gaze approximately 25 degrees above straight ahead in semi-darkness. For the oVEMP electromyograms will be recorded with active bipolar electrodes (Delsys Inc., Boston, MA) on the infra-orbital ridge 1 cm below the eyelid with a reference electrode on the below the knee cap. The EMG potentials were amplified; band-pass filtered using a BagnoliTM Desktop EMG System (Delsys Inc., Boston, MA, USA). This EMG signal is sampled at 10 kHz and the data stimulus onset to

  12. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  13. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  14. Understanding the links between vestibular and limbic systems regulating emotions.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Archana; Jinu, K V; Sailesh, Kumar Sai; Mishra, Soumya; Reddy, Udaya Kumar; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular system, which consists of structures in the inner ear and brainstem, plays a vital role is body balance and patient well-being. In recent years, modulating this system by vestibular stimulation techniques are reported to be effective in stress relief and possibly patient's emotional well-being. Emotions refer to an aroused state involving intense feeling, autonomic activation, and related change in behavior, which accompany many of our conscious experiences. The limbic system is primarily involved in the regulation of emotions. Considering the extensive networks between vestibular and limbic system, it is likely that vestibular stimulation techniques may be useful in influencing emotions. Hence, we review here, the possible mechanisms through which vestibular system can influence emotions and highlight the necessary knowledge gaps, which warrants further research to develop vestibular stimulation techniques as a means to treat health conditions associated with emotional disturbances.

  15. Review of Vestibular and Oculomotor Screening and Concussion Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Deitrick, Jamie McAllister; Collins, Michael W; Mucha, Anne

    2017-03-01

    Vestibular and oculomotor impairment and symptoms may be associated with worse outcomes after sport-related concussion (SRC), including prolonged recovery. In this review, we evaluate current findings on vestibular and oculomotor impairments as well as treatment approaches after SRC, and we highlight areas in which investigation is needed. Clinical researchers have intimated that recovery from SRC may follow certain clinical profiles that affect the vestibular and oculomotor pathways. Identifying clinical profiles may help to inform better treatment and earlier intervention to reduce recovery time after SRC. As such, screening for and subsequent monitoring of vestibular and oculomotor impairment and symptoms are critical to assessing and informing subsequent referral, treatment, and return to play. However, until recently, no brief-screening vestibular and oculomotor tools were available to evaluate this injury. In response, researchers and clinicians partnered to develop the Vestibular/Ocular-Motor Screening, which assesses pursuits, saccades, vestibular ocular reflex, visual motion sensitivity, and convergence via symptom provocation and measurement of near-point convergence. Other specialized tools, such as the King-Devick test for saccadic eye movements and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory for dizziness, may provide additional information regarding specific impairments and symptoms. Tools such as the Vestibular/Ocular-Motor Screening provide information to guide specialized referrals for additional assessment and targeted rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation and visual-oculomotor therapies involve an active, expose-recover approach to reduce impairment and symptoms. Initial results support the effectiveness of both vestibular and visual-oculomotor therapies, especially those that target specific impairments. However, the evidence supporting rehabilitation strategies for both vestibular and oculomotor impairment and symptoms is limited and involves small

  16. Estimation of Optimum Stimulus Amplitude for Balance Training using Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    at different stimulation levels. Results from the balance task suggest that there are inter-individual differences and the minimum SVS amplitude was found to be in the range of 1 mA to 2.5 mA across subjects. SVS resulted in an average decrement of balance task performance in the range of 62%-73% across different measured variables at the minimum SVS amplitude in comparison to the control trial (no stimulus). Training using supra-threshold SVS stimulation is one of the sensory challenges used for preflight SA training designed to improve adaptability to novel gravitational environments. Inter-individual differences in response to SVS can help customize the SA training paradigms using minimal dosage required. Another application of using SVS is to simulate acute deterioration of vestibular sensory inputs in the evaluation of tests for assessing vestibular function.

  17. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  18. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  19. The vestibular system of the owl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  20. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  1. Direction Specific Biases in Human Visual and Vestibular Heading Perception

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    Heading direction is determined from visual and vestibular cues. Both sensory modalities have been shown to have better direction discrimination for headings near straight ahead. Previous studies of visual heading estimation have not used the full range of stimuli, and vestibular heading estimation has not previously been reported. The current experiments measure human heading estimation in the horizontal plane to vestibular, visual, and spoken stimuli. The vestibular and visual tasks involved 16 cm of platform or visual motion. The spoken stimulus was a voice command speaking a heading angle. All conditions demonstrated direction dependent biases in perceived headings such that biases increased with headings further from the fore-aft axis. The bias was larger with the visual stimulus when compared with the vestibular stimulus in all 10 subjects. For the visual and vestibular tasks precision was best for headings near fore-aft. The spoken headings had the least bias, and the variation in precision was less dependent on direction. In a separate experiment when headings were limited to ±45°, the biases were much less, demonstrating the range of headings influences perception. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between the bias curves for visual and spoken stimuli in every subject. The correlation between visual-vestibular and vestibular-spoken biases were weaker but remained significant. The observed biases in both visual and vestibular heading perception qualitatively resembled predictions of a recent population vector decoder model (Gu et al., 2010) based on the known distribution of neuronal sensitivities. PMID:23236490

  2. The History and Evolution of Surgery on the Vestibular Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Naples, James G; Eisen, Marc D

    2016-11-01

    The history of surgery on the vestibular labyrinth is rich but sparsely documented in the literature. The story begins over a century ago with the labyrinthectomy in an era that consisted exclusively of ablative surgery for infection or vertigo. Improved understanding of vestibular physiology and pathology produced an era of selective ablation and hearing preservation that includes semicircular canal occlusion for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. An era of restoration began with a discovery of superior semicircular canal dehiscence and its repair. The final era of vestibular replacement is upon us as the possibility of successful prosthetic vestibular implantation becomes reality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  3. Bedside examination for vestibular screening in occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Zamysłowska-Szmytke, Ewa; Szostek-Rogula, Sylwia; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of bedside examination for screening of vestibular and balance system for occupational medicine purposes. Study group comprised 165 patients referred to Audiology and Phoniatric Clinic due to vestibular and/or balance problems. Caloric canal paresis of 19% was the cut off value to divide patients into 43 caloric-positive vestibular subjects and 122 caloric-negative patients. The latter group comprised 79 subjects revealing abnormalities of videonystagmographic (VNG) oculomotor tests (central group) and 43 subjects with normal VNG. Vestibular and balance symptoms were collected. Five tests were included to bedside examination: Romberg and Unterberger tests, Head Impulse Test (HIT), Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) and gaze nystagmus assessment. Vestibular and balance symptoms were reported by 82% of vestibular, 73% of central and 40% of VNG-normal patients. Thirteen out of 18 VNG-normal but symptomatic subjects (73%) had abnormal tests in clinical assessment. The sensitivity of bedside test set for vestibular pathology was 88% as compared to caloric test and 68% for central pathology as compared to VNG oculomotor tests. The combination of 5 bedside tests reveal satisfactory sensitivity to detect vestibular abnormalities. Bedside examination abnormalities are highly correlated with vestibular/balance symptoms, regardless the normal results of VNG. Thus, this method should be recommended for occupational medicine purposes. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Multisensory Interactions between Vestibular, Visual and Somatosensory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Walther, Leif Erik; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular inputs are constantly processed and integrated with signals from other sensory modalities, such as vision and touch. The multiply-connected nature of vestibular cortical anatomy led us to investigate whether vestibular signals could participate in a multi-way interaction with visual and somatosensory perception. We used signal detection methods to identify whether vestibular stimulation might interact with both visual and somatosensory events in a detection task. Participants were instructed to detect near-threshold somatosensory stimuli that were delivered to the left index finger in one half of experimental trials. A visual signal occurred close to the finger in half of the trials, independent of somatosensory stimuli. A novel Near infrared caloric vestibular stimulus (NirCVS) was used to artificially activate the vestibular organs. Sham stimulations were used to control for non-specific effects of NirCVS. We found that both visual and vestibular events increased somatosensory sensitivity. Critically, we found no evidence for supra-additive multisensory enhancement when both visual and vestibular signals were administered together: in fact, we found a trend towards sub-additive interaction. The results are compatible with a vestibular role in somatosensory gain regulation. PMID:25875819

