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Sample records for acute variceal hemorrhage

  1. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  2. Hepatic Angiosarcoma Associated with Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Kanai, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takakura, Kazuki; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koyama, Seita; Imazu, Hiroo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohata, Mitsuru; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Because patients present with no specific symptoms, the cancer can grow undetected and most cases are diagnosed too late for resection. We present the case of a 78-year-old Japanese man admitted to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. A total gastrectomy had previously been performed on the patient to treat gastric cancer. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy was performed to control the bleeding from varices over the anastomosis. Computed tomography revealed the presence of multiple atypical liver nodules in the enhanced image. Histological diagnosis of hepatic angiosarcoma was obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma and acute variceal hemorrhage. PMID:27721730

  3. Comparison of microcoils and polyvinyl alcohol particles in selective microcatheter angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer-Ul-Haq; Idris, Muhammad; Salam, Basit; Akhtar, Waseem; Jamil, Yasir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with microcoils in angiembolisation of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who underwent transcatheter angioembolization from January, 1995 to December, 2013 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Patients were divided into two groups on basis of use of either microcoils or PVA particles and compared in terms of technical success, clinical success, re-bleeding and ischemic complication rates. Chi (χ2) square and Fisher’s exact tests were applied and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty seven patients underwent angioembolization. Microcoil and PVA particles embolization was performed in 63% (36/57) and 35% (20/57) cases respectively. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100%). Clinical success rate was higher in microcoils group (92%) than PVA particles group (75%) with statistically significant P value (p=0.048). Ischemic complication was seen in one case (3%) in the microcoil group, while no such complications were seen in the PVA particles group. Conclusion: In angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage microcoils are better than Polyvinyl alcohol particles with higher clinical success and lower re-bleed rates. PMID:26430397

  4. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. Materials and Methods From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Results Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. Conclusion PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:26957908

  5. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  6. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  7. No Mortality Difference Following Treatment with Terlipressin or Somatostatin in Cirrhotic Patients with Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of terlipressin versus somatostatin as adjuvants to endoscopic treatment in cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll patients who were discharged with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses of cirrhosis and who underwent gastric variceal sclerotherapy for gastric variceal bleeding between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2007. We observed treatment outcomes and identified clinical factors associated with mortality. Results: In total, we enrolled 311 cirrhosis patients who underwent sclerotherapy for active gastric variceal bleeding. Among them, 218 patients received terlipressin, and 93 patients received somatostatin. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 13.2% (41/311). A total of 78 (25.1%) patients underwent second-look endoscopy, but only 12 (7%) needed a second course of gastric variceal sclerotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality rates for patients treated with terlipressin and somatostatin were 13.3% and 12.9%, respectively, showing no statistically significant differences between outcomes in the two treatment groups (P = 0.672). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 3.257, 95% CI: 1.640-6.469, P= 0.001), acute renal failure (HR: 6.261, 95% CI: 2.376-16.499, P < 0.001), or hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 3.091, 95% CI: 1.430-6.680, P= 0.004). Conclusions: Mortality rates did not differ significantly between cirrhosis patients with acute gastric variceal bleeding who received somatostatin or terlipressin as adjuvants to endoscopy. PMID:27184641

  8. Management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage: controversies and areas of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Trawick, Eric P; Yachimski, Patrick S

    2012-03-21

    Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (UGIH) remains a common presentation requiring urgent evaluation and treatment. Accurate assessment, appropriate intervention and apt clinical skills are needed for proper management from time of presentation to discharge. The advent of pharmacologic acid suppression, endoscopic hemostatic techniques, and recognition of Helicobacter pylori as an etiologic agent in peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has revolutionized the treatment of UGIH. Despite this, acute UGIH still carries considerable rates of morbidity and mortality. This review aims to discuss current areas of uncertainty and controversy in the management of UGIH. Neoadjuvant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has become standard empiric treatment for UGIH given that PUD is the leading cause of non-variceal UGIH, and PPIs are extremely effective at promoting ulcer healing. However, neoadjuvant PPI administration has not been shown to affect hard clinical outcomes such as rebleeding or mortality. The optimal timing of upper endoscopy in UGIH is often debated. Upon completion of volume resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, upper endoscopy should be performed within 24 h in all patients with evidence of UGIH for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. With rising healthcare cost paramount in today's medical landscape, the ability to appropriately triage UGIH patients is of increasing value. Upper endoscopy in conjunction with the clinical scenario allows for accurate decision making concerning early discharge home in low-risk lesions or admission for further monitoring and treatment in higher-risk lesions. Concomitant pharmacotherapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antiplatelet agents, such as clopidogrel, has a major impact on the etiology, severity, and potential treatment of UGIH. Long-term PPI use in patients taking chronic NSAIDs or clopidogrel is discussed thoroughly in this review. PMID:22468078

  9. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  10. Acute bleeding varices: a five-year prospective evaluation of tamponade and sclerotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Terblanche, J; Yakoob, H I; Bornman, P C; Stiegmann, G V; Bane, R; Jonker, M; Wright, J; Kirsch, R

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study of massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 143 patients had esophageal varices diagnosed on emergency endoscopic examination. Seventy-one patients had active bleeding from varices and required Sengstaken tube tamponade during at least one hospital admission. The remaining patients included 33 with variceal bleeding which had stopped and 39 who were bleeding from another source. Sixty-six of the former group of 71 patients were referred for emergency injection sclerotherapy. These 66 patients were followed prospectively to August 1980, and had 137 episodes of endoscopically proven variceal bleeding requiring Sengstaken tube control followed by injection sclerotherapy during 93 separate hospital admissions. Definitive control of hemorrhage was achieved in 95% the patients admitted to the hospital (single injection 70%; two or three injections 22%). The death rate per hospital admission was 28%. No patient died of continued variceal bleeding, and exsanguinating variceal hemorrhage no longer poses a major problem at our hospital. The combined use of initial Sengstaken tube tamponade followed by injection sclerotherapy has simplified emergency treatment in the group of patients who continue to bleed actively from esophageal varices, despite initial conservative treatment. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7025770

  11. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  12. Bleeding esophageal varices: treatment with vasopressin, transhepatic embolization and selective splenorenal shunting.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W C; Nabseth, D C; Widrich, W C; Bush, H L; O'Hara, E T; Robbins, A H

    1982-01-01

    The fate of 359 consecutive alcoholic cirrhotic male patients with bleeding esophageal varices was determined through chart review and personal interview. Three historical periods (1966-70; 1971-75; 1976-80) were defined based on availability of different therapeutic modalities. Management of acutely bleeding varices by conservative, nonsurgical means, including embolization, was preferable to emergency surgery when considering 30-day mortality rates. Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of esophagogastric varices significantly improved the rate of control of hemorrhage and 30-day survival over previously employed nonsurgical methods. The combination of nonsurgical management of acute variceal hemorrhage followed by selective distal splenorenal shunting resulted in maximum salvage of the alcoholic cirrhotic patient. PMID:6978109

  13. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  14. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  15. Band ligation vs. N-Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection in acute gastric variceal bleeding: a prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tantau, Marcel; Crisan, Dana; Popa, Daniel; Vesa, Stefan; Tantau, Alina

    BACKGROUND. Treatment of gastric varices (GV) implies a number of several difficulties and sometimes entails complications. The best endoscopic success rate was attributed until now to the use of tissue adhesives(N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate) and band ligation. AIM. To assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of cyanoacrylate injection compared to band ligation in patients with acute GV hemorrhage. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Thirty-seven patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from GV were included in the study, treated with cyanoacrylate injection (GVO)-19 patients or band ligations (GVL)-18 patients. They were followed up for overall results, complications and survival rate. RESULTS. The mean age of the study group was 60.22 ± 9.34 years, with a male/female ratio of 21:16. The mean follow-up period was 427.26 ± 214.16 days in the GVO group and 406.21 ± 213.23 days in the GVL group (p = 0.76). Initial hemostasis was achieved in all patients treated with cyanoacrylate and in 88.88% from the GVL group (p = 0.43). Rebleeding occurred in 72.22% of the GVL group and in 31.57% of the GVO patients (p = 0.03). Patients in the GVO group had a significantly larger rebleeding-free period(p = 0.006). No difference was found in survival rates(p = 0.75). The Child Class (p = 0.003 for Class C) and treatment method (p = 0.01) were independently associated with the rate of rebleeding. No differences were found regarding the rate of complications. CONCLUSION. The use of cyanoacrylate in acute GV bleeding had better results when compared with band ligation in terms of controlling the hemorrhage and recurrence of bleeding. The overall survival rate was not influenced by the method used for the treatment of complicated GV.

  16. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  17. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  18. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser.

  19. [Glypressin and emergency sclerotherapy, deferred emergency shunt (Warren, portacaval, mesocaval): new tactics in the treatment of severe hemorrhage by esophagogastric varices in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Huscher, C; Biraghi, M; Chiodini, S; Recher, A; Torri, F; Zamboni, F

    1990-01-01

    Transplenic decompression of esophageal varices by distal splenorenal shunt according to Warren (DSRS) aims to a selective detention of the esophago-gastric varices, also assuring an adequate portal perfusion and hypertensive state of the porto-mesenteric district. The DSRS though, should and must not be performed in emergency as a high mortality rate is registered in all cases of emergency porto-systemic derivations. A mortality risk is reported even during endoscopic sclerosis if performed in emergency compared to the elective procedure. The scope of our study was to test the validity of a new approach of the hemorrhagic cirrhotic patient: the end point was to stop the bleeding with Glypressin and deferred sclerotherapy, associating a selective shunt at 40-60 days. Out of 32 patients with esophago-gastric variceal bleeding, 8 were selected also for derivative surgery. Results show Glypressin as the first and best therapeutic approach. The drug in many cases stops bleeding or at least reduces the blood loss allowing an easier endoscopic sclerosis. Further sclerosis and/or surgical therapy may assure variceal eradication.

  20. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  1. Acute management and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding: A western Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Justin; Wong, Winnie; Zandieh, Iman; Leung, Yvette; Lee, Samuel S; Ramji, Alnoor; Yoshida, Eric M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur. METHODS: Gastroenterologists in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were sent a self-reporting questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rate was 70.4% (86 of 122). Intravenous octreotide was recommended by 93% for EVB patients but the duration was variable. The preferred timing for endoscopy in suspected acute EVB was within 12 h in 75.6% of respondents and within 24 h in 24.6% of respondents. Most (52.3%) gastroenterologists do not routinely use antibiotic prophylaxis in acute EVB patients. The preferred duration of antibiotic therapy was less than three days (35.7%), three to seven days (44.6%), seven to 10 days (10.7%) and throughout hospitalization (8.9%). Methods of secondary prophylaxis included repeat endoscopic therapy (93%) and beta-blocker therapy (84.9%). Most gastroenterologists (80.2%) routinely attempted to titrate beta-blockers to a heart rate of 55 beats/min or a 25% reduction from baseline. The most common form of secondary prophylaxis was a combination of endoscopic and pharmacological therapy (70.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Variability exists in some areas of EVB treatment, especially in areas for which evidence was lacking at the time of the last guideline publication. Gastroenterologists varied in the use of prophylactic antibiotics for acute EVB. More gastroenterologists used combination secondary prophylaxis in the form of band ligation eradication and beta-blocker therapy rather than either treatment alone. Future guidelines may be needed to address these practice differences. PMID:16955150

  2. Occurrence of infective endocarditis following endoscopic variceal ligation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Meifang; Dong, Huihui; Xv, Lichen; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, however, prophylaxis antibiotic during EVL is controversial. Methods: We reported a 60-year-old man with diabetes, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma who received EVL for esophageal variceal haemorrhage. Results: On the second day after EVL, the patient developed fever and chills. A week after EVL, the blood cultures were viridans streptococcus positive, and echocardiogram showed a vegetation on the cardiac valve. The patient was therefore diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE). The patient was cured after 7 weeks of intravenous piperacillin sulbactam sodium. No complications were observed during the 3-month follow-up after discharge. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first documented case to report IE caused by viridans streptococcus after EVL. Therefore, whether prophylaxis antibiotic should be administered to cirrhotic patients receiving EVL is worth further research. PMID:27583858

  3. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  4. Gastric varices: Classification, endoscopic and ultrasonographic management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan Ahmad; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Maiwall, Rakhi; Choudhury, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are responsible for 10-30% of all variceal hemorrhage. However, they tend to bleed more severely with higher mortality. Around 35-90% rebleed after spontaneous hemostasis. Approximately 50% of patients with cirrhosis of liver harbor gastroesophageal varices. In this review, new treatment modalities in the form of endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have been discussed besides discussion on classification and pathophysiology of GV. PMID:26958057

  5. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  6. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  7. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  8. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  9. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  10. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  11. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy and common mimics.

    PubMed

    Homme, James L; Block, Jason M

    2016-05-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare acute benign cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis affecting children younger than 24 months of age. Its presentation can be confused with those of urticaria, erythema multiforme, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, idiopathic thrombocytopenia,meningococcemia, Kawasaki disease, and drug rash. We present 2 cases of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, discuss the characteristics of AHEI, and compare and contrast AHEI with similar dermatologic presentations. This review provides emergency physicians with the basic knowledge necessary to easily recognize AHEI as a distinct clinical entity. The patients were 19- and 23-month-old females who presented to the pediatric emergency department at St Mary's Hospital,Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, with impressive purpuric rashes and edema of the hands and feet after preceding upper respiratory tract infections. Both children had benign courses with complete resolution of clinical findings. These 2 cases typify the presentation of AHEI.Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy presents with characteristic purpuric lesions and extremity edema. The emergency physician's recognition of these presenting characteristics will help diagnose AHEI, avoid unnecessary procedures and tests, and aid in counseling the patient's parents.

  12. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  13. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  14. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine.

  15. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine. PMID:26409801

  16. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Marak, Creticus P; Joy, Parijat S; Gupta, Pragya; Bukovskaya, Yana; Guddati, Achuta K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH.

  17. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kitulwatte, Indira D; Kim, Patrick J H; Pollanen, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis. A 48-year-old previously healthy male was found dead in his locked apartment. At autopsy he was found to be malnourished, and his lungs showed gross evidence of bilateral pneumonia with abscess formation and bullous emphysema. Multiple petechial hemorrhages were observed in the brain and mainly involved white matter in the cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Microscopy of the brain and spinal cord revealed perivenular hemorrhages, central microthrombi in venules with fibrin exudation into the subcortical white matter, and early perivenular demyelination associated with scanty mixed cellular infiltrates. Other microscopic features included widespread diffuse viral myocarditis, extensive suppurative bronchopneumonia, and chronic bronchitis. This case illustrates the death of a man with a rare fatal disease associated with two other potentially lethal diseases. The case also illustrates the importance of a holistic approach when determining the cause of death, especially when there are competing causes of death. PMID:26148811

  18. [Orbital varices].

    PubMed

    Seceleanu, Andreea; Szabo, I; Călugăru, M; Dudea, S M; Preda, D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to point out a case with orbital venous abnormalities at the left eye, associated with varices of the legs. The clinical picture of this case was: intermittent exophthalmos, venous malformations at the level of the lids and episclera, elevated ocular pressure. All this signs reveal an abnormality at the level of venous wall, indicating a constitutional weakness of the venous system. The case was investigated by imagistic methods: ultrasound examination, Doppler -ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. According to the facts offered by clinical and imagistic investigation this case can be included into the first type of orbital varices, associated with secondary glaucoma provoked by an elevated episcleral venous pressure. PMID:15598045

  19. Somatostatin plus isosorbide 5-mononitrate versus somatostatin in the control of acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding: a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Junquera, F; Lopez-Talavera, J; Mearin, F; Saperas, E; Videla, S; Armengol, J; Esteban, R; Malagelada, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of portal hypertension. Somatostatin reduces portal pressure by decreasing splanchnic blood flow, and nitrates by diminishing intrahepatic resistance. Experimental studies have shown that the combination of somatostatin and nitrates has an additive effect in decreasing portal pressure.
AIM—To compare the therapeutic efficacy of either intravenous infusion of somatostatin plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate or somatostatin alone in gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding associated with liver cirrhosis.
METHODS—A unicentre, double blind, placebo controlled, clinical trial was conducted. Sixty patients bleeding from oesophageal or gastric varices were randomised to receive intravenous infusion of somatostatin (250 µg/hour) plus oral isosorbide 5-mononitrate (40 mg/12 hours) (group I) or somatostatin infusion plus placebo (group II) for 72 hours.
RESULTS—The two groups of patients had similar clinical, endoscopic, and haematological characteristics. Control of bleeding was achieved in 18 out of 30 patients (60%) in group I and 26 out of 30 patients (87%) in group II (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in mean transfusion requirements between the two groups: 2.6 (2.2) v 1.8 (1.6) respectively; means (SD). Mortality and side effects were similar in the two groups, but development of ascites was higher in group I (30%) than in group II (7%) (p<0.05).
CONCLUSION—In cirrhotic patients with acute gastro-oesophageal variceal bleeding, addition of isosorbide 5-mononitrate to somatostatin does not improve therapeutic efficacy, induces more adverse effects, and should not be used.


Keywords: gastro-oesophageal bleeding; haemorrhage; portal hypertension; clinical trial; isosorbide 5-mononitrate; somatostatin PMID:10601068

  20. Combined Uphill and Downhill Varices as a Consequence of Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Harwani, Yogesh P.; Kumar, Ajit; Chaudhary, Akash; Kumar, Manoj; Choudeswari, Padmavathi R.; Kankanala, Vishnu V.; Joshi, Nayana; Kansagra, Chintan; Shah, Sandip; Tripathi, Abhisheka

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhage from downhill varices is a rare manifestation. The etiology of downhill varices is due to superior vena cava obstruction while uphill varices are secondary to portal hypertension. We report a rare case of 55-year-old female with bleeding downhill varices not associated with obstruction or compression of superior vena cava, but was due to severe pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to chronic rheumatic heart disease. PMID:25755536

  1. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  2. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  3. Early Blood Pressure Lowering Does Not Reduce Growth of Intraventricular Hemorrhage following Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Results of the INTERACT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward; Anderson, Craig S.; Wang, Xia; Arima, Hisatomi; Saxena, Anubhav; Moullaali, Tom J.; Delcourt, Candice; Wu, Guojun; Wang, Jinchao; Chen, Guofang; Lavados, Pablo M.; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Chalmers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) extension is common following acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with poor prognosis. Aim To determine whether intensive blood pressure (BP)-lowering therapy reduces IVH growth. Methods Pooled analyses of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trials (INTERACT1 and INTERACT2) computed tomography (CT) substudies; multicenter, open, controlled, randomized trials of patients with acute spontaneous ICH and elevated systolic BP, randomly assigned to intensive (<140 mm Hg) or guideline-based (<180 mm Hg) BP management. Participants had blinded central analyses of baseline and 24-hour CT. Association of BP lowering to IVH growth was assessed in analysis of covariance. Results There was no significant difference in adjusted mean IVH growth following intensive (n = 228) compared to guideline-recommended (n = 228) BP treatment (1.6 versus 2.2 ml, respectively; p = 0.56). Adjusted mean IVH growth was nonsignificantly greater in patients with a mean achieved systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg over 24 h (3.94 ml; p trend = 0.26). Conclusions Early intensive BP-lowering treatment had no clear effect on IVH in acute ICH. PMID:27603933

  4. Emergency Portacaval Shunt Versus Rescue Portacaval Shunt in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Emergency Treatment of Acutely Bleeding Esophageal Varices in Cirrhosis—Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Question: Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Methods Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Results Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child’s class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per

  5. Intracranial chordoma presenting as acute hemorrhage in a child: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth A.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Shah, Sanket U.; Abdulkader, Marwah M.; Bonnin, Jose M.; Ackerman, Laurie L.; Shaikh, Kashif A.; Kralik, Stephen F.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant neoplasms derived from remnants of the embryological notochord. Pediatric cases comprise only 5% of all chordomas, but more than half of the reported pediatric chordomas are intracranial. For patients of all ages, intracranial chordomas typically present with symptoms such as headaches and progressive neurological deficits occurring over several weeks to many years as they compress or invade local structures. There are only reports of these tumors presenting acutely with intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients. Case Description: A 10-year-old boy presented with acute onset of headache, emesis, and diplopia. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain were suspicious for a hemorrhagic mass located in the left petroclival region, compressing the ventral pons. The mass was surgically resected and demonstrated acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Pathologic examination was consistent with chordoma. Conclusion: There are few previous reports of petroclival chordomas causing acute intracranial hemorrhage. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a petroclival chordoma presenting as acute intracranial hemorrhage in a pediatric patient. Although uncommon, it is important to consider chordoma when evaluating a patient of any age presenting with a hemorrhagic lesion of the clivus. PMID:25949851

  6. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study. PMID:27660569

  7. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  8. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study.

  9. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X.; Wan, Z.B.; Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y.; Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S.; Zhao, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units. PMID:24519130

  10. Percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection for the treatment of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mafeld, Sebastian; McNeill, Michael; Haslam, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy is a valuable diagnostic approach. While commonly safe, it is not without risk and the most feared vascular complications include hemorrhage, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula formation. We report a case of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy that was immediately identified by ultrasonography and successfully treated with percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection. This technique may prove a useful addition to the armamentarium of any operator performing renal biopsies.

  11. Percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection for the treatment of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Mafeld, Sebastian; McNeill, Michael; Haslam, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy is a valuable diagnostic approach. While commonly safe, it is not without risk and the most feared vascular complications include hemorrhage, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula formation. We report a case of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy that was immediately identified by ultrasonography and successfully treated with percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection. This technique may prove a useful addition to the armamentarium of any operator performing renal biopsies. PMID:26809832

  12. Colonic varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1987-03-01

    Colonic varices is a rare condition, generally associated with portal hypertension, which normally presents as acute, severe, gastrointestinal blood loss. A case is presented in which the varicosities were observed serendipitously in a patient with a pancreatic tumor, in whom the bleeding was not variceal but due to two small unrelated gastric hemangiomas. The literature is reviewed and scintigraphic features described.

  13. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  14. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  15. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  16. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  17. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  18. [Glial fibrillary acidic protein in patients with symptoms of acute stroke: diagnostic marker of cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Foerch, C; Pfeilschifter, W; Zeiner, P; Brunkhorst, R

    2014-08-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a highly brain-specific protein that is expressed in large quantities in astrocytes and has important functions in terms of maintaining and stabilizing the cytoskeleton. Acute intracerebral hemorrhage leads to an immediate mechanical destruction of astroglial cells with the subsequent release of GFAP into the extracellular space and the bloodstream. On the other hand, necrosis, cytolysis and GFAP release does not occur before 6-12 h after symptom onset in ischemic stroke. Thus, in the early hours after stroke increased GFAP values could indicate intracerebral hemorrhage. This review article describes the underlying pathophysiology of the test and guides the reader through the available data. Potential implications regarding the prehospital triage of acute stroke patients are discussed, including the possibility to initiate hyperacute treatment, such as blood pressure reduction in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Other areas of interest for a potential GFAP test include traumatic brain injury and malignant gliomas.

  19. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  20. Acute and Chronic Fetal Anemia as a Result of Fetomaternal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal anemia such as right ventricular enlargement, diminished cerebral vascular resistance, and elevated middle cerebral artery end-diastolic velocity. On the other hand, signs of acute fetal decompensation such as deterioration of the fetal heart tracing, diminished biophysical score, decreased cord pH, and increased cord base deficit were noted. Following delivery, the neonate's initial hemoglobin was 4.0 g/dL and the maternal KB ratio was 0.015 indicative of a significant fetomaternal hemorrhage. Discussion. One should consider FMH as part of the differential diagnosis for fetal or immediate neonatal anemia. We describe a unique case of FMH that demonstrated both acute and chronic clinical features. It is our hope that this case will assist practitioners in differentiating acute FMH that may require emergent delivery from chronic FMH which may be able to be expectantly managed. PMID:24804127

  1. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. PMID:24220549

  2. Bleeding Duodenal Varices Successfully Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO) Assisted by CT During Arterial Portography

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu Sugimoto, Koji; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Masahiko; Hirota, Shozo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices.

  3. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage as the initial presentation of acute lymphocytic leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashikant; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Thakur, Jai Deep; Khan, Imad Saeed; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic complications of acute leukemia are well described and are a common cause of mortality in these patients. However, to our knowledge, fatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) as an initial presentation of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has only been reported once. We report a case of previously undiagnosed ALL presenting with ICH. Our patient is a 17-year old male who was found unresponsive several hours after complaining of headache. Initial emergency room evaluation found the patient to have anisocoria with a fixed and dilated right pupil and demonstrated evidence of decorticate posturing. Imaging revealed a large right-sided intraparenchymal hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, midline shift, and uncal herniation. Laboratory evaluation showed marked leukocytosis with blastic predominance and evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Emergent surgical intervention was performed. However, despite evacuation of the hematoma, the patient eventually progressed to clinical brain death. Usually, ICH is seen in ALL patients after the diagnosis has been made. We report a unique case of fatal intracranial hemorrhage as the initial presentation of ALL and discuss the possible management dilemmas to treat such entities. ALL should be kept in the broad differential diagnosis of spontaneous ICH, especially in a young patient with evidence of severe coagulopathy.

  4. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H. Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  5. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia.

    PubMed

    Eker, Amber; Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  6. Vasopressin, renin, and cortisol responses to hemorrhage during acute blockade of cardiac nerves in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) on the increases in plasma renin activity (PRA), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and cortisol in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage was determined in conscious dogs (n = 9). Procaine was infused into the pericardial space to produce acute reversible CNB, or saline was infused in the control hemorrhage. Blood was removed from the inferior vena cava at a rate of 1 ml.kg-1.min-1. In the control hemorrhage, plasma AVP increased from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 219 +/- 66 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.63 +/- 0.20 to 3.08 +/- 0.91 ng angiotensin I (ANG I).ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.4 +/- 0.2 to 4.0 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dl. When the hemorrhage was repeated during acute CNB, plasma AVP increased from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 185 +/- 59 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.44 +/- 0.14 to 2.24 +/- 0.27 ng ANG I.ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.6 micrograms/dl, and none of the increases differed significantly from the responses during the control hemorrhage. Left atrial pressure fell significantly after removal of 6 ml/kg of blood, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at control levels until blood loss reached 20 ml/kg during pericardial infusion of either saline or procaine. The declines in MAP at the 30 ml/kg level of hemorrhage in both treatments were similar. These results demonstrate that acutely blocking input from cardiac receptors does not reduce the increases in plasma AVP, cortisol, and PRA in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that input from cardiac receptors is required for a normal AVP response to hemorrhage and suggest that other receptors, presumably arterial baroreceptors, can stimulate AVP and cortisol secretion in the absence of signals from the heart.

  7. Spontaneous rupture and hemorrhage of adrenal pseudocyst presenting with acute abdomen and shock.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Valizadeh, Neda

    2011-12-01

    Adrenal gland pseudocysts are not common conditions, and most of them are nonfunctional and asymptomatic. However, large pseudocysts may causes abdominal discomfort and have compressive effects on adjacent organs. They may rupture spontaneously or after trauma, and lead to retroperitoneal hemorrhage and surgical emergency. Herein, we report a case of 21-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous rupture of adrenal pseudocyst. She was treated successfully by open surgery, removal of adrenal pseudocyst and unilateral adrenalectomy.

  8. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  9. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  10. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF ACUTELY BLEEDING ESOPHAGEAL VARICES IN CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marshall J.; Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.; Orloff, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bleeding esophageal varices (BEV) in cirrhosis has been considered an indication for liver transplantation (LT). This issue was examined in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of unselected, consecutive patients with advanced cirrhosis and BEV that compared endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) (n=106) to emergency direct portacaval shunt (EPCS) (n=105). Methods Diagnostic workup and treatment were initiated within 8 hours. Patients were evaluated for LT on admission and repeatedly thereafter. 96% underwent over 10 years of regular follow-up. The analysis was supplemented by 1300 unrandomized cirrhotic patients who previously underwent portacaval shunt (PCS) with 100% follow-up. Results In the RCT, long-term bleeding control was 100% following EPCS, only 20% following EST. 3, 5, 10, and 15-year survival rates were 75%, 73%, 46%, and 46% following EPCS, compared to 44%, 21%, 9%, and 9% following EST (p<0.001). Only 13 RCT patients (6%) were ultimately referred for LT mainly because of progressive liver failure; only 7 (3%) were approved for LT and only 4 (2%) underwent LT. 1- and 5-year LT survival rates were 0.68% and 0, compared to 81% and 73% after EPCS. In the 1300 unrandomized PCS patients. 50 (3.8%) were referred and 19 (1.5%) underwent LT. Five-year survival rate was 53% compared to 72% for all 1300 patients. Conclusions If bleeding is permanently controlled, as occurred invariably following EPCS, cirrhotic patients with BEV seldom require LT. PCS is effective first-line and long-term treatment. Should LT be required in patients with PCS, although technically more demanding, numerous studies have shown that PCS does not increase mortality or complications. EST is not effective emergency or long-term therapy. PMID:21168637

  11. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  12. Association of deep venous thrombosis with calf vein diameter in acute hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitazono, Takanari; Okada, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the association between the development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and calf vein diameter in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. We measured the maximum diameter of paralytic side posttibial veins (PTVs) and peroneal veins (PVs) in 49 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage on admission and at 2 weeks after stroke onset by ultrasonography. We also examined for the presence or absence of DVT, and then analyzed the association of DVT with the maximum vein diameter. At 2 weeks after stroke, DVTs were detected in PTVs in 7 patients and in PVs in 6 patients. The maximum calf vein diameters at 2 weeks were significantly greater in patients with DVT compared with those without DVT (PTV, P = .033; PV, P = .015). Although calf vein diameter at admission did not influence the future incidence of DVT in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, the presence of DVT was associated with calf vein dilatation.

  13. Embolization therapy for bleeding from jejunal loop varices due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hiyama, Eiso; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Four patients underwent embolization therapy for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy existing in hepatopetal collateral veins due to chronic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction through the afferent veins using microcoils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. In all four patients, all afferent veins were successfully embolized and successful hemostasis was achieved without liver dysfunction. However, recurrence of the varices and rebleeding occurred within a year in two patients. Embolization for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy through afferent veins is acceptable in terms of safety and is useful to achieve hemostasis in emergency circumstances. PMID:26330264

  14. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  15. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  16. A Novel Rhabdovirus Associated with Acute Hemorrhagic Fever in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J. Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B.; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W.; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S.; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Leroy, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09×106 RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ∼140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1∶1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa. PMID:23028323

  17. A novel rhabdovirus associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in central Africa.

    PubMed

    Grard, Gilda; Fair, Joseph N; Lee, Deanna; Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D; Chiu, Charles Y; Leroy, Eric M

    2012-09-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09 × 10(6) RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ≈ 140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1:1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa.

  18. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  19. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report

    PubMed Central

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection. PMID:25628207

  20. Echo-endoscopic analysis of variceal hemodynamics in patient with isolated gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, HIdemichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Takagi, Tadayuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is considered that gastric varices (GVs) which have the large form in endoscopic view should be treated because they are regarded as having high blood flow volume and the risky varices of hemorrhage. However, there is no data of the correlation among the endoscopic view, diameter of GV, and blood flow volume in GV. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GV diameter correlates to blood flow volume or not. In addition, the correlation between the endoscopic findings of GVs, patient status, and blood flow volume was assessed. Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 patients were enrolled. Variceal form and its location were observed using flexible GI endoscopes. Assessment of variceal form and location was according to Japanese society of portal hypertension. Then, the GV diameter (the maximum short axis), the GV flow velocity, and the GV flow volume were measured by echo-endoscope with curved linear array or with electronic radial array. Results: Nineteen of 24 enrolled patients were analyzed. There was strong correlation between the GV diameter and the GV flow volume (rs = 0.85, P < 0.01). No significant difference in the GV diameter and the GV flow volume was found between each location. However, there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form. In addition, no significant difference was found among Child–Pugh classifications, and in cases associated with or without hepatocelluer carcinoma. Conclusions: Strong correlation was found between GV diameter and flow volume of GV, regardless of the location. However, since there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form in endoscopic view, measuring GV diameter is important to understand its hemodynamics for further treatment. PMID:25485272

  1. [Medical therapy for intracranial hemorrhage: update blood pressure management for prevention and acute treatment].

    PubMed

    Koga, Masatoshi; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common stroke subtype in Japan. Hypertension is the leading cause. Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study (PROGRESS) revealed that blood pressure (BP) lowering could reduce stroke recurrence by 28% (ICH recurrence by 49%). The guideline for the management of hypertension (JSH2009) recommends BP control of ≤ 140/90 mm Hg for patients with prior stroke. BP is frequently elevated in acute ICH, although BP management strategy is controversial. The guideline from the American Stroke Association suggests if systolic BP (SBP) >180 mm Hg and there is no evidence of elevated intracranial pressure, then consider a modest reduction of BP. A nationwide survey revealed that SBP lowering to ≤ 160 mm Hg using intravenous nicardipine in acute ICH is a major strategy in Japan, and the safety was confirmed by a multicenter, prospective, observational study. Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT) and Antihypertensive Treatment of Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) showed the feasibility and safety of early rapid BP lowering to 140 mm Hg. INTERACT2 and ATACH II are the randomized trials to compare the guideline-based control (<180 mm Hg) and strict control (<140 mm Hg). We have just started to enroll patients to ATACH II from Japan on February 2012.

  2. Downhill Esophageal Varices Associated With Central Venous Catheter-Related Thrombosis Managed With Endoscopic and Surgical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Joshua C.; Bhusal, Sushma; Desai, Deepak; Cerulli, Maurice A.

    2016-01-01

    Downhill esophageal varices are a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. We present a case of downhill variceal bleeding due to superior vena cava thrombosis resulting from a prior central venous catheter. The patient was managed with endoscopic band ligation and later with surgical axillary vein to right atrium bypass grafting. Successful long-term resolution of varices was achieved at 1 year of follow-up. This is the longest follow-up described for combined endoscopic and surgical management in the existing literature for catheter-associated downhill varices. PMID:27807564

  3. The changing spectrum of treatment for variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Rikkers, L F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on patient selection and outcome of surgical treatment for this complication of portal hypertension, as reflected in a single surgeon's 18-year experience with operations for variceal hemorrhage. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Definitive treatment of patients who bleed from portal hypertension has been progressively altered during the past 2 decades during which endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and TIPS have successively become available as alternative treatment options to operative portosystemic shunts and devascularization procedures. METHODS: Two hundred sixty-three consecutive patients who were surgically treated for portal hypertensive bleeding between 1978 and 1996 were reviewed retrospectively. Four Eras separated by the dates when endoscopic therapy (January 1981), liver transplantation (July 1985), and TIPS (January 1993) became available in our institution were analyzed. Throughout all four Eras, a selective operative approach, using the distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS), nonselective shunts, and esophagogastric devascularization, was taken. The most common indications for nonselective shunts and esophagogastric devascularization were medically intractable ascites and splanchnic venous thrombosis, respectively. Most other patients received a DSRS. RESULTS: The risk status (Child's class) of patients undergoing surgery progressively improved (p = 0.001) throughout the 4 Eras, whereas the need for emergency surgery declined (p = 0.002). The percentage of nonselective shunts performed decreased because better options to manage acute bleeding episodes (sclerotherapy, TIPS) and advanced liver disease complicated by ascites (liver transplantation, TIPS) became available (p = 0.009). In all Eras, the operative mortality rate was directly related to Child's class (A, 2.7%; B, 7.5%; and C, 26

  4. Colorectal variceal bleeding in patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis and idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Takahashi, T; Mercado, M A; Prado-Orozco, E; Ferral, H; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Esquivel, E

    1992-03-01

    We report three patients with colonic variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, 0.5% of all cases with hemorrhagic portal hypertension studied by us in the last 16 years. One patient had idiopathic portal hypertension, and the others had extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. Colonic varices were documented in all three cases by angiogram; large arteriovenous fistulas in the territory of the superior mesenteric artery and between the inferior mesenteric artery and hemorrhoidal veins were demonstrated in one patient. Two patients underwent colonoscopy; colonic varices were seen in only one. Two patients also had bled from esophagogastric varices. One patient underwent descending colon and sigmoid resection after failure to control bleeding with ligation of arterial supply; one patient underwent the Sugiura procedure, plus transanal ligation of hemorrhoids and rectal varices. At 3 months, 2 years, and 4 years of follow-up, the patients were in good general condition without any evidence of rebleeding.

  5. Percutaneous Trans-hepatic Obliteration for Bleeding Esophagojejunal Varices After Total Gastrectomy and Esophagojejunostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Michiko; Sugimoto, Koji; Nakamura, Tetsu; Kita, Yasufumi; Zamora, Carlos A. Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 72-year-old man who had undergone a total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer 6 years earlier presented to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. Endoscopic examination indicated esophageal varices with cherry-red spots and hemorrhage arising from beyond the anastomosis. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiography revealed a dilated vein in the elevated jejunal limb supplying the varices. Percutaneous trans-hepatic obliteration (PTO) of the varices through the jejunal vein was performed using microcoils, ethanolamine oleate, and gelatin sponge cubes. Ten days after the procedure, endoscopic examination revealed reduction and thrombosis of the varices. We consider PTO to be an effective alternative method for treating ruptured esophagojejunal varices after total gastrectomy.

  6. Natural history of premacular hemorrhage due to severe acute anemia: clinical and anatomical features in two untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia Del; La Spina, Carlo; Mantovani, Elena; Gagliardi, Marco; Lattanzio, Rosangela; Pierro, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Premacular retrohyaloid hemorrhage is a rare complication of acute severe anemia. The authors report two cases of premacular hemorrhage in which no treatment other than clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography observation was performed. The natural history of this condition reveals that complete clinical resolution is not accompanied by full anatomical restoration. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:E5-E7.]. PMID:24496165

  7. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure. PMID:25876581

  8. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure.

