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Sample records for acute viral disease

  1. Acute viral E hepatitis with chronic liver disease (autoimmune hepatitis).

    PubMed

    Desai, H G; Naik, A S

    2005-03-01

    A 36 years old male presented with anorexia, jaundice and ascites. He was suffering from acute viral E hepatitis. In view of ascites, he was investigated for associated asymptomatic chronic liver disease (CLD). The CLD was diagnosed as cirrhosis with autoimmune hepatitis and was treated with steroid with good response. He is maintaining good health with low dose steroid, on follow up for 1 year.

  2. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare.

  3. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare. PMID:21983132

  4. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

  5. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  6. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  7. Hand, foot, and mouth disease: identifying and managing an acute viral syndrome.

    PubMed

    Repass, Gregory L; Palmer, William C; Stancampiano, Fernando F

    2014-09-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common, typically self-limited viral syndrome in children and adults. It is marked by fever, oral ulcers, and skin manifestations affecting the palms, soles, and buttocks, with symptoms usually lasting less than 1 week. Because it has the potential to reach epidemic levels in the United States, general practitioners need to be aware of it. PMID:25183845

  8. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  9. Viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases in Rio de Janeiro: first two years of a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Sutmoller, F.; Nascimento, J. P.; Chaves, J. R. S.; Ferreira, V.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study was undertaken to establish the incidence and possible viral etiology of acute respiratory diseases among the child population of a shanty town in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results demonstrated that nearly half of all the illnesses seen were respiratory infections, 10% of them affecting the lower respiratory tract. Viruses were isolated from 20% of the throat swabs collected. Of the viruses identified, 47% were adenoviruses, 25% were enteroviruses, 9% were influenza A, 8% herpes simplex, 7% parainfluenza, 3% respiratory syncytial and 1% influenza B viruses. PMID:6606500

  10. Exosomes in Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Viruses have evolved many mechanisms by which to evade and subvert the immune system to ensure survival and persistence. However, for each method undertaken by the immune system for pathogen removal, there is a counteracting mechanism utilized by pathogens. The new and emerging role of microvesicles in immune intercellular communication and function is no different. Viruses across many different families have evolved to insert viral components in exosomes, a subtype of microvesicle, with many varying downstream effects. When assessed cumulatively, viral antigens in exosomes increase persistence through cloaking viral genomes, decoying the immune system, and even by increasing viral infection in uninfected cells. Exosomes therefore represent a source of viral antigen that can be used as a biomarker for disease and targeted for therapy in the control and eradication of these disorders. With the rise in the persistence of new and reemerging viruses like Ebola and Zika, exploring the role of exosomes become more important than ever. PMID:27324390

  11. [Viral exanthematic childhood diseases].

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W

    1997-01-01

    Exanthem is defined as multiple, inflammatory skin alteration with a hematogenic, lymphogenic or neurogenic origin. Typically, so called exanthematic children's diseases are measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) and in the past small pox. The pathogenesis of the viral-caused diseases primarily occurs in the vascular connective tissue. The cytopathogenetic effects result in inflammatory tissue reactions with activation of defence mechanism and producing of immune complexes. First symptoms are hyperemia, edema and inflammatory infiltrates with itchy swellings. Virological laboratory diagnosis are necessary especially for the progress of atypical infectious diseases, for persons with immunological or chronical illness and under chemotherapeutical or immunosuppressival treatment.

  12. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses.

  13. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses. PMID:26403374

  14. Immunization Against Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wehrle, Paul F.

    1965-01-01

    Means are now at hand, if properly employed, to virtually eliminate clinical poliomyelitis and measles from this country. If such control is to be accomplished, more effective means are required to reach virtually all of the four million infants born each year in this country. Influenza can be suppressed, and improvements in influenza vaccine have been achieved in recent years. It seems likely at this time that at least several of the more important viral diseases can be controlled by utilizing antigens based on the biologic characteristics of the agent, and directed toward the reservoir of infection and the conditions favoring transmission of the infection. The theoretical problem of the effects in man of viruses that are oncogenic in rodents and are derived from various tissue culture systems deserves serious attention. However, this consideration, that of antigenic potency, and other problems reviewed should not be allowed to subvert efforts to solve the real problems that face us, the disability and death resulting from these common infections. PMID:14347979

  15. [Metabolism of various biogenic amines in acute viral neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Martynenko, I N; Shchegoleva, R A; Ponomarenko, V P; Leshchinskaia, E V; Kodkind, G Kh

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of biogenic amines was examined in 62 patients with various acute viral neuroinfections. The control group consisted of 57 persons. Depending on the process character and disease period variations of the levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid, coeruloplasmin and histamine were discovered. A comparison of the results obtained with the clinical course of the diseases revealed a certain correlation, especially in patients with acute meningoencephalitis.

  16. Breast milk transmission of viral disease.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E R; Keller, M A

    2001-01-01

    Breast milk transmission of maternal viral infection is well established for CMV and HIV-1. In the case of CMV, this usually does not pose a risk to the infant since serious disease is prevented by placentally transferred maternal antibody. However, in HIV infection, breast-feeding increases the risk of maternal-fetal transmission by about 25% with late breast-feeding (after six months of age) constituting a particular risk. In other maternal viral diseases, e.g., other herpes viruses, parvovirus, hepatitis A, B and C, and rubella, the virus is often demonstrated in the breast milk, but transmission is very rare. The highest risk is during an acute viral infection at the time of birth, since the breast milk has a high titer of virus, and a lack of antibody to neutralize the organism. PMID:11795036

  17. Viral-bacterial interactions in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Marom, Tal; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a polymicrobial disease, which usually occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). While respiratory viruses alone may cause viral AOM, they increase the risk of bacterial middle ear infection and worsen clinical outcomes of bacterial AOM. URI viruses alter Eustachian tube (ET) function via decreased mucociliary action, altered mucus secretion and increased expression of inflammatory mediators among other mechanisms. Transient reduction in protective functions of the ET allows colonizing bacteria of the nasopharynx to ascend into the middle ear and cause AOM. Advances in research help us to better understand the host responses to viral URI, the mechanisms of viral-bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx and the development of AOM. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding viral-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical course of AOM. We focus on the common respiratory viruses and their established role in AOM.

  18. Acute viral hepatitis in California sea lions.

    PubMed

    Britt, J O; Nagy, A Z; Howard, E B

    1979-11-01

    Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed in five California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) stranded along the Los Angeles coast. Light microscopy revealed large nuclear inclusion bodies in hepatocytes. Electron microscopy provided evidence that these inclusion bodies were composed of adenovirus-like virions. Attempts to grow the virus in cell culture systems were unsuccessful. PMID:521373

  19. Serum amyloid A protein in acute viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    Miwata, H; Yamada, T; Okada, M; Kudo, T; Kimura, H; Morishima, T

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) were measured in 254 children with viral diseases, including measles, varicella, rubella, mumps, echo-30 meningitis, chronic hepatitis B and C, and in eight with Kawasaki disease. Latex agglutination nephelometric immunoassay was used for assaying SAA. In 191 out of 195 patients (98%), SAA concentrations became markedly raised in the acute phase of the viral disease: measles (97%), varicella (100%), mumps (95%), and echo-30 meningitis (99%) with mean titres of 82.4, 80.5, 60.2, 75.2, and 101.1 micrograms/ml respectively. This increase in SAA was followed by a rapid return to normal concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml) during convalescence. Remarkably higher concentrations of SAA (mean 1630 micrograms/ml) were detected in the acute phase of patients with Kawasaki disease, but in most of the children with chronic hepatitis B or C, the titres of SAA remained normal. There was no close correlation between SAA and serum concentrations for alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, beta 2-microglobulin, transferrin, and IgG. There was a clear correlation between SAA and C reactive protein concentrations, although SAA showed a greater incremental change than C reactive protein in the acute phase. In the acute phase of these viral diseases, 56% of the patients had raised SAA concentrations (> or = 5 micrograms/ml) with normal C reactive protein concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml). These results indicate that SAA could be useful as an inflammatory marker in children with acute viral infections. PMID:8481043

  20. Viral etiology in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Azkur, Dilek; Özaydın, Eda; Dibek-Mısırlıoğlu, Emine; Vezir, Emine; Tombuloğlu, Duygu; Köse, Gülşen; Kocabaş, Can N

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is predominantly a viral disease. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common agent, but other newly identified viruses have also been considered as causes. The aim of the present study is to determine the respiratory viruses causing acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. Infants younger than 2 years of age who were hospitalized for acute viral bronchiolitis in a children's hospital between November 2011 and May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of viruses as etiologic agents using a realtime polymerase chain reaction method.A total of 55 infants were included in this study. The mean age of the children was 6.98±5.53 months, and 63.6% were male. In the 55 children, 63 viruses were detected. A single viral pathogen was detected in 47 (85.5%) patients, and two viruses were co-detected in 8 (14.6%) patients. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified, accounting for 25 (45.5%) cases, followed by rhinovirus (n=9, 16.4%), and human metapneumovirus (n = 8, 14.5%).Although respiratory syncytial virus remains the major viral pathogen in infants hospitalized for acute broncholitis, more than half of bronchiolitis cases are associated with other respiratory viruses.

  1. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  2. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  3. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  4. Ocular manifestations of feline viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Feline viral diseases are common and cats can be presented with a variety of clinical manifestations. Ocular disease associated with viral pathogens is not unusual, particularly with viruses causing upper respiratory tract disease in cats, such as feline herpesvirus type 1 and feline calicivirus. These agents mainly cause ocular surface disease. Other viruses, such as feline immunodeficiency virus and feline coronavirus, can cause uveitis, while feline leukemia virus can induce ocular lymphosarcoma. This review covers the most common viral pathogens of cats that cause ocular manifestations, the specific features of the ocular diseases caused by these viruses and therapeutic recommendations.

  5. Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Caluwaerts, Séverine; Achar, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viral disease’s interaction with pregnancy is poorly understood and remains a particular challenge for medical and para-medical personnel responding to an outbreak. This review article is written with the benefit of hindsight and experience from the largest recorded Ebola outbreak in history. We have provided a broad overview of the issues that arise for pregnant women and for the professionals treating them during an Ebola outbreak. The discussion focuses on the specifics of Ebola infection in pregnancy and possible management strategies, including the delivery of an infected woman. We have also discussed the wider challenges posed to pregnant women and their carers during an epidemic, including the identification of suspected Ebola-infected pregnant women and the impact of the disease on pre-existing health services. This paper outlines current practices in the field, as well as highlighting the gaps in our knowledge and the paramount need to protect the health-care workers directly involved in the management of pregnant women. PMID:26457118

  6. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  7. Sequential Bottlenecks Drive Viral Evolution in Early Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kerensa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Pham, Son T.; Chopra, Abha; Cameron, Barbara; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J.; White, Peter A.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection. PMID:21912520

  8. [Emerging viral diseases in Europe].

    PubMed

    Löbermann, M; Gürtler, L G; Eichler-Löbermann, B; Reisinger, E C

    2012-04-01

    Emergence of viral agents in Europe is influenced by various factors. Climatic changes influencing possible vectors, insufficient vaccination, and travel of man and goods are among the most important reasons to explain these changes. Fever and arthralgia are the leading symptoms in infection with Dengue, Sindbis, or Chikungunya virus. In contrast, tick-born encephalitis (TBE), Toscana, or West Nile virus infections mainly lead to meningo-encephalitis. In Europe, hemorrhagic fever is caused by Crimean Congo and Hanta virus. Protective vaccines are available for emerging viral agents like TBE, influenza and measles.

  9. Viral antibodies in the CSF after acute CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Cappel, R; Thiry, L; Clinet, G

    1975-09-01

    Viral antibodies were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 25 patients having acute viral central nervous system (CNS) infections, and from 39 control patients. The results, collected two weeks after the clinical onset, revealed the presence of antibodies in nine of 13 (69%) CSF specimens from patients suffering from encephalitis of myelitis, and in only one of nine (11%) of the CSF samples of those presenting a viral meningitis infection. This difference was statistically significant and suggests that the titration of viral antibodies in the CSF can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of viral CNS infection. Our data also suggest that localized production of antibodies occurs during the course of acute CNS infections, and that the respiratory syncytial virus can be associated with CNS infections in man.

  10. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kitulwatte, Indira D; Kim, Patrick J H; Pollanen, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis. A 48-year-old previously healthy male was found dead in his locked apartment. At autopsy he was found to be malnourished, and his lungs showed gross evidence of bilateral pneumonia with abscess formation and bullous emphysema. Multiple petechial hemorrhages were observed in the brain and mainly involved white matter in the cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Microscopy of the brain and spinal cord revealed perivenular hemorrhages, central microthrombi in venules with fibrin exudation into the subcortical white matter, and early perivenular demyelination associated with scanty mixed cellular infiltrates. Other microscopic features included widespread diffuse viral myocarditis, extensive suppurative bronchopneumonia, and chronic bronchitis. This case illustrates the death of a man with a rare fatal disease associated with two other potentially lethal diseases. The case also illustrates the importance of a holistic approach when determining the cause of death, especially when there are competing causes of death. PMID:26148811

  11. Emerging viral diseases in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Moal, Valérie; Zandotti, Christine; Colson, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are the most important cause of infections and a major source of mortality in Kidney Transplant Recipients (KTRs). These patients may acquire viral infections through exogenous routes including community exposure, donor organs, and blood products or by endogenous reactivation of latent viruses. Beside major opportunistic infections due to CMV and EBV and viral hepatitis B and C, several viral diseases have recently emerged in KTRs. New medical practices or technologies, implementation of new diagnostic tools, and improved medical information have contributed to the emergence of these viral diseases in this special population. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on emerging viral diseases and newly discovered viruses in KTRs over the last two decades. We identified viruses in the field of KT that had shown the greatest increase in numbers of citations in the NCBI PubMed database. BKV was the most cited in the literature and linked to an emerging disease that represents a great clinical concern in KTRs. HHV-8, PVB19, WNV, JCV, H1N1 influenza virus A, HEV, and GB virus were the main other emerging viruses. Excluding HHV8, newly discovered viruses have been infrequently linked to clinical diseases in KTRs. Nonetheless, pathogenicity can emerge long after the discovery of the causative agent, as has been the case for BKV. Overall, antiviral treatments are very limited, and reducing immunosuppressive therapy remains the cornerstone of management. PMID:23132728

  12. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  13. Immune activation and viral burden in acute disease induced by simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14: correlation between in vitro and in vivo events.

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, R; Fultz, P N

    1994-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmmPBj14 (SIV-PBj14) is an atypical lentivirus that causes acute disease and death in pig-tailed macaques and in vitro replicates efficiently in resting macaque lymphocytes and activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that production of large quantities of SIV-PBj14 induces widespread immune activation and elaboration of cytokines which lead directly to the death of infected pig-tailed macaques. Following intravenous inoculation of pig-tailed macaques with SIV-PBj14, acute disease developed and was characterized by high levels of plasma viremia, p27gag antigenemia, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). All animals died within 10 days of infection, at which time some animals had as many as 100% CD4+ cells in the periphery and lymphoid tissues infected. During the last few days before death, titers of infectious virus in blood increased as much as 10(5)-fold. By using dual-label immunofluorescence assays for detection of cell surface activation markers, both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were shown to express the IL-2 and transferrin receptors following either in vivo or in vitro infection with SIV-PBj14. Furthermore, in vitro infection of quiescent macaque lymphocytes by SIV-PBj14 was accompanied by proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets, as measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine. Increases in numbers of activated lymphocytes and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma coincided with increased amounts of detectable virus in vivo. Clinical signs of disease and pathologic findings were most consistent with death from a shock-like syndrome, in which acute-phase inflammatory cytokines are known to play a major role. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-2, and IL-6 were detected in some cultures infected with SIV-PBj14, but this finding was not consistent. When cytokines were detected, their concentrations were essentially no different

  14. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  15. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  16. Viral upper respiratory tract infections in young children with emphasis on acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Hovi, Tapani; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2006-08-01

    Viral upper respiratory infection is the most common reason for seeking medical care for children. Recurrent viral respiratory infections and subsequent complications (e.g. acute otitis media (AOM)) are a burden for children, their families and society. Over the past decade, our knowledge on the significance of respiratory viruses has broadened remarkably. Viruses cause large variety of respiratory diseases and cause alone diseases, which previously have been assumed to be bacterial only (e.g. AOM and pneumonia). Methods for detection analysis of respiratory viruses are developing making both the diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of respiratory infections easier. Accurate diagnosis of respiratory infections and awareness of possible viral etiology could reduce the use of antibiotics. Etiologic studies of viral infections are becoming increasingly important, with the emergence of new antiviral drugs and vaccines.

  17. Countermeasures against viral diseases of farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Kibenge, Frederick S B; Godoy, Marcos G; Fast, Mark; Workenhe, Samuel; Kibenge, Molly J T

    2012-09-01

    Farmed fish provide an increasing fraction of the human food supply, and are of major economic importance in many countries. As in the case of terrestrial agriculture, bringing together large numbers of animals of a single species (i.e., monoculture) increases the risk of infectious disease outbreaks, including viral infections. Aquaculture, in which farmed fish are kept at high population densities in close proximity with wild fish reservoirs, is ideal for the emergence of wild-type pathogens that exist benignly in local wild fish and/or the spreading of aquatic pathogens to wild fish that enter into or come into close proximity with net cages and with fish escaping from them. This paper provides a general review for the nonspecialist of viral diseases of farmed fish and how they could be prevented or treated. It has five principal objectives: (1) to provide an update on the most important and emerging viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture; (2) to review general aspects of innate antiviral defense against virus infections in fish, including recent advances in antiviral signaling; (3) to discuss current principles and practices of vaccinating fish; (4) to review antiviral drugs that have activity against viruses of farmed fish, and current barriers to employing them in aquaculture; and (5) to discuss the growing use of "functional feeds" in salmonid aquaculture to mitigate viral diseases. In conclusion, despite the challenging aquatic environment, it is expected that well thought-out combinations of vaccination and immunostimulants and/or antiviral drugs could provide solid protection against viral diseases of farmed fish.

  18. Viral diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Phillip A; McGavern, Dorian B

    2015-04-01

    Virus-induced diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent a significant burden to human health worldwide. The complexity of these diseases is influenced by the sheer number of different neurotropic viruses, the diverse routes of CNS entry, viral tropism, and the immune system. Using a combination of human pathological data and experimental animal models, we have begun to uncover many of the mechanisms that viruses use to enter the CNS and cause disease. This review highlights a selection of neurotropic viruses that infect the CNS and explores the means by which they induce neurological diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis.

  19. The Association of Viral Hepatitis and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.; Olsen, Harvey; Swanson, Virginia; Rinderknecht, Heinrich

    1972-01-01

    The histological features of 24 pancreases obtained from patients who died of causes other than hepatitis, pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors, included a variable degree of autolysis, rare foci of inflammatory reaction but no hemorrhagic fat necrosis or destruction of elastic tissue in vessel walls (elastolysis). Assays of elastase in extracts of these pancreases showed no free enzyme, but varying amounts of proelastase. A review of autopsy findings in 33 patients with fatal liver necrosis attributed to halothane anesthesia, demonstrated changes of acute pancreatitis only in two. On the other hand, a review of 16 cases of fulminant viral hepatitis revealed changes characteristic of acute pancreatitis in seven – interstitial edema, hemorrhagic fat necrosis, inflammatory reaction and frequently elastolysis in vessel walls. Determination of elastase in extracts of one pancreas showed the bulk of the enzyme in free form. Furthermore, assays of urinary amylase in 44 patients with viral hepatitis showed increased levels of this enzyme (2583 ± 398 mean value ± standard error, Somogyi units per 100 ml in 13, or 29.5 percent). The evidence suggests that acute pancreatitis may at times complicate viral hepatitis. Although direct proof of viral pancreatic involvement is not feasible at present, a rational hypothesis is advanced which underlines similar mechanisms of tissue involvement in both liver and pancreas that may be brought about by the hepatitis viruses. PMID:5070694

  20. Pathophysiology of Clinical Symptoms in Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the pathophysiology of common symptoms of acute viral respiratory infections (e.g., sneezing, nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, muscle pains, malaise, and mood changes). Since clinical symptoms are not sufficient to determine the etiology of viral respiratory tract infections, we believe that the host defense mechanisms are critical for the symptomatology. Consequently, this review of literature is focused on the pathophysiology of respiratory symptoms regardless of their etiology. We assume that despite a high prevalence of symptoms of respiratory infection, their pathogenesis is not widely known. A better understanding of the symptoms' pathogenesis could improve the quality of care for patients with respiratory tract infections.

  1. Neuroprotection mediated by inhibition of calpain during acute viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Mirchia, Kanish; Sauer, Brian M.; McGovern, Renee M.; Reid, Joel M.; Buenz, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic complications associated with viral encephalitis, including seizures and cognitive impairment, are a global health issue, especially in children. We previously showed that hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection in mice is associated with calpain activation and is the result of neuronal death triggered by brain-infiltrating inflammatory monocytes. We therefore hypothesized that treatment with a calpain inhibitor would protect neurons from immune-mediated bystander injury. C57BL/6J mice infected with the Daniel’s strain of Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus were treated with the FDA-approved drug ritonavir using a dosing regimen that resulted in plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range for calpain inhibition. Ritonavir treatment significantly reduced calpain activity in the hippocampus, protected hippocampal neurons from death, preserved cognitive performance, and suppressed seizure escalation, even when therapy was initiated 36 hours after disease onset. Calpain inhibition by ritonavir may be a powerful tool for preserving neurons and cognitive function and preventing neural circuit dysregulation in humans with neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:27345730

  2. Viral PCR positivity in stool before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is strongly associated with acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    van Montfrans, Joris; Schulz, Laura; Versluys, Birgitta; de Wildt, Arianne; Wolfs, Tom; Bierings, Marc; Gerhardt, Corinne; Lindemans, Caroline; Wensing, Anne; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2015-04-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) can be triggered by inflammatory conditions, including infections and mucositis. We investigated the association between PCR positivity for gastrointestinal (GI) viruses in stool before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and intestinal aGVHD using Cox proportional hazard models. We included 48 consecutive HCT patients (28 with malignancies and 20 with nonmalignancies) without GI symptoms before HCT. Fifteen patients were GI virus positive: 9 adenovirus, 3 norovirus, 2 parechovirus, and 1 astrovirus. Overall survival was 58% ± 8%. The cumulative incidence of aGVHD grade 2 to 4 was 43% ± 8% (n = 18) after a median of 47 days (range, 14 to 140). In univariate analysis, GI virus PCR positivity was the only predictor for aGVHD (P = .008): within the group of GI virus PCR-positive patients, the cumulative incidence of aGVHD 2 to 4 was 70% ± 12% versus 29 ± 8% in the PCR-negative group (P = .004). In conclusion, GI virus PCR positivity before HCT predicted development of intestinal aGVHD. These results may ultimately affect monitoring, aGVHD prophylaxis, and treatment, as well as rescheduling of elective HCTs.

  3. Viral diseases in Ethiopia: a review.

    PubMed

    Aseffa, A

    1993-10-01

    Ethiopia is endemic for many viral diseases. Serosurveys have demonstrated the high prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus. There are also indications of high transmission for hepatitis C, hepatitis E and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The population is exposed to poliomyelitis, hepatitis A, measles, rubella and mumps early in life. Rotaviral diarrhoea is an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Vast areas of the country are endemic for yellow fever and rabies. The extent of many other viral diseases in the country is unknown. There is a need for a well organised national laboratory to assess the impact of vaccination efforts and to support control as well as surveillance measures within the country.

  4. Viral diseases in Ethiopia: a review.

    PubMed

    Aseffa, A

    1993-10-01

    Ethiopia is endemic for many viral diseases. Serosurveys have demonstrated the high prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus. There are also indications of high transmission for hepatitis C, hepatitis E and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The population is exposed to poliomyelitis, hepatitis A, measles, rubella and mumps early in life. Rotaviral diarrhoea is an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Vast areas of the country are endemic for yellow fever and rabies. The extent of many other viral diseases in the country is unknown. There is a need for a well organised national laboratory to assess the impact of vaccination efforts and to support control as well as surveillance measures within the country. PMID:8187657

  5. [Global threats from emerging viral diseases].

    PubMed

    Chastel, Claude

    2007-11-01

    Emerging viral diseases are nothing new. Smallpox probably reached Europe from Asia in the 5th century, and yellow fever emerged in the Americas during the 16th century as a consequence of the African slave trade. Dengue fever arose simultaneously in South-East Asia, Africa, and North America during the 18th century. In 1918-1919 the so-called Spanish flu spread like wildfire through all five continents, killing between 25 and 40 million people. The second half of the 20th century saw the emergence of HIV/AIDS (1981), among other viral diseases. Even more worrying is the fact that emerging and re-emerging viral diseases have had a tendency to spread more quickly and more widely during the last decade, invading whole countries and continents; witness the recent outbreaks of Nipah virus, West Nile, Rift Valley fever, SARS, monkeypox, avian flu (H5N1) and Chikungunya. The complex factors underlying these new trends are briefly discussed.

  6. Acute pancreatitis associated with acute viral hepatitis A (HAV) - a case report.

    PubMed

    Arafat, S M; Azad, A K; Basher, A; Ananna, M A; Islam, M S; Abdullah, S; Abdullah, A M; Islam, M A

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, a young woman had acute viral hepatitis (HAV) and acute pancreatitis together. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, jaundice and abdominal pain. Hepatic and pancreatic enzymes were elevated. Her serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was high. An initial abdominal ultrasound was per-formed at hospital and revealed features of acute viral hepatitis. Spiral computed imaging revealed imaging features of an acute stage of pancreatitis and gallbladder wall thickness. HAV infection was diagnosed by the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) against HAV in the serum. She was closely monitored and treated conservatively. On 10th day of hospital admission she was discharge after an uneventful recovery. In the current literature HAV infections have rarely been reported as a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  7. Vaccines for viral diseases with dermatologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    Vaccines against infectious diseases have been available since the 1800s, when an immunization strategy against smallpox developed by Jenner gained wide acceptance. Until recently, the only vaccination strategies available involved the use of protein-based, whole killed, and attenuated live virus vaccines. These strategies have led to the development of effective vaccines against a variety of diseases with primary or prominent cutaneous manifestations. Effective and safe vaccines now used worldwide include those directed against measles and rubella (now commonly used together with a mumps vaccine as the trivalent MMR), chickenpox, and hepatitis B. The eradication of naturally occurring smallpox remains one of the greatest successes in the history of modern medicine, but stockpiles of live smallpox exist in the United States and Russia. Renewed interest in the smallpox vaccine reflects concerns about a possible bioterrorist threat using this virus. Yellow fever is a hemorrhagic virus endemic to tropical areas of South America and Africa. An effective vaccine for this virus has existed since 1937, and it is used widely in endemic areas of South America, and to a lesser extent in Africa. This vaccine is recommended once every 10 years for people who are traveling to endemic areas. Advances in immunology have led to a greater understanding of immune system function in viral diseases. Progress in genetics and molecular biology has allowed researchers to design vaccines with novel mechanisms of action (eg, DNA, vector, and VLP vaccines). Vaccines have also been designed to specifically target particular viral components, allowing for stimulation of various arms of the immune system as desired. Ongoing research shows promise in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination for viral infections with cutaneous manifestations. Further studies are necessary before vaccines for HSV, HPV, and HIV become commercially available.

  8. Vaccines for viral diseases with dermatologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Brentjens, Mathijs H; Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    Vaccines against infectious diseases have been available since the 1800s, when an immunization strategy against smallpox developed by Jenner gained wide acceptance. Until recently, the only vaccination strategies available involved the use of protein-based, whole killed, and attenuated live virus vaccines. These strategies have led to the development of effective vaccines against a variety of diseases with primary or prominent cutaneous manifestations. Effective and safe vaccines now used worldwide include those directed against measles and rubella (now commonly used together with a mumps vaccine as the trivalent MMR), chickenpox, and hepatitis B. The eradication of naturally occurring smallpox remains one of the greatest successes in the history of modern medicine, but stockpiles of live smallpox exist in the United States and Russia. Renewed interest in the smallpox vaccine reflects concerns about a possible bioterrorist threat using this virus. Yellow fever is a hemorrhagic virus endemic to tropical areas of South America and Africa. An effective vaccine for this virus has existed since 1937, and it is used widely in endemic areas of South America, and to a lesser extent in Africa. This vaccine is recommended once every 10 years for people who are traveling to endemic areas. Advances in immunology have led to a greater understanding of immune system function in viral diseases. Progress in genetics and molecular biology has allowed researchers to design vaccines with novel mechanisms of action (eg, DNA, vector, and VLP vaccines). Vaccines have also been designed to specifically target particular viral components, allowing for stimulation of various arms of the immune system as desired. Ongoing research shows promise in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination for viral infections with cutaneous manifestations. Further studies are necessary before vaccines for HSV, HPV, and HIV become commercially available. PMID:12757257

  9. Viral hepatitis: a sexually transmitted disease?

    PubMed

    Buzby, M

    1996-03-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are often discussed in the context of herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and AIDS. Viral hepatitis, specifically hepatitis B, is also an STD often omitted from these discussions. The incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is variable throughout the world. In North America, the highest incidence occurs in patients who are between the ages of 15 and 25 years. Safe and effective vaccines are available to prevent HBV infection, which has an associated increased risk of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in the carrier state. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a newly identified hepatotrophic virus that may also be sexually transmitted. There are no vaccines for the prevention of HCV infection and the majority of those who are infected become chronic carriers with chronic liver disease. Discussions focused on the prevention of STDs must include counseling for the prevention of HBV and HCV. PMID:8788658

  10. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  11. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation. PMID:3727398

  12. Update on viral diseases of the equine respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, James R; Bailey, Kirsten E; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Hartley, Carol A

    2015-04-01

    Many viral agents have been associated with respiratory disease of the horse. The most important viral causes of respiratory disease in horses are equine influenza and the equine alphaherpesviruses. Agents such as equine viral arteritis virus, African horse sickness virus, and Hendra virus establish systemic infections. Clinical signs of disease resulting from infection with these agents can manifest as respiratory disease, but the respiratory tract is not the major body system affected by these viruses. Treatment of viral respiratory disease is generally limited to supportive therapies, whereas targeted antimicrobial therapy is effective in cases of bacterial infection.

  13. Role of pentraxin 3 in shaping arthritogenic alphaviral disease: from enhanced viral replication to immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Foo, Suan-Sin; Chen, Weiqiang; Taylor, Adam; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Yu, Xing; Teng, Terk-Shin; Reading, Patrick C; Blanchard, Helen; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Ng, Lisa F P; Herrero, Lara J; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2015-02-01

    The rising prevalence of arthritogenic alphavirus infections, including chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Ross River virus (RRV), and the lack of antiviral treatments highlight the potential threat of a global alphavirus pandemic. The immune responses underlying alphavirus virulence remain enigmatic. We found that pentraxin 3 (PTX3) was highly expressed in CHIKV and RRV patients during acute disease. Overt expression of PTX3 in CHIKV patients was associated with increased viral load and disease severity. PTX3-deficient (PTX3(-/-)) mice acutely infected with RRV exhibited delayed disease progression and rapid recovery through diminished inflammatory responses and viral replication. Furthermore, binding of the N-terminal domain of PTX3 to RRV facilitated viral entry and replication. Thus, our study demonstrates the pivotal role of PTX3 in shaping alphavirus-triggered immunity and disease and provides new insights into alphavirus pathogenesis. PMID:25695775

  14. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  15. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  16. Acute viral infections of upper respiratory tract in elderly people living in the community: comparative, prospective, population based study of disease burden.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, K. G.; Kent, J.; Hammersley, V.; Cancio, E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the disease burden of upper respiratory infections in elderly people living at home. DESIGN: Prospective surveillance of elderly people. INTERVENTION: None. SETTING: Leicestershire, England SUBJECTS: 533 subjects 60 to 90 years of age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pathogens, symptoms, restriction of activity, duration of illness, medical consultations, interval between onset of illness and medical consultation, antibiotic use, admission to hospital, and death. RESULTS: 231 pathogens were identified for 211 (43%) of 497 episodes for which diagnostic specimens were available: 121 (52%) were rhinoviruses, 59 (26%) were coronaviruses, 22 (9.5%) were influenza A or B, 17 (7%) were respiratory syncytial virus, 7 (3%) were parainfluenza viruses, and 3 (1%) were Chlamydia species; an adenovirus and Mycoplasma pneumoniae caused one infection each. Infections occurred at a rate of 1.2 episodes per person per annum (95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.7; range 0-10) and were clinically indistinguishable. Lower respiratory tract symptoms complicated 65% of upper respiratory infections and increased the medical consultation rate 2.4-fold (chi 2 test P < 0.001). The median interval between onset of illness and medical consultation was 3 days for influenza and 5 days for other infections. Rhinoviruses caused the greatest disease burden overall followed by episodes of unknown aetiology, coronaviruses, influenza A and B, and respiratory syncytial virus. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory viruses cause substantial morbidity in elderly people. Although respiratory syncytial virus and influenza cause considerable individual morbidity, the burden of disease from rhinovirus infections and infections of unknown aetiology seems greater overall. The interval between onset of illness and consultation together with diagnostic difficulties raises concern regarding the role of antiviral drugs in treating influenza. PMID:9366736

  17. Acute viral bronchiolitis in South Africa: Strategies for management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zar, H J; Madhi, S A; White, D A; Masekela, R; Risenga, S; Lewis, H; Feldman, C; Morrow, B; Jeena, P

    2016-04-01

    Management of acute viral bronchiolitis is largely supportive. There is currently no proven effective therapy other than oxygen for hypoxic children. The evidence indicates that there is no routine benefit from inhaled, rapid short-acting bronchodilators, adrenaline or ipratropium bromide for children with acute viral bronchiolitis. Likewise, there is no demonstrated benefit from routine use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids, inhaled hypertonic saline nebulisation, montelukast or antibiotics. The last should be reserved for children with severe disease, when bacterial co-infection is suspected. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease remains a challenge. A specific RSV monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, administered as an intramuscular injection, is available for children at risk of severe bronchiolitis, including premature infants, young children with chronic lung disease, immunodeficiency, or haemodynamically significant congenital heart disease. Prophylaxis should be commenced at the start of the RSV season and given monthly during the season. The development of an RSV vaccine may offer a more effective alternative to prevent disease, for which the results of clinical trials are awaited. Education of parents or caregivers and healthcare workers about diagnostic and management strategies should include the following: bronchiolitis is caused by a virus; it is seasonal; it may start as an upper respiratory tract infection with low-grade fever; symptoms are cough and wheeze, often with fast breathing; antibiotics are generally not needed; and the condition is usually self limiting, although symptoms may occur for up to four weeks in some children. PMID:27303780

  18. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Winton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. PMID:20409453

  19. Clinical course and management of acute and chronic viral hepatitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Licata, A; Ingrassia, D; Serruto, A; Soresi, M; Giannitrapani, L; Montalto, G; Craxì, A; Almasio, P L

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy is a para-physiologic condition, which usually evolves without any complications in the majority of women, even if in some circumstances moderate or severe clinical problems can also occur. Among complications occurring during the second and the third trimester very important are those considered as concurrent to pregnancy such as hyperemesis gravidarum, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The liver diseases concurrent to pregnancy typically occur at specific times during the gestation and they may lead to significant maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Commonly, delivery of the foetus, even preterm, usually terminates the progression of these disorders. All chronic liver diseases, such as chronic viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson's disease, and cirrhosis of different aetiologies may cause liver damage, independently from pregnancy. In this review we will also comment the clinical implications of pregnancies occurring in women who received a orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) Therefore, the management of immunosuppressive therapy before and after the delivery in women who received liver transplant is becoming a relevant clinical issue. Finally, we will focus on acute and chronic viral hepatitis occurring during pregnancy, on management of advanced liver disease and we will review the literature on the challenging issue regarding pregnancy and OLT.