  5. The Frog Vestibular System as a Model for Lesion-Induced Plasticity: Basic Neural Principles and Implications for Posture Control

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, François M.; Straka, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Studies of behavioral consequences after unilateral labyrinthectomy have a long tradition in the quest of determining rules and limitations of the central nervous system (CNS) to exert plastic changes that assist the recuperation from the loss of sensory inputs. Frogs were among the first animal models to illustrate general principles of regenerative capacity and reorganizational neural flexibility after a vestibular lesion. The continuous successful use of the latter animals is in part based on the easy access and identifiability of nerve branches to inner ear organs for surgical intervention, the possibility to employ whole brain preparations for in vitro studies and the limited degree of freedom of postural reflexes for quantification of behavioral impairments and subsequent improvements. Major discoveries that increased the knowledge of post-lesional reactive mechanisms in the CNS include alterations in vestibular commissural signal processing and activation of cooperative changes in excitatory and inhibitory inputs to disfacilitated neurons. Moreover, the observed increase of synaptic efficacy in propriospinal circuits illustrates the importance of limb proprioceptive inputs for postural recovery. Accumulated evidence suggests that the lesion-induced neural plasticity is not a goal-directed process that aims toward a meaningful restoration of vestibular reflexes but rather attempts a survival of those neurons that have lost their excitatory inputs. Accordingly, the reaction mechanism causes an improvement of some components but also a deterioration of other aspects as seen by spatio-temporally inappropriate vestibulo-motor responses, similar to the consequences of plasticity processes in various sensory systems and species. The generality of the findings indicate that frogs continue to form a highly amenable vertebrate model system for exploring molecular and physiological events during cellular and network reorganization after a loss of vestibular function

  6. Effects of Sound on the Vestibular System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    account for acoustical vestibular stimulation is based on unidirectional (dc) flow of perilymph and endolymph through the labyrinth (see Section III, p...62). We postulate that a dc labyrinth fluid flow results from static displacement of the stapes. One tachnique for producing static stapes...differs from its resting position, and fluid must flow through the labyrinth in order to fill the volume created by this shift in average stapes

  7. The clinical characteristics and treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chang; Gong, Qilin; Zuo, Wenjing; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Aidong

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). The clinical features of the VS patients were explored by retrospectively analyzing the clinical data from 542 cases of SSNHL patients between January 2008 and March 2013. There were 10 cases (10 ears) diagnosed with VS in 542 cases of SSNHL patients (10 ears, 1.85 %), 3 males, 7 females, with a range of 28-57 years. Among all the cases, eight patients with abnormal ABR, ten with ear ipsilateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited and seven patients with healthy ear contralateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited. Neuromas were classified by Koos grades according to size (8 of grade I, 1 of grade II, 1 of grade IV). Eight small VS  patients were taken waiting and MRI therapy strategies. Meanwhile, we used glucocorticoid treatment and timely and short-term medication to improve the microcirculation of the inner ear for these patients. And four cases' hearing was improved. Some vestibular schwannomas have SSNHL as initial symptoms, especially the small ones in internal auditory canal. To prevent misdiagnosis or leak-diagnosis, MRI should be performed as a routine test for SSNHL, and ABR is sometimes necessary for SSNHL patients. It is also necessary to give appropriate treatment to protect hearing of the small vestibular schwannoma patients whose first symptoms are diagnosed as SSNHL in acute phase.

  8. Management of unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lata A; Van Hyfte, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    A representative sample of literature regarding unilateral hearing loss (UHL) was reviewed to provide evidence of the effects of UHL and the intervention options available for children with UHL. Considerations during the assessment and management of children with UHL are illustrated using case illustrations. Research articles published from 2013 to 2015 were searched in the PubMed database using the keywords "unilateral hearing loss". Articles from 1950 to 2013 were included from a previous literature review on minimal hearing loss [1]. A retrospective review of charts of 14 children with UHL was also conducted. The evidence indicates that children with UHL are more likely to have structural anomalies of the inner ear; may face challenges in six different domains, and have six intervention options available. Evidence also indicates that although some children appear to exhibit no delays or difficulties, others have significant challenges, some of which continue into adulthood. Children with UHL have to be treated on a case-by-case basis. Parent education regarding UHL, its effects, and all available management options is critical so they can make informed decisions. Close monitoring and good communication between professionals in different domains is crucial in order to minimize the potential negative effects of UHL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unilateral posterior crossbite and mastication.

    PubMed

    Rilo, Benito; da Silva, José Luis; Mora, María Jesús; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Santana, Urbano

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to characterize masticatory-cycle morphology, and distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke, in adult subjects with uncorrected unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB), comparing the results obtained with those obtained in a parallel group of normal subjects. Mandibular movements (masticatory movements and laterality movements with dental contact) were registered using a gnathograph (MK-6I Diagnostic System) during unilateral chewing of a piece of gum. Traces were recorded on the crossbite and non-crossbite sides in the crossbite group, and likewise on both sides in the non-crossbite group. Mean contact glide distance on the crossbite side in the UPXB group was significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.001), and mean contact glide distance on the non-crossbite side in the UPXB group was significantly lower than in the control group (p=0.042). Cycle morphology was abnormal during chewing on the crossbite side, with the frequency distribution of cycle types differing significantly from that for the noncrossbite side and that for the control group (p<0.001). Patients with crossbite showed alterations in both contact glide distances and masticatory cycle morphology. These alterations are probably adaptive responses allowing maintenance of adequate masticatory function despite the crossbite.

  10. Localization by unilateral BAHA users.

    PubMed

    Wazen, Jack J; Ghossaini, Soha N; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Kuller, Mary

    2005-06-01

    Patients with unilateral hearing loss report difficulty hearing conversation on their impaired side, localizing sound, and understanding of speech in background noise. The bone-anchored cochlear stimulator (BAHA) (Entific, Gothenburg, Sweden) has been shown to improve performance in persons with unilateral severe-profound sensorineural loss (USNHL). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of BAHA in sound localization for USNHL listeners. Prospective study of 12 USNHL subjects, 9 of whom received implants on the poorer hearing side. A control group of 10 normal hearing subjects were assessed for comparison. Localization with and without BAHA was assessed using an array of 8 speakers at head level separated by 45 degrees. Error analysis matrix was generated to evaluate the confusions, accuracy in response, and laterality judgment. The average accuracy of speaker localization was 16% in the unaided condition, with no improvement with BAHA use. Laterality judgment was poorer than 43% in both aided and nonaided conditions. Patients with UNSNHL had poor sound localization and laterality judgment abilities that did not improve with BAHA use.