  9. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  10. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  11. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman presenting with acute epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Yasuomi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    A 26-year-old woman in week 31 of pregnancy presented to the emergency room with acute onset of paraplegia. Her medical history was unremarkable. Neurological examination revealed complete paraplegia, total sensory loss below the T7 dermatome, and significant vesicorectal dysfunction. MRI revealed an intraspinal mass from T3 to T4, which was hyperintense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Blood examination found no abnormality. She underwent emergent hemilaminectomy and removal of the hematoma. Intraoperatively, unusually ectatic venous vessels were found adhered to the lower surface of the epidural clot. No concurrent vascular malformations were identified and the dura mater was intact. The histological diagnosis was angiolipoma. Postoperatively her neurological deficits showed remarkable improvement, and she gave birth to a healthy baby. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman may be complicated with acute epidural hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation can be performed safely with a good functional prognosis.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  13. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Transseptal Orbital Decompression in Treating Acute Retrobulbar Hemorrhage and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerer, Rüdiger; Schattmann, Katrin; Essig, Harald; Jehn, Philipp; Metzger, Marc; Kokemüller, Horst; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Tavassol, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing visual acuity secondary to orbital trauma may be caused by sudden space-occupying or expanding intraorbital lesions, including retrobulbar hemorrhage (RBH), herniation, or swelling. RBH must be diagnosed and treated immediately. This article addresses the efficacy of transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression in a combination with a systematic review of the literature for a comparison of this method with existing treatment options. For this study the department's database was retrospectively screened for patients with acute RBH who were treated between 2009 and 2011 using the authors' approach. Patients presenting with RBH were classified into RBH classes I to III according to three different clinical and radiological manifestations of acute RBH. The efficacy of transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression was assessed by postoperative visual acuities. The literature review was performed by using the MEDLINE database. The time period for the study was between 2009 and 2011 during which 10 patients were diagnosed with suspected RBH and 9 were treated with the authors' technique. Visual acuities were reconstituted or maintained in almost 86% of patients who were diagnosed and treated according to the authors approach and who survived initial trauma. It was concluded that transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression provides an efficient and rapid approach for treating patients with acute RBH. By distinguishing three different manifestations of acute RBH, the authors present a diagnostic tool that may facilitate classification of RBH and determination of treatment options. PMID:24624253

  14. Dengue hemorrhagic fever patients with acute abdomen: clinical experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Khor, Boon-Siang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Kuender D

    2006-05-01

    Among 328 patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), 14 (4 men and 10 women, median age 44 years) had acute abdomen. DHF/DSS was initially suspected in only 2 of these 14 patients. Presumptive diagnoses of acute cholecystitis (6 acalculus and 4 calculus cholecystitis) were made in 10 patients, non-specific peritonitis in three patients, and acute appendicitis in one patients. Cholecystectomy, percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage, and appendectomy were performed in three patients. Transfused blood in the three patients who underwent invasive procedures and the 11 patients who received supportive treatment included packed red blood cells (24 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), fresh frozen plasma (84 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), and platelets (192 versus 180 units; P = 0.003). Patients who underwent invasive procedures also had prolonged time in the hospital (median = 11 versus 7 days; P = 0.015). To avoid unnecessary invasive procedure-related morbidity and mortality, this report underscores the importance of a careful differential diagnosis in patients with acute abdomen in a dengue-endemic setting.

  15. The Role of Spleen Stiffness in Determining the Severity and Bleeding Risk of Esophageal Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwi Young; Jin, Eun Hyo; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae Young; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Hong Sang; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varix and its hemorrhage are serious complications of liver cirrhosis. Recent studies have focused on noninvasive prediction of esophageal varices. We attempted to evaluate the association of liver and spleen stiffness (LS and SS) as measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, with the presence and severity of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic patients. We measured LS and SS, along with endoscopic examination of esophageal varices for a total of 125 cirrhotic patients at a single referral hospital in this prospective observational study. The diagnostic utility of noninvasive methods for identifying varices and their bleeding risk was compared, including LS, SS, spleen length, Child-Pugh score, and various serum fibrosis indices. Esophageal varices were present in 77 patients (61.6%). SS was significantly higher in patients with varices than in those without varices (3.58 ± 0.47 vs 3.02 ± 0.49; P < 0.001). A tendency toward increasing SS levels was observed with increasing severity of varices (no varix, 3.02 ± 0.49; F1, 3.39 ± 0.51; F2, 3.60 ± 0.42; F3, 3.85 ± 0.37; P < 0.001). SS was significantly higher in patients who experienced variceal hemorrhage than in those who did not (3.80 ± 0.36 vs 3.20 ± 0.51; P = 0.002). An optimal cut-off value of SS for high-risk varices (≥F2) or variceal hemorrhage was 3.40 m/s. SS was significantly correlated with the presence, severity, and bleeding risk of esophageal varices. Prompt endoscopic evaluation of variceal status and prophylactic measures based on the SS may be warranted for cirrhotic patients. PMID:26091449

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Impact of Obesity on Hemodynamic Stability During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Jones, Alan E.; Coleman, Thomas G.; Summers, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that morbid obesity may be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. Objectives: In this study, a theoretic analysis using a derivation of the Guyton model of cardiovascular physiology examines the expected impact of obesity on hemodynamic changes in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) and Cardiac Output (CO) during Hemorrhagic Shock (HS). Patients and Methods: Computer simulation studies were used to predict the relative impact of increasing Body Mass Index (BMI) on global hemodynamic parameters during HS. The analytic procedure involved recreating physiologic conditions associated with changing BMI for a virtual subject in an In Silico environment. The model was validated for the known effect of a BMI of 30 on iliofemoral venous pressures. Then, the relative effect of changing BMI on the outcome of target cardiovascular parameters was examined during simulated acute loss of blood volume in class II hemorrhage. The percent changes in these parameters were compared between the virtual nonobese and obese subjects. Model parameter values are derived from known population distributions, producing simulation outputs that can be used in a deductive systems analysis assessment rather than traditional frequentist statistical methodologies. Results: In hemorrhage simulation, moderate increases in BMI were found to produce greater decreases in MAP and CO compared to the normal subject. During HS, the virtual obese subject had 42% and 44% greater falls in CO and MAP, respectively, compared to the nonobese subject. Systems analysis of the model revealed that an increase in resistance to venous return due to changes in intra-abdominal pressure resulting from obesity was the critical mechanism responsible for the differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that obese patients in HS may have a higher risk of hemodynamic instability compared to their nonobese counterparts primarily due to obesity

  17. Detection of multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI).

    PubMed

    Kullnig, Petra E; Rauscher, Alexander; Witoszynskyj, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Kentouche, Karim; Reichenbach, Juergen R; Mentzel, Hans Joachim; Kaiser, Werner Alois

    2007-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combines magnitude and phase information from a high-resolution, fully velocity compensated, three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence. We report on the use of this MRI technique in a young patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and demonstrate a higher detection rate of hemorrhagic lesion in comparison with other T2*-weighted sequences.

  18. Acute hemoptysis and pulmonary hemorrhage after judo as presentation of intralobar sequestration.

    PubMed

    Kleffner, Tim; Holzer, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Feindt, Peter; Groetzner, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Intralobar sequestration (ILS) is a rare anomaly that is usually diagnosed with symptoms of cough, expectoration, or recurrent pneumonia in children. We experienced a case of an 11-year-old boy with massive hemoptysis after judo sports. He was admitted to hospital and intubated due to respiratory failure. His chest computed tomography (CT) scan which was performed without contrast agent revealed a large intrapulmonary hematoma or tumor, mimicking traumatic hemothorax. Due to blood loss and circulatory instability, emergency thoracotomy was performed and a massive intralobar hemorrhage due to a ruptured ILS artery was found. After lobectomy including resection of the ILS, the patient was stabilized and extubated. Aspergillus was detected in the resected lobe and postoperatively acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and invasive aspergillosis occurred and was treated specifically. However, the young patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. In young patients with hemoptysis and intrapulmonary hemorrhage after trauma, the possibility of ruptured ILS should be kept in mind. This report shows that ILS can have a dramatic course of disease, and for this reason a nonurgent resection should be considered in all patients when this diagnosis is made. PMID:22535674

  19. [Successful induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia complicated with brain hemorrhage and hyperleukocytosis].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takuya; Abe, Nana; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koyama, Satoshi; Miyashita, Kazuho; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yuki; Tachibana, Takayoshi; Kamijo, Aki; Tomita, Naoto; Ishigastubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Adequate management of hyperleukocytosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is essential for the prevention of life-threatening complications related to leukostasis and tumor lysis syndrome, but the optimal therapeutic strategy remains unclear. We report a 15-year-old girl with newly diagnosed AML who had extreme hyperleukocytosis (leukocyte count at diagnosis, 733,000/μl) leading to a brain hemorrhage. She was initially treated with hydroxyurea, but presented with brain hemorrhage due to leukostasis and underwent leukapheresis emergently with intensive care and mechanical ventilation. Full-dose standard induction chemotherapy was initiated after achieving gradual cytoreduction (leukocyte count, 465,000/μl) within five days after the initiation of therapy with hydroxyurea and leukapheresis. These treatments were successful and she experienced no complications. The patient ultimately recovered fully and was discharged with complete remission of AML. Although the effects of hydroxyurea and leukapheresis in the setting of hyperleukocytosis are still controversial, these initial treatments may contribute to successful bridging therapy followed by subsequent induction chemotherapy, especially in AML cases with extreme hyperleukocytosis or life-threatening leukostasis. PMID:26935637

  20. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (<3 days from ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  1. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy: an unusual diagnosis for the general pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diego Fontana Siqueira; Darcie, Ana Letícia Fornazieri; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Hein, Noely; Lo, Denise Swei; Yoshioka, Cristina Ryoka Miyao; Hirose, Maki; Cardoso, Debora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy (AHEI) is a rare leukocytoclastic vasculitis, clinically characterized by the classical triad: palpable purpuric skin lesions, edema and fever, and is commonly misdiagnosed as Henoch-Schönlein purpura. In addition to its sudden onset, AHEI is also characterized by its self-limited course with complete and spontaneous recovery occurring between 1 and 3 weeks. Because of the scarcity of studies on therapy with corticosteroids, the conservative approach is usually recommended. The authors report an unusual case of an one-year-old boy who presented with typical cutaneous rash of AHEI and orchitis, the latter showing complete resolution after less than 24 hours of prednisolone therapy. The authors call attention to this entity mainly as a differential diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and to the importance of new studies to establish the benefits of corticosteroid therapy for AHEI. PMID:26558246

  2. Blood soluble drag-reducing polymers prevent lethality from hemorrhagic shock in acute animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Kameneva, Marina V; Wu, Zhongjun J; Uraysh, Arkady; Repko, Brandon; Litwak, Kenneth N; Billiar, Timothy R; Fink, Mitchell P; Simmons, Richard L; Griffith, Bartley P; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, blood-soluble drag reducing polymers (DRPs) have been shown to significantly enhance hemodynamics in various animal models when added to blood at nanomolar concentrations. In the present study, the effects of the DRPs on blood circulation were tested in anesthetized rats exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock. The animals were acutely resuscitated either with a 2.5% dextran solution (Control) or using the same solution containing 0.0005% or 5 parts per million (ppm) concentration of one of two blood soluble DRPs: high molecular weight (MW=3500 kDa) polyethylene glycol (PEG-3500) or a DRP extracted from Aloe vera (AVP). An additional group of animals was resuscitated with 0.0075% (75 ppm) polyethylene glycol of molecular weight of 200 kDa (PEG-200), which possesses no drag-reducing ability. All of the animals were observed for two hours following the initiation of fluid resuscitation or until they expired. We found that infusion of the DRP solutions significantly improved tissue perfusion, tissue oxygenation, and two-hour survival rate, the latter from 19% (Control) and 14% (PEG-200) to 100% (AVP) and 100% (PEG-3500). Furthermore, the Control and PEG-200 animals that survived required three times more fluid to maintain their blood pressure than the AVP and PEG-3500 animals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying these observed beneficial hemodynamic effects of DRPs are discussed. Our findings suggest that the drag-reducing polymers warrant further investigation as a potential clinical treatment for hemorrhagic shock and possibly other microcirculatory disorders.

  3. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  4. Reevaluation of the linkage between acute hemorrhagic shock and bacterial translocation in the rat.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, M T; Rodriguez, L F; Chen, C Y; Smith, G S; Russell, D H; Myers, S I; Cocanour, C S; Reed, R L; Miller, T A

    1993-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the conditions under which acute periods of hemorrhagic shock induce bacterial translocation. Rats (at least six per group) were anesthetized intraperitoneally with the barbiturate, pentobarbital (50 or 65 mg/kg), or the inhalation anesthetic methoxyflurane. Following anesthesia, the femoral artery was catheterized, from which blood was withdrawn to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mmHg for 30, 60, or 90 min, followed by reinfusion of shed blood. Instrumented, but nonshocked animals served as controls. Rats were sacrificed at 0, 2, or 24 hr postshock, and quantitative bacterial cultures of the mesenteric lymph node complex (MLN), liver, and spleen were made. Within groups, the effects of heparinization were also determined. In pentobarbital-treated animals, regardless of the extent of heparinization, consistent translocation to both MLN and distant organs occurred when shock was prolonged for 90 min, and assessment of translocation was made 24 hr after reinfusion of shed blood. Furthermore, a mortality rate of approximately 30% was found in rats subjected to this protocol. The magnitude of translocation was less consistent, and did not differ from that in sham shock controls, under other conditions of shock and evaluation. In rats anesthetized with methoxyflurane, no mortality occurred, and no statistical significance between the incidence or degree of translocation in shocked animals vs. sham shock controls could be demonstrated, regardless of the shock protocol. In additional studies, effects of these anesthetics on intestinal morphology and superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) flow in the context of hemorrhagic shock were assessed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8348683

  5. Long Term Variceal Sclerotherapy: Is Endoscopic Sclerosis a Unique Therapeutic Approach and a True Alternative to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, A.; Rambach, W.

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic sclerotherapy has been used to control acute variceal haemorrhage which persists despite conservative therapy, prevent recurrent variceal haemorrhage in patients with a history of oesophageal haemorrhage, and to prevent a haemorrhage in patients with oesophageal varices who never bled. In this short paper I will cover our personal experience with more than 2000 patients receiving particularly paravariceal endoscopic sclerotherapy of bleeding esophageal varices, and especially present the results of our prospective and controlled randomized trials (Table 1) and underline the thesis that endoscopic sclerotherapy and surgical procedures for patients with portal hypertension are complementary supporting measures or options. PMID:1911473

  6. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  7. Severe bleeding from esophageal varices resistant to endoscopic treatment in a non cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Caronna, Roberto; Bezzi, Mario; Schiratti, Monica; Cardi, Maurizio; Prezioso, Giampaolo; Benedetti, Michele; Papini, Federica; Mangioni, Simona; Martino, Gabriele; Chirletti, Piero

    2008-01-01

    A non cirrhotic patient with esophageal varices and portal vein thrombosis had recurrent variceal bleeding unsuccessfully controlled by endoscopy and esophageal transection. Emergency transhepatic portography confirmed the thrombosed right branch of the portal vein, while the left branch appeared angulated, shifted and stenotic. A stent was successfully implanted into the left branch and the collateral vessels along the epatoduodenal ligament disappeared. In patients with esophageal variceal hemorrhage and portal thrombosis if endoscopy fails, emergency esophageal transection or nonselective portocaval shunting are indicated. The rare patients with only partial portal thrombosis can be treated directly with stenting through an angioradiologic approach. PMID:18644135

  8. Intensive Blood-Pressure Lowering in Patients with Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Barsan, William G; Hanley, Daniel F; Hsu, Chung Y; Martin, Renee L; Moy, Claudia S; Silbergleit, Robert; Steiner, Thorsten; Suarez, Jose I; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wang, Yongjun; Yamamoto, Haruko; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-15

    Background Limited data are available to guide the choice of a target for the systolic blood-pressure level when treating acute hypertensive response in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We randomly assigned eligible participants with intracerebral hemorrhage (volume, <60 cm(3)) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5 or more (on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating worse condition) to a systolic blood-pressure target of 110 to 139 mm Hg (intensive treatment) or a target of 140 to 179 mm Hg (standard treatment) in order to test the superiority of intensive reduction of systolic blood pressure to standard reduction; intravenous nicardipine to lower blood pressure was administered within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was death or disability (modified Rankin scale score of 4 to 6, on a scale ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) at 3 months after randomization, as ascertained by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment assignments. Results Among 1000 participants with a mean (±SD) systolic blood pressure of 200.6±27.0 mm Hg at baseline, 500 were assigned to intensive treatment and 500 to standard treatment. The mean age of the patients was 61.9 years, and 56.2% were Asian. Enrollment was stopped because of futility after a prespecified interim analysis. The primary outcome of death or disability was observed in 38.7% of the participants (186 of 481) in the intensive-treatment group and in 37.7% (181 of 480) in the standard-treatment group (relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.27; analysis was adjusted for age, initial GCS score, and presence or absence of intraventricular hemorrhage). Serious adverse events occurring within 72 hours after randomization that were considered by the site investigator to be related to treatment were reported in 1.6% of the patients in the intensive-treatment group and in 1.2% of those in the standard-treatment group. The rate of renal adverse events

  9. Intensive Blood-Pressure Lowering in Patients with Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Barsan, William G; Hanley, Daniel F; Hsu, Chung Y; Martin, Renee L; Moy, Claudia S; Silbergleit, Robert; Steiner, Thorsten; Suarez, Jose I; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wang, Yongjun; Yamamoto, Haruko; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-15

    Background Limited data are available to guide the choice of a target for the systolic blood-pressure level when treating acute hypertensive response in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We randomly assigned eligible participants with intracerebral hemorrhage (volume, <60 cm(3)) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5 or more (on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating worse condition) to a systolic blood-pressure target of 110 to 139 mm Hg (intensive treatment) or a target of 140 to 179 mm Hg (standard treatment) in order to test the superiority of intensive reduction of systolic blood pressure to standard reduction; intravenous nicardipine to lower blood pressure was administered within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was death or disability (modified Rankin scale score of 4 to 6, on a scale ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) at 3 months after randomization, as ascertained by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment assignments. Results Among 1000 participants with a mean (±SD) systolic blood pressure of 200.6±27.0 mm Hg at baseline, 500 were assigned to intensive treatment and 500 to standard treatment. The mean age of the patients was 61.9 years, and 56.2% were Asian. Enrollment was stopped because of futility after a prespecified interim analysis. The primary outcome of death or disability was observed in 38.7% of the participants (186 of 481) in the intensive-treatment group and in 37.7% (181 of 480) in the standard-treatment group (relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.27; analysis was adjusted for age, initial GCS score, and presence or absence of intraventricular hemorrhage). Serious adverse events occurring within 72 hours after randomization that were considered by the site investigator to be related to treatment were reported in 1.6% of the patients in the intensive-treatment group and in 1.2% of those in the standard-treatment group. The rate of renal adverse events

  10. Acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock caused by spontaneous rupture of renal cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yaman, İsmail; Sağlam, İsmet; Kurt, Kamile

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an important cause of end stage renal failure. Rarely, these patients may present with hemorrhagic shock caused by rupture of the renal cyst. The aim of this study was to report a rare case of a patient who arrived at the emergency department with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. A 58-year-old male with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. The patient was admitted to the Department of Surgery with diagnosis of acute abdomen and perirenal hematoma. Although the patient was on conservative treatment, his symptoms did not improve and the patient was operated emergently. During exploration, there was bleeding from the right polycystic kidney, which was 30×20 cm in dimension. The patient underwent nephrectomy and drainage of the hematoma, and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day without any problems. Bleeding due to rupture of a cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs rarely but it may be life threatening. Although conservative methods are often preferable in treatment, surgery can be life saving for patients in whom the clinical situation does not improve.

  11. Studies on porcine pancreatic elastase activity. II. Immunoreactive elastase level during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Matsuno, S; Noto, N; Saitoh, Y; Sato, T

    1980-06-01

    Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis was produced in pig to study serum concentration of elastase and its physiological role. Pancreatitis was induced in two groups of young pigs by the injection of autologous bile. One group was injected with autologous bile (0.5 ml/kg) at high pressure, and the second group was injected as low pressure (100 cm H2O). Then femoral blood, portal blood and thoracic lymph were sampled at scheduled time intervals. The control level of immunoreactive elastase was around 90 ng/ml in each site, which significantly increased beginning 15 min after bile injection; the level of immunoreactive elastase was higher in the thoracic lymph duct than in the femoral and portal vein. The total and free elastase of both groups in pancreatic tissue were significantly decreased in pancreatitis, and an abundance of immunoreactive elastase was found in the ascites. The increasing pattern of immunoreactive elastase and amylase after bile injection was very similar. Therefore, the level of immunoreactive elastase was considered to be inadequate to determine the grade of severity of pancreatitis as well as the level of amylase which is already known.

  12. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Namas, R; Ghuma, A; Hermus, L; Zamora, R; Okonkwo, DO; Billiar, TR; Vodovotz, Y

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partially propagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP's). DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and non-human primates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS and TBI in the near future. PMID:21483522

  13. Acute myocarditis in dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report and review of cardiac complications in dengue-affected patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Lee, Wen-Huei; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) complicated by acute myocarditis and review the literature. A 65-year-old woman experienced DHF due to dengue virus serotype 3, complicated with acute myocarditis and acute pulmonary edema. Clinically this masqueraded as acute myocardial infarction, with an electrocardiographically depressed ST segment in precordial leads and elevated serum cardiac-specific troponin I level. Under supportive management, the patient recovered 3 days later. A total of 18 pertinent articles involving 339 dengue-affected patients with cardiac complications were found by PubMed search. Clinical manifestations of cardiac complications varied considerably, from self-limiting tachy-brady arrhythmia to severe myocardial damage, leading to hypotension and pulmonary edema. Although rare, a fatal outcome was reported in some cases of dengue with cardiac complications. To avoid otherwise preventable morbidity and mortality, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for cardiac complications in patients with dengue illness and should manage this accordingly.

  14. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  15. Perfusion Imaging in the 3 Hour Time Window Predicts a tPA-Associated Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Edwards, Adam; Dehkharghani, Seena; Nahab, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    Perfusion imaging is being evaluated in acute ischemic stroke patients to identify those who may benefit from reperfusion therapies beyond standard thrombolytic time windows but limited data is available on its utility in patients presenting within standard thrombolytic time windows. We report a case of a patient presenting within the 3 hour time window where computerized tomographic perfusion imaging before intravenous thrombolysis identified a large volume of severely ischemic tissue and where intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration subsequently resulted in a fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Whether perfusion imaging can predict an increased risk of tPA-associated symptomatic hemorrhage in patients presenting within standard thrombolytic time windows requires further study. PMID:25692511

  16. [Prevention of the 1st bleeding of esophageal varices: review of the literature and clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Di Lecce, F; Contini, S

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on prophylactic sclerosis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics, taking as a starting point their personal experience. The natural history of varices and the criteria of their hemorrhagic risk are described; moreover are presented the results of the most important controlled studies of prophylactic surgery, sclerosis and beta-blocking drugs. In spite of the rather encouraging results after sclerosis at the long-term follow-up and the promising aspects of beta-blocking agents, it is not felt to recommend, according to the literature, a routine application of prophylactic sclerosis, a procedure which should be reserved to leading centers in controlled studies.

  17. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  18. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation. PMID:22576007

  19. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3).

    PubMed

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  20. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3)

    PubMed Central

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  1. [Morpho-biophysical research of erythrocytes of intact and vagotomized rats in various terms after the acute hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Tsibulevsky, A Yu; Dubovaya, T K; Maksina, A G; Sokolinsky, B Z; Pyatnitsky, A M; Medovy, V S; Anisimova, V E

    2013-01-01

    The acute massive hemorrhage (35-37% of the blood volume) at rats is accompanied by changes of morphological (diameter, the area, polarizations, the form-factor, integrated and specific absorbency) and biophysical (a relief of a surface and microviscosity of a lipid phase of plasmolemma) characteristics of erythrocytes. Thus character and dynamics of response of erythron initially intact and vagotomized (14 days after operation) animals essentially differ: the former demonstrate significant changes in 3-10 h and 240 h and the latter--in 0.5 h and 96 h. PMID:23805715

  2. Gastroprotection Studies of Schiff Base Zinc (II) Derivative Complex against Acute Superficial Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A; Majid, Nazia Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v), orally. Ethanol (95% v/v) was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10−5 M/kg) was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II) complex (2.181×10−5 and 4.362×10−5 M/kg) protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10−5 M/kg). Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism. PMID:24058648

  3. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  4. Multiple esophageal variceal ruptures with massive ascites due to myelofibrosis-induced portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Koichi; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year old man had been diagnosed at 42 years of age as having polycythemia vera and had been monitored at another hospital. Progression of anemia had been recognized at about age 70, and the patient was thus referred to our center in 2008 where secondary myelofibrosis was diagnosed based on bone marrow biopsy findings. Hematemesis due to rupture of esophageal varices occurred in January and February of 2011. The bleeding was stopped by endoscopic variceal ligation. Furthermore, in March of the same year, hematemesis recurred and the patient was transported to our center. He was in irreversible hemorrhagic shock and died. The autopsy showed severe bone marrow fibrosis with mainly argyrophilic fibers, an observation consistent with myelofibrosis. The liver weighed 1856 g the spleen 1572 g, indicating marked hepatosplenomegaly. The liver and spleen both showed extramedullary hemopoiesis. Myelofibrosis is often complicated by portal hypertension and is occasionally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to esophageal varices. A patient diagnosed as having myelofibrosis needs to be screened for esophageal/gastric varices. Myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully decide the therapeutic strategy in consideration of the patient’s concomitant conditions, treatment invasiveness and quality of life. PMID:22851873

  5. [Brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a surgical case report].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-01

    We report a rare case of brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 79-year-old woman presented with sudden headache and monoplegia of the right upper limb 10 years after diagnosis of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma. Despite the known metastatic lesions in the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, she had been well for 10 years since thyroidectomy, focal irradiation and internal radiation of 131I. CT demonstrated intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity. She underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset and the histological diagnosis was metastatic brain tumor of thyroid papillary carcinoma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the monoplegia was improved. Papillary thyroid carcinoma has a relatively benign course, and surgical removal of the brain metastasis is able to contribute to longer survival times for patients.

  6. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  7. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: a 5-year experience with new antileukemic agents and a new approach to preventing fatal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Feldman, E J; Arlin, Z A; Ahmed, T; Mittelman, A; Ascensao, J L; Puccio, C A; Coombe, N; Baskind, P

    1989-01-01

    Forty-six induction courses were administered to 32 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. There were 28 males and 18 females with a median age of 39.5 (range 19-68). Twelve patients were previously untreated, 32 were in relapse, and 2 were refractory to primary induction chemotherapy. Heparin 7.5-10 units/kg/h by continuous infusion, 4-6 units of platelets and 1-2 units of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) every 12 h were given to all patients. Previously untreated patients received either daunorubicin, idarubicin or mitoxantrone in combination with cytarabine (Ara-C). For relapsed and refractory patients, regimens included amsacrine with high-dose cytarabine (Amsa/HiDac), homoharringtonine (HHT) alone, or with Ara-C, mitoxantrone and bisantrene. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in only 1 out of 46 courses (2%). Complete remission rates (CR) were as follows: previously untreated 83% (10/12), relapsed 66% (21/32), primary refractory 50% (1/2). Amsa/HiDac resulted in a 71% (10/14) CR and HHT-based regimens achieved a 46% (6/13) CR. These regimens are effective and the value of their incorporation into primary therapy should be studied. The use of heparin with platelet and FFP transfusions every 12 h reduces the risk of hemorrhage during induction therapy.

  8. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF.

  9. Promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis therapy for acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-qin; Wei, Jing-jing; Xia, Wan; Li, Ji-huang; Liu, Ai-ju; Yin, Su-bing; Wang, Chen; Song, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Guo-qing; Fan, Ji-ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the current evidence available regarding the promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis (PBCRBS) therapy for Chinese patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: Six databases were searched from their inception to November 2013. The studies assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' were selected for detailed assessment and meta-analysis. The herbal compositions for PBCRBS therapy for acute ICH patients were also assessed. Results: From the 6 databases, 292 studies claimed randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Nine studies with 798 individuals were assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' by using the Cochrane RoB tool. Meta-analysis showed that PBCRBS monotherapy and adjuvant therapy for acute ICH could improve the neurological function deficit, reduce the volume of hematoma and perihematomal edema, and lower the mortality rate and dependency. Moreover, there were fewer adverse effects when compared with Western conventional medication controls. Xueshuantong Injection and Fufang Danshen Injection, Buyang Huanwu Decoction and Liangxue Tongyu formula, and three herbs (danshen root, sanqi and leech) were the most commonly used Chinese herbal patent injections, herbal prescriptions and single herbs, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the apparently positive findings, it is premature to conclude that there is sufficient efficacy and safety of PBCRBS for ICH because of the high clinical heterogeneity of the included studies and small number of trials in the meta-analysis. Further large sample-sizes and rigorously designed RCTs are needed. PMID:25960132

  10. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  11. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  12. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  13. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  14. Calculation of the Residual Blood Volume after Acute, Non-Ongoing Hemorrhage Using Serial Hematocrit Measurements and the Volume of Isotonic Fluid Infused: Theoretical Hypothesis Generating Study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won Sup; Chon, Sung-Bin

    2016-05-01

    Fluid resuscitation, hemostasis, and transfusion is essential in care of hemorrhagic shock. Although estimation of the residual blood volume is crucial, the standard measuring methods are impractical or unsafe. Vital signs, central venous or pulmonary artery pressures are inaccurate. We hypothesized that the residual blood volume for acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage was calculable using serial hematocrit measurements and the volume of isotonic solution infused. Blood volume is the sum of volumes of red blood cells and plasma. For acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage, red blood cell volume would not change. A certain portion of the isotonic fluid would increase plasma volume. Mathematically, we suggest that the residual blood volume after acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage might be calculated as 0·25N/[(Hct1/Hct2)-1], where Hct1 and Hct2 are the initial and subsequent hematocrits, respectively, and N is the volume of isotonic solution infused. In vivo validation and modification is needed before clinical application of this model.

  15. Calculation of the Residual Blood Volume after Acute, Non-Ongoing Hemorrhage Using Serial Hematocrit Measurements and the Volume of Isotonic Fluid Infused: Theoretical Hypothesis Generating Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation, hemostasis, and transfusion is essential in care of hemorrhagic shock. Although estimation of the residual blood volume is crucial, the standard measuring methods are impractical or unsafe. Vital signs, central venous or pulmonary artery pressures are inaccurate. We hypothesized that the residual blood volume for acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage was calculable using serial hematocrit measurements and the volume of isotonic solution infused. Blood volume is the sum of volumes of red blood cells and plasma. For acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage, red blood cell volume would not change. A certain portion of the isotonic fluid would increase plasma volume. Mathematically, we suggest that the residual blood volume after acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage might be calculated as 0·25N/[(Hct1/Hct2)–1], where Hct1 and Hct2 are the initial and subsequent hematocrits, respectively, and N is the volume of isotonic solution infused. In vivo validation and modification is needed before clinical application of this model. PMID:27134507

  16. Gluing Gastric Varices in 2012: Lessons Learnt Over 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Vivek A; Verma, Abhai

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices (GV) continues to pose a challenge to the endoscopist and no consensus has been reached on the best way for treating these patients. Gastric variceal obturation (GVO) with the tissue adhesive, N-2-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBC), is considered the treatment of first-choice for this condition in most parts of the world. The liquid monomer polymerizes into a solid cast, obturating the vessel within 10–20 s of coming in contact with ionic solutions such as blood. Gastric variceal obturation achieves hemostasis in over 90% of patients with active bleeding, eradicates GV in over 80% of these patients, and re-bleeding occurs in 3–30%. These results are comparable with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS; over 90% hemostasis in acute bleeding with re-bleeding in 15–30%). Though, there has been no direct comparison with GVO, balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of GV (BRTO) achieves near 100% obliteration with recurrence in 0–10% and is superior to TIPS for hemostasis in active bleeding when used in combination with transcatheter sclerotherapy. Several complications have been described for GVO including thromboembolic complications which occur in 0.5–4.3% and may be devastating in some. Many of the complications and the variability in results of GVO can be attributed to variations in injection technique. The use of a standardized injection technique has been reported to achieve 100% hemostasis and obliteration with 6.9% re-bleeding and no embolic complications. Gastric variceal obturation with NBC continues to be the first-choice therapy for GV bleeding outside Japan. Adherence to a standard injection technique will maximize hemostasis and eradication of GV while minimizing complications of therapy. PMID:25755406

  17. Blood volume of nonsplenectomized and splenectomized cats before and after acute hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breznock, E.M.; Strack, D.

    1982-10-01

    Blood volume (BV) was determined in awake, nonsplenectomized (NSPX) and splenectomized (SPX) cats before and after hemorrhage (6 ml/kg). Each NSPX cat had a determined BV at least 10 ml/kg greater than the same cat after splenectomy. The mean BV of SPX cats was 43.4 +/- 8.94. ml kg (4.3% of body weight). The calculated RBC masses of NSPX and SPX cats were 17.0 +/- 4.07 and 12.2 +/- 1.12 ml/kg, respectively. Each NSPX cat had apparent RBC masses of 5 ml/kg greater than that of the same cat after splenectomy was done. At 1 hour after a hemorrhage, the BV and RBC masses determined in SPX cats were 46.7 +/- 12.1 and 9.7 +/- 1.90 ml/kg, respectively. Extravascular-to-intravascular fluid flux (calculated from RBC masses and plasma protein dilution) was approximately 0.80% of body weight. The indirect method with /sup 51/Cr-labeled RBC for BV determination was accurate and precise in awake, SPX cats; in awake, NSPX cats, the /sup 51/Cr-labeled RBC dilution method was precise, but not accurate. The spleen in the cat resulted in marked overestimations of BV and RBC masses.

  18. Ultrastructural mitochondria changes in perihematomal brain and neuroprotective effects of Huperzine A after acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiying; Jiang, Mei; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Guo; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to observe the ultrastructural changes of neuronal mitochondria in perihematomal brain tissue and assess the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A (HA, a mitochondrial protector) following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Brain hemorrhage was induced in adult Sprague Dawley rats by injecting autologous blood into the striatum and then removing the brains 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 hours later to analyze mitochondrial ultrastructure in a blinded manner. Parallel groups of ICH rats were treated with HA or saline immediately after ICH. Perihematomal apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation were tracked by immunoblots, and neurobehavioral test results were compared between the groups. Results Mitochondria in perihematomal neurons demonstrated dramatic changes including mitochondrial swelling, intracristal dilation, and decreased matrix density. HA treatment decreased mitochondrial injury and apoptosis, inhibited caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation, and improved behavioral recovery. Conclusion These data show that ICH induces dramatic mitochondrial damage, and HA exhibits protective effects possibly through ameliorating mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest a new direction for novel therapeutics. PMID:26508860

  19. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  20. Anticoagulation Reversal Strategies for Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients Presenting with Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joshua K; Chen, Peter C; Falvey, Jennifer; Melvin, Amber L; Lidder, Alcina K; Lowenstein, Lisa M; Miranpuri, Amrendra S; Knight, Peter A; Massey, H Todd

    2016-01-01

    The safety of alternative vitamin K antagonist (VKA) reversal strategies in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD's) who present with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are not well known. A review of LVAD patients with ICH from May 2008 to 2015 was conducted, comparing the safety and efficacy of 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate-assisted VKA reversal (4F-PCC group, n = 10) to reversal with traditional agents alone (no-PCC group, n = 10). An analysis of a no-reversal strategy in selected patients (n = 11) with ICH was additionally performed. Thirty-one cases of ICH on LVAD support were reviewed. The rate of post reversal thromboembolic events was not significantly different between 4F-PCC and no-PCC patients (0% vs. 10%, p = 1.0); however, the time to VKA reversal was shorter (474 vs. 945 minutes, p = 0.02) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) requirements lower (1.9 vs. 3.6 units, p = 0.05) in 4F-PCC patients, with no difference in mortality between groups (p = 1.0). Eleven patients (mean ICH volume: 0.4 cm) were successfully managed without active VKA reversal, with no increased hemorrhage noted on neuroimaging. These results suggest that 4F-PCC-assisted reversal in LVAD patients is safe and may improve the efficacy of VKA reversal. Our findings also indicate that carefully selected patients with small ICH volumes may be safely managed by discontinuing anticoagulation and allowing the international normalized ratio (INR) to normalize physiologically. PMID:27347708

  1. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Osborne, Scott; Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven; Li, Ruizong; Erbland, Marcia

    2016-10-01

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  2. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  3. Postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, Cindy W

    2012-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a very common obstetric emergency with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Understanding its etiology is fundamental to effectively managing PPH in an acute setting. Active management of the third stage of labor is also a key component in its prevention. Management strategies include conservative measures (medications, uterine tamponade, and arterial embolization) as well as surgical interventions (arterial ligations, compression sutures, and hysterectomy). Creating a standardized PPH protocol and running simulation-based drills with a multidisciplinary team may also help decrease maternal morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes, although further studies are needed. PMID:22309588

  4. Acute-phase proteins in stroke: influences of its cause (cerebral hemorrhage or infarction), of the cerebral site of infarction, and of the sex of patients.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, D A; Haţegan, D; Jipescu, I; Steinbruch, L; Scu, M G

    1991-01-01

    In most of the 129 patients with a recent stroke by cerebral hemorrhage or infarction a note-worthy acute-phase response was found, as demonstrated by important quantitative alterations of blood levels of several acute-phase proteins (APP). These alterations were different in patients with cerebral hemorrhage as compared to those with cerebral infarction. The alterations due to cerebral infarction were not different according to the site of the infarction in brain, i.e. in the brain territories irrigated by the carotid artery system or by the basilar artery system. The APP alterations do not depend on the sex of patients or on the time elapsed from stroke-onset to blood collection.