  20. [Epidemiologic features of acute viral respiratory infections in familial foci].

    PubMed

    Lidina, P V; Mironovskaia, A V

    1977-03-01

    A study was made of the epidemiological peculiarities of viral respiratory infections of various etiology in the familial foci with the use of a methodical approach permitting to detect the true spread of infection in the familial foci, with consideration to the subclinical forme fruste of the disease and "carrier state". It appeared that in the familial foci the infectiousness of the majority of respiratory viral infections was greater than in the closed collective bodies uniting persons of the same age. The age composition of the family influences the manifestness (particularly in parainfluenza infection) and the intensity of the epidemic process characterized by the coefficient of the secondary affections. The type of the apartment, the floor on which it is located, and the number of persons residing in it had no significant influence on the spread of the viral infections in the familial foci. A definite role in this process is played by the level of specific serum antibodies in the members of the family surrounding the patient. The association of morbidity level with the antibody level proved to be the most distinct in children with influenza and adenoviral infection; this association was less significant in adults. PMID:193325

  1. Global trends in emerging viral diseases of wildlife origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Ip, Hon S.

    2015-01-01

    The following article provides examples of recently emerged viral diseases of wildlife origin. The examples have been selected to illustrate the drivers of emerging viral diseases, both novel pathogens and previously known diseases, the impacts of these diseases, as well as the role of wildlife both as “villains” or reservoirs as well as “victims” of these viral diseases. The article also discusses potential management strategies for emerging viral diseases in wildlife populations and future science directions in wildlife health to prevent, prepare, respond to, and recover from these disease events. Finally, the concept of One Health and its potential role in developing solutions to these issues of mutual concern is discussed.

  2. Effects of chloroquine on viral infections: an old drug against today's diseases?

    PubMed

    Savarino, Andrea; Boelaert, Johan R; Cassone, Antonio; Majori, Giancarlo; Cauda, Roberto

    2003-11-01

    Chloroquine is a 9-aminoquinoline known since 1934. Apart from its well-known antimalarial effects, the drug has interesting biochemical properties that might be applied against some viral infections. Chloroquine exerts direct antiviral effects, inhibiting pH-dependent steps of the replication of several viruses including members of the flaviviruses, retroviruses, and coronaviruses. Its best-studied effects are those against HIV replication, which are being tested in clinical trials. Moreover, chloroquine has immunomodulatory effects, suppressing the production/release of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, which mediate the inflammatory complications of several viral diseases. We review the available information on the effects of chloroquine on viral infections, raising the question of whether this old drug may experience a revival in the clinical management of viral diseases such as AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome, which afflict mankind in the era of globalisation.

  3. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL), therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate that mucosal immune

  4. [World epidemiological situation: viral disease incidence (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, F

    1981-01-01

    The importance of viral disease, although estimated with difficulty, seems very large in human pathology. Viruses appear to be involved in most of respiratory disease. Moreover, in tropical countries, measles and viral diarrhoeas (mainly rotaviruses) are fatal for many children. But smallpox eradication must be considered as the most important fact which occurred in the field during the last five years, and the consequences of this new situation are discussed. Finally, beyond the recent question of african viral haemorrhagic fevers, one must take in account the increasing prevalence of several arboviruses, specially dengue in southeast Asia, which is one of the first causes of paediatric mortality in urban environment.

  5. [Efficacy of piracetam treatment of acute viral neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Niss, A I; Umanskiĭ, K G; Maksutova, E L; Rudometov, Iu P

    1985-01-01

    Piracetam influence on the depth of consciousness loss and psychic function recovery was examined in two groups of 30 patients (study and control) selected at random. The study was carried out in conditions of a specialized department for patients with acute virus neuroinfections. Accelerated periods of egress from unconsciousness (including coma), high rate of reduction of psychoorganic and somatovegetative disorders followed by successful rehabilitation were characteristic of patients given piracetam from the disease onset. The results obtained permit recommending piracetam for wide use in neuroinfections.

  6. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Cori, Anne; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements. PMID:27367230

  7. A Novel Host-Proteome Signature for Distinguishing between Acute Bacterial and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Oved, Kfir; Cohen, Asi; Boico, Olga; Navon, Roy; Friedman, Tom; Etshtein, Liat; Kriger, Or; Bamberger, Ellen; Fonar, Yura; Yacobov, Renata; Wolchinsky, Ron; Denkberg, Galit; Dotan, Yaniv; Hochberg, Amit; Reiter, Yoram; Grupper, Moti; Srugo, Isaac; Feigin, Paul; Gorfine, Malka; Chistyakov, Irina; Dagan, Ron; Klein, Adi; Potasman, Israel; Eden, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and viral infections are often clinically indistinguishable, leading to inappropriate patient management and antibiotic misuse. Bacterial-induced host proteins such as procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and Interleukin-6, are routinely used to support diagnosis of infection. However, their performance is negatively affected by inter-patient variability, including time from symptom onset, clinical syndrome, and pathogens. Our aim was to identify novel viral-induced host proteins that can complement bacterial-induced proteins to increase diagnostic accuracy. Initially, we conducted a bioinformatic screen to identify putative circulating host immune response proteins. The resulting 600 candidates were then quantitatively screened for diagnostic potential using blood samples from 1002 prospectively recruited patients with suspected acute infectious disease and controls with no apparent infection. For each patient, three independent physicians assigned a diagnosis based on comprehensive clinical and laboratory investigation including PCR for 21 pathogens yielding 319 bacterial, 334 viral, 112 control and 98 indeterminate diagnoses; 139 patients were excluded based on predetermined criteria. The best performing host-protein was TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 0.91), which was consistently up-regulated in viral infected patients. We further developed a multi-protein signature using logistic-regression on half of the patients and validated it on the remaining half. The signature with the highest precision included both viral- and bacterial-induced proteins: TRAIL, Interferon gamma-induced protein-10, and CRP (AUC of 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96). The signature was superior to any of the individual proteins (P<0.001), as well as routinely used clinical parameters and their combinations (P<0.001). It remained robust across different physiological systems, times from symptom

  8. Emergence of viral diseases: mathematical modeling as a tool for infection control, policy and decision making.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2010-08-01

    Mathematical modeling can be used for the development and implementation of infection control policy to combat outbreaks and epidemics of communicable viral diseases. Here an outline is provided of basic concepts and approaches used in mathematical modeling and parameterization of disease transmission. The use of mathematical models is illustrated, using the 2001 UK foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic, the 2003 global severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and human influenza pandemics, as examples. This provides insights in the strengths, limitations, and weaknesses of the various models, and demonstrates their potential for supporting policy and decision making. PMID:20218764

  9. Emergence of viral diseases: mathematical modeling as a tool for infection control, policy and decision making.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2010-08-01

    Mathematical modeling can be used for the development and implementation of infection control policy to combat outbreaks and epidemics of communicable viral diseases. Here an outline is provided of basic concepts and approaches used in mathematical modeling and parameterization of disease transmission. The use of mathematical models is illustrated, using the 2001 UK foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic, the 2003 global severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and human influenza pandemics, as examples. This provides insights in the strengths, limitations, and weaknesses of the various models, and demonstrates their potential for supporting policy and decision making.

  10. The role of respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Klein, B S; Dollete, F R; Yolken, R H

    1982-07-01

    We utilized recently developed enzyme immunoassay techniques to examine the role of selected viruses in the etiology of acute otitis media. Viral pathogens were found in middle ear fluids obtained from 13 (24%) of 53 children with acute otitis media; respiratory syncytial virus accounted for ten of the 13 viral agents identified. In addition, respiratory syncytial viral antigen was found in nasopharyngeal washings obtained from 15 of the 53 children. Seven of these children had RSV identified as the sole middle ear pathogen, whereas six children had otitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae as either the sole middle ear pathogen or in combination with RSV. Similarly, all three children with respiratory infections caused by influenza virus had ear infections caused by bacterial pathogens, either alone or in combination with influenza virus. These findings suggest that, in patients with viral respiratory infection, coexisting acute otitis media may be associated with the recovery of either viruses or bacteria from the middle ear exudates.

  11. Viral load and acute otitis media development after human metapneumovirus upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Patel, Janak A; Loeffelholz, Michael; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-07-01

    The role of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection (URI) was studied. Nasopharyngeal specimens from 700 URI episodes in 200 children were evaluated; 47 (7%) were positive for hMPV, 25 (3.6%) with hMPV as the only virus. Overall, 24% of URI episodes with hMPV only were complicated by acute otitis media, which was the lowest rate compared with other respiratory viruses. hMPV viral load was significantly higher in children with fever, but there was no difference in viral load in children with hMPV-positive URI with or without acute otitis media complication.

  12. [Social determinants and risk of acute viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Malvasio, P; Russo, R; Zotti, C; Vigna, I; Ruggenini Moiraghi, A

    1998-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between viral hepatitis risk and social determinants in Piedmont region population surveyed by SEIEVA (sistema epidemiologico integrato dell'epatite virale acuta). The education and the working position showed different correlation with incidence rates of different types of viral hepatitis A, B, non-A non-B. The hepatitis A risk is proportional to education and the probability of hepatitis B and non-A non-B is higher in low social classes. This situation is only apparently a balanced risk: the clinical seriousness and the strong probability of complications of hepatitis B and non-A non-B make the risks deeply unequal.

  13. Fulminant bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome associated with viral encephalitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunkui; Zhu, Lijun; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common cause of acute viral encephalitis. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding eye disease that may be induced by HSV. The present case study reports the very rare case of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) combined with acute retinal necrosis (ARN). A 47-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with persistent high fever and somnolence for 5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signals in the right medial temporal lobes, and HSV-1 was identified in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Five days later, despite treatment with intravenous acyclovir and partial improvement in consciousness, the patient suddenly developed blurred vision and bilateral visual pain. Fundus fluorescence angiography revealed bilateral vessel obstruction and flaky reduced fluorescence. ARN was diagnosed clinically. Dexamethasone was administered as an anti-inflammatory adjunct to intravenous acyclovir therapy. The visual acuity of the patient was reduced to mere light perception a further 4 days later. The present case indicates that HSE may be complicated with ARN, causing a reduction in visual acuity to mere light perception within a very short time.

  14. Fulminant bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome associated with viral encephalitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunkui; Zhu, Lijun; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common cause of acute viral encephalitis. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding eye disease that may be induced by HSV. The present case study reports the very rare case of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) combined with acute retinal necrosis (ARN). A 47-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with persistent high fever and somnolence for 5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signals in the right medial temporal lobes, and HSV-1 was identified in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Five days later, despite treatment with intravenous acyclovir and partial improvement in consciousness, the patient suddenly developed blurred vision and bilateral visual pain. Fundus fluorescence angiography revealed bilateral vessel obstruction and flaky reduced fluorescence. ARN was diagnosed clinically. Dexamethasone was administered as an anti-inflammatory adjunct to intravenous acyclovir therapy. The visual acuity of the patient was reduced to mere light perception a further 4 days later. The present case indicates that HSE may be complicated with ARN, causing a reduction in visual acuity to mere light perception within a very short time. PMID:27698716

  15. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, and climate change, bacterial and viral infections that were once unrecognized or uncommon are being seen more frequently in the Western Hemisphere. A delay in diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, and management of these emerging bacterial and viral diseases.

  16. Acute viral bronchiolitis in South Africa: Diagnostic flow.

    PubMed

    White, D A; Zar, H J; Madhi, S A; Jeena, P; Morrow, B; Masekela, R; Risenga, S; Green, R

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiolitis may be diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. In a young child, the diagnosis can be made on the clinical pattern of wheezing and hyperinflation. Clinical symptoms and signs typically start with an upper respiratory prodrome, including rhinorrhoea, low-grade fever, cough and poor feeding, followed 1 - 2 days later by tachypnoea, hyperinflation and wheeze as a consequence of airway inflammation and air trapping.The illness is generally self limiting, but may become more severe and include signs such as grunting, nasal flaring, subcostal chest wall retractions and hypoxaemia. The most reliable clinical feature of bronchiolitis is hyperinflation of the chest, evident by loss of cardiacdullness on percussion, an upper border of the liver pushed down to below the 6th intercostal space, and the presence of a Hoover sign(subcostal recession, which occurs when a flattened diaphragm pulls laterally against the lower chest wall).Measurement of peripheral arterial oxygen saturation is useful to indicate the need for supplemental oxygen. A saturation of <92% at sea level and 90% inland indicates that the child has to be admitted to hospital for supplemental oxygen. Chest radiographs are generally unhelpful and not required in children with a clear clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis.Blood tests are not needed routinely. Complete blood count tests have not been shown to be useful in diagnosing bronchiolitis or guiding its therapy. Routine measurement of C-reactive protein does not aid in management and nasopharyngeal aspirates are not usually done.Viral testing adds little to routine management. Risk factors in patients with severe bronchiolitis that require hospitalisation and may even cause death, include prematurity, congenital heart disease and congenital lung malformations. PMID:27303779

  17. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  18. History and prospects for viral disease eradication.

    PubMed

    de Quadros, Ciro A

    2002-10-01

    Edward Jenner first articulated the concept of eradication when he first inoculated the vaccinia. Before considering a disease for eradication some factors should be considered, such as the biological characteristics of the infectious agent: does the infectious agent infects only humans? Does it have a non-human reservoir and induce long-life immunity after infection? Is there a tool or intervention that effectively interrupts the chain of transmission from one individual to another? The first disease to be eradicated was smallpox. This extraordinary initiative set the example for any future disease eradication program. The eradication of polio from the Americas was launched in May 1985 and the Region of the Americas was certified polio-free in September 1994. At this same year, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) launched an initiative to eradicate measles from the Americas. Only 1,500 cases have been reported during the year 2000, and transmission was interrupted in most countries of the Region. Tremendous progress has been achieved in disease eradication efforts, which resulted in the global eradication of smallpox, the eradication of poliomyelitis from the Americas and its nearly global eradication, and the nearly complete eradication of measles from the Americas. The biotechnology revolution is providing us with many new vaccines and we have to continue the search for those diseases that could eventually be eradicated. Eradication of a disease brings the greatest health benefit, which is the absence of the health threat. It is also the quintessential example of health equity, as all mankind reaps the benefits, bringing eternal cost savings. As Louis Pasteur pointed out, "it is within the power of man to eradicate infection from the earth". PMID:12410345

  19. Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  20. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are highly prevalent, although most of these diseases develop and progress slowly, often unnoticed by the affected individual. However, a subgroup of these diseases include aggressive and acute forms that have a relatively low prevalence but show a rapid-course, high rate of progression leading to severe destruction of the periodontal tissues, or cause systemic symptoms that often require urgent attention from healthcare providers. Aggressive periodontitis is an early-onset, destructive disease that shows a high rate of periodontal progression and distinctive clinical features. A contemporary case definition of this disease is presented. Population studies show that the disease is more prevalent in certain geographic regions and ethnic groups. Aggressive periodontitis is an infectious disease, and recent data show that in affected subjects the subgingival microbiota is composed of a mixed microbial infection, with a wide heterogeneity in the types and proportions of microorganisms recovered. Furthermore, there are significant differences in the microbiota of the disease among different geographic regions and ethnicities. There is also evidence that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemycomitans-JP2 clone may play an important role in the development of the disease in certain populations. The host response plays an important role in the susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis, where the immune response may be complex and involve multiple mechanisms. Also, genetic factors seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease, but the mechanisms of increased susceptibility are complex and not yet fully understood. The available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations either in a few major genes or in multiple small-effect genes, and there is also evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Diagnostic methods for this disease, based on a specific microbiologic, immunologic or

  1. Pathogenesis of Viral Infection in Exacerbations of Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew I; Farne, Hugo A; Singanayagam, Aran; Jackson, David J; Mallia, Patrick; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-11-01

    Chronic airway diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and their prevalence is predicted to increase in the future. Respiratory viruses are the most common cause of acute pulmonary infection, and there is clear evidence of their role in acute exacerbations of inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Studies have reported impaired host responses to virus infection in these diseases, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of these abnormal immune responses has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for virus-induced exacerbations. The aim of this article is to review the current knowledge regarding the role of viruses and immune modulation in acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary diseases and to discuss exciting areas for future research and novel treatments.

  2. Viral Agents Causing Brown Cap Mushroom Disease of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Daniel; Green, Julian; Grogan, Helen; Burton, Kerry

    2015-10-01

    The symptoms of viral infections of fungi range from cryptic to severe, but there is little knowledge of the factors involved in this transition of fungal/viral interactions. Brown cap mushroom disease of the cultivated Agaricus bisporus is economically important and represents a model system to describe this transition. Differentially expressed transcript fragments between mushrooms showing the symptoms of brown cap mushroom disease and control white noninfected mushrooms have been identified and sequenced. Ten of these RNA fragments have been found to be upregulated over 1,000-fold between diseased and nondiseased tissue but are absent from the Agaricus bisporus genome sequence and hybridize to double-stranded RNAs extracted from diseased tissue. We hypothesize that these transcript fragments are viral and represent components of the disease-causing agent, a bipartite virus with similarities to the family Partitiviridae. The virus fragments were found at two distinct levels within infected mushrooms, at raised levels in infected, nonsymptomatic, white mushrooms and at much greater levels (3,500 to 87,000 times greater) in infected mushrooms exhibiting brown coloration. In addition, differential screening revealed 9 upregulated and 32 downregulated host Agaricus bisporus transcripts. Chromametric analysis was able to distinguish color differences between noninfected white mushrooms and white infected mushrooms at an early stage of mushroom growth. This method may be the basis for an "on-farm" disease detection assay.

  3. Epidemiology of the spread of viral diseases under aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander G

    2013-02-01

    Aquaculture production is increasing rapidly worldwide. However, production has been associated with the emergence of several novel diseases, including viral diseases, that have caused serious problems for producers. Using examples largely from salmon farming in Scotland I review briefly the factors that allow transmission to occur in aquaculture. These include transmission through the water, which is relatively local to the infected farm, and anthropogenic transports (such as transport of fish between sites) that may occur over very long distances. A Disease Management Area (DMA) approach, as developed in Scotland to fight infectious salmon anaemia, can be effective at reducing pathogen transmission and hence disease emergence.

  4. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kokki, I.; Smith, D.; Simmonds, P.; Ramalingam, S.; Wellington, L.; Willocks, L.; Johannessen, I.; Harvala, H.

    2015-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014). A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59%) had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70%) had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29%) had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%); three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion) are required. PMID:26904201

  5. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  6. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P < 0.05 by χ(2) test). Children with high respiratory syncytial virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  7. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to multiple hepatitis B virus polymerase epitopes during and after acute viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are thought to contribute to viral clearance and liver cell injury during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Using a strategy involving the in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with HBV-derived synthetic peptides containing HLA-A2.1, -A31, and -Aw68 binding motifs, we have previously described CTL responses to several epitopes within the HBV nucleocapsid and envelope antigens in patients with acute hepatitis. In this study we define six HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes located in the highly conserved reverse transcriptase and RNase H domains of the viral polymerase protein, and we show that the CTL response to polymerase is polyclonal, multispecific, and mediated by CD8+ T cells in patients with acute viral hepatitis, but that it is not detectable in patients with chronic HBV infection or uninfected healthy blood donors. Importantly, the peptide-activated CTL recognize target cells that express endogenously synthesized polymerase protein, suggesting that these peptides represent naturally processed viral epitopes. DNA sequence analysis of the viruses in patients who did not respond to peptide stimulation indicated that CTL nonresponsiveness was not due to infection by viral variants that differed in sequences from the synthetic peptides. CTL specific for one of the epitopes were unable to recognize several naturally occurring viral variants, except at high peptide concentration, underlining the HBV subtype specificity of this response. Furthermore, CTL responses against polymerase, core, and envelope epitopes were detectable for more than a year after complete clinical recovery and seroconversion, reflecting either the persistence of trace amounts of virus or the presence of long lived memory CTL in the absence of viral antigen. Finally, we demonstrated that wild type viral DNA and RNA can persist indefinitely, in trace quantities, in the serum and PBMC after complete clinical and serological recovery

  8. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  9. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  10. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available.

  11. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness.

  12. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  13. Prevention and control of viral diseases of salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.

    1976-01-01

    Three viral diseases of salmonids are of worldwide concern: infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), and infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN). Six principal approaches are being used to prevent or control these diseases: 1) preventing contact o the pathogen with the host, 2) environmental manipulation, 3) immunization, 4) chemotherapy, 5 selective breeding for disease resistance, and 6) reducing stress conditions which augment disease conditions. Preventing the introduction of a pathogen into a new stock of fish has been accomplished mainly by implementing stringent laws to prevent transport of infected fish into uninfected areas. Stocks of fish already infected are sometimes destroyed, and the hatchery is disinfected and restocked with fish free of specific pathogens. Environmental manipulation (elevated water temperature) has been successfully used to control IHN. Chemotherapeutics such as povidone-iodine for IPN and benzipyrene for IHN show promise of controlling mortalities; however, the practicality of using these drugs to eliminate the carrier fish has not been evaluated. Salmonids are capable of developing immune responses to viruses; however, development of effective vaccines, selective breeding for disease resistance, and identification of stress conditions which augment disease are still in the experimental phase.

  14. Viral, parasitic and prion diseases of farmed deer and bison.

    PubMed

    Haigh, J C; Mackintosh, C; Griffin, F

    2002-08-01

    The most important viral disease of farmed deer and bison is malignant catarrhal fever. The other herpesviruses which have been isolated from these species are briefly described. Other viral agents that are recognised in these animals, including adenovirus, parapox, foot and mouth disease, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, bovine virus diarrhoea, rotavirus and coronavirus, are also discussed. Ectoparasites of importance in this group in various parts of the world include a variety of ticks, as well as lice, keds, Oestridae, mange mites and fire ants. Helminth parasites include liver flukes (Fascioloides and Fasciola), gastrointestinal nematodes of the family Trichostrongylidae, pulmonary lungworms of the genus Dictyocaulus and extra-pulmonary lungworms of the family Protostrongylidae. Chronic wasting disease is principally important in North America, where the disease occurs in wild cervids in a limited area and has been reported in farmed deer in a small number of states in the United States of America and one province in Canada. These diseases are summarised in terms of their classification, epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, treatment and control. PMID:11974612

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of viral diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although most viral infections present with asymptomatic or subclinical manifestations, viruses may result in fatal complications in severe immunocompromised recipients. Reactivation of latent viruses, such as herpesviruses, is frequent during the immunosuppression that occurs with allo-HSCT. Viruses acquired from community, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses, are also important pathogens of post-transplant viral diseases. Currently, molecular diagnostic methods have replaced or supplemented traditional methods, such as viral culture and antigen detection, in diagnosis of viral infections. The utilization of polymerase chain reaction facilitates the early diagnosis. In view of lacking efficacious agents for treatment of viral diseases, prevention of viral infections is extremely valuable. Application of prophylactic strategies including preemptive therapy reduces viral infections and diseases. Adoptive cellular therapy for restoring virus-specific immunity is a promising method in the treatment of viral diseases. PMID:24341630

  16. Vaccines and Vaccination for Veterinary Viral Diseases: A General Overview.

    PubMed

    Brun, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A high number of infectious diseases affecting livestock and companion animals are caused by pathogens of viral etiology. Ensuring the maximum standards of quality and welfare in animal production requires developing effective tools to halt and prevent the spread of those infectious diseases affecting animal husbandry. To date, one of the best strategies is to implement vaccination policies whenever possible. However many of the currently manufactured vaccines relies in classical vaccine technologies (killed or attenuated vaccines) which, under some circumstances, may not be optimal in terms of safety or adequate for widespread application in disease-free countries at risk of disease introduction. One step ahead is needed to improve and adapt vaccine manufacturing to the use of new generation vaccine technologies already tested in experimental settings. Here we present in the context of animal viral diseases of veterinary interest, an overview of some current vaccine technologies that can be approached for virus pathogens with a brief insight in the type of immunity elicited.

  17. DNA vaccines against viral diseases of farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Øystein; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Immunization by an antigen-encoding DNA was approved for commercial sale in Canada against a Novirhabdovirus infection in fish. DNA vaccines have been particularly successful against the Novirhabdoviruses while there are reports on the efficacy against viral pathogens like infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, infectious salmon anemia virus, and lymphocystis disease virus and these are inferior to what has been attained for the novirhabdoviruses. Most recently, DNA vaccination of Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome virus was reported. Research efforts are now focused on the development of more effective vectors for DNA vaccines, improvement of vaccine efficacy against various viral diseases of fish for which there is currently no vaccines available and provision of co-expression of viral antigen and immunomodulatory compounds. Scientists are also in the process of developing new delivery methods. While a DNA vaccine has been approved for commercial use in farmed salmon in Canada, it is foreseen that it is still a long way to go before a DNA vaccine is approved for use in farmed fish in Europe.

  18. Viral biocontrol: grand experiments in disease emergence and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Although viral emergence is commonly associated with cross-species transmission, the processes and determinants of viral evolution in a novel host environment are poorly understood. We address key questions in virus emergence and evolution using data generated from two unique natural experiments: the deliberate release of myxoma virus (MYXV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) as biological control (biocontrol) agents against the European rabbit in Australia, and which have been of enormous benefit to Australia’s ecosystem and agricultural industries. Notably, although virulence evolution in MYXV and RHDV followed different trajectories, a strongly parallel evolutionary process was observed in Australia and Europe. These biocontrol agents were also characterised by a lack of transmission to non-target host species, suggesting that there are major barriers to successful emergence. PMID:25455418

  19. New DNA Viruses Identified in Patients with Acute Viral Infection Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morris S.; Kapoor, Amit; Lukashov, Vladimir V.; Simmonds, Peter; Hecht, Frederick; Delwart, Eric

    2005-01-01

    A sequence-independent PCR amplification method was used to identify viral nucleic acids in the plasma samples of 25 individuals presenting with symptoms of acute viral infection following high-risk behavior for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission. GB virus C/hepatitis G virus was identified in three individuals and hepatitis B virus in one individual. Three previously undescribed DNA viruses were also detected, a parvovirus and two viruses related to TT virus (TTV). Nucleic acids in human plasma that were distantly related to bacterial sequences or with no detectable similarities to known sequences were also found. Nearly complete viral genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of a new parvovirus distinct from known human and animal parvoviruses and of two related TTV-like viruses highly divergent from both the TTV and TTV-like minivirus groups. The detection of two previously undescribed viral species in a small group of individuals presenting acute viral syndrome with unknown etiology indicates that a rich yield of new human viruses may be readily identifiable using simple methods of sequence-independent nucleic acid amplification and limited sequencing. PMID:15956568

  20. Emerging viral diseases of Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, J. S.; Chua, K. B.; Daniels, P. W.; Eaton, B. T.; Field, H. E.; Hall, R. A.; Halpin, K.; Johansen, C. A.; Kirkland, P. D.; Lam, S. K.; McMinn, P.; Nisbet, D. J.; Paru, R.; Pyke, A. T.; Ritchie, S. A.; Siba, P.; Smith, D. W.; Smith, G. A.; van den Hurk, A. F.; Wang, L. F.; Williams, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 6 years, a number of zoonotic and vectorborne viral diseases have emerged in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific. Vectorborne disease agents discussed in this article include Japanese encephalitis, Barmah Forest, Ross River, and Chikungunya viruses. However, most emerging viruses have been zoonotic, with fruit bats, including flying fox species as the probable wildlife hosts, and these will be discussed as well. The first of these disease agents to emerge was Hendra virus, formerly called equine morbillivirus. This was followed by outbreaks caused by a rabies-related virus, Australian bat lyssavirus, and a virus associated with porcine stillbirths and malformations, Menangle virus. Nipah virus caused an outbreak of fatal pneumonia in pigs and encephalitis in humans in the Malay Peninsula. Most recently, Tioman virus has been isolated from flying foxes, but it has not yet been associated with animal or human disease. Of nonzoonotic viruses, the most important regionally have been enterovirus 71 and HIV. PMID:11485641

  1. [An update on viral diseases of the dog and cat].

    PubMed

    Bodewes, R; Egberink, H F

    2009-04-15

    In this review, recent developments in the field of viral diseases of the dog and the cat are discussed. In the dog, infection with the coronavirus type 2 is associated with respiratory signs, while infection of a highly pathogenic strain of the coronavirus type 1 has been identified as the cause of mortality in puppies. A new strain of the canine parvovirus is identified, from which the pathogenicity is not yet completely clarified. Infection with West Nile virus is associated with progressive neurological disease and subclinical infections in dogs. Infection with equine influenza A (H3N8) or a highly related influenza virus can cause severe respiratory disease and mortality in greyhounds and other dogs. Infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) can cause disease and mortality in cats and is mostly subclinical in dogs. A number of outbreaks of highly virulent strains of the calicivirus in cats have been described.

  2. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  3. Recent viral pathogen in acute gastroenteritis: a retrospective study at a tertiary hospital for 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hye Il; Lee, Yoo Mi; Choi, You Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viral gastroenteritis among children is mainly caused by rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus strains. However, changing socioeconomic conditions and a rotavirus vaccination program may be affecting the prevalence of these viral infections. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the season-specific trends in viral infections for facilitating prophylaxis and surveillance in our region. Methods We evaluated 345 pediatric patients (203 males, 142 females; age, 1 month to 16 years) who visited the CHA Bundang Medical Center because of gastroenteric symptoms between June 2014 and May 2015. The specimens were simultaneously tested for norovirus, rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus via multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results The most common virus was norovirus, followed by rotavirus, adenovirus, and astrovirus. Of all viral infections, 45.2% occurred mainly between 6 and 24 months of age; in particular, norovirus infection mostly occurred in all age groups except those below 6 months of age, when rotavirus was most prevalent. In addition, seasonal variation was observed, such as norovirus infection from December to February, rotavirus infection from February to April, and adenovirus infection from July to October. Conclusion Our results showed that the most common cause of acute pediatric viral gastroenteritis had changed from rotavirus to norovirus in our patients, because of effective rotaviral vaccination. We recommend the management of food and personal hygiene in accordance with age or seasons as well as active vaccination for preventing viral gastroenteritis. PMID:27186218

  4. Presence of viral nucleic acids in the middle ear: acute otitis media pathogen or bystander?

    PubMed

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ruohola, Aino; Hendley, J Owen

    2012-04-01

    Viruses play an important role in acute otitis media (AOM) pathogenesis, and live viruses may cause AOM in the absence of pathogenic bacteria. Detection of AOM pathogens generally relies on bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. When viral culture is used and live viruses are detected in the middle ear fluid of children with AOM, the viruses are generally accepted as AOM pathogens. Because viral culture is not sensitive and does not detect the comprehensive spectrum of respiratory viruses, polymerase chain reaction assays are commonly used to detect viral nucleic acids in the middle ear fluid. Although polymerase chain reaction assays have greatly increased the viral detection rate, new questions arise on the significance of viral nucleic acids detected in the middle ear because nucleic acids of multiple viruses are detected simultaneously, and nucleic acids of specific viruses are detected repeatedly and in a high proportion of asymptomatic children. This article first reviews the role of live viruses in AOM and presents the point-counterpoint arguments on whether viral nucleic acids in the middle ear represent an AOM pathogen or a bystander status. Although there is evidence to support both directions, helpful information for interpretation of the data and future research direction is outlined.

  5. Stochastical modeling for Viral Disease: Statistical Mechanics and Network Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Deem, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical methods of statistical mechanics are developed and applied to study the immunological response against viral disease, such as dengue. We use this theory to show how the immune response to four different dengue serotypes may be sculpted. It is the ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. Here we propose to utilize a scale free network based stochastic model to investigate the mitigation strategies and analyze the risk.

  6. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  7. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  8. Brief report: acute viral hepatitis and poor maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnant Sudanese women.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rihab E; Karsany, Mubarak S; Adam, Ishag

    2008-10-01

    Sixteen pregnant women presented at the three main hospitals in Khartoum province, Sudan during the period of March-September 2007 with features of acute viral hepatitis. Their mean (SD) gestational age was 28.0(6.7) weeks. The etiology of acute viral hepatitis was hepatitis B virus in five women (31.3%), hepatitis C virus in one woman (6.3%), hepatitis E virus in eight women (50%), and hepatitis non-A-to-E virus in two women (12.5%). There were four (25%) maternal deaths and three (18.7%) intrauterine fetal deaths. Three of these maternal deaths were due to hepatitis E virus and the fourth was due to hepatitis B virus.