  11. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S., E-mail: murphye3@ccf.or; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation tomore » >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.« less

  12. Spatial and temporal characteristics of vestibular convergence

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kimberly L.; Zakir, Mridha; Haque, Asim; Dickman, J. David

    2011-01-01

    In all species studied, afferents from semicircular canals and otolith organs converge on central neurons in the brainstem. However, the spatial and temporal relationships between converging inputs and how these contribute to vestibular behaviors is not well understood. In the current study, we used discrete rotational and translational motion stimuli to characterize canal- and otolith-driven response components of convergent non-eye movement (NEM) neurons in the vestibular nuclear complex of alert pigeons. When compared to afferent responses, convergent canal signals had similar gain and phase ranges but exhibited greater spatial variability in their axes of preferred rotation. Convergent otolith signals also had similar mean gain and phase values to the afferent population but were spatially well-matched with the corresponding canal signals, cell-by-cell. However, neither response component alone nor a simple linear combination of these components was sufficient to predict actual net responses during combined canal-otolith stimulation. We discuss these findings in the context of previous studies of pigeon vestibular behaviors, and we compare our findings to similar studies in other species. PMID:21756981

  13. Auditory adaptation testing as a tool for investigating tinnitus origin: two patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Carol A; Silman, Shlomo; Emmer, Michele B

    2017-06-01

    To enhance the understanding of tinnitus origin by disseminating two case studies of vestibular schwannoma (VS) involving behavioural auditory adaptation testing (AAT). Retrospective case study. Two adults who presented with unilateral, non-pulsatile subjective tinnitus and bilateral normal-hearing sensitivity. At the initial evaluation, the otolaryngologic and audiologic findings were unremarkable, bilaterally. Upon retest, years later, VS was identified. At retest, the tinnitus disappeared in one patient and was slightly attenuated in the other patient. In the former, the results of AAT were positive for left retrocochlear pathology; in the latter, the results were negative for the left ear although a moderate degree of auditory adaptation was present despite bilateral normal-hearing sensitivity. Imaging revealed a small VS in both patients, confirmed surgically. Behavioural AAT in patients with tinnitus furnishes a useful tool for exploring tinnitus origin. Decrease or disappearance of tinnitus in patients with auditory adaptation suggests that the tinnitus generator is the cochlea or the cochlear nerve adjacent to the cochlea. Patients with unilateral tinnitus and bilateral, symmetric, normal-hearing thresholds, absent other audiovestibular symptoms, should be routinely monitored through otolaryngologic and audiologic re-evaluations. Tinnitus decrease or disappearance may constitute a red flag for retrocochlear pathology.

  14. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important

  15. Unilateral retinopathy secondary to occult primary intraocular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Gaetano R.; Hood, Donald C.; Marr, Brian; Hussein, Shafinaz; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study is to report the clinical case of a 53-year-old woman whose presenting manifestation of primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) was unilateral retinal degeneration. Method A case report was created with review of clinical, imaging, electrophysiologic, and pathological investigations. Results A 53-year-old woman with a distant history of ocular herpes simplex developed progressive central visual loss and intermittent photopsia over 4 years in her right eye. Ophthalmic examination revealed reduced visual acuity OD, central scotoma, and minimal ocular findings. Autofluorescence and infrared imaging revealed mild reflectance changes in the temporal macula, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography identified mild disruptions of inner segment/outer segment junctions in the subfoveal region of the right eye. A mild window defect was seen on fluorescein angiography. Electrophysiology with multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) revealed evidence of unilateral macular dysfunction. Full-field ERGs revealed progressive global retinal dysfunction over 6 months, with unilateral decreases in amplitude and implicit time shifts, as seen in cases of autoimmune retinopathies. The eye eventually exhibited mild vitreous cellular infiltration on ophthalmoscopic examination, and vitrectomy diagnosed B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Further evaluation revealed no evidence of central nervous system or systemic disease, consistent with occult PIOL. Conclusions This case illustrates an atypical presentation of PIOL characterized by unilateral retinal disease presenting with symptoms and signs of macular dysfunction. Clinical and ERG features evolved into an acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR)-like phenotype. PIOL should be considered in atypical cases of AZOOR with vitreal reactions, and some cases of AZOOR may be related to B cell lymphocyte disorders. PMID:24081663

  16. Vestibular perception and navigation in the congenitally blind.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M; Glasauer, Stefan; Gresty, Michael A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2007-06-01

    Vestibular input is required for accurate locomotion in the dark, yet blind subjects' vestibular function is unexplored. Such investigation may also identify visually dependent aspects of vestibular function. We assessed vestibular function perceptually in six congenitally blind (and 12 sighted) subjects. Cupula deflection by a transient angular, horizontal acceleration generates a related vestibular nerve signal that declines exponentially with time constant approximately 4-7 s, which is prolonged to 15 s in the evoked vestibular-ocular reflex by the brain stem "velocity storage." We measured perceptual velocity storage in blind subjects following velocity steps (overall perceptual vestibular time constant, experiment 1) and found it to be significantly shorter (5.34 s; range: 2.39-8.58 s) than in control, sighted subjects (15.8 s; P < 0.001). Vestibular navigation was assessed by subjects steering a motorized Bárány-chair in response to imposed angular displacements in a path-reversal task, "go-back-to-start" (GBS: experiment 2); and a path-completion task, "complete-the-circle" (CTC: experiment 3). GBS performances (comparing response vs. stimulus displacement regression slopes and r(2)) were equal between groups (P > 0.05), but the blind showed worse CTC performance (P < 0.05). Two blind individuals showed ultrashort perceptual time constants, high lifetime physical activity scores and superior CTC performances; we speculate that these factors may be inter-related. In summary, the vestibular velocity storage as measured perceptually is visually dependent. Early blindness does not affect path reversal performance but is associated with worse path completion, a task requiring an absolute spatial strategy. Although congenitally blind subjects are overall less able to utilize spatial mechanisms during vestibular navigation, prior extensive physical spatial activity may enhance vestibular navigation.

  17. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  18. Vestibular and oculomotor findings in neurologically-normal, non-concussed children.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Daniel J; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Wiebe, Douglas J; Master, Christina L; Grady, Matthew F; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2018-03-27

    To determine the proportion of non-concussed, neurologically normal children with failures on a vestibular and oculomotor examination for concussion performed in an acute setting. This was a cross-sectional study of subjects 6-18 years old presenting to a paediatric emergency department with non-neurologic chief complaints. The examination was administered by a paediatric emergency medicine physician, and includes assessments of dysmetria, nystagmus, smooth pursuits, saccades, gaze stability, near-point of convergence, and gait/balance testing. Of the 295 subjects enrolled, 24% failed at least one element of testing. About 13% had >1 failed element and 5% had >2 failed elements. About 29% of females and 19% of males had failed examinations. By age, 15% of subjects 6-8 years old, 32% 9-11 years, 32% 12-14 years, and 26% 15-18 years had failed examinations. Overall, 10% were unable to complete the exam due to developmental age. The provider should be aware that a proportion of non-concussed children may demonstrate failure on a single element of the vestibular and oculomotor exam. While this testing is of benefit to the acute care provider in diagnosing paediatric concussion, its utility is greatest in the context of an injury history with acute onset of concussion symptoms.