  5. Acute anti-emetic withdrawal associated with a hemorrhagic cerebellar arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, S; Tomlinson, K; Valles, J; Hundert, M; Bagdonas, R; Eisenberg, M

    2010-08-01

    We present a 67-year-old right-handed male with a brachium pontis arteriovenous malformation on continuous anti-emetic therapy who demonstrated acute withdrawal symptoms after the abrupt discontinuation of ondansetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist. Removal of anti-emetic therapy led to the development of extreme flushing and tremor, but subsequent return of ondansetron resulted in the resolution of these symptoms. This is the first clinical report demonstrating acute withdrawal from an anti-emetic agent and we further highlight the need for future studies evaluating not only arterial supply with pressure gradients and anatomical location, but also the association with periventricular venous drainage, venous drainage stenosis, and mass effect from venous stasis as this may contribute partly to the sensitivity of the serotonergic receptors seen here. PMID:20488707

  6. [Structural-metabolic characteristics of the myocardium in acute hemorrhage and hyperbaric oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Berkutskaia, T S; Bykov, E G; Leonov, A N

    1975-01-01

    Histochemical and pathomorphological changes in the myocardium in acute loss of blood and hyperbaric oxygenation were investigated in experiments on 130 white rats. It was established that acute loss of blood brought about an activation of phosphorylase, a decrease in the content of glycogen, an inhibition of the activity of cytochrome oxidase and succinic dehydrogenase in the myocardium. Foci of dystrophy were formed in the subendocaridal zone of the two ventricles and septum. Oxygenobarotherapy contributed to normalization of the level of activity of enzymes, preservation of glycogen, reduced the extent of manifestation of dystrophic changes in myocardiocytes. Hyperbaric oxygenation of healthy animals led to changes in the enzymatic activity in the myocardium. Dystrophic changes were noted in individual myocardiocytes. The data obtained testify to a direct influence of oxygen on metabolism of the myocardial cells.

  7. Risk of Hemorrhage in Combined Neuroform Stenting and Coil Embolization of Acutely Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jankowitz, B.; Thomas, A.J.; Vora, N.; Gupta, R.; Levy, E.; Yamamoto, J.; Kassam, A.; Gologorsky, Y.; Panapitiya, N.; Sandhu, E.; Crago, E.; Hricik, A.; Lee, K.; Gallek, M.; Jovin, T.; Horowitz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Stenting as adjuvant therapy for the coiling of acutely ruptured aneurysms remains controversial due to the necessity of anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications. We report our experience using the Neuroform stent in the management of 41 aneurysms in 40 patients over a period of three years. For aneurysms whose open surgical risk remains excessive with a morphology that would preclude complete embolization, the risks of stenting may be warranted. PMID:20557738

  8. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  9. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  10. The radical scavenger edaravone improves neurologic function and perihematomal glucose metabolism after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hanbing; Cui, Derong; Yang, Dehua; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhao, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative injury caused by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the progression of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced secondary brain injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that the free radical scavenger edaravone may prevent neuronal injury and brain edema after ICH. However, the influence of edaravone on cerebral metabolism in the early stages after ICH and the underlying mechanism have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of edaravone on perihematomal glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluorordeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Additionally, the neurologic deficits, brain edemas, and cell death that followed ICH were quantitatively analyzed. After blood infusion, the rats treated with edaravone showed significant improvement in both forelimb placing and corner turn tests compared with those treated with vehicle. Moreover, the brain water content of the edaravone-treated group was significantly decreased compared with that of the vehicle group on day 3 after ICH. PET/CT images of ICH rats exhibited obvious decreases in FDG standardized uptake values in perihematomal region on day 3, and the lesion-to-normal ratio of the edaravone-treated ICH rats was significantly increased compared with that of the control rats. Calculation of the brain injury volumes from the PET/CT images revealed that the volumes of the blood-induced injuries were significantly smaller in the edaravone group compared with the vehicle group. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assays performed 3 days after ICH revealed that the numbers of apoptotic cells in perihematomal region of edaravone-treated ICH rats were decreased relative to the vehicle group. Thus, the present study demonstrates that edaravone has scavenging properties that attenuate neurologic behavioral deficits and brain edema in the early period of ICH. Additionally, edaravone may improve

  11. Urea for treatment of acute SIADH in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia occurring as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The efficacy and safety of urea as treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia has not been reported in this population. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to our department for nontraumatic SAH between January 2003 and December 2008 (n = 368). All patients with SIADH-induced hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 135 mEq/L, urine sodium > 20 mEq/L, and osmolality > 200 mOsm/kg; absence of overt dehydration or hypovolemia; no peripheral edema or renal failure; no history of adrenal or thyroid disease) routinely received urea per os when hyponatremia was associated with clinical deterioration or remained less than 130 mEq/L despite saline solution administration. Results Forty-two patients developed SIADH and were treated with urea. Urea was started after a median of 7 (IQR, 5–10) days and given orally at doses of 15–30 g tid or qid for a median of 5 (IQR, 3–7) days. The median plasma sodium increase over the first day of treatment was 3 (IQR, 1–6) mEq/L. Hyponatremia was corrected in all patients, with median times to Na+ >130 and >135 mEq/L of 1 (IQR, 1–2) and 3 (IQR, 2–4) days, respectively. Urea was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were reported. Conclusions Oral urea is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia in SAH patients. PMID:22647340

  12. Evaluation of a computer-aided detection algorithm for timely diagnosis of small acute intracranial hemorrhage on computed tomography in a critical care environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2009-02-01

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (AIH) is a primary task in the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) brain scans of patients suffering from acute neurological disturbances or after head trauma. Interpretation can be difficult especially when the lesion is inconspicuous or the reader is inexperienced. We have previously developed a computeraided detection (CAD) algorithm to detect small AIH. One hundred and thirty five small AIH CT studies from the Los Angeles County (LAC) + USC Hospital were identified and matched by age and sex with one hundred and thirty five normal studies. These cases were then processed using our AIH CAD system to evaluate the efficacy and constraints of the algorithm.

  13. Intracranial hemorrhage in acute and chronic childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura over a ten-year period: an Egyptian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen; Elbarbary, Nancy; Khaddah, Normine; Abdelwahab, Magy; El Rashidy, Farida; Hassab, Hoda; Al-Tonbary, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a rare but major cause of death in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The authors reviewed data of 1,840 patient with ITP, from 5 pediatric hematology centers in Egypt from 1997 to 2007, to study the incidence and risk factors of ICH. Ten cases of ICH were identified with a median age at presentation of 7.5 years; 4 patients had acute ITP, 2 persistent and 4 chronic. The platelet count was <10 x 10(9)/l in 7 cases, and only 1 patient had a history of head trauma. Seven children were on treatment prior to or at the time of occurrence of ICH and all were treated by pharmacotherapy. Two children died shortly afterwards due to late referral to a specialized center. Our results suggest that treatment does not prevent ICH and that it can occur at any time during the course of the disease. Delayed referral can be considered a risk factor for unfavorable outcome of ICH, highlighting the importance of teaching sessions for patients and their parents to minimize subsequent morbidity and mortality of ICH in children with ITP. PMID:19955713

  14. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes in adults experiencing dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2009-04-01

    In a retrospective study, acute renal failure (ARF) was found in 10 (3.3%) among 304 hospitalized adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 6 (60%) of the 10 patients with ARF died, whereas all 294 patients without ARF (controls) survived (P < 0.001). Compared with the controls, DHF patients with ARF were found to be significantly older (P = 0.002) and male predominant (P < 0.001) and to have higher frequency of previous stroke (P = 0.005), chronic renal insufficiency (P = 0.046), dengue shock syndrome (DSS; P < 0.001), gastrointestinal bleeding (P < 0.001), and concurrent bacteremia (P = 0.009), lower hemoglobin (P = 0.003) and serum albumin levels (P = 0.003), and higher incidences of prolonged prothrombin time (P < 0.001), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.001), and alanine aminotransferase levels (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed DSS (odd ratio = 220.0; P < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for development of ARF in DHF patients. The high fatality rate in DHF patients complicated with ARF in our series underscore the importance of clinicians' alertness to this potentially fatal complication so that initiation of timely appropriate treatment is possible.

  15. [Role of computerized tomography in percutaneous drainage of acute infected necrotic-hemorrhagic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Violino, P; Ghirardo, D; Fioranti, L; Borrelli, M; Scarrone, A; Pancione, L; Ambrogi, C; Ferro, C

    1996-09-01

    In the last few years, Computed Tomography (CT) has emerged as the most sensitive and reliable imaging technique to diagnose acute pancreatitis (AP). Besides assessing the extent of damage to the pancreas and to periglandular tissue. CT can recognize the major early and late complications of the disease promptly and with extreme accuracy. We investigated the diagnostic capabilities of CT in controlling AP development and tried to assess the role of interventional radiology as a therapeutic support after or instead of surgery in treating the necrotic forms of pancreatitis complicated by sepsis. From 1989 to 1995, acute pancreatitis mostly due to biliary tract disease and alcoholism was diagnosed in 228 patients. Necrotic processes were identified in 105 of them since disease onset; septic complications developed in 57 patients. Surgery was performed in 42 patients, but the result was poor in 11 of them (30%) and CT showed the persistence of some infectious pancreatic exudate which had been drained insufficiently. Since sepsis persisted in these patients, the exudate was aspirated percutaneously after positioning appropriate drainage means guided by abdominal CT. Sepsis resolved completely in 10 patients, while one required subsequent surgery. Percutaneous drainage catheters were positioned in 15 patients as the treatment of choice, under CT and US guidance. Sepsis resolved in 7 cases only (45%), while 3 of the extant patients died and 5 needed surgery. The results of our experience demonstrate the effectiveness of percutaneous drainage under CT guidance. However, this technique should be used after and as a support to surgery, the latter remaining the treatment of choice for infectious necrotic AP. Thus, in our experience, the use of percutaneous aspiration instead of surgery proved to be a less effective tool in curing this condition and its use should therefore be limited to high-risk surgical patients.

  16. Sclerotherapy Of Esophageal Varices In Severe Hemophilia A Patient And High Titer Inhibitor--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Andrzej B; Dąbrowski, Wojciech P; Szczepanik, Anna M; Pielaciński, Konrad; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    In cirrhotic hemophilia patients bleeding from esophageal varices is a serious clinical condition due to congenital deficiency of clotting factors VIII or IX, decreased prothrombin synthesis and hypersplenic thrombocytopenia. In hemophiliac with high-titer inhibitor bypassing therapy is required with activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) or recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa). Doses and duration treatment with these agents following endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices have not been yet established. Authors report the first case of a severe hemophilia A patient with high titer inhibitor (40 BU) treated with repeated injection sclerotherapy. The patient was admitted with symptoms of massive esophageal variceal hemorrhage ceased with emergency sclerotherapy. Bypassing therapy was administered with aPCC at initial dose of 72.5 U/kg and then with average daily dose of 162 U/kg through 5 days. To achieved a total eradication of esophageal varices the patient was then subjected to four elective sclerotherapy procedures. Two were covered by aPCC with daily dose of 120 U/kg and 145 U/kg for 4 and 3 days respectively and the following two procedures were covered by rFVIIa with the initial dose of 116 µg/kg and the next doses of 87 µg/kg administered every 3 hours in procedure day and every 4 hours on the next two days. During all procedures excellent hemostasis was achieved and no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed. Bypassing regimen therapy with aPCC and rFVIIa we applied have been shown to be safe and effective in this patient subjected to sclerotherapy procedures.

  17. Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis (massive necrosis) with fat necrosis induced in mice by DL-ethionine fed with a choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, B.; Estes, L. W.; Longnecker, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    Female, albino mice were fed a choline-deficient diet containing 0.5% DL-ethionine. All animals died within 5 days due to the development of an acute hemorrhagic pancreatis with fat necrosis throughout the peritoneal cavity. The apancreatitis was characterized by a massive necrosis of the exocrine parenchyma with intense hemorrhage and inflammatory reaction of the stroma. The sequence of histologic and ultrastructural alterations occurring in the acinar cells of the pancreas were studied in mice fed the diet for 1, 2, and 3 days. Major findings consited of accumulation of zymogen granules, vacuolation due to foci of cytoplasmic degradation, and alterations in the morphology of the zymogen granules. The pancreatitis appears to be due to intraparenchymal activation of zymogens, resulting from a synergistic action of choline deficiency with the basic toxicity of ethionine toward the acinar cells of the pancreas. The experimental model simulates closely the acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with fat necrosis occurring in humans and may prove useful for exploring the pathogenesis of this condition. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 PMID:1094837

  18. Analysis of factors affecting hemorrhagic diathesis and overall survival in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Seul; Koh, Myeong Seok; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Suee; Oh, Sung Yong; Han, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study investigated whether patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) truly fulfill the diagnostic criteria of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), as proposed by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) and the Korean Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (KSTH), and analyzed which component of the criteria most contributes to bleeding diathesis. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis was conducted on newly diagnosed APL patients between January 1995 and May 2012. Results: A total of 46 newly diagnosed APL patients were analyzed. Of these, 27 patients (58.7%) showed initial bleeding. The median number of points per patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of overt DIC by the ISTH and the KSTH was 5 (range, 1 to 7) and 3 (range, 1 to 4), respectively. At diagnosis of APL, 22 patients (47.8%) fulfilled the overt DIC diagnostic criteria by either the ISTH or KSTH. In multivariate analysis of the ISTH or KSTH diagnostic criteria for overt DIC, the initial fibrinogen level was the only statistically significant factor associated with initial bleeding (p = 0.035), but it was not associated with overall survival (OS). Conclusions: Initial fibrinogen level is associated with initial presentation of bleeding of APL patients, but does not affect OS. PMID:26552464

  19. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  20. Bleeding Ectopic Varices as the First Manifestation of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Brij; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic varices are defined as dilated portosystemic collateral veins in locations other than the gastroesophageal region. We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding as the first manifestation of portal hypertension. We diagnosed ectopic duodenal varices without gastroesophageal varices on upper GI endoscopy and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO) on CT angiography and managed this case. PMID:25374725

  1. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  2. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  3. The Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Video Capsule Endoscopy Compared to Other Strategies to Manage Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Andrew C.; Ward, Michael J.; Gralnek, Ian M.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Study objective Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a common presentation in hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). A novel diagnostic approach is to use video capsule endoscopy to directly visualize the upper GI tract and identify bleeding. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the relative costs and benefits of video capsule endoscopy compared to other strategies in low to moderate risk ED patients with acute upper GI hemorrhage. Methods We constructed a model using standard decision analysis software to examine the cost-effectiveness of four available strategies for a base-case patient who presents to the ED with either mild or moderate risk scenarios (by Glasgow-Blatchford Score) for requiring invasive hemostatic intervention (i.e., endoscopic, surgical, etc.) The four available diagnostic strategies were (1) direct imaging with video capsule endoscopy performed in the ED, (2) risk stratification using the Glasgow-Blatchford score, (3) nasogastric tube placement and, finally, (4) an admit-all strategy. Results In the low-risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy was preferred strategy (cost $5,691, 14.69 QALYs) and more cost effective than the remaining strategies including nasogastric tube strategy (cost $8,159, 14.69 QALYs), risk stratification strategy (cost $10,695, 14.69 QALYs) and admit-all strategy (cost $22,766, 14.68 QALYs). In the moderate risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy continued to be preferred strategy (cost $9,190, 14.56 QALYs) compared to nasogastric tube (cost $9,487, 14.58 QALYs, ICER $15,891) and more cost effective than admit-all strategy (cost, $22,584, 14.54 QALYs.) Conclusion Video capsule endoscopy may be cost-effective for low and moderate risk patients presenting to the ED with acute upper GI hemorrhage. PMID:24961149

  4. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  5. International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Scoring System for disseminated intravascular coagulation ≥ 6: a new predictor of hemorrhagic early death in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Mirjana; Suvajdzic, Nada; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Kurtovic, Nada Kraguljac; Sretenovic, Aleksandra; Elezovic, Ivo; Tomin, Dragica

    2013-03-01

    High-hemorrhagic early death (ED) rate is a major impediment in the managing of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our group of 56 newly diagnosed APL patients, ED occurred in 12 subjects, due to endocranial bleeding (8/12), differentiation syndrome (2/12), or infection (2/12). Predictors of hemorrhagic ED were as follows: white blood cells count ≥ 20 × 10(9)/L (P = 0.002337), Eastern cooperative oncology group performance status ≥ 3 (P = 0.00173), fibrinogen level <2 g/L (P = 0.004907), prothrombin time <50% (P = 0.0124), and International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Scoring System for disseminated intravascular coagulation (ISTH DIC score) ≥ 6 (P = 0.00741). Multivariate analysis indicated ISTH DIC score ≥ 6 to be the most significant predictor for hemorrhagic ED (P = 0.008). The main finding of this study is that simple coagulation-related tests, performed on hospital admission and combined in the ISTH DIC score, might help to identify patients at high risk for fatal bleeding needing more aggressive supportive measures.

  6. Mismatch of Low Perfusion and High Permeability Predicts Hemorrhagic Transformation Region in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intra-arterial Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nan; Li, Ying; Wintermark, Max; Jackson, Alan; Wu, Bing; Su, Zihua; Chen, Fei; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yongwei; Zhu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the permeability related parameter Ktrans, derived from computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, can predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke who receive intra-arterial thrombolysis. Data from patients meeting the criterion were examined. CTP was performed and Ktrans maps were used to assess the permeability values in HT and non-HT regions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated, showing the sensitivity and specificity of Ktrans for predicting HT risk. Composite images were produced to illustrate the spatial correlations among perfusion, permeability changes and HT. This study examined 41 patients. Twenty-six patients had hemorrhagic infarction and 15 had parenchymal hemorrhage. The mean Ktrans value in HT regions was significantly lower than that in the non-HT regions (0.26 ± 0.21/min vs. 0.78 ± 0.64/min; P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis identified an optimal cutoff value of 0.334/min for Ktrans to predict HT risk. Composite images suggested ischemic regions with low permeability, or the mismatch area of low perfusion and high permeability, more likely have HT. HT regions after intra-arterial thrombolysis had lower permeability values on Ktrans maps. The mismatch area of lower perfusion and higher permeability are more likely to develop HT. PMID:27302077

  7. Is portal-systemic shunt worthwhile in Child's class C cirrhosis? Long-term results of emergency shunt in 94 patients with bleeding varices.

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, M J; Orloff, M S; Rambotti, M; Girard, B

    1992-01-01

    A prospective evaluation was conducted of 94 unselected patients ("all comers") with biopsy-proven Child's class C cirrhosis (93% alcoholic) and endoscopically proven acutely bleeding esophageal varices who underwent emergency portacaval shunt (EPCS) (85% side-to-side, 15% end-to-side) within 8 hours of initial contact (mean, 6.1 hours) during the past 12 years. Follow-up has been 100% and includes all patients for at least 1 year, and 61 patients (65%) for 5 to 12 years. Incidence of serious risk factors on initial contact was: ascites, 97%; jaundice, 86%; portal-systemic encephalopathy including past history, 71%; severe muscle wasting, 96%; alcohol ingestion within 7 days, 66%; delirium tremens, 16%; serum albumin, less than or equal to 2.5 g/dL 76%; indocyanine green dye retention greater than or equal to 50% in 45 minutes, 66%; serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase greater than or equal to 100 units/L, 60%; hyperdynamic cardiac output greater than or equal to 6 L/minute, 98%. Mean Child's point score was 13.7 out of a maximum of 15. EPCS reduced mean corrected free portal pressure from 286 to 23 mm saline, and permanently controlled variceal bleeding in every patient. Of the 94 patients, 74 (80%) left the hospital alive and 68 (72%) survived 1 year. Five-year actuarial survival rate is 64%. Hepatic failure was the main cause of death during initial hospitalization as well as during follow-up, when it was related to continued alcoholism. Portal-systemic encephalopathy, which was present on initial contact in 55% of patients, occurred at some time during follow-up in 18.7%, but was recurrent and required dietary protein restriction in only 9%, all of whom had resumed alcoholism. The low incidence of portal-systemic encephalopathy was attributable to the lifelong program of follow-up with regular dietary counseling and continued emphasis on both protein restriction to 60 g/day and abstinence from alcohol. Abstinence was sustained in 69%, liver function improved

  8. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  9. Rapid diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 variant by real-time one-step RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Nicolas; Lahlou Amine, Idriss; Tcheng, Remy; Falcon, Delphine; Rivat, Nathalie; Dussart, Philippe; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Chomel, Jean-Jacques; Norder, Helene; Eugene, Maxime; Lina, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Coxsackievirus A24 variant is, together with enterovirus 70 and adenoviruses, the major etiological agent involved in acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks worldwide. However, the standard virus isolation method followed by serotyping or VP1 region sequencing is time-consuming. A rapid method for the detection of coxsackievirus A24 variant from conjunctival swab specimens would be useful in the context of explosive and extensive outbreaks. A one-step real-time RT-PCR assay based on TaqMan technology was thus developed and assessed on 36 conjunctival swabs from outbreaks of conjunctivitis in Morocco in 2004 due to a coxsackievirus A24 variant and in Corsica in 2006 due to adenovirus type 3, and 83 virus strains including 41 coxsackievirus A24 variant collected in French Guiana and Guadeloupe in 2003, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2003, in Morocco in 2004 and 42 other virus species genetically close or known to be responsible for conjunctivitis. All the conjunctival swabs from coxsackievirus A24 variant related outbreak and the 41 coxsackievirus A24 variant strains were tested positive by the RT-PCR assay within 4h. This novel single-tube real-time RT-PCR assay is sensitive and specific, and consists in a reliable and faster alternative to the viral culture for recent and future acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A24 variant.

  10. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 {+-} 5.4 to 6.4 {+-} 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates.

  11. Acute cyst rupture, hemorrhage and septic shock after a shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Bae, Sang Rak; Lho, Yong Soo; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) ranges from 10 to 36 %. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for urinary calculi in ADPKD was reported to be a safe and effective treatment option. However, there is a potential risk of cyst rupture and traumatic hemorrhage because of shockwaves. A 39-year-old female with polycystic kidneys and upper ureter stone was treated with SWL and developed life-threatening complications of cyst rupture, traumatic hemorrhage and septic shock. She was initially treated with supportive care in the intensive care unit, but in the end nephrectomy was performed.

  12. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  13. Gastric Varices: An Overview for the Gastroenterology Nurse.

    PubMed

    Dale, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Gastric varices can occur in as many as one-third of patients with portal hypertension. Within the nursing literature, however, articles focus on the management of esophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding with few publications about management of gastric varices. Given the advancement in therapies, it is prudent for gastroenterology nurses to have an understanding of its management and treatment options. This article reviews the pathophysiology, classification, and management of patients with gastric varices and outlines the importance of the nurse's role in the education and ongoing care for this patient group. PMID:26825559

  14. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/μL; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/μL; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/μL). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous

  15. Management of Acute Submacular Hemorrhage with Intravitreal Injection of Tenecteplase, Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pil; Park, Jun Sang; Kwon, Oh Woong; You, Yong Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the visual and anatomical outcomes for neovascular age-related macular degeneration with submacular hemorrhage after intravitreal injections of tenecteplase (TNK), anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and expansile gas. Methods This study was a retrospective clinical case series following 25 eyes of 25 patients. All patients received a triple injection using 0.05 mL TNK (50 µg), 0.05 mL anti-VEGF and 0.3 mL of perfluoropropane gas. Retreatment with anti-VEGF was performed as needed. Preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central retinal thickness were analyzed. Results The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution of best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly from 1.09 ± 0.77 at baseline to 0.52 ± 0.60 at 12 months (p < 0.001). The mean central retinal thickness also improved significantly from 545 ± 156 at baseline to 266 ± 107 at 12 months (p < 0.001). A visual improvement of 0.3 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution unit or more was achieved in 15 eyes (60%). During the 12 postoperative months, an average of 4.04 intravitreal anti-VEGF injections was applied. Conclusions A triple injection of TNK, anti-VEGF, and a gas appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of submacular hemorrhage secondary to neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27247518

  16. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge. This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  17. Follow-up of Large Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization at an Acute Stage in Patients with Poor-Grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S.; Tanaka, N.; Tani, S.; Nakamura, S.; Ohbuchi, H.; Hirota, K.; Iwabuchi, S.; Kasuya, H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the clinical and angiographic outcome of large aneurysms treated with coil embolization at an acute stage in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2004, eight consecutive WFNS grade 5 patients with large aneurysms (15~23mm) were treated with endovascular coil embolization within two days and followed for at least 30 months. There were three middle cerebral and five internal carotid artery aneurysms. No patients were treated by craniotomy and none survived without treatment. Two patients died of primary brain damage or cerebral vasospasm within one month. One patient died of pneumonia at 24 months. Four patients were alive with good recovery or moderate disability at the time of final follow-up (30~66 months). Angiography immediately after the procedure showed complete occlusion in three, neck remnant in four, and body filling in one patient. No complication was seen related to the procedure. Three aneurysms that were initially neck remnant developed body filling due to coil compaction. Two were re-treated with coils at six and 12 months and resulted in neck remnant. One patient refused re-treatment and died of re-bleeding. Endovascular coil embolization can be selected at an acute stage for the treatment of aneurysms in patients with poor-grade SAH without intraparenchymal hematoma even if the aneurysm is large. Serial follow up by MRA/angiography is necessary for at least 12 months. PMID:20465928

  18. Obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs, effective surgical techniques, and extensive blood banking facilities, post-partum hemorrhage remains a major cause of death in the United States. A hemorrhage bundle developed by the New York Safe Motherhood Initiative provides clear guidelines for reducing such deaths. This bundle focuses on risk assessment, preparation, diagnosis, and the provision of several management algorithms. Implementation of the protocols and approaches contained in this document, or their equivalent, on a systems basis and a consideration of several additional recommendations for individual care will reduce the likelihood of death from hemorrhage.

  19. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  20. [Low gastrointestinal bleeding due to ectopic varices as a result of adhesions].

    PubMed

    Perea García, J; Lago Oliver, J; Muñoz Jiménez, F; del Valle, E; Duque Pérez, C; Turégano Fuentes, F

    2000-01-01

    Portal hypertension frequently causes the appearance of porto-systemic shunts, such as esophageal varices and also, but with much less frequency, other atypical shunts known as ectopic varices. Despite their infrequency/rarity, ectopic varices can cause serious gastrointestinal bleeding. Intraabdominal adhesions, especially post-operative ones, promote their appearance. The therapeutic management of ectopic varices is initially the same as that for esophageal varices but surgical treatment is usually necessary as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. PMID:15324625

  1. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  2. Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Persisting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding after Band Ligation or Injection-Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Seufferlein, Thomas; Perkhofer, Lukas; Wagner, Martin; Kleger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Despite a pronounced reduction of lethality rates due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, esophageal variceal bleeding remains a challenge for the endoscopist and still accounts for a mortality rate of up to 40% within the first 6 weeks. A relevant proportion of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding remains refractory to standard therapy, thus making a call for additional tools to achieve hemostasis. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) incorporate such a tool. Methods We evaluated a total number of 582 patients admitted to our endoscopy unit with the diagnosis “gastrointestinal bleeding” according to our documentation software between 2011 and 2014. 82 patients suffered from esophageal variceal bleeding, out of which 11 cases were refractory to standard therapy leading to SEMS application. Patients with esophageal malignancy, fistula, or stricture and a non-esophageal variceal bleeding source were excluded from the analysis. A retrospective analysis reporting a series of clinically relevant parameters in combination with bleeding control rates and adverse events was performed. Results The initial bleeding control rate after SEMS application was 100%. Despite this success, we observed a 27% mortality rate within the first 42 days. All of these patients died due to non-directly hemorrhage-associated reasons. The majority of patients exhibited an extensive demand of medical care with prolonged hospital stay. Common complications were hepatic decompensation, pulmonary infection and decline of renal function. Interestingly, we found in 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) stent dislocation at time of control endoscopy 24 h after hemostasis or at time of stent removal. The presence of hiatal hernia did not affect obviously stent dislocation rates. Refractory patients had significantly longer hospitalization times compared to non-refractory patients. Conclusions Self-expandable metal stents for esophageal variceal bleeding seem to be safe and

  3. Is the circulating plasma volume sufficiently maintained? Fluid management of an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuro; Katayama, Yoichi; Igarashi, Takahiro; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Jun; Hirayama, Teruyasu

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known cause of mortality and morbidity following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Prevention of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm is the basic management after SAH. Numerous pharmaceutical therapies and endovascular treatments are available against cerebral vasospasm, but none of them have so far proven to improve the outcome. We have focused on maintaining the circulation volume in order to prevent cerebral vasospasm. But to maintain the central venous pressure, huge infusion volume was required, and hyponatremia was frequently observed due to natriuresis and osmotic diuresis. Excessive natriuresis and diuresis cannot be managed through sodium and water replacement, since sodium replacement induces further natriuresis and diuresis (desalination), and water replacement induces hyponatremia. We therefore administered fludrocortisone and hydrocortisone to inhibit excessive natriuresis and diuresis. The efficacy of sodium reabsorption therapy is extremely high to maintain the circulation volume that might have a therapeutic effect to prevent cerebral vasospasm. In this article, we review our institution's experience regarding the management of patients with aneurysmal SAH and also discuss the importance of water and sodium balance when managing such patients.

  4. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  5. Acute Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Cole, Erica C.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ9-THC (.01–50 mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100 mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ9-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ9-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval) = 0.64 (0.26 – 1.55) mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01 – 0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ9-THC given i.p. was 2–3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ9-THC between each behavior measure was 7–18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects. PMID:23769745

  6. Acute Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Cole, Erica C

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ(9)-THC (.01-50mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ(9)-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ(9)-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval)=0.64 (0.26-1.55)mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01-0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ(9)-THC given i.p. was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ(9)-THC between each behavior measure was 7-18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects.

  7. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  8. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  9. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... and sweaty. These symptoms are followed by a shock -like state. Bleeding appears as tiny spots of ...

  11. Schistosomal versus nonschistosomal variceal bleeders. Do they respond differently to selective shunt (DSRS)?

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, F A; Abu-Elmagd, K M; Sultan, A A; Aly, M A; Fathy, O M; Bahgat, O O; el-Fiky, A M; el-Barbary, M H; Mashhoor, N

    1989-01-01

    The distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS) was performed in 125 consecutive variceal bleeders. To date, no patients have been lost to follow-up (mean of 79 +/- 20 months). Liver pathology was documented in 85 patients: 45 patients had schistosomal hepatic fibrosis, 17 had nonalcoholic cirrhosis, and 23 had mixed pattern (hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis). The preoperative data base for these three groups was matched (p greater than 0.05), with a mean follow-up of 79 +/- 20, 70 +/- 14, and 77 +/- 22 months for each population, respectively. The results showed low operative mortality (4.8%), high cumulative patency rate (94.8%) and low recurrent variceal hemorrhage (5.6%). The biochemical data showed significant increase in serum bilirubin (p less than 0.001) and aspartate transaminase (AST) (p less than 0.05) in the nonschistosomal patients. Chronic hyperbilirubinemia was found in 33% of the schistosomal group. Prograde portal perfusion was detected in 94% of the patients, with development of collaterals in 91%. The angiographic pattern of these collaterals was 50% pancreatic, 45% gastric, and 26% colosplenic. Patients with mixed liver disease had a high incidence of Grade III portal perfusion (57%) and more common pancreatic and gastric collaterals (71%). The cumulative survival for all patients was 74.1%, with hepatic cell failure being the leading cause of death (13 patients, 50% of all deaths). The schistosomal patients had a 91.6% incidence, whereas the cirrhotic and mixed groups had survival rates of 75.6% and 65.2%, respectively. Also, of a 15% total incidence of encephalopathy, 4.4% was related to the schistosomal patients, 23.5% to the cirrhotics, and 21.7% to the mixed population. Statistically, the survival rate was significantly better (p less than 0.05) and encephalopathy was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the schistosomal population. In conclusion, this data shows that: 1) DSRS has a high patency rate and a low variceal hemorrhage recurrence rate; 2

  12. Addition of Somatostatin After Successful Endoscopic Variceal Ligation Does not Prevent Early Rebleeding in Comparison to Placebo: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Jha, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Vibhu V.; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh C.; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficacy of endoscopic sclerotherapy in controlling acute variceal bleeding is significantly improved when vasoactive drug is added. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is superior to sclerotherapy. Whether efficacy of EVL will also improve with addition of somatostatin is not known. We compared EVL plus somatostatin versus EVL plus placebo in control of acute variceal bleeding. Methods Consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were enrolled. After emergency EVL, patients were randomized to receive either somatostatin (250 mcg/hr) or placebo infusion. Primary endpoint was treatment failure within 5 days. Treatment failure was defined as fresh hematemesis ≥2 h after start of therapy, or a 3 gm drop in Hb, or death. Results 61 patients were enrolled (EVL plus somatostatin group, n = 31 and EVL plus placebo group, n = 30). The baseline characteristics were similar. Within the initial 5-day period, the frequency of treatment failure was similar in both the groups (EVL plus somatostatin group 8/31 [26%] versus EVL plus placebo group 7/30 [23%]; P = 1.000). The mortality was also similar in the two groups (3/31 [10%] vs. 3/30 [10%]; P = 1.000). Baseline HVPG ≥19 mm Hg and active bleeding at index endoscopy were independent predictors of treatment failure. Conclusions Addition of somatostatin infusion to EVL therapy does not offer any advantage in control of acute variceal bleeding or reducing mortality. The reason for this may be its failure to maintain sustained reduction in portal pressure for five days. Active bleeding at index endoscopy and high baseline HVPG should help choose early alternative treatment options. Trial registered with ClincalTrials.gov vide NCT01267669. PMID:26628838

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Panax notoginseng Saponin Therapy for Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Meta-Analysis, and Mini Review of Potential Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongying; Huang, Ping; Yu, Zhaosheng; Xing, Daniel H.; Ouyang, Shuai; Xing, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial/intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a leading cause of death and disability in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. No proven drug is available for ICH. Panax notoginseng (total saponin extraction, PNS) is one of the most valuable herb medicines for stroke and cerebralvascular disorders in China. We searched for randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) involving PNS injection to treat cerebral hemorrhage for meta-analysis from various databases including the Chinese Stroke Trials Register, the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Chinese BioMedical disk, and China Doctorate/Master Dissertations Databases. The quality of the eligible trials was assessed by Jadad’s scale. Twenty (20) of the 24 identified randomized controlled trials matched the inclusive criteria including 984 ICH patients with PNS injection and 907 ICH patients with current treatment (CT). Compared to the CT groups, PNS-treated patients showed better outcomes in the effectiveness rate (ER), neurological deficit score, intracranial hematoma volume, intracerebral edema volume, Barthel index, the number of patients died, and incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: PNS injection is superior to CT for acute ICH. A review of the literature shows that PNS may exert multiple protective mechanisms against ICH-induced brain damage including hemostasis, anti-coagulation, anti-thromboembolism, cerebral vasodilation, invigorated blood dynamics, anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and anti-hyperglycemic effects. Since vitamin C and other brain cell activators (BCA) that are not considered common practice were also used as parts of the CT in several trials, potential PNS and BCA interactions could exist that may have made the effect of PNS therapy less or more impressive than by PNS therapy alone. Future PNS trials with and without the inclusion of such controversial BCAs as part of the CT could

  14. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Methods: Only prospective or randomized studies were included in this meta-analysis. Binomial distribution was used to compute variance for each study. Random effects models were used as the final model for estimating the effect size and 95 % confidence interval. Adjusted effects were obtained using meta-regression analysis. Results: Nineteen prospective studies involving 1001 procedures in 587 patients were included in the meta-analysis on the risk of bacteremia after EVS or EVL in cirrhotics with esophageal varices. The frequency of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy was 13 %. The frequency of bacteremia after EVS (17 %) was higher than after EVL (6 %) with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVS (14 %) was significantly less than after emergency EVS (22 %) (P < 0.001). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVL (7.6 %) was not significantly different from after emergency EVL (3.2 %) (P = 0.850). Conclusions: The incidence of bacteremia is low in patients with cirrhosis and varices after esophageal variceal therapy. These results are consistent with our current guidelines that antibiotic prophylaxis before endoscopic variceal therapy is only necessary for bleeding patients. PMID:26528494

  15. Safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in the management of patients with gastric and duodenal varices who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, James; Trotter, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and cirrhosis. Options are limited for patients who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). Cyanoacrylate injections have been reported to be efficacious in previous case series. The aim of this retrospective study was to report our single-center experience with the safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients who were not TIPS candidates. Electronic medical records were reviewed for 16 patients who underwent a total of 18 esophagogastroduodenoscopies for acute gastric or duodenal variceal bleeding and secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices; 14 patients had cirrhosis with an average Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score of 16, and 2 patients had noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Primary endpoints of the study included early and delayed rebleeding rate, complications, and death or liver transplantation. The rebleeding rate (early or delayed) was 7%, and no complications were found. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). In conclusion, 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective alternative for non-TIPS candidates who present with acute gastric variceal bleeding given its low rebleeding and complication rate. PMID:27695164

  16. Safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in the management of patients with gastric and duodenal varices who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, James; Trotter, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and cirrhosis. Options are limited for patients who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). Cyanoacrylate injections have been reported to be efficacious in previous case series. The aim of this retrospective study was to report our single-center experience with the safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients who were not TIPS candidates. Electronic medical records were reviewed for 16 patients who underwent a total of 18 esophagogastroduodenoscopies for acute gastric or duodenal variceal bleeding and secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices; 14 patients had cirrhosis with an average Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score of 16, and 2 patients had noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Primary endpoints of the study included early and delayed rebleeding rate, complications, and death or liver transplantation. The rebleeding rate (early or delayed) was 7%, and no complications were found. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). In conclusion, 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective alternative for non-TIPS candidates who present with acute gastric variceal bleeding given its low rebleeding and complication rate.