  9. Clinical Disease Severity of Respiratory Viral Co-Infection versus Single Viral Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Science, Michelle E.; Tran, Dat; Smieja, Marek; Merglen, Arnaud; Mertz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from cohort studies evaluating the severity of respiratory viral co-infections are conflicting. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical severity of viral co-infections as compared to single viral respiratory infections. Methods We searched electronic databases and other sources for studies published up to January 28, 2013. We included observational studies on inpatients with respiratory illnesses comparing the clinical severity of viral co-infections to single viral infections as detected by molecular assays. The primary outcome reflecting clinical disease severity was length of hospital stay (LOS). A random-effects model was used to conduct the meta-analyses. Results Twenty-one studies involving 4,280 patients were included. The overall quality of evidence applying the GRADE approach ranged from moderate for oxygen requirements to low for all other outcomes. No significant differences in length of hospital stay (LOS) (mean difference (MD) −0.20 days, 95% CI −0.94, 0.53, p = 0.59), or mortality (RR 2.44, 95% CI 0.86, 6.91, p = 0.09) were documented in subjects with viral co-infections compared to those with a single viral infection. There was no evidence for differences in effects across age subgroups in post hoc analyses with the exception of the higher mortality in preschool children (RR 9.82, 95% CI 3.09, 31.20, p<0.001) with viral co-infection as compared to other age groups (I2 for subgroup analysis 64%, p = 0.04). Conclusions No differences in clinical disease severity between viral co-infections and single respiratory infections were documented. The suggested increased risk of mortality observed amongst children with viral co-infections requires further investigation. PMID:24932493

  10. Altered Oral Viral Ecology in Association with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Melissa; Abeles, Shira R.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Naidu, Mayuri; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human oral cavity is home to a large and diverse community of viruses that have yet to be characterized in patients with periodontal disease. We recruited and sampled saliva and oral biofilm from a cohort of humans either periodontally healthy or with mild or significant periodontal disease to discern whether there are differences in viral communities that reflect their oral health status. We found communities of viruses inhabiting saliva and the subgingival and supragingival biofilms of each subject that were composed largely of bacteriophage. While there were homologous viruses common to different subjects and biogeographic sites, for most of the subjects, virome compositions were significantly associated with the oral sites from which they were derived. The largest distinctions between virome compositions were found when comparing the subgingival and supragingival biofilms to those of planktonic saliva. Differences in virome composition were significantly associated with oral health status for both subgingival and supragingival biofilm viruses but not for salivary viruses. Among the differences identified in virome compositions was a significant expansion of myoviruses in subgingival biofilm, suggesting that periodontal disease favors lytic phage. We also characterized the bacterial communities in each subject at each biogeographic site by using the V3 hypervariable segment of the 16S rRNA and did not identify distinctions between oral health and disease similar to those found in viral communities. The significantly altered ecology of viruses of oral biofilm in subjects with periodontal disease compared to that of relatively periodontally healthy ones suggests that viruses may serve as useful indicators of oral health status. PMID:24846382

  11. Post viral acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epithiopathy in a teenage child.

    PubMed

    Nga, Angeline D C; Ramli, N; Mimiwati, Z

    2009-06-01

    We report a rare case of a young boy presenting with bilateral blurring of vision following a viral like illness. Fundus examination revealed multiple pale cream-coloured lesions scattered across the posterior pole of both eyes. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed characteristic features of early hypofluorescence and late hyperfluorescence, further confirming the diagnosis of acute posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPPE). He was treated with topical steroids for the accompanying mild anterior uveitis. He had a prompt visual recovery with no adverse sequelae.

  12. [Reflection on 2 current viral diseases: yellow fever and dengue].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    1997-01-01

    Yellow fever and dengue are two current viral diseases induced by flaviviruses and usually transmitted by the same mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. From 1987 to 1991, 18,753 cases of yellow fever, mainly from Africa, have been notified to WHO, leading to 4,522 deaths. On the other hand, WHO estimates that 2.5 billions individuals living in tropical areas are at risk to contract dengue fevers. In fact, 500,000 patients are hospitalized each year for dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome and 90% of them are children. Nevertheless, the control of these two viral diseases would be reached easily in destroying mechanically the mosquito larval resting places. Although superficially similar, the two entities are in fact quite different. Relatively few is known about the pathogenesis of yellow fever whereas, for dengue fevers, it is difficult to integrate so many results accumulated to explain the occurrence of haemorrhagic phenomena according to the two main theories so far proposed which are not exclusive. The immunological one (S.B. Halstead) tries to explain the pathological events by the effect of anti-dengue enhancing antibodies acquired during a previous exposure to one of the dengue viruses, whereas that of increased virus virulence (L. Rosen) refers to fast passages between individuals during explosive epidemics.

  13. Major viral diseases affecting fish aquaculture in Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, S I; Rodríguez, S

    1997-06-01

    The number of viruses isolated from fish has grown in the last few years as a reflection of the increasing interest in fish diseases, particularly those occurring in aquaculture facilities. Of all the described viruses, only a few are considered to be of serious concern and economic importance; they are described in this review, drawing special attention to the four families of viruses (Birnaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Iridoviridae and Reoviridae) that have been reported in Spanish aquaculture. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, a member of the first family, is the most spread virus with a prevalence of 39%. Viral diseases are untreatable and because effective and safe vaccines for fish are not yet commercially available, a great care needs to be exercised when moving fish or eggs from one site or country to another. Some fish health control regulations have been legislated in Europe and USA.

  14. Progress in Treatment of Viral Infections in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moschovi, Maria; Adamaki, Maria; Vlahopoulos, Spiros A.

    2016-01-01

    In children, the most commonly encountered type of leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). An important source of morbidity and mortality in ALL are viral infections. Even though allogeneic transplantations, which are often applied also in ALL, carry a recognized risk for viral infections, there are multiple factors that make ALL patients susceptible to viral infections. The presence of those factors has an influence in the type and severity of infections. Currently available treatment options do not guarantee a positive outcome for every case of viral infection in ALL, without significant side effects. Side effects can have very serious consequences for the ALL patients, which include nephrotoxicity. For this reason a number of strategies for personalized intervention have been already clinically tested, and experimental approaches are being developed. Adoptive immunotherapy, which entails administration of ex vivo grown immune cells to a patient, is a promising approach in general, and for transplant recipients in particular. The ex vivo grown cells are aimed to strengthen the immune response to the virus that has been identified in the patients’ blood and tissue samples. Even though many patients with weakened immune system can benefit from progress in novel approaches, a viral infection still poses a very significant risk for many patients. Therefore, preventive measures and supportive care are very important for ALL patients. PMID:27471584

  15. MRI of diffuse liver disease: characteristics of acute and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chundru, Surya; Kalb, Bobby; Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Sharma, Puneet; Costello, James; Martin, Diego R

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse liver disease, including chronic liver disease, affects tens of millions of people worldwide, and there is a growing need for diagnostic evaluation as treatments become more readily available, particularly for viral liver diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides unique capabilities for noninvasive characterization of the liver tissue that rival or surpass the diagnostic utility of liver biopsies. There has been incremental improvement in the use of standardized MRI sequences, acquired before and after administration of a contrast agent, for the evaluation of diffuse liver disease and the study of the liver parenchyma and blood supply. More recent developments have led to methods for quantifying important liver metabolites, including lipids and iron, and liver fibrosis, the hallmark of chronic liver disease. Here, we review the MRI techniques and diagnostic features associated with acute and chronic liver disease. PMID:24808418

  16. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses.

  17. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  18. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  19. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... virus. Viral infections that may cause this include chickenpox , Coxsackie disease, Epstein-Barr, and echovirus . Other causes ...

  20. Bone marrow is a major site of long-term antibody production after acute viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, M K; Matloubian, M; Ahmed, R

    1995-01-01

    Antiviral antibody production is often sustained for long periods after resolution of an acute viral infection. Despite extensive documentation of this phenomenon, the mechanisms involved in maintaining long-term antibody production remain poorly defined. As a first step towards understanding the nature of long-term humoral immunity, we examined the anatomical location of antibody-producing cells during acute viral infection. Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model, we found that after resolution of the acute infection, when antiviral plasma cells in the spleen decline, a population of virus-specific plasma cells appears in the bone marrow and constitutes the major source of long-term antibody production. Following infection of adult mice, LCMV-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) peaked in the spleen at 8 days postinfection but were undetectable in the bone marrow at that time. The infection was essentially cleared by 15 days, and the ASC numbers in the spleen rapidly declined while an increasing population of LCMV-specific ASC began to appear in the bone marrow. Compared with the peak response at 8 days postinfection, time points from 30 days to more than 1 year later demonstrated greater-than-10-fold reductions in splenic ASC. In contrast, LCMV-specific plasma cell numbers in the bone marrow remained high and correlated with the high levels of antiviral serum antibody. The presence of LCMV-specific plasma cells in the bone marrow was not due to persistent infection at this site, since the virus was cleared from both the spleen and bone marrow with similar kinetics as determined by infectivity and PCR assays. The immunoglobulin G subclass profile of antibody-secreting cells derived from bone marrow and the spleen correlated with the immunoglobulin G subclass distribution of LCMV-specific antibody in the serum. Upon rechallenge with LCMV, the spleen exhibited a substantial increase in virus-specific plasma cell numbers during the early phase

  1. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  2. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and regulatory T cells in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, V; Tamburrini, E; Laghi, V; Cauda, R; Levrero, M; Ruocco, G; Ortona, L; Balsano, F

    1985-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, we observed a significant decrease in OKT4/OKT8 ratio with a significant increase in the OKT8 positive subset in acute type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis. This altered ratio persisted in type B for a long time until HBsAg antibody became detectable, while it soon returned to normal in type A and non-A-non-B hepatitis. In the majority of acute hepatitis the altered ratio is because of an increase and not to a decrease in the whole T cell population, as described in chronic HBV infection. The number of HNK-1 positive cells remained raised during the recovery phase of type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that NK cells play a role in the host defence against B and non-A-non-B virus infections. Serum beta 2-microglobulin concentrations were increased only in acute hepatitis B and non-A-non-B where immunological mechanisms are suspected to be involved, and showed a good correlation with the population of activated OKIa positive cells. PMID:2862096

  3. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Andrea L.; Huber, Victor C.; Chaussee, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  4. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea L; Huber, Victor C; Chaussee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  5. Lack of association between viral load and severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Ana Paula Duarte; Leitão, Lidiane Alves de Azeredo; Luisi, Fernanda; Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Coutinho, Sandra Eugênia; da Silva, Jaqueline Ramos; Mattiello, Rita; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio Condessa; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the correlation between respiratory syncytial viral load and length of hospitalization in infants with acute wheezing episodes. Methods: This was a two-year, cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 12 months of age with bronchiolitis at the time of admission to a tertiary hospital. For the identification of respiratory viruses, nasopharyngeal secretions were collected. Samples were analyzed (throughout the study period) by direct immunofluorescence and (in the second year of the study) by quantitative real-time PCR. We screened for three human viruses: rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Results: Of 110 samples evaluated by direct immunofluorescence, 56 (50.9%) were positive for a single virus, and 16 (14.5%) were positive for two or more viruses. Among those 72 samples, the most prevalent virus was respiratory syncytial virus, followed by influenza. Of 56 samples evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, 24 (42.8%) were positive for a single virus, and 1 (1.7%) was positive for two viruses. Among those 25 samples, the most prevalent virus was again respiratory syncytial virus, followed by human rhinovirus. Coinfection did not influence the length of the hospital stay or other outcome s. In addition, there was no association between respiratory syncytial virus load and the length of hospitalization. Conclusions: Neither coinfection nor respiratory syncytial viral load appears to influence the outcomes of acute bronchiolitis in infants.

  6. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot.

    PubMed

    Hessman, Bill E; Sjeklocha, David B; Fulton, Robert W; Ridpath, Julia F; Johnson, Bill J; McElroy, Diana R

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causing high morbidity and mortality involving 2 lots of calves (lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx, and esophagus. Mucosal lesions varied from small (1-3 mm) infrequent mucosal ulcerations to large (5 mm to 1 cm) and coalescing ulcerations. Necrotic debris was present in ulcerations of some mortalities with some having plaque-like debris, but other mortalities presented more proliferative lesions. A calf persistently infected with BVDV arrived with one lot and the isolated virus was genotyped as BVDV-1b. Identical BVDV-1b strains were isolated from 2 other mortalities. A BVDV-2a genotype was also isolated in this outbreak. This genotype was identical to all BVDV-2a strains isolated in both lots. Serum samples were collected from exposed and unexposed animals and tested for antibodies for multiple viral pathogens. Seropositivity ranged from zero percent for calicivirus to 100% positive to Pseudocowpox virusx. At the end of the feeding period, the morbidity and mortality for the 2 lots involved was 76.2% and 30.8%, respectively, for lot A, and 49.0% and 5.6%, respectively, for lot B. Differential diagnoses included vesicular stomatitis viruses, Bovine papular stomatitis virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Based on the present case, acute BVDV should be considered when mucosal lesions are observed grossly.

  7. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  8. Viral Dose and Immunosuppression Modulate the Progression of Acute BVDV-1 Infection in Calves: Evidence of Long Term Persistence after Intra-Nasal Infection.

    PubMed

    Strong, Rebecca; La Rocca, Severina Anna; Paton, David; Bensaude, Emmanuelle; Sandvik, Torstein; Davis, Leanne; Turner, Jane; Drew, Trevor; Raue, Rudiger; Vangeel, Ilse; Steinbach, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection of cattle causes a diverse range of clinical outcomes from being asymptomatic, or a transient mild disease, to producing severe cases of acute disease leading to death. Four groups of calves were challenged with a type 1 BVDV strain, originating from a severe outbreak of BVDV in England, to study the effect of viral dose and immunosuppression on the viral replication and transmission of BVDV. Three groups received increasing amounts of virus: Group A received 10(2.55)TCID50/ml, group B 10(5.25)TCID50/ml and group C 10(6.7)TCID 50/ml. A fourth group (D) was inoculated with a medium dose (10(5.25)TCID50/ml) and concomitantly treated with dexamethasone (DMS) to assess the effects of chemically induced immunosuppression. Naïve calves were added as sentinel animals to assess virus transmission. The outcome of infection was dose dependent with animals given a higher dose developing severe disease and more pronounced viral replication. Despite virus being shed by the low-dose infection group, BVD was not transmitted to sentinel calves. Administration of dexamethasone (DMS) resulted in more severe clinical signs, prolonged viraemia and virus shedding. Using PCR techniques, viral RNA was detected in blood, several weeks after the limit of infectious virus recovery. Finally, a recently developed strand-specific RT-PCR detected negative strand viral RNA, indicative of actively replicating virus, in blood samples from convalescent animals, as late as 85 days post inoculation. This detection of long term replicating virus may indicate the way in which the virus persists and/or is reintroduced within herds. PMID:25955849

  9. Strain Variation and Disease Severity in Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: In Search of a Viral Marker.

    PubMed

    Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2015-09-01

    The wide spectrum of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and known differences in the biology and in vitro growth of CMV strains continue to drive studies in search for specific viral genetic determinants that may predict severity of congenital CMV disease. Several CMV genes have been studied in detail in congenitally infected children, but the complexity of the viral genome and differences in the definition of symptomatic disease versus asymptomatic CMV infection continue to raise questions related to what constitutes a pathogenic CMV strain.

  10. Acute cerebrovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; García-Eroles, L; Maragall, C; Massons, J; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    In 2,000 consecutive stroke patients collected in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 10-year period, we assessed whether stroke in men and women was different in respect to vascular risk factors, clinical features and natural history. The frequency of the different variable in men and women was analyzed by means of univariate analysis and logistic regression models. Women accounted for 48% of the study population (n = 967) and were older than men (mean age 75 vs. 69 years, p < 0.001). In the age group of 85 years or older, stroke was more frequent in women than in men (69.8 vs. 30.2%, p < 0.001). Women showed a higher frequency of cardioembolic infarction and a lower occurrence of lacunar infarction and stroke of undetermined cause than men. In-hospital mortality (17.4 vs. 13.3%) and length of hospital stay (19.6 vs. 16.7 days) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in women than in men. In the model based on demographic variables and cardiovascular risk factors, obesity, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and age were significant predictors of stroke in women, while intermittent claudication, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cigarette smoking and alcohol abuse were predictors in male sex. Hypertension and limb weakness were predictors for stroke in women, and absence of neurological deficit at hospital discharge, lacunar syndrome and ataxia were predictors in men in the models based on all variables. Women differ from men in the distribution of risk factors and stroke subtype, stroke severity and outcome. Differences in stroke pathology and/or differences in functional anatomy or plasticity of the brain between sexes may account for these findings.

  11. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; Nga, Tran T T; van Doornum, Gerard J; Groen, Jan; Binh, Tran Q; Giao, Phan T; Hung, Le Q; Nams, Nguyen V; Kager, P A; de Vries, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control program. Serum was collected on first presentation (t0) and after 3 weeks (t3) for serology. After exclusion of acute dengue infection, acute and convalescent serum samples from 606 patients were using enzyme-linked immunoassays to detect IgA, as well as IgM and IgG antibodies against common respiratory viruses. Paired sera showed the following infections: human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 4.7%), influenza B virus (FLUBV, 2.2%), influenza A virus (FLUAV, 1.9%) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, 0.6%). There was no association between type of infection and age, sex or seasonality; some inter-annual differences were observed for influenza. Antibody prevalence, indicative of previous infections, was relatively low: HPV, 56.8%, FLUBV, 12.1%; FLUAV, 5.9% and HRSV, 6.8%.

  12. Characteristics and progression of children with acute viral bronchiolitis subjected to mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ferlini, Roberta; Pinheiro, Flávia Ohlweiler; Andreolio, Cinara; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci; Piva, Jefferson Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of children with acute viral bronchiolitis subjected to mechanical ventilation for three consecutive years and to correlate their progression with mechanical ventilation parameters and fluid balance. Methods Longitudinal study of a series of infants (< one year old) subjected to mechanical ventilation for acute viral bronchitis from January 2012 to September 2014 in the pediatric intensive care unit. The children's clinical records were reviewed, and their anthropometric data, mechanical ventilation parameters, fluid balance, clinical progression, and major complications were recorded. Results Sixty-six infants (3.0 ± 2.0 months old and with an average weight of 4.7 ± 1.4kg) were included, of whom 62% were boys; a virus was identified in 86%. The average duration of mechanical ventilation was 6.5 ± 2.9 days, and the average length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit was 9.1 ± 3.5 days; the mortality rate was 1.5% (1/66). The peak inspiratory pressure remained at 30cmH2O during the first four days of mechanical ventilation and then decreased before extubation (25 cmH2O; p < 0.05). Pneumothorax occurred in 10% of the sample and extubation failure in 9%, which was due to upper airway obstruction in half of the cases. The cumulative fluid balance on mechanical ventilation day four was 402 ± 254mL, which corresponds to an increase of 9.0 ± 5.9% in body weight. Thirty-seven patients (56%) exhibited a weight gain of 10% or more, which was not significantly associated with the ventilation parameters on mechanical ventilation day four, extubation failure, duration of mechanical ventilation or length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit. Conclusion The rate of mechanical ventilation for acute viral bronchiolitis remains constant, being associated with low mortality, few adverse effects, and positive cumulative fluid balance during the first days. Better fluid control might reduce the duration of mechanical

  13. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  14. Viral competition and maternal immunity influence the clinical disease caused by very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2011-09-01

    The very virulent form of infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) causes an immunosuppressive disease that is further characterized by the rapid onset of morbidity and high mortality in susceptible chickens. In 2009, vvIBDV was first reported in California, U. S. A., and since that time only a few cases of acute infectious bursal disease attributed to vvIBDV have been recognized in California. In other countries where vvIBDV has become established, it rapidly spreads to most poultry-producing regions. Two factors that may be involved in limiting the spread or reducing the severity of the clinical disease caused by vvIBDV in the U. S. A. are maternal immunity and competition with endemic variant strains of the virus. In this study, the ability of vvIBDV to infect and cause disease in maternally immune layer chickens was examined at weekly intervals over a 5-wk period during which their neutralizing maternal antibodies waned. Birds inoculated with vvIBDV at 2, 3, and 4 wk of age seemed healthy throughout the duration of the experiment, but macroscopic and microscopic lesions were observed in their bursa tissues. A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also confirmed the presence of vvIBDV RNA in their bursa tissues, indicating this virus was infecting the birds even at 2 wk of age when neutralizing maternal antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were still relatively high (> 2000 geometric mean antibody titer). No mortality was observed in any birds when inoculated at 2, 3, or 4 wk of age; however, inoculation at 5 and 6 wk of age resulted in 10% and 20% mortality, respectively. Three experiments on the competition between vvIBDV and the two variant viruses T1 and FF6 were conducted. In all three experiments, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) birds that were inoculated with only the vvIBDV became acutely moribund, and except for Experiment 1 (62% mortality) all succumbed to the infection within 4 days of being exposed. When the

  15. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization.

  16. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7 %), followed by noroviruses (19.4 %), enteric adenoviruses (7.5 %), astroviruses (6.0 %), bacteria and parasites (4.5 % each) and sapoviruses (1.4 %). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3 %) and G2P[4] (21.4 %); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains.

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease: Structure of a viral deubiquitinating enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ratia, Kiira; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Barretto, Naina; Baker, Susan C.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    Replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) requires proteolytic processing of the replicase polyprotein by two viral cysteine proteases, a chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) and a papain-like protease (PLpro). These proteases are important targets for development of antiviral drugs that would inhibit viral replication and reduce mortality associated with outbreaks of SARS-CoV. In this work, we describe the 1.85-Å crystal structure of the catalytic core of SARS-CoV PLpro and show that the overall architecture adopts a fold closely resembling that of known deubiquitinating enzymes. Key features, however, distinguish PLpro from characterized deubiquitinating enzymes, including an intact zinc-binding motif, an unobstructed catalytically competent active site, and the presence of an intriguing, ubiquitin-like N-terminal domain. To gain insight into the active-site recognition of the C-terminal tail of ubiquitin and the related LXGG motif, we propose a model of PLpro in complex with ubiquitin–aldehyde that reveals well defined sites within the catalytic cleft that help to account for strict substrate-recognition motifs. PMID:16581910

  18. Relating plaque morphology to respiratory syncytial virus subgroup, viral load, and disease severity in children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-In; Murphy, Ryan; Majumdar, Sirshendu; Harrison, Lisa G.; Aitken, Jody; DeVincenzo, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Viral culture plaque morphology in human cell lines are markers for growth capability and cytopathic effect, and have been used to assess viral fitness and select pre-attenuation candidates for live viral vaccines. We classified RSV plaque morphology and analyzed the relationship between plaque morphology as compared to subgroup, viral load and clinical severity of infection in infants and children. Methods We obtained respiratory secretions from 149 RSV-infected children. Plaque morphology and viral load was assessed within the first culture passage in HEp-2 cells. Viral load was measured by PCR, as was RSV subgroup. Disease severity was determined by hospitalization, length of stay, intensive care requirement, and respiratory failure. Results Plaque morphology varied between individual subjects; however, similar results were observed among viruses collected from upper and lower respiratory tracts of the same subject. Significant differences in plaque morphology were observed between RSV subgroups. No correlations were found among plaque morphology and viral load. Plaque morphology did not correlate with disease severity. Conclusions Plaque morphology measures parameters that are viral-specific and independent of the human host. Morphologies vary between patients and are related to RSV subgroup. In HEp-2 cells, RSV plaque morphology appears unrelated to disease severity in RSV-infected children. PMID:26107392

  19. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  20. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni.

  1. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  2. Cell-based Assays to Identify Inhibitors of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Green, Neil; Ott, Robert D.; Isaacs, Richard J.; Fang, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Antagonizing the production of infectious virus inside cells requires drugs that can cross the cell membrane without harming host cells. Objective It is therefore advantageous to establish intracellular potency of anti-viral drug candidates early in the drug-discovery pipeline. Methods To this end, cell-based assays are being developed and employed in high-throughput drug screening, ranging from assays that monitor replication of intact viruses to those that monitor activity of specific viral proteins. While numerous cell-based assays have been developed and investigated, rapid counter screens are also needed to define the specific viral targets of identified inhibitors and to eliminate nonspecific screening hits. Results/Conclusions Here, we describe the types of cell-based assays being used in antiviral drug screens and evaluate the equally important counter screens that are being employed to reach the full potential of cell-based high-throughput screening. PMID:19750206

  3. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  4. [The lesion predilection and the phenomenology of the basic forms of the mental pathology in acute viral neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Maksutova, E L

    1993-01-01

    Verified material on 246 cases of acute viral encephalitis and meningoencephalitis was studied prospectively. The clinical and psychopathological analysis shown predilection to cerebral affection in formation of a number of psychopathological syndromes reflecting focal insufficiency and related to etiotopic characteristics of the underlying pathological process.

  5. Approved and experimental countermeasures against pestiviral diseases: Bovine viral diarrhea, classical swine fever and border disease.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, M Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The pestiviruses, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), classical swine fever (CSFV) and border disease virus, are important livestock pathogens in many countries, but current vaccines do not completely prevent the spread of infection. Control of pestiviral diseases is especially difficult due to the constant viremia and viral shedding of persistently infected (PI) animals, which must be identified and eliminated to prevent disease transmission. Existing vaccines are limited by the delay between vaccination and the onset of protection, the difficulty of differentiating serologically between vaccinated and naturally infected animals and the need for broad vaccine cross-protection against diverse virus strains. Antiviral therapy could potentially supplement vaccination by providing immediate protection in the case of an outbreak. Numerous compounds with in vitro antiviral activity against BVDV have been identified through its role as a surrogate for hepatitis C virus. Fewer drugs active against CSFV have been identified, but many compounds that are effective against BVDV will likely inhibit CSFV, given their similar genomic sequences. While in vitro research has been promising, the paucity of efficacy studies in animals has hindered the commercial development of effective antiviral drugs against the pestiviruses. In this article, we summarize the clinical syndromes and routes of transmission of BVD, CSF and border disease, discuss currently approved vaccines, review efforts to develop antiviral therapies for use in outbreak control and suggest promising directions for future research.

  6. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp. PMID:26458776

  7. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp.

  8. [Humoral and cellular immune phenomena in an acute viral hepatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sodomann, C P

    1975-08-01

    During the course of acute viral hepatitis A and B, several humoral and cellular immune phenomena have been observed, part of which is predominantly or even exclusively associated with hepatitis B: 1. Relative and absolute counts for T-lymphocytes depressed and for "null" -cells elevated; 2. mild elevation of serum globulin levels; 3. IgM augmentation occurring fastly, pronounced, and long lasting in typical cases; 4. IgG augmentation occurring later, less pronounced, and for a shorter period in typical cases; 5. autoantibodies to smooth muscles and mitochondria in low titers in some patients; 6. specific antibodies to "e" -antigen (early) and HB-Ag (later in the course) in part of the cases with hepatitis B; 7. immune complexes including HB-Ag, IgG and probably IgM (and IgA) as well as complement in some cases; 8. depressed levels of the fourth component of complement and - in cases complicated by "allergic" symptoms - of C3, C4, and total complement; 9. occurrence of activated lymphocytes ("virocytes") in peripheral blood; 10. enhanced spontaneous lymphocytic DNA-synthesis; 11. enchanced phytohaemagglutinin stimulation of lymphocytes; 12. mild lymphocyte proliferation to HB-Ag in part of the acute and convalescent cases of hepatitis B; 13. production of migration inhibition factor to liver specific protein (and HB-Ag) or lymphocytes in different percentages of patients with hepatitis B. Origin, diagnostic and prognostic importance, as well as pathogenetic revelance of the described immune phenomena are discussed.

  9. Outcome of Severe Dengue Viral Infection-caused Acute Liver Failure in Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Laoprasopwattana, Kamolwish; Jundee, Puthachat; Pruekprasert, Pornpimol; Geater, Alan

    2016-06-01

    To determine clinical course and outcomes of liver functions in children with dengue viral infection-caused acute liver failure (ALF), the records of patients aged <15 years attending our institution during 1989-2011 were reviewed. Of the 41 ALF patients, 2, 6 and 33 patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever grade II, III and IV, respectively. Multiorgan failure including respiratory failure, massive bleeding and acute kidney injury occurred in 80.0%, 96.0% and 84.0% of the ALF cases, respectively, with an overall fatality rate of 68.3%. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were highest on the day that the patient developed ALF. Lactate dehydrogenase levels had positive correlations with AST (r = 0.95) and ALT (r = 0.87) (all p < 0.01). The median (interquartile range) days before the AST and ALT levels returned to lower than 200 U/L after the ALF were 10.5 (8.8, 12.8) and 10.5 (7.8, 14.0) days, respectively.

  10. An Acute Immune Response to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication Contributes to Viral Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Baseler, Laura J; Falzarano, Darryl; Scott, Dana P; Rosenke, Rebecca; Thomas, Tina; Munster, Vincent J; Feldmann, Heinz; de Wit, Emmie

    2016-03-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first identified in a human with severe pneumonia in 2012. Since then, infections have been detected in >1500 individuals, with disease severity ranging from asymptomatic to severe, fatal pneumonia. To elucidate the pathogenesis of this virus and investigate mechanisms underlying disease severity variation in the absence of autopsy data, a rhesus macaque and common marmoset model of MERS-CoV disease were analyzed. Rhesus macaques developed mild disease, and common marmosets exhibited moderate to severe, potentially lethal, disease. Both nonhuman primate species exhibited respiratory clinical signs after inoculation, which were more severe and of longer duration in the marmosets, and developed bronchointerstitial pneumonia. In marmosets, the pneumonia was more extensive, with development of severe airway lesions. Quantitative analysis showed significantly higher levels of pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and higher amounts of pulmonary viral antigen in marmosets. Pulmonary expression of the MERS-CoV receptor, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, was similar in marmosets and macaques. These results suggest that increased virus replication and the local immune response to MERS-CoV infection likely play a role in pulmonary pathology severity. Together, the rhesus macaque and common marmoset models of MERS-CoV span the wide range of disease severity reported in MERS-CoV-infected humans, which will aid in investigating MERS-CoV disease pathogenesis. PMID:26724387

  11. Anorexia during acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    1996-02-01

    Anorexia is associated with disorders of all systems. Anorexia represents a consistent clinical manifestation during acute and chronic pathophysiological processes (infection, inflammation, injury, toxins, immunological reactions, malignancy and necrosis). Anorexia during disease can be beneficial or deleterious depending on the timing and duration. Temporary anorexia during acute disease may be beneficial to an organism since a restriction in the intake of micro- and macro-nutrients will inhibit bacterial growth. Long-term anorexia during chronic disease, however, is deleterious to an organism and may be associated with cachexia, which can ultimately result in death. Various mechanisms participate in the anorexia observed during disease, including cytokine action. Anorexia induced by cytokines is proposed to involve modulation of hypothalamic-feeding associated sites, prostaglandin-dependent mechanisms, modifications of neurotransmitter systems, gastrointestinal, metabolic, and endocrine factors. In addition, the anorexia-cachexia syndrome is multifactorial and may involve chronic pain, depression or anxiety, hypogeusia and hyposmia, chronic nausea, early satiety, malfunction of the gastrointestinal system, metabolic alterations, cytokine action, production of other anorexigenic substances and/or iatrogenic causes (chemotherapy, radiotherapy). Cachexia may result not only from anorexia and a decreased caloric intake, but also from malabsorption and losses from the body (ulcers, hemorrhage, effusions), or a change in body metabolism. Research has focused on potential interventions to modify anorexia during disease and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Nutritional modifications and the use of specific steroids (such as megestrol acetate) are being tested in the clinical setting. Understanding the specific mechanisms responsible for anorexia during disease as well as their interactions is essential to develop interventions for the control of anorexia (during a critical

  12. Emerging and changing viral diseases in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Samaranayake, L P

    2016-04-01

    Most viral infections encountered in resource-rich countries are relatively trivial and transient with perhaps fever, malaise, myalgia, rash (exanthema) and sometimes mucosal manifestations (enanthema), including oral in some. However, the apparent benignity may be illusory as some viral infections have unexpected consequences - such as the oncogenicity of some herpesviruses and human papillomaviruses. Infections are transmitted from various human or animal vectors, especially by close proximity, and the increasing movements of peoples across the globe, mean that infections hitherto confined largely to the tropics now appear worldwide. Global warming also increases the range of movement of vectors such as mosquitoes. Thus recent decades have seen a most dramatic change with the emergence globally also of new viral infections - notably human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) - and the appearance of some other dangerous and sometimes lethal infections formerly seen mainly in, and reported from, resource-poor areas especially in parts of Asia, Latin America and Africa. This study offers a brief update of the most salient new aspects of the important viral infections, especially those with known orofacial manifestations or other implications for oral health care. PMID:26179810

  13. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  14. Methods of treating Parkinson's disease using viral vectors

    DOEpatents

    Bankiewicz, Krys; Cunningham, Janet

    2012-11-13

    Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant AAV virions, to the central nervous system (CNS) are provided for the treatment of CNS disorders, particularly those disorders which involve the neurotransmitter dopamine. The methods entail providing rAAV virions that comprise a transgene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and administering the virions to the brain of a mammal using a non-manual pump.

  15. [Endotoxin Is a Companent in Pathogenesis of Chronic Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Anikhovskaya, I; Kubatiev, A; Khasanova, G; Yakovlev, M

    2015-01-01

    The level of endotoxin and indicators of activity of antiendotoxin immunity (antibody concentration to glycolipid Re-chemotype and general antigen of enterobacteria) were estimated in serum of 174 patients with persistent viral infections (viruses: herpes simplex, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency). The presence of markers of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (interleukin IL-1β) and acquired immunodeficiency (CD4+) in HIV-infected patients were also determined. Persistent viral infections are accompanied by endotoxin aggression intestinal origin (caused by them), which is able to induce the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In HIV-infected patients with this syndrome is cyclical, when the phase of hyperactivity replaced immunodeficiency. Schematically, this process can be represented as the following sequence of events: HIV-mediated damage to the intestinal barrier--the development of endotoxin aggression--induction ofsystemic inflammatory response syndrome--the depletion of the immune system, which is transient and is related to the duration of activity of the virus replication cycle, i.e., with damage to enterocytes. Using antiendotoxin component (means of reducing levels of endotoxin in the blood) in the scheme of treatment of persistent viral infections can serve as an element of a successful prevention of complications. PMID:26237956

  16. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  17. An Analysis of Viral Testing in non-Acetaminophen (non-APAP) Pediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Kathleen B.; Olio, Dominic Dell; Lobritto, Steven J.; Lopez, M James; Rodriguez-Baez, Norberto; Yazigi, Nada A.; Belle, Steven H.; Zhang, Song; Squires, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Viral infections are often suspected to cause pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) but large-scale studies have not been performed. We analyzed results of viral testing among non-acetaminophen (non APAP) PALF study participants. Methods Participants were enrolled in the PALF registry. Diagnostic evaluation and final diagnosis were determined by the site investigator and methods for viral testing by local standard of care. Viruses were classified as either Causative Viruses (CV) or Associated Viruses (AV). Supplemental testing for CV was performed if not done clinically and serum was available. Final diagnoses included “Viral”, “Indeterminate” and “Other”. Results Of 860 participants, 820 had at least one test result for a CV or AV. A positive viral test was found in 166/820 (20.2%) participants and distributed among “Viral” [66/80 (82.5%)], “Indeterminate” [52/420 (12.4%)] and “Other” [48/320 (15.0%)] diagnoses. CV accounted for 81/166 (48.8%) positive tests. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) was positive in 39/335 (11.6%) who were tested: 26/103 (25.2%) and 13/232 (5.6%) among infants 0 - 6 months and over 6 months, respectively. HSV was not tested in 61.0% and 53% of the over-all cohort and those 0 - 6 months, respectively. Supplemental testing yielded 17 positive, including 5 HSV. Conclusions Viral testing in PALF occurs frequently but is often incomplete. Evidence for acute viral infection was found in 20.2% of those tested for viruses. HSV is an important viral cause for PALF in all age groups. The etiopathogenic role of CV and AV in PALF requires further investigation. PMID:25079486

  18. Acute on-chip HIV detection through label-free electrical sensing of viral nano-lysate.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Hadi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Inci, Fatih; Wang, Shuqi; Willenbrecht, Remington B M; Giguel, Francoise F; Tsibris, Athe M N; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-08-12

    Development of portable biosensors has broad applications in environmental monitoring, clinical diagnosis, public health, and homeland security. There is an unmet need for pathogen detection at the point-of-care (POC) using a fast, sensitive, inexpensive, and easy-to-use method that does not require complex infrastructure and well-trained technicians. For instance, detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) at acute infection stage has been challenging, since current antibody-based POC technologies are not effective due to low concentration of antibodies. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time a label-free electrical sensing method that can detect lysed viruses, i.e. viral nano-lysate, through impedance analysis, offering an alternative technology to the antibody-based methods such as dipsticks and Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The presented method is a broadly applicable platform technology that can potentially be adapted to detect multiple pathogens utilizing impedance spectroscopy for other infectious diseases including herpes, influenza, hepatitis, pox, malaria, and tuberculosis. The presented method offers a rapid and portable tool that can be used as a detection technology at the POC in resource-constrained settings, as well as hospital and primary care settings.