  19. Sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei during active head movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; Boyle, R.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Many secondary vestibular neurons are sensitive to head on trunk rotation during reflex-induced and voluntary head movements. During passive whole body rotation the interaction of head on trunk signals related to the vestibulo-collic reflex with vestibular signals increases the rotational gain of many secondary vestibular neurons, including many that project to the spinal cord. In some units, the sensitivity to head on trunk and vestibular input is matched and the resulting interaction produces an output that is related to the trunk velocity in space. In other units the head on trunk inputs are stronger and the resulting interaction produces an output that is larger during the reflex. During voluntary head movements, inputs related to head on trunk movement combine destructively with vestibular signals, and often cancel the sensory reafferent consequences of self-generated movements. Cancellation of sensory vestibular signals was observed in all of the antidromically identified secondary vestibulospinal units, even though many of these units were not significantly affected by reflexive head on trunk movements. The results imply that the inputs to vestibular neurons related to head on trunk rotation during reflexive and voluntary movements arise from different sources. We suggest that the relative strength of reflexive head on trunk input to different vestibular neurons might reflect the different functional roles they have in controlling the posture of the neck and body.

  20. Vestibular influences on autonomic cardiovascular control in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Costa, F.; Kaufmann, H.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that anatomical connections exist between vestibular and autonomic nuclei. Animal studies have shown functional interactions between the vestibular and autonomic systems. The nature of these interactions, however, is complex and has not been fully defined. Vestibular stimulation has been consistently found to reduce blood pressure in animals. Given the potential interaction between vestibular and autonomic pathways this finding could be explained by a reduction in sympathetic activity. However, rather than sympathetic inhibition, vestibular stimulation has consistently been shown to increase sympathetic outflow in cardiac and splanchnic vascular beds in most experimental models. Several clinical observations suggest that a link between vestibular and autonomic systems may also exist in humans. However, direct evidence for vestibular/autonomic interactions in humans is sparse. Motion sickness has been found to induce forearm vasodilation and reduce baroreflex gain, and head down neck flexion induces transient forearm and calf vasoconstriction. On the other hand, studies using optokinetic stimulation have found either very small, variable, or inconsistent changes in heart rate and blood pressure, despite substantial symptoms of motion sickness. Furthermore, caloric stimulation severe enough to produce nystagmus, dizziness, and nausea had no effect on sympathetic nerve activity measured directly with microneurography. No effect was observed on heart rate, blood pressure, or plasma norepinephrine. Several factors may explain the apparent discordance of these results, but more research is needed before we can define the potential importance of vestibular input to cardiovascular regulation and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  1. Body ownership and embodiment: vestibular and multisensory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Halje, P; Blanke, O

    2008-06-01

    Body ownership and embodiment are two fundamental mechanisms of self-consciousness. The present article reviews neurological data about paroxysmal illusions during which body ownership and embodiment are affected differentially: autoscopic phenomena (out-of-body experience, heautoscopy, autoscopic hallucination, feeling-of-a-presence) and the room tilt illusion. We suggest that autoscopic phenomena and room tilt illusion are related to different types of failures to integrate body-related information (vestibular, proprioceptive and tactile cues) in addition to a mismatch between vestibular and visual references. In these patients, altered body ownership and embodiment has been shown to occur due to pathological activity at the temporoparietal junction and other vestibular-related areas arguing for a key importance of vestibular processing. We also review the possibilities of manipulating body ownership and embodiment in healthy subjects through exposition to weightlessness as well as caloric and galvanic stimulation of the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In healthy subjects, disturbed self-processing might be related to interference of vestibular stimulation with vestibular cortex leading to disintegration of bodily information and altered body ownership and embodiment. We finally propose a differential contribution of the vestibular cortical areas to the different forms of altered body ownership and embodiment.

  2. Effect of meprobamate on the vestibulosensory and vestibular somatic reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of meprobamate on the vestibular illusion of counter-rotation, movement coordination and vertical writing was investigated by a double blind trial method and placebo. The results confirm the possibility of the meprobamate application for prophylaxis and correction of vestibular disturbances.

  3. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A vestibular sensation: probabilistic approaches to spatial perception.

    PubMed

    Angelaki, Dora E; Klier, Eliana M; Snyder, Lawrence H

    2009-11-25

    The vestibular system helps maintain equilibrium and clear vision through reflexes, but it also contributes to spatial perception. In recent years, research in the vestibular field has expanded to higher-level processing involving the cortex. Vestibular contributions to spatial cognition have been difficult to study because the circuits involved are inherently multisensory. Computational methods and the application of Bayes theorem are used to form hypotheses about how information from different sensory modalities is combined together with expectations based on past experience in order to obtain optimal estimates of cognitive variables like current spatial orientation. To test these hypotheses, neuronal populations are being recorded during active tasks in which subjects make decisions based on vestibular and visual or somatosensory information. This review highlights what is currently known about the role of vestibular information in these processes, the computations necessary to obtain the appropriate signals, and the benefits that have emerged thus far.

  5. A vestibular sensation: probabilistic approaches to spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Angelaki, Dora E.; Klier, Eliana M.; Snyder, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    The vestibular system helps maintain equilibrium and clear vision through reflexes, but it also contributes to spatial perception. In recent years, research in the vestibular field has expanded to higher level processing involving the cortex. Vestibular contributions to spatial cognition have been difficult to study because the circuits involved are inherently multisensory. Computational methods and the application of Bayes theorem are used to form hypotheses about how information from different sensory modalities is combined together with expectations based on past experience in order to obtain optimal estimates of cognitive variables like current spatial orientation. To test these hypotheses, neuronal populations are being recorded during active tasks in which subjects make decisions based on vestibular and visual or somatosensory information. This review highlights what is currently known about the role of vestibular information in these processes, the computations necessary to obtain the appropriate signals, and the benefits that have emerged thus far. PMID:19945388

  6. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  7. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolated Vestibular Suppression Impairment With Vestibular Migraine: A Phenotypic CANVAS Variant.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Watson, Shaun R

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia with Neuropathy and Vestibular Areflexia (CANVAS) is likely to have a genetic basis. We describe the unique eye movement features of a possible phenotypic CANVAS variant. The patient comes from a large CANVAS kindred (four out of nine siblings) and has sensory neuropathy, cerebellar eye signs, and vestibular migraine (VM), but otherwise normal vestibular function. We recorded eye and head movements using the gold standard scleral search coil technique: in the patient, a close relative with mild sensory neuropathy, and a normal control. At ≥ 0.8 Hz vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression (VORS) was significantly smaller in the patient. At 1 Hz, the patient's VORS was almost two times worse than the control, and five times worse at 1.6 Hz. The patient's VORS deficiency was observed with the naked eye as an inability to keep the eye stationary during imposed sinusoidal head rotation at ∼ 1 Hz. At ≤ 0.8 Hz the patient had 10 to 20% lower smooth pursuit function compared with both the patient-relative and control subjects. This difference was difficult to detect by the naked eye. Saccadic oculomotor and vestibular function was normal. We propose that impaired VORS and VM are because of similar, but distinct, consequences of selective partial cerebellar dysfunction. The patient's VORS data are consistent with a CANVAS neuropathological study showing selective degeneration of the dorsal vermis of the cerebellum, a region thought to be important for VORS. Taken together our findings suggest the patient is a CANVAS variant. We hypothesise VORS impairment is part of CANVAS, but not revealed because of vestibular loss.