  17. A randomized control trial of bi-monthly versus bi-weekly endoscopic variceal ligation of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Tajiri, Takashi

    2005-09-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is a safe and simple procedure now being used on a widening scale. Yet most patients who undergo endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices eventually require additional treatment for recurrent varices. In this study, we investigated and compared the efficacy and long-term results of EVL performed in three treatments with a total of sixteen O-rings at two different intervals; bi-weekly (once every 2 wk: the conventional interval) and bi-monthly (once every 2 months). A total of 63 patients with esophageal varices were randomly assigned to groups receiving bi-weekly or bi-monthly EVL treatment. Optimal medical therapy was assessed by one medical doctor who was unaware of the patients' treatment assignments. Three parameters of treatment outcome were evaluated: the rate of recurrence, rate of additional treatment, and overall survival. The overall rates of variceal recurrence and additional treatment were both higher in the bi-weekly group than in the bi-monthly group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, EVL performed for the treatment of esophageal varices at bi-monthly intervals brought about better results than the same treatment performed at bi-weekly intervals. The treatments intercalated by the longer interval obtained a higher total eradication rate, lower recurrence rate, and lower rate of additional treatment. PMID:16128945

  18. Bleeding from peristomal varices: perspectives on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fucini, C; Wolff, B G; Dozois, R R

    1991-12-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with chronic liver disease undergoing colon surgery with a stoma. Our aim was to examine the morbidity of bleeding for peristomal, perianastomotic, and esophageal varices in a group of patients with chronic liver disease who underwent colectomy at the Mayo Clinic between 1970 and 1988. Morbidity was evaluated in terms of the number of major bleeding episodes and the number of units of blood transfused. The treatment of bleeding was also evaluated. One hundred seventeen patients (74 males and 43 females) aged 11-78 years were studied. Sixty-two patients (53 percent) had a permanent stoma, while 55 patients (47 percent) had a colonic resection and anastomosis. Sixty-seven patients (62 percent) had chronic ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the stoma group, bleeding appeared from stomal and/or esophageal varices in 19 patients (31 percent), while, in the non-stoma group, bleeding exclusively from the esophageal varices occurred in eight patients (15 percent). Perianastomotic variceal bleeding was never observed. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of one major bleed occurring from gastrointestinal varices appeared to be similar between the two groups. Patients who bled from peristomal varices with or without esophageal bleeding (n = 17) rebled more frequently (6.5 +/- 5.5 vs. 3 +/- 1.6; P less than 0.05) and were transfused more often (14.9 +/- 12.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 4.1; P less than 0.05) than patients who bled exclusively from esophageal varices (n = 10). No difference was found in the incidence of recurrent bleeding and the number of units of blood transfused between patients who bled exclusively from peristomal varices (n = 10) and those who bled from both peristomal and esophageal varices (n = 7). Medical and local measures were more effective in controlling esophageal bleeding than in controlling peristomal bleeding. Therefore, patients with chronic liver disease who must undergo

  19. [Molecular Identification and Phylogenetic Analyses of Coxsackievirus A24v Causing an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis in Jiangxi, China, in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Qiai; Zhang, Shuxia; Gong, Tian; Zhu, Tian; Wang, Donavan; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-05-01

    To identify the cause of an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) in Jiangxi (China) in 2010, 20 eye conjunctival swabs were first collected from AHC patients. Then, viruses were isola- ted and tested for human enterovirus 70, coxsackievirus A24 variant (CV-A24v) and adenovirus using the polymerase chain reaction. All CV-A24v isolates underwent sequencing of 3C and VP1 coding regions. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for Jiangxi CV-A24v and worldwide CV-A24v based on,3C and VP1 regions, respectively. Ten out of 20 specimens were positive for CV-A24v, implying that the outbreak was caused by CV-A24v. The phylogenetic tree based on the 3C region showed that Jiangxi CV- A24v belonged to cluster 5 in genotype IV (GIV-C5) with strains isolated throughout the world after 2010, and were divided further into A and B lineages. Phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 region showed that all of the worldwide CV-A24v strains isolated after 2000 could be divided into five groups (1-5). Jiangxi CV-A24v was classified into group 5 and also divided further into A and B lineages upon analyses of the 3C region. These data suggested that CV-A24v causing AHC outbreaks in China in 2010 belonged to GIV-C3 and GIV-C5. At least two transmission lineages were circulated in Jiangxi in 2010. The classification of CV-A24v isolated after 2010 worldwide using the phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 region was almost consistent with that based on the 3C region and also had significant chronological clustering.

  20. The acute effects of hemorrhagic shock on cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen tension, and spreading depolarization following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Shear, Deborah A; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often occurs in conjunction with additional trauma, resulting in secondary complications, such as hypotension as a result of blood loss. This study investigated the combined effects of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on physiological parameters, including acute changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), brain tissue oxygen tension (P(bt)O₂), and cortical spreading depolarizations (CSDs). All recordings were initiated before injury (PBBI/HS/both) and maintained for 2.5 h. Results showed that PBBI alone and combined PBBI and HS produced a sustained impairment of ipsilateral rCBF that decreased by 70% from baseline (p<0.05). Significant and sustained reductions in P(bt)O₂ (50% baseline; p<0.05) were also observed in the injured hemisphere of the animals subjected to both PBBI and HS (PBBI+HS). In contrast, PBBI alone produced smaller, more transient reductions in P(bt)O₂ levels. The lower limit of cerebral autoregulation was significantly higher in the PBBI+HS group (p<0.05, compared to HS alone). Critically, combined injury resulted in twice the number of spontaneous CSDs as in PBBI alone (p<0.05). It also lowered the propagation speed of CSD and the threshold of CSD occurrence [induced CSD at higher mean arterial pressure (MAP)]. However, rCBF and P(bt)O₂ were not responsive to the depolarizations. Our data suggest that PBBI together with HS causes persistent impairment of CBF and brain tissue oxygen tension, increasing the probability of CSDs that likely contribute to secondary neuropathology and compromise neurological recovery. PMID:23461630

  1. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Lazor, R; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined by the presence of red blood cells originating from the lung capillaries or venules within the alveoli. The diagnosis is established on clinical features, radiological pattern, and especially bronchoalveolar lavage. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may have many immune or non-immune causes. Immune causes of DAH include vasculitides, connective tissue diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome). Treatment is both supportive and causal, often based on high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy (especially intravenous cyclophosphamide). Plasma exchanges are performed in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and are considered in systemic vasculitis. Non-immune causes of DAH mainly include heart diseases, coagulation disorders, infections, drug toxicities and idiopathic DAH. Treatment of non-immune DAH is that of its cause. Whatever the cause, DAH is an emergency requiring prompt assessment and early treatment.

  2. [Hemorrhagic enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Brobmann, G F; van Lessen, H; Springorum, H W; Thomas, C

    1976-10-21

    Intestinal infarction in the absence of organic vascular occlusion received increasing attention in recent years. The clinical picture is discussed based on results in 9 cases, an attempt to suggest a possible pathophysiological mechanism is made. Prophylactic digitalisation especially in the elderly patient in the absence of severe heart failure and in cases with already low mesenteric perfusion may lead to a further vasoconstriction and to hemorrhagic enteropathy. Therapeutic possibilities are discussed. PMID:1086816

  3. Validation of an Endoscopic Fibre-Optic Pressure Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Variceal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Kong, De-Run; Li, Su-Wen; Yu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Ging-Jing; Yu, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors have developed endoscopic fibre-optic pressure sensor to detect variceal pressure and presented the validation of in vivo and in vitro studies, because the HVPG requires catheterization of hepatic veins, which is invasive and inconvenient. Compared with HVPG, it is better to measure directly the variceal pressure without puncturing the varices in a noninvasive way. PMID:27314010

  4. Validation of an Endoscopic Fibre-Optic Pressure Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Variceal Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Kong, De-Run; Li, Su-Wen; Yu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Ging-Jing; Yu, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors have developed endoscopic fibre-optic pressure sensor to detect variceal pressure and presented the validation of in vivo and in vitro studies, because the HVPG requires catheterization of hepatic veins, which is invasive and inconvenient. Compared with HVPG, it is better to measure directly the variceal pressure without puncturing the varices in a noninvasive way. PMID:27314010

  5. Safety of direct endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Thompson, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of transgastric direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN) in patients with walled-off necrosis (WON) and gastric varices. METHODS: A single center retrospective study of consecutive DEN for WON was performed from 2012 to 2015. All DEN cases with gastric fundal varices noted on endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the admission for DEN were collected for analysis. In all cases, external urethral sphincter (EUS) with doppler was used to exclude the presence of intervening gastric varices or other vascular structures prior to 19 gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle access into the cavity. The tract was serially dilated to 20 mm and was entered with an endoscope for DEN. Pigtail stents were placed to facilitate drainage of the cavity. Procedure details were recorded. Comprehensive chart review was performed to evaluate for complications and WON recurrence. RESULTS: Fifteen patients who underwent DEN for WON had gastric varices at the time of their procedure. All patients had an INR < 1.5 and platelets > 50. Of these patients, 11 had splenic vein thrombosis and 2 had portal vein thrombosis. Two patients had isolated gastric varices, type 1 and the remaining 13 had > 5 mm gastric submucosal varices on imaging by CT, MRI or EUS. No procedures were terminated without completing the DEN for any reason. One patient had self-limited intraprocedural bleeding related to balloon dilation of the tract. Two patients experienced delayed bleeding at 2 and 5 d post-op respectively. One required no therapy or intervention and the other received 1 unit transfusion and had an EGD which revealed no active bleeding. Resolution rate of WON was 100% (after up to 2 additional DEN in one patient) and no patients required interventional radiology or surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: In patients with WON and gastric varices, DEN using EUS and doppler guidance may be performed safely. Successful resolution

  6. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  7. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  8. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients.

  9. A polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is related to hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mallolas, Judith; Rodríguez, Rocío; Gubern, Carme; Camós, Susanna; Serena, Joaquín; Castellanos, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) of cerebral infarction is a common and serious occurrence following acute ischemic stroke. The expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has been shown to increase after cerebral ischemia. This protein has been mainly located at the microvasculature within the infarcted and peri-infarcted area, so we aimed to investigate whether survivin gene polymorphisms, also known as BIRC5 gene, were associated with HT of cerebral infarction. Polymorphism screening of the BIRC5 gene was performed in 107 patients with a hemispheric ischemic stroke and 93 controls by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing analysis. Genotype-phenotype correlation was performed in patients. MRI was carried out within 12 h of symptoms onset and at 72 ± 12 h. The presence of HT was determined on the second DWI sequence and classified according to ECASS II criteria. MMP-9 levels were analyzed at admission. Forty-nine patients (45.8%) had HT. The -241 C/T (rs17878467) polymorphism was identified in the promoter region of the survivin gene. The prevalence of the mutant allele (T) was similar in patients and controls (14 vs. 16%, respectively; P = 0.37). However, 9 (29%) patients with allele T had HT compared to 40 (52.6%) of wild-type (P = 0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that the polymorphism was associated with a lower risk of HT (OR 0.16; 95% CI 0.04-0.65; P = 0.01). The -241 C/T polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is associated with a lower risk of HT in patients with ischemic stroke. It has recently been reported that the -241 C/T polymorphism increases survivin promoter activity, reinforcing the hypothesis that patients with the mutant allele may have increased survivin expression in the brain. Different mechanisms, including BBB protection by the inhibition or activation of different angiogenic growth factors and the inhibition of apoptosis during

  10. Noninvasive predictors of presence and grade of esophageal varices in viral cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Nada, Lahmidani; Samira, El Fakir; Bahija, Benyachou; Adil, Ibrahimi; Nourdine, Aqodad

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the presence and the grade of varices by non-invasive methods is likely to predict the need for prophylactic beta blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. The factors related to the presence of varices are not well-defined. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to determine the appropriateness of the various factors in predicting the existence and also the grade of esophageal varices. Patients with diagnosis of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or B were included in a retrospective study between January 2001 and January 2010. All the patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, appropriate investigations, imaging studies (ultrasound with Doppler) and endoscopy at our center. Five variables considered relevant to the presence and grade of varices were tested using univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Three hundred and seventy two patients with viral liver cirrhosis were included, with 192 (51.6%) males. Platelet count and abundance of ascites were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices. However, abundance of ascites, prothrombin time, diameter of the spleen and portal vein were significantly associated with a large varice. In multivariate analysis, platelet count inferior to 100000 was associated with presence of varices (p = 0.04) and only abundance of ascites was associated with large varice. Low Platelet count (< or equal 100000) is associated with the presence of varices in viral cirrhotic patients and abundance of ascites is correlated with the presence of large varices.

  11. Torsade de pointes complicating the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices: association with neuroleptics, vasopressin, and electrolyte imbalance.

    PubMed

    Faigel, D O; Metz, D C; Kochman, M L

    1995-05-01

    Torsade de pointes is an unusual life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia that has been associated with vasopressin, neuroleptic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances, including hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. Over a 9-month period, we observed torsade de pointes in three patients with cirrhosis and bleeding esophageal varices who did not have prior cardiac disease. All had received endoscopic sclerotherapy and continuous infusions of vasopressin and nitroglycerin. For sedation, two patients received haloperidol and one droperidol. In addition, two patients had either hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia. In all three patients, there was prolongation of the electrocardiographic QT interval and a "long-short" initiating sequence followed by ventricular tachycardia with torsade de pointes morphology. All were successfully cardioverted; there was one late death due to aspiration and septicemia. We conclude that cirrhotics with variceal hemorrhage may be at increased risk of developing this arrhythmia in the setting of treatment with vasopressin, sedation with neuroleptic drugs, and electrolyte abnormalities. We urge close monitoring of these patients for cardiac arrhythmia and recommend that neuroleptics be used cautiously, if at all.

  12. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to subcapsular renal hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, N C; Sirvanci, M; Tüfek, I; Onat, L; Duran, C

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare intraabdominal bleeding. In this report we present a case of a nontraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma. A 54-year-old patient who was under warfarin therapy, developed subcapsular right renal hematoma. Subcapsular and retroperitoneal hemorrhage were low signal on T1- and T2-weighted images consistent with acute stage of blood. The source of subcapsular hematoma was shown to be the rupture of hemorrhagic renal cyst on MRI. Extension of hemorrhage into the retroperitoneal space anterior to right psoas muscle was also successfully shown on MRI. Patient underwent nephrectomy and retroperitoneal blood was evacuated.

  13. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  14. Circadian occurrence of variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Siringo, S; Bolondi, L; Sofia, S; Hermida, R C; Gramantieri, L; Gaiani, S; Piscaglia, F; Carbone, C; Misitano, B; Corinaldesi, R

    1996-12-01

    Several clinical events have a rhythmicity over the 24 h period. We assessed the presence of periodic rhythm in the occurrence of haematemesis in patients with liver cirrhosis under different daylight regimens, namely during standard time and during daylight savings. Over a 48 month period there were 212 consecutive admissions of 118 cirrhotics with variceal bleeding. Complete data were available for 181 episodes of bleeding: 121 (66.9%) started with haematemesis and 60 (33.1%) started with melaena. One hundred and two (56%) episodes occurred during daylight savings and 79 (44%) occurred during standard time. The cosinor test showed a 24 h biphasic peak for the occurrence of haematemesis (09.45 and 21.45 h). Moreover, a biphasic diurnal asymmetric frequency was also found by multiple component rhythmometry. The time peaks of onset of variceal haemorrhage did not change significantly during standard time and daylight savings. Patients with more than one haematemesis episode significantly bled over the same time interval. The present study confirms that over the 24 h period variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients occurs with a predictable rhythmicity that does not seem to be under the control of the light-dark cycle. The finding of a chronorisk for variceal haemorrhage addresses specific questions for pathophysiological studies as well as for new treatment strategies.

  15. Prevention of Portal Hypertension: from Variceal Development to Clinical Decompensation

    PubMed Central

    Vorobioff, Julio D.; Groszmann, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of portal hypertension (PH) has been exclusively devoted to gastro-esophageal varices related events at different frameworks including prophylactic, emergency or preventive therapy. The goals of treatment are to avoid the first bleeding episode, stop active bleeding and prevent bleeding recurrence, respectively. The objective of pre-primary prophylaxis (PPP) is to avoid variceal development and therefore, it necessarily deals with cirrhotic patients at earlier stages of the disease. At these earlier stages, nonselective beta blocker (NSBB) have been ineffective in preventing the development of varices and other complications of PH. Therefore, treatment should not rely on NSBB. It is possible, that at these earlier stages, etiological treatment of liver disease itself could prevent the progression of PH. This review will focus mainly on early treatment of PH, because if successful, it may translate into histological-hemodynamic improvements, avoiding not only variceal development but also other PH related complications, such as ascites and porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE). Moreover, the advent of new therapies may allow not only the prevention of the complications of PH, but also the chance of a substantial degree of regression in the cirrhotic process with the possible prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:24913395

  16. Vulvar varices: an uncommon entity in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Diana; Kane, Philip B; Liang, Sharon; Conway, Christine; Tornos, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Varicose veins in the vulvar and perivulvar area are seen in 4% of women. Most of them are secondary to pregnancy and usually regress spontaneously. Vulvar varicose veins are rare in nonpregnant women. When present, they can be seen alone, associated with leg varices or associated with venous malformations of the labia, clitoral area, or vagina with or without arteriovenous malformations on the limbs or trunk (Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome and Parkes-Weber syndrome). In some cases, vulvar varices are seen as part of the so-called "pelvic congestion syndrome." Clinically, vulvar varices may present as small isolated protrusions, mainly in the labia majora, or as large masses, involving the vulva and even the perivulvar area. The treatment of choice of vulvar varices seen during pregnancy is conservative and symptomatic. Surgical pathologists need to be aware of the existence of vulvar varicose veins and its possible presence in biopsy specimens. Vulvar varicose veins can be misdiagnosed clinically as cysts or masses mainly in the Bartholin gland area. Correct diagnosis of the lesion is important to determine appropriate therapy and to recognize the possibility of associated anatomical or pathological problems.

  17. Case Report: Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Portal Vein Thrombosis Secondary to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gnerre, Jeffrey; Sun, Yankai; Jedynak, Andrzej; Gilet, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder varices are a rare form of collateralization that develop in patients with portal hypertension. We present here a case of gallbladder varices accurately diagnosed by contrast enhanced CT imaging of the abdomen and confirmed by Color Doppler Sonography. A 76-year-old patient with hepatocellular carcinoma developed portal vein thrombosis due to tumor extension during the course of treatment and was incidentally discovered to have gallbladder varices. While most commonly asymptomatic, gallbladder varices are associated with increased risk of massive bleeding, either spontaneously or during cholecystectomy. As a result, the existence of such varices should be well documented if the patient is to undergo any abdominal surgical procedures. In addition, because of a particular association with portal vein thrombosis, patients with portal hypertension that are found to possess gallbladder varices should be evaluated for portal vein thrombosis. PMID:27761177

  18. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  19. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  20. The complement system is involved in acute inflammation but not in the hemorrhage produced by a Bothrops atrox snake venom low molecular mass proteinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Flávia G; Petretski, Jorge H; Kanashiro, Milton M; Lemos, Luciana; da Silva, Wilmar Dias; Kipnis, Thereza L

    2004-03-01

    Low molecular weight hemorrhagins were purified from crude Bothrops atrox snake venom by gel filtration followed by ionic strength chromatography. The protein fractions obtained, designated HI-1 to HI-8, contained proteins with molecular masses lower than 30 kDa. HI-5, the most representative among of these fractions, exhibited, in vitro, proteolytic and C inactivating properties, as analyzed by proteolysis of a protein substrate, and C system consumptive activities as assayed by reduction of the hemolytic C activity in normal human serum and by cleavage of partially purified component C3. HI-5 hemorrhagin injected i.m. into C-sufficient BALB/c mice induced a local inflammation characterized by edema, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and hemorrhage. In contrast, when injected into BALB/c mice previously C-depleted, the number of PMN per tissue section, but not hemorrhage, was significantly reduced (129.668 +/- 31.341 cells per microscopic field) as compared with the control C-sufficient mice (812.168 +/- 111.194 cells per microscopic field). The observations were confirmed by using C5-deficient mice instead of C-depleted mice. The average number of PMN per tissue section in C5-defficient A/J mice was 72.666 +/- 19.416 cells per microscopic field. These data indicate that the C system is involved in PMN accumulation, but not in the hemorrhage, at the local induced lesions by low molecular mass B. atrox hemorrhagins. HI-5 apparently is not contaminated with other direct or indirect inflammation mediators, PMN accumulation and hemorrhage, however, an independent phenomenon, could be mediated by the same hemorrhagin proteinase domain. PMID:15104120

  1. Angiographic findings in 2 children with cerebral paragonimiasis with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jingyu; Miao, Hongpin; Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang

    2013-05-01

    Hemorrhagic events associated with cerebral paragonimiasis are not rare, especially in children and adolescents; however, angiographic evidence of cerebrovascular involvement has not been reported. The authors describe angiographic abnormalities of the cerebral arteries seen in 2 children in whom cerebral paragonimiasis was associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The patients presented with acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a beaded appearance and long segmental narrowing of arteries, consistent with arteritis. In both patients, involved vessels were seen in the area of the hemorrhage. The vascular changes and the hemorrhage, together with new lesions that developed close to the hemorrhage and improved after praziquantel treatment, were attributed to paragonimiasis. Further study of the frequency and mechanism of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular complications associated with cerebral paragonimiasis is needed.

  2. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  3. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  4. Oesophageal and gastric varices: historical aspects, classification and grading: everything in one place

    PubMed Central

    Abby Philips, Cyriac; Sahney, Amrish

    2016-01-01

    Variceal disease and its management are of the utmost importance in the treatment of portal hypertension. Current guidelines are universal for management of variceal disease in portal hypertension. Classification and grading systems are numerous and differ according to geographical location. In this exhaustive review, the historical aspects of variceal disease, its classification and the grading systems in use are discussed, with self-explanatory tables and timelines. A better and clear understanding of the evolution of portal hypertension and variceal disease is provided. PMID:27324725

  5. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  6. Endovascular Therapies for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Techniques and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted for acute management of hemorrhagic complications in obstetric and gynecologic patients. The aim of this article is to review the common indications for vascular embolization in obstetric and gynecologic emergencies, specifically in the setting of primary postpartum hemorrhage, and to discuss the technique and outcomes of endovascular treatment. PMID:24436559

  7. Ankaferd hemostat in the management of gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Beyazit, Yavuz; Kekilli, Murat; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C; Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Basaranoglu, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding refers to any hemorrhage ascribed to the pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract, extending from the mouth to the anal canal. Despite the recent improvements in the endoscopic, hemostatic and adjuvant pharmacologic techniques, the reported mortality is still around 5%-10% for peptic ulcer bleeding and about 15%-20% for variceal hemorrhages. Although endoscopic management reduces the rates of re-bleeding, surgery, and mortality in active bleeding; early recurrence ratios still occur in around 20% of the cases even with effective initial hemostatic measures. In this quest for an alternative pro-hemostatic agent for the management of GI bleedings, Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) offers a successful candidate, specifically for “difficult-to-manage” situations as evidenced by data presented in several studies. ABS is a standardized mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. It is effective in both bleeding individuals with normal hemostatic parameters and in patients with deficient primary and/or secondary hemostasis. ABS also modulates the cellular apoptotic responses to hemorrhagic stress, as well as hemostatic hemodynamic activity. Through its effects on the endothelium, blood cells, angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, vascular dynamics, and wound healing, ABS is now becoming an effective alternative hemostatic medicine for gastrointestinal bleedings that are resistant to conventional anti-hemorrhagic measurements. The aim of this review is to outline current literature experience suggesting the place of ABS in the management of GI bleeding, and potential future controlled trials in this complicated field. PMID:22046083

  8. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  9. [Esophageal carcinoma after the endoscopic sclerotherapy of varices].

    PubMed

    Macías Rodríguez, M A; Soria de la Cruz, M J; Iglesias Arrabal, M; Martín Herrera, L

    1992-07-01

    We report the case of a 52-years-old smoking male, diagnosed of liver cirrhosis, who developed a squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus 36 months after undergoing endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Nine courses with 3% polidocanol were performed along 10 months. It was injected intra and paravariceal at a total dose of 117 ml. The relationship between endoscopic injection sclerotherapy and developing squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is discussed.

  10. Methicillin Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bracis, R.; Sanders, C. V.; Gilbert, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a recognized complication of methicillin therapy. Hemorrhagic cystitis due to methicillin has not been emphasized. Evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis developed in six patients receiving methicillin therapy and was confirmed by cystoscopy in three of them. PMID:907335

  11. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  12. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  13. Maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Dildy, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhage remains as one of the top 3 obstetrics related causes of maternal mortality, with most deaths occurring within 24-48 hours of delivery. Although hemorrhage related maternal mortality has declined globally, it continues to be a vexing problem. More specifically, the developing world continue to shoulder a disproportionate share of hemorrhage related deaths (99%) compared with industrialized nations (1%). Given the often preventable nature of death from hemorrhage, the cornerstone of effective mortality reduction involves risk factor identification, quick diagnosis, and timely management. In this monograph we will review the epidemiology, etiology, and preventative measures related to maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

  14. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  15. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  16. Massive duodenal variceal bleed; complication of extra hepatic portal hypertension: Endoscopic management and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Steevens, Christopher; Abdalla, Maisa; Kothari, Truptesh H; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding from duodenal varices is reported to be a catastrophic and often fatal event. Most of the cases in the literature involve patients with underlying cirrhosis. However, approximately one quarter of duodenal variceal bleeds is caused by extrahepatic portal hypertension and they represent a unique population given their lack of liver dysfunction. The authors present a case where a 61-year-old male with history of remote crush injury presented with bright red blood per rectum and was found to have bleeding from massive duodenal varices. Injection sclerotherapy with ethanolamine was performed and the patient experienced a favorable outcome with near resolution of his varices on endoscopic follow-up. The authors conclude that sclerotherapy is a reasonable first line therapy and review the literature surrounding the treatment of duodenal varices secondary to extrahepatic portal hypertension. PMID:26558159

  17. Cerebral and splenic infarctions after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae-Seong; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-09-14

    Variceal bleeding is the most serious complication of portal hypertension, and it accounts for approximately one fifth to one third of all deaths in liver cirrhosis patients. Currently, endoscopic treatment remains the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments include band ligation and injection sclerotherapy. Injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been successfully used to treat variceal bleeding. Although injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate provides effective treatment for variceal bleeding, injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is associated with a variety of complications, including systemic embolization. Herein, we report a case of cerebral and splenic infarctions after the injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to treat esophageal variceal bleeding.

  18. [Intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages after administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemicstroke due to anterior cerebral artery dissection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Ken; Koyama, Seigo; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2011-06-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of right hemiparesis. At admission, he was alert and well oriented. His verbal comprehension seemed good, but his speech was not fluent. He could not stand or walk owing to the right hemiparesis, which was severe in the lower extremity. Computed tomographic (CT) scans on admission showed no abnormality. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed after the CT showed a high-intensity lesion in the left cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed occlusion and irregularity of the left A2 portion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). At 1 h 50 min after the onset of the hemiparesis, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 0.6 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. At 1 h after the administration of rt-PA, he became drowsy and his right hemiparesis deteriorated. CT scans performed again showed a hematoma in the left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. He was treated conservatively. MRA performed on the 18th day after admission showed recanalization of the left ACA and abnormal dilatation of the left A2 segment. The abnormal dilatation was also depicted by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) performed on the 26th day after admission and even on the 33rd and 77th days. As seen in our case, the definite diagnosis of dissection confined to the ACA frequently needs serial angiographies; therefore, its diagnosis immediately after the onset is often difficult. Thrombolytic therapy by intravenous administration of rt-PA for cerebral infarction caused by dissection of the ACA may recanalize the occluded site and facilitate the progression of the dissection, resulting in intracerebral and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages. In patients with cerebral infarction due to ACA dissection, strict control of blood pressure and careful observation are necessary after thrombolytic therapy by rt-PA.

  19. Intestinal Epithelial TLR-4 Activation Is Required for the Development of Acute Lung Injury after Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock via the Release of HMGB1 from the Gut.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Chhinder P; Jia, Hongpeng; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte; Ozolek, John; Zhu, Xiaorong; Billiar, Timothy R; Hackam, David J

    2015-05-15

    The mechanisms that lead to the development of remote lung injury after trauma remain unknown, although a central role for the gut in the induction of lung injury has been postulated. We hypothesized that the development of remote lung injury after trauma/hemorrhagic shock requires activation of TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, and we sought to determine the mechanisms involved. We show that trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused lung injury in wild-type mice, but not in mice that lack TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, confirming the importance of intestinal TLR4 activation in the process. Activation of intestinal TLR4 after trauma led to increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, enterocyte apoptosis, and the release of circulating HMGB1, whereas inhibition of ER stress attenuated apoptosis, reduced circulating HMGB1, and decreased lung injury severity. Neutralization of circulating HMGB1 led to reduced severity of lung injury after trauma, and mice that lack HMGB1 in the intestinal epithelium were protected from the development of lung injury, confirming the importance of the intestine as the source of HMGB1, whose release of HMGB1 induced a rapid protein kinase C ζ-mediated internalization of surface tight junctions in the pulmonary epithelium. Strikingly, the use of a novel small-molecule TLR4 inhibitor reduced intestinal ER stress, decreased circulating HMGB1, and preserved lung architecture after trauma. Thus, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation leads to HMGB1 release from the gut and the development of lung injury, whereas strategies that block upstream TLR4 signaling may offer pulmonary protective strategies after trauma.

  20. [Hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst: case report and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Aranda, Jorge; Wingartz-Plata, Hugo F; Maldonado-Arce, Boris; Vega-Espinosa, J Juvenal; Maldonado-Alcaraz, Efraín

    2004-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare entities, and hemorrhagic pseudocysts are even less frequent. Generally, they are unsuspected during first patient evaluation and can suggest acute abdomen. We present the case of a hemorrhagic pseudocyst with sudden onset of abdominal pain and features compatible with acute appendicitis.

  1. Profiling biochemical and hemodynamic markers using chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained rats undergoing severe, acute controlled hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock as an integrated in-vivo model system to assess new blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Daull, P; Blouin, A; Cayer, J; Beaudoin, M; Belleville, K; Sirois, P; Nantel, F; Chang, T M S; Battistini, B

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess several biochemical and physiological endpoint parameters alongside controlled hemorrhagic and recovery phases of chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained healthy rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12-14 weeks; 430+/-20 g; n=22-18) were instrumented with a saline-perfused femoral arterial catheter and placed individually in a metabolic cage for up to 20 days, allowing instant assessments of the hemodynamic profile and blood and urine sampling for hematological profile and biochemical measurements to assess hepatic, renal and metabolic functions. In addition, body weight, food and water intake, and diuresis were monitored daily. After a 7-day stabilization period, the rats underwent severe and acute hemorrhagic shock (HS) (removal of 50% of total circulating blood volume), kept in hypovolemic shock for an ischemic period of 50 min and then resuscitated over 10 min. Gr. 1 was re-infused with autologous shed blood (AB; n=10) whereas Gr. 2 was infused 1:1 with a solution of sterile saline-albumin (SA; 7% w/v) (n=8-12). Ischemic rats recovered much more rapidly following AB re-infusion than those receiving SA. Normal hemodynamic and biochemical profiles were re-established after 24 h. Depressed blood pressure lasted 4-5 days in SA rats. The hematological profile in the SA resuscitated rats was even more drastically affected. Circulating plasma concentrations of hemoglobin (-40%), hematocrit (-50%), RBC (-40%) and platelets (-41%) counts were still severely decreased 24 h after the acute ischemic event whereas WBC counts increased 2.2-fold by day 4. It took 5-9 days for these profiles to normalize after ischemia-reperfusion with SA. Diuresis increased in both groups (by 45+/-7% on day 1) but presented distinct electrolytic profiles. Hepatic and renal functions were normal in AB rats whereas altered in SA rats. The present set of experiments enabled us to validate a model of HS in conscious rats and the use of an

  2. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  3. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M D

    1993-05-01

    Adrenal cysts are uncommon. They may be fatal if they hemorrhage and are not rapidly diagnosed. Most adrenal cysts are small and asymptomatic. When they are symptomatic, it is usually because the cyst has enlarged, causing flank discomfort, gastrointestinal complaints, and hemorrhage. Occasionally, a palpable mass may be found. It is thought that hemorrhage occurs secondary to trauma or some toxic or infectious process. The author describes a case in which a previously healthy man had a sudden hemorrhage within a benign adrenal cyst with infarction of the kidney. A discussion of adrenal cysts follows.

  4. Perinephric Hematoma and Hemorrhagic Shock as a Rare Presentation for an Acutely Obstructive Ureteral Stone with Forniceal Rupture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zynger, Debra L.; Box, Geoffrey N.; Shah, Ketul K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Spontaneous perinephric hematoma (SPH) secondary to a forniceal rupture as the first presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone in a patient without history of urolithiasis has not been described previously. Case presentation: We report a 70-year-old Caucasian male patient who presented to our emergency room with fever, altered mental status, and left flank pain. He had a temperature of 103.3°F, tachycardia, but stable blood pressure. He had left flank tenderness. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed an intracapsular hematoma (13.3 × 10.0 × 6.4 cm) with an active bleeding and a 1.1 cm left proximal ureteral stone. The patient became quickly hemodynamically unstable and was taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy and left nephrectomy. An active bleeding was encountered secondary to a (2.4 × 2.0 cm) lateral capsular defect in the kidney. Conclusion: Hemorrhagic/septic shock as a presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone may require an emergent nephrectomy in a hemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:27579423

  5. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and emphysematous brain abscess after endoscopic variceal ligation in a patient with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-I; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Chuang, Chiao-Hsiung; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2006-10-01

    Procedure-related bacterial infections may complicate esophageal variceal ligation in cirrhosis patients. Here, we report a 58-year-old man with underlying diabetes and liver cirrhosis who developed Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and brain abscess with gas formation in brain parenchyma and ventricles after this procedure. Despite administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, he became comatose on the 3rd day of acute illness and died on the 4th day of hospitalization. This case highlights the indication for antimicrobial prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and the need for early and heightened awareness of central nervous system infections in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Modified Sugiura Operation for Idiopathic Portal Hypertension with Bleeding Oesophageal Varices. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schettini, A-V; Pinheiro, R S; Pescatore, P; Lerut, J

    2015-01-01

    A case of a 36 years old man presenting massive upper GI bleeding due to oesophageal varices developed in the context of an idiopathic portal cavernoma and extensive porto-splenic thrombosis is discussed. He underwent a successful modified Sugiura operation (oesophago-gastric devascularisation and splenectomy [OGDS]) completed with interventional endoscopic treatment of residual oesophageal varices. The benefit of the modified Sugiura procedure proposed for the treatment of upper GI variceal bleeding developed in the context of splanchnic venous thrombosis is discussed. The procedure is a valid therapy in the treatment of symptomatic extra-hepatic hypertension when other options are inapplicable. PMID:26158259

  7. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Watson, G A; Abu-Shanab, A; O'Donohoe, R L; Iqbal, M

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  8. Splenic infarction after N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices: why does it happen?

    PubMed

    Köksal, Aydin S; Kayaçetin, Ertuğrul; Torun, Serkan; Erkan, Vedat; Ökten, Riza S

    2013-10-01

    Recent guidelines and consensus reports recommend endoscopic injection therapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate as the first-line treatment for bleeding-isolated gastric varices and gastroesophageal varices types 1 and 2. Embolization is a rare but serious complication of cyanoacrylate injection, which may be fatal in some cases. Herein, we present a patient who developed splenic infarction after N-butyl-cyanoacrylate injection for gastroesophageal varices type 2 and discuss the potential reasons and tips to prevent the occurence of embolization.

  9. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Shanab, A.

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  10. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg(-1) min(-1)), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (P time < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited.

  11. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  12. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  13. Multi-site evaluation of a computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm for small acute intra-cranial hemorrhage and development of a stand-alone CAD system ready for deployment in a clinical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi R.; Fernandez, James; Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2010-03-01

    Timely detection of Acute Intra-cranial Hemorrhage (AIH) in an emergency environment is essential for the triage of patients suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury. Moreover, the small size of lesions and lack of experience on the reader's part could lead to difficulties in the detection of AIH. A CT based CAD algorithm for the detection of AIH has been developed in order to improve upon the current standard of identification and treatment of AIH. A retrospective analysis of the algorithm has already been carried out with 135 AIH CT studies with 135 matched normal head CT studies from the Los Angeles County General Hospital/ University of Southern California Hospital System (LAC/USC). In the next step, AIH studies have been collected from Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and are currently being processed using the AIH CAD system as part of implementing a multi-site assessment and evaluation of the performance of the algorithm. The sensitivity and specificity numbers from the Walter Reed study will be compared with the numbers from the LAC/USC study to determine if there are differences in the presentation and detection due to the difference in the nature of trauma between the two sites. Simultaneously, a stand-alone system with a user friendly GUI has been developed to facilitate implementation in a clinical setting.