  19. Minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weil, S C

    2000-03-01

    In the last decade our understanding of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has advanced tremendously. The recognition of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as a powerful therapeutic agent paralleled the cloning of the t(15;17) breakpoint. RtPCR for the PML-RARA hybrid mRNA has become the hallmark of molecular diagnosis and molecular monitoring in APL. Current techniques are useful in predicting complete remission and a possible cure in many patients who repeatedly test negative by PCR. Standardizing techniques and improving the sensitivity of the assay are important. Doing this in a way so that clinically relevant minimal residual disease can be distinguished from "indolent disease" remains among the future challenges in APL. PMID:10702899

  20. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  1. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A.; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I.; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  2. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  3. Gene Expression Profiles from Disease Discordant Twins Suggest Shared Antiviral Pathways and Viral Exposures among Multiple Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; O'Hanlon, Terrance P; Lai, Zhennan; Fannin, Rick; Weller, Melodie L; Rider, Lisa G; Chiorini, John A; Miller, Frederick W

    2015-01-01

    Viral agents are of interest as possible autoimmune triggers due to prior reported associations and widely studied molecular mechanisms of antiviral immune responses in autoimmunity. Here we examined new viral candidates for the initiation and/or promotion of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), as well as possible related signaling pathways shared in the pathogenesis of those disorders. RNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 33 twins discordant for SAID and 33 matched, unrelated healthy controls was analyzed using a custom viral-human gene microarray. Paired comparisons were made among three study groups-probands with SAID, their unaffected twins, and matched, unrelated healthy controls-using statistical and molecular pathway analyses. Probands and unaffected twins differed significantly in the expression of 537 human genes, and 107 of those were associated with viral infections. These 537 differentially expressed human genes participate in overlapping networks of several canonical, biologic pathways relating to antiviral responses and inflammation. Moreover, certain viral genes were expressed at higher levels in probands compared to either unaffected twins or unrelated, healthy controls. Interestingly, viral gene expression levels in unaffected twins appeared intermediate between those of probands and the matched, unrelated healthy controls. Of the viruses with overexpressed viral genes, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) was the only human viral pathogen identified using four distinct oligonucleotide probes corresponding to three HSV-2 genes associated with different stages of viral infection. Although the effects from immunosuppressive therapy on viral gene expression remain unclear, this exploratory study suggests a new approach to evaluate shared viral agents and antiviral immune responses that may be involved in the development of SAID.

  4. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases? Unveiling associations of three diseases and viral loci.

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K; Lindegaard, Hanne M; Rossing, Peter; Petersen, Thor; Tarnow, Lise; Hansen, Bettina; Lorenzen, Tove; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Jensen, Sara B; Bahrami, Shervin; Lajer, Maria; Schmidt, Kathrine L M; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Junker, Peter; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte antigens is reported for multiple sclerosis. We speculate the possibility that recombinants or mixed viral particles are formed and that the resulting viruses stimulate the innate immune system, thereby initiating the autoimmune response. PMID:26091722

  5. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  6. Peripherally restricted acute phase response to a viral mimic alters hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Konat, Gregory W

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that peripherally restricted acute phase response (APR) elicited by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a viral mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC), renders the brain hypersusceptible to excitotoxic insult as seen from profoundly exacerbated kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. In the present study, we found that this hypersusceptibility was protracted for up to 72 h. RT-PCR profiling of hippocampal gene expression revealed rapid upregulation of 23 genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors generally within 6 h after PIC challenge. The expression of most of these genes decreased by 24 h. However, two chemokine genes, i.e., Ccl19 and Cxcl13 genes, as well as two chemokine receptor genes, Ccr1 and Ccr7, remained upregulated for 72 h suggesting their possible involvement in the induction and sustenance of seizure hypersusceptibility. Also, 12 genes encoding proteins related to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission featured initial upregulation or downregulation followed by gradual normalization. The upregulation of the Gabrr3 gene remained upregulated at 72 h, congruent with its plausible role in the hypersusceptible phenotype. Moreover, the expression of ten microRNAs (miRs) was rapidly affected by PIC challenge, but their levels generally exhibited oscillating profiles over the time course of seizure hypersusceptibility. These results indicate that protracted seizure susceptibility following peripheral APR is associated with a robust polygenic response in the hippocampus. PMID:24363211

  7. Herbal drug BNO 1016 is safe and effective in the treatment of acute viral rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Rainer; Mondigler, Martin; Stammer, Holger; Stierna, Pontus; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Conclusion: Daily intake of 480 mg of BNO 1016 for 15 days is an effective treatment in acute viral rhinosinusitis. Objectives: The pooled efficacy data of two similar randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials were analyzed. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the individual trials. Methods: The efficacy analysis was based on 589 patients. Treatment was performed orally with either 3 × 160 mg BNO 1016 (n = 294) or 3 × placebo (n = 295) for 15 days. In both trials patients underwent five visits to the investigational sites. Symptoms were evaluated according to the EPOS 2012 guideline. Ultrasonography was used to confirm the diagnosis at onset of treatment and the remission of symptoms at the last visit. Efficacy was evaluated by the investigator as the mean major symptom score (MSS) at the end of treatment (visit 5, day 14). Patients reported symptoms and social/emotional consequences of rhinosinusitis using a quality of life questionnaire (SNOT-20 GAV). Results: MSS improved during the treatment period by a mean of 10.02 ± 1.61 score points to 2.47 ± 2.55 for BNO 1016 and of 9.87 ± 1.52 to 3.63 ± 3.63 for placebo. Differences between treatment groups at end of therapy (1.16 ± 3.14 score points; p < 0.0001) and patient-assessed quality of life (p = 0.0015) were statistically significant in favor of BNO 1016. PMID:25496178

  8. The relationship between visfatin, liver inflammation, and acute phase reactants in chronic viral hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Enver; Akbal, Erdem; Koçak, Erdem; Akyürek, Ömer; Köklü, Seyfettin; Ekiz, Fuat; Yılmaz, Barış

    2016-09-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis B (CHB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Adipokine stimulation might play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum visfatin concentrations and the relationship between visfatin, fibrosis, liver inflammation, and acute phase reactants in CHB patients.The sampling universe of the study consisted of 41 CHB patients and 25 healthy controls. All patients had positive hepatitis B surface antigen (Hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) positive n: 7, n: 34 HBeAg negative) for at least 6 months and detectable serum HBV DNA. Serum visfatin concentrations were significantly higher in the CHB patients [18.0 ± 10.9 ng dL(-1)] than in the healthy controls [9.4 ± 1.6 ng dL(-1)] [P < 0.001]. On the other hand, fibrinogen and haptoglobin concentrations were significantly lower in CHB patients. A strong negative correlation was observed between serum visfatin concentration, haptoglobin, and fibrinogen levels; however, there was no significant correlation between visfatin, glucose, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, BMI, Knodell score, fibrosis score, hepatitis B virus DNA, sedimentation, and C-reactive protein. Visfatin concentrations were elevated and visfatin was negatively correlated with haptoglobin and fibrinogen levels in CHB patients.

  9. Emerging viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2012-09-01

    Unique disorders appear episodically in human populations and cause life-threatening systemic or neurological disease. Historical examples of such disorders include von Economo encephalitis, a disorder of presumed viral etiology; acquired immune deficiency syndrome, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus; and severe acute respiratory syndrome, caused by a member of the coronavirus family. This article describes the factors that contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases and focuses on selected recent examples of emerging viral infections that can affect the nervous system of infants, children, and adolescents.

  10. [Therapeutic modalities for the management of cough associated with acute respiratory viral infection, effective in an otolaryngologist's practice].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, A I; Paniakina, M A; Korostelev, S A; Mitiuk, A M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness ascoril therapy in comparison with the treatment using the mucoactive agent lasolvan in the adult patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. Patients and methods. The study included 120 patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. They were divided into two groups. The patients comprising group 1 (n=6.) were treated with ascoril, those in group 2 (n=60) were given lasolvan. Results. The effectiveness of the treatment of cough in group 1 was found to be higher compared with that in group 2 (p<0.05); moreover, it was associated with better dynamics of certain indicators of the quality of life, such as the social activity level, vitality, and general health (p<0.05). The safety of the proposed treatment was confirmed by the absence of the adverse events throughout the entire treatment period.

  11. [Therapeutic modalities for the management of cough associated with acute respiratory viral infection, effective in an otolaryngologist's practice].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, A I; Paniakina, M A; Korostelev, S A; Mitiuk, A M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness ascoril therapy in comparison with the treatment using the mucoactive agent lasolvan in the adult patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. Patients and methods. The study included 120 patients suffering from productive cough associated with acute viral respiratory infection. They were divided into two groups. The patients comprising group 1 (n=6.) were treated with ascoril, those in group 2 (n=60) were given lasolvan. Results. The effectiveness of the treatment of cough in group 1 was found to be higher compared with that in group 2 (p<0.05); moreover, it was associated with better dynamics of certain indicators of the quality of life, such as the social activity level, vitality, and general health (p<0.05). The safety of the proposed treatment was confirmed by the absence of the adverse events throughout the entire treatment period. PMID:24781181

  12. Viral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S B

    1991-09-01

    Viral pneumonias are common in infants and young children but rare in adults. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral pathogens in infants and children. Influenza virus types A and B account for over one half of viral pneumonias in adults. Immunocompromised hosts are susceptible to pneumonias caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and other herpesviruses, as well as rubeola and adenovirus. Diagnosis of viral pneumonia depends on appropriate viral cultures and acute and convalescent sera for specific antibodies. Superinfection with bacteria is common in adults. Anti-viral therapy is available for several respiratory viruses. Ribavirin, amantadine/rimantadine, interferon alpha, and acyclovir are antiviral drugs that may be of benefit in treatment and prophylaxis. Prevention of viral pneumonia will depend upon improved viral immunization practices.

  13. Severe viral oesophagitis, pharyngitis, and stomatitis as antecedents of ileocecal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Waluga, Marek; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Kajor, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male who developed a severe erosive oesophagitis extending to the pharynx and oral cavity without obvious risk factors. Endoscopic image suggested viral aetiology that could not be confirmed by routine serological diagnostics of infections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpes simplex virus. The histopathological evaluation also gave no definite clues to the aetiology of the inflammation. Treatment with acyclovir was ineffective, but gancyclovir therapy caused spectacular clinical improvement and healing of erosions. Two months later the patient presented febrile diarrhoea that was a symptom of ileocecal Crohn's disease proven by endoscopy, enterography, and histopathology. It is the first report of severe viral oesophagitis preceding clinical manifestation of Crohn's disease. This observation warrants further study towards the viral aetiology of oral, pharyngeal, and oesophageal erosions, frequently associated with Crohn's disease. PMID:25960815

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  16. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  17. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  18. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  19. Non-viral therapeutic approaches to ocular diseases: An overview and future directions.

    PubMed

    Zulliger, Rahel; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2015-12-10

    Currently there are no viable treatment options for patients with debilitating inherited retinal degeneration. The vast variability in disease-inducing mutations and resulting phenotypes has hampered the development of therapeutic interventions. Gene therapy is a logical approach, and recent work has focused on ways to optimize vector design and packaging to promote optimized expression and phenotypic rescue after intraocular delivery. In this review, we discuss ongoing ocular clinical trials, which currently use viral gene delivery, but focus primarily on new advancements in optimizing the efficacy of non-viral gene delivery for ocular diseases. Non-viral delivery systems are highly customizable, allowing functionalization to improve cellular and nuclear uptake, bypassing cellular degradative machinery, and improving gene expression in the nucleus. Non-viral vectors often yield transgene expression levels lower than viral counterparts, however their favorable safety/immune profiles and large DNA capacity (critical for the delivery of large ocular disease genes) make their further development a research priority. Recent work on particle coating and vector engineering presents exciting ways to overcome limitations of transient/low gene expression levels, but also highlights the fact that further refinements are needed before use in the clinic.

  20. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  1. Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27092305

  2. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Flichman, Diego; Kott, Veronica; Sookoian, Silvia; Campos, Rodolfo

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up. METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 mo and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced. RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established. CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattern. Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are non-synonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes, thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process. PMID:12854149

  3. Impact of global warming on viral diseases: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Zell, Roland; Krumbholz, Andi; Wutzler, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Global warming is believed to induce a gradual climate change. Hence, it was predicted that tropical insects might expand their habitats thereby transmitting pathogens to humans. Although this concept is a conclusive presumption, clear evidence is still lacking--at least for viral diseases. Epidemiological data indicate that seasonality of many diseases is further influenced by strong single weather events, interannual climate phenomena, and anthropogenic factors. So far, emergence of new diseases was unlinked to global warming. Re-emergence and dispersion of diseases was correlated with translocation of pathogen-infected vectors or hosts. Coupled ocean/atmosphere circulations and 'global change' that also includes shifting of demographic, social, and economical conditions are important drivers of viral disease variability whereas global warming at best contributes.

  4. Utility of serum procalcitonin values in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    Falsey, Ann R; Becker, Kenneth L; Swinburne, Andrew J; Nylen, Eric S; Snider, Richard H; Formica, Maria A; Hennessey, Patricia A; Criddle, Mary M; Peterson, Derick R; Walsh, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    Background Serum procalcitonin levels have been used as a biomarker of invasive bacterial infection and recently have been advocated to guide antibiotic therapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, rigorous studies correlating procalcitonin levels with microbiologic data are lacking. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) have been linked to viral and bacterial infection as well as noninfectious causes. Therefore, we evaluated procalcitonin as a predictor of viral versus bacterial infection in patients hospitalized with AECOPD with and without evidence of pneumonia. Methods Adults hospitalized during the winter with symptoms consistent with AECOPD underwent extensive testing for viral, bacterial, and atypical pathogens. Serum procalcitonin levels were measured on day 1 (admission), day 2, and at one month. Clinical and laboratory features of subjects with viral and bacterial diagnoses were compared. Results In total, 224 subjects with COPD were admitted for 240 respiratory illnesses. Of these, 56 had pneumonia and 184 had AECOPD alone. A microbiologic diagnosis was made in 76 (56%) of 134 illnesses with reliable bacteriology (26 viral infection, 29 bacterial infection, and 21 mixed viral bacterial infection). Mean procalcitonin levels were significantly higher in patients with pneumonia compared with AECOPD. However, discrimination between viral and bacterial infection using a 0.25 ng/mL threshold for bacterial infection in patients with AECOPD was poor. Conclusion Procalcitonin is useful in COPD patients for alerting clinicians to invasive bacterial infections such as pneumonia but it does not distinguish bacterial from viral and noninfectious causes of AECOPD. PMID:22399852

  5. Acute transverse myelitis and subacute thyroiditis associated with dengue viral infection: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Zhiming; Dong, Yaxian; Chen, Xiaolian; Yao, Huiyan; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is a rare manifestation of dengue infection. To the best of our knowledge, only 6 cases of acute transverse myelitis as a manifestation of dengue infection have been reported thus far. The present study described a case of acute transverse myelitis complicated with subacute thyroiditis 6 days after the onset of dengue viral infection. In addition, the available literature was searched to identify similar previous cases. Treatment with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone immunoglobulin plasmapheresis and physiotherapy resulted in partial recovery at 3 months post-infection. In conclusion, the involvement of dengue infection should be considered in patients who develop central nervous system manifestations during or after the recovery period of dengue infection. Furthermore, since methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin are effective during the active phase of the infection, prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment are crucial. PMID:27703498

  6. [Japanese encephalitis: a fast-changing viral disease].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, F

    2010-08-01

    The following aspects are dealt with in this article: 1) current geographical distribution of Japanese encephalitis; 2) clinical patterns of Japanese encephalitis; 3) vertebrate hosts of Japanese encephalitis virus; 4) vectors of JE virus; 5) epidemiological locations (endemic area, endemoepidemic area, epidemic area); 6) unknown epidemiological aspects; 7) JE virus serotypes; 8) evolution of the disease and recent epidemiological changes; 9) phylogenetic origin of the JE virus; 10) ecological changes in the past, factors in the emergence of the disease; and 11) the future: Can we predict how the situation will evolve?

  7. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  8. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  9. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Snow, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate

  10. Detection of viral and bacterial pathogens in hospitalized children with acute respiratory illnesses, Chongqing, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, En-Mei; Wo, Yin; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause large disease burden each year. The codetection of viral and bacterial pathogens is quite common; however, the significance for clinical severity remains controversial. We aimed to identify viruses and bacteria in hospitalized children with ARI and the impact of mixed detections.Hospitalized children with ARI aged ≤16 were recruited from 2009 to 2013 at the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR. Bacteria were isolated from NPAs by routine culture methods. Detection and codetection frequencies and clinical features and severity were compared.Of the 3181 hospitalized children, 2375 (74.7%) were detected with ≥1 virus and 707 (22.2%) with ≥1 bacteria, 901 (28.3%) with ≥2 viruses, 57 (1.8%) with ≥2 bacteria, and 542 (17.0%) with both virus and bacteria. The most frequently detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, and influenza virus. Clinical characteristics were similar among different pathogen infections for older group (≥6 years old), with some significant difference for the younger. Cases with any codetection were more likely to present with fever; those with ≥2 virus detections had higher prevalence of cough; cases with virus and bacteria codetection were more likely to have cough and sputum. No significant difference in the risk of pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and intensive care unit admission were found for any codetection than monodetection.There was a high codetection rate of common respiratory pathogens among hospitalized pediatric ARI cases, with fever as a significant predictor. Cases with codetection showed no significant difference in severity than those with single pathogens. PMID:25906103

  11. Modulation of Type I Interferon-Associated Viral Sensing during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Simon P.; Petitjean, Gaël; Kunkel, Désirée; Liovat, Anne-Sophie; Ploquin, Mickaël J.; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Lebon, Pierre; Jacquelin, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), such as African green monkeys (AGMs), do not progress to AIDS when infected with SIV. This is associated with an absence of a chronic type I interferon (IFN-I) signature. It is unclear how the IFN-I response is downmodulated in AGMs. We longitudinally assessed the capacity of AGM blood cells to produce IFN-I in response to SIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Phenotypes and functions of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and other mononuclear blood cells were assessed by flow cytometry, and expression of viral sensors was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. pDCs displayed low BDCA-2, CD40, and HLA-DR expression levels during AGM acute SIV (SIVagm) infection. BDCA-2 was required for sensing of SIV, but not of HSV, by pDCs. In acute infection, AGM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced less IFN-I upon SIV stimulation. In the chronic phase, the production was normal, confirming that the lack of chronic inflammation is not due to a sensing defect of pDCs. In contrast to stimulation by SIV, more IFN-I was produced upon HSV stimulation of PBMCs isolated during acute infection, while the frequency of AGM pDCs producing IFN-I upon in vitro stimulation with HSV was diminished. Indeed, other cells started producing IFN-I. This increased viral sensing by non-pDCs was associated with an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 and IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 caused by IFN-I in acute SIVagm infection. Our results suggest that, as in pathogenic SIVmac infection, SIVagm infection mobilizes bone marrow precursor pDCs. Moreover, we show that SIV infection modifies the capacity of viral sensing in cells other than pDCs, which could drive IFN-I production in specific settings. IMPORTANCE The effects of HIV/SIV infections on the capacity of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to produce IFN-I in vivo are still incompletely defined. As IFN-I can restrict viral replication, contribute to inflammation

  12. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  13. Transmissible Gastroenteritis MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR DIARRHEA IN AN ACUTE VIRAL ENTERITIS IN PIGLETS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, D. G.; Gali, D. G.; Kelly, M. H.; Hamilton, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    We studied 3-wk-old piglets 40 h after experimental infection with transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus to identify the mechanisms of diarrhea in this disease and to better understand infectious diarrhea in humans. Using continuous segmental marker perfusion in four regions along the gut, we found significant increases in net intraluminal accumulation of water and electrolytes only in the proximal jejunum, the region infected by the virus. In this jejunal segment studied in vivo, unidirectional sodium flux, extracellular fluid (ECF) to lumen, significantly increased, lumen to ECF significantly decreased, compared with matchfed littermates. The standard perfusate rendered hypertonic by adding mannitol (450 mosmol/kg), in the same segment of normal pigs, caused only an increase in ECF to lumen flux of sodium. TGE did not alter gross villous structure or intraluminal bacteria, bile salts, lactate, pH, or osmolality. Epithelial cell migration was accelerated in the jejunum of infected pigs. Isolated in suspension, these cells from TGE pigs exhibited increased active and passive sodium efflux, cells from mannitol-perfused pigs exhibited only increased active sodium efflux. In this viral enteritis, altered sodium transport occurring in the jejunum, the region of the intestine infected appears to be associated with defective epithelial cell function. The precise nature of the abnormalities in sodium transport, their relationship to disturbances of transport of other solutes, and to virus epithelial cell interaction remain to be defined. Images PMID:4825228

  14. Future impact of molecular biology and biotechnology on bacterial and viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Pang, T

    1993-06-01

    The advent of recombinant DNA technology has already made a significant impact on various aspects related to the basic understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in infectious diseases, as well as practical applications related to diagnostics and prevention. The present paper discusses recent technological innovations and increased analytical capabilities which promise to have an even more significant impact on the control of viral and bacterial diseases. PMID:8350782

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed. PMID:26675364

  16. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-12-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed. PMID:26675364

  17. A Temporal Gate for Viral Enhancers to Co-opt Toll-Like-Receptor Transcriptional Activation Pathways upon Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Kai A.; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Isern, Elena; Forster, Thorsten; Krause, Eva; Brune, Wolfram; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2015-01-01

    series of pharmacologic, siRNA and genetic loss-of-function experiments we determined that signalling mediated by the TLR-adaptor protein MyD88 plays a vital role for governing the inflammatory activation of the CMV enhancer in macrophages. Downstream TLR-regulated transcription factor binding motif disruption for NFκB, AP1 and CREB/ATF in the CMV enhancer demonstrated the requirement of these inflammatory signal-regulated elements in driving viral gene expression and growth in cells as well as in primary infection of neonatal mice. Thus, this study shows that the prototypical CMV enhancer, in a restricted time-gated manner, co-opts through DNA regulatory mimicry elements, innate-immune transcription factors to drive viral expression and replication in the face of on-going pro-inflammatory antiviral responses in vitro and in vivo and; suggests an unexpected role for inflammation in promoting acute infection and has important future implications for regulating latency. PMID:25856589

  18. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD, the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help clarifying the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  19. Comparative analysis of viral genomes from acute and chronic hepatitis B reveals novel variants associated with a lower rate of chronicity.

    PubMed

    Chook, Jack Bee; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Khang, Tsung Fei; Ng, Kee Peng; Tiang, Yee Peng; Mohamed, Rosmawati

    2013-03-01

    Infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) may lead to an acute or chronic infection. It is generally accepted that the clinical outcome of infection depends on the balance between host immunity and viral survival strategies. In order to persist, the virus needs to have a high rate of replication and some immune-escape capabilities. Hence, HBVs lacking these properties are likely to be eliminated more rapidly by the host, leading to a lower rate of chronicity. To test this hypothesis, 177 HBV genomes from acute non-fulminant cases and 1,149 from chronic cases were retrieved from GenBank for comparative analysis. Selection of candidate nucleotides associated with the disease state was done using random guess cut-off and the Bonferroni correction. Five significant nucleotides were detected using this filtering step. Their predictive values were assessed using the support vector machine classification with five-fold cross-validation. The average prediction accuracy was 61% ± 1%, with a sensitivity of 24% ± 1%, specificity of 98% ± 1%, positive predictive value of 92% ± 4% and negative predictive value of 56% ± 1%. BCP/X, enhancer I and surface/polymerase variants were found to be associated almost exclusively with acute hepatitis. These HBV variants are novel potential markers for non-progression to chronic hepatitis. PMID:23297244

  20. Outbreak of acute bovine viral diarrhea in Brazilian beef cattle: clinicopathological findings and molecular characterization of a wild-type BVDV strain subtype 1b.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, M; Headley, S A; Lisbôa, J A N; Amude, A M; Alfieri, A A

    2008-12-01

    When first described in 1946, bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) was characterized as an acute transmissible disease associated with severe leucopenia, high fever, depression, diarrhea, gastrointestinal erosions, and hemorrhages. Recently the severe acute form has been related only to some hypervirulent BVDV-2 strains. This article reports the detection of BVDV-1b associated with an acute and fatal outbreak of BVD in a Brazilian beef cattle herd. Depression, anorexia, watery diarrhea, sialorrhea, and weakness were observed in six steers. One of these animals was evaluated for laboratorial, clinical, and pathological alterations. Laboratory findings were non-specific; clinically, the animal was weak, with dehydration and erosive oral lesions. Pathological alterations were predominant at the tongue, esophagus, and rumen. A RT-PCR assay using primers to partially amplify the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the BVDV genome was performed and identified BVDV in all clinical samples analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis of BVDV derived from lymph node revealed that this strain was clustered within the BVDV subtype 1b. This differentiating was only possible to be performed by molecular characterization since both clinical presentation and pathologic findings were similar to BVDV-2 infection.

  1. Neuropharmacological sequelae of persistent CNS viral infections: lessons from Borna disease virus.

    PubMed

    Solbrig, Marylou V; Koob, George F

    2003-03-01

    Borna Disease Virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus that is worldwide in distribution, causing movement and behavior disorders in a wide range of animal species. BDV has also been reported to be associated with neuropsychiatric diseases of humans by serologic study and by recovery of nucleic acid or virus from blood or brain. Natural infections of horses and sheep produce encephalitis with erratic excited behaviors, hyperkinetic movement or gait abnormalities; naturally infected cats have ataxic "staggering disease." Experimentally infected primates develop hyperactivity, aggression, disinhibition, then apathy; prosimians (lower primates) have hyperactivity, circadian disruption, abnormal social and dominance behaviors, and postural disorders. However, the neuropharmacological determinants of BD phenotypes in laboratory and natural hosts are incompletely understood. Here we review how experimentally infected rodents have provided models for examining behavioral, pharmacologic, and biochemical responses to viral challenge, and how rodents experimentally infected as neonates or as adolescents are providing models for examining age-specific neuropharmacological adaptations to viral injury. PMID:12667891

  2. [Relations of melatonin level and insufficiency of T and B immune components in children with acute viral neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, S K; Svechkin, O V; Samsonenko, R A

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the content of melatonin, cortisol and indicators of cellular (E-rosette formation, 3H-lymphocyte blast transformation) and humoral (E AC-rosette formation, IgA, IgM IgG) immunity in 36 children with acute viral neuroinfections (encephalitis, encephalomyelitis, chorio-ependymitis, polyradiculoneuritis). The children's age ranged from 7 to 14 years. A significant correlation was determined between the levels of melatonin, cortisol, 3H-lymphocyte blast transformation and IgG. Variants of immunomodulating therapy are provided, bearing in mind the disorders revealed.

  3. Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system.

  4. Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system. PMID:25230484

  5. Chronic active destructive herpes simplex encephalitis with recovery of viral DNA 12 years after disease onset.

    PubMed

    Asenbauer, B; McEntagart, M; King, M D; Gallagher, P; Burke, M; Farrell, M A

    1998-06-01

    Acute herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) carries significant morbidity and mortality even after early treatment with antiviral agents (7). As well as causing acute neurological disease, Herpes viruses are associated with relapsing--remitting (Varicella--Zoster, Epstein-Barr) and chronic (Rasmussen encephalitis) disease processes (1). A two-year-old girl developed acute HSE which was followed by a 10-year neurologic illness characterised by asymmetric spastic tetraparesis, pseudobulbar palsy, the opercular syndrome of Foix-Chavany-Marie (4) and seizures. The neurological signs remained static until the child died suddenly 12 years after disease onset. Neuropathologic examination demonstrated active chronic encephalitis. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA was recovered from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded brain tissue. This case provides additional evidence for the development of chronic neurological disease attributable to persistence of herpes simplex virus type 1. PMID:9706620

  6. The nsp2 Replicase Proteins of Murine Hepatitis Virus and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Are Dispensable for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rachel L.; Sims, Amy C.; Brockway, Sarah M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Denison, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    The positive-stranded RNA genome of the coronaviruses is translated from ORF1 to yield polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into intermediate and mature nonstructural proteins (nsps). Murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) polyproteins incorporate 16 protein domains (nsps), with nsp1 and nsp2 being the most variable among the coronaviruses and having no experimentally confirmed or predicted functions in replication. To determine if nsp2 is essential for viral replication, MHV and SARS-CoV genome RNA was generated with deletions of the nsp2 coding sequence (MHVΔnsp2 and SARSΔnsp2, respectively). Infectious MHVΔnsp2 and SARSΔnsp2 viruses recovered from electroporated cells had 0.5 to 1 log10 reductions in peak titers in single-cycle growth assays, as well as a reduction in viral RNA synthesis that was not specific for any positive-stranded RNA species. The Δnsp2 mutant viruses lacked expression of both nsp2 and an nsp2-nsp3 precursor, but cleaved the engineered chimeric nsp1-nsp3 cleavage site as efficiently as the native nsp1-nsp2 cleavage site. Replication complexes in MHVΔnsp2-infected cells lacked nsp2 but were morphologically indistinguishable from those of wild-type MHV by immunofluorescence. nsp2 expressed in cells by stable retroviral transduction was specifically recruited to viral replication complexes upon infection with MHVΔnsp2. These results demonstrate that while nsp2 of MHV and SARS-CoV is dispensable for viral replication in cell culture, deletion of the nsp2 coding sequence attenuates viral growth and RNA synthesis. These findings also provide a system for the study of determinants of nsp targeting and function. PMID:16227261

  7. The nsp2 replicase proteins of murine hepatitis virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus are dispensable for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rachel L; Sims, Amy C; Brockway, Sarah M; Baric, Ralph S; Denison, Mark R

    2005-11-01

    The positive-stranded RNA genome of the coronaviruses is translated from ORF1 to yield polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into intermediate and mature nonstructural proteins (nsps). Murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) polyproteins incorporate 16 protein domains (nsps), with nsp1 and nsp2 being the most variable among the coronaviruses and having no experimentally confirmed or predicted functions in replication. To determine if nsp2 is essential for viral replication, MHV and SARS-CoV genome RNA was generated with deletions of the nsp2 coding sequence (MHVDeltansp2 and SARSDeltansp2, respectively). Infectious MHVDeltansp2 and SARSDeltansp2 viruses recovered from electroporated cells had 0.5 to 1 log10 reductions in peak titers in single-cycle growth assays, as well as a reduction in viral RNA synthesis that was not specific for any positive-stranded RNA species. The Deltansp2 mutant viruses lacked expression of both nsp2 and an nsp2-nsp3 precursor, but cleaved the engineered chimeric nsp1-nsp3 cleavage site as efficiently as the native nsp1-nsp2 cleavage site. Replication complexes in MHVDeltansp2-infected cells lacked nsp2 but were morphologically indistinguishable from those of wild-type MHV by immunofluorescence. nsp2 expressed in cells by stable retroviral transduction was specifically recruited to viral replication complexes upon infection with MHVDeltansp2. These results demonstrate that while nsp2 of MHV and SARS-CoV is dispensable for viral replication in cell culture, deletion of the nsp2 coding sequence attenuates viral growth and RNA synthesis. These findings also provide a system for the study of determinants of nsp targeting and function. PMID:16227261

  8. Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Depleted Irreversibly during Acute HIV-1 Infection in the Absence of Viral Suppression.

    PubMed

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Kazer, Samuel W; Mjösberg, Jenny; Mabuka, Jenniffer M; Wellmann, Amanda; Ndhlovu, Zaza; Yadon, Marisa C; Nhamoyebonde, Shepherd; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Simoni, Yannick; Andersson, Frank; Kuhn, Warren; Garrett, Nigel; Burgers, Wendy A; Kamya, Philomena; Pretorius, Karyn; Dong, Krista; Moodley, Amber; Newell, Evan W; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Goulder, Philip; Shalek, Alex K; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Leslie, Alasdair

    2016-02-16

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play a central role in the response to infection by secreting cytokines crucial for immune regulation, tissue homeostasis, and repair. Although dysregulation of these systems is central to pathology, the impact of HIV-1 on ILCs remains unknown. We found that human blood ILCs were severely depleted during acute viremic HIV-1 infection and that ILC numbers did not recover after resolution of peak viremia. ILC numbers were preserved by antiretroviral therapy (ART), but only if initiated during acute infection. Transcriptional profiling during the acute phase revealed upregulation of genes associated with cell death, temporally linked with a strong IFN acute-phase response and evidence of gut barrier breakdown. We found no evidence of tissue redistribution in chronic disease and remaining circulating ILCs were activated but not apoptotic. These data provide a potential mechanistic link between acute HIV-1 infection, lymphoid tissue breakdown, and persistent immune dysfunction. PMID:26850658

  9. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: a curable disease.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, F; Nervi, C; Avvisati, G; Mandelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The Second International Symposium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) was held in Rome in 12-14 November 1997. Clinical and basic investigators had the opportunity to discuss in this meeting the important advances in the biology and treatment of this disease achieved in the last 4 years, since the First Roman Symposium was held in 1993. The first part of the meeting was dedicated to relevant aspects of laboratory research, and included the following topics: molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis and of response/resistance to retinoids, biologic and therapeutic effects of new agents such as arsenicals and novel synthetic retinoids; characterization of APL heterogeneity at the morphological, cytogenetic and immunophenotypic level. The updated results of large cooperative clinical trials using variable combinations of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy were presented by the respective group chairmen, and formed the 'core' part of the meeting. These studies, which in most cases integrated the molecular assessment of response to treatment, provided a stimulating framework for an intense debate on the most appropriate frontline treatment options to be adopted in the future. The last day was dedicated to special entities such as APL in the elderly and in the child, as well as the role of bone marrow transplantation. The prognostic value of molecular monitoring studies was also discussed in the final session of the meeting. In this article, we review the major advances and controversial issues in APL biology and treatment discussed in this symposium and emerging from very recent publications. We would like to credit the successful outcome of this meeting to the active and generous input of all invited speakers and to participants from all over the world who provided constructive and fruitful discussions.