  9. Oculo-vestibular recoupling using galvanic vestibular stimulation to mitigate simulator sickness.

    PubMed

    Cevette, Michael J; Stepanek, Jan; Cocco, Daniela; Galea, Anna M; Pradhan, Gaurav N; Wagner, Linsey S; Oakley, Sarah R; Smith, Benn E; Zapala, David A; Brookler, Kenneth H

    2012-06-01

    Despite improvement in the computational capabilities of visual displays in flight simulators, intersensory visual-vestibular conflict remains the leading cause of simulator sickness (SS). By using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), the vestibular system can be synchronized with a moving visual field in order to lessen the mismatch of sensory inputs thought to result in SS. A multisite electrode array was used to deliver combinations of GVS in 21 normal subjects. Optimal electrode combinations were identified and used to establish GVS dose-response predictions for the perception of roll, pitch, and yaw. Based on these data, an algorithm was then implemented in flight simulator hardware in order to synchronize visual and GVS-induced vestibular sensations (oculo-vestibular-recoupled or OVR simulation). Subjects were then randomly exposed to flight simulation either with or without OVR simulation. A self-report SS checklist was administered to all subjects after each session. An overall SS score was calculated for each category of symptoms for both groups. The analysis of GVS stimulation data yielded six unique combinations of electrode positions inducing motion perceptions in the three rotational axes. This provided the algorithm used for OVR simulation. The overall SS scores for gastrointestinal, central, and peripheral categories were 17%, 22.4%, and 20% for the Control group and 6.3%, 20%, and 8% for the OVR group, respectively. When virtual head signals produced by GVS are synchronized to the speed and direction of a moving visual field, manifestations of induced SS in a cockpit flight simulator are significantly reduced.

  10. Efficacy of electrotactile vestibular substitution in patients with peripheral and central vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Y.P.; Tyler, M.E.; Skinner, K.L.; Hogle, R.A.; Bach-y-Rita, P.

    2008-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction of either central or peripheral origin can significantly affect balance, posture, and gait. We conducted a pilot study to test the effectiveness of training with the BrainPort® balance device in subjects with a balance dysfunction due to peripheral or central vestibular loss. The BrainPort® balance device transmits information about the patient’s head position via electrotactile stimulation of the tongue. Head position data is sensed by an accelerometer and displayed on the tongue as a pattern of stimulation. This pattern of stimulation moves forward, backward, and laterally on the tongue in direct response to head movements. Users of the device were trained to use this stimulation to adjust their position in order to maintain their balance. Twenty-eight subjects with peripheral or central vestibular loss were trained with the BrainPort balance device and tested using the following standardized quantitative measurements of the treatment effects: Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). All subjects had chronic balance problems and all but one had previously participated in vestibular rehabilitation therapy. The scores on the clinical tests upon entry into the study were compared to their scores following training with the BrainPort balance device. Our results exhibit consistent positive and statistically significant improvements in balance, posture and gait. These results exceed what could normally be achieved in three to five days of traditional balance training alone. Since this was not a controlled study, we are unable to distinguish the degree to which these improvements are attributable to training with the BrainPort balance device versus the balance exercises performed by all subjects as a part of the BrainPort training sessions. Nonetheless, after training with the Brain

  11. The role of the vestibular system in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.; Mueller, S. Alyssa

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances during spaceflight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of Earth. During spaceflight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system so that astronauts can produce appropriate body movements in microgravity. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. One set of internal cues that may assist in the manual localization of objects is information from the vestibular system. This system contributes to our sense of the body's position in space by providing information on head position and movement and the orientation of the body with respect to gravity. Research on the vestibular system has concentrated on its role in oculo-motor control. Little is known about the role that vestibular information plays in manual motor control, such as reaching and pointing movements. Since central interpretation of vestibular information is altered in microgravity, it is important to determine its role in this process. This summer, we determined the importance of vestibular information in a subject's ability to point accurately toward a target in extrapersonal space. Subjects were passively rotated across the earth-vertical axis and then asked to point back to a previously-seen target. In the first paradigm, the subjects used both visual and vestibular cues for the pointing response, while, in the second paradigm, subjects used only vestibular information. Subjects were able to point with 85 percent accuracy to a target using vestibular information alone. We infer from this result that vestibular input plays a role in the spatial programming of

  12. Labyrinthectomy and Vestibular Neurectomy for Intractable Vertiginous Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Alfredo Vega; Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia Vales; Arévalo, Rodrigo Jácome; Diaz, Marite Palma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy are considered the surgical procedures with the highest possibility of controlling medically untreatable incapacitating vertigo. Ironically, after 100 years of the introduction of both transmastoid labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy, the choice of which procedure to use rests primarily on the evaluation of the hearing and of the surgical morbidity. Objective To review surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy for the treatment of incapacitating vestibular disorders. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis In this review we describe and compare surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy. A contrast between surgical and chemical labyrinthectomy is also examined. Proper candidate selection, success in vertigo control and complication rates are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Conclusions Vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy achieve high and comparable rates of vertigo control. Even though vestibular neurectomy is considered a hearing sparing surgery, since it is an intradural procedure, it carries a greater risk of complications than transmastoid labyrinthectomy. Furthermore, since many patients whose hearing is preserved with vestibular nerve section may ultimately lose that hearing, the long-term value of hearing preservation is not well established. Although the combination of both procedures, in the form of a translabyrinthine vestibular nerve section, is the most certain way to ablate vestibular function for patients with no useful hearing and disabling vertigo, some advocate for transmastoid labyrinthectomy alone, considering that avoiding opening the subarachnoid space minimizes the possible intracranial complications. Chemical labyrinthectomy may be considered a safer alternative, but the risks of hearing loss when hearing preservation is desired are also high. PMID:28382129

  13. Labyrinthectomy and Vestibular Neurectomy for Intractable Vertiginous Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Alfredo Vega; Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia Vales; Arévalo, Rodrigo Jácome; Diaz, Marite Palma

    2017-04-01

    Introduction  Labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy are considered the surgical procedures with the highest possibility of controlling medically untreatable incapacitating vertigo. Ironically, after 100 years of the introduction of both transmastoid labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy, the choice of which procedure to use rests primarily on the evaluation of the hearing and of the surgical morbidity. Objective  To review surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy for the treatment of incapacitating vestibular disorders. Data Sources  PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis  In this review we describe and compare surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy. A contrast between surgical and chemical labyrinthectomy is also examined. Proper candidate selection, success in vertigo control and complication rates are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Conclusions  Vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy achieve high and comparable rates of vertigo control. Even though vestibular neurectomy is considered a hearing sparing surgery, since it is an intradural procedure, it carries a greater risk of complications than transmastoid labyrinthectomy. Furthermore, since many patients whose hearing is preserved with vestibular nerve section may ultimately lose that hearing, the long-term value of hearing preservation is not well established. Although the combination of both procedures, in the form of a translabyrinthine vestibular nerve section, is the most certain way to ablate vestibular function for patients with no useful hearing and disabling vertigo, some advocate for transmastoid labyrinthectomy alone, considering that avoiding opening the subarachnoid space minimizes the possible intracranial complications. Chemical labyrinthectomy may be considered a safer alternative, but the risks of hearing loss when hearing preservation is desired are also high.