  14. Hemodynamic changes in a patient with esophageal varices after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy evaluated by endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Katsu; Ohmura, Takumi; Suga, Toshihiro

    2007-03-01

    A 46-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital for treatment of high-risk esophageal varices in February 2000. Images of the esophageal varices, paraesophageal veins and palisade veins were obtained by endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography (ECDUS) before endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Prophylactic EIS was performed six times per week for esophageal varices, and EIS was continued until the esophageal varices were completely eradicated. In July 2002, endoscopy revealed esophageal varices graded as Cb, F1, Lm, and RC(-), and color flow images of the palisade veins (hepatofugal flow), esophageal varices, and a developed paraesophageal vein were obtained with ECDUS. In April 2003, endoscopy showed esophageal varices graded as Cb, F1, Lm, and RC(-), and color flow images of the palisade veins and esophageal varices were obtained using ECDUS. The blood in the palisade veins flowed in an alternate direction on color flow images, and pulsatile waves were delineated at the gastroesophageal junction. In January 2004, endoscopy revealed esophageal varices graded as F0 and RC(-), and pulsatile waves were delineated in the lower esophagus with ECDUS. However, the esophageal varices and palisade veins had disappeared from color flow images. In conclusion, ECDUS was useful for evaluating hemodynamic changes after EIS.

  15. Efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation for bleeding esophageal varices in patients with tumor thrombus of the portal vein trunk (Vp3) associated with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, S; Matsumoto, Y; Murakami, M; Shibata, H; Saigenji, K

    1997-04-01

    We studied the efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) in 16 patients with tumor thrombus of the portal vein trunk (Vp3) associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. The average (+/-SD) number of O rings used was 9.0 +/- 5.0 for the esophageal varices (n = 7) and 16.4 +/- 4.5 for the esophagogastric varices (n = 9). The variceal size was quickly reduced in 11 of the 13 cases whose therapeutic outcome was able to be assessed by endoscopy. The red color sign improved in 10 of the 13 cases, but the therapeutic end point (F0, RC-) was achieved in only two patients, who were also treated by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. Emergency EVL achieved only short-term survival (17.14 +/- 6.64 days) and transient hemostasis. Elective EVL was associated with a survival duration of 90.0 +/- 64.25 days. The difference in the survival rate between emergency and elective cases was significant (P < .05). With regard to the timing of its application, EVL, being a less-invasive treatment, should be performed electively before variceal rebleeding for those patients with Vp3 hepatocellular carcinoma whose liver function is preserved. PMID:9151930

  16. [Two cases of esophageal variceal rupture associated with chemotherapy for liver metastasis of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mizuyama, Yoko; Shinto, Osamu; Matsutani, Sinji; Arimoto, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Ohno, Yoshioki; Takashima, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    A morphological change resembling liver cirrhosis called pseudocirrhosis may be observed following chemotherapy for liver metastasis of breast cancer. Pseudocirrhosis is hypothesized to be caused by retraction of the hepatic capsule along with tumor shrinkage and subsequent scar formation around the metastatic lesion, as a response to the infiltrating tumor or chemotherapy-induced hepatic injury. The progression of cirrhotic changes may result in portal hypertension and esophageal varices. We managed two cases of esophageal variceal rupture during chemotherapy for breast cancer with liver metastasis. Hemostasis was successfully achieved by the endoscopic variceal ligation technique in both cases. We conclude that clinicians should be aware of the risk of pseudocirrhosis during chemotherapy for liver metastasis, and a periodic endoscopic follow-up is recommended along with appropriate management of esophageal varices.

  17. Endoscopic submucosal dissection combined with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for early gastric cancer on gastric fundal varices.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Asano, Naoki; Yokosawa, Satoshi; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-08-01

    Currently, there is little report of treatment strategy for early gastric cancer (EGC) on gastric fundal varices (GFVs), because controlling GFVs was more challenging than controlling gastric cardiac varices associated with esophageal varices. We first report effective endoscopic treatment of EGC on GFVs of a 77-year-old man with Child-B cirrhosis. Endoscopic ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography studies revealed intramucosal EGC on variceal components, supplied from posterior gastric vein and drained to subphrenic vein without gastrorenal shunt. With informed consent, we performed endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) after eradication of GFVs by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Histologic assessment revealed curability of ESD and inflammation and fibrosis around EIS site. Thereafter, no recurrence and complication had occurred. To avoid life-threatening bleeding from GFVs, we achieved complete resection by ESD under direct visualization of submucosa after eradication of GFVs by EIS based on the examination of hemodynamics and local relationship between EGC and GFVs.

  18. Splenic artery embolization for the treatment of bleeding gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patrick A; Phang, David; Richmond, Bryan; Gill, Gurpreet; Campbell, John E

    2014-04-01

    Splenic vein thrombosis can lead to gastric varices. Subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding may ensue related to the change in venous outflow to the portal system. Vascular surgeons are infrequently asked to assist in the management of this entity. However, with many vascular surgeons providing diverse endovascular-based interventions, understanding catheter-based solutions is imperative. This report presents a case in which arterial embolization was used to treat gastric variceal bleeding.

  19. Sympathetic storming in a patient with intracranial basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Marino, Michael; Desai, Anjuli; Nissley, Frederick

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic deficits and medical complications are common sequelae after intracranial hemorrhage. Among the medical complications, sympathetic storming is relatively rare. We describe a case of a patient with an acute right basal ganglia hemorrhage. During the patient's hospital course, he developed tachypnea, diaphoresis, hypertension, hyperthermia, and tachycardia for three consecutive days. A complete laboratory work-up and imaging studies were unremarkable for infectious etiology, new intracranial hemorrhage, and deep vein thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with sympathetic storming, a relatively uncommon cause of these symptoms. The storming was secondary to a kinked Foley catheter, and subsequent placement of a new catheter resulted in the resolution of his symptoms. PMID:21297401

  20. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  1. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  2. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throughout Body Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder that affects about one in 5,000 people and causes arterial blood to flow directly into the veins, creating weakened ballooned vessels that can rupture. Interventional radiologists ...

  3. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers.

  4. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W; van der Groen, G

    1989-01-01

    Hantaviruses, the causative agents of HFRS, have become more widely recognized. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that these pathogens are distributed worldwide. People who come into close contact with infected rodents in urban, rural and laboratory environments are at particular risk. Transmission to man occurs mainly via the respiratory tract. The epidemiology of the hantaviruses is intimately linked to the ecology of their principal vertebrate hosts. Four distinct viruses are now recognized within the hantavirus genus and that number is likely to increase to six very soon; however, further investigations are necessary. Much more work is still needed before we fully understand the wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms of HFRS as well as the pathogenicity of the different viruses in the hantavirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. HFRS is difficult to diagnose on clinical grounds alone and serological evidence is often needed. A fourfold rise in IgG antibody titer in a 1-week interval, and the presence of the IgM type of antibodies against hantaviruses are good evidence for an acute hantavirus infection. Physicians should be alert for HFRS each time they deal with patients with acute febrile flu-like illness, renal failure of unknown origin and sometimes hepatic dysfunction. Especially the mild form of HFRS is difficult to diagnose. Acute onset, headache, fever, increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and polyuria are signs and symptoms compatible with a mild form of HFRS. Differential diagnosis should be considered for the following diseases in the endemic areas of HFRS: acute renal failure, hemorrhagic scarlet fever, acute abdomen, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, murine typhus, spotted fevers, non-A, non-B hepatitis, Colorado tick fever, septicemia, dengue, heartstroke and DIC. Treatment of HFRS is mainly supportive. Recently, however, treatment of HFRS patients with ribavirin in China and Korea, within 7 days after onset of fever, resulted in a reduced

  5. Endoscopic treatment of gastric varices bleeding with the use of n-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Kobryń, Konrad; Paluszkiewicz, Rafał; Krawczyk, Marek; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal varices and gastric varices are naturally-formed, pathological portosystemic shunts that occur in patients with portal hypertension. Gastric varices are responsible for about 10% of variceal bleeding; however, they are also the cause of massive haemorrhage, often with dramatic progress. Aim To assess the results of endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices using tissue glue Histoacryl. Material and methods From January 2013 to May 2015 170 patients underwent a total of 244 obliterations with the administration of tissue glue due to gastroesophageal varices. We analysed 35 patients who received urgent endoscopic intervention due to life-threatening gastric variceal bleeding. Results Thirty-five patients underwent 47 endoscopic procedures of haemorrhage management. Immediate haemostasis was achieved in 32 (91.4%) patients. In 3 (8.6%) cases endoscopy failed. In 2 patients a Linton tube was applied before secondary endoscopy. A single trans jugular portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed. Permanent haemostasis during the first endoscopy was achieved in 26 (74%) patients. Six (17%) patients presented recurrent bleeding 1–4 days following the initial treatment. Three patients had a splenic artery embolisation performed. One of the embolised patients required surgery, and a splenectomy was carried out. Conclusions If this kind of therapy is unavailable at the time, it is advised that one of the conventional methods of controlling bleeding is used, introducing basic life support and transporting the patient to a specialist centre with adequate endoscopic facilities, radiological possibilities of endovascular intervention, and surgical treatment of liver transplantation. PMID:26759632

  6. [Case of cardial varices rupture due to danaparoid sodium with portal venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kawaratani, Hideto; Matsumura, Masahiko; Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Morimoto, Tomoko; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Umemoto, Norie; Sakai, Kyouko; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    A 54-year-old man had been admitted to Nara city hospital because of hematemesis and dyspnea caused by physical exertion, and was given a diagnosis of esophago-cardial varices and portal venous thrombosis. He was transferred to our hospital for further examinations and treatments. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) revealed the progression of portal venous thrombosis. Danaparoid sodium was administered to treat the portal vein thrombus. 5 days later, the patient was found to have hematemesis resulting from a cardial varices rupture. After endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) was performed, danaparoid sodium was administered for 2 weeks. After the treatment, portal vein thrombus had almost disappeared. Due to an increased risk of bleeding, cases of esophago-cardial varices with portal venous thrombosis must be treated with care. This is the first report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to danaparoid sodium. Danaparoid sodium must be carefully administered when patients have portal venous thrombosis with delicate varices. PMID:19057161

  7. Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a myeloproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Robert; Charles, Hearns; Hymes, Kenneth; Chandarana, Hersh; Sigal, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Therapeutic options for gastric variceal bleeding in the presence of extensive portal vein thrombosis associated with a myeloproliferative disorder are limited. We report a case of a young woman who presented with gastric variceal bleeding secondary to extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis due to a Janus kinase 2 mutation associated myeloproliferative disorder that was managed effectively with partial splenic embolization.

  8. Pontine infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pontine infarcts are often part of a large ischemia involving the brainstem, although infarcts may be restricted to the pons. In both cases, infarcts in the pons are characterized by interesting clinical patterns resulting from a variety of cranial nerve dysfunctions, eye movement disorders and motor, sensory and cerebellar manifestations, either isolated or in combination. The anteromedial and anterolateral territories are the most commonly involved. Penetrating branch artery disease is the most common etiology. Ten percent of all intracerebral hemorrhages are located in the pons, and small hemorrhages in this brainstem structure may, in some instances, give rise to unusual clinical manifestations. PMID:22377887

  9. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  10. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Parambil, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed autosomal-dominant angiodysplasia that has an estimated prevalence of 1 in 5000 individuals, with variable clinical presentations even within family members with identical mutations. The most common manifestations are telangiectasias of the skin and nasal mucosa. However, HHT can often be complicated by the presence of arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias in the lungs, brain, gastrointestinal tract, and liver that are often silent and can lead to life-threatening complications of stroke and hemorrhage. This article reviews HHT for the pulmonologist, who is not uncommonly the first practitioner to encounter these patients. PMID:27514597

  11. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention. PMID:23844289

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage associated with methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Ahmet; Satar, Salim; Uzun, Belkan; Topal, Metin; Yesilagac, Hasan; Avci, Andakkan

    2006-12-01

    Methanol is a common component of gasoline, antifreeze, washer fluid, perfume, household cleaners and various other industrial products. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis, serious neurologic sequelae and rarely imaging findings. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old man with methanol intoxication who was in a comatose stage. Computed tomography (CT) showed widespread brain edema and hemorrhages localized in the supratentorial region of the temporal lobe, nearly 3 x 1 cm in a crescent shape, in the white matter surrounding the capsula externa and extending to the periventricular white matter and occipital lobes. Temporal lobe hemorrhage in our patient might also have been due to the effect of heparinization during hemodialysis, metabolic and lactic acidosis, or formate.

  13. Tracheal varices caused by mediastinal compression of a large intrathoracic goiter: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHINI, R.; SANTOPRETE, S.; TRIOLA, R.; POLISTENA, A.; MONACELLI, M.; AVENIA, S.; SANGUINETTI, A.; PUMA, F.; AVENIA, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal varices are a rare condition but they can be an important source of massive or recurrent haemoptysis. Usually they are related to increased pressure in the pulmonary veins. Mediastinal goiter is often associated to compressive effects on the surrounding structures, including mediastinal vessels with potential superior vena cava syndrome. Case report We describe a case, not previously reported in literature, of mediastinal goiter with hemoptysis as first clinical manifestation. Bleeding was attributed to a superior vena cava syndrome associated to a tracheal fragile mucosa with an easily bleeding intramural nodule which was diagnosed as tracheal varices after total thyroidectomy. The nodule in fact disappeared together with the venous hypertensive signs after venous decompression of the mediastinum. Conclusions Compressive symptoms including tracheal varices, related to mediastinal goiter, can be treated surgically by total thyroidectomy via cervicotomy and when required with associated median sternotomy. PMID:25827666

  14. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group.

  15. Pulmonary hemorrhage following anabolic agent abuse: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Rasmussen, Finn; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Numerous adverse effects follow anabolic agent abuse. Pulmonary hemorrhage is not considered one of them. We present two cases of young male bodybuilders who developed diffuse alveolar bleeding as a result of anabolic steroid abuse. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with anabolic agent abuse has not been described previously in the literature. Both patients developed acute dyspnea and hemoptysis with consistent radiological findings. In both cases symptoms promptly resolved with cessation of exposure and no medical intervention was required and no signs of persistent lung damage were seen. It is crucial to be aware of pulmonary hemorrhage as an acute complication of anabolic agent abuse. It should be considered an important differential diagnosis in the athletic patient presenting with respiratory symptoms.

  16. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  17. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  18. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  19. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  20. Delayed Consecutive Contralateral Thalamic Hemorrhage after Spontaneous Thalamic Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hun; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Cho, Yong Jun

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic hemorrhagic events have ranged from 12 to 19 in prior reports, with a time lag between bilateral thalamic hemorrhage of up to two days. Herein, we report the first case of delayed (17 days) consecutive contralateral thalamic hemorrhage after spontaneous first thalamic hemorrhage. A 65-year-old female initially presented with a drowsy mentality with a left-side motor weakness (grade II/III). Brain computed tomography (CT) demonstrated right side thalamic and intraventricular hemorrhage. She regained alertness with mild residual motor weakness (grade III/IV) under medical management. Seventeen days later, a sudden and generalized tonic-clonic seizure developed. Brain CT scans revealed a new contralateral thalamic hemorrhage coincident with microbleeds. Neurologic status remained unchanged, consisting of a stuporous mentality with quadriparesis of grade II/II. We report the first case of delayed consecutive contralateral thalamic hemorrhage up to 17 days after first thalamic hemorrhage. The case highlights the need for close monitoring of patients with thalamic hemorrhage who experience microbleeds on the contralateral side, due to the possibility of delayed hemorrhage.

  1. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  2. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever imported into Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tenner-Racz, K; Poppert, D; Emmerich, P; Frank, C; Dinges, C; Penning, R; Nerlich, A; Racz, P; Günther, S

    2012-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne virus (family Flaviviridae) causing dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever. Here, we report the first fatal DENV infection imported into Germany. A female traveler was hospitalized with fever and abdominal pain after returning from Ecuador. Due to a suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis, cholecystectomy was performed. After cholecystectomy, severe spontaneous bleeding from the abdominal wound occurred and the patient died. Postmortem analysis of transudate and tissue demonstrated a DENV secondary infection of the patient and a gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) due to an extensive edema.

  3. A fourfold increase of oesophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with a history of oesophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Large, recent population-based data for evaluating the predictors of oesophageal variceal bleeding (OVB) among cirrhotic patients is still lacking. This study aimed to determine the cumulative incidence of OVB among cirrhotic patients and identify the predictors of OVB occurrence. METHODS Patient information on 38,172 cirrhotic patients without a history of OVB, who were discharged between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2007, was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database for this study. All patients were followed up for three years. Death was the competing risk when calculating the cumulative incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) of OVB. RESULTS OVB was present in 2,609 patients (OVB group) and absent in 35,563 patients (non-OVB group) at hospitalisation. During the three-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of OVB was 44.5% and 11.3% in the OVB and non-OVB group, respectively (p < 0.001). Modified Cox regression analysis showed that the HR of OVB history was 4.42 for OVB occurrence (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.13–4.74). Other predictors for OVB occurrence included hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.24), young age (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.98), ascites (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.37–1.56), alcohol-related disorders (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28), peptic ulcer bleeding (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.41) and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06–1.23). CONCLUSION Cirrhotic patients have a fourfold increased risk of future OVB following the first incidence of OVB. PMID:26768323

  4. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hemorrhage Mimicking an Aneurysm: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashish; Vyas, Sameer; Sanghvi, Ankur; Salunke, Pravin; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background A sudden onset of neurological symptoms in patients is conventionally thought to be due to vascular phenomenon, with one common differential diagnosis being subarachnoid hemorrhage. Another important differential diagnosis is ischemic stroke. An uncommon cause of such acute symptoms can be hemorrhage in a pre-existing tumor, that is, intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH). Purpose ITH is an important, though uncommon differential diagnosis in cases of sudden onset of neurological deterioration. Methods and Result A 60-year-old male presented with seizures and loss of consciousness 12 h prior to admission. The episode was sudden in onset. After detailed clinical and radiological investigations, the patient was diagnosed with glioma with bleed and was successfully operated upon. Conclusion The combination of hemorrhage and ischemic stroke pointed more towards an aneurysm rather than a tumor bleed. There were pointers both in favor of and against both the diagnosis. Therefore, a complex hemorrhagic cerebral tumor with acute presentation and discordant finding on CT or CT angiography should be characterized preoperatively. A large thrombosed aneurysm remains an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27780994

  5. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Primary or nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes, and has a poor prognosis. ICH has a mortality rate of almost 50% when associated with intraventricular hemorrhage within the first month, and 80% rate of dependency at 6 months from onset. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying the underlying etiology and thus assisting in the important therapeutic decisions. There are several imaging modalities available in the workup of patients who present with ICH, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A review of the current imaging approach, as well as a differential diagnosis of etiologies and imaging manifestations of primary versus secondary intraparenchymal hemorrhage, is presented. Active bleeding occurs in the first hours after symptom onset, with early neurologic deterioration. Identifying those patients who are more likely to have hematoma expansion is an active area of research, and there are many ongoing therapeutic trials targeting this specific patient population at risk. PMID:27432674

  6. Pancreatic carcinoma presenting as bleeding from segmental gastric varices: pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mullan, F. J.; McKelvey, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    Splenic vein occlusion leading to gastric variceal haemorrhage should be considered in cases of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report an unusual case in which the underlying pathology was a resectable carcinoma of the pancreatic tail. Images Figure 1 PMID:2371194

  7. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  8. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hayes, E B; Gubler, D J

    1992-04-01

    Hundreds of thousands of dengue cases are reported worldwide each year. Given the difficulty in obtaining full reporting, the actual number of human infections is probably much higher than the number reported. Dengue is usually a nonspecific febrile illness that resolves with supportive therapy but the clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe hemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. The pathophysiology of the severe forms of dengue may be related to sequential infection with different serotypes, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental and host factors or a combination of these factors. Control of dengue at the present time is dependent on control of the principal vector mosquito, A. aegypti. Efforts to achieve such control are now focusing on community education and action towards eliminating this mosquito's breeding sites near human dwellings. Vaccine development continues, but at present the only way to avoid dengue in an area where it is endemic or epidemic is to use repellents and mosquito barriers. The movement of people to and from tropical areas makes dengue an important differential diagnosis in any patient with an acute illness and history of recent travel to tropical areas. Because of continued infestation of the southeastern United States with A. aegypti, indigenous transmission in the continental United States remains a public health concern.

  9. Idiopathic Spontaneous Intramedullary Hemorrhage: A Report of a Rare Case of Repeated Intramedullary Hemorrhage with Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with acute voiding difficulty, numbness and weakness of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intramedullary hemorrhagic mass that extended from T9 to T10. T8-T10 laminotomy and surgical removal of the hemorrhagic mass was performed. The pathological diagnosis was hematoma. Her neurological status remained the same after the operation. At 5 days post-operation, the patient suddenly became paraplegic, and MRI that was immediately performed revealed a recurrent intramedullary hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation was performed. Again, histological examination showed only hematoma, without any evidence of abnormal vessels or a tumor. A postoperative MRI revealed no abnormal lesions other than those resulting from postoperative changes. At a 9-month follow up, the patient could walk a short distance with the aid of a walker. Because spontaneous intramedullary hemorrhage with unknown etiology is very rare, it is essential to perform a meticulous inspection of the hemorrhagic site to find the underlying cause. Repeated hemorrhage can occur; therefore, close observation of patients after surgery is important in cases without an apparent etiology. Urgent surgical evacuation is important to improve outcomes in these cases. PMID:26834818

  10. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  11. Fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia: Don't forget Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Cristina; Pravinkumar, Egbert; Balachandran, Dave; Schneider, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia secondary to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. S. maltophilia is commonly a non-virulent pathogen. However, in the immunocompromised, it is generally associated with bacteremia after central venous catheter placement or pneumonia. Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a rare presentation of this bacteria, with only 31 cases reported in the literature, and has 100% mortality within 72 hours. Rapid recognition and early suspicion should be key in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27358764

  12. A case of dengue hemorrhagic fever in a Japanese child.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Y; Harada, T; Ogawa, M; Okamoto, Y; Maeda, K

    1989-01-01

    A 6-year-old Japanese girl contracted a febrile illness with hemorrhagic manifestations when she traveled in Indonesia. A remarkable decrease in the numbers of platelets and white blood cells was observed in her acute-phase blood specimens. Her father, who accompanied her, showed dengue fever-like symptoms at almost the same time as her illness. It was determined by serological tests that they were infected with dengue virus type 1. Moreover, she showed a secondary antibody response to the flavivirus due to the pre-existing antibody to Japanese encephalitis virus. This is the first confirmed case of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Japanese people.

  13. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shruti; Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  14. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  15. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  16. Esophageal transection with automatic stapler device for bleeding esophageal varices. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Chaimoff, C

    1989-01-01

    The EEA stapler offers a relative easy technique for the control of severe bleeding from esophageal varices. Two cases are reported in which this technique in combination with proximal gastric devascularization and splenectomy was found to be superior to the performance of portosystemic shunt in emergency cases. The results of portocaval shunts created during severe bleeding from esophageal varices are not satisfactory because of the high mortality rate varying between 36% and 47% (1, 2) and the development of postoperative encephalopathy. For these reasons the tendency today, in cases of severe bleeding from esophageal varices where conservative treatment was unsuccessful, is that the surgeon should attack the bleeding area itself (3). Support for this opinion may be found in the publications of Sugiura and Futagawa (4, 5) and of Koyama et al. (6) about their long-term good results obtained after esophageal transection for bleeding esophageal varices. PMID:2785322

  17. Corticosterone, but not Glucose, Treatment Enables Fasted Adrenalectomized Rats to Survive Moderate Hemorrhage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Chew, Gordon; Ha, Taryn; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Fed adrenalectomized rats survive the stress of hemorrhage and hypovolemia, whereas fasted adrenalectomized rats become hypotensive and hypoglycemic after the first 90 min and die within 4 hours (h). We have studied the effects of glucose and corticosterone (B) infusions after hemorrhage as well as treatment with B at the time of adrenalectomy on the capacity of chronically prepared, conscious, fasted, adrenalectomized rats to survive hemorrhage. We have also measured the magnitudes of vasoactive hormone responses to hemorrhage. Maintenance of plasma glucose concentrations did not sustain life; however, treatment of rats at the time of adrenalectomy with B allowed 100 percent survival, and acute treatment of adrenalectomized rats at the time of hemorrhage allowed about 50 percent survival during the 5-h posthemorrhage observation period. Rats in the acute B infusion group that died exhibited significantly increased plasma B and significantly decreased plasma glucose concentrations by 2 h compared to the rats that lived. Plasma vasopressin, renin, and norepinephrine responses to hemorrhage were markedly augmented in the adrenalectomized rats not treated with B, and plasma vasopressin concentrations were significantly elevated at 1 and 2 h in all of the rats that subsequently died compared to values in those that lived. We conclude that: 1) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats is not a result of lack of glucose; 2) chronic and, to an extent, acute treatment of fasted adrenalectomized rats with B enables survival; 3) fasted adrenalectomized rats exhibit strong evidence of hepatic insufficiency which is not apparent in either fed adrenalectomized rats or B-treated fasted adrenalectomized rats; 4) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats may result from hepatic failure as a consequence of marked splanchnic vasoconstriction mediated bv the actions of extraordinarily high levels of vasoactive hormones after hemorrhage; and 5) B appears to

  18. Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L

    1996-01-01

    Dengue has been known for more than 200 years. The first dengue viruses were isolated about 50 years ago. Prior to the 1950's, dengue was considered a mild febrile disease, though rare hemorrhagic and fatal cases were known to occur. After that date, the first epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) appeared in Southeast Asia, and DHF became the most important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in the region. The emergence of DHF epidemics was first explained by mutations affecting dengue viruses, making them more virulent, but this hypothesis was not retained. Then, the "secondary infection" or "immune enhancement" theory was proposed to explain the increased virulence of dengue viruses when children had a secondary infection. This second hypothesis is still actually favoured. However, observations in Southeast Asia, some Pacific islands, and Americas do not agree with the "secondary infection" hypothesis, which consequently has been modified several times. Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the recognition that some viral strains are more virulent than others. Another hypothesis is the selection of more virulent dengue strains by the new vector Ae. aegypti, replacing the local vector Ae. albopictus, when urbanization and modern transportation increased in Southeast Asia after the last war. Comparisons between epidemics are very difficult, because of the distinction between DHF cases according to WHO criteria and dengue fever (DF) cases with hemorrhages. This distinction has no pathogenic or prognostic grounds, and makes the task of clinicians more difficult. The actual situation in countries facing dengue epidemics makes clear that this disease will continue to be a public health problem for some time to come.

  19. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  20. Massive choroidal hemorrhage associated with low molecular weight heparin therapy.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Leibovitch, I; Goldstein, M; Loewenstein, A

    2002-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with unstable angina pectoris was treated with subcutaneous enoxaparine (Clexane) for several days before presenting with severe pain and decreased vision in her left eye. The intraocular pressure was 70 mmHg, and fundus examination showed a pigmented choroidal lesion and associated choroidal and retinal detachment. Ultrasonography was consistent with choroidal hemorrhage, and she was diagnosed as having acute glaucoma secondary to massive subchoroidal hemorrhage. Medical control of the intraocular pressure resulted in a significant clinical improvement. Intraocular hemorrhage and angle-closure glaucoma are rare and previously unreported complications in patients treated with low molecular weight heparin. It is important to be aware of this ocular complication as these drugs are so often used. PMID:11943940

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  2. Epidemiology of hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, J W

    1989-01-01

    Twelve distinct viruses associated with hemorrhagic fever in humans are classified among four families: Arenaviridae, which includes Lassa, Junin, and Machupo viruses; Bunyaviridae, which includes Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan viruses; Filoviridae, which includes Marburg and Ebola viruses; and Flaviviridae, which includes yellow fever, dengue, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Omsk viruses. Most hemorrhagic fever viruses are zoonoses, with the possible exception of the four dengue viruses, which may continually circulate among humans. Hemorrhagic fever viruses are found in both temperate and tropical habitats and generally infect both sexes and all ages, although the age and sex of those infected are frequently influenced by the possibility of occupational exposure. Transmission to humans is frequently by bite of an infected tick or mosquito or via aerosol from infected rodent hosts. Aerosol and nosocomial transmission are especially important with Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Marburg, and Ebola viruses. Seasonality of hemorrhagic fever among humans is influenced for the most part by the dynamics of infected arthropod or vertebrate hosts. Mammals, especially rodents, appear to be important natural hosts for many hemorrhagic fever viruses. The transmission cycle for each hemorrhagic fever virus is distinct and is dependent upon the characteristics of the primary vector species and the possibility for its contact with humans.

  3. Transmission of epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever in easternmost Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sukri, Nono C; Laras, Kanti; Wandra, Toni; Didi, Sukman; Larasati, Ria P; Rachdyatmaka, Josef R; Osok, Stevie; Tjia, Petrus; Saragih, John M; Hartati, Sri; Listyaningsih, Erlin; Porter, Kevin R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Prawira, Ingerani S; Punjabi, Narain; Suparmanto, Sri A; Beecham, H James; Bangs, Michael J; Corwin, Andrew L

    2003-05-01

    In April 2001, a second suspected outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the easternmost region of Indonesia was investigated in Merauke, a town located in the southeastern corner of Papua, by the Indonesian Ministry of Health and the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2. Principal case criteria of hemorrhagic disease provided for a study enrollment of 15 clinically acute and 37 convalescing subjects. Additionally, 32 comparable age/sex controls were selected from neighboring households. Laboratory diagnosis involved three testing methodologies: virus isolation by cell culture, a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and serologic assays. Antibody (IgM) to dengue virus was detected in 27% of the acute clinical cases, 30% of the convalescing cases, and only 3% of the matched controls. Dengue 3 was the only viral serotype detected from acute serum samples by the RT-PCR. The mean +/- SD age of the acute and convalescing cases was 7.8 +/- 5.4 years. Overall hospital records accounted for 172 suspected outbreak cases, all urban residents of Merauke with no recent travel history outside the area. The estimated outbreak-associated case fatality rate among all suspected dengue cases was 1.2%. A seven-year retrospective review of hospital records in Merauke showed negligible disease reporting involving hemorrhagic disease prior to the outbreak.

  4. Transmission of epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever in easternmost Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sukri, Nono C; Laras, Kanti; Wandra, Toni; Didi, Sukman; Larasati, Ria P; Rachdyatmaka, Josef R; Osok, Stevie; Tjia, Petrus; Saragih, John M; Hartati, Sri; Listyaningsih, Erlin; Porter, Kevin R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Prawira, Ingerani S; Punjabi, Narain; Suparmanto, Sri A; Beecham, H James; Bangs, Michael J; Corwin, Andrew L

    2003-05-01

    In April 2001, a second suspected outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the easternmost region of Indonesia was investigated in Merauke, a town located in the southeastern corner of Papua, by the Indonesian Ministry of Health and the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2. Principal case criteria of hemorrhagic disease provided for a study enrollment of 15 clinically acute and 37 convalescing subjects. Additionally, 32 comparable age/sex controls were selected from neighboring households. Laboratory diagnosis involved three testing methodologies: virus isolation by cell culture, a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and serologic assays. Antibody (IgM) to dengue virus was detected in 27% of the acute clinical cases, 30% of the convalescing cases, and only 3% of the matched controls. Dengue 3 was the only viral serotype detected from acute serum samples by the RT-PCR. The mean +/- SD age of the acute and convalescing cases was 7.8 +/- 5.4 years. Overall hospital records accounted for 172 suspected outbreak cases, all urban residents of Merauke with no recent travel history outside the area. The estimated outbreak-associated case fatality rate among all suspected dengue cases was 1.2%. A seven-year retrospective review of hospital records in Merauke showed negligible disease reporting involving hemorrhagic disease prior to the outbreak. PMID:12812338

  5. Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Yousef; Qureshi, Adnan

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with devastating outcomes. Admission to the intensive care unit has been the only proven course to improve outcomes. All other treatment modalities have failed so far. The majority of patients presenting with ICH have an elevated blood pressure (BP). Initial data on the safety and efficacy of BP treatment in acute ICH have been conflicting. This has led to large prospective and randomized clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of early BP lowering in acute ICH. These trials showed safety and a tendency toward improved functional outcomes. In fact, the results of three subsequent meta-analyses also showed safety and possible efficacy of early lowering of BP in ICH. Based on the results of the published clinical trials and meta-analyses, the American Heart Association and the European Stroke Association concluded that early intensive treatment of BP in acute ICH is safe and might improve functional outcome. The authors advocate that-pending additional data from ongoing trials-health care professionals should maintain the SBp < 140 mm Hg in patients presenting with acute ICH. PMID:27214702

  6. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  7. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  8. Prospective randomized comparison of sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidocanol as variceal sclerosing agents.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, D K; Singh, B; Dogra, R; Dasarathy, S; Sharma, M P

    1992-02-01

    A prospective randomized controlled study was designed to evaluate differences in efficacy and complication rate between the two most commonly used sclerosing agents, sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STD) and polidocanol. Of 52 patients with esophageal variceal bleeding, 26 were randomized to receive sclerotherapy with 1.5% STD and 26 to receive 1% polidocanol at weekly intervals. Eradication of varices was achieved in 88% patients each of the STD and polidocanol group. There was no significant difference between patients injected with STD and polidocanol with regard to re-bleeding (27% vs. 15%) and mortality (11.5% in both). The use of STD, in contrast to polidocanol, was associated with a higher incidence of complications in terms of severe retrosternal pain (27% vs. 4%), deep ulceration (53% vs. 23%), dysphagia (88% vs. 46%), and stricture formation (27% vs. 8%). It was concluded that these two agents were similar in efficacy. However, polidocanol was superior due to a lower incidence of complications.

  9. Gastric variceal bleeding due to pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gotto, Antonio; Lieberman, Michael; Pochapin, Mark

    2014-03-24

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is a common clinical scenario. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, gastric varices can be frequently overlooked on endoscopy, particularly if not suspected or volume depleted. We report a case of suspected gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a childhood history of pancreatitis, who also experienced severe epigastric pain while in hospital. After transfer to an academic medical centre, the presence of gastric varices was identified and presumed to be due to splenic vein thrombosis. Pancreatitis is the most common cause of splenic vein thrombosis and accords with the patient's history, even though it occurred many years previously. This case highlights the importance of recognising pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis as a possible aetiology for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Complication of Cystic Fibrosis in a 3-Month-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadi, Faezeh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Maedeh; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of mucous and sweat glands, which affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Herein, we describe a 3-month-old girl with a history of recurrent episodes of urinary tract infections that required hospitalization. She was referred to our center at the age of three months, with massive gastroesophageal variceal bleeding. In physical examination, she had clubbing, hepatosplenomegaly, and mild ascites. Laboratory studies revealed high serum levels of liver enzymes and low level of Albumin. As of suspicious to CF, sweat tests were performed twice which confirmed the diagnosis of CF. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices is a rare complication of CF, which could result as a consequence of hepatobiliary involvement of disease. Early diagnosis of CF could prevent severe complications and even death in this group of patients. PMID:27107529

  11. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C; Tseng, J; Lui, K; Wan, Y; Tsai, C; Shem, C; Wu, C

    1999-01-01

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.


Keywords: splenic arteriovenous fistula; gastrointestinal bleeding; transcatheter arterial embolization PMID:10435172

  12. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  13. Endocrine function following acute SAH.

    PubMed

    Vespa, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes may occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in hypopituitarism. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify articles with English-language abstracts published between 1980 and March 2011, which addressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis insufficiency and hormone replacement. A total of 18 observational and prospective, randomized studies were selected for this review. Limited data are available, evaluating pituitary effects during the acute stage after subarachnoid hemorrhage, with inconsistent results being reported. Overall, after acute subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortisol levels may initially be supranormal, decreasing toward normal levels over time. During the months to years after subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary deficiency may occur in one out of three patients. Limited data suggest modest outcome benefits with fludrocortisone and no benefit or harm from corticosteroids. PMID:21809154

  14. Simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization for gastric fundal varices

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kuraoka, Naosuke; Ogawa, Kohei; Sato, Munehiro; Aiba, Tsuneo; Yoneyama, Osamu; Furukawa, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Igarashi, Kentarou

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously reported the techniques and usefulness of simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and partial splenic embolization (PSE), based on the hypothesis that concomitant PSE can diminish the increase in portal venous pressure after B-RTO. Objective After experiencing more cases and performing longer-term follow-up, we re-evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE for gastric fundal varices (GVs). Methods We performed B-RTO in 36 consecutive patients treated for GVs from 2005 to 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE (Group 1) and 13 underwent B-RTO monotherapy (Group 2). The outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups except that the splenic volumes were larger in Group 1 than 2. B-RTO was technically successful in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%) in Group 1 and in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%) in Group 2. In all patients with ruptured GVs (six in Group 1 and five in Group 2), complete hemostasis was obtained by B-RTO. Exacerbation of esophageal varices was significantly less frequent in Group 1 than 2 (p = 0.0017). Conclusion Concomitant PSE with B-RTO may contribute to prevention of the exacerbation of esophageal varices after B-RTO. PMID:26966524

  15. Endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices complicated by Isaacs' syndrome involving difficulty with conventional sedation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Sato, Ken; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old male consulted a local doctor with a chief complaint of systemic convulsions and muscle stiffness and was diagnosed with Isaacs' syndrome based on positive findings for antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels in 2009. He subsequently experienced repeated hematemesis in 2013, at which time he was taken to our hospital by ambulance. Emergent endoscopy revealed esophageal varices with spurting bleeding. The bleeding was stopped with urgent endoscopic variceal ligation. Three days later, the patient developed sudden dyspnea with stridor during inspiration under sedation with an intravenous injection of low-dose flunitrazepam prior to receiving additional treatment and was aroused with intravenous flumazenil, after which his dyspnea immediately improved. Dyspnea may be induced by muscle cramps associated with Isaacs' syndrome exacerbated by sedation. Endoscopic variceal ligation was performed safely using multiple ligation devices in an awake state following pre-medication with hydroxyzine, without sudden dyspnea. Endoscopists should be cautious of the use of sedatives in patients with diseases associated with muscle twitching or stiffness, as in the current case. In addition, it is necessary to administer endoscopic treatment in an awake state or under conscious sedation in patients with a high risk of dyspnea. PMID:26862027

  16. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  17. Domestically acquired seoul virus causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome-Maryland, 2008.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christian; Palekar, Rakhee; Kim, Peter; Blythe, David; de Senarclens, Olivier; Feldman, Katherine; Farnon, Eileen C; Rollin, Pierre E; Albariño, Cesar G; Nichol, Stuart T; Smith, Margo

    2009-11-15

    Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses capable of causing human disease. The Seoul virus is a hantavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in East Asia. To our knowledge, we report the first domestically acquired case of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome caused by the Seoul virus, confirmed by serology testing, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The patient presented with myalgias and fever, and developed acute renal failure.