  10. Herbal plants and plant preparations as remedial approach for viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Ganjhu, Rajesh Kumar; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Maity, Hindol; Dowarha, Deepu; Devadiga, Santhosha; Nag, Snehlata; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2015-12-01

    Herbal plants, plant preparations and phytoconstituents have proved useful in attenuating infectious conditions and were the only remedies available, till the advent of antibiotics (many being of plant origin themselves). Among infectious diseases, viral diseases in particular, remain the leading cause of death in humans globally. A variety of phytoconstituents derived from medicinal herbs have been extensively studied for antiviral activity. Based on this rationale, an online search was performed, which helped to identify a large number of plant species harboring antiviral molecules. These herbal sources have been reported individually or in combinations across a large number of citations studied. Activities against rabies virus, Human immunodeficiency virus, Chandipura virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Enterovirus, Influenza A/H1N1 and other influenza viruses were discovered during the literature search. This review includes all such plant species exhibiting antiviral properties. The review also encompasses composition and methodologies of preparing various antiviral formulations around the globe. An elaborate section on the formulations filed for patent registration, along with non-patented formulations, has also been included in this article. To conclude, herbal sources provide researchers enormous scope to explore and bring out viable alternatives against viral diseases, considering non-availability of suitable drug candidates and increasing resistance to existing drug molecules for many emerging and re-emerging viral diseases. PMID:26645032

  11. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  12. Programmed cell death of T lymphocytes during acute viral infection: a mechanism for virus-induced immune deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Razvi, E S; Welsh, R M

    1993-01-01

    Acute viral infections induce immune deficiencies, as shown by unresponsiveness to mitogens and unrelated antigens. T lymphocytes isolated from mice acutely infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) were found in this study to undergo activation-induced apoptosis upon signalling through the T-cell receptor (TcR)-CD3 complex. Kinetic studies demonstrated that this sensitivity to apoptosis directly correlated with the induction of immune deficiency, as measured by impaired proliferation in response to anti-CD3 antibody or to concanavalin A. Cell cycling in interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone stimulated proliferation of LCMV-induced T cells without inducing apoptosis, but preculturing of T cells from acutely infected mice in IL-2 accelerated apoptosis upon subsequent TcR-CD3 cross-linking. T lymphocytes isolated from mice after the acute infection were less responsive to IL-2, but those T cells, presumably memory T cells, responding to IL-2 were primed in each case to die a rapid apoptotic death upon TcR-CD3 cross-linking. These results indicate that virus infection-induced unresponsiveness to T-cell mitogens is due to apoptosis of the activated lymphocytes and suggest that the sensitization of memory cells by IL-2 induced during infection will cause them to die upon antigen recognition, thereby impairing specific responses to nonviral antigens. Images PMID:8371341

  13. Dengue-induced Acute Kidney Injury (DAKI): A Neglected and Fatal Complication of Dengue Viral Infection--A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Yusra Habib; Hamzah, Azhar Amir; Jummaat, Fauziah; Khan, Amer Hayat

    2015-11-01

    Dengue Viral Infection (DVI) imperils an estimated 2.5 billion people living in tropical and subtropical regions. World Health Organization (2011) guidelines also classified dengue as 'Expanded Dengue Syndrome' to incorporate wide spectrum of unusual manifestations of dengue infection affecting various organ systems - including liver, kidney, heart and brain. Renal involvements are least appreciated area of dengue infection, therefore, we systematically reviewed studies describing renal disorders in dengue infection, with emphasis on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). The purpose of current review is to underscore clinicians’attention to this neglected intricacy of DVI. It suggests that dengue induced renal involvements vary from glomerulonephritis, nephrotic range proteinuria and AKI. We observed great disparity in incidence of AKI among dengue patients, based upon criteria used to define AKI. AKI among dengue patients was found to be associated with significant morbidity, mortality and longer hospitalization, adding financial burden to patients and healthcare system. Additionally, we identified several predictors of AKI in dengue patients including old age, obesity, severe dengue infection and concurrent bacterial or viral infection. Direct viral injury and deposition of antigen-antibody complex in glomerulus were found to be possible causes of renal disorders in dengue infection. Prior knowledge of clinico-laboratory characteristics and risk factors with early detection of AKI by using appropriate criteria would not only reduce morbidity and mortality but also decrease burden to patients and healthcare system. PMID:26577971

  14. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  15. Evaluation of the functional involvement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in nuclear import of viral cDNA during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tamako; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Zhou, Xin; Nara, Nobuo; Ohashi, Takashi; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2004-11-01

    Nuclear import of viral cDNA is a critical step for establishing the proviral state of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The contribution of HIV-1 integrase (IN) to the nuclear import of viral cDNA is controversial, partly due to a lack of identification of its bona fide nuclear localization signal. In this study, to address this putative function of HIV-1 IN, the effects of mutations at key residues for viral cDNA recognition (PYNP at positions 142 to 145, K156, K159, and K160) were evaluated in the context of viral replication. During acute infection, some mutations (N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA) severely reduced viral gene expression to less than 1% the wild-type (WT) level. None of the mutations affected the synthesis of viral cDNA. Meanwhile, the levels of integrated viral cDNA produced by N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutants were severely reduced to less than 1% the WT level. Quantitative PCR analysis of viral cDNA in nuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that these mutations significantly reduced the level of viral cDNA accumulation in nuclei. Further analysis revealed that IN proteins carrying the N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutations showed severely reduced binding to viral cDNA but kept their karyophilic properties. Taken together, these results indicate that mutations that reduced the binding of IN to viral cDNA resulted in severe impairment of virus infectivity, most likely by affecting the nuclear import of viral cDNA that proceeds integration. These results suggest that HIV-1 IN may be one of the critical constituents for the efficient nuclear import of viral cDNA.

  16. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  17. Viral Metagenomics on Blood-Feeding Arthropods as a Tool for Human Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Annika; Nitsche, Andreas; Kohl, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance and monitoring of viral pathogens circulating in humans and wildlife, together with the identification of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), are critical for the prediction of future disease outbreaks and epidemics at an early stage. It is advisable to sample a broad range of vertebrates and invertebrates at different temporospatial levels on a regular basis to detect possible candidate viruses at their natural source. However, virus surveillance systems can be expensive, costly in terms of finances and resources and inadequate for sampling sufficient numbers of different host species over space and time. Recent publications have presented the concept of a new virus surveillance system, coining the terms “flying biological syringes”, “xenosurveillance” and “vector-enabled metagenomics”. According to these novel and promising surveillance approaches, viral metagenomics on engorged mosquitoes might reflect the viral diversity of numerous mammals, birds and humans, combined in the mosquitoes’ blood meal during feeding on the host. In this review article, we summarize the literature on vector-enabled metagenomics (VEM) techniques and its application in disease surveillance in humans. Furthermore, we highlight the combination of VEM and “invertebrate-derived DNA” (iDNA) analysis to identify the host DNA within the mosquito midgut. PMID:27775568

  18. Dengue virus therapeutic intervention strategies based on viral, vector and host factors involved in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Lara J; Zakhary, Andrew; Gahan, Michelle E; Nelson, Michelle A; Herring, Belinda L; Hapel, Andrew J; Keller, Paul A; Obeysekera, Maheshi; Chen, Weiqiang; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Taylor, Adam; Wolf, Stefan; Bettadapura, Jayaram; Broor, Shobha; Dar, Lalit; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2013-02-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is the most widespread arbovirus, being endemic in over 100 countries, and is estimated to cause 50 million infections annually. Viral factors, such as the genetic composition of the virus strain can play a role in determining the virus virulence and subsequent clinical disease severity. Virus vector competence plays an integral role in virus transmission and is a critical factor in determining the severity and impact of DV outbreaks. Host genetic variations in immune-related genes, including the human leukocyte antigen, have also been shown to correlate with clinical disease and thus may play a role in regulating disease severity. The host's immune system, however, appears to be the primary factor in DV pathogenesis with the delicate interplay of innate and acquired immunity playing a crucial role. Although current research of DV pathogenesis has been limited by the lack of an appropriate animal model, the development of DV therapeutics has been a primary focus of research groups around the world. In the past decade advances in both the development of vaccines and anti-virals have increased in dramatically. This review summarises the current understanding of viral, vector and host factors which contribute to dengue virus pathogenesis and how this knowledge is critically important in the development of pharmaceutical interventions. PMID:23103333

  19. Epidemiology and detection as options for control of viral and parasitic foodborne disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jaykus, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Human enteric viruses and protozoal parasites are important causes of emerging food and waterborne disease. Epidemiologic investigation and detection of the agents in clinical, food, and water specimens, which are traditionally used to establish the cause of disease outbreaks, are either cumbersome, expensive, and frequently unavailable or unattempted for the important food and waterborne enteric viruses and protozoa. However, the recent introduction of regulatory testing mandates, alternative testing strategies, and increased epidemiologic surveillance for food and waterborne disease should significantly improve the ability to detect and control these agents. We discuss new methods of investigating foodborne viral and parasitic disease and the future of these methods in recognizing, identifying, and controlling disease agents. PMID:9366607

  20. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  1. Non-viral delivery of the porphobilinogen deaminase cDNA into a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Annika; Nowak, Grzegorz; Möller, Christer; Harper, Pauline

    2004-05-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inborn error of metabolism, results from the deficient activity of the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Clinical symptoms of this autosomal dominant hepatic porphyria include episodic acute attacks of abdominal pain, neuropathy, and psychiatric disturbances. Current therapy based on intravenous heme administration is palliative and there is no way to prevent the attacks. Thus, efforts are focused on methods to replace the deficient activity in the liver to prevent the acute attacks of this hepatic porphyria. Here we explore the efficiency of a non-viral gene delivery to obtain PBGD expression in the liver of AIP transgenic mice. Four vectors were evaluated: naked DNA and DNA complexed to liposomes, polyethylenimine (PEI), and PEI-galactose, using a luciferase construct as reporter gene. The vectors were administered intravenously or directly into the portal vein with transient blood flow blockage. After tail vein injection of the DNA complexes, the liposome vector had the highest luciferase expression in lung and less in liver. When injected into the portal vein, the naked DNA had considerably higher hepatic reporter gene expression; 100 microg of naked DNA had the highest hepatic luciferase expression 24h after portal vein injection. When these vectors were used to deliver the PBGD gene into the AIP mouse model no enhancement of the endogenous PBGD activity in liver was detectable, despite the presence of the PBGD-plasmids as verified by PCR. Thus, more efficient non-viral vectors are needed to express sufficient PBGD activity over the endogenous hepatic level (approximately 30% of normal) in this murine system.

  2. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  3. [The concept of emerging viral diseases: what risk for Reunion Island?].

    PubMed

    Peton, M; Vilain, P; Reilhes, O; Cardinale, E; Gaüzère, B A; Filleul, L

    2013-08-01

    In Reunion Island, the risk of emerging infectious diseases lies mainly in several viral zoonoses: West Nile fever, Sindbis virus, Nipah virus, Wesselsbron virus, Rift Valley fever and Japanese encephalitis. There morbidity and consequences are more or less important but they all have a non-negligible epidemic potential, so they have to be monitored. Indeed, the struggle against these emerging infectious diseases requires an early detection of the cases, thus a surveillance system capable of detecting them as early as possible, thanks to a real international network of information, warning and prevention. PMID:23765703

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  5. Aptamer-based therapeutics: new approaches to combat human viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2013-11-25

    Viruses replicate inside the cells of an organism and continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment. Many life-threatening diseases, such as AIDS, SARS, hepatitis and some cancers, are caused by viruses. Because viruses have small genome sizes and high mutability, there is currently a lack of and an urgent need for effective treatment for many viral pathogens. One approach that has recently received much attention is aptamer-based therapeutics. Aptamer technology has high target specificity and versatility, i.e., any viral proteins could potentially be targeted. Consequently, new aptamer-based therapeutics have the potential to lead a revolution in the development of anti-infective drugs. Additionally, aptamers can potentially bind any targets and any pathogen that is theoretically amenable to rapid targeting, making aptamers invaluable tools for treating a wide range of diseases. This review will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of viral therapies that use aptamers. The aptamer selection process will be described, followed by an explanation of the potential for treating virus infection by aptamers. Recent progress and prospective use of aptamers against a large variety of human viruses, such as HIV-1, HCV, HBV, SCoV, Rabies virus, HPV, HSV and influenza virus, with particular focus on clinical development of aptamers will also be described. Finally, we will discuss the challenges of advancing antiviral aptamer therapeutics and prospects for future success.

  6. Disease burden in Brazil: an investigation into alcohol and non-viral cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Flávia Batista; Campos, Mônica Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Juliana Ribeiro; Flor, Luisa Sório; Schramm, Joyce Mendes de Andrade; Costa, Maria de Fátima dos Santos

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol use/dependence are an important risk factor for cirrhosis of the liver. The article aims to describe and conduct a comparative analysis of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY), Years of Life Lost (YLL) and Years Lived with Disability (YLD) of alcohol use disorders and non-viral cirrhosis in Brazil in 2008. DALY was calculated as the sum of YLL and YLD. For YLL estimates, the mean number of deaths from 2007- 2009 in the country was considered. After revision of epidemiological data, prevalence of each disease was modelled with the DisMod tool, which generated incidence data for YLD estimates. Alcohol and non-viral cirrhosis were responsible for 3% and 1% of total DALYs, respectively. In both diseases, men contributed to a greater proportion of DALYs. Among the first ten causes of DALYs, alcohol use disorders occupied the second, third and sixth positions at the ages of 15-29, 30-44 and 45- 59, respectively. Non-viral cirrhosis was the eighth cause of DALY in the 30-44 age group in men; the fifth, in the 45-59 group and the eighth, in the 60-69 group. Age distribution suggests that interventions directed against alcohol use/dependence would have effects on the burden of alcoholic cirrhosis in the country. PMID:25715143

  7. Aptamer-Based Therapeutics: New Approaches to Combat Human Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses replicate inside the cells of an organism and continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment. Many life-threatening diseases, such as AIDS, SARS, hepatitis and some cancers, are caused by viruses. Because viruses have small genome sizes and high mutability, there is currently a lack of and an urgent need for effective treatment for many viral pathogens. One approach that has recently received much attention is aptamer-based therapeutics. Aptamer technology has high target specificity and versatility, i.e., any viral proteins could potentially be targeted. Consequently, new aptamer-based therapeutics have the potential to lead a revolution in the development of anti-infective drugs. Additionally, aptamers can potentially bind any targets and any pathogen that is theoretically amenable to rapid targeting, making aptamers invaluable tools for treating a wide range of diseases. This review will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of viral therapies that use aptamers. The aptamer selection process will be described, followed by an explanation of the potential for treating virus infection by aptamers. Recent progress and prospective use of aptamers against a large variety of human viruses, such as HIV-1, HCV, HBV, SCoV, Rabies virus, HPV, HSV and influenza virus, with particular focus on clinical development of aptamers will also be described. Finally, we will discuss the challenges of advancing antiviral aptamer therapeutics and prospects for future success. PMID:24287493

  8. [The application of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology in viral infection diseases].

    PubMed

    Lijuan, Yin; Siqi, Hu; Fei, Guo

    2015-05-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease from microbial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) adaptive immune system has been used to facilitate efficient genome engineering in eukaryotic cells. The specific targeted genome is recognized and cut by gRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 complex, specifically by the endonuclease Cas9. The targeted gene locus could be repaired either by homology-directed repair or nonhomologous end joining, thus achieving a desired editing outcome. Viruses infect cells through specific receptors, and then the viral genome is transcribed, replicated and translated to complete its life cycle. As a result, some DNA virus and retrovirus genomes are integrated into the cellular genome. Gene therapy is a new trend to treat viral infected diseases. Given its designable sequence-specific editing of the targeted genome, CRISPR/Cas9 has tremendous potential in treating persistent and latent viral infections. In this review, we summarize the mechanism and progresses of CRISPR/Cas9, and also highlight its therapeutic application in infectious diseases.

  9. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges. PMID:8764013

  10. Family history of autoimmune thyroid disease and childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perillat-Menegaux, Florence; Clavel, Jacqueline; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Nelken, Brigitte; Philippe, Noël; Sommelet, Danièle; Vilmer, Etienne; Hémon, Denis

    2003-01-01

    The association between a familial history of autoimmune disease and childhood acute leukemia was investigated in a French case-control study that, overall, was designed to assess the role of perinatal, infectious, environmental, and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. Familial histories of autoimmune disease in first- and second-degree relatives were compared in 279 incident cases, 240 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 39 cases of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 285 controls. Recruitment was frequency matched by age, gender, hospital, and ethnic origin. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using an unconditional regression model taking into account the stratification variables, socioeconomic status, and familial structure. A statistically significant association between a history of autoimmune disease in first- or second-degree relatives and ALL (OR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.8) was found. A relationship between thyroid diseases overall and ALL (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.9) was observed. This association was more pronounced for potentially autoimmune thyroid diseases (Grave's disease and/or hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease and/or hypothyroidism) (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1-10.7 and OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.0-31.1, respectively for ALL and ANLL), whereas it was not statistically significant for the other thyroid diseases (thyroid goiter, thyroid nodule, and unspecified thyroid disorders) (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.5 and OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.2-7.0, respectively, for ALL and ANLL). The results suggest that a familial history of autoimmune thyroid disease may be associated with childhood acute leukemia.

  11. Plasma viral RNA load predicts disease progression in accelerated feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, L J; Mathiason-Dubard, C K; O'Neil, L L; Hoover, E A

    1996-01-01

    Viral RNA load has been shown to indicate disease stage and predict the rapidity of disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. We had previously demonstrated that feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA levels in plasma correlate with disease stage in infected cats. Here we expand upon those observations by demonstrating that plasma virus load is 1 to 2 logs higher in cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease than in long-term survivors. Differences in plasma FIV RNA levels are evident by 1 to 2 weeks after infection and are consistent throughout infection. We also evaluated humoral immune responses in FIV-infected cats for correlation with survival times. Total anti-FIV antibody titers did not differ between cats with rapidly progressive FIV disease and long-term survivors. These findings indicate that virus replication plays an important role in FIV disease progression, as it does in HIV-1 disease progression. The parallels in virus loads and disease progressions between HIV-1 and FIV support the idea that the accelerated disease model is well suited for the study of therapeutic agents directed at reducing lentiviral replication. PMID:8642679

  12. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  13. Aetiological role of viral and bacterial infections in acute adult lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Creer, D D; Dilworth, J P; Gillespie, S H; Johnston, A R; Johnston, S L; Ling, C; Patel, S; Sanderson, G; Wallace, P G; McHugh, T D

    2006-01-01

    Background Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are a common reason for consulting general practitioners (GPs). In most cases the aetiology is unknown, yet most result in an antibiotic prescription. The aetiology of LRTI was investigated in a prospective controlled study. Methods Eighty adults presenting to GPs with acute LRTI were recruited together with 49 controls over 12 months. Throat swabs, nasal aspirates (patients and controls), and sputum (patients) were obtained and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) assays were used to detect Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, influenza viruses (AH1, AH3 and B), parainfluenza viruses 1–3, coronaviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, rhinoviruses, and enteroviruses. Standard sputum bacteriology was also performed. Outcome was recorded at a follow up visit. Results Potential pathogens were identified in 55 patients with LRTI (69%) and seven controls (14%; p<0.0001). The identification rate was 63% (viruses) and 26% (bacteria) for patients and 12% (p<0.0001) and 6% (p = 0.013), respectively, for controls. The most common organisms identified in the patients were rhinoviruses (33%), influenza viruses (24%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%) compared with 2% (p<0.001), 6% (p = 0.013), and 4% (p = 0.034), respectively, in controls. Multiple pathogens were identified in 18 of the 80 LRTI patients (22.5%) and in two of the 49 controls (4%; p = 0.011). Atypical organisms were rarely identified. Cases with bacterial aetiology were clinically indistinguishable from those with viral aetiology. Conclusion Patients presenting to GPs with acute adult LRTI predominantly have a viral illness which is most commonly caused by rhinoviruses and influenza viruses. PMID:16227331

  14. Viral surveillance and discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

    2014-01-01

    The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

  15. Acute non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces pronounced type I interferon response in pregnant cows and fetuses.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Austin, Kathleen J; Han, Hyungchul; Montgomery, Donald L; Shoemaker, Megan L; van Olphen, Alberto L; Hansen, Thomas R

    2008-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection occurs in the cattle population worldwide. Non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV strains cause transient infection (TI) or persistent infection (PI) depending on the host's immune status. Immunocompetent adult animals and fetuses in late gestation resolve the infection. Fetal infection in early gestation results in PI with chronic viremia and life-long viral shedding, ensuring virus perpetuation in the population. Eighteen pregnant heifers, divided into three groups, were intranasally inoculated with ncp BVDV2 virus early (day 75) and late (day 175) in gestation, or kept BVDV-naïve. Fetuses were retrieved on day 190. Antiviral activity in blood of dams and fetuses, maternal expression of interferon (IFN) stimulated gene 15kDa (ISG15), virological and serological status of heifers and fetuses, and fetal growth were studied. A pronounced antiviral activity in blood of heifers and TI fetuses during acute BVDV infection was accompanied by drastic up-regulation of ISG15 mRNA in maternal blood. Only one PI fetus expressed low IFN response 115 days post inoculation despite high BVDV antigen and RNA levels. PI fetuses presented with growth retardation. Infection of pregnant heifers with ncp BVDV2 early in gestation adversely affects fetal development and antiviral responses, despite protective immune responses in the dam.

  16. Acute non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces pronounced type I interferon response in pregnant cows and fetuses.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Austin, Kathleen J; Han, Hyungchul; Montgomery, Donald L; Shoemaker, Megan L; van Olphen, Alberto L; Hansen, Thomas R

    2008-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection occurs in the cattle population worldwide. Non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV strains cause transient infection (TI) or persistent infection (PI) depending on the host's immune status. Immunocompetent adult animals and fetuses in late gestation resolve the infection. Fetal infection in early gestation results in PI with chronic viremia and life-long viral shedding, ensuring virus perpetuation in the population. Eighteen pregnant heifers, divided into three groups, were intranasally inoculated with ncp BVDV2 virus early (day 75) and late (day 175) in gestation, or kept BVDV-naïve. Fetuses were retrieved on day 190. Antiviral activity in blood of dams and fetuses, maternal expression of interferon (IFN) stimulated gene 15kDa (ISG15), virological and serological status of heifers and fetuses, and fetal growth were studied. A pronounced antiviral activity in blood of heifers and TI fetuses during acute BVDV infection was accompanied by drastic up-regulation of ISG15 mRNA in maternal blood. Only one PI fetus expressed low IFN response 115 days post inoculation despite high BVDV antigen and RNA levels. PI fetuses presented with growth retardation. Infection of pregnant heifers with ncp BVDV2 early in gestation adversely affects fetal development and antiviral responses, despite protective immune responses in the dam. PMID:18053605

  17. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purposing of existing, licenced medicines that may limit the morbidity and mortality rates of EBOV and could be used immediately. Here we test three such medicines and measure their ability to inhibit pseudotype viruses (PVs) of two EBOV species, Marburg virus (MARV) and avian influenza H5 (FLU-H5). We confirm the ability of chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit viral entry in a pH specific manner. The commonly used proton pump inhibitors, Omeprazole and Esomeprazole were also able to inhibit entry of all PVs tested but at higher drug concentrations than may be achieved in vivo. We propose CQ as a priority candidate to consider for treatment of EBOV. PMID:26069727

  18. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry.

    PubMed

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purposing of existing, licenced medicines that may limit the morbidity and mortality rates of EBOV and could be used immediately. Here we test three such medicines and measure their ability to inhibit pseudotype viruses (PVs) of two EBOV species, Marburg virus (MARV) and avian influenza H5 (FLU-H5). We confirm the ability of chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit viral entry in a pH specific manner. The commonly used proton pump inhibitors, Omeprazole and Esomeprazole were also able to inhibit entry of all PVs tested but at higher drug concentrations than may be achieved in vivo. We propose CQ as a priority candidate to consider for treatment of EBOV. PMID:26069727

  19. An individual-based model of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease on European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, John E.; Sharples, Colin M.; Bell, Diana J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an individual-based model of Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) for European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), representing up to 1000 rabbits in four hectares. Model output for productivity and recruitment matched published values. The disease was density-dependent and virulence affected outcome. Strains that caused death after several days produced greater overall mortality than strains in which rabbits either died or recovered very quickly. Disease effect also depended on time of year. We also elaborated a larger scale model representing 25 km2 and 100,000+ rabbits, split into a number of grid-squares. This was a more traditional model that did not represent individual rabbits, but employed a system of dynamic equations for each grid-square. Disease spread depended on probability of transmission between neighboring grid-squares. Potential recovery from a major population crash caused by the disease relied on disease virulence and frequency of recurrence. The model's dependence on probability of disease transmission between grid-squares suggests the way that the model represents the spatial distribution of the population affects simulation. Although data on RVHD in Europe are lacking, our models provide a basis for describing the disease in realistic detail and for assessing influence of various social and spatial factors on spread.

  20. Venezuelan equine encephalitis in Panama: fatal endemic disease and genetic diversity of etiologic viral strains.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2009-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961-2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America.

  1. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis in Panama: Fatal Endemic Disease and Genetic Diversity of Etiologic Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Evelia; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Cisneros, Julio; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a reemerging, mosquito-borne viral disease of the neotropics that is severely debilitating and sometimes fatal to humans. Periodic epidemics mediated by equine amplification have been recognized since the 1920s, but interepidemic disease is rarely recognized. We report here clinical findings and genetic characterization of 42 cases of endemic VEE detected in Panama from 1961–2004. Recent clusters of cases occurred in Darien (eastern Panama) and Panama provinces (central Panama) near rainforest and swamp habitats. Patients ranged from 10 months to 48 years of age, and the more severe cases with neurological complications, including one fatal infection, were observed in children. The VEE virus strains isolated from these cases all belonged to an enzootic, subtype ID lineage known to circulate among sylvatic vectors and rodent reservoir hosts in Panama and Peru. These findings underscore endemic VEE as an important but usually neglected arboviral disease of Latin America. PMID:19564908

  2. Greater numbers of nucleotide substitutions are introduced into the genomic RNA of bovine viral diarrhea virus during acute infections of pregnant cattle than of non-pregnant cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains circulating in domestic livestock herds show significant sequence variation. Conventional wisdom states that most sequence variation arises during acute infections in response to immune or other environmental pressures. A recent study showed that more nucle...

  3. Blue moon neurovirology: the merits of studying rare CNS diseases of viral origin.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lauren A; Rall, Glenn F

    2010-09-01

    While measles virus (MV) continues to have a significant impact on human health, causing 150,000-200,000 deaths worldwide each year, the number of fatalities that can be attributed to MV-triggered central nervous system (CNS) diseases are on the order of a few hundred individuals annually (World Health Organization 2009). Despite this modest impact, substantial effort has been expended to understand the basis of measles-triggered neuropathogenesis. What can be gained by studying such a rare condition? Simply stated, the wealth of studies in this field have revealed core principles that are relevant to multiple neurotropic pathogens, and that inform the broader field of viral pathogenesis. In recent years, the emergence of powerful in vitro systems, novel animal models, and reverse genetics has enabled insights into the basis of MV persistence, the complexity of MV interactions with neurons and the immune system, and the role of immune and CNS development in virus-triggered disease. In this review, we highlight some key advances, link relevant measles-based studies to the broader disciplines of neurovirology and viral pathogenesis, and propose future areas of study for the field of measles-mediated neurological disease.

  4. Investigation of intestine function during acute viral hepatitis using combined sugar oral loads.

    PubMed Central

    Parrilli, G; Cuomo, R; Nardone, G; Maio, G; Izzo, C M; Budillon, G

    1987-01-01

    One fifth of all cases of A virus hepatitis (AVH) have symptoms of gastroenteritis at the onset. This study investigated the mediated intestinal absorption of D-xylose (D-xyl) and 3-o-methyl-D-glucose (3-omG) and the non-mediated permeation of lactulose (Lacl, mol wt 342) and L-rhamnose (L-rh, mol wt 164) during acute and remission phases of AVH. Ten patients with AVH were given an oral load containing these sugars (5 g D-xyl: 2.5 g 3-omG, 1 g L-rh, 5 g lacl in 250 ml water) once during the acute phase and again during remission. The same load was given once to a group of 22 healthy controls. The mean concentration of D-xyl in urine and the ratio of D-xyl to 3-omG in plasma and urine were normal in both the AVH phases, ruling out intestinal malabsorption even in the acute phase. This study showed a significant increase in non-mediated permeation to Lacl, but not to L-rh, during the acute phase. These data indicate that the barrier function of the intestine is compromised in AVH infection while the absorptive function is not. An abnormally low concentration of D-xyl and 3-omG in plasma at one hour was found in all patients during the acute phase. This finding cannot be explained by alterations in intestinal absorption, but could be accounted for by increased space distribution of the sugars because of increased diffusion into tissue cells and/or expansion of the extracellular space by fluid retention. PMID:3428669

  5. Absence of measles viral genomic sequence in intestinal tissues from Crohn's disease by nested polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y; Funakoshi, O; Kuroe, K; Kanazawa, K; Nakajima, H; Saito, H; Murata, Y; Munakata, A; Yoshida, Y

    1996-01-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease remains unknown, although evidence for a viral cause has long been sought. Recent studies have shown inflammation of the submucosal microvascular endothelium and granulomata, and endothelial cell cytoplasmic inclusions, consistent with paramyxovirus, were identified by electron microscopy suggesting a persistent measles virus infection in Crohn's disease. Measles, mumps, and rubella viruses were tested for Crohn's disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RNA was extracted from resected intestinal specimens from 15 patients with Crohn's disease, 14 with ulcerative colitis, and 14 controls without inflammatory bowel disease. This was used to perform nested PCR after reverse transcription (RT) of the RNA to cDNA with primer pairs directed against two regions in the genome of the measles virus and one region in the mumps and rubella viral genomes. Despite enhanced sensitivity of nested RT-PCR, measles, mumps, and rubella viral genomic sequences were not found in any intestinal specimen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8801199

  6. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Grytdal, Scott P; DeBess, Emilio; Lee, Lore E; Blythe, David; Ryan, Patricia; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D; Hall, Aron J

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children <5 years of age (outpatient incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1

  7. Increased Expressions of IL-22 and Th22 cells in the coxsackievirus B3-Induced mice acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, a new subset of T helper (Th) cell that predominantly secret cytokine interleukin-22 (IL-22) is identified, termed Th22 cells. The Th22 subset has been demonstrated to be involved in immunity and tissue inflammation. However, the existence of Th22 cells and role of IL-22 in acute viral myocarditis (AVMC) remain unknown. Methods BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally (i.p) infected with CVB3 for establishing AVMC models. Control mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) i.p. On day 14 post injection, frequencies of splenic Th22 cells were determined, productions of IL-22 and expressions of IL-22R (IL-22 receptor) were measured. To further investigate the effects of IL-22, AVMC mice treated with Anti-IL-22 neutralizing antibody were explored. The severity of AVMC were monitored; the frequencies of Th22 cells, the expressions of IL-22 and IL-22R were investigated; in addition to IFN-γ, inflammatory cytokines IL-17, TNF-α, IL-6 as well as IL-1β, were evaluated. Cardiac viral replication were detected. Results Compared with control group, significant elevations of circulating Th22 cells and IL-22, cardiac protein and mRNA of IL-22, and IL-22R1 were demonstrated in AVMC group. Treatment of AVMC mice with Anti-IL-22 Ab exacerbated the severity of viral myocarditis, verified by lower survival rate, higher HW/BW ratios and cardiac pathological scores. Anti-IL-22 Ab decreased the frequencies of Th22 cells and the levels of IL-22, and increased the expressions of cardiac IL-22R1. Up-regulations of IL-17, IL-6 and TNF-α, down-regulations of IFN-γ proteins and gene expressions in the plasma and myocardium, were observed in Anti-IL-22 Ab group. Furthermore, neutralization of IL-22 significantly promoted cardiac viral replication. Conclusions Our data indicate that the increased frequencies of IL-22-producing Th22 cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced mice AVMC, IL-22 may act as an myocardium-protective cytokine

  8. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  9. Acute diarrhoeal disease in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John E.; Guzmán, Miguel A.; Ascoli, Werner; Scrimshaw, Nevin S.

    1964-01-01

    A number of primary epidemiological characteristics are recognized as common to members of a syndrome designated “acute undifferentiated diarrhoeal disease”. This syndrome includes both specific and non-specific diarrhoeal disorders. Within the existing knowledge and with the facilities available in less developed countries, an epidemiological basis for control, directed against the syndrome as a whole, is presented as the practical approach to community management. Clinical and microbiological distinctions do not extend to the main bulk of the problem. Individual epidemiological patterns exist according to age and varying social and ecological conditions. Field study by periodic home visits over four years has defined these patterns in highland rural villages in Guatemala. The chief problem was weanling diarrhoea. PMID:14230899

  10. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  11. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats.

  12. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  13. Current and future applications of dried blood spots in viral disease management.

    PubMed

    Snijdewind, Ingrid J M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Fraaij, Pieter L A; van der Ende, Marchina E; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Gruters, Rob A

    2012-03-01

    Almost five decades after their first application in diagnostics, dried blood spot (DBS) cards remain to be of key interest in many research areas and clinical applications. The advantages of sample stability during transport and storage, can now be combined with the high sensitivity of novel diagnostic techniques for the measurement and analysis of nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules which may overcome the limitations of the small samples sizes in DBS cards. Here we present a survey of the literature on the use of DBS cards for diagnosis, monitoring and epidemiological studies of virus infections other than HIV, including CMV, HBV, HCV, HAV, HEV, HTLV, EBV, HSV, measles-, rubella- and dengue-virus. The minimal invasiveness of sampling and the relative ease of handling and storing DBS cards is expected to offer additional opportunities to measure and analyze biomarkers of viral disease in resource poor settings or when limited amount of blood can be obtained. Large retrospective studies of virus infections in newborns using stored DBS cards have already been undertaken for screening of congenital infections. In addition, DBS cards have been used prospectively for prevalence studies, outbreak surveillance, mass screening for viral infections, follow-up of chronic infection and its treatment in resource-limited areas. We do not expect that current wet sampling techniques of plasma or serum will be replaced by DBS sampling but it allows extension of sampling in persons and settings that are currently difficult to access or that lack suitable storage facilities. In conclusion, DBS card sampling and storage will aid adequate outbreak management of existing and emerging viral diseases. PMID:22244848

  14. [Serological survey of antibodies against viral diseases of public health interest in llamas (Lama glama) from Jujuy province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Elena S; Rodríguez, Daniela V; Marin, Raúl E; Setti, Walter; Romero, Sandra; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Llama population from Argentina is mainly concentrated in the Andean Puna, Jujuy. Llamas represent an important economic resource for the Andean communities. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antibodies against viral antigens associated to viral diseases of economic impact (neonatal diarrhea, reproductive and respiratory syndromes). A total of 349 serum samples from adult llamas were analyzed. The obtained antibody prevalence was 100 % for Rotavirus A and 70 % for Bovine parainfluenza virus 3. In contrast, no reactors were detected to Bovine herpesvirus 1, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, Human influenza A virus (H1N1) and Equine influenza virus (H3N8). These results confirm the wide circulation of rotavirus and parainfluenza virus in Argentinean llamas and suggest that susceptibility to infection with bovine herpesvirus, pestivirus and influenza A viruses is low. This serologic survey provides novel information regarding the epidemiology of viral diseases affecting llamas from the Argentinean Andean Puna. PMID:24721276

  15. [Acute atrioventricular block in chronic Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vince; Zima, Endre; Gellér, László; Merkely, Béla

    2010-09-26

    The tick bite transmitted Lyme disease is one of the most common antropozoonosis, about 10 000 new infections are reported in Hungary each year. The progress and clinical presentation can vary, and carditis can occur in later stages. A serologically verified Lyme disease caused third degree atrioventricular block in young male presenting with presyncope. Based on the tick-bites mentioned a few weeks prior to hospital admission, Lyme carditis was considered with the administration of antibiotics and monitor observation. Typical skin lesions were not recognized and laboratory findings showed no pathology. An electrophysiological study recorded a predominant supra-His atrioventricular block. Total regression of conduction could be detected later and the serological tests established an underlying Lyme disease. Currently no definite treatment recommendation is available for the potentially reversible Lyme carditis. The tick bite seemed to be the key on our way to diagnosis; however, serological tests proved the disease to be older than one year. A detailed medical history and serological tests are essential in identifying the cause and pacemaker implantation can be avoided.