  14. Electric Current Transmission Through Tissues of the Vestibular Labyrinth of a Patient: Perfection of the Vestibular Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. P.; Shchetinin, P. P.; Melnichuk, S. V.; Kingma, H.; Van de Berg, R.; Pleshkov, M. O.; Starkov, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    An electric model of current transmission through tissues of the vestibular labyrinth of a patient is suggested. To stimulate directly the vestibular nerve in surgical operation, terminations of the electrodes are implanted through the bone tissue of the labyrinth into the perilymph in the vicinity of the vestibular nerve. The biological tissue of the vestibular labyrinth surrounding the electrodes and having heterogeneous composition possesses conductive and dielectric properties. Thus, when a current pulse from the vestibular implant is applied to one of the electrodes, conductive disturbance currents may arise between the electrodes and the vestibular nerves that can significantly deteriorate the direct signal quality. To study such signals and to compensate for the conductive disturbance currents, an equivalent electric circuit with actual electric impedance properties of tissues of the vestibular system is suggested, and the time parameters of the conductive disturbance current transmission are calculated. It is demonstrated that these parameters can reach large values. The suggested electric model and the results of calculations can be used for perfection of the vestibular implant.

  15. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  16. Validation of the Italian Version of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Situational Vertigo Questionnaire, and the Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scale for Peripheral and Central Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi, Silvia; Rezzani, Cristiana; Gnesi, Marco; Manfrin, Marco; Quaglieri, Silvia; Nuti, Daniele; Mandalà, Marco; Monti, Maria Cristina; Versino, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Neurophysiological measurements of the vestibular function for diagnosis and follow-up evaluations provide an objective assessment, which, unfortunately, does not necessarily correlate with the patients' self-feeling. The literature provides many questionnaires to assess the outcome of rehabilitation programs for disequilibrium, but only for the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) is an Italian translation available, validated on a small group of patients suffering from a peripheral acute vertigo. We translated and validated the reliability and validity of the DHI, the Situational Vertigo Questionnaire (SVQ), and the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in 316 Italian patients complaining of dizziness due either to a peripheral or to a central vestibular deficit, or in whom vestibular signs were undetectable by means of instrumental testing or clinical evaluation. Cronbach's coefficient alpha, the homogeneity index, and test-retest reproducibility, confirmed reliability of the Italian version of the three questionnaires. Validity was confirmed by correlation test between questionnaire scores. Correlations with clinical variables suggested that they can be used as a complementary tool for the assessment of vestibular symptoms. In conclusion, the Italian versions of DHI, SVQ, and ABC are reliable and valid questionnaires for assessing the impact of dizziness on the quality of life of Italian patients with peripheral or central vestibular deficit.

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Patients With Vestibular Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Oron, Yahav; Shemesh, Shay; Shushan, Sagit; Cinamon, Udi; Goldfarb, Abraham; Dabby, Ron; Ovnat Tamir, Sharon

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the correlation between cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and vestibular neuritis (VN) in hospitalized adult patients. A cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital setting. The medical records of patients (aged over 18 years old) who were hospitalized between the years 2005 and 2014 with the diagnosis of VN were retrieved. Inclusion criteria were: (1) acute vertigo lasting for at least 24 hours, (2) absence of auditory complaints, (3) horizontal unidirectional nystagmus present during physical examination, and (4) absence of neurological symptoms or signs. The ratio of CVRFs among VN patients was compared to the ratio of those among the general Israeli population. A significantly higher prevalence of CVRFs was found among VN hospitalized patients in comparison to the general population ( P < .05). Furthermore, a significant correlation ( P < .001) was found between the patients' age and the number of CVRFs (r = .387). A positive correlation (r = .643) was found between the number of CVRFs and VN in each age group ( P = .119). There may be a possible interrelation between CVRFs and VN. This correlation can be caused by occlusion of small blood vessels leading to labyrinthine ischemia and apparition of symptoms of VN.

  18. Vestibular Dysfunction after Subconcussive Head Impact.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sungjae; Ma, Lei; Kawata, Keisuke; Tierney, Ryan; Jeka, John J

    2017-01-01

    Current thinking views mild head impact (i.e., subconcussion) as an underrecognized phenomenon that has the ability to cause significant current and future detrimental neurological effects. Repeated mild impacts to the head, however, often display no observable behavioral deficits based on standard clinical tests, which may lack sensitivity. The current study investigates the effects of subconcussive impacts from soccer heading with innovative measures of vestibular function and walking stability in a pre- 0-2 h, post- 24 h post-heading repeated measures design. The heading group (n = 10) executed 10 headers with soccer balls projected at a velocity of 25 mph (11.2 m/sec) over 10 min. Subjects were evaluated 24 h before, immediately after, and 24 h after soccer heading with: the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS); a walking stability task with visual feedback of trunk movement; and galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) while standing with eyes closed on foam. A control group (n = 10) followed the same protocol with no heading. The results showed significant decrease in trunk angle, leg angle gain, and center of mass gain relative to GVS for the heading group compared with controls. Medial-lateral trunk orientation displacement and velocity during treadmill walking increased immediately after mild head impact for the heading group compared with controls. Controls showed an improvement in mBESS scores over time, indicating a learning effect, which was not observed with the heading group. These results suggest that mild head impact leads to a transient dysfunction in vestibular processing, which deters walking stability during task performance.

  19. Vestibular Dysfunction after Subconcussive Head Impact

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Kawata, Keisuke; Tierney, Ryan; Jeka, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Current thinking views mild head impact (i.e., subconcussion) as an underrecognized phenomenon that has the ability to cause significant current and future detrimental neurological effects. Repeated mild impacts to the head, however, often display no observable behavioral deficits based on standard clinical tests, which may lack sensitivity. The current study investigates the effects of subconcussive impacts from soccer heading with innovative measures of vestibular function and walking stability in a pre- 0–2 h, post- 24 h post-heading repeated measures design. The heading group (n = 10) executed 10 headers with soccer balls projected at a velocity of 25 mph (11.2 m/sec) over 10 min. Subjects were evaluated 24 h before, immediately after, and 24 h after soccer heading with: the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS); a walking stability task with visual feedback of trunk movement; and galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) while standing with eyes closed on foam. A control group (n = 10) followed the same protocol with no heading. The results showed significant decrease in trunk angle, leg angle gain, and center of mass gain relative to GVS for the heading group compared with controls. Medial-lateral trunk orientation displacement and velocity during treadmill walking increased immediately after mild head impact for the heading group compared with controls. Controls showed an improvement in mBESS scores over time, indicating a learning effect, which was not observed with the heading group. These results suggest that mild head impact leads to a transient dysfunction in vestibular processing, which deters walking stability during task performance. PMID:26885560