  18. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Yee; Liu, Jia-Shou; Lai, Shung-Lon; Wu, Hsiu-Shan; Lan, Min-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Nattokinase is used as a health-promoting medicine for preventing thrombosis due to its fibrinolytic activity. Cerebral microbleed is remnant of blood extravasations from the damaged vessels related to cerebral microangiopathies. We report a patient, having used aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, who had an acute cerebellar hemorrhage after taking nattokinase 400 mg daily for 7 consecutive days. In addition to the hemorrhagic lesion, multiple microbleeds were demonstrated on brain MR images. We suggest that nattokinase may increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients who have bleeding-prone cerebral microangiopathy and are receiving other antithrombotic agent at the same time.

  19. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M.; Wang, Ping Z.; Bai, Xue F.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  20. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  1. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  2. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit’s brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xue-Long; Zheng, Yang; Shen, Hai-Ming; Jing, Wen-Li; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Tan, Qing-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane. METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model. Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve. RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage. Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure. CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could cause intracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage. PMID:15786536

  3. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  4. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1998-07-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to develop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  5. Treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: the clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Sterzi, R; Vidale, S

    2004-03-01

    Of all strokes 10% to 15% are intracerebral hemorrhage, primary ICH accounting for more than 75% of cases. A correct evaluation and management must start in the emergency room, in particular for patients who rapidly deteriorate. The diffusion of organized care for stroke patients and the availability of the stroke units in Italian hospitals, may represent a further opportunity to improve the outcome of patients with ICH. Despite the bulk of evidences coming from the randomized clinical therapeutic trials for acute ischemic stroke, the available data for randomized surgical trials are scanty. In these small randomized studies, neither surgical nor medical treatment has conclusively been shown to benefit patients with ICH. Surgical techniques are improving but it is important to find out the time window during which surgical evacuation is most effective with respect to the long-term outcome. The use of thrombolytic therapy to promote the resolution of ventricular blood clots appears to be promising.

  6. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  7. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Suk

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes.

  8. Fibrinolytic agents in the treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage in adults

    PubMed

    Haines; Lapointe

    1998-05-13

    This paper aims to review current literature on the treatment of acute intraventricular hemorrhage in adults with intraventricular infusion of fibrinolytic agents. A literature search on the topics of "intraventricular hemorrhage" or "intracerebral hemorrhage" with "thrombolytic therapy", "fibrinolytic therapy", "urokinase", "streptokinase", "tissue plasminogen activator" or "tPA" covering the years 1966-1997 was carried out electronically. This was supplemented by searching the reference lists of the identified articles. Articles regarding exclusively intracerebral hemorrhage or hematoma, neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage, non-therapeutic issues, and laboratory research were excluded. The included articles are summarized in evidence and evaluation tables. Six articles evaluating the treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage in adults with intraventricular fibrinolytic agents were identified. One reports a small randomized clinical trial including 16 patients and appears to show a statistically insignificant preference for urokinase treatment. Five other reports present case series for which a total of 58 patients were exposed to either streptokinase, urokinase, or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and suggest good outcome. Two of them were with non-randomized retrospective or prospective controls, and three have no controls. Despite important limitations, all reports suggest that blood is more rapidly cleared from the ventricles and outcome is better when administering a fibrinolytic agent intraventricularly. While the experience presented in these papers suggests that intraventricular administration of fibrinolytic agents may be associated with fewer complications, more rapid clearing of blood from the ventricles, less late hydrocephalus, and better long-term outcome than is seen in patients treated with ventricular drainage alone, it is insufficient to recommend such treatment as a matter of policy. Substantial methodologic flaws render these

  9. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  10. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  11. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  12. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  13. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO.

  14. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO. PMID:27014763

  15. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease: analysis of tissues by amplification and in situ hybridization reveals widespread orbivirus infection at low copy numbers.

    PubMed

    Brodie, S J; Bardsley, K D; Diem, K; Mecham, J O; Norelius, S E; Wilson, W C

    1998-05-01

    A recent outbreak of hemorrhagic fever in wild ruminants in the northwest United States was characterized by rapid onset of fever, followed shortly thereafter by hemorrhage and death. As a result, a confirmed 1,000 white-tailed deer and pronghorn antelope died over the course of 3 months. Lesions were multisystemic and included severe edema, congestion, acute vascular necrosis, and hemorrhage. Animals that died with clinical signs and/or lesions consistent with hemorrhagic fever had antibody to epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) by radioimmune precipitation but the antibody was limited exclusively to class immunoglobulin M. These findings, indicative of acute infection, were corroborated by the observation that numerous deer were found dead; however, clinically affected deer were rarely seen during the outbreak. Furthermore, only in animals with hemorrhagic lesions was EHDV-2 isolated and/or erythrocyte-associated EHDV-2 RNA detected by serotype-specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. By using a novel RT in situ PCR assay, viral nucleic acid was localized to the cytoplasm of large numbers of tissue leukocytes and vascular endothelium in tissues with hemorrhage and to vessels, demonstrating acute intimal and medial necrosis. Because PCR amplification prior to in situ hybridization was essential for detecting EHDV, the virus copy number within individual cells was low, <20 virus copies. These findings suggest that massive covert infection characterized by rapid dissemination of virus facilitates the severe and lethal nature of this disease. PMID:9557671

  16. Esophageal Stent for Refractory Variceal Bleeding: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preliminary studies suggest that covered self-expandable metal stents may be helpful in controlling esophageal variceal bleeding. Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of esophageal stent in refractory variceal bleeding in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library covering the period from January 1970 to December 2015. Data were selected and abstracted from eligible studies and were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 test. Results. Five studies involving 80 patients were included in the analysis. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 91 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 46.8 d (range, 30–60 d). The success rate of stent deployment was 96.7% (95% CI: 91.6%–99.5%) and complete response to esophageal stenting was in 93.9% (95% CI: 82.2%–99.6%). The incidence of rebleeding was 13.2% (95% CI: 1.8%–32.8%) and the overall mortality was 34.5% (95% CI: 24.8%–44.8%). Most of patients (87.4%) died from hepatic or multiple organ failure, and only 12.6% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding. There was no stent-related complication reported and the incidence of stent migration was 21.6% (95% CI: 4.7%–46.1%). Conclusion. Esophageal stent may be considered in patients with variceal bleeding refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:27517043

  17. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M. Williams, D.M.

    1985-08-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful.

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karakama, Jun; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maehara, Taketoshi; Ohno, Kikuo

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with an extremely rare case of intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of an anterior spinal artery aneurysm manifesting as disturbance of consciousness following sudden onset of neck pain and numbness of the extremities. Cranial computed tomography revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage, mainly in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography studies on admission and on the 4th day demonstrated no definite abnormality as a bleeding source. A ventricular catheter was inserted to treat the acute hydrocephalus, and conservative management was continued during the acute period. Third angiography on the 18th day demonstrated an anterior spinal artery aneurysm at the C1 level which was considered to be the bleeding site. After conservative treatment, the patient was discharged without neurological deficits. Fourth angiography on the 108 th day disclosed spontaneous disappearance of the aneurysm, which was confirmed by the fifth angiography on the 269 th day. If subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown etiology is encountered, spinal artery aneurysm should be considered as the bleeding source. Despite the controversy concerning the treatment strategy, ruptured spinal artery aneurysms can be treated conservatively because of the possibility of spontaneous regression. Follow-up angiography is required to evaluate the natural course of the lesion.

  19. [Clinical observation of 15 Thai children with dengue hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Chang, C S; Harn, M R; Nimmannitya, S

    1990-03-01

    Fifteen Thai children, diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever and admitted to the Children's Hospital in Bangkok, were studied. All cases were serologically proved to be secondary dengue infections. The clinical signs and symptoms in the first few days of the acute febrile phase were similar to those observed in cases with classical dengue fever, and included continuously high fever, headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, etc. In the laboratory findings we noted hypoalbuminemia and mild elevation of the GOT and GPT. The hemogram showed an increasing atypical lymphocyte count during the acute febrile period. Prolongations of the partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time were also found, especially in the severe shock cases. All patients had varying degrees of hepatomegaly and pleural effusion from their chest x-rays accompanied by a rapid increase in the hematocrit of more than 20% and a fall in the platelet count to less than 100000/microliters. During the plasma leakage period the patients easily developed shock, even leading to death, unless adequate fluid supplies were given. This is also the major pathophysiological difference between dengue hemorrhagic fever and classical dengue fever. Although some studies concerning the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever have been reported, but the exact mechanisms need further investigation.

  20. Intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Reijmer, Yael D; Charidimou, Andreas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia are composed of cognitive deficits resulted from a range of vascular lesions and pathologies, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic. However the contribution of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presumed due to small vessel diseases on cognitive impairment is underestimated, in contrast to the numerous studies about the role of ischemic vascular disorders on cognition. In this review we summarize recent findings from clinical studies and appropriate basic science research to better elucidate the role and possible mechanisms of intracerebral hemorrhage in cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  1. Determinants of myocardial hemorrhage after coronary reperfusion in the anesthetized dog

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, L.A.J.; White, F.; Heggtveit, H.A.; Sanders, T.M.; Bloor, C.M.; Covell, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Intramyocardial hemorrhage often occurs with reperfusion in experimental acute myocardial infarction and is thought to be associated with extension of necrosis. To determine if hemorrhage was associated with extension of necrosis, 10 anesthetized dogs were reperfused after 6 hours of circumflex coronary artery occlusion and 10 others had control occlusion with no reperfusion. Fifteen of the 20 reperfused dogs had gross hemorrhage and none of the control dogs did. In 12 reperfused and 10 control dogs, radioactive microspheres were injected after coronary occlusion to quantitate collateral flow and in the reperfusion group microspheres were injected to quantitate reflow. Complete flow data were available in eight reperfused and 10 analyzed for hemorrhage, collateral flow and creatine kinase activity. Serial microscopic examination was performed in eight additional dogs reperfused after 6 hours to determine if hemorrhage occurs into otherwise microscopically normal myocardium. Pathologic examination indicatd that hemorrhage did not occur into otherwise microscopically normal myocardium. These studies indicate that hemorrhage or reperfusion is associated with severe myocardial necrosis and markedly depressed flow before reperfusion and this occurs only into myocardium already markedly compromised at the time of reperfusion.

  2. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  3. [Fatal necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis related to sodium valproate: case report].

    PubMed

    Munhoz, R P; dos Santos, M L; Hernández-Fustes, O J

    2001-09-01

    Among the idiosyncratic reactions related to VPA, pancreatitis is the most rare and less remembered even though its potentially fatal course. We report the case of a 5 year-old boy with epilepsy treated with VPA 40 mg/kg/day associated with CBZ 20 mg/kg/day and PB 3 mg/kg/day, admitted for vomiting, abdominal pain, low grade fever, abdominal tension and amylasis of 288 UI. On evolution presented upper digestive hemorrhage, shock and amylasis of 564 UI. The patient was submitted to exploratory laparotomy with findings of hemorrhagic ascitis, retroperitoneal hematoma, increased volume of pancreas with edema and hemorrhage leading to diagnosis of necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis and a fatal course. Pancreatic complications are well known complications related to VPA treatment and may vary between asymptomatic hyperamilasemy to fatal acute pancreatitis. The characteristics of our patient correlates with the data on literature: we found 7 similar cases reported, 4 of which died.

  4. Medullary Hemorrhage after Ischemic Wallenberg's Syndrome in a Patient with Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Background The main complication of cerebral cavernous angioma is hemorrhage. Ischemic stroke as a complication of cerebral cavernous angioma has rarely been described, and hemorrhage after ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome has not been reported before. Case Report A 45-year-old woman presented with perioral numbness, hoarseness, dysphagia, and worsening of her previous sensory symptoms. The patient had been taking aspirin for 3 years after suffering from ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome with left paresthesia as a residual symptom. Brain computed tomography revealed an acute medullary hematoma in the previously infarcted area. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous angioma in the right medulla. Conclusions We presume that cerebral cavernous angioma was responsible for both the ischemia and the hemorrhage, and we also cautiously speculate that the aspirin contributed to the development of hemorrhage in the previously infarcted area. PMID:21264204

  5. A fatal outcome due to pulmonary hemorrhage following Russell’s viper bite

    PubMed Central

    Palangasinghe, Dhammika R.; Weerakkody, Ranga M.; Dalpatadu, Chamila G.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.

    2015-01-01

    Russell’s viper (RV) envenomation causes local effects, coagulopathy, thrombosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and neurological manifestations. Although coagulopathy and endothelial destruction causing local and mucosal surface bleeding is known, isolated severe pulmonary hemorrhage is not commonly reported. We report a previously healthy 18-year-old male who had bilateral severe pulmonary hemorrhages, which resulted in a fatal outcome following RV bite. This diagnosis was supported by persistent alveolar shadows, with minimum improvement despite hemodialysis without heparin, mixed acidosis and endotracheal tube bleeding. Other bleeding manifestations were absent. Polyvalent antivenom was administered in lieu of prolonged whole blood clotting time. Thrombocytopenia and mildly deranged clotting parameters were noted. Pulmonary hemorrhages were significant enough to require transfusion. This case highlights the importance of suspecting pulmonary hemorrhages in patients with alveolar shadows and desaturation following RV bite despite the absence of other bleeding manifestations in light of failure of optimum therapy including hemodialysis. PMID:25935188

  6. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  7. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  8. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  9. Resveratrol Rescues Kidney Mitochondrial Function Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Karamercan, Mehmet Akif; Ye, Lan; Bhatti, Tricia; Becker, Lance B.; Baur, Joseph A.; Sims, Carrie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic shock may contribute to acute kidney injury by profoundly altering renal mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) activator, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative damage in a variety of aging-related disease states. We hypothesized that RSV treatment during resuscitation would ameliorate kidney mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. Method Using a decompensated hemorrhagic shock model, male Long-Evans rats (n=6 per group) were sacrificed prior to hemorrhage (Sham), at severe shock, and following either lactated Ringer’s (LR) Resuscitation or LR+RSV Resuscitation (RSV: 30mg/kg). At each time point, blood samples were assayed for arterial blood gases, lactate, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine. Mitochondria were also isolated from kidney samples in order to assess individual electron transport complexes (CI, CII, and CIV) using high-resolution respirometry. Total mitochondria reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using fluorometry and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring 4-hydroxynonenal by Western blot. qPCR was used quantify mRNA from PGC1-α, SIRT1, and proteins known to mitigate oxidative damage and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Results RSV supplementation during resuscitation restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation. Compared to standard LR resuscitation, RSV treatment significantly increased SIRT1 and PGC1-α expression and significantly increased both SOD2 and catalase expression. Although RSV was associated with decreased lactate production, pH, BUN and serum creatinine values did not differ between resuscitation strategies. Conclusions Resuscitation with RSV significantly restored renal mitochondrial function and decreased oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25895148

  10. Experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease in yearling black-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Woods, L W; Hanley, R S; Chiu, P H; Burd, M; Nordhausen, R W; Stillian, M H; Swift, P K

    1997-10-01

    An apparently novel adenovirus was associated with an epizootic of hemorrhagic disease that is believed to have killed thousands of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in California (USA) during 1993-1994. A systemic vasculitis with pulmonary edema and hemorrhagic enteropathy or a localized vasculitis associated with necrotizing stomatitis/pharyngitis/glossitis or osteomyelitis of the jaw were common necropsy findings in animals that died during this epizootic. Six black-tailed yearling deer (O. hemionus columbianus) were inoculated with purified adenovirus isolated from a black-tailed fawn that died of acute adenovirus hemorrhagic disease during the epizootic. Three of six inoculated deer also received intramuscular injections of dexamethasone sodium phosphate every 3 days during the study. Eight days post-inoculation, one deer (without dexamethasone) developed bloody diarrhea and died. Necropsy and histopathologic findings were identical to lesions in free-ranging animals that died of the natural disease. Hemorrhagic enteropathy and pulmonary edema were the significant necropsy findings and there was microscopic vascular damage and endothelial intranuclear inclusion bodies in the vessels of the intestines and lungs. Adenovirus was identified in necrotic endothelial cells in the lungs by fluorescent antibody staining, immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. Adenovirus was reisolated from tissues of the animal that died of experimental adenovirus hemorrhagic disease. Similar gross and microscopic lesions were absent in four of six adenovirus-inoculated deer and in the negative control animal which were necropsied at variable intervals during the 14 wk study. One deer was inoculated with purified adenovirus a second time, 12 wk after the first inoculation. Fifteen days after the second inoculation, this deer developed severe ulceration of the tongue, pharynx and rumen and necrotizing osteomyelitis of the mandible which was associated with

  11. A rare case of splenic lymphoma in a patient with polymyositis manifesting as gastric variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Ravish; Walia, Sandeep; Zalawadia, Ashish; Siddiqui, Yousuf

    2015-04-01

    We report an unusual case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to isolated gastric variceal bleeding in a patient with splenomegaly who was subsequently diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient is a 47-year-old male with a history of polymyositis who presented to the emergency room with complaints of lightheadedness and melena for 2 days. On initial presentation, the patient had positive orthostatic vital signs. He was found to be anemic with presenting hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl (compared with 13.4 g/dl 4 months prior to presentation). The patient was aggressively resuscitated with intravenous fluid and blood transfusions. An emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed which showed isolated gastric varices in the fundus of the stomach, with no active bleeding or high-risk stigmata. Abdominal computed tomography revealed focal splenic vein thrombosis and splenomegaly with ill-defined hypodensities. Portal and superior mesenteric veins were patent. Mild edema was seen surrounding the spleen and non-specific abdominal lymphadenopathy was also reported. A surgical consultation recommended an urgent splenectomy. Pathology of the removed spleen revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed lymphomatous disease in the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and bone marrow. The patient was subsequently started on chemotherapy.

  12. Downhill varices secondary to HeRO graft-related SVC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Roopkiranjot, Kahlon; Lakshminarayan, Nandagopal; Balabhadrapatruni, Krishna; Gebregeorgis, Wihib; Kissner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters are well-documented causes of benign central vein stenosis, which can be associated with proximal or downhill esophageal varices due to shunting of blood flow from the upper portion of the body through the esophageal venous plexuses. A majority of these cases remain asymptomatic. As a result, studies are largely limited to symptomatic patients, with incidence rates ranging from 16% to 29%. Recently, Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) graft has been introduced as an effective alternate hemodialysis access in catheter-dependent patients, especially in the presence of significant central venous occlusion. It differs from a conventional arteriovenous graft (AVG) by the fact that its venous outflow end is in the right atrium via one of the central veins, bypassing any significant occlusion upstream. Lower intervention rates and reduced incidence of bacteremia make it comparable to conventional tunneled catheters. However, the incidence of central vein occlusion and associated complications with HeRO grafts is unknown. We present the first case of gastrointestinal bleeding from downhill esophageal varices secondary to HeRO-graft-related SVC occlusion.

  13. Hyperacute injury marker (HARM) in primary hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, R.; Menon, R.; Warach, S.; Latour, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize a previously unreported form of CNS barrier disruption in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH): hyperacute injury marker (HARM). Methods: In this retrospective cohort analysis of patients presenting with primary ICH, precontrast and postcontrast MRI scans obtained within 5 days of symptom onset were analyzed. The presence of CNS barrier disruption was defined by 1) perihematomal or intrahematomal enhancement visualized on postcontrast T1-weighted MRI or 2) HARM: sulcal or ventricular hyperintensity visualized on postcontrast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences (graded on a 5-point scale). Results: Forty-six patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 65 years, median NIH Stroke Scale score was 7, and mean ICH volume was 12.2 mL (range 0.3–46.9 mL). HARM was visualized in 85% of patients, and this was moderate to severe in 50%. In all cases, the sulcal enhancement was noncontiguous with the hematoma. Of those patients with postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, perihematomal or intrahematomal contrast enhancement was visualized in 75% of patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that HARM occurs in intracerebral hemorrhage and that it likely represents a second type of CNS barrier disruption distinct from parenchymal postcontrast T1-weighted enhancement. Similar to T1 enhancement, this phenomenon may serve as a clinically useful biomarker to test therapies aimed at stabilizing acute ICH and CNS barrier disruption. Future studies are needed to further define the time course and prognostic implications of this finding. PMID:22031531

  14. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors.

  15. Vital bleach of hemorrhagic discoloration.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Schmidt, J C

    1991-05-01

    An unusual case is presented of a maxillary central incisor with hemorrhagic discoloration that was successfully treated with the thermocatalytic vital bleach technique. This case emphasizes the need for a thorough radiographic and clinical examination to include vitality tests when a patient presents with a discolored tooth.

  16. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors. PMID:21698554

  17. Hemorrhagic onset of spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marcos Devanir Silva; Paz, Daniel de Araujo; Rodrigues, Thiago Pereira; Gandolfi, Ana Camila de Castro; Lamis, Fabricio Correa; Stavale, João Norberto; Suriano, Italo Capraro; Cetl, Luiz Daniel Marques Neves; Cavalheiro, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumors that generally induce slow progressive cord compression. Here, the authors describe a case of sudden-onset palsy of the lower extremities caused by hemorrhagic spinal angiolipoma. An emergent laminectomy was performed to achieve total lesion removal. Follow-up examinations indicated neurological improvement and the absence of recurrence.

  18. Mosquito-borne hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Arboviruses continue to be a significant source of disease, especially in regions where their insect hosts are endemic. This article highlights these diseases, with particular focus on dengue, yellow fever, and viral hemorrhagic fever. A general background is provided, as well information concerning diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Hemorrhagic complications of severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stroud, W H; Cullom, J W; Anderson, M C

    1981-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage associated with pancreatitis is a rare but frequently lethal complication. Fifteen patients with this complication are presented. Bleeding occurred in four patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, in three patients with pancreatic abscesses, in seven patients with pseudocysts, and in one patient with chronic relapsing pancreatitis following longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. The initial presentation of hemorrhage was gastrointestinal in eight patients and retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal in seven. Abdominal pain with associated nausea and vomiting was present in all patients on admission. Duration of symptoms prior to hospitalization averaged 6 days. During hospitalization the 15 patients received a total of 512 units of blood for transfusions ranging from 8 to 177 units. Admission amylase values were of no benefit in assessing severity of the disease, but application of Ranson's criteria accurately predicted both severity and prognosis. The common denominator in all cases of bleeding appeared to be the presence of an overwhelming or continuing inflammatory process with necrosis and erosion of adjacent vascular and visceral structures. The overall mortality rate in the series was 53.3%. Those patients with hemorrhage associated with pseudocyst formation had the highest survival rates, whereas those with necrotizing pancreatitis and hemorrhage had an extremely poor response to aggressive medical and/or surgical management.

  20. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  1. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Heather A; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F; Lewis, Anne D; Colgin, Lois M A; Axthelm, Michael K; Pecotte, Jerilyn K; Baric, Ralph S; Wong, Scott W; Brinton, Margo A

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100-1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages had a high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques.

  2. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy. Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding. Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding. We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  3. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  4. Regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly in two patients with hepatitis-C-related liver cirrhosis after interferon and ribavirin combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Jae; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Na, Soo-Young; Choi, Eun Kwang; Boo, Sun Jin; Jeong, Seung Uk; Song, Hyung Joo; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Bong Soo; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. PMID:27572075

  5. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  6. HMGB1 Is a Potential Biomarker for Severe Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Resman Rus, Katarina; Fajs, Luka; Korva, Miša; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) are common representatives of viral hemorrhagic fevers still often neglected in some parts of the world. Infection with Dobrava or Puumala virus (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) can result in a mild, nonspecific febrile illness or as a severe disease with hemorrhaging and high fatality rate. An important factor in optimizing survival rate in patients with VHF is instant recognition of the severe form of the disease for which significant biomarkers need to be elucidated. To determine the prognostic value of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) as a biomarker for disease severity, we tested acute serum samples of patients with HFRS or CCHF. Our results showed that HMGB1 levels are increased in patients with CCHFV, DOBV or PUUV infection. Above that, concentration of HMGB1 is higher in patients with severe disease progression when compared to the mild clinical course of the disease. Our results indicate that HMGB1 could be a useful prognostic biomarker for disease severity in PUUV and CCHFV infection, where the difference between the mild and severe patients group was highly significant. Even in patients with severe DOBV infection concentrations of HMGB1 were 2.8–times higher than in the mild group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Our results indicated HMGB1 as a potential biomarker for severe hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:27348219

  7. Clinical discriminators of lobar and deep hemorrhages: the Stroke Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Massaro, A R; Sacco, R L; Mohr, J P; Foulkes, M A; Tatemichi, T K; Price, T R; Hier, D B; Wolf, P A

    1991-12-01

    Of the 1,805 patients with acute stroke enrolled in the Stroke Data Bank, 237 had parenchymatous hemorrhage. After excluding 34 secondary intracerebral and 31 infratentorial hemorrhage patients, a logistic regression analysis of the 172 patients with primary supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) elucidated clinical factors that distinguished the 65 patients with lobar hemorrhage (LH) from the 107 patients with deep hemorrhage (DH) located in the basal ganglia and thalamus. In LH, severe headache was more common than in DH, while hypertension and motor deficit were significantly less common. Patients with either LH or DH had a similar prognosis and mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, despite the hematoma volume measured on the initial CT being significantly greater for LH than DH. The presence of intraventricular extension (IVH) was more frequent in DH. The frequency of IVH increased with hematoma volume in LH, but remained constant for DH. Two CT variables (IVH and hematoma volume) that differed in these two hemorrhage groups were important predictors of coma (GCS less than or equal to 8) in a logistic regression model. Differences in the frequency of IVH may help explain why the degree of impairment in consciousness was similar in the two groups. Among patients with supratentorial ICH, location of the hematoma is related to both volume and IVH, which are important determinants of the level of consciousness.

  8. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  9. Epidemic leptospirosis associated with pulmonary hemorrhage-Nicaragua, 1995.

    PubMed

    Trevejo, R T; Rigau-Pérez, J G; Ashford, D A; McClure, E M; Jarquín-González, C; Amador, J J; de los Reyes, J O; Gonzalez, A; Zaki, S R; Shieh, W J; McLean, R G; Nasci, R S; Weyant, R S; Bolin, C A; Bragg, S L; Perkins, B A; Spiegel, R A

    1998-11-01

    In October 1995, epidemic "hemorrhagic fever," without jaundice or renal manifestations, was reported in rural Nicaragua following heavy flooding; 2259 residents were evaluated for nonmalarial febrile illnesses (cumulative incidence, 6.1%) and 15 (0.7%) died with pulmonary hemorrhage. A case-control study found that case-patients were more likely than controls to have ever walked in creeks (matched odds ratio [MOR], 15.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-132.3), have household rodents (MOR, 10.4; 95% CI, 1.1-97.1), or own dogs with titers >/=400 to Leptospira species (MOR, 23.4; 95% CI, 3.6-infinity). Twenty-six of 51 case-patients had serologic or postmortem evidence of acute leptospirosis. Leptospira species were isolated from case-patients and potential animal reservoirs. This leptospirosis epidemic likely resulted from exposure to flood waters contaminated by urine from infected animals, particularly dogs. Leptospirosis should be included in the differential diagnosis for nonmalarial febrile illness, particularly during periods of flooding or when pulmonary hemorrhage occurs.

  10. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  11. [Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever viruses: update on filoviruses].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Baize, S; Gonzalez, J P

    2011-04-01

    The Ebola and Marburg viruses are the sole members of the Filoviridae family of viruses. They are characterized by a long filamentous form that is unique in the viral world. Filoviruses are among the most virulent pathogens currently known to infect humans. They cause fulminating disease characterized by acute fever followed by generalized hemorrhagic syndrome that is associated with 90% mortality in the most severe forms. Epidemic outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola viruses have taken a heavy toll on human life in Central Africa and devastated large ape populations in Gabon and Republic of Congo. Since their discovery in 1967 (Marburg) and 1976 (Ebola), more than 2,300 cases and 1,670 deaths have been reported. These numbers pale in comparison with the burden caused by malnutrition or other infectious disease scourges in Africa such as malaria, cholera, AIDS, dengue or tuberculosis. However, due to their extremely high lethality, association with multifocal hemorrhaging and specificity to the African continent, these hemorrhagic fever viruses have given rise to great interest on the part not only of the international scientific community but also of the general public because of their perceived potential as biological weapons. Much research has been performed on these viruses and major progress has been made in knowledge of their ecology, epidemiology and physiopathology and in development of vaccine candidates and therapeutic schemes. The purpose of this review is to present the main developments in these particular fields in the last decade.

  12. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  13. ALCOHOLIC VERSUS NONALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS IN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EMERGENCY THERAPY OF BLEEDING VARICES

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marshall J.; Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.; Orloff, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that portal-systemic shunts be avoided in alcoholic cirrhotics because survival rate is allegedly lower in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. We examined this issue in a randomized controlled trial. Methods 211 unselected, consecutive patients with cirrhosis and bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) (n=106) or emergency portacaval shunt (EPCS) (105). Treatment was initiated within 8 hours. EST failure was treated by rescue PCS. 10-yr follow-up was 96%. Results Results strongly favored EPCS over EST (p<0.001). Among EPCS patients, 83% were alcoholic and 17% nonalcoholic. Outcomes were (1) permanent control of bleeding 100% vs. 100%; (2) 5-yr survival 71% vs.78%; (3) encephalopathy 14% vs. 19%; (4) yearly charges $38,300 vs. $43,000. Conclusions EPCS results were similar in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhotics. EPCS is an effective first line emergency treatment in all forms of cirrhosis, including alcoholic. PMID:21195430

  14. Extensive gastric varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Domstad, P.A.; Loh, F.G.; Pulmano, C.

    1987-04-01

    An alcohol abuse patient complicated by chronic pancreatitis had splenic vein thrombosis leading to gastric varices and underwent abdominal Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy. First pass study, sequential images up to 1 hour, and a 2.5 hour image showed abnormal radioactivity in the left side of the abdomen and midabdomen. In 24 hour images, the high level of activity in the left side persisted; in addition, there was accumulation of radioactivity in the cecum, ascending, transverse colon, the splenic flexure, and descending colon. A splenectomy was performed and during the surgical procedure, a large dilated vein in the greater omentum was noted. It is reemphasized that delayed imaging up to 24 hours is important when the results of earlier images are equivocal or negative.

  15. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt vs endoscopic therapy in preventing variceal rebleeding

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui; Zhang, Meng; Pang, Jack XQ; Yan, Fei; Li, Ying-Chao; Lv, Liang-Shan; Yuan, Jia; Palikhe, Muna; Li, Wei-Zhi; Wang, Zhi-Lun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare early use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with endoscopic treatment (ET) for the prophylaxis of recurrent variceal bleeding. METHODS: In-patient data were collected from 190 patients between January 2007 and June 2010 who suffured from variceal bleeding. Patients who were older than 75 years; previously received surgical treatment or endoscopic therapy for variceal bleeding; and complicated with hepatic encephalopathy or hepatic cancer, were excluded from this research. Thirty-five cases lost to follow-up were also excluded. Retrospective analysis was done in 126 eligible cases. Among them, 64 patients received TIPS (TIPS group) while 62 patients received endoscopic therapy (ET group). The relevant data were collected by patient review or telephone calls. The occurrence of rebleeding, hepatic encephalopathy or other complications, survival rate and cost of treatment were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: During the follow-up period (median, 20.7 and 18.7 mo in TIPS and ET groups, respectively), rebleeding from any source occurred in 11 patients in the TIPS group as compared with 31 patients in the ET group (Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test, P = 0.000). Rebleeding rates at any time point (6 wk, 1 year and 2 year) in the TIPS group were lower than in the ET group (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). Eight patients in the TIPS group and 16 in the ET group died with the cumulative survival rates of 80.6% and 64.9% (Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test χ2 = 4.864, P = 0.02), respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to 6-wk survival rates (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). However, significant differences were observed between the two groups in the 1-year survival rates (92% and 79%) and the 2-year survival rates (89% and 64.9%) (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). No significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups in the occurrence of

  16. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment.

  17. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment. PMID:27648035

  18. Correlation of HVPG Level with CTP Score, MELD Score, Ascites, Size of Varices, and Etiology in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniam; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kalra, Naveen; Bhatia, Anmol; Dhiman, Radha K.; Duseja, Ajay K.; Chawla, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study intends to determine the correlation of a patient's hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement with six factors: Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, presence of ascites, size of varices, presence of variceal bleeding, and an etiology of cirrhosis. The study also aims to identify the predictors of higher HVPG measurements that can indirectly affect the prognosis of cirrhotic patients. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with cirrhosis were enrolled prospectively and each patient's HVPG level was measured by the transjugular catheterization of the right or middle hepatic vein. The wedged hepatic venous pressure (WHVP) and free hepatic venous pressure (FHVP) were measured using a 7F balloon catheter. The HVPG level was calculated as the difference between the WHVP and FHVP measurements. Results: The mean HVPG level was higher in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic cirrhosis (19.5 ± 7.3 vs 15.2 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P = 0.13). The mean HVPG was also higher in bleeders compared with nonbleeders (18.5 ± 5.3 vs 10.7 ± 3.1 mmHg, P = 0.001). Patients with varices had a higher mean HVPG level than those without varices (17.4 ± 5.8 vs 11.7 ± 3.9 mmHg, P = 0.04). The difference among the three categories of varices (small, large, and no varices) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). In addition, the mean HVPG level was higher in patients with ascites than in those without ascites (18.7 ± 4.7 vs 11 ± 5.3 mmHg, P = 0.002), and it was significantly higher in patients in CTP class C (21.8 ± 5.5 mmHg) as compared with those in CTP class B (16.9 ± 2.9 mmHg) and CTP class A (10.5 ± 4.1 mmHg; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: HVPG levels were significantly higher in patients in CTP class C as compared with those in CTP classes A and B, thereby indicating that an HVPG measurement correlates with severity of liver disease. A high HVPG level signifies more severe liver disease and can predict the

  19. Does adding variceal status to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh score improve its performance in predicting mortality in cirrhosis?

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoli; Wen, Maoyao; Shen, Yi; Wang, Wanqin; Yang, Xiaoxue; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    The Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score is widely used worldwide to predict outcomes across a broad spectrum of liver diseases, mainly cirrhosis. Portal hypertension and variceal bleed are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients, although the variceal status is not incorporated into the classical CTP score. We sought to determine whether the inclusion of variceal status, specifically the Child-Turcotte-Pugh-Kumar (CTPK) score, would improve the utility of the classical CTP score to predict the clinical outcomes of cirrhotic patients in a single but high-volume center in China.We retrospectively analyzed the records of 253 patients from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 and performed follow-up for at least 12 months. The CTPK score and the CTP score were obtained as soon as possible after the patient's admission. Telephone follow-up was performed to assess survival situations.At 3 and 12 months, the cumulative number of deaths was 9.1% (n = 23) and 13.8% (n = 35), respectively. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, the CTPK score was independently associated with death within 3 and 12 months after adjusting for potential confounders. The predictive ability related to the 2 scores was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) respectively. At 3 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.814 and 0.838, respectively. At 12 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.825 and 0.840, respectively. No significant difference between time points was observed. Both the CTPK score and the CTP score displayed prognostic value in cirrhotic patients, as the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the CTPK score could clearly discriminate patients in the intermediate term (P < 0.001).The CTPK score provides reliable prediction of mortality in Chinese cirrhotic patients for both short-term and medium-term prognoses, although it is not superior to the CTP score. Therefore, the CTP

  20. Does adding variceal status to the Child–Turcotte–Pugh score improve its performance in predicting mortality in cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoli; Wen, Maoyao; Shen, Yi; Wang, Wanqin; Yang, Xiaoxue; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score is widely used worldwide to predict outcomes across a broad spectrum of liver diseases, mainly cirrhosis. Portal hypertension and variceal bleed are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients, although the variceal status is not incorporated into the classical CTP score. We sought to determine whether the inclusion of variceal status, specifically the Child–Turcotte–Pugh–Kumar (CTPK) score, would improve the utility of the classical CTP score to predict the clinical outcomes of cirrhotic patients in a single but high-volume center in China. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 253 patients from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 and performed follow-up for at least 12 months. The CTPK score and the CTP score were obtained as soon as possible after the patient's admission. Telephone follow-up was performed to assess survival situations. At 3 and 12 months, the cumulative number of deaths was 9.1% (n = 23) and 13.8% (n = 35), respectively. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, the CTPK score was independently associated with death within 3 and 12 months after adjusting for potential confounders. The predictive ability related to the 2 scores was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) respectively. At 3 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.814 and 0.838, respectively. At 12 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.825 and 0.840, respectively. No significant difference between time points was observed. Both the CTPK score and the CTP score displayed prognostic value in cirrhotic patients, as the Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that the CTPK score could clearly discriminate patients in the intermediate term (P < 0.001). The CTPK score provides reliable prediction of mortality in Chinese cirrhotic patients for both short-term and medium-term prognoses, although it is not superior to the CTP

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  2. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described.