  16. How Ambient Humidity May Affect the Transmission of Viral Infectious Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wan; Marr, Linsey; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2013-04-01

    Viral infectious diseases such as influenza have been a great burden to public health. The airborne transmission route is an important venue for the spread of many respiratory viral diseases. Many airborne viruses have been shown to be sensitive to ambient humidity, yet the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain elusive. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon may provide insight into the temporal and spatial distribution of diseases. For instance, studies have repeatedly suggested ambient humidity as an important environmental determinant in the transmission of influenza in temperate regions. Further, knowing how to optimize humidity so as to minimize virus survival may have practical implications for disease prevention. In this talk, we will discuss multiple mechanisms that may account for the association between humidity and viability of viruses in aerosols, including water activity, surface inactivation, salt toxicity, and conformational changes to the virus in response to varying pH. As a case study, we will discuss our work on the effect of relative humidity (RH) on survival of influenza A virus (IAV) and how it may contribute to the transmission patterns of seasonal flu around the world. We measured the change in viability of IAV in droplets at various RHs. Results suggest three potential regimes defined by humidity: physiological (~100% RH) with high viability, concentrated (~50% to near 100% RH) with lower viability, and dry (<~50% RH) with high viability. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic basis for the dependence of IAV's transmission on humidity. In temperate regions, the increase in influenza activity in winter may be due to enhanced transmission via the aerosol route thanks to IAV's higher viability in droplets at low RH. In tropical regions, transmission could be enhanced due to high viability of IAV at extremely high RH (rainy season), as observed in our study, possibly through both the aerosol route and the contact

  17. Acute graft-vs-host disease: pathobiology and management.

    PubMed

    Goker, H; Haznedaroglu, I C; Chao, N J

    2001-03-01

    Acute graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to safe allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. GVHD occurs when transplanted donor T lymphocytes react to foreign host cells. It causes a wide variety of host tissue injuries. This review focuses on the pathobiological basis, clinical aspects, and current management strategies of acute GVHD. Afferent phase of acute GVHD starts with myeloablative conditioning, i.e., before the infusion of the graft. Total-body irradiation (TBI) or high-dose chemotherapy regimens cause extensive damage and activation in host tissues, which release inflammatory cytokines and enhance recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. Recognition of the foreign host antigens by donor T cells and activation, stimulation, and proliferation of T cells is crucial in the afferent phase. Effector phase of acute GVHD results in direct and indirect damage to host cells. The skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver are major target organs of acute GVHD. Combination drug prophylaxis in GVHD is essential in all patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Steroids have remained the standard for the treatment of acute GVHD. Several clinical trials have evaluated monoclonal antibodies or receptor antagonist therapy for steroid-resistant acute GVHD, with different successes in a variety of settings. There are some newer promising agents like mycophenolate mofetil, glutamic acid-lysine-alanine-tyrosine (GLAT), rapamycin, and trimetrexate currently entering in the clinical studies, and other agents are in development. Future experimental and clinical studies on GVHD will shed further light on the better understanding of the disease pathobiology and generate the tools to treat malignant disorders with allogeneic HSCT with specific graft-vs-tumor effects devoid of GVHD. PMID:11274753

  18. Transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease: better utilization of existing models through viral transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Platt, Thomas L; Reeves, Valerie L; Murphy, M Paul

    2013-09-01

    Animal models have been used for decades in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) research field and have been crucial for the advancement of our understanding of the disease. Most models are based on familial AD mutations of genes involved in the amyloidogenic process, such as the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1). Some models also incorporate mutations in tau (MAPT) known to cause frontotemporal dementia, a neurodegenerative disease that shares some elements of neuropathology with AD. While these models are complex, they fail to display pathology that perfectly recapitulates that of the human disease. Unfortunately, this level of pre-existing complexity creates a barrier to the further modification and improvement of these models. However, as the efficacy and safety of viral vectors improves, their use as an alternative to germline genetic modification is becoming a widely used research tool. In this review we discuss how this approach can be used to better utilize common mouse models in AD research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  19. Viral load of various tissues of rainbow trout challenged with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus at various stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, B; Joiner, C; Stone, D; Dodge, M; Reese, R A; Dixon, P

    2011-01-21

    Market-sized rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were challenged by waterborne exposure to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV isolate of genogroup Ia). Fish were sampled at 4 stages of infection (before onset of clinical signs, clinically affected fish, mortalities and survivors) and the viral load determined in (1) internal organs, (2) muscle tissue and (3) brain and gill tissue. Virus levels were determined by virus titration and real-time RT-PCR. VHSV was detected by either method in the majority of fish before onset of clinical signs and in the survivor group as well as in all fish in the clinically affected fish and mortality groups. Mean virus amounts per mg of tissue determined by virus titration (TCID50) or real-time RT-PCR (copy number) were > 10(4) in preclinical fish, > 10(3.8) in clinically affected fish, > 10(3.9) in mortalities and > 10(1.2) in survivors. Virus levels tended to be highest in the internal organs of subclinical and clinically affected fish and in brain and gill tissue of survivors. The results demonstrate that significant levels of VHSV can be found in tissues of rainbow trout that may be marketed for human consumption, which may have relevance for the biosecurity of VHS-free areas.

  20. The role of viral and host microRNAs in the Aujeszky's disease virus during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Timoneda, Oriol; Núñez-Hernández, Fernando; Balcells, Ingrid; Muñoz, Marta; Castelló, Anna; Vera, Gonzalo; Pérez, Lester J; Egea, Raquel; Mir, Gisela; Córdoba, Sarai; Rosell, Rosa; Segalés, Joaquim; Tomàs, Anna; Sánchez, Armand; Núñez, José I

    2014-01-01

    Porcine production is a primary market in the world economy. Controlling swine diseases in the farm is essential in order to achieve the sector necessities. Aujeszky's disease is a viral condition affecting pigs and is endemic in many countries of the world, causing important economic losses in the swine industry. microRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs which modulates gene expression in animals, plants and viruses. With the aim of understanding miRNA roles during the Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] (also known as suid herpesvirus type 1 [SuHV-1]) infection, the expression profiles of host and viral miRNAs were determined through deep sequencing in SuHV-1 infected porcine cell line (PK-15) and in an animal experimental SuHV-1 infection with virulent (NIA-3) and attenuated (Begonia) strains. In the in vivo approach miR-206, miR-133a, miR-133b and miR-378 presented differential expression between virus strains infection. In the in vitro approach, most miRNAs were down-regulated in infected groups. miR-92a and miR-92b-3p were up-regulated in Begonia infected samples. Functional analysis of all this over expressed miRNAs during the infection revealed their association in pathways related to viral infection processes and immune response. Furthermore, 8 viral miRNAs were detected by stem loop RT-qPCR in both in vitro and in vivo approaches, presenting a gene regulatory network affecting 59 viral genes. Most described viral miRNAs were related to Large Latency Transcript (LLT) and to viral transcription activators EP0 and IE180, and also to regulatory genes regarding their important roles in the host-pathogen interaction during viral infection.

  1. Viral RNA modulates the acid sensitivity of foot-and-mouth disease virus capsids.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, S; Abrams, C C; Fry, E; Crowther, J C; Belsham, G J; Stuart, D I; King, A M

    1995-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manifests an extreme sensitivity to acid, which is thought to be important for entry of the RNA genome into the cell. We have compared the low-pH-induced disassembly in vitro of virions and natural empty capsids of three subtypes of serotype A FMDV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. For all three subtypes (A22 Iraq 24/64, A10(61), and A24 Cruzeiro), the empty capsid was more stable by 0.5 pH unit on average than the corresponding virion. Unexpectedly, in the natural empty capsids used in this study, the precursor capsid protein VP0 was found largely to be cleaved into VP2 and VP4. For picornaviruses the processing of VP0 is closely associated with encapsidation of viral RNA, which is considered likely to play a catalytic role in the cleavage. Investigation of the cleavage of VP0 in natural empty capsids failed to implicate the viral RNA. However, it remains possible that these particles arise from abortive attempts to encapsidate RNA. Empty capsids expressed from a vaccinia virus recombinant showed essentially the same acid lability as natural empty capsids, despite differing considerably in the extent of VP0 processing, with the synthetic particles containing almost exclusively uncleaved VP0. These results indicate that it is the viral RNA that modulates acid lability in FMDV. In all cases the capsids dissociate at low pH directly into pentameric subunits. Comparison of the three viruses indicates that FMDV A22 Iraq is about 0.5 pH unit more sensitive to low pH than types A10(61) and A24 Cruzeiro. Sequence analysis of the three subtypes identified several differences at the interface between pentamers and highlighted a His-alpha-helix dipole interaction which spans the pentamer interface and appears likely to influence the acid lability of the virus. PMID:7983739

  2. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency.

  3. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency. PMID:26595733

  4. Burden, seasonal pattern and symptomatology of acute respiratory illnesses with different viral aetiologies in children presenting at outpatient clinics in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Chan, K-H; Ip, D K M; Fang, V J; Fung, R O P; Leung, G M; Peiris, M J S; Cowling, B J

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory viruses cause acute respiratory diseases with a broad and overlapping spectrum of symptoms. We examined the clinical symptoms and explored the patterns of various respiratory viral infections in children in Hong Kong. Among 2090 specimens collected from outpatient care (2007-2010), 1343 (64.3%) were positive for any virus by the xTAG assay, and 81 (3.9%) were positive for co-infection. The most frequently detected viruses among children aged 6-15 years were enterovirus/rhinovirus and influenza virus A, whereas most non-influenza viruses were more frequently detected in younger children. Higher body temperature was more common for illnesses associated with influenza viruses than for those associated with non-influenza viruses, but other symptoms were largely similar across all infections. The seasonality pattern varied among different viruses, with influenza virus A being the predominant virus detected in winter, and enterovirus/rhinovirus being more commonly detected than influenza virus A in the other three seasons, except for 2009. PMID:26033670

  5. Dynamics of Dengue Disease Severity Determined by the Interplay Between Viral Genetics and Serotype-Specific Immunity

    PubMed Central

    OhAinle, Molly; Balmaseda, Angel; Macalalad, Alexander R.; Tellez, Yolanda; Zody, Michael C.; Saborío, Saira; Nuñez, Andrea; Lennon, Niall J.; Birren, Bruce W.; Gordon, Aubree; Henn, Matthew R.; Harris, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The rapid spread of dengue is a worldwide public health problem. In two clinical studies of dengue in Managua, Nicaragua, we observed an abrupt increase in disease severity across several epidemic seasons of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) transmission. Waning DENV-1 immunity appeared to increase the risk of severe disease in subsequent DENV-2 infections after a period of cross-protection. The increase in severity coincided with replacement of the Asian/American DENV-2 NI-1 clade with a new virus clade, NI-2B. In vitro analyses of viral isolates from the two clades and analysis of viremia in patient blood samples support the emergence of a fitter virus in later, relative to earlier, epidemic seasons. In addition, the NI-1 clade of viruses was more virulent specifically in children who were immune to DENV-1, while DENV-3 immunity was associated with more severe disease among NI-2B infections. Our data demonstrate that the complex interaction between viral genetics and population dynamics of serotype-specific immunity contribute to the risk of severe dengue disease. Furthermore, this work provides insights into viral evolution and the interaction between viral and immunological determinants of viral fitness and virulence. PMID:22190239

  6. Tumor necrosis factor α is associated with viral control and early disease progression in patients with HIV type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sagar A; Korner, Christian; Sirignano, Michael N; Amero, Molly; Bazner, Sue; Rychert, Jenna; Allen, Todd M; Rosenberg, Eric S; Bosch, Ronald J; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation in early human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression is not well characterized. Ninety patients with untreated primary HIV-1 infection were studied to determine associations of inflammatory proteins with early disease progression. High plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels (≥8.5 pg/mL) were significantly associated with an increased viral load set point and shorter times to reaching a CD4(+) T-cell count of <500 cells/mm(3) and initiating antiretroviral therapy. The increased risk of reaching a CD4(+) T-cell count of <500 cells/mm(3) in the group with high TNF-α levels was driven by viral load but was independent of concurrent CD4(+) T-cell count. Thus, TNF-α appears to be an important mediator of inflammation in patients with poor viral control and early HIV-1 disease progression.

  7. Animal viral diseases and global change: bluetongue and West Nile fever as paradigms.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Á

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have an undoubted influence on the appearance, distribution, and evolution of infectious diseases, and notably on those transmitted by vectors. Global change refers to environmental changes arising from human activities affecting the fundamental mechanisms operating in the biosphere. This paper discusses the changes observed in recent times with regard to some important arboviral (arthropod-borne viral) diseases of animals, and the role global change could have played in these variations. Two of the most important arboviral diseases of animals, bluetongue (BT) and West Nile fever/encephalitis (WNF), have been selected as models. In both cases, in the last 15 years an important leap forward has been observed, which has lead to considering them emerging diseases in different parts of the world. BT, affecting domestic ruminants, has recently afflicted livestock in Europe in an unprecedented epizootic, causing enormous economic losses. WNF affects wildlife (birds), domestic animals (equines), and humans, thus, beyond the economic consequences of its occurrence, as a zoonotic disease, it poses an important public health threat. West Nile virus (WNV) has expanded in the last 12 years worldwide, and particularly in the Americas, where it first occurred in 1999, extending throughout the Americas relentlessly since then, causing a severe epidemic of disastrous consequences for public health, wildlife, and livestock. In Europe, WNV is known long time ago, but it is since the last years of the twentieth century that its incidence has risen substantially. Circumstances such as global warming, changes in land use and water management, increase in travel, trade of animals, and others, can have an important influence in the observed changes in both diseases. The following question is raised: What is the contribution of global changes to the current increase of these diseases in the world? PMID:22707955

  8. Animal viral diseases and global change: bluetongue and West Nile fever as paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Á

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have an undoubted influence on the appearance, distribution, and evolution of infectious diseases, and notably on those transmitted by vectors. Global change refers to environmental changes arising from human activities affecting the fundamental mechanisms operating in the biosphere. This paper discusses the changes observed in recent times with regard to some important arboviral (arthropod-borne viral) diseases of animals, and the role global change could have played in these variations. Two of the most important arboviral diseases of animals, bluetongue (BT) and West Nile fever/encephalitis (WNF), have been selected as models. In both cases, in the last 15 years an important leap forward has been observed, which has lead to considering them emerging diseases in different parts of the world. BT, affecting domestic ruminants, has recently afflicted livestock in Europe in an unprecedented epizootic, causing enormous economic losses. WNF affects wildlife (birds), domestic animals (equines), and humans, thus, beyond the economic consequences of its occurrence, as a zoonotic disease, it poses an important public health threat. West Nile virus (WNV) has expanded in the last 12 years worldwide, and particularly in the Americas, where it first occurred in 1999, extending throughout the Americas relentlessly since then, causing a severe epidemic of disastrous consequences for public health, wildlife, and livestock. In Europe, WNV is known long time ago, but it is since the last years of the twentieth century that its incidence has risen substantially. Circumstances such as global warming, changes in land use and water management, increase in travel, trade of animals, and others, can have an important influence in the observed changes in both diseases. The following question is raised: What is the contribution of global changes to the current increase of these diseases in the world? PMID:22707955

  9. Animal viral diseases and global change: bluetongue and West Nile fever as paradigms.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Á

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have an undoubted influence on the appearance, distribution, and evolution of infectious diseases, and notably on those transmitted by vectors. Global change refers to environmental changes arising from human activities affecting the fundamental mechanisms operating in the biosphere. This paper discusses the changes observed in recent times with regard to some important arboviral (arthropod-borne viral) diseases of animals, and the role global change could have played in these variations. Two of the most important arboviral diseases of animals, bluetongue (BT) and West Nile fever/encephalitis (WNF), have been selected as models. In both cases, in the last 15 years an important leap forward has been observed, which has lead to considering them emerging diseases in different parts of the world. BT, affecting domestic ruminants, has recently afflicted livestock in Europe in an unprecedented epizootic, causing enormous economic losses. WNF affects wildlife (birds), domestic animals (equines), and humans, thus, beyond the economic consequences of its occurrence, as a zoonotic disease, it poses an important public health threat. West Nile virus (WNV) has expanded in the last 12 years worldwide, and particularly in the Americas, where it first occurred in 1999, extending throughout the Americas relentlessly since then, causing a severe epidemic of disastrous consequences for public health, wildlife, and livestock. In Europe, WNV is known long time ago, but it is since the last years of the twentieth century that its incidence has risen substantially. Circumstances such as global warming, changes in land use and water management, increase in travel, trade of animals, and others, can have an important influence in the observed changes in both diseases. The following question is raised: What is the contribution of global changes to the current increase of these diseases in the world?

  10. Efficient transmission of Cassava brown streak disease viral pathogens by chip bud grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Techniques to study plant viral diseases under controlled growth conditions are required to fully understand their biology and investigate host resistance. Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) presents a major threat to cassava production in East Africa. No infectious clones of the causal viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) or Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) are available, and mechanical transmission to cassava is not effective. An improved method for transmission of the viruses, both singly and as co-infections has been developed using bud grafts. Findings Axillary buds from CBSD symptomatic plants infected with virulent isolates of CBSV and UCBSV were excised and grafted onto 6–8 week old greenhouse-grown, disease-free cassava plants of cultivars Ebwanateraka, TME204 and 60444. Plants were assessed visually for development of CBSD symptoms and by RT-PCR for presence of the viruses in leaf and storage root tissues. Across replicated experiments, 70-100% of plants inoculated with CBSV developed CBSD leaf and stem symptoms 2–6 weeks after bud grafting. Infected plants showed typical, severe necrotic lesions in storage roots at harvest 12–14 weeks after graft inoculation. Sequential grafting of buds from plants infected with UCBSV followed 10–14 days later by buds carrying CBSV, onto the same test plant, resulted in 100% of the rootstocks becoming co-infected with both pathogens. This dual transmission rate was greater than that achieved by simultaneous grafting with UCBSV and CBSV (67%), or when grafting first with CBSV followed by UCBSV (17%). Conclusions The bud grafting method described presents an improved tool for screening cassava germplasm for resistance to CBSD causal viruses, and for studying pathogenicity of this important disease. Bud grafting provides new opportunities compared to previously reported top and side grafting systems. Test plants can be inoculated as young, uniform plants of a size easily handled in a

  11. In vivo kinetics of human natural killer cells: the effects of ageing and acute and chronic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wallace, Diana L; de Lara, Catherine M; Ghattas, Hala; Asquith, Becca; Worth, Andrew; Griffin, George E; Taylor, Graham P; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L; Macallan, Derek C

    2007-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells form a circulating population in a state of dynamic homeostasis. We investigated NK cell homeostasis by labelling dividing cells in vivo using deuterium-enriched glucose in young and elderly healthy subjects and patients with viral infection. Following a 24-hr intravenous infusion of 6,6-D2-glucose, CD3– CD16+ NK cells sorted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) were analysed for DNA deuterium content by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to yield minimum estimates for proliferation rate (p). In healthy young adults (n = 5), deuterium enrichment was maximal ∼10 days after labelling, consistent with postmitotic maturation preceding circulation. The mean (± standard deviation) proliferation rate was 4·3 ± 2·4%/day (equivalent to a doubling time of 16 days) and the total production rate was 15 ± 7·6 × 106 cells/l/day. Labelled cells disappeared from the circulation at a similar rate [6·9 ± 4·0%/day; half-life (T½) <10 days]. Healthy elderly subjects (n = 8) had lower proliferation and production rates (P = 2·5 ± 1·0%/day and 7·3 ± 3·7 × 106 cells/l/day, respectively; P = 0·04). Similar rates were seen in patients chronically infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) (P = 3·2 ± 1·9%/day). In acute infectious mononucleosis (n = 5), NK cell numbers were increased but kinetics were unaffected (P = 2·8 ± 1·0%/day) a mean of 12 days after symptom onset. Human NK cells have a turnover time in blood of about 2 weeks. Proliferation rates appear to fall with ageing, remain unperturbed by chronic HTLV-I infection and normalize rapidly following acute Epstein–Barr virus infection. PMID:17346281

  12. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  13. Update on the development and use of viral and bacterial vaccines for the prevention of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D P

    2001-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most frequent diagnosis in physician offices among children 1-4 years of age. Viruses that cause upper respiratory tract infections (i.e., respiratory syncytial virus [RSV], influenza virus, parainfluenza virus [PIV], and others) play an important role in the development of AOM. Prevention of infections with these viral pathogens likely would reduce the incidence of AOM. In three previous studies, influenza virus vaccines showed 30-36% efficacy against the development of AOM. Vaccines to prevent infections with RSV and PIV type 3 are undergoing clinical testing at this time. The three major bacterial pathogens causing AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), and Moraxella catarrhalis. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, licensed in the United States in 2000, was shown in two pivotal trials to reduce the incidence of all causes of AOM by 6%, pneumococcal AOM by 34%, and pneumococcal AOM caused by serotypes contained in the vaccine by 57%. Currently, vaccines against NTHi and M. catarrhalis are under development.

  14. [Investigation of viral nucleic acids in middle-ear effusion specimens from children with acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Abu Sitteh, Muhammed H; Sener, Kenan; Yapar, Mehmet; Kiliç, Abdullah; Güney, Cakir; Kubar, Ayhan

    2008-07-01

    Acute otitis media with effusion (OME) is one of the major causes of antibiotic use, indication for operation and hearing loss in children. In two third of the cases the etiologic agents are bacteria. Nonetheless, increasing numbers of reports have implicated viruses as etiologic agents that may have some effect on prognosis of OME. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of nucleic acids of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) type A and B, influenza type A virus, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), and enteroviruses in the middle ear effusion specimens from children with otitis media by TaqMan real-time PCR. As a result, 18 of 30 (60%) OME samples were found positive in terms of viral nucleic acids by real-time PCR. RSV-A was detected in nine samples (30%), CMV in 3 (10%) samples and HSV-1 in 1 (3.3%) sample. In five of the samples two viruses were detected in the same sample (three were positive for adenovirus and RSV-A, and two were positive for CMV and RSV-A). Our data have supported the importance of viruses as etiologic agents of OME. Additionally, it was thought that TaqMan real-time PCR may be used as a reliable and rapid method for the detection of viruses in the middle ear effusion samples.

  15. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from nondisinfected drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Borchardt, Mark A; Kieke, Burney A; Spencer, Susan K; Loge, Frank J

    2012-09-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence from virus intrusions into the distribution systems of 14 nondisinfecting, groundwater-source, community water systems. Water samples for virus quantification were collected monthly at wells and households during four 12-week periods in 2006-2007. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection was installed on the communities' wellheads during one study year; UV was absent the other year. UV was intended to eliminate virus contributions from the wells and without residual disinfectant present in these systems, any increase in virus concentration downstream at household taps represented virus contributions from the distribution system (Approach 1). During no-UV periods, distribution system viruses were estimated by the difference between well water and household tap virus concentrations (Approach 2). For both approaches, a Monte Carlo risk assessment framework was used to estimate AGI risk from distribution systems using study-specific exposure-response relationships. Depending on the exposure-response relationship selected, AGI risk from the distribution systems was 0.0180-0.0661 and 0.001-0.1047 episodes/person-year estimated by Approaches 1 and 2, respectively. These values represented 0.1-4.9% of AGI risk from all exposure routes, and 1.6-67.8% of risk related to drinking water exposure. Virus intrusions into nondisinfected drinking water distribution systems can contribute to sporadic AGI.

  16. Seasonal Drivers of Pneumococcal Disease Incidence: Impact of Bacterial Carriage and Viral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Grant, Lindsay R.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Viboud, Cécile; O'Brien, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Winter-seasonal epidemics of pneumococcal disease provide an opportunity to understand the drivers of incidence. We sought to determine whether seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease is caused by increased nasopharyngeal transmission of the bacteria or increased susceptibility to invasive infections driven by cocirculating winter respiratory viruses. Methods. We analyzed pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease data collected from children <7 years old in the Navajo/White Mountain Apache populations between 1996 and 2012. Regression models were used to quantify seasonal variations in carriage prevalence, carriage density, and disease incidence. We also fit a multivariate model to determine the contribution of carriage prevalence and RSV activity to pneumococcal disease incidence while controlling for shared seasonal factors. Results. The seasonal patterns of invasive pneumococcal disease epidemics varied significantly by clinical presentation: bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia incidence peaked in late winter, whereas invasive nonpneumonia pneumococcal incidence peaked in autumn. Pneumococcal carriage prevalence and density also varied seasonally, with peak prevalence occurring in late autumn. In a multivariate model, RSV activity was associated with significant increases in bacteremic pneumonia cases (attributable percentage, 15.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8%–26.1%) but was not associated with invasive nonpneumonia infections (8.0%; 95% CI, −4.8% to 19.3%). In contrast, seasonal variations in carriage prevalence were associated with significant increases in invasive nonpneumonia infections (31.4%; 95% CI, 8.8%–51.4%) but not with bacteremic pneumonia. Conclusions.The seasonality of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia could be due to increased susceptibility to invasive infection triggered by viral pathogens, whereas seasonality of other invasive pneumococcal infections might be primarily driven by increased nasopharyngeal

  17. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces.

  18. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Christelle; Jolles, Anna; Seabloom, Eric W; Power, Alison G; Mitchell, Charles E; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2014-03-01

    Disease dilution (reduced disease prevalence with increasing biodiversity) has been described for many different pathogens. Although the mechanisms causing this phenomenon remain unclear, the disassembly of communities to predictable subsets of species, which can be caused by changing climate, land use or invasive species, underlies one important hypothesis. In this case, infection prevalence could reflect the competence of the remaining hosts. To test this hypothesis, we measured local host species abundance and prevalence of four generalist aphid-vectored pathogens (barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses) in a ubiquitous annual grass host at 10 sites spanning 2000 km along the North American West Coast. In laboratory and field trials, we measured viral infection as well as aphid fecundity and feeding preference on several host species. Virus prevalence increased as local host richness declined. Community disassembly was non-random: ubiquitous hosts dominating species-poor assemblages were among the most competent for vector production and virus transmission. This suggests that non-random biodiversity loss led to increased virus prevalence. Because diversity loss is occurring globally in response to anthropogenic changes, such work can inform medical, agricultural and veterinary disease research by providing insights into the dynamics of pathogens nested within a complex web of environmental forces. PMID:24352672

  19. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  20. Viral Vectors for In Vivo Gene Transfer in Parkinson’s disease: Properties and Clinical Grade Production

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Corinna; Snyder, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Because Parkinson’s disease is a progressive degenerative disorder that is mainly confined to the basal ganglia, gene transfer to deliver therapeutic molecules is an attractive treatment avenue. The present review focuses on direct in vivo gene transfer vectors that have been developed to a degree that they have been successfully used in animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, the properties of recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, herpes simplex virus, and lentivirus are described and contrasted. In order for viral vectors to be developed into clinical grade reagents, they must be manufactured and tested to precise regulatory standards. Indeed, clinical lots of viral vectors can be produced in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) regulations using industry accepted manufacturing methodologies, manufacturing controls, and quality systems. The viral vector properties themselves combined with physiological product formulations facilitate long-term storage and direct in vivo administration. PMID:17916354

  1. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance. PMID:26184286

  2. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-07-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host-pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance.

  3. Beak and feather disease virus: correlation between viral load and clinical signs in wild Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Regnard, Guy L; Boyes, Rutledge S; Martin, Rowan O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), the most prevalent viral disease affecting psittacines, is caused by beak and feather disease virus (BFDV). This study assessed viral load using qPCR in a wild Cape parrot population affected by PBFD and compared it to overall physical condition based on clinical signs attributable to PBFD. A significant inverse correlation between viral load and overall physical condition was found, which confirmed that clinical signs may confidently be used to diagnose the relative severity of BFDV infections in wild populations. This is the first assessment of BFDV viral load in a wild psittacine population.

  4. The effects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on cattle reproduction in relation to disease control.

    PubMed

    Fray, M D; Paton, D J; Alenius, S

    2000-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a major reproductive pathogen in cattle. Infection of the bull can lead to a fall in semen quality and the isolation of infectious virus in the ejaculate, while infection in the cow leads to poor conception rates, abortions and congenital defects. BVDV also reduces the animal's resistance to other respiratory and enteric pathogens. The prevalence of BVDV is primarily due to the efficiency with which the virus crosses the placenta of susceptible females. Calves that survive infection during the first trimester of pregnancy are born with a persistent and lifelong infection. These persistently infected (PI) animals represent between 1.0% and 2.0% of the cattle population and continuously shed infectious virus. The availability of reliable diagnostic ELISA and PCR techniques, which can test milk or serum samples for virus or antibodies, has simplified BVDV surveillance and improved the prospects for control. Although PI animals are the principal vectors within and between herds, they can be readily identified and removed. By contrast, cows carrying a PI foetus are particularly problematic. These animals have been compared to 'Trojan Horses' because they are virus-negative and antibody-positive but they deliver PI calves. In general, acutely infected cattle are much less efficient vectors but infections at the onset of puberty have resulted in a localised and persistent infection within the testes. Under these circumstances, virus shedding into the semen may remain undetected. Transmission of BVDV can be controlled through vaccination or eradication. BVDV vaccine technology has been developing over the past 30 years, but currently available vaccines are still of the conventional inactivated or attenuated sort. In general, vaccination has not been applied with sufficient rigor to make a significant impact on the level of circulating virus, unlike the national and regional eradication programmes established in areas such as

  5. The origins of cachexia in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2006-02-01

    The term cachexia originates from the Greek root kakos hexis, which translates into "bad condition," recognized for centuries as a progressive deterioration of body habitus. Cachexia is commonly associated with a number of disease states, including acute inflammatory processes associated with critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cachexia is responsible for the deaths of 10%-22% of all patients with cancer and approximately 15% of the trauma deaths that occur from sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and malnutrition days to weeks after the initial traumatic event. The abnormalities associated with cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, a preferential loss of somatic muscle and fat mass, altered hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and anemia. Anorexia alone cannot fully explain the development of cachexia; metabolic alterations in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism contribute to the severe tissue losses. Despite significant advances in our understanding of specific disease processes, the mechanisms leading to cachexia remain unclear and multifactorial. Although complex, increasing evidence from both animal models and clinical studies suggests that an inflammatory response, mediated in part by a dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, plays a role in the genesis of cachexia, associated with both critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases. These cytokines are further thought to induce an acute phase protein response (APR) and produce the alterations in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism identified as crucial markers of acute inflammation in states of malignancy and critical illness. Although much is still unknown about the etiology of cachexia, there is growing appreciation that cachexia represents the endproduct of an inappropriate interplay between multiple cytokines, neuropeptides, classic stress

  6. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection. PMID:26709698

  7. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  8. Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) can open the door to other problems, including reproductive, respiratory, and enteric disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a review, written for a lay publication whose core audience in dairy producers. A brief history of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) research is given as well as a review of recent research discoveries. National efforts to reduce antibiotic use have led to a greater emphasis on disease prevention ...

  9. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  10. Targeted disruption of influenza A virus hemagglutinin in genetically modified mice reduces viral replication and improves disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Chen, Chao; Yang, Zhou; Chi, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus can cause acute respiratory infection in animals and humans around the globe, and is still a major threat to animal husbandry and public health. Due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift of the virus, development of novel anti-influenza strategies has become an urgent task. Here we generated transgenic (TG) mice stably expressing a short-hairpin RNA specifically targeting hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus, and investigated the susceptibility of the mice to influenza virus infection. We found that HA expression was dramatically disrupted in TG mice infected with WSN or PR8 virus. Importantly, the animals showed reduced virus production in lungs, slower weight loss, attenuated acute organ injury and consequently increased survival rates as compared to wild type (WT) mice after the viral infection. Moreover, TG mice exhibited a normal level of white blood cells following the virus infection, whereas the number of these cells was significantly decreased in WT mice with same challenge. Together, these experiments demonstrate that the TG mice are less permissive for influenza virus replication, and suggest that shRNA-based efficient disruption of viral gene expression in animals may be a useful strategy for prevention and control of a viral zoonosis. PMID:27033724

  11. Nanomedicine for Infectious Disease Applications: Innovation towards Broad-Spectrum Treatment of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Lee, Jaywon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Nanomedicine enables unique diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities to tackle problems in clinical medicine. As multifunctional agents with programmable properties, nanomedicines are poised to revolutionize treatment strategies. This promise is especially evident for infectious disease applications, for which the continual emergence, re-emergence, and evolution of pathogens has proven difficult to counter by conventional approaches. Herein, a conceptual framework is presented that envisions possible routes for the development of nanomedicines as superior broad-spectrum antiviral agents against enveloped viruses. With lipid membranes playing a critical role in the life cycle of medically important enveloped viruses including HIV, influenza, and Ebola, cellular and viral membrane interfaces are ideal elements to incorporate into broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Examples are presented that demonstrate how nanomedicine strategies inspired by lipid membranes enable a wide range of targeting opportunities to gain control of critical stages in the virus life cycle through either direct or indirect approaches involving membrane interfaces. The capabilities can be realized by enabling new inhibitory functions or improving the function of existing drugs through nanotechnology-enabled solutions. With these exciting opportunities, due attention is also given to the clinical translation of nanomedicines for infectious disease applications, especially as pharmaceutical drug-discovery pipelines demand new routes of innovation. PMID:26551316

  12. Synthetic viruses: a new opportunity to understand and prevent viral disease

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Tumpey, Terrence M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2010-01-01

    Rapid progress in DNA synthesis and sequencing is spearheading the deliberate, large-scale genetic alteration of organisms. These new advances in DNA manipulation have been extended to the level of whole-genome synthesis, as evident from the synthesis of poliovirus, from the resurrection of the extinct 1918 strain of influenza virus and of human endogenous retroviruses and from the restructuring of the phage T7 genome. The largest DNA synthesized so far is the 582,970 base pair genome of Mycoplasma genitalium, although, as yet, this synthetic DNA has not been ‘booted’ to life. As genome synthesis is independent of a natural template, it allows modification of the structure and function of a virus’s genetic information to an extent that was hitherto impossible. The common goal of this new strategy is to further our understanding of an organism’s properties, particularly its pathogenic armory if it causes disease in humans, and to make use of this new information to protect from, or treat, human viral disease. Although only a few applications of virus synthesis have been described as yet, key recent findings have been the resurrection of the 1918 influenza virus and the generation of codon- and codon pair–deoptimized polioviruses. PMID:20010599

  13. Nanomedicine for Infectious Disease Applications: Innovation towards Broad-Spectrum Treatment of Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Lee, Jaywon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Nanomedicine enables unique diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities to tackle problems in clinical medicine. As multifunctional agents with programmable properties, nanomedicines are poised to revolutionize treatment strategies. This promise is especially evident for infectious disease applications, for which the continual emergence, re-emergence, and evolution of pathogens has proven difficult to counter by conventional approaches. Herein, a conceptual framework is presented that envisions possible routes for the development of nanomedicines as superior broad-spectrum antiviral agents against enveloped viruses. With lipid membranes playing a critical role in the life cycle of medically important enveloped viruses including HIV, influenza, and Ebola, cellular and viral membrane interfaces are ideal elements to incorporate into broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Examples are presented that demonstrate how nanomedicine strategies inspired by lipid membranes enable a wide range of targeting opportunities to gain control of critical stages in the virus life cycle through either direct or indirect approaches involving membrane interfaces. The capabilities can be realized by enabling new inhibitory functions or improving the function of existing drugs through nanotechnology-enabled solutions. With these exciting opportunities, due attention is also given to the clinical translation of nanomedicines for infectious disease applications, especially as pharmaceutical drug-discovery pipelines demand new routes of innovation.