  20. Unilateral spatial neglect after posterior parietal damage.

    PubMed

    Vallar, Giuseppe; Calzolari, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Unilateral spatial neglect is a disabling neurologic deficit, most frequent and severe after right-hemispheric lesions. In most patients neglect involves the left side of space, contralateral to a right-hemispheric lesion. About 50% of stroke patients exhibit neglect in the acute phase. Patients fail to orient, respond to, and report sensory events occurring in the contralateral sides of space and of the body, to explore these portions of space through movements by action effectors (eye, limbs), and to move the contralateral limbs. Neglect is a multicomponent higher-level disorder of spatial awareness, cognition, and attention. Spatial neglect may occur independently of elementary sensory and motor neurologic deficits, but it can mimic and make them more severe. Diagnostic tests include: motor exploratory target cancellation; setting the midpoint of a horizontal line (bisection), that requires the estimation of lateral extent; drawing by copy and from memory; reading, assessing neglect dyslexia; and exploring the side of the body contralateral to the lesion. Activities of daily living scales are also used. Patients are typically not aware of neglect, although they may exhibit varying degrees of awareness toward different components of the deficit. The neural correlates include lesions to the inferior parietal lobule of the posterior parietal cortex, which was long considered the unique neuropathologic correlate of neglect, to the premotor and to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, to the posterior superior temporal gyrus, at the temporoparietal junction, to subcortical gray nuclei (thalamus, basal ganglia), and to parietofrontal white-matter fiber tracts, such as the superior longitudinal fascicle. Damage to the inferior parietal lobule of the posterior parietal cortex is specifically associated with the mainly egocentric, perceptual, and exploratory extrapersonal, and with the personal, bodily components of neglect. Productive manifestations, such as

  1. Vestibular function in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  2. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  3. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  4. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome with vestibular involvement.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, G; Boschi, A; Deggouj, N; van Pesch, V; Sindic, C J M

    2011-01-01

    We describe a patient who had four relapses of Miller Fisher syndrome over a period of 20 years. The classical triad - ophthalmoparesis, ataxia and areflexia - was present during the first two attacks; ataxia was not observed during the third episode. The final recurrence was characterized by signs suggestive of a central involvement of the oculomotor pathways, subclinical slowing of the visual-evoked potentials, and peripheral vestibular hyporeactivity. Brain imaging was normal, but high levels of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies were detectable during the second relapse and persisted after the fourth recurrence despite complete clinical recovery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Prepubertal Unilateral Gynecomastia: Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Bacak, Gökhan; Baran, Rıza Taner; Avcı, Yahya; Baran, Ahmet; Keleş, Ayşenur; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Alanay, Yasemin; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Prepubertal unilateral gynecomastia is an extremely rare condition. At present, its etiology and management strategy are not well known. Two unrelated prepubertal boys of ages 8 and 9 who presented with complaints of unilateral enlargement of breast tissue are reported. Physical examination, biochemical, hormonal and oncologic work-up findings were normal. Both patients were treated with peripheral liposuction successfully. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations showed benign fibroglandular gynecomastia and intensive (3+) estrogen receptor expression in 100% of periductal epithelial cells. Although an extremely rare and generally benign condition, patients with prepubertal unilateral gynecomastia should have a full endocrine and oncologic work-up. PMID:25541897

  6. Model-based Vestibular Afferent Stimulation: Modular Workflow for Analyzing Stimulation Scenarios in Patient Specific and Statistical Vestibular Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Michael; Schier, Peter P.; Fritscher, Karl D.; Raudaschl, Patrik; Johnson Chacko, Lejo; Glueckert, Rudolf; Saba, Rami; Schubert, Rainer; Baumgarten, Daniel; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Our sense of balance and spatial orientation strongly depends on the correct functionality of our vestibular system. Vestibular dysfunction can lead to blurred vision and impaired balance and spatial orientation, causing a significant decrease in quality of life. Recent studies have shown that vestibular implants offer a possible treatment for patients with vestibular dysfunction. The close proximity of the vestibular nerve bundles, the facial nerve and the cochlear nerve poses a major challenge to targeted stimulation of the vestibular system. Modeling the electrical stimulation of the vestibular system allows for an efficient analysis of stimulation scenarios previous to time and cost intensive in vivo experiments. Current models are based on animal data or CAD models of human anatomy. In this work, a (semi-)automatic modular workflow is presented for the stepwise transformation of segmented vestibular anatomy data of human vestibular specimens to an electrical model and subsequently analyzed. The steps of this workflow include (i) the transformation of labeled datasets to a tetrahedra mesh, (ii) nerve fiber anisotropy and fiber computation as a basis for neuron models, (iii) inclusion of arbitrary electrode designs, (iv) simulation of quasistationary potential distributions, and (v) analysis of stimulus waveforms on the stimulation outcome. Results obtained by the workflow based on human datasets and the average shape of a statistical model revealed a high qualitative agreement and a quantitatively comparable range compared to data from literature, respectively. Based on our workflow, a detailed analysis of intra- and extra-labyrinthine electrode configurations with various stimulation waveforms and electrode designs can be performed on patient specific anatomy, making this framework a valuable tool for current optimization questions concerning vestibular implants in humans. PMID:29311790

  7. Bilateral segmental aplasia with unilateral uterine horn torsion in a Pomeranian bitch.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Noboru; Aoshima, Keisuke; Kimura, Takashi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral segmental aplasia of the uterine horns with unilateral pyometra and uterine horn torsion were diagnosed in a Pomeranian bitch that presented with chronic abdominal distension and an acute onset of anorexia and lethargy. Because radiographic and ultrasonographic findings revealed the presence of markedly enlarged bilateral uterine horns filled with fluid in the caudal abdomen, a tentative diagnosis of either pyometra or hydrometra with uterine horn torsion was made. Exploratory laparotomy showed bilateral, segmentally distended uterine horns with unilateral uterine horn torsion. Ovariohysterectomy was performed, and bilateral segmental aplasia of the uterine horns with the development of unilateral uterine horn torsion was diagnosed histopathologically. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of uterine horn torsion in conjunction with segmental aplasia of the uterine horn in a bitch.

  8. Altered vestibular function in fetal and newborn rats gestated in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers evaluated vestibular development and function in rat pups flown during gestation on the NASA-NIH R1 and R2 missions. Fetal and postnatal vestibular function were examined. Altered vestibular-mediated responses in the experimental fetal pups are attributed to either direct effect of gravity on the vestibular system or indirect effects of microgravity transduced through the mother. The postnatal tests confirmed the hypothesis that the vestibular system continually adapts and responds to tonic stimulation.