  3. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of South America.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Robert B

    2002-09-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiology and distinguishing features of three viral hemorrhagic fevers (dengue hemorrhagic fever, yellow fever and arenaviral hemorrhagic fever) that have emerged as important public health problems in South America. Although the etiology, natural history and control of the three diseases are different, their clinical manifestations and histopathology findings are similar and can be difficult to differentiate. Consequently, early recognition and correct diagnosis are essential for effective control measures to be initiated.

  4. Superselective arterial embolization of the superior mesenteric artery for the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Run-Zhe; Zhao, Gang; Jin, Nan; Chen, Bao-An; Ding, Jia-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Superselective arterial embolization is a common therapeutic procedure for cases of visceral hemorrhage. However, until now, it has not been applied in the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage caused by acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We describe a case presenting with persistent GI bleeding associated with acute GVHD successfully treated by superselective arterial embolization of the superior mesenteric artery with gelatin sponge after noneffective conventional management. This case will help guide hematologists to deal with a similar situation in the future. PMID:25419120

  5. Hemorrhagic cystitis: A challenge to the urologist

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, R.; Kumar, Santosh; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2010-01-01

    Severe hemorrhagic cystitis often arises from anticancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Infectious etiologies are less common causes except in immunocompromised hosts. These cases can be challenging problems for the urologist and a source of substantial morbidity and sometimes mortality for the patients. A variety of modalities of treatment have been described for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis but there is none that is uniformly effective. Some progress has been made in the understanding and management of viral hemorrhagic cystitis. This article reviews the common causes of severe hemorrhagic cystitis and the currently available management options. PMID:20877590

  6. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

  7. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  8. Hepatic hemorrhage in malignant rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, K; Ikeda, K; Saida, Y; Takenaka, R; Shibata, M; Takeuchi, T

    1996-12-01

    Intrahepatic hemorrhage is a serious and life-threatening complication in liver disease. We describe a patient who had two episodes of intrahepatic hemorrhage after having malignant rheumatoid arthritis for 8 yr. Abdominal CT scans revealed a large intrahepatic, subcapsular hematoma. Arteriography demonstrated irregularity, caliber change, and pseudoaneurysms of the right hepatic artery, suggesting vasculitis as a cause of the bleeding. The hemorrhage was first treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, which failed to exert long term control, but arterial infusion of a large dose of prednisolone when the hemorrhage appeared was successful in managing it.

  9. Novel predictors for immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection for gastric varices without using lipiodol.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, T S; Menachery, John; Gokul, B J; Murugesh, M; Vivek Sandeep, T C

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic obturation of gastric varices using tissue adhesive glues like cyanoacrylate is an accepted modality for the treatment of gastric varices. This study was undertaken to determine whether it was possible to predict immediate puncture site bleed on withdrawal of needle catheter during endoscopic glue injection without lipiodol. We prospectively analyzed 100 consecutive patients with cirrhosis who underwent glue injection. Glue injection was successful in all the patients. Immediate puncture site bleed was observed in only four cases and all of them correlated with negative catheter pull sign and positive red catheter sign. Catheter pull sign and red catheter sign were excellent predictors of immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection and should be routinely tested.

  10. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-10-16

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available.

  11. [Bleeding oesophageal varices in a seven-year-old boy supposedly as a late complication to neonatal umbilical venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Rogvi, Rasmus Á; Møller, Fie Gregersen; Bergström, Anita; Ifaoui, Inge Bøtker; Jørgensen, Marianna Hørby

    2016-05-30

    A seven-year-old boy was admitted with haematemesis. The boy was originally born at 27 weeks' gestational age. His neonatal period had been complicated by sepsis, for which he was treated with antibiotics through an umbilical venous catheter (UVC). A gastroscopy showed grade III oesophageal varices with bleeding. He was examined thoroughly for other causes of portal hypertension, but none were found. Portal hypertension caused by UVC in the neonatal period is a rare but very serious complication to neonatal UVC.

  12. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  13. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Isolated Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Pancreatic Cancer Complicated by Portal Biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubachev, Kubach; Abdullaev, Elbrus; Zarkua, Nonna; Abdullaev, Abakar; Fokin, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is the complex of abnormalities of extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder, arising as a result of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and noncirrhotic portal fibrosis, which can be caused by coagulopathies, tumors, inflammation, postoperative complications, dehydration, and neonatal umbilical vein catheterization. We report a case of a 55-year-old male patient with the history of pancreatic cancer and cholecystoenteric anastomosis presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding from gallbladder varices via the anastomosis. PMID:27800195

  14. Propylthiouracil-induced alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Bünyamin; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Kacemer, Hasret; Demirkan, Halil; Altuntaş, Atilla; Dirican, Nigar; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Thionamide induced vasculitis is a multisystem disease. The patients may present with different clinical signs and findings due to organ involvement. These patients are almost always perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) or antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) positive. Clinical findings are not seen in all of the patients who are ANCA positive while using thionamide. Although symptoms usually resolve with drug discontinuation, some patients, however, require high-dose steroids, immunosuppressants, or plasmapheresis. We present here a case of alveolar hemorrhage induced by propilthiouracil (PTU) during treatment with PTU for Graves’ disease; patients completely recovered with corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis.

  15. Adiposity and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Mary E.; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Brown, Anna; Kirichek, Oksana; Price, Alison; Yang, TienYu Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare associations of body mass index (BMI) with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke risk, and to review the worldwide evidence. Methods: We recruited 1.3 million previously stroke-free UK women between 1996 and 2001 (mean age 57 years [SD 5]) and followed them by record linkage for hospital admissions and deaths. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted relative risks for ischemic and hemorrhagic (intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage) stroke in relation to BMI. We conducted a meta-analysis of published findings from prospective studies on these associations. Results: During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, there were 20,549 first strokes, of which 9,993 were specified as ischemic and 5,852 as hemorrhagic. Increased BMI was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (relative risk 1.21 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 95% confidence interval 1.18–1.23, p < 0.0001) but a decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk 0.89 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 0.86–0.92, p < 0.0001). The BMI-associated trends for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly different (heterogeneity: p < 0.0001) but were not significantly different for intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 2,790) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 3,062) (heterogeneity: p = 0.5). Published data from prospective studies showed consistently greater BMI-associated relative risks for ischemic than hemorrhagic stroke with most evidence (prior to this study) coming from Asian populations. Conclusions: In UK women, higher BMI is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke but decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The totality of the available published evidence suggests that BMI-associated risks are greater for ischemic than for hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:27605176

  16. Endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices with N-butyl, 2-cyanoacrylate glue injection in children with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ujjal; Borkar, Vibhor; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Srivastava, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In view of the paucity of literature, we carried out this audit to evaluate the safety and efficacy of N- butyl, 2-cynoacrylate glue injection therapy in secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices in children. Patients and methods: Consecutive children (≤ 18 years) with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension who presented with bleeding from gastric varices and who had undergone cyanoacrylate glue injection therapy were included. They were evaluated for safety, efficacy and complications. Their long-term outcomes and follow-up were recorded. Results: Over 11 years, 28 children with median age 13 (range, 8 to 18) years (68 % boys), underwent cyanoacrylate glue injection for bleeding gastric varices. In 25 (89 %) cases, extrahepatic portal venous obstruction was the etiology and isolated gastric varices were the source of the bleeding. Primary and secondary gastric variceal bleeding was seen in 11 (39 %) and 17 (61 %) children, respectively. A total 36 sessions with median volume of 2 (range, 1 – 5) mL of glue injections were required (2 sessions in 8 children). Hemostasis was achieved in all and 57 % had gastric variceal obliteration. Two children had early (< 1 month) rebleeding and 2 children had late rebleeding. One child had gastric ulcer. Over a median follow-up of 24 (8 – 98) months, 14 children underwent surgery (12 porto-systemic shunt), 2 were lost to follow-up, 1 died and there was no recurrence of bleeding in the remaining 11. Conclusions: Cyanoacrylate glue injection is highly effective mode of secondary prophylaxis of bleeding gastric varices in children with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Rebleeding occurred in 14 % but treatment-related complications were uncommon. However, a large controlled clinical trial is required to confirm our findings. PMID:27757413

  17. Idiopathic Bilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in a 63-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Kshitij; Singh, Amandeep; Jenkins, Donald; Bahl, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a largely uncommon condition typically caused by a number of factors including infection, MI, CHF, anticoagulants, trauma, surgery, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Yet, idiopathic bilateral hemorrhage is rare. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain that was eventually diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hemorrhages due to an unknown origin. Abdominal CT revealed normal adrenal glands without enlargement, but an MRI displayed enlargement due to hemorrhage in both adrenals. There was no known cause; the patient had not suffered from an acute infection and was not on anticoagulants, and the patient's history did not reveal any of the other known causative factors. The case underscores the importance of keeping bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on the list of differentials even when a cause is not immediately clear. It also raises the question of whether CT is the most sensitive test in the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage and whether the diagnostic approach should place greater weight on MRI. The case highlights the need for prompt therapy with steroids once bilateral hemorrhage is suspected to avert the development or progression of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25973281

  18. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  19. Subchorionic hemorrhage treatment with dydrogesterone.

    PubMed

    Pelinescu-Onciul, Dimitrie

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of progestogenic therapy for the prevention of spontaneous abortions in patients with subchorionic hemorrhage. One hundred pregnant women with bleeding and ultrasonographic evidence of subchorionic hematoma were treated with oral dydrogesterone 40 mg/day. Only cases in which the embryo was viable were included. The follow-up included ultrasonography and intravaginal examination. Of the 100 pregnancies, 93 had a favorable evolution with maintenance of pregnancy. The abortion rate was therefore 7%. This compares with an abortion rate of 18.7% obtained in a previous study in women with subchorionic hematoma treated with micronized progesterone. The abortion rate was therefore reduced by up to 37% with dydrogesterone, as most cases had large-volume hematomas at the first visit and thus a poor prognosis. In conclusion, the marked immunomodulatory effect of dydrogesterone in maintaining a T helper-2 cytokine balance means that it is a good choice for preventing abortion in women suffering from subchorionic hemorrhage. PMID:17943544

  20. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in a yak

    PubMed Central

    Raabis, Sarah M.; Byers, Stacey R.; Han, Sushan; Callan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection was diagnosed in a 3-year-old yak. The yak had signs of intermittent tremors, dysphagia, oral ulcerative lesions, hemorrhagic enteritis, tachypnea, and thrombocytopenia. Postmortem diagnostics confirmed EHDV (serotype 2) using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gross and histopathological results were consistent with EHDV reported in other species. PMID:24688138

  1. Postpartum hemorrhage: use of hemostatic combat gauze.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Bernd C; Rezniczek, Günther A; Rolf, Norbert; Maul, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Cheap and simple interventions that are intended to minimize postpartum hemorrhage are of major public health concern. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in which conservative interventions had failed. The use of a chitosan-covered gauze that originally was developed for combat trauma allowed us to achieve hemostasis, and a seemingly inevitable hysterectomy was avoided. PMID:22011588

  2. Surgical Outcomes of Hemorrhagic Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Heon; Jung, Eugene; Gwak, Ho Shin; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors are not rare, but little is known about the surgical outcome following treatment. We conducted this study to determine the result of the surgical outcome of hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors. Materials and Methods From July 2001 to December 2008, 21 patients underwent surgery for hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors at our institution. 15 patients had lung cancer, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the rest had rectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. 20 patients had macroscopic hemorrhage in the tumors, and one patient had intracerebral hemorrhage surrounding the tumor. A retrospective clinical review was conducted focusing on the patterns of presenting symptoms and signs, as well as local recurrence following surgery. Results Among 21 hemorrhagic brain metastases, local recurrence developed in two patients. The 12 month progression free survival rate was 86.1%. Mean time to progression was 20.8 months and median survival time after surgery was 11.7 months. Conclusion The results of our study showed that hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors rarely recurred after surgery. Surgery should be considered as a good treatment option for hemorrhagic brain metastasis, especially in cases with increased intracranial pressure or severe neurologic deficits. PMID:21811426

  3. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  4. First outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Rahman, Khalilur; Siddque, A K; Shoma, Shereen; Kamal, A H M; Ali, K S; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F

    2002-07-01

    During the first countrywide outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Bangladesh, we conducted surveillance for dengue at a hospital in Dhaka. Of 176 patients, primarily adults, found positive for dengue, 60.2% had dengue fever, 39.2% dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 0.6% dengue shock syndrome. The Dengue virus 3 serotype was detected in eight patients.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu-Lei; Li, Peng; Ji, Ming; Zong, Ye; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2010-01-01

    Superwarfarins are a class of rodenticides. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a fatal complication of superwarfarin poisoning, requiring immediate treatment. Here, we report a 55-year-old woman with tardive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning after endoscopic cold mucosal biopsy. PMID:20355251

  6. [A case of left occipital lobe hemorrhage in a patient with progressive systemic sclerosis: evaluation of cerebral angiography and histology].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, H; Kubo, Y; Otawara, Y; Kudo, A; Tomitsuka, N; Yoshida, K; Ogawa, A; Kurose, K; Suzuki, M; Chiba, S

    2000-11-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is uncommon in progressive systemic sclerosis, with only 2 reported cases associated with intracerebral hemorrhage detected by neuroimaging. A 55-year-old woman with a 10-year history of scleroderma presented with left occipital lobe hemorrhage manifesting as headache and vomiting. She had no signs of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia. CT and MRI, on admission, showed left occipital lobe hemorrhage with ventricular rupture and acute left subdural hematoma. Serial cerebral angiography was performed on day 0, day 7 and day 14, and found no evidence of aneurysm, arteriovenous multiformation or tumor stain in the left occipital lobe. However, the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries showed increasing segmental narrowing suggestive of vasculitis. Histological examination of a section from the brain cortex adjacent to the hemorrhage revealed no evidence of vasculitis, fibrinoid degeneration or amyloid deposition. Focal vasculitis may have occurred secondary to the homorrhagic lesion.

  7. Postadenoidectomy hemorrhage: how we do it?

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Nevzat; Evren, Cenk; Altun, Uzay

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Conventionally, adenoidectomy has been performed using blind curettage. Postoperative hemorrhage is the most common complication of surgery. There is no specific management algorithm in the literature. In this study, we described an endoscopic approach in the management of postadenoidectomy hemorrhage. Material and methods: Between 1995 and 2014, 7946 patients undergoing adenoidectomy under general anesthesia in our clinic were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had a rest adenoid tissue located in the choanae. Endoscopic excision of the tissue was performed without using a post-nasal pack. Results: All patients (100%) had a rest adenoid tissue located in the choanae. Hemorrhage was completely discontinued with endoscopic excision of the hemorrhagic tissue. Conclusion: Based on our study findings, we conclude that an endoscopic approach should be applied in all postoperative patients with hemorrhage who are unresponsive to conservative treatment modalities. PMID:25932238

  8. Modulating the Immune Response Towards a Neuroregenerative Peri-injury Milieu After Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin; Flores, Jerry J; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages account for 15-20 % of stroke sub-types and have very poor prognoses. The mortality rate for cerebral hemorrhage patients is between 40 and 50 %, of which at least half of the deaths occur within the first 2 days, and 75 % of survivors are incapable of living independently after 1 year. Current emergency interventions involve lowering blood pressure and reducing intracranial pressure by controlled ventilations or, in the worst case scenarios, surgical intervention. Some hemostatic and coagulatherapeutic interventions are being investigated, although a few that were promising in experimental studies have failed in clinical trials. No significant immunomodulatory intervention, however, exists for clinical management of cerebral hemorrhage. The inflammatory response following cerebral hemorrhage is particularly harmful in the acute stage because blood-brain barrier disruption is amplified and surrounding tissue is destroyed by secreted proteases and reactive oxygen species from infiltrated leukocytes. In this review, we discuss both the destructive and regenerative roles the immune response play following cerebral hemorrhage and focus on microglia, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes as the primary agents directing the response. Microglia, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes each have sub-types that significantly influence the over-arching immune response towards either a pro-inflammatory, destructive, or an anti-inflammatory, regenerative, state. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies of cerebral hemorrhages that selectively target these immune cells are reviewed and we suggest immunomodulatory therapies that reduce inflammation, while augmenting neural repair, will improve overall cerebral hemorrhage outcomes. PMID:25946986

  9. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism.

  10. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Sang Man; Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang Yoo; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A number of etiologies of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) have been proposed, including viral infection, vascular disturbance, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Intralabyrinthine hemorrhage (ILH) as a cause of SSNHL is extremely rare, and there have been no studies defining the characteristics of hearing impairment and prognosis in patients with ISSNHL due to ILH. This study aimed to investigate the difference in impaired hearing patterns and prognosis for hearing recovery between patients with ISSNHL due to ILH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sex- and age-matched patients with ISSNHL due to causes other than ILH. Subjects and Methods We compared the results of audiometry and MRI in 12 patients who had ILH on MRI (hemorrhage group) and in 23 sex- and age-matched controls without abnormal findings related to their hearing loss on MRI (non-hemorrhage group). Initial hearing impairment, progression, and recovery of hearing loss were compared between the two groups. Results A majority of patients (92%) in the hemorrhage group complained of dizziness. Initial hearing impairment was more frequent in the hemorrhage group than in the non-hemorrhage group (94.09±35.9 vs. 66.66±30.1, p-value=0.036). The final recovery threshold in the hemorrhage group was worse (78.19±46.26 vs. 37.17±31.96, p-value=0.014) than that in the non-hemorrhage group. In the hemorrhage group, hearing recovery seemed to occur less often at high frequencies (2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz) than at low frequencies (250, 500, and 1,000 Hz). Conclusions The presence of ILH was associated with poor hearing prognosis and the occurrence of vertigo. The abrupt onset of hearing loss associated with vertigo and the presence of hyperresonance on fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI images of labyrinthic fluid strongly suggests acute intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and is predictive of considerable hearing impairment and poor prognosis. PMID:27144231

  11. Successful application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Petermann, Arndt; Visouli, Aikaterini; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Ketteler, Markus; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly applied in adults with acute refractory respiratory failure that is deemed reversible. Bleeding is the most frequent complication during ECMO support. Severe pre-existing bleeding has been considered a contraindication to ECMO application. Nevertheless, there are cases of successful ECMO application in patients with multiple trauma and hemorrhagic shock or head trauma and intracranial hemorrhage. ECMO has proved to be life-saving in several cases of life-threatening respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hemorrhage of various causes, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s disease). We successfully applied ECMO in a 65-year-old woman with acute life-threatening respiratory failure due to diffuse massive pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis, manifested as severe pulmonary-renal syndrome. ECMO sustained life and allowed disease control, together with plasmapheresis, cyclophosphamide, corticoids, and renal replacement therapy. The patient was successfully weaned from ECMO, extubated, and discharged home. She remains alive on dialysis at 17 months follow-up. PMID:23926421

  12. Acute isolated capsular stroke. A clinical study of 148 cases.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; Martínez-Rebollar, María; Oliveres, Montserrat; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan; Targa, Cecilia

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess differential features between capsular stroke of ischemic and hemorrhagic origin, and to compare capsular strokes with all other (non-capsular) strokes. Data of 148 patients with isolated capsular stroke were collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry in which 2000 consecutive acute stroke patients were included. Isolated capsular stroke accounted for 8.4% of strokes included in the registry (8.4% of ischemic strokes and 10.5% of intracerebral hemorrhages). Capsular stroke of hemorrhagic origin (n = 24) was more severe than ischemic capsular stroke (n = 124) as determined by a significantly higher in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and lower number of patients free of functional deficit at discharge. After multivariate analysis, limb weakness, sudden onset, and sensory symptoms were independently associated with capsular hemorrhage, whereas pure motor hemiparesis appeared to be associated with capsular infarction. In summary, one of each 12 patients with acute ischemic stroke and one of each 10 patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage had an isolated capsular stroke. Lacunar syndrome was the most frequent clinical presentation being more common (particularly pure motor hemiparesis) in ischemic than in hemorrhagic capsular stroke. Capsular hemorrhage and capsular infarction showed identical risk factor profiles suggesting the same underlying vascular pathology for both conditions.

  13. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  14. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. PMID:26826742

  15. [Management of major postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nebout, Sophie; Merbai, Nadia; Faitot, Valentina; Keita, Hawa

    2014-02-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is defined by loss of greater than 500 mL of blood following vaginal delivery or 1,000 mL of blood following cesarean section, in the first 24 hours postpartum. Its incidence is up to 5% and the severe forms represent 1% of births. PPH is the first cause of obstetrical maternal mortality in France and 90% of these deaths are considered as preventable. Its management is multidisciplinary (obstetricians, anesthetists, midwives, biologists and interventional radiologists), based on treatment protocols where time is a major prognosis factor. In case of failure of the initial measures (oxytocin, manual placenta removal, uterus and birth canal examination), the management of severe forms includes active resuscitation (intravenous fluids, blood transfusion, vasoactive drugs), haemostatic interventions (sulprostone, tamponnade and haemostatic suture, surgical procedures and arterial embolization) and the correction of any potential coagulopathy (administration of blood products and haemostatic agents). PMID:24373716

  16. Congenital hemorrhagic disorders in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Awidi, A S

    1984-07-29

    The results of a three year prospective study of inherited bleeding syndromes in Jordan is presented. There were 112 patients from 64 families. Of these there were 42 patients with hemophilia A, 23 with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, 22 with von Willebrand's disease, 11 with Christmas disease, 6 with hypofibrinogenemia, 3 with afibrinogenemia, 2 with factor XIII deficiency, 2 with storage pool disease and 1 with factor XI deficiency. The pattern of inherited bleeding syndromes in Jordan is different from that seen in Europe and U.S.A. in that Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is very common. High proportion of hemophiliacs were severe. Arthropathy was common. A significant number of bleeders had fatal hemorrhage. In a high proportion of patients, no family history of bleeding was found.

  17. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  18. Severe gastric variceal haemorrhage due to splenic artery thrombosis and consecutive arterial bypass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is mainly caused by ulcers. Gastric varicosis due to portal hypertension can also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertension causes the development of a collateral circulation from the portal to the caval venous system resulting in development of oesophageal and gastric fundus varices. Those may also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Case presentation In this study, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with recurrent severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by arterial submucosal collaterals due to idiopathic splenic artery thrombosis. The diagnosis was secured using endoscopic duplex ultrasound and angiography. The patient was successfully treated with a laparoscopic splenectomy and complete dissection of the short gastric arteries, resulting in the collapse of the submucosal arteries in the gastric wall. Follow-up gastroscopy was performed on the 12th postoperative week and showed no signs of bleeding and a significant reduction in the arterial blood flow within the gastric wall. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months also showed no further gastrointestinal bleeding as well as subjective good quality of life for the patient. Conclusion Submucosal arterial collaterals must be excluded by endosonography via endoscopy in case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides adequate treatment in preventing any recurrent bleeding, if gastric arterial collaterals are caused by splenic artery thrombosis. PMID:21711534

  19. An epizootic of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease in captive black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Woods, L W; Keel, M K; MacLachlan, N J; Porter, C O; Lehmkuhl, H D

    2000-09-01

    Ten fawns and four adult black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in a captive herd died as a result of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease. Acute, systemic infections were characterized by hemorrhagic enteropathy, pulmonary edema, and occasional ulceration of the upper alimentary tract. Localized infections were limited to the upper alimentary tract and included stomatitis, pharyngitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, and rumenitis. In deer with acute, systemic infections, a diagnosis was made by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The serum neutralization test was useful for confirming a diagnosis in animals with prolonged, localized infections. Deer originating from herds with a history of adenovirus infection should not be transferred to other captive herds or released into free-ranging populations because they may serve as carriers of adenovirus.

  20. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ross; Kebriaei, Meysam; Gard, Andrew; Thorell, William; Surdell, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Three patients with remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery are presented. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage is a rare surgical complication that is most often associated with aneurysm clipping or temporal lobectomies. Bleeding occurs on the superior cerebellar cortex and is believed to be venous in origin. The precise pathogenesis of remote cerebellar hemorrhage has yet to be fully elucidated but is generally considered to be a consequence of intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid loss causing caudal displacement of the cerebellum with resultant stretching of the supracerebellar veins. This case series will hopefully shed further light on the incidence, presentation, workup, and treatment of this particular complication of supratentorial surgery. PMID:24238635

  1. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  2. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia: rare consequence of sexual stimulation in a paraplegic].

    PubMed

    Galiart, E; Baumberger, M; Pannek, J

    2013-11-01

    Nearly all men with spinal cord injury suffer from neurogenic sexual dysfunction which is often treated with phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors. We describe a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia (AD) caused by sexual stimulation. Nitrates are frequently used for acute treatment of AD; however, the use of these drugs in combination with PDE5 inhibitors is contraindicated. Therefore, meticulous information from patients and relatives on the risk of AD and possible drug interactions is of vital importance. PMID:23784679

  3. Cutting-edge advances in the medical management of obstetrical hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Luis D; Saade, George R; Gei, Alfredo F; Hankins, Gary D V

    2011-12-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is the most common form of shock encountered in obstetric practice. Interventions that may limit transfusion requirements include normovolemic hemodilution, use of recombinant activated factor VII, selective embolization of pelvic vessels by interventional radiology, and the use of the cell saver intraoperatively. Current understanding of the mechanisms of acute coagulopathy calls into question the current transfusion guidelines, leading to a tendency to apply massive transfusion protocols based on hemostatic resuscitation despite lack of prospective data. PMID:21816382

  4. [Spontaneous hemorrhage and arterial hypertension as complication of Adrenal Pseudocyst. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Müller Arteaga, C A; Martín Blanco, S; Calleja Escudero, J; Torrecilla Garcia-Ripoll, J R; Rivero Martínez, D; Fernández del Busto, E

    2005-06-01

    Adrenal Pseudocyst are uncommon and asymptomatic tumors. We report an unusual case who had previous high blood pressure and acute hemorrhage presented with abdominal pain and shock. Diagnosis was made with ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed the presence of large retroperitoneal hematoma around the superior pole of the left kidney. Urgent surgery was made with a complete excision of a 10 cm. tumor with preservation of adrenal tissue and the left kidney. Histopathological diagnosis was: Adrenal Pseudocyst. Blood pressure normalized after surgery.

  5. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: epidemiology, social impact and a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Fàbregas Julià, N; Rama-Maceiras, P; Hernández-Palazón, J; Rubio Romero, R; Carmona Aurioles, J

    2010-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, is a worldwide problem, representing personal tragedy, great social and economic consequences, and a heavy burden on the health care system. Estimated to be responsible for up to 10% of mortality in industrialized countries, cerebrovascular disease also affects individuals who are still in the workforce, with consequent loss of productive years. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a type of cerebrovascular accident that leads to around 5% of all strokes. SAH is most often due to trauma but may also be spontaneous, in which case the cause may be a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (80%) or arteriovenous malformation or any other abnormality of the blood or vessels (20%). Although both the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal SAH has improved in recent years, related morbidity and mortality remains high: 50% of patients die from the initial hemorrhage or later complications. If patients whose brain function is permanently damaged are added to the count, the percentage of cases leading to severe consequences rises to 70%. The burden of care of patients who are left incapacitated by SAH falls to the family or to private and public institutions. The economic cost is considerable and the loss of quality of life for both the patient and the family is great. Given the magnitude of this problem, the provision of adequate prophylaxis is essential; also needed are organizational models that aim to reduce mortality as well as related complications. Aneurysmal SAH is a condition which must be approached in a coordinated, multidisciplinary way both during the acute phase and throughout rehabilitation in order to lower the risk of unwanted outcomes.

  6. Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage After a Cranial Operation

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Robert; Sparrow, Harlan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of patients who underwent a cranial operation and postoperatively suffered an intracranial hemorrhage significant enough to require evacuation. Materials & methods  3,109 cranial operations were performed at Houston Methodist Hospital (Texas Medical Center campus) between January 2009 and December 2013. Of these, 59 cases required a second operation for evacuation of an intracranial hemorrhage. The information gathered included the patients’ age, gender, past medical history, medications and laboratory data, initial diagnosis, date/type of first and second operations, duration of hospitalization, discharge condition, and discharge destination. Results The study found a 1.90% rate of a postoperative hemorrhage significant enough to require evacuation after a cranial operation. The average age in the cohort requiring reoperation was 63 +/- 14 years with 42 male and 17 female. Hematoma evacuations were performed at various time intervals depending on the pathology treated at the initial operation. The time to second operation was 2.7 days after intraparenchymal hematoma evacuation, 6.0 days after cerebrovascular surgery, 6.2 days after tumor surgery and 9.7 days after subdural hematoma evacuation. The rate of postoperative hematoma development was 9.1% after a subdural hematoma evacuation, while it was only 1.1% in all other operations. Overall, those requiring hematoma evacuation had a 15% mortality rate, 64% were non-ambulatory, and 54% were discharged to long-term acute care facility, skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation facility or hospice. Conclusions  Neurological outcomes were poor in patients who underwent a cranial operation and required a second operation to remove a hematoma. This study suggests close observation of elderly males after a cranial operation, especially after subdural hematoma evacuation, and longer observation time for patients undergoing subdural hematoma evacuation than intraparenchymal

  7. Large epidemics of hemorrhagic fevers in Mexico 1545-1815.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Soto, R; Romero, L C; Maguire, J H

    2000-06-01

    In 1545, twenty-four years after the Spanish conquest of the Aztec empire, an epidemic of a malignant form of a hemorrhagic fever appeared in the highlands of Mexico. The illness was characterized by high fever, headache, and bleeding from the nose, ears, and mouth, accompanied by jaundice, severe abdominal and thoracic pain as well as acute neurological manifestations. The disease was highly lethal and lasted three to four days. It attacked primarily the native population, leaving the Spaniards almost unaffected. The hemorrhagic fevers remained in the area for three centuries and the etiologic agent is still unknown. In this report we describe, and now that more information is available, analyze four epidemics that occurred in Mexico during the colonial period with a focus on the epidemic of 1576 which killed 45% of the entire population of Mexico. It is important to retrieve such diseases and the epidemics they caused from their purely historical context and consider the reality that if they were to reemerge, they are potentially dangerous. PMID:11304065

  8. Cytokines as biomarkers of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Tsergouli, Katerina; Çağlayık, Dilek Yağcı; Bino, Silvia; Como, Najada; Uyar, Yavuz; Korukluoglu, Gulay

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a potentially severe disease caused by CCHF virus. As in other viral hemorrhagic fevers, it is considered that the course and outcome of the disease depend on the viral load and the balance among the immune response mediators, and that a fatal outcome is the result of a "cytokine storm." The level of 27 cytokines was measured in serum samples taken from 29 patients during the acute phase of the disease. Two cases were fatal. Among survivors, significant differences between severe and non-severe cases were observed in the levels of IP-10, and MCP-1, while the levels of IL-1b, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-15, IP-10, MCP-1, TNF-α, and RANTES differed significantly between fatal and non-fatal cases (P < 0.05). RANTES was negatively correlated with the outcome of the disease. A striking similarity with the cytokine patterns seen in Ebola virus disease was observed. A weak Th1 immune response was seen. The viral load was positively correlated with IL-10, IP-10, and MCP-1 levels, and negatively correlated with the ratio IL-12/IL-10. Especially IP-10 and MCP-1 were significantly associated with the viral load, the severity and outcome of the disease, and they could act as biomarkers and, probably, as potential targets for treatment strategies design. PMID:26118413

  9. Epidemic dengue hemorrhagic fever in rural Indonesia. II. Clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Eram, S; Setyabudi, Y; Sadono, T I; Sutrisno, D S; Gubler, D J; Sulianti Saroso, J

    1979-07-01

    Clinical observations were made on 95 serologically or virologically confirmed dengue fever cases during an epidemic in a rural area of Indonesia in December 1976. The age distribution was similar to that observed in patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, a highly endemic urban area. The observed disease ranged in severity from undifferentiated fever to shock and death. The majority of patients had acute onset of fever with nausea, vomiting, headache, and abdominal pain. Hepatomegaly was observed in only 19% of the patients. A positive tourniquet test was the most frequently observed hemorrhagic manifestation, but epistaxis was observed in 20% and hematemesis in 6% of the patients. Dengue shock syndrome was observed in 37% of the patients. There were four deaths, three of which were confirmed as due to dengue infection by virus isolation. The data suggest that one, and possibly two, of the fatal cases with virus isolation were primary infections, based on the results of hemagglutination-inhibition test using all four dengue antigens.

  10. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  11. Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage Secondary to Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Chen, Yi-Li; Yang, Shu-Xu; Wang, Yi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a routine procedure for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion, and is associated with many complications. A delayed hemorrhage after the VP shunt surgery, however, is quite rare. In this study, we report a case involving late-onset hemorrhage. The 67-year-old male patient with a history of head trauma and brain surgery underwent a VP shunt placement for hydrocephalus. The surgery course was uneventful and no bleeding was revealed in the first computed tomographic (CT) scan after the procedure. However, a massive intraparenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage occurred 8 h following adjustment of the valve system on the 8th day after surgery. Erosion of the vasculature by catheter cannulation and a sudden reduction of CSF pressure after downregulation of the valve could be one of the possible causes of the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). PMID:26632700

  12. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kota; Kato, Shunsuke; Nagano, Hiroto; Ohtsukasa, Shunro; Kawachi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities. PMID:27807449

  13. [Subretinal hemorrhage. Natural course and staging].

    PubMed

    Bopp, S

    2012-07-01

    Subretinal hemorrhages are a complication of various diseases which arise from the choroidal or retinal circulation. Most commonly the underlying pathology is a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) especially in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Less common ocular diseases are those with non-AMD-related CNV and retinal arterial macroaneurysms (RAM). Case studies have demonstrated a poor prognosis, however, a significant portion have favorable outcomes. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making is difficult. As a major difficulty in comparing different treatment modalities for submacular hemorrhages is the lack of a standardized definition of the extent of the hemorrhage. A classification for AMD-related subretinal hemorrhages including size, thickness and intraretinal location is suggested.

  14. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  15. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  16. Modified spleen stiffness measurement by transient elastography is associated with presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated hepatitis C virus cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Calvaruso, V; Bronte, F; Conte, E; Simone, F; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of liver transient elastography (TE), spleen TE and other noninvasive tests (AAR, APRI score, platelet count, platelet/spleen ratio) in predicting the presence and the size of oesophageal varices in compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis, we studied 112 consecutive patients with compensated HCV cirrhosis who underwent biochemical tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, liver TE and spleen TE by Fibroscan(®) (Echosens, Paris, France) using a modified software version with a range between 1.5 and 150 kPa. Spleen TE was not reliable in 16 patients (14.3%). Among the 96 patients with a valid measurement (69.8% men, mean age: 63.2 ± 9.5 years), 43.7% had no oesophageal varices, 29.2% had grade 1% and 27.1% had grade 2 or grade 3 oesophageal varices. Patients with values of 75 kPa by standard spleen TE had mean values of modified spleen TE of 117 kPa (range: 81.7-149.5). Linear regression revealed a significant correlation between modified spleen TE and oesophageal varix size (r = 0.501; beta: 0.763, SE: 0.144; P < 0.001). On univariate analysis, the variables associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices were AAR score, APRI score, platelet/spleen ratio, liver TE and modified spleen TE. On multivariate analysis, only modified spleen TE (OR: 1.026; 95% CI: 1.007-1.046; P = 0.006) and AAR (OR: 14.725; 95% CI: 1.928-112.459; P = 0.010) remained independently associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices. Platelet/spleen ratio was the best predictor of oesophageal varices area under the ROC curve (AUROC: 0.763, cut-off: 800, sensitivity: 74%, specificity: 70%), while modified spleen TE was more accurate in predicting grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices (AUROC: 0.82, cut-off: 54.0 kPa, sensitivity: 80%, specificity: 70%). Portal hypertension increases spleen stiffness, and the measurement of modified spleen TE is an accurate, noninvasive tool for predicting the presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated HCV

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction after return of spontaneous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Injune; Kim, Youn Jung; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram changes in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been described as ST-T changes that mimic acute coronary syndrome and even acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Elevation of cardiac enzymes and abnormality of regional myocardial wall motion have been reported frequently for SAH. We report a case of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivor with high suspicion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction based on the electrocardiogram and bedside echocardiography, who had normal coronary arteries on emergent coronary angiography. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with SAH as a cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:27752607

  18. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:20825914

  19. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  20. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case.

  1. Argentine hemorrhagic fever: a primate model.

    PubMed

    Weissenbacher, M C; Calello, M A; Colillas, O J; Rondinone, S N; Frigerio, M J

    1979-01-01

    Experimental Junin virus infection of a New World primate, Callithrix jacchus, was evaluated. The virus produced anorexia, loss of weight, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and hemorrhagic and neurological symptoms and terminated in death. Virus was recovered from urine, blood samples and all tissues taken at autopsy. These preliminary observations show that several aspects of the experimental disease in C. jacchus are quite similar to severe natural Argentine hemorrhagic fever of man.