  14. Development of a live attenuated vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxin; Gao, Xuyuan; Xiao, Yali; Liu, Shaoqiong; Peng, Shan; Li, Xuesong; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Wu, Xiaogang; Yan, Pixi; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Tong, Guangzhi; Li, Zejun

    2014-02-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus that is causing massive economic loss in the Chinese duck industry. To obtain a live vaccine candidate against the disease, the DTMUV isolate FX2010 was passaged serially in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Characterization of FX2010-180P revealed that it was unable to replicate efficiently in chicken embryonated eggs, nor intranasally infect mice or shelducks at high doses of 5.5log10 tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50). FX2010-180P did not induce clinical symptoms, or pathological lesions in ducks at a dose of 5.5log10TCID50. The attenuation of FX2010-180P was due to 19 amino acid changes and 15 synonymous mutations. Importantly, FX2010-180P elicited good immune responses in ducks inoculated at low doses (3.5log10TCID50) and provided complete protection against challenge with a virulent strain. These results indicate that FX2010-180P is a promising candidate live vaccine for prevention of duck Tembusu viral disease.

  15. Fc receptors and their influence on efficacy of therapeutic antibodies for treatment of viral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Ong, Eugenia Z; Mok, Darren ZL; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The lack of vaccines against several important viral diseases necessitates the development of therapeutics to save lives and control epidemics. In recent years, therapeutic antibodies have received considerable attention due to their good safety profiles and clinical success when used against viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, Ebola virus and Hendra virus. The binding affinity of these antibodies can directly impact their therapeutic efficacy. However, we and others have also demonstrated that the subtype of Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs) engaged influences the stoichiometric requirement for virus neutralization. Hence, the development of therapeutic antibodies against infectious diseases should consider the FcγRs engaged and Fc-effector functions involved. This review highlights the current state of knowledge about FcγRs and FcγR effector functions involved in virus neutralization, with emphasis on factors that can affect FcγR engagement. A better understanding of Fc-FcγR interactions during virus neutralization will allow development of therapeutic antibodies that are efficacious and can be administered with minimal side effects. PMID:26466016

  16. Acute arthropathy in patients with rash diseases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Bastos Camacho, Luiz Antonio; Fernandes Bruno, Letícia; de Gusmão, Rodrigo Coimbra; de Medeiros Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Coca Velarde, Luis Guillermo; Mendonça Siqueira, Marilda

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of acute arthropathy and selected clinical features in patients with acute rash diseases. Serum samples from 1,554 patients were tested for anti-measles, dengue, human parvovirus B19, and rubella virus IgM using enzyme immunoassay. Sera from children, in whom these infections were excluded, were studied for anti-human herpesvirus type 6 IgG antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence test. Joint complaints occurred in 31.2% of the 862 patients with an etiologic diagnosis and were more frequently seen in adults than in children (OR 8.5). Among the adults, arthropathy prevailed in women compared to men (OR 1.8). Arthropathy was most frequently reported in rubella (41.2%) and in dengue fever cases (41.1%) than in the other rash diseases studied (p < 0.0001). Joint complaints were more frequently seen in patients with fever (OR 1.6) and with five or more days of onset of the disease (OR 1.6), regardless of serological diagnosis. Arthropathy appeared as a frequent condition in rash diseases, typically with low severity and no specific pattern of joint involvement.

  17. An examination of co-infection in acute gastroenteritis and histo-blood group antigens leading to viral infection susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    FURUYA, KENTA; NAKAJIMA, HITOSHI; SASAKI, YOUSUKE; URITA, YOSHIHISA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract in terms of viruses, bacteria and the ABO blood group. We hypothesized that a combination of norovirus (NV) and bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract could affect the likelihood of an individual to contracting NV. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are considered to act as receptors that can lead to NV susceptibility. In addition to genetics, co-infection in the gastrointestinal tract may be associated with this mechanism. A total of 370 patients with acute gastroenteritis presenting with diarrhea (14–89 years) were recruited. The male/female ratio was 20/17. Single infection (bacteria or virus), co-infection with two viruses, and co-infection with one virus and one bacterium were statistically analyzed. In total, 88 of the 376 subjects (23.4%) were positive for one virus, and 50 (13.3%) were positive for one bacterium. Co-transfection with bacteria and a virus were detected in 46 (47.9%) of the 96 bacterial gastroenteritis cases. Statistical analysis revealed that co-infection of bacteria and NV was not significant in all viral infections (P=0.768). In terms of the ABO histo-blood group type and NV infection, the frequency in the O type was not significantly increased (P=0.052). Co-infection of bacteria and a virus occurred frequently in the gastrointestinal tract. The ABO blood phenotype expression was not a significant factor in NV infection in the present case series and the results did not suggest an affinity of NV for specific bacteria. PMID:26998270

  18. Intrahepatic endothelial and Kupffer cells involved in immunosuppressive cytokines and natural killer (NK)/NK T cell disorders in viral acute hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A; Bleau, C; Martin, J-P; Lamontagne, L

    2008-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, the intrahepatic tolerance sustained by immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by Kupffer cells (KC), liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), natural killer (NK) T cells and natural regulatory T cells may be disturbed. NK cells are recruited normally in the liver and produce interferon (IFN)-γ to control viral replication. The use of mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3) attenuated variants showing selected tropisms for KC or LSEC have allowed determining their roles in the disturbances of immune tolerance during viral hepatitis. Groups of C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 (KC+, LSEC+), low attenuated 51·6-MHV3 (KC+, LSEC−) or high attenuated CL12-MHV3 (KC−, LSEC−) variants for the first 3 days. Results showed that IL-10, TGF-β and PGE2 production in the liver decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice and increased in 51·6-MHV3- and CL12-MHV3-infected mice. The ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 in liver decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice, while it was not (or low) altered in mice infected with the attenuated MHV3 variant mice. Phenotypic analysis of intrahepatic mononuclear cells revealed that apoptotic NK and NK T cells increased in mice infected with the L2-MHV3, but were minor in 51·6-MHV3- and CL12-MHV3-infected mice. The numbers of CD4+ forkhead box P3+ cells increased in the livers from low pathogenic CL12-MHV3 and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. These results indicate that viral permissivity of KC and LSEC is involved in the decrease of IL-10 and PGE2, while KC may play an additional role in the apoptosis of NK and NK T cells during acute viral hepatitis. PMID:18336588

  19. Noninvasive imaging in acute coronary disease. A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, B.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Numerous highly complex and sensitive noninvasive imaging techniques have enhanced the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optimum use requires specific objectives to be defined in advance, including a review of the potential impact of the test on subsequent decisions. An additional issue that is subject to scrutiny in the current climate of cost containment relates to the incremental value of a specific examination. The imaging modality to be used will partially depend on other issues, including accessibility, cost, and interindividual or institutional expertise with a particular technique. Major applications in noninvasive imaging in the acute coronary syndromes include the following: (1) diagnosis, including identification of associated diseases and contraindications for acute reperfusion; (2) evaluation and management of complications ; (3) determination of prognosis (both early and late); (4) estimation of myocardial viability; (5) assessment of therapeutic efficacy; (6) investigational approaches, including 99mTc-sestamibi tomographic imaging, ultrafast cine computed tomographic scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Previous studies in the prethrombolytic era have documented the powerful impact of radionuclide stress testing on prognosis, but this needs to be reevaluated in the light of the changing current population undergoing stress testing. Preliminary data imply that the prognostic accuracy of stress testing after thrombolytic therapy is diminished. Moreover, the role of the open infarct-related artery in traditional estimates of prognosis requires further study. Noninvasive imaging has multiple applications in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary disease, but the decision to use a specific technology in a particular circumstance mandates good clinical judgment and selectivity. 82 references.

  20. Mapping QTL for Resistance Against Viral Nervous Necrosis Disease in Asian Seabass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Le; Wan, Zi Yi; Ye, Bao Qing; Huang, Shuqing; Wong, Sek-Man; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-02-01

    Viral nervous necrosis disease (VNN), caused by nervous necrosis virus (NNV), leads to mass mortality in mariculture. However, phenotypic selection for resistance against VNN is very difficult. To facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) for resistance against VNN and understanding of the genetic architecture underlying the resistance against this disease, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance against VNN in Asian seabass. We challenged fingerlings at 37 days post-hatching (dph), from a single back-cross family, with NNV at a concentration of 9 × 10(6) TCID50/ml for 2 h. Daily mortalities were recorded and collected. A panel of 330 mortalities and 190 surviving fingerlings was genotyped using 149 microsatellites with 145 successfully mapped markers covering 24 linkage groups (LGs). Analysis of QTL for both resistance against VNN and survival time was conducted using interval mapping. Five significant QTL located in four LGs and eight suggestive QTL in seven LGs were identified for resistance. Another five significant QTL in three LGs and five suggestive QTL in three LGs were detected for survival time. One significant QTL, spanning 3 cM in LG20, was identified for both resistance and survival time. These QTL explained 2.2-4.1% of the phenotypic variance for resistance and 2.2-3.3% of the phenotypic variance for survival time, respectively. Our results suggest that VNN resistance in Asian seabass is controlled by many loci with small effects. Our data provide information for fine mapping of QTL and identification of candidate genes for a better understanding of the mechanism of disease resistance.

  1. Interferon-λ rs12979860 genotype and liver fibrosis in viral and non-viral chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Eslam, Mohammed; Hashem, Ahmed M.; Leung, Reynold; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Berg, Thomas; Dore, Gregory J.; Chan, Henry L.K.; Irving, William L.; Sheridan, David; Abate, Maria L.; Adams, Leon A.; Mangia, Alessandra; Weltman, Martin; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Spengler, Ulrich; Shaker, Olfat; Fischer, Janett; Mollison, Lindsay; Cheng, Wendy; Powell, Elizabeth; Nattermann, Jacob; Riordan, Stephen; McLeod, Duncan; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Douglas, Mark W.; Liddle, Christopher; Booth, David R.; George, Jacob; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Ampuero, Javier; Bassendine, Margaret; Wong, Vincent W. S.; Rosso, Chiara; White, Rose; Mezzabotta, Lavinia; Suppiah, Vijayaprakash; Michalk, Monika; Malik, Barbara; Matthews, Gail; Applegate, Tanya; Grebely, Jason; Fragomeli, Vincenzo; Jonsson, Julie R.; Santaro, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis is a core pathologic process that contributes to mortality in ~45% of the population and is likely to be influenced by the host genetic architecture. Here we demonstrate, using liver disease as a model, that a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs12979860) in the intronic region of interferon-λ4 (IFNL4) is a strong predictor of fibrosis in an aetiology-independent manner. In a cohort of 4,172 patients, including 3,129 with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 555 with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 488 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), those with rs12979860CC have greater hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In CHC, those with rs12979860CC also have greater stage-constant and stage-specific fibrosis progression rates (P<0.0001 for all). The impact of rs12979860 genotypes on fibrosis is maximal in young females, especially those with HCV genotype 3. These findings establish rs12979860 genotype as a strong aetiology-independent predictor of tissue inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:25740255

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion.

    PubMed

    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Cocco, Giulio; Iannetti, Giovanni; Romano, Marcello; Schiavone, Cosima

    2015-12-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) can be defined as acute inflammatory disease of the gallbladder without evidence of gallstones. The first case was reported in 1844 by Duncan et al.; however, some cases may have been missed previously in view of the complexity of the diagnosis. Several risk factors have been identified, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in view of its multiple mechanisms of action, seems to play a key role. Atypical clinical onset, paucity of symptoms, overlap with comorbidities, and lack of robust, controlled trials result often in under or misdiagnosed cases. Moreover, laboratory results may be negative or not specific in the late stage of the disease, when a surgical treatment cannot be longer helpful if complications arise. A rapid diagnosis is therefore essential to achieve a prompt treatment and to avoid further clinical deterioration. In this short review, we would present the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of the complex relation between AAC and CVD. Then, we fully emphasize the role of ultrasound to achieve an early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment in suspected cases, reducing mortality and complications rates.

  3. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  4. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  5. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  6. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Utilizes an Autophagic Pathway During Viral Replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with positive-strand RNA viruses results in the rearrangement of intracellular membranes into viral replication complexes (VRC) which are the sites of viral RNA replication. Cellular autophagy has been proposed to be a mechanism of VRC formation for a number of positive-stranded RNA viruse...

  7. The olfactory nerve: a shortcut for influenza and other viral diseases into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Debby; Verdijk, Rob; Kuiken, Thijs

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory nerve consists mainly of olfactory receptor neurons and directly connects the nasal cavity with the central nervous system (CNS). Each olfactory receptor neuron projects a dendrite into the nasal cavity on the apical side, and on the basal side extends its axon through the cribriform plate into the olfactory bulb of the brain. Viruses that can use the olfactory nerve as a shortcut into the CNS include influenza A virus, herpesviruses, poliovirus, paramyxoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, rabies virus, parainfluenza virus, adenoviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya virus, La Crosse virus, mouse hepatitis virus, and bunyaviruses. However, mechanisms of transport via the olfactory nerve and subsequent spread through the CNS are poorly understood. Proposed mechanisms are either infection of olfactory receptor neurons themselves or diffusion through channels formed by olfactory ensheathing cells. Subsequent virus spread through the CNS could occur by multiple mechanisms, including trans-synaptic transport and microfusion. Viral infection of the CNS can lead to damage from infection of nerve cells per se, from the immune response, or from a combination of both. Clinical consequences range from nervous dysfunction in the absence of histopathological changes to severe meningoencephalitis and neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Efficacy of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccination to prevent reproductive disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important reproductive pathogen of cattle worldwide. The reproductive outcome of BVDV infection is largely dependent on the immune status of the dam and the stage of gestation at the time of infection. Potential sequelae include failure of conception, abortion, a variety of congenital malformations, and fetal infection. Vaccination is a possible tool in the control of BVDV, and there has been a recently renewed focus on providing fetal protection through vaccination. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BVDV vaccination to prevent reproductive disease by performing a quantitative synthesis of previously published studies. Pertinent articles to be included in the analysis were identified by performing a search in four relevant scientific databases (PubMed, CAB abstracts, National Agricultural Library catalog, and Web of Science) and examining the reference lists of 10 germane review articles. Inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis mandated that the studies were controlled, primary studies that included necessary data for use in the meta-analysis (e.g., group size, number of abortions). Forty-six studies in 41 separate articles matched the inclusion criteria. Risk ratio effect sizes were used in random effects, weighted meta-analyses to assess the impact of BVDV vaccination on three outcomes: risk of fetal infection, abortion risk, and pregnancy risk. Within each outcome, subanalyses were performed to evaluate the effect of a variety of interventions, including modified live, inactivated, polyvalent and monovalent vaccination, homologous, heterologous, or field challenge, and studies with only bovine subjects. The analysis revealed a decrease in abortions of nearly 45% and a nearly 85% decrease in fetal infection rate in cattle vaccinated for BVDV compared with unvaccinated cohorts. Additionally, pregnancy risk was increased by approximately 5% in field trials of BVDV vaccinates. This meta

  9. Viral meningitis epidemics and a single, recent, recombinant and anthroponotic origin of swine vesicular disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Christian A. W.; Nielsen, Sandra C. Abel; Samaniego, Jose Alfredo; Wadsworth, Jemma; Knowles, Nick J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a close relative of the human Enterovirus B serotype, coxsackievirus B5. As the etiological agent of a significant emergent veterinary disease, several studies have attempted to explain its origin. However, several key questions remain, including the full biological ancestry of the virus, and its geographical and temporal origin. Methodology: We sequenced near-complete genomes of 27 SVDV and 13 coxsackievirus B5 samples, all originally isolated between 1966 and 2006, and analysed these in conjunction with existing sequences and historical information. Results: While analyses incorporating 24 additional near-complete SVDV genomic sequences indicate clear signs of within-SVDV recombination, all 51 SVDV isolates remain monophyletic. This supports a hypothesis of a single anthroponotic transfer origin. Analysis of individual coding and non-coding regions supports that SVDV has a recombinant origin between coxsackievirus B5 and another Enterovirus B serotype, most likely coxsackievirus A9. Extensive Bayesian sequence-based analysis of the time of the most recent common ancestor of all analysed sequences places this within a few years around 1961. Epidemiological evidence points to China as an origin, but there are no available samples to test this conclusively. Conclusions and implications: Historical investigation and the clinical aspects of the involved Enterovirus B serotypes, makes the current results consistent with a hypothesis stating that SVDV originated through co-infection, recombination, and a single anthroponotic event, during large viral meningitis epidemics around 1960/1961 involving the ancestral serotypes. The exact geographical origin of SVDV may remain untestable due to historical aspects. PMID:26508717

  10. Efficacy of bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccination to prevent reproductive disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important reproductive pathogen of cattle worldwide. The reproductive outcome of BVDV infection is largely dependent on the immune status of the dam and the stage of gestation at the time of infection. Potential sequelae include failure of conception, abortion, a variety of congenital malformations, and fetal infection. Vaccination is a possible tool in the control of BVDV, and there has been a recently renewed focus on providing fetal protection through vaccination. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BVDV vaccination to prevent reproductive disease by performing a quantitative synthesis of previously published studies. Pertinent articles to be included in the analysis were identified by performing a search in four relevant scientific databases (PubMed, CAB abstracts, National Agricultural Library catalog, and Web of Science) and examining the reference lists of 10 germane review articles. Inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis mandated that the studies were controlled, primary studies that included necessary data for use in the meta-analysis (e.g., group size, number of abortions). Forty-six studies in 41 separate articles matched the inclusion criteria. Risk ratio effect sizes were used in random effects, weighted meta-analyses to assess the impact of BVDV vaccination on three outcomes: risk of fetal infection, abortion risk, and pregnancy risk. Within each outcome, subanalyses were performed to evaluate the effect of a variety of interventions, including modified live, inactivated, polyvalent and monovalent vaccination, homologous, heterologous, or field challenge, and studies with only bovine subjects. The analysis revealed a decrease in abortions of nearly 45% and a nearly 85% decrease in fetal infection rate in cattle vaccinated for BVDV compared with unvaccinated cohorts. Additionally, pregnancy risk was increased by approximately 5% in field trials of BVDV vaccinates. This meta

  11. HLA-A and -B allele associations with secondary dengue virus infections correlate with disease severity and the infecting viral serotype in ethnic Thais.

    PubMed

    Stephens, H A F; Klaythong, R; Sirikong, M; Vaughn, D W; Green, S; Kalayanarooj, S; Endy, T P; Libraty, D H; Nisalak, A; Innis, B L; Rothman, A L; Ennis, F A; Chandanayingyong, D

    2002-10-01

    Little is known of the role of classical HLA-A and -B class I alleles in determining resistance, susceptibility, or the severity of acute viral infections. Appropriate paradigms for immunogenetic studies of acute viral infections are dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Both primary and secondary infections with dengue virus (DEN) serotypes 1, 2, 3 or 4, can result in either clinically less severe DF or the more severe DHF. In secondary exposures, a memory response is induced in immunologically primed individuals, which can both clear the infecting dengue virus and contribute to its pathology. In a case-control study of 263 ethnic Thai patients infected with either DEN-1, -2, -3 or -4, we detected HLA class I associations with secondary infections, but not in immunologically naive patients with primary infections. HLA-A*0203 was associated with the less severe DF, regardless of the secondary infecting virus serotype. By contrast, HLA-A*0207 was associated with susceptibility to the more severe DHF in patients with secondary DEN-1 and DEN-2 infections only. Conversely, HLA-B*51 was associated with the development of DHF in patients with secondary infections, and HLA-B*52 was associated with DF in patients with secondary DEN-1 and DEN-2 infections. Moreover, HLA-B44, B62, B76 and B77 also appeared to be protective against developing clinical disease after secondary dengue virus infection. These results confirm that classical HLA class I alleles are associated with the clinical outcome of exposure to dengue virus, in previously exposed and immunologically primed individuals.

  12. Assessment of protection from systemic infection or disease afforded by low to intermediate titers of passively acquired neutralizing antibody against bovine viral diarrhea virus in calves.

    PubMed

    Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1995-06-01

    Colostrum-deprived calves (n = 24) were fed various amounts of colostrum, colostrum substitute, or milk replacer to establish a range in titer of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody in serum. The calves were then challenge exposed intranasally with a virulent, noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV-890). After viral challenge exposure, calves were monitored for fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhea. In addition, viral isolation and viral titration were performed on specimens of nasal secretions, buffy coat cells, and serum obtained from the calves. Fever and systemic spread of virus were detected in calves that had viral neutralizing titer of 256 or lower. Calves that had viral neutralizing titer lower than 16 developed severe clinical disease manifested by fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhea. Severity and duration of signs of disease decreased as titers of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody increased. These results indicate that low to intermediate titers of passively acquired viral neutralizing antibody were not sufficient to fully protect calves from virulent bovine viral diarrhea virus.

  13. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  14. Advancing the Minimal Residual Disease Concept in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B; Mulé, Matthew P; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past 60 years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and preclinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (non-APL) AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption, including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients, and finally the need to involve patients in decision-making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  15. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  16. Evaluation of continuous low dose rate versus acute single high dose rate radiation combined with oncolytic viral therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHUNYAN; ZHANG, YONGGANG; LIU, MINZHI MAGGIE; ZHOU, HAOMING; CHOWDHURY, WASIM H.; LUPOLD, SHAWN E.; DEWEESE, TED L.; RODRIGUEZ, RONALD

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd) has been previously demonstrated to augment the activity of radiation, resulting in synergy of cell kill. However, previous models combining radiation with CRAd have not focused on the methods of radiation delivery. Materials and methods We model the combination of a novel prostate-specific CRAd, Ad5 PSE/PBN E1A-AR (Ad5: adenovirus 5; PSE: prostate-specific enhancer; PBN: rat probasin promoter; E1A: early region 1A; AR: androgen receptor), with radiation delivered both acutely and continuously, in an effort to better mimic the potential clinical modes of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Results We demonstrate that pre-treatment of cells with acute single high dose rate (HDR) radiation 24 hours prior to viral infection results in significantly enhanced viral replication and virus-mediated cell death. In addition, this combination causes increased level of γ-H2AX (Phosphorylated histone protein H2AX on serine 139), a marker of double-stranded DNA damage and an indirect measure of nuclear fragmentation. In contrast, continuous low dose rate (LDR) radiation immediately following infection of the same CRAd results in no enhancement of viral replication, and only additive effects in virus-mediated cell death. Conclusions These data provide the first direct assessment of the real-time impact of radiation on viral replication and the first comparison of the effect of radiation delivery on the efficacy of CRAd virotherapy. Our data demonstrate substantial differences in CRAd efficacy based on the mode of radiation delivery. PMID:20201650

  17. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  18. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  19. Resolving the Origin of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus: Insights from an Investigation of the Viral Stocks Released in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Eden, John-Sebastian; Read, Andrew J.; Duckworth, Janine A.; Strive, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    To resolve the evolutionary history of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), we performed a genomic analysis of the viral stocks imported and released as a biocontrol measure in Australia, as well as a global phylogenetic analysis. Importantly, conflicts were identified between the sequences determined here and those previously published that may have affected evolutionary rate estimates. By removing likely erroneous sequences, we show that RHDV emerged only shortly before its initial description in China. PMID:26378178

  20. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries.

  1. Viral carcinogenesis: revelation of molecular mechanisms and etiology of human disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    The RNA and DNA tumor viruses have made fundamental contributions to two major areas of cancer research. Viruses were vital, first, to the discovery and analysis of cellular growth control pathways and the synthesis of current concepts of cancer biology and, second, to the recognition of the etiology of some human cancers. Transforming retroviruses carry oncogenes derived from cellular genes that are involved in mitogenic signalling and growth control. DNA tumor viruses encode oncogenes of viral origin that are essential for viral replication and cell transformation; viral oncoproteins complex with cellular proteins to stimulate cell cycle progression and led to the discovery of tumor suppressors. Viral systems support the concept that cancer development occurs by the accumulation of multiple cooperating events. Viruses are now accepted as bona fide etiologic factors of human cancer; these include hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomaviruses, human T-cell leukemia virus type I and hepatitis C virus, plus several candidate human cancer viruses. It is estimated that 15% of all human tumors worldwide are caused by viruses. The infectious nature of viruses distinguishes them from all other cancer-causing factors; tumor viruses establish long-term persistent infections in humans, with cancer an accidental side effect of viral replication strategies. Viruses are usually not complete carcinogens, and the known human cancer viruses display different roles in transformation. Many years may pass between initial infection and tumor appearance and most infected individuals do not develop cancer, although immunocompromised individuals are at elevated risk of viral-associated cancers. Variable factors that influence viral carcinogenesis are reviewed, including possible synergy between viruses and environmental cofactors. The difficulties in establishing an etiologic role for a virus in human cancer are discussed, as well as the different approaches that proved

  2. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  3. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2015-12-04

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication.

  4. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea M.; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Scheef, Elizabeth A.; Reed, Jason S.; Panganiban, Antonito T.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Friedrich, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Nef-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165–173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication. PMID:26637459

  5. Risk management of viral infectious diseases in wastewater reclamation and reuse: Review.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Toru; Katayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Inappropriate usage of reclaimed wastewater has caused outbreaks of viral infectious diseases worldwide. International and domestic guidelines for wastewater reuse stipulate that virus infection risks are to be regulated by the multiple-barrier system, in which a wastewater treatment process composed of sequential treatment units is designed based on the pre-determined virus removal efficiency of each unit. The objectives of this review were to calculate representative values of virus removal efficiency in wastewater treatment units based on published datasets, and to identify research topics that should be further addressed for improving implementation of the multiple-barrier system. The removal efficiencies of human noroviruses, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in membrane bioreactor (MBR) and conventional activated sludge (CAS) processes were obtained by a systematic review protocol and a meta-analysis approach. The log10 reduction (LR) of norovirus GII and enterovirus in MBR were 3.35 (95% confidence interval: 2.39, 4.30) and 2.71 (1.52, 3.89), respectively. The LR values of rotavirus, norovirus GI and GII in CAS processes were 0.87 (0.20, 1.53), 1.48 (0.96, 2.00) and 1.35 (0.52, 2.18), respectively. The systematic review process eliminated a substantial number of articles about virus removal in wastewater treatment because of the lack of information required for the meta-analysis. It is recommended that future publications should explicitly describe their treatment of left-censored datasets. Indicators, surrogates and methodologies appropriate for validating virus removal performance during daily operation of wastewater reclamation systems also need to be identified. PMID:26985655

  6. Risk management of viral infectious diseases in wastewater reclamation and reuse: Review.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Toru; Katayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Inappropriate usage of reclaimed wastewater has caused outbreaks of viral infectious diseases worldwide. International and domestic guidelines for wastewater reuse stipulate that virus infection risks are to be regulated by the multiple-barrier system, in which a wastewater treatment process composed of sequential treatment units is designed based on the pre-determined virus removal efficiency of each unit. The objectives of this review were to calculate representative values of virus removal efficiency in wastewater treatment units based on published datasets, and to identify research topics that should be further addressed for improving implementation of the multiple-barrier system. The removal efficiencies of human noroviruses, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in membrane bioreactor (MBR) and conventional activated sludge (CAS) processes were obtained by a systematic review protocol and a meta-analysis approach. The log10 reduction (LR) of norovirus GII and enterovirus in MBR were 3.35 (95% confidence interval: 2.39, 4.30) and 2.71 (1.52, 3.89), respectively. The LR values of rotavirus, norovirus GI and GII in CAS processes were 0.87 (0.20, 1.53), 1.48 (0.96, 2.00) and 1.35 (0.52, 2.18), respectively. The systematic review process eliminated a substantial number of articles about virus removal in wastewater treatment because of the lack of information required for the meta-analysis. It is recommended that future publications should explicitly describe their treatment of left-censored datasets. Indicators, surrogates and methodologies appropriate for validating virus removal performance during daily operation of wastewater reclamation systems also need to be identified.

  7. Serosurvey for selected viral diseases and demography of African wild dogs in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Creel, S; Creel, N M; Munson, L; Sanderlin, D; Appel, M J

    1997-10-01

    African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are endangered, with only 3,000-5,000 remaining in the wild. It is believed that wild dogs are unusually vulnerable to viral diseases, particularly rabies and canine distemper (CDV). However, canine distemper has been confirmed by laboratory diagnosis in only one free-living wild dog. The 43,000 km2 Selous Game Reserve (SGR; Tanzania) holds approximately 900 adult wild dogs. In a study area of 2,600 km2, the population maintained high density (> or = 1 dog/20.5 km2) from 1991 to 1996. The population was stable, varying 18% below and 9% above the mean density over the 6-yr period. Serum samples (n = 22) collected over 3 yr showed that most individuals were exposed to CDV (59%:95% confidence interval = 43-76% seropositive) and canine parvovirus (68%:95% CI = 54-81% seropositive), although none were seropositive for rabies (0%:95% CI = 0-17%). CDV titers were positively related to age, with no seropositive dogs younger than 1.9 yr. At least five of 13 dogs positive for CDV seroconverted during the study. Dogs with high CDV titers did not survive better in the years after sampling (mean survival +/- SE for those that died = 638 +/- 92 days,). Variation in mean litter size was inversely related to CPV exposure in the SGR and elsewhere. Annual mortality rates were low in comparison to other populations for all age classes (pups: 31 +/- 8%, n = 127, yearlings: 22 +/- 10%, n = 93, adults: 20 +/- 6%, n = 235). Annual mortality rates fluctuated little between 1992 and 1996. These data show that wild dog populations, like those of other canids, can remain stable and demographically healthy despite exposure to CDV and CPV.

  8. Comparison of cytokine gene polymorphisms among Greek patients with invasive meningococcal disease or viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Titmarsh, Callum J; Moscovis, Sophia M; Hall, Sharron; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Kesanopoulos, Konstantinos; Xirogianni, Athanasia; Scott, Rodney J; Blackwell, C Caroline

    2013-05-01

    High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are implicated in the severity of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) and viral meningitis (VM). This study compared single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes among patients with VM or IMD. Patient DNA samples were prepared by the National Meningitis Reference Laboratory in Athens: n=98 for IMD and n=53 for VM. The results for both patient groups were compared with data published for healthy Greek control data. Real-time PCR was used to assess the interleukin (IL) gene SNPs IL6 G-174C, IL1B C-511T, IL1RN T+2018C, IL10 G-1082A and IL8 A-251T and the tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) SNP TNFA G-308A. Differences were compared by Fisher's exact test. The genotype for high IL-6 responses was predominant among IMD (51%, P=0.0008) and VM (74.5%, P<0.0001) patients compared with the controls (31%). The genotype associated with high TNF-α responses was 5% among controls and lower for IMD (1.1%, P=0.0014) and VM (0%, P=0.052). There was no difference for IL-8 SNPs between controls and IMD (P=0.162), but the difference was significant for VM (P=0.0025). IL-6 (P=0.024) and IL-8 (P=0.00004) SNPs differed between IMD and VM. Reports on associations between IL-8 SNPs and cytokine responses differ. Because of its role in neutrophil attraction, differences in frequencies of the IL-8 SNP for IMD and VM require further investigation.

  9. Tracking of Peptide-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses after an Acute Resolving Viral Infection: a Study of Parvovirus B19▿

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Jeffery, Katie; Bowness, Paul; Klenerman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4+ T-cell response to the two B19 capsid proteins were investigated using a set of overlapping peptides and gamma interferon-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a cohort of acutely infected individuals who presented with acute arthropathy. These were compared to those for a cohort of B19-specific immunoglobulin M-negative (IgM−), IgG+ remotely infected individuals. Both cohorts of individuals were found to make broad CD4+ responses. However, while the responses following acute infection were detectable ex vivo, responses in remotely infected individuals were only detected after culture. One epitope (LASEESAFYVLEHSSFQLLG) was consistently targeted by both acutely (10/12) and remotely (6/7) infected individuals. This epitope was DRB1*1501 restricted, and a major histocompatibility complex peptide tetramer stained PBMCs from acutely infected individuals in the range of 0.003 to 0.042% of CD4+ T cells. Tetramer-positive populations were initially CD62Llo; unlike the case for B19-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, however, CD62L was reexpressed at later times, as responses remained stable or declined slowly. This first identification of B19 CD4+ T-cell epitopes, including a key immunodominant peptide, provides the tools to investigate the breadth, frequency, and functions of cellular responses to this virus in a range of specific clinical settings and gives an important reference point for analysis of peptide-specific CD4+ T cells during acute and persistent virus infections of humans. PMID:16943301

  10. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  11. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-08-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis.

  12. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  13. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  14. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.; Gregg, J.; Grady, C.; Collins, R.; Winton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 10 1 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml-1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 ?? ?10 8 pfu fish-1 d-1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring. ?? Inter-Research 2010.