  9. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nazar, C; Feldman, M; González, R; Espinoza, R

    2017-06-01

    A 27-year-old woman with a history of nyctalopia and constriction of visual field of the right eye. The ophthalmological examination showed a visual field and electroretinogram that were compatible with unilateral retinitis pigmentosa (RP). After a one year follow-up, the unilateral condition remained. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa is a rare condition, with a frequency between 0.2%-5% of the RP. It mainly affects women and older age groups than bilateral RP. For a definitive diagnosis, it is necessary to have a funduscopy and electroretinogram (ERG) altered unilaterally, and exclude infectious, inflammatory, and vascular causes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. 48 CFR 30.603-2 - Unilateral and desirable changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... changes. 30.603-2 Section 30.603-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Unilateral and desirable changes. (a) Unilateral changes. (1) The contractor may unilaterally change its... the aggregate, as a result of the unilateral change. (2) Prior to making any contract price or cost...

  11. 48 CFR 30.603-2 - Unilateral and desirable changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... changes. 30.603-2 Section 30.603-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Unilateral and desirable changes. (a) Unilateral changes. (1) The contractor may unilaterally change its... the aggregate, as a result of the unilateral change. (2) Prior to making any contract price or cost...

  12. Recent surgical options for vestibular vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Dazert, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is not a well-defined disease but a symptom that can occur in heterogeneous entities diagnosed and treated mainly by otolaryngologists, neurologists, internal medicine, and primary care physicians. Most vertigo syndromes have a good prognosis and management is predominantly conservative, whereas the need for surgical therapy is rare, but for a subset of patients often the only remaining option. In this paper, we describe and discuss different surgical therapy options for hydropic inner ear diseases, Menière’s disease, dehiscence syndromes, perilymph fistulas, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. At the end, we shortly introduce the most recent developments in regard to vestibular implants. Surgical therapy is still indicated for vestibular disease in selected patients nowadays when conservative options did not reduce symptoms and patients are still suffering. Success depends on the correct diagnosis and choosing among different procedures the ones going along with an adequate patient selection. With regard to the invasiveness and the possible risks due to surgery, in depth individual counseling is absolutely necessary. Ablative and destructive surgical procedures usually achieve a successful vertigo control, but are associated with a high risk for hearing loss. Therefore, residual hearing has to be included in the decision making process for surgical therapy. PMID:29279721

  13. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement.

  14. Treatment of peripheral vestibular dysfunction using photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Young; Hyun, Jai-Hwan; Suh, Myung-Whan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae Yun; Rhee, Chung Ku

    2017-08-01

    Gentamicin, which is still used in modern medicine, is a known vestibular toxic agent, and various degrees of balance problems have been observed after exposure to this pharmacologic agent. Photobiomodulation is a candidate therapy for vertigo due to its ability to reach deep inner ear organs such as the cochlea. Previous reports have suggested that photobiomodulation can improve hearing and cochlea function. However, few studies have examined the effect of photobiomodulation on balance dysfunction. We used a rat model to mimic human vestibulopathy resulting from gentamicin treatment and evaluated the effect of photobiomodulation on vestibular toxicity. Slow harmonic acceleration (SHA) rotating platform testing was used for functional evaluation and both qualitative and quantitative epifluorescence analyses of cupula histopathology were performed. Animals were divided into gentamicin only and gentamicin plus laser treatment groups. Laser treatment was applied to one ear, and function and histopathology were evaluated in both ears. Decreased function was observed in both ears after gentamicin treatment, demonstrated by low gain and no SHA asymmetry. Laser treatment minimized the damage resulting from gentamicin treatment as shown by SHA asymmetry and recovered gain in the treated ear. Histology results reflected the functional results, showing increased hair cell density and epifluorescence intensity in laser-treated cupulae.

  15. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  16. The clinical manifestations of vestibular migraine: A review.

    PubMed

    O'Connell Ferster, Ashley P; Priesol, Adrian J; Isildak, Huseyin

    2017-06-01

    To provide an overview of vestibular migraines presentation, pathology, and diagnosis, as well as an update on current diagnostic criteria. A review of the most recent literature on vestibular migraines was performed. Vestibular migraine is a process with significant impact on the quality of life for those afflicted with the disease, with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo and migraine symptoms lasting several minutes to 72h. Inner ear disease can co-exist with migraine and the vestibular symptoms occurring with vestibular migraine can mimic inner ear disorders providing a challenge for clinicians in establishing diagnosis. Recent diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine proposed by a joint committee of the Bárány Society and the International Headache Society provide an important standard for clinical diagnosis and research endeavor. Vestibular migraine is a challenging disease process to both diagnose and treat. Proper diagnosis and treatment requires a thorough understanding of the current literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  18. Vestibular and balance issues following sport-related concussion.

    PubMed

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C; Hale, Troy D

    2015-01-01

    To review relevant literature regarding the effect of concussion on vestibular function, impairments, assessments and management strategies. REASONING: Dizziness and balance impairments are common following sport-related concussion. Recommendations regarding the management of sport-related concussion suggest including tests of balance within the multifactorial assessment paradigm for concussive injuries. The literature was searched for guidelines and original studies related to vestibular impairments following concussion, oculomotor and balance assessments and treatment or rehabilitation of vestibular impairments. The databases searched included Medline, CINAHL, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews through October 2013. Dizziness following concussion occurs in ∼67-77% of cases and has been implicated as a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Balance impairments also occur after concussion and last 3-10 days post-injury. Assessments of balance can be done using both clinical and instrumented measures with success. Vestibular rehabilitation has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with vestibular impairments, with one study demonstrating success in decreasing symptoms and increasing function following concussion. Best practices suggest that the assessment of vestibular function through cranial nerve, oculomotor and balance assessments are an important aspect of concussion management. Future studies should evaluate the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation for improving patient outcomes.

  19. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  20. [Vestibular testing abnormalities in individuals with motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Ou, Yongkang; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Yiqing

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the vestibular function of motion sickness. VNG, which tests the vestibular function of horizontal semicircular canal, and CPT, which tests vestibulospinal reflex and judge proprioceptive, visual and vestibular status, were performed in 30 motion sickness patients and 20 healthy volunteers (control group). Graybiel score was recorded at the same time. Two groups' Graybiel score (12.67 +/- 11.78 vs 2.10 +/- 6.23; rank test P<0.05), caloric test labyrinth value [(19.02 +/- 8.59) degrees/s vs (13.58 +/- 5.25) degrees/s; t test P<0.05], caloric test labyrinth value of three patients in motion sickness group exceeded 75 degrees/s. In computerized posturography testing (CPT), motion sickness patients were central type (66.7%) and disperse type (23.3%); all of control group were central type. There was statistical significance in two groups' CTP area, and motion sickness group was obviously higher than control group. While stimulating vestibulum in CPT, there was abnormality (35%-50%) in motion sickness group and none in control group. Generally evaluating CPT, there was only 2 proprioceptive hypofunction, 3 visual hypofunction, and no vestibular hypofunction, but none hypofunction in control group. Motion sickness patients have high vestibular susceptible, some with vestibular hyperfunction. In posturography, a large number of motion sickness patients are central type but no vestibular hypofunction, but it is hard to keep balance when stimulating vestibulum.

  1. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  2. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  3. Evaluation of the caffeine effect in the vestibular test.

    PubMed

    Felipe, Lilian; Simões, Lilia Correia; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Mancini, Patrícia Cotta

    2005-01-01

    Exists controversy about the interference of the caffeine in the vestibular test. Coffee is the richest source of caffeine. While in some services, the patients were oriented to suspend the ingestion of caffeine 24 to