  2. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  3. Critical pitfall: varices in cancer patients mimicking lymphadenopathy; differentiation of varicose veins and enlarged lymph nodes in routine staging.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Tilman; Pansini, Michele; Bongartz, Georg; Niemann, Tilo

    2011-01-01

    Two patients, each with a history of multiple cancers, were referred to our institution for routine cancer staging. Contrast enhanced multislice-CT showed round and oval shaped inguinal and retroperitoneal masses in one patient and inguinal mass lesions in the other patient. The mass lesions were suspicious of lymphadenopathy related to cancer recurrence. Additional MR-Imaging, however, showed tortuous varicose veins as well as suspicious lymph nodes in one patient and solely venous convolutes in the other patient. Regarding the routine contrast enhanced CT-scan in the portovenous phase, varices showed no significant difference in radiodensity compared to enlarged lymph nodes.

  4. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study.

  5. Congenital hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Zhang, Minfeng; Yang, Cheng; Cai, Wenchang; Zhao, Qian; Shen, Weifeng; Yang, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fast-growing congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage are rare in clinical practice. Additionally, the clinical manifestations of and laboratory and imaging findings for this condition are often nonspecific and are particularly difficult to differentiate from those of hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, thus posing great challenges for diagnosis and treatment. The 2 case reports presented here aim to analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage in the Chinese Han population to provide an important reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Diagnoses: These 2 case reports present 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage. Case 1 involved a 31-year-old patient with a very large, fast-growing hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and elevated carbohydrate antigen 199. Case 2 involved a patient with intense, paroxysmal right upper abdominal pain; computed tomography suggested a hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and possibly hepatobiliary cystadenoma. Outcomes: Both patients underwent liver resection. Postoperative follow-up showed that for both patients, the symptoms improved, the laboratory findings returned to normal levels, and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion: Liver resection is an ideal treatment for patients with congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage, and especially those with fast-growing, symptomatic hepatic cysts or hepatic cysts that are difficult to differentiate from hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27759646

  6. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  7. Munchausen syndrome by proxy with massive proteinuria and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Lhopital, Caroline; Cloppet, Henri; Feït, Jean-Patrick; Bourlon, Isabelle; Morin, Denis; Cochat, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with acute abdominal pain. Massive proteinuria of 10 g/1.73 m(2) per day was detected on standard urinalysis. There was no peripheral edema. Serum concentrations of total proteins, lipids, and creatinine and immunological investigations were normal. Two kidney biopsies revealed no abnormalities. Several weeks later he was admitted for intestinal hemorrhage with significant anemia. Endoscopy of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and small bowel (via laparotomy) were normal. Electrophoresis of urine proteins revealed the unusual finding of an albumin fraction of 99.4%. During a routine check-up in the outpatient clinic fresh urine samples were obtained while the boy's mother was absent. These were all negative for protein. The mother, who was a nurse, finally confessed to adding human albumin to the urine samples.

  8. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vatter, Heather A.; Donaldson, Eric F.; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F.; Lewis, Anne D.; Colgin, Lois M.A.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Pecotte, Jerilyn K.; Baric, Ralph S.; Wong, Scott W.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2014-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100–1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages showed a very high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100 PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. PMID:25463617

  9. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  10. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC) to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD) and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures. PMID:25386355

  11. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in infants.

    PubMed

    Hongsiriwon, Suchat

    2002-03-01

    A report of 19 cases of serologically-proven dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in infants aged 3-12 months who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Chon Buri Regional Hospital, Thailand, during 1995 to 1998. Subjects were 8 males and 11 females, with the peak age of 8 months. Four cases (21%) had DHF and other common co-infections ie pneumonia (2 cases), Staphylococcus aureus sepsis (1 case) and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis (1 case). The clinical manifestations of the 15 DHF cases were high fever (100%), coryza (93.3%), hepatomegaly (80%), drowsiness (53.3 %), and vomiting (46.7%); rash was observed in only 27%; one-fifth developed febrile convulsions. Sites of bleeding were the skin (petechiae) 58%, gastrointestinal system (melena) 16%, and mucous membrane (epistaxis) 5%; thrombocytopenia and increased hematocrit (> or =20%) were noted in 95% and 84% respectively. The majority of the patients (18 cases, 95%) had primary infection; only one (5%) had secondary infection. The clinical severity of the DHF was Grade I, II, and III (dengue shock syndrome) in 21%, 47% and 32% of cases respectively. After appropriate and effective management, all the infants recovered fully.

  12. Aspirin use for primary prophylaxis: Adverse outcomes in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Souk, Karina M; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) taking aspirin for primary prophylaxis to those not taking it. METHODS: Patients not known to have any vascular disease (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease) who were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1993 and 2010 with NVUGIB were included. The frequencies of in-hospital mortality, re-bleeding, severe bleeding, need for surgery or embolization, and of a composite outcome defined as the occurrence of any of the 4 bleeding related adverse outcomes were compared between patients receiving aspirin and those on no antithrombotics. We also compared frequency of in hospital complications and length of hospital stay between the two groups. RESULTS: Of 357 eligible patients, 94 were on aspirin and 263 patients were on no antithrombotics (control group). Patients in the aspirin group were older, the mean age was 58 years in controls and 67 years in the aspirin group (P < 0.001). Patients in the aspirin group had significantly more co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension [25 (27%) vs 31 (112%) and 44 (47%) vs 74 (28%) respectively, (P = 0.001)], as well as dyslipidemia [21 (22%) vs 16 (6%), P < 0.0001). Smoking was more frequent in the aspirin group [34 (41%) vs 60 (27%), P = 0.02)]. The frequencies of endoscopic therapy and surgery were similar in both groups. Patients who were on aspirin had lower in-hospital mortality rates (2.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.002), shorter hospital stay (4.9 d vs 7 d, P = 0.01), and fewer composite outcomes (10.6% vs 24%, P = 0.01). The frequencies of in-hospital complications and re-bleeding were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who present with NVUGIB while receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis had fewer adverse outcomes. Thus aspirin may have a protective effect beyond its cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27462392

  13. PREDICTORS OF HIGHLY PREVALENT BRAIN ISCHEMIA IN INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Gibbons, M. Christopher; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; German, Laura; Sobotka, Ian; Edwards, Dorothy; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and temporal profile of concurrent ischemic lesions in patients with acute primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Patients were recruited within a prospective, longitudinal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based study of primary ICH. Clinical, demographic, and MRI data were collected on all subjects at baseline and 1 month. Results Of the 138 patients enrolled, mean age was 59 years, 54% were male, 73% black, and 84% had a history of hypertension. At baseline, ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were found in 35% of patients. At 1 month, lesions were present in 27%, and of these lesions, 83% were new and not present at baseline. ICH volume (p=0.025), intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.019), presence of microbleeds (p=0.024), and large, early reductions in mean arterial pressure (p=0.003) were independent predictors of baseline DWI lesions. A multivariate logistical model predicting the presence of 1 month DWI lesions included history of any prior stroke (p=0.012), presence of 1 or more microbleeds (p=0.04), black race (p=0.641), and presence of a DWI lesion at baseline (p=0.007) Interpretation This study demonstrates that more than 1/3 of patients with primary ICH have active cerebral ischemia at baseline remote from the index hematoma, and 1/4 of patients experience ongoing, acute ischemic events at 1 month. Multivariate analyses implicate blood pressure reductions in the setting of an active vasculopathy as a potential underlying mechanism. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of these lesions on outcome and optimal management strategies to arrest vascular damage. PMID:22367992

  14. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior.

  15. Predictors of outcome in childhood intracerebral hemorrhage: a prospective consecutive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Storm, Phillip B; Heuer, Gregory G; Zimmerman, Robert A; Feiler, Alana M; Kasner, Scott E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose To describe features of children with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and to determine predictors of short-term outcome in a single-center prospective cohort study. Methods Single-center prospective consecutive cohort study of spontaneous ICH in children age 1-18 years from January 2006 to June 2008. Exclusion criteria were inciting trauma; intracranial tumor; isolated epidural, subdural, intraventricular, or subarachnoid hemorrhage; hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke; and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Hospitalization records were abstracted. Follow-up assessments included outcome scores using the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) and King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI). ICH volumes and total brain volumes (TBV) were measured by manual tracing. Results Twenty-two patients, median age of 10.3 years (range 4.2-16.6 years), had presenting symptoms of headache in 77%, focal deficits 50%, altered mental status 50%, and seizures 41%. Vascular malformations caused hemorrhage in 91%. Surgical treatment (hematoma evacuation, lesion embolization or excision) was performed during acute hospitalization in 50%. One patient died acutely. At median follow-up of 3.5 months (range 0.3-7.5 months), 71% of survivors had neurological deficits; 55% had clinically significant disability. Outcome based on PSOM and KOSCHI scores was worse in patients with ICH volume >2% of TBV (p=0.023) and altered mental status at presentation (p = 0.005). Conclusions Spontaneous childhood ICH was due mostly to vascular malformations. Acute surgical intervention was commonly performed. Although death was rare, 71% of survivors had persisting neurological deficits. Larger ICH volume and altered mental status predicted clinically significant disability. PMID:20019325

  16. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  17. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Su-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature.

  18. Pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome associated with an autochthonous case of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Setlik, Robert F; Ouellette, Daniel; Morgan, Julia; McAllister, C Kenneth; Dorsey, David; Agan, Brian K; Horvath, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michelle K; Purcell, Bret

    2004-07-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a much rarer form of the disease, occurs when a person previously infected with dengue is re-infected with a different viral serotype. In recent years the infection rates of dengue and both clinical syndromes have increased along the United States-Mexico border. We present the case of a 61-year-old Laotian female who presented with a 1-week history of fever, altered mental status, oral ulceration, and rash. The patient developed diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and anemia requiring multiple transfusions. She eventually sustained multi-organ system failure and expired. Both the titer data and serologies were consistent with the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. We hypothesize that this syndrome was the result of re-infection occurring within the United States. This case is also unusual in that it is the second reported in the literature of pulmonary hemorrhages associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  19. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 × 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose.

  20. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  1. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  2. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  3. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. Case Report: We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Conclusions: This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity. PMID:24826208

  4. Early recognition of intraventricular hemorrhage in the setting of thrombocytosis in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Marvinia; Fontoura, Romy; Sugalski, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytosis is frequently encountered as an incidental laboratory finding since isolated thrombocytosis is often asymptomatic. Even though thrombocytosis is benign and self-limiting in most cases, it can at times result in thrombosis or hemorrhage. The most common type of thrombocytosis is reactive (secondary) thrombocytosis and can be due to infections, trauma, surgery, or occult malignancy. Since thrombocytosis is a known risk factor for thrombosis, it is commonly a concern for ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction. Much less common are hemorrhagic events associated with thrombocytosis. Studies have shown that when hemorrhage is present in patients with thrombocytosis, it is most often seen in the setting of chronic myelogenous leukemia and essential thrombocythemia. In essential thrombocythemia, the overall risk of bleeding and thrombosis is 0.33% per patient-year and 6.6% per patient-year, respectively. In the general population, the risk of bleeding and thrombosis is 0% and 1.2%, respectively. The present study is a case report of an 83-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with hypertension and headache, who was then found to have significant thrombocytosis (platelets >1,000×109/L) and acute right intraventricular hemorrhage without any signs of neurological deficits, or evidence of vascular malformations or mass. We present this case report for review and discussion of some of the challenges and considerations associated with the management of such patients. PMID:27307770

  5. Luminal platelet aggregates in functional deficits in parenchymal vessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Victor; Flores, Rowena; Muller, Artur; Sehba, Fatima A.

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of early ischemic injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not understood. This study examined the acute effect of endovascular puncture-induced SAH on parenchymal vessel function in rat, using intravascular fluorescent tracers to assess flow and vascular permeability and immunostaining to assess structural integrity and to visualize platelet aggregates. In sham-operated animals, vessels were well filled with tracer administered 10 seconds before sacrifice, and parenchymal escape of tracer was rare. At ten minutes and 3 hours after hemorrhage, patches of poor vascular filling were distributed throughout the forebrain. Close examination of these regions revealed short segments of narrowed diameter along many profiles. Most vascular profiles with reduced perfusion contained platelet aggregates and in addition showed focal loss of collagen IV, a principal component of basal lamina. In contrast, vessels were well filled at 24 hours post-hemorrhage, indicating that vascular perfusion had recovered. Parenchymal escape of intravascular tracer was detected at 10 minutes post-hemorrhage and later as plumes of fluorescence emanating into parenchyma from restricted microvascular foci. These data demonstrate that parenchymal microvessels are compromised in function by 10 minutes after SAH and identify focal microvascular constriction and local accumulation of luminal platelet aggregates as potential initiators of that compromise. PMID:20654597

  6. Successful coil embolization for life-threatening hemorrhage in childhood leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Jun; Ueda, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Ozaki, Yusuke; Wakita, Satoshi; Maeda, Miho; Fukunaga, Yoshitaka

    2013-04-01

    An 11-year-old boy was experienced severe life-threatening hemorrhage from a branch of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy. The patient had a history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), diagnosed at 3 years of age. Subsequent to discontinuing his psychotropic medication, the patient's mental status deteriorated and treatment with midazolam for 3 weeks was necessary to allow the completion of the leukemia induction regimen. On day 51, although there was no indication of thrombocytopenia or a coagulation disorder, the patient began to hemorrhage suddenly from anal with resulting hypovolemic shock, and large-volume blood transfusion was initiated. Although upper and lower endoscopy failed to determine the location of the hemorrhage, angiography enabled us to determine that it was a branch of the SMA (the middle colic artery #6), and selective arterial embolization was used to arrest the bleeding. There could have been underlying causes, such as, a probable malformation or aneurysm in that area, although there was no indication before or after the event. This is a rare case of arterial hemorrhage from a branch of the SMA that occurred in a pediatric patient idiopathically during the induction therapy of leukemia. PMID:23679168

  7. Spreading Depolarizations: A Therapeutic Target Against Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, David Y; Oka, Fumiaki; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia is the most feared cause of secondary injury progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initially thought to be a direct consequence of large artery spasm and territorial ischemia, recent data suggests that delayed cerebral ischemia represents multiple concurrent and synergistic mechanisms, including microcirculatory dysfunction, inflammation, and microthrombosis. Among these mechanisms, spreading depolarizations (SDs) are arguably the most elusive and underappreciated in the clinical setting. Although SDs have been experimentally detected and examined since the late 1970s, their widespread occurrence in human brain was not unequivocally demonstrated until relatively recently. We now know that SDs occur with very high incidence in human brain after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and trauma, and worsen outcomes by increasing metabolic demand, decreasing blood supply, predisposing to seizure activity, and possibly worsening brain edema. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of SDs in injured brain. Although much of our mechanistic knowledge comes from experimental models of focal cerebral ischemia, clinical data suggest that the same principles apply regardless of the mode of injury (i.e., ischemia, hemorrhage, or trauma). The hope is that a better fundamental understanding of SDs will lead to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SD occurrence and its adverse consequences contributing to injury progression in subarachnoid hemorrhage and other forms of acute brain injury. PMID:27258442

  8. Successful use of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt to control severe refractory oesophageal variceal haemorrhage in a poor risk patient.

    PubMed Central

    Beales, I. L.; Jackson, J. E.; Rudolf, M.; Arnold, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a 44 year old man with a severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage from oesophageal varices. Bleeding could not be controlled with conservative therapy and sclerotherapy. He was successfully treated with a radiologically guided transjugular intrahepatic stent shunt at a time when his condition was too poor to attempt an open surgical procedure. PMID:8121873

  9. Overview of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    It is well documented that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage can occur in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs, and monkeys. Our own experimental studies have focused on mice, rats, and pigs as animal models. The characteristics of the lesions produced in mice, rats and pigs were similar to those described in studies by our research group and others, suggesting a common pathogenesis for the initiation and propagation of the lesions at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Five experimental in vivo studies have been conducted to evaluate whether cavitation is responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage. The studies evaluated the dependencies of hydrostatic pressure, frequency, pulse polarity, contrast agents and lung inflation, and the results of each study appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that the mechanism for the production of a lung hemorrhage was inertial cavitation. Other dependencies evaluated included beam width, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, exposure duration, and animal species and age. The thresholds for producing ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, in general, were less than the FDA's regulatory limit of a Mechanical Index (MI) of 1.9. Further, the MI does not appear to provide a risk-based index for lung hemorrhage. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  10. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  11. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  12. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  13. Effects of dextran 70 versus crystalloids in the microcirculation of porcine hemorrhagic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Lehtola, A.; Kivilaakso, E.; Puolakkainen, P.; Karonen, S.L.; Lempinen, M.; Schroeder, T.

    1986-06-01

    The cause of hemodynamic changes occurring during acute pancreatitis remains obscure. Using a pig model of acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the reference sample method with 113Tin and 46 Scandium labelled microspheres, blood flow to organs was determined before and five hours after the induction of pancreatitis. Blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output were measured hourly. There were two treatment groups. The first group received dextran 70 (5.7 milliliters per kilogram per hour) and saline solution (7.5 milliliters per kilogram per hour) in sufficient amounts to maintain cardiac output at the initial (prepancreatic) level. The second group received saline solution (26 milliliters per kilogram per hour) only and during the experiment the cardiac output was allowed to decrease to approximately one-half of the initial level. In the dextran 70 group, blood flow in various organs stayed at the initial level or was slightly increased. However, in the saline solution group there was a marked and significant decrease in the blood flow in all organs except the antral mucosa, gallbladder and adrenal glands. The changes in the pancreatic fraction of the cardiac output during the experiment were similar to those of other organs in respective treatment groups. In conclusion, adequate infusion of dextran maintains cardiac output and organ microcirculation at the initial level during the early phase of acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. It is suggested that the hemodynamic changes which develop during acute pancreatitis are mainly secondary to the ensuing hypovolemia and not direct consequences of the pancreatic inflammatory process.

  14. A study of the time course of conversion of edematous to hemorrhagic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, N D; Singh, S M; Porter-Fink, V; Widdison, A L; Reber, H A

    1991-02-01

    We studied the conversion of acute edematous pancreatitis (AEP) to acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis (AHP) in an experimental model in cats. In the model, 16,16 dimethyl PgE2 effects this conversion by increasing microvascular permeability. First, we induced AEP in cats and then gave PgE2 at increasing intervals after the induction of AEP to see how long an interval would still allow conversion. In 6 groups of cats, PgE2 was administered for 2 h, starting at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 h after the creation of AEP. Twelve h later, the cats were sacrificed and the pancreases were graded for inflammation and hemorrhage. Significant pancreatic hemorrhage did not occur when the PgE2 was administered at 12 h compared to 2 h. Next, we determined that PgE2 still retained its ability to increase pancreatic vascular permeability when administered 12 h after the creation of AEP. This was done by perfusing a marker molecule through the MPD (fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled dextran: FITC-D, mol wt 20,000) and then finding it in portal venous blood (PVB). The presence of FITC-D in PVB signified increased vascular permeability, since normally none was present. We concluded that conversion of AEP to AHP was possible during the first 12 h after induction of AEP. Lack of conversion at 12 h was not caused by a lack of vascular reactivity at that time. PMID:2033324

  15. Usefulness of intra-procedural cone-beam computed tomography in modified balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; So, Naomi; Chapman, Ryan; McWilliams, Justin P; Loh, Christopher T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kee, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether intra-procedural cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed during modified balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (mBRTO) can accurately determine technical success of complete variceal obliteration. METHODS: From June 2012 to December 2014, 15 patients who received CBCT during mBRTO for treatment of portal hypertensive gastric variceal bleeding were retrospectively evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) CBCT images were performed and evaluated prior to the end of the procedure, and these were further analyzed and compared to the pre-procedure contrast-enhanced computed tomography to determine the technical success of mBRTO including: Complete occlusion/obliteration of: (1) gastrorenal shunt (GRS); (2) gastric varices; and (3) afferent feeding veins. Post-mBRTO contrast-enhanced CT was used to confirm the accuracy and diagnostic value of CBCT within 2-3 d. RESULTS: Intra-procedural 3D-CBCT images were 100% accurate in determining the technical success of mBRTO in all 15 cases. CBCT demonstrated complete occlusion/obliteration of GRS, gastric varices, collaterals and afferent feeding veins during mBRTO, which was confirmed with post-mBRTO CT. Two patients showed incomplete obliteration of gastric varices and feeding veins on CBCT, which therefore required additional gelfoam injections to complete the procedure. No patient required additional procedures or other interventions during their follow-up period (684 ± 279 d). CONCLUSION: CBCT during mBRTO appears to accurately and immediately determine the technical success of mBRTO. This may improve the technical and clinical success/outcome of mBRTO and reduce additional procedure time in the future. PMID:27158425

  16. Global aphasia due to left thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ozeren, Ali; Koc, Filiz; Demirkiran, Meltem; Sönmezler, Abdurrahman; Kibar, Mustafa

    2006-12-01

    Global aphasia is an acquired language disorder characterized by severe impairments in all modalities of language. The specific sites of injury commonly include Wernike's and Broca's areas and result from large strokes--particularly those involving the internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries. Rarely, deep subcortical lesions may cause global aphasia. We present three cases with global aphasia due to a more rare cause: left thalamic hemorrhage. Their common feature was the large size of the hemorrhage and its extension to the third ventricule. HMPAO-SPECT in one of the cases revealed ipsilateral subcortical, frontotemporal cortical and right frontal cortical hypoperfusion. Left thalamic hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of global aphasia. PMID:17114855

  17. [Severe hemorrhagic gastritis of radiation origin].

    PubMed

    Flobert, C; Cellier, C; Landi, B; Berger, A; Durdux, C; Palazzo, L; Carnot, F; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1998-02-01

    Severe gastric complications due to radiotherapy are uncommon, in particular hemorrhagic gastritis. A high total dose and, above all, high daily fraction appear to be the main risk factors in gastric injuries. A case of hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiotherapy requesting a total gastrectomy is reported. The patient was treated for a primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hemorrhagic gastritis occurred despite a low total dose (40 Gy) and 2 Gy daily fractions. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and repeated biopsies are usually insufficient to exclude a tumor recurrence. Endoscopic ultrasonography may argue for a recurrence or for radiation lesions. As the conservative treatment is usually ineffective, these gastrointestinal radiation injuries ought to be treated surgically. Besides it allows to ascertain the benign nature of radiation lesions. PMID:9762196

  18. Traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage with a good prognosis.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Gezen, Ferruh; Akgul, Mehmet; Dosoglu, Murat

    2011-01-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl with an isolated traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage following a traffic accident, who had a good prognosis. Her neurological examination upon arrival was normal and she had no complaint other than headache and vomiting. Computed tomography on admission showed a hemorrhage in the lateral and fourth ventricles. She had a Glasgow Coma Score of 15, and she was thus given only antiepileptic drugs for prophylaxis and followed. Computed tomography that was repeated 5 days after admission showed no blood and all ventricles were of normal size. There was no vascular pathology on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography. The patient remains well 5 months after her accident. Intraventricular hemorrhage does not always have a poor prognosis.

  19. Renin responses to hemorrhage in conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roarty, T.P.; Chadwick. K.J.; Raff, H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the role of beta adrenergic inhibition on the renin response to graded hemorrhage (hem) in conscious rats. Chronic femoral arterial (for measurement of mean arterial pressure - MAP) and venous (for drug infusion) catheters were implanted at least 5 days before experimentation. Hem was administered in < 2 min. 10 rats (CTL) were exposed to a total of 21 episodes of hemorrhage. 13 rats (B-block) were given 1 mg/kg propranolol hydrochloride iv 20 min prior to hem (24 episodes total). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Pre-hem PRA levels were measured in the first 1 ml of hem blood. Hem resulted in hem volume-dependent decreases in blood pressure and increase-response to hemorrhage.

  20. Renin responses to hemorrhage to conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roarty, T.P.; Chadwick, K.J.; Raff, H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the role of beta adrenergic inhibition on the renin response to graded hemorrhage (hem) in conscious rats. Chronic femoral arterial (for measurement of mean arterial pressure - MAP) and venous (for drug infusion) catheters were implanted at least 5 days before experimentation. Hem was administered in < 2 min. 10 rats (CTL) were exposed to a total of 21 episodes of hemorrhage. 13 rats (B-block) were given 1 mg/kg propranolol hydrochloride iv 20 min prior to hem (24 episodes total). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Pre-hem PRA levels were measured in the first 1 ml of hem blood. Hem resulted in hem volume-dependent decreases in blood pressure and increases in PRA. B-block did not significantly alter the mean renin response to hemorrhage.

  1. Primary Medullary Hemorrhage Associated with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Jee-Young

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous primary medullary hemorrhage is a rare event. A 64-year-old man was admitted for sudden-onset vertigo and vomiting. His clinical features were similar to those of lateral medullary syndrome. The patient had no anticoagulant therapy, vascular malformation, or a caudal extension of a pontine hemorrhage. The patient had multiple hypertensive changes, including retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography, multiple cerebral microbleeds, and small-vessel changes on MRI. T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI performed 3 months prior to admission and contrast-enhanced MRI showed no evidence of vascular malformation. We concluded that the patient had uncontrolled hypertension that may have lead to primary medullary hemorrhage. PMID:20396466

  2. Early seizures in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Chraa; Kissani, Najib

    2015-01-01

    Early seizures (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and the predictive factors for early seizures as well the clinical outcome in patients with first-ever stroke. A total of 352 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, admitted to our department, were included in this retrospective study. Early seizures were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. About 47 patients (13%) had early seizure, and 8 had a status epilepticus. We had 28 women and 19 men. The mean age was 71.6 ± 14.6. They were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical associated hemorrhage. ES were associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). Early seizures occured in about 13% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES seem to be associated with a worse outcome after acute stroke. PMID:26097640

  3. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia with Unusual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dheeraj; Ramasamy, Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a report of an elderly lady who was hospitalized with progressive worsening of breathlessness and fatigue of one month's duration. Clinical evaluation of the patient revealed hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension without left heart failure, and bilateral gluteal calcinosis cutis. Initially, CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome was considered in view of the telangiectasia and calcinosis cutis, but a strong autosomal inheritance pattern and endoscopies (nasal and upper gastrointestinal) favored a diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with rare associations. PMID:26180702

  4. Recovery from Intracranial Hemorrhage Due to Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamhmoodi, Abdolreza

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare and fatal presentation of leptospirosis. In this paper we present the case of a 51-year-old male farmer who lives in northern Iran. He came to our hospital with a severe headache. A paraclinical evaluation showed clear signs of thrombocytopenia, and a brain MRI revealed left temporoparietal hemorrhage. Our preliminary diagnosis was Leptospirosis, and after 26 days of hospital care the patient was discharged in good condition. This paper will educationally help physicians in better diagnosis and treatment of leptospirosis. PMID:22013452

  5. Hepatic Venous Waveform, Splenoportal and Damping Index in Liver Cirrhosis: Correlation with Child Pugh’s Score and Oesophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Antil, Neha; Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Malik, Amita; Gupta, Bhupender; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical assessment of chronic liver disease is done by Modified Child Pugh’s and Model for end-stage liver disease scoring system. Measurement of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and Upper GI Endoscopy are considered the gold standards for measurement of portal hypertension in cirrhotics. There is a need for non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Ultrasonography with colour and spectral Doppler evaluation may be an effective, rapid and inexpensive alternative. Aim To evaluate hepatic venous waveform, damping index, splenoportal index in patients of cirrhosis on Colour Doppler ultrasound, also predict severity of portal hypertension and presence of oesophageal varices. Materials and Methods Thirty patients of chronic liver disease were included in the study. Ultrasound and colour Doppler was done to look hepatic venous waveform pattern, Damping Index (DI), and Splenoportal Index (SPI). Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography scan (CT) was done if renal function tests were normal, else endoscopy when the renal function tests were deranged to look for oesophageal varices. Results Twenty two (73.3%) patients had monophasic waveform. Biphasic and triphasic waveforms were seen in 4 (13.3%) cases. Twenty two patients (73.3%) had monophasic waveforms and majority of them were in class C. This distribution of hepatic vein waveform was statistically significantly with the Child Pugh’s class (p<0.05). Twenty patients (66.7%) had value of Damping index more than >0.6 where majority of patients (18) belonged to class C and 2 in class B. There was a positive correlation between Child Pugh’s total score and Damping index (r=0.614; p<0.05). There was weak positive correlation between splenoportal index and Child Pugh’s score (r=0.269; p=0.15). Conclusion Change in triphasic to monophasic waveform and DI >0.6 suggests severe liver dysfunction and is associated with severe portal hypertension. Hepatic venous waveform pressure changes, DI and SPI

  6. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS. PMID:22165665

  7. Massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage from an asymptomatic adrenal cortical adenoma. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W M; Timberlake, G A

    1989-05-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted to the General Surgical Service, with acute onset of left back and flank pain. Two weeks prior to admission he had been subjected to a 3G to 4G acceleration in an ejection seat training simulator. On the day of admission, he had performed a 100 yard swim in flight gear following a seven foot jump into water. He denied any injury during the above exercises or any other trauma. A falling hematocrit was demonstrated by serial determinations and a computerized tomography scan revealed a left retroperitoneal hematoma with normal bilateral renal function and no obvious renal injury. Continued hemorrhage resulted in laparotomy, which showed an 11 cm left adrenal tumor with massive hemorrhage into the retroperitoneum. Histologically the tumor was a benign non-functioning adrenal cortical adenoma. PMID:2719407

  8. The return of an old worm: cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2012-11-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.

  9. The Return of an Old Worm: Cerebral Paragonimiasis Presenting with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes. PMID:23166429

  10. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Saeed; Baratloo, Alireza; Rouhipour, Alaleh; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Yousefifard, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) was first reported in 1976 with two concurrent outbreaks of acute viral hemorrhagic fever centered in Yambuku (near the Ebola river), Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Nzara, Sudan. The current outbreak of the Ebola virus was started by reporting the first case in March 2014 in the forest regions of southeastern Guinea. Due to infection rates raising over 13,000% within a 6-month period, Ebola is now considered as a global public health emergency and on August 8th, 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. With more than 5000 involved cases and nearly 3000 deaths, this event has turned into the largest and most dangerous Ebola virus outbreak in the world. Based on the above-mentioned, the present article aimed to review the virologic characteristics, transmission, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Ebola virus disease. PMID:26512362

  11. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 2010: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed AL Dabal, Laila; Rahimi Shahmirzadi, Mohmamed Reza; Baderldin, Samar; Abro, Ali; Zaki, Ali; Dessi, Zulfa; Al Eassa, Essa; Khan, Gulfaraz; Shuri, Hassan; Alwan, Abid Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a severe infectious disease that is not endemic in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Case Presentation We report two cases of confirmed CCHF diagnosed in Dubai, UAE, during Hajj season 2010. Both patients presented with an acute history of high-grade fever, skin rash, and hematemesis. Conclusions In spite of maximal supportive measures and intravenous ribavirin therapy, both patients died within a few days from start of illness. More than 250 health care workers came into variable degrees of contact with the index cases, and none of them developed signs or symptoms suggestive of acquiring the illness. Health care workers from nonendemic regions should be aware of zoonotic hemorrhagic fevers imported via infected cattle and ticks and be able to diagnose and properly manage suspected cases in a timely manner. In addition, proper infection-control measures should be undertaken to prevent nosocomial spread of infection. PMID:27795839

  12. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; a Review Article.

    PubMed

    Safari, Saeed; Baratloo, Alireza; Rouhipour, Alaleh; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Yousefifard, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) was first reported in 1976 with two concurrent outbreaks of acute viral hemorrhagic fever centered in Yambuku (near the Ebola river), Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Nzara, Sudan. The current outbreak of the Ebola virus was started by reporting the first case in March 2014 in the forest regions of southeastern Guinea. Due to infection rates raising over 13,000% within a 6-month period, Ebola is now considered as a global public health emergency and on August 8(th), 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. With more than 5000 involved cases and nearly 3000 deaths, this event has turned into the largest and most dangerous Ebola virus outbreak in the world. Based on the above-mentioned, the present article aimed to review the virologic characteristics, transmission, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Ebola virus disease.

  13. Polyarteritis nodosa, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sheldon C; Olliff, Simon P; McCafferty, Ian; Wigmore, Stephen J; Mirza, Darius F

    2008-02-01

    This unique case reports the first recorded episode in the medical literature of vasculitis post-liver transplantation, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A 52-year-old Caucasian woman underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for autoimmune cirrhosis complicated by hepatoma and portal vein thrombosis. Late hepatic artery thrombosis led to a second liver graft. Following recovery from an episode of acute rejection, the patient presented with large volume hematemesis, melena, and hemochezia (passage of fresh blood from the rectum). Following upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and surgery, angiography illustrated the presence of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), which was successfully treated with high-dose steroid therapy. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an unusual presentation of vasculitis, especially PAN. The occurrence of this phenomenon post-OLT, in the presence of immunosuppression is previously unreported.

  14. Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier for Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Treatment in a Jehovah’s Witness

    PubMed Central

    Posluszny, Joseph A.; Napolitano, Lena M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of severe hemorrhagic shock due to acute blood loss from traumatic injuries in a Jehovah’s witness (JW) trauma patient is very challenging since hemostatic blood product resuscitation is limited by refusal of the transfusion of allogeneic blood products. Case Presentation: We describe a multifaceted approach to the clinical care of a severely anemic JW trauma patient including the early administration of a bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) as a bridge to resolution of critical anemia (nadir hemoglobin 3.9 g/dL). Hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier infusions were used to supplement oxygen delivery until endogenous erythropoiesis could restore adequate red blood cell mass. Subsequent endogenous bone marrow recovery was supported by early administration of high-dose erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron supplementation. Conclusions: Early HBOC administration can be used in the treatment of severe hemorrhagic shock in trauma patients who refuse allogeneic blood.

  15. Hospital-based diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, and hepatitis in Cambodian children.

    PubMed

    Chhour, Y Meng; Ruble, Gaye; Hong, Rathavuth; Minn, Kyi; Kdan, Yuvatha; Sok, Touch; Nisalak, Ananda; Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Vaughn, David W; Endy, Timothy P

    2002-05-01

    Surveillance was conducted for three clinical syndromes (hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, and hepatitis) in Cambodian children admitted to the National Pediatric Hospital in Phnom Penh from July 1996 through September 1998. Acute- and convalescent-phase sera, and cerebrospinal fluid, when applicable, underwent diagnostic evaluation for infections with Dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Hepatitis A, B, C, and E viruses. Of 621 children admitted with hemorrhagic fever, 499 (80%) were confirmed to have either primary or secondary DENV infection. DENV rates were as high as 10.6/100 hospital admissions in September 1998. Of 50 children with clinical encephalitis, 9 (18%) had serologic evidence of JEV infection. Forty-four children had clinical hepatitis, most (55%) due to Hepatitis A virus (HAV). One patient had Hepatitis B virus, and no patients had hepatitis C or E. This study identified a large number of children with vaccine-preventable diseases (JEV and HAV).

  16. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  17. Multimodality Monitoring, Inflammation, and Neuroregeneration in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ariel B.; Esteves Veiga, José C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The mortality rate of poor-grade SAH ranges from 34% to 52%. In an attempt to improve SAH outcomes, clinical research on multimodality monitoring has been performed, as has basic science research on inflammation and neuroregeneration (which can occur due to injury-induced neurogenesis). Nevertheless, the current literature does not focus on the integrated study of these fields. Multimodality monitoring corresponds to physiological data obtained during clinical management by both noninvasive and invasive methods. Regarding inflammation and neuroregeneration, evidence suggests that, in all types of stroke, a proinflammatory phase and an anti-inflammatory phase occur consecutively; these phases affect neurogenesis, which is also influenced by other pathophysiological features of stroke, such as ischemia, seizures, and spreading depression. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether injury-induced neurogenesis is a prognostic factor in poor-grade SAH that can be monitored and modulated. METHODS: We propose a protocol for multimodality monitoring-guided hypothermia in poor-grade SAH in which cellular and molecular markers of inflammation and neuroregeneration can be monitored in parallel with clinical and multimodal data. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: This study may reveal correlations between markers of inflammation and neurogenesis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, based on clinical and multimodality monitoring parameters. DISCUSSION: This protocol has the potential to lead to new therapies for acute, diffuse, and severe brain diseases. ABBREVIATIONS: BBB, blood-brain barrier CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure EEG, electroencephalography ICP, intracranial pressure IL, interleukin MCA, middle cerebral artery SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage SD, spreading depression SGZ, subgranular zone SVZ, subventricular zone TCD, transcranial Doppler PMID:25050583

  18. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak. PMID:24807363

  19. Severe perinephric hemorrhage after shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, N K; Karanastasis, D; Stenos, J L

    1995-06-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who, after a second session of shockwave lithotripsy for multiple stones in the right kidney, showed symptoms of severe hemorrhage and flank pain unresponsive to analgesics, with the gradual development of extensive and serious perinephric hematoma. The bleeding necessitated nephrectomy. Unrecognized chronic pyelonephritis may have been a predisposing factor.

  20. Uterine artery embolization for primary postpartum hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Jun-Mo; Ryu, Ae-Li; Chung, Soo-Ho; Seok Lee, Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and death. A prompt management of uterine artery embolization (UAE) is important for a good outcome. UAE is generally accepted to be a safe and reliable procedure. Objective: To estimate critical patient characteristics influencing the success of UAE for the treatment of emergent primary postpartum hemorrhage. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study that reviewed 121 patients who were diagnosed primary postpartum hemorrhage between February 2002 and December 2009 at a tertiary treatment center among 4,022 deliveries. We evaluated patient clinical characteristics associated with a successful surgical outcome of UAE. Results: The success rate for UAE was 96%. For two cases, UAE complication was associated with fever (>38.5oC). Five patients had problems that required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Conclusion: To increase the surgical success rate and lower the number of ICU admissions, the decision to treat primary postpartum hemorrhage using UAE should be based on individual patient clinical findings under the direction of obstetrics staff and an interventional radiologist. PMID:24639786