  15. A Survey of Texas HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis Providers' Billing and Reimbursement Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Matthew B; Atwood, Robin; Greenberg, Jennifer B; Ray, Tara; Harris, Karol Kaye

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act presents financial challenges and opportunities for publicly funded service providers. We assessed billing practices and anticipated barriers to third-party billing among organizations in Texas that provide publicly funded HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis services. One third to one half of the organizations did not bill for medical services. The most common barrier to third-party billing was lack of staff knowledge about billing and coding. Future research must evaluate options for organizations and communities to maintain access to infectious disease services for vulnerable populations.

  16. Primary Epstein-Barr-virus infections in acute neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grose, C; Henle, W; Henle, G; Feorino, P M

    1975-02-20

    Infectious mononucleosis has been associated with Guillain--Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, meningoencephalitis and transverse myelitis. Since it is not known that many children with infectious mononucleosis do not develop heterophil antibodies, we looked for evidence of current or recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients with these neurologic diseases by using serodiagnostic procedures for detection and titration of antibodies to various antigens related to Epstein-Barr virus. Seven of 24 cases with Guillain-Barre syndrome and three of 16 with facial palsy were definitely associated with primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus as were two cases each of the other two neurologic diseases. Only one of these patients had obvious clinical infectious mononucleosis, and only a few demonstrated heterophil agglutinins. It is evident that the virus must be considered in the diagnosis of various acute neurologic diseases affecting children and young adults, even in the absence of heterophil-antibody response or other signs of infectious mononucleosis.

  17. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  18. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  19. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  20. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  1. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  2. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome.

  3. TLR ligand induced IL-6 counter-regulates the anti-viral CD8+ T cell response during an acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lang, Karl S.; Trilling, Mirko; Yan, Huimin; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael; Dittmer, Ulf; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists contribute to the control of viral infection by augmenting virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. It is also well established that signaling by TLRs results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6). However, how these pro-inflammatory cytokines influence the virus-specific CD8+ T-cell response during the TLR agonist stimulation remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of TLR-induced IL-6 in shaping virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the Friend retrovirus (FV) mouse model. We show that the TLR agonist induced IL-6 counter-regulates effector CD8+ T-cell responses. IL-6 potently inhibited activation and cytokine production of CD8+ T cells in vitro. This effect was mediated by a direct stimulation of CD8+ T cells by IL-6, which induced upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation and SOCS3 and downregulated STAT4 phosphorylation and T-bet. Moreover, combining TLR stimulation and IL-6 blockade during an acute FV infection resulted in enhanced virus-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity and better control of viral replication. These results have implications for our understanding of the role of TLR induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating effector T cell responses and for the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome T cell dysfunction in chronic viral infections. PMID:25994622

  4. Noninvasive, Targeted, and Non-Viral Ultrasound-Mediated GDNF-Plasmid Delivery for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chung‐Yin; Chan, Hong-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, You-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports the growth and survival of dopaminergic neurons. CNS gene delivery currently relies on invasive intracerebral injection to transit the blood-brain barrier. Non-viral gene delivery via systematic transvascular route is an attractive alternative because it is non-invasive, but a high-yield and targeted gene-expressed method is still lacking. In this study, we propose a novel non-viral gene delivery approach to achieve targeted gene transfection. Cationic microbubbles as gene carriers were developed to allow the stable formation of a bubble-GDNF gene complex, and transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure concurrently interacting with the bubble-gene complex allowed transient gene permeation and induced local GDNF expression. We demonstrate that the focused ultrasound-triggered GDNFp-loaded cationic microbubbles platform can achieve non-viral targeted gene delivery via a noninvasive administration route, outperform intracerebral injection in terms of targeted GDNF delivery of high-titer GDNF genes, and has a neuroprotection effect in Parkinson’s disease (PD) animal models to successfully block PD syndrome progression and to restore behavioral function. This study explores the potential of using FUS and bubble-gene complexes to achieve noninvasive and targeted gene delivery for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26786201

  5. Correlation Between Breakdown of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Disease Outcome of Viral Encephalitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Aaron L.; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.; Sidwell, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated in two mouse models of viral encephalitis. The ability of sodium fluorescein (NaFl) to cross the BBB from the serum into the central nervous system was assayed in animals inoculated with virulent strains of either Banzi or Semliki Forest viruses. To test the hypothesis that increases in BBB permeability were associated with poor disease outcome subsequent experiments measured BBB permeability in conjunction with treatment with the interferon inducer Ampligen (poly I: poly C12U). A single intraperitoneal injection of Ampligen (1 mg/kg) administered either 24 h or 4-6 h before, but not 24 h after, virus inoculation with Banzi virus provided significant improvements in survival, viral brain titers, weight change, and BBB permeability. In comparison, a similar treatment with Ampligen administered either 24 h or 4-6 h before inoculation with Semliki Forest virus was able to significantly improve weight change, and BBB permeability, but only animals receiving Ampligen 4-6 h pre-virus showed a significantly improved mortality. In general, it was found that evaluation of BBB permeability was a more sensitive indicator of disease outcome and the antiviral efficacy Ampligen than either weight change or brain viral titers. PMID:17223204

  6. Correlation between breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and disease outcome of viral encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Aaron L; Morrey, John D; Smee, Donald F; Sidwell, Robert W

    2007-08-01

    Changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated in two mouse models of viral encephalitis. The ability of sodium fluorescein (NaFl) to cross the BBB from the serum into the central nervous system was assayed in animals inoculated with virulent strains of either Banzi or Semliki Forest viruses. To test the hypothesis that increases in BBB permeability were associated with poor disease outcome subsequent experiments measured BBB permeability in conjunction with treatment with the interferon inducer Ampligen (poly I:poly C(12)U). A single intraperitoneal injection of Ampligen (1 mg/kg) administered either 24 h or 4-6 h before, but not 24 h after, virus inoculation with Banzi virus provided significant improvements in survival, viral brain titers, weight change and BBB permeability. In comparison, a similar treatment with Ampligen administered either 24 h or 4-6 h before inoculation with Semliki Forest virus was able to significantly improve weight change, and BBB permeability, but only animals receiving Ampligen 4-6 h pre-virus showed a significantly improved mortality. In general, it was found that evaluation of BBB permeability was a more sensitive indicator of disease outcome and the antiviral efficacy Ampligen than either weight change or brain viral titers. PMID:17223204

  7. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Kevin; Chen, Feng; Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W; Kharel, Madan K; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel; Hsia, S Victor

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  8. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  9. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  10. Retroviral induction of acute lymphoproliferative disease and profound immunosuppression in adult C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have shown that a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) causes the acute onset of lymphoproliferation and immunosuppression when injected into adult C57BL/6 mice. The ecotropic/MCF (mink cell focus- inducing) mixture of MuLV stimulates polyclonal B lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation to antibody-secreting cells. Serum Ig levels are elevated for all isotypes except IgA. The viral infection leads to a rapid decline in T lymphocyte responses to mitogens and alloantigens, as well as a decrease in helper cell activity. Specific antibody responses to both T-dependent and T-independent antigens are impaired, and the response of B lymphocytes to mitogens is abolished. The profound immunosuppression seems to be due to the MuLV-induced polyclonal activation of lymphocytes. No active suppression of normal lymphocyte responses by cells from virus-infected mice was observed. The disease induced by the LP-BM5 MuLV isolate thus seems a promising model for the study of lymphocyte activation and the mechanisms of retrovirus-induced immunosuppression. PMID:2984305

  11. Pathogen-directed Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the natural history of this chronic lung disorder. These events can be caused by a large number of infectious and noninfectious agents and are associated with an increased local and systemic inflammatory response. Their frequency and severity have been linked to progressive deterioration in lung function and health status. Infectious pathogens ranging from viral to atypical and typical bacteria have been implicated in the majority of episodes. Most therapeutic regimens to date have emphasized broad, nonspecific approaches to bronchoconstriction and pulmonary inflammation. Increasingly, therapy that targets specific etiologic pathogens has been advocated. These include clinical and laboratory-based methods to identify bacterial infections. Further additional investigation has suggested specific pathogens within this broad class. As specific antiviral therapies become available, better diagnostic approaches to identify specific pathogens will be required. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy for at-risk individuals during high-risk times may become a standard therapeutic approach. As such, the future will likely include aggressive diagnostic algorithms based on the combination of clinical syndromes and rapid laboratory modalities to identify specific causative bacteria or viruses. PMID:18073397

  12. Replicative fitness of transmitted HIV-1 drives acute immune activation, proviral load in memory CD4+ T cells, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Scully, Eileen; Macharia, Gladys; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Deymier, Martin J; Vanderford, Thomas H; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Ende, Zachary; Brooks, Kelsie; Tang, Jianming; Yu, Tianwei; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Silvestri, Guido; Douek, Daniel; Goepfert, Paul A; Price, Matthew A; Allen, Susan A; Paiardini, Mirko; Altfeld, Marcus; Gilmour, Jill; Hunter, Eric

    2015-03-24

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by varying degrees of chronic immune activation and disruption of T-cell homeostasis, which impact the rate of disease progression. A deeper understanding of the factors that influence HIV-1-induced immunopathology and subsequent CD4(+) T-cell decline is critical to strategies aimed at controlling or eliminating the virus. In an analysis of 127 acutely infected Zambians, we demonstrate a dramatic and early impact of viral replicative capacity (vRC) on HIV-1 immunopathogenesis that is independent of viral load (VL). Individuals infected with high-RC viruses exhibit a distinct inflammatory cytokine profile as well as significantly elevated T-cell activation, proliferation, and CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion, during the earliest months of infection. Moreover, the vRC of the transmitted virus is positively correlated with the magnitude of viral burden in naive and central memory CD4(+) T-cell populations, raising the possibility that transmitted viral phenotypes may influence the size of the initial latent viral reservoir. Taken together, these findings support an unprecedented role for the replicative fitness of the founder virus, independent of host protective genes and VL, in influencing multiple facets of HIV-1-related immunopathology, and that a greater focus on this parameter could provide novel approaches to clinical interventions.

  13. Plagued by doubt and viral misinformation: the need for evidence-based use of historical disease images.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lori; Nevell, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The digitisation of historical disease images and their widespread availability on the internet have been a boon to education and research, but with unintended consequences, including the misrepresentation of infectious diseases in the past and the viral spread of misinformation. Many medieval images containing scenes of infectious disease come from non-medical sources and are not meant to convey any medical meaning. Erroneous modern captions have led to the publication of several historical images labelled as depictions of the plague, although artistic and textual evidence shows that they are not. Mislabelled images lose their intended historical narrative, and their use creates a distorted view of the past and of the disease in question. Scholars should give the same careful consideration to an image's evidentiary context that they would insist on giving to all other forms of evidence. PMID:27522232

  14. Plagued by doubt and viral misinformation: the need for evidence-based use of historical disease images.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lori; Nevell, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The digitisation of historical disease images and their widespread availability on the internet have been a boon to education and research, but with unintended consequences, including the misrepresentation of infectious diseases in the past and the viral spread of misinformation. Many medieval images containing scenes of infectious disease come from non-medical sources and are not meant to convey any medical meaning. Erroneous modern captions have led to the publication of several historical images labelled as depictions of the plague, although artistic and textual evidence shows that they are not. Mislabelled images lose their intended historical narrative, and their use creates a distorted view of the past and of the disease in question. Scholars should give the same careful consideration to an image's evidentiary context that they would insist on giving to all other forms of evidence.

  15. [Acute encephalic manifestations in Senegalese children with sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Diagne, I; Diagne-Guèye, N R; Fall, L; Ndiaye, O; Camara, B; Diouf, S; Signate-Sy, H; Kuakuvi, N

    2001-01-01

    The course of sickle cell disease (SCD) may be complicated by neurologic events, mainly bactérial meningitidis and stroke. We retrospectively studied all cases with acute encephalic manifestations (AEM) in a cohort of 461 children and adolescents with SCD followed at Albert Royer Children Hospital of Dakar (Senegal) from january 1991 to december 2000 (ten years). Among them 438 had sickle cell anemia (SCA), 19 SC disease and 4 S-beta thalassemia (3 S-beta+, 1 S-beta0). Seven patients, all with SCA, presented antecedents of AEM revealed by flacid and proportionnal hemiplegia evoking stroke. Prevalence of these AEM was 1.5 per cent among patients with SCD and 1.6 per cent among those with SCA. They were 4 girls and 3 boys (sex ratio = 0.75) aged 4 to 8.5 years when occurred the first accident. We observed no clinical or biological distinctive characteristic of SCA in these patients compared to those without crebrovascular accident. Recurrence was observed once in a boy after a 12 months interval and twice in a girl after 20 and 60 months intervals successively. No transfusionnal program was applied to prevent recurrent stroke because of insufficient conditions for long-term transfusion. Stroke appears to be rare in senegalese children with SCD. However it poses in our context the major problem of applicability of transfusionnal program which constitute the only therapy universally recognised to be effective to prevent recurrence. Nevertheless hydroxyurea could be a satisfactory alternative.

  16. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  17. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE QUANTITATION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Shook, David; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is heterogeneous. A minority of patients has clinical and biologic features that are associated with a very high risk of relapse. For the remaining patients no clear prognostic factors can be identified at diagnosis. The degree of treatment response is likely to be an informative predictor of outcome for these patients. Modern assays to detect AML cells that are undetectable by conventional morphologic techniques, i.e. minimal residual disease (MRD), can potentially improve measurements of treatment response. It is plausible that modifications to treatment based on the results of these assays will improve clinical management and ultimately increase cure rates. Established MRD assays for AML are based on either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genetic abnormalities or flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes. Residual disease and treatment response can be measured by these assays in a manner that is much more sensitive and objective than that afforded by conventional morphologic examination. The expanding use of MRD testing is beginning to change the definition of treatment response and of remission. Other clinically informative uses of MRD testing include the detection of early relapse and the evaluation of the efficacy of new antileukemic agents. PMID:19778853

  18. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  19. Simultaneous detection of five notifiable viral diseases of cattle by single-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed real-time PCR (qPCR) assays enable the detection of several target genes in a single reaction, which is applicable for simultaneous testing for the most important viral diseases in samples obtained from ruminants with unspecific clinical symptoms. Here, reverse transcription qPCR (RT-qPCR) systems for the detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and bluetongue virus (BTV) were combined with an internal control system based on the beta-actin gene. Additionally, a background screening for three further major pathogens of cloven-hoofed animals reportable to the World Organisation for Animal Health, namely foot-and-mouth disease virus, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus, and Rift Valley fever virus, was integrated using the identical fluorophore for the respective RT-qPCR assays. Every pathogen-specific assay had an analytical sensitivity of at least 100 genome copies per reaction within the multiplex approach, and a series of reference samples and clinical specimens obtained from cattle, but also from small ruminants, were detected reliably. The qPCR systems integrated in the background screening were even not influenced by the simultaneous amplification of very high BVDV and BTV genome copy numbers. The newly developed multiplex qPCR allows the specific and sensitive detection of five of the most important diseases of ruminants and could be used in the context of monitoring programs or for differential diagnostics. PMID:25746154

  20. Simultaneous detection of five notifiable viral diseases of cattle by single-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed real-time PCR (qPCR) assays enable the detection of several target genes in a single reaction, which is applicable for simultaneous testing for the most important viral diseases in samples obtained from ruminants with unspecific clinical symptoms. Here, reverse transcription qPCR (RT-qPCR) systems for the detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and bluetongue virus (BTV) were combined with an internal control system based on the beta-actin gene. Additionally, a background screening for three further major pathogens of cloven-hoofed animals reportable to the World Organisation for Animal Health, namely foot-and-mouth disease virus, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus, and Rift Valley fever virus, was integrated using the identical fluorophore for the respective RT-qPCR assays. Every pathogen-specific assay had an analytical sensitivity of at least 100 genome copies per reaction within the multiplex approach, and a series of reference samples and clinical specimens obtained from cattle, but also from small ruminants, were detected reliably. The qPCR systems integrated in the background screening were even not influenced by the simultaneous amplification of very high BVDV and BTV genome copy numbers. The newly developed multiplex qPCR allows the specific and sensitive detection of five of the most important diseases of ruminants and could be used in the context of monitoring programs or for differential diagnostics.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of viral fitness due to a single nucleotide polymorphism in the Marek's disease virus UL 41 gene via an in vitro competition assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a T cell lymphoma, is an economically important disease of poultry caused by the Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus. A greater understanding of viral gene function and the contribution of sequence variation to virulence should facilitate eff...

  2. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  3. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  4. Exposure to ozone reduces influenza disease severity and alters distribution of influenza viral antigens in murine lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.A.; Zee, Y.C,; Osebold, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    Exposure to ambient levels of ozone (0.5 ppm) was shown to alter the pathogenesis of respiratory infection after aerosol infection of mice with influenza A virus. A semiquantitative method for determination of the sites of virus replication by direct immunofluorescence indicated that exposure to ozone reduced the involvement of respiratory epithelium in the infectious process and resulted in a less widespread infection of the alveolar parenchyma. Furthermore, the ozone-mediated alteration in viral antigen distribution was consistent with significantly reduced influenza disease mortality and prolonged survival time, but only when the oxidant was present during the course of infection. Reduced disease severity in ozone-exposed animals appeared to be independent of peak pulmonary virus titers, pulmonary interferon titers, and pulmonary and serum-neutralizing antibody titers. These studies suggested that the distribution of influenza virus in the murine lung was a key factor in disease severity.

  5. A review of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever pneumonia and viral-bacterial synergism in respiratory disease of cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D

    1982-01-01

    Unanswered questions on the etiology and prevention of shipping fever pneumonia have allowed this disease to remain one of the most costly to the North American cattle industry. Research in this area has indirected that while Pasteurella haemolytica and, to a lesser extent, P. multocida are involved in most cases, they seem to require additional factors to help initiate the disease process. Bovine herpes virus 1 has been shown experimentally to be one such factor. This review examines in some detail the topics of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever, and viral-bacterial interactions in the production of respiratory disease in various species. It deals with history, definitions, etiologies, clinical signs and lesions, and considers exposure levels, transmission and various pathogenetic mechanisms that are postulated or known to occur. PMID:6290011

  6. Etiology and Viral Genotype in Patients with End-Stage Liver Diseases admitted to a Hepatology Unit in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan-Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Jaramillo, Sergio; Norder, Helene; Pujol, Flor Helene; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are the principal risk factor associated to end-stage liver diseases in the world. A study was carried out on end-stage liver disease cases admitted to an important hepatology unit in Medellin, the second largest city in Colombia. From 131 patients recruited in this prospective study, 71% of cases were diagnosed as cirrhosis, 12.2% as HCC, and 16.8% as cirrhosis and HCC. Regarding the risk factors of these patients, alcohol consumption was the most frequent (37.4%), followed by viral etiology (17.6%). Blood and/or hepatic tissue samples from patients with serological markers for HCV or HBV infection were characterized; on the basis of the phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5′ UTR and HBV S gene, isolates belonged to HCV/1 and HBV/F3, respectively. These results confirm the presence of strains associated with poor clinical outcome, in patients with liver disease in Colombia; additionally, HBV basal core promoter double mutant was identified in HCC cases. Here we show the first study of cirrhosis and/or HCC in Colombian and HBV and HCV molecular characterization of these patients. Viral aetiology was not the main risk factor in this cohort but alcohol consumption. PMID:21941645

  7. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure.

  8. New Concepts in the Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Control of Diseases Caused by the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    PubMed Central

    Radostits, Otto M.; Littlejohns, Ian R.

    1988-01-01

    The new information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of mucosal disease of cattle is reviewed. It is now known that clinical mucosal disease occurs only in cattle which were infected with a pestivirus in early gestation and were born with persistent viral infection and specific immunotolerance. These animals may be clinically normal at birth but may develop fatal mucosal disease, perhaps following superinfection with another pestivirus, usually between 6 and 24 months of age. They may also remain clinically normal indefinitely and breed successfully. The progeny from persistently infected females will similarly be persistently viremic, and maternal families of such animals may be established. Congenital defects may occur when infection of the fetus occurs in mid-gestation. Although fetuses may be infected in utero in late gestation, the infections do not persist, the fetuses develop antibodies, and they appear to suffer no ill-effects. Postnatal infection can result in subclinical disease (bovine viral diarrhea) with a normal immune response; the virus may also be responsible for enhanced susceptibility to other infections, diarrhea in newborn calves, and reproductive failure. Prevention of the economically important diseases caused by the virus is dependent upon the identification and elimination of persistently viremic animals, which are reservoirs of infection, and the vaccination of immunocompetent females at least three weeks before breeding. However, because of serotypic differences between strains, there is some doubt whether vaccination will reliably provide protection against the transplacental fetal infections that are important in the pathogenesis of this disease. There is no substantial evidence to warrant the vaccination of feedlot cattle. PMID:17423063

  9. Vaccines 85: Molecular and chemical basis of resistance to parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, R.A.; Chanock, R.M.; Brown, F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 70 selections. Some of the selection titles are: Structure of the Gene Encoding of Immunodominant Surface Antigen on the Sprozoite of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; Cloning and Expression in Bacteria of the Genes for Merozite-specific Antigens from the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; A Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium falciparum in Merozoites: Studies on the Protein and its Gene; Genetic Construction of Cholera Vaccine Prototypes; and Viral Genes, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Immunity.

  10. Cigarette smoke causes acute airway disease and exacerbates chronic obstructive lung disease in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Conlon, Thomas M; Ballester Lopez, Carolina; Seimetz, Michael; Bednorz, Mariola; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Weissmann, Norbert; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates a strong link between postnatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and increased respiratory morbidity in young children. However, how CS induces early onset airway disease in young children, and how it interacts with endogenous risk factors, remains poorly understood. We, therefore, exposed 10-day-old neonatal wild-type and β-epithelial sodium ion channel (β-ENaC)-transgenic mice with cystic fibrosis-like lung disease to CS for 4 days. Neonatal wild-type mice exposed to CS demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), which was accompanied by increased levels of Mmp12 and Cxcl1 BALF from β-ENaC-transgenic mice contained greater numbers of macrophages, which did not increase following acute CS exposure; however, there was significant increase in airway neutrophilia compared with filtered air transgenic and CS-exposed wild-type controls. Interestingly, wild-type and β-ENaC-transgenic mice demonstrated epithelial airway and vascular remodeling following CS exposure. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that CS exposure caused increased mucus accumulation in the airway lumen of neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice compared with wild-type controls, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of goblet cells and Muc5ac upregulation. We conclude that short-term CS exposure 1) induces acute airway disease with airway epithelial and vascular remodeling in neonatal wild-type mice; and 2) exacerbates airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and mucus plugging in neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice with chronic lung disease. Our results in neonatal mice suggest that young children may be highly susceptible to develop airway disease in response to tobacco smoke exposure, and that adverse effects may be aggravated in children with underlying chronic lung diseases. PMID:27448665

  11. Impact of fetal and neonatal viral (and parasitic) infections on later development and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Yvonne A

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that there are 4 million neonatal deaths and an equal number of stillbirths annually, the majority in the developing world. Neonatal deaths account for one third of deaths in children less than 5 years of age, and at least one third of neonatal deaths are related to infections. Infections also account for 80% of deaths in the postneonatal period through 5 years of age. There are several viral and parasitic infections which produce fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Neonatal infections occur during one or more perinatal periods: in utero (congenital), intrapartum (during labor and delivery), and early or late postpartum. Here the term perinatal refers to all of these stages of fetal or neonatal infections. The mechanisms of perinatal viral and parasitic infections vary depending on the specific pathogen, however, all begin with maternal infection. Following maternal infection, organisms may produce indirect placental infection with or without fetal infection, direct fetal or neonatal infection, or primary maternal infection and subsequent perinatal sequelae without either placental or fetal infection. Some pathogens may produce infections by more than one mechanism. This brief report will provide an overview of the pathogenesis, general outcomes, and known pathogens associated with perinatal viral and parasitic infections. PMID:18196955

  12. Impact of fetal and neonatal viral (and parasitic) infections on later development and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Yvonne A

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that there are 4 million neonatal deaths and an equal number of stillbirths annually, the majority in the developing world. Neonatal deaths account for one third of deaths in children less than 5 years of age, and at least one third of neonatal deaths are related to infections. Infections also account for 80% of deaths in the postneonatal period through 5 years of age. There are several viral and parasitic infections which produce fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Neonatal infections occur during one or more perinatal periods: in utero (congenital), intrapartum (during labor and delivery), and early or late postpartum. Here the term perinatal refers to all of these stages of fetal or neonatal infections. The mechanisms of perinatal viral and parasitic infections vary depending on the specific pathogen, however, all begin with maternal infection. Following maternal infection, organisms may produce indirect placental infection with or without fetal infection, direct fetal or neonatal infection, or primary maternal infection and subsequent perinatal sequelae without either placental or fetal infection. Some pathogens may produce infections by more than one mechanism. This brief report will provide an overview of the pathogenesis, general outcomes, and known pathogens associated with perinatal viral and parasitic infections.

  13. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  14. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  15. Characterization of a highly conserved domain within the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein S2 domain with characteristics of a viral fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Roth, Shoshannah L; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-08-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of alpha-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae.

  16. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Domain within the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein S2 Domain with Characteristics of a Viral Fusion Peptide▿

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of α-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae. PMID:19439480

  17. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  18. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients. PMID:27606147

  19. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients.

  20. Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases continue to be one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. Both epidemics and sporadic cases occur. In some years, outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever and Japanese encephalitis reached alarming proportions. The significance of other arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases has still to be determined. Therefore, continuous epidemiological surveillance, diagnosis, and control of these groups of diseases remains an urgent task. The objectives, targets, priority areas, and strategies for future plans of action have been identified and recommendations formulated. PMID:6603917

  1. Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases continue to be one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions. Both epidemics and sporadic cases occur. In some years, outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever and Japanese encephalitis reached alarming proportions. The significance of other arthropod- and rodent-borne viral and rickettsial diseases has still to be determined. Therefore, continuous epidemiological surveillance, diagnosis, and control of these groups of diseases remains an urgent task.The objectives, targets, priority areas, and strategies for future plans of action have been identified and recommendations formulated.

  2. Application of control measures against viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits in the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L; Smíd, B; Valícek, L

    1991-06-01

    The first outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) of rabbits were reported from eastern Slovakia in 1987. In 1988, the infection spread throughout the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic. Electron microscopy was used by the Veterinary Research Institute in Brno to diagnose the disease during the early stage of infection. At present, the regional laboratories of the veterinary investigation services use the haemagglutination and the direct immunofluorescence tests as the principal methods to demonstrate the causal agent. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques have been developed to demonstrate VHD virus, while the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been used to detect antibodies. Diagnostic kits, allowing a wide use of these methods, are now available commercially. Two types of inactivate vaccines were developed and produced in 1988 and 1989. VHD is controlled by vaccination of exposed rabbit colonies. This is accompanied by other preventive and protective measures, directed by district veterinary officers following instructions from federal authorities.

  3. Reverse plaque formation method for titration of non-cytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Itoh, O; Sasaki, H; Hanaki, T

    1983-01-01

    The reverse plaque formation (RPF) method with a semi-micro plate was applied to the titration of a non-cytopathogenic (non-CP) strain of bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease (BVD-MD) virus. All the five non-CP strains used in this experiment formed reverse plaques (RP) on bovine testicle cell culture under methyl cellulose overlay. The RPF was inhibited by the pretreatment of a non-CP virus strain with immune rabbit serum to a reference strain. The specificity of the RPF method was demonstrated by the linear test and Poisson distribution test. Comparative titration of commercial BVD-MD vaccines was carried out by the semi-micro RPF method and the tube method based on the exaltation on Newcastle disease virus. The virus titer obtained by the former was slightly higher than that obtained by the latter. The former was proved to be a method of high sensitivity for determining non-CP virus.

  4. Long-term evaluation of teeth and implants during the periodic maintenance in patients with viral liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was designed to investigate the maintenance of teeth and implants in patients with viral liver disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS 316 patients without any significant systemic disease were selected as a control group. Liver disease group was consisted of 230 patients. Necessary data were collected using clinical records and panoramic radiographs. Then, the patients were subdivided into 2 groups based on the type of active dental therapy received before maintenance period (Pre-Tx). Analysis for finding statistically significant difference was performed based on the need for re-treatment of active dental therapy (Re-Tx) and change in the number of teeth (N-teeth) and implants (N-implants). RESULTS Comparing to control group, the patients with liver disease showed higher value on N-teeth, N-implants, and Re-Tx. Statistically significant differences were found on N-teeth (P=.000) and Re-Tx (P=.000) in patients with non-surgical Pre-Tx. Analysis based on severity of liver disease showed that N-teeth and Re-Tx were directly related to severity of liver disease regardless of received type of Pre-Tx. Significant differences were found on N-teeth (P=.003) and Re-Tx (P=.044) in patients with non-surgical Pre-Tx. CONCLUSION In this study, it was concluded that liver disease might influence the loss of teeth and cause the relapse of dental disease during maintenance period in patients. A significant positive relationship between tooth and implant loss and severity of liver disease seems to exist. PMID:27555902

  5. In vivo infection of IgG-containing cells by Jembrana disease virus during acute infection

    SciTech Connect

    Desport, Moira; Tenaya, I.W. Masa; McLachlan, Alexander; McNab, Tegan J.; Rachmat, Judhi; Hartaningsih, Nining; Wilcox, Graham E.

    2009-10-25

    Jembrana disease virus (JDV) is an unusual bovine lentivirus which causes a non-follicular proliferation of lymphocytes, a transient immunosuppression and a delayed humoral response in infected Bali cattle in Indonesia. A double-immunofluorescent labeling method was developed to identify the subset of mononuclear cells in which the viral capsid protein could be detected. Viral antigen was present in pleomorphic centroblast-like cells which were identified as IgG-containing cells, including plasma cells, in lymphoid tissues. There was no evidence of infection of CD3{sup +} T-cells or MAC387{sup +} monocytes in tissues but large vacuolated cells with a macrophage-like morphology in the lung were found to contain viral antigen although they could not be shown conclusively to be infected. The tropism of JDV for mature IgG-containing cells may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of Jembrana disease, the delayed antibody responses and the genetic composition of this atypical lentivirus.

  6. Emerging and re-emerging viral infections in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Agostino; Beltramo, Tiziana; Torre, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Emerging viral infections are becoming a serious problem in Europe in the recent years. This is particularly true for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), West Nile virus (WNV) disease, Toscana virus (TOSV) disease, and potentially for avian influenza virus (H5N1). In contrast, emergence or re-emergence of severe viral infections, including tick borne encephalitis virus, and viral haemorrhagic fever caused by Hantavirus and dengue virus have been frequently reported in several European countries. Laboratory diagnosis of these viral infections based on viral isolation or detection by immune electron microscopy, immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has dramatically improved in the recent years, and SARS represents a good example of a diagnostic approach to emerging viral infections. Finally, old and new promising agents are in the pipeline of pharmaceutical companies to treat emerging viral infections. However only prevention based on large epidemiological studies, and research and development of new vaccines may be able to control and eventually eradicate these deadly viral infections.

  7. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: the first transmissible disease of the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Macrì, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is the first severe and easily transmissible disease to emerge in the 21st century. It is caused by the infection with a coronavirus, a single strand RNA capsulated virus, recently found in a small mammalian, the masked palm civet. It is likely to represent the source of human infection. The first cases of SARS have been reported in the Chinese province of Guangdong and, since then, probable cases have been reported world wide. The clinical picture is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, cough or dyspnea in patients affected by air-space opacities (unifocal involvement in the 54.6% of cases) or distress respiratory syndrome and linked to a recent exposure to a SARS case or to a travel/residence in an affected area. The empirical therapy is based on broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids and ribavirin, but susceptibility testing have failed to demonstrate direct anti-viral activity of ribavirin against SARS-related coronavirus in vitro. The exposure to respiratory droplets and the contact with biologic fluids (respiratory and gastrointestinal secretions) represent the most efficient transmission modality of the SARS-related coronavirus. Hand hygiene is the most simple and cost effective measure of infection control to prevent contagion, and the use of airborne, contact and droplet precaution is strictly recommended to all health care workers taking care of such patients. The spread of SARS, to less developed country with limited resource for public health programs, represent the emerging alarming threat in the new global scenario.

  8. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA. PMID:26982472

  9. Bovine Mx1 enables resistance against foot-and-mouth disease virus in naturally susceptible cells by inhibiting the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; Xia, X-Z; Hu, G-X; Yu, L; He, H-B

    2016-03-01

    Innate immunity, especially the anti-viral genes, exerts an important barrier function in preventing viral infections. Myxovirus-resistant (Mx) gene take an anti-viral role, whereas its effects on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in naturally susceptible cells are still unclear. The bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cell line BPTE-siMx1, in which bovine Mx1 gene was silenced, was established and treated with IFN alpha for 6 hr before FMDV infection. The copy numbers of the negative and positive strand viral RNA were determined by strand-specific real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. The TCID50 of BPTE-siMx1 cells increased at least 17-fold as compared to control cells BPTE-LacZ at 8 hr post infection, thus silencing of bovine Mx1 could promote the replication of FMDV. The amount of both the negative and positive strand viral RNA in BPTE-siMx1 cells significantly increased as compared to BPTE-LacZ cells, indicating that the replication levels of viral RNA were promoted by silencing bovine Mx1. The bovine Mx1 gene could provide resistance against FMDV in the bovine primary fetal tracheal epithelial cells via suppressing the replication of viral RNA.

  10. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  11. Non-viral human IL-10 gene expression reduces acute rejection in heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, In Chul; Mullen, Patricia M; Precht, Andrew F; Khanna, Ajai; Li, Melissa; Behling, Cynthia; Lopez, Valerie F; Chiou, Henry C; Moss, Ronald B; Hart, Marquis E

    2003-01-01

    We studied nonviral delivery, expression, and the effect of the human interleukin-10 (Hu IL-10) gene on the rat model of heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT). Two previous pilot studies showed remarkable expression of the Hu IL-10 gene in donor and recipient rats, and a decreasing effect of acute rejection in certain cases. In this study, we focused on the efficacy of Hu IL-10 gene expression to decrease acute rejection compared with cyclosporine A (CyA) in a HALT model. Three study groups and one control group were designed. Each group consisted of 6 DA donor and 6 Lewis recipient rats, which underwent HALT. In the control group, donors and recipients were not treated at all. In group II, recipients were treated with one dose of CyA. In group III, donors were treated with Hu IL-10 plasmid. In group IV, donors were treated with Hu IL-10 plasmid, and recipients were treated with one dose of CyA. Rejection was established by histopathology: it revealed 100% rejection in control and 33.3% rejection in study groups II, III, and IV. Human IL-10 gene expression prevented acute rejection with the same efficacy as CyA in the HALT model in rats.

  12. [Current treatment and management of the acute phase of Peyronies's disease].

    PubMed

    Vanni, Alex J; Bennett, Nelson E

    2009-10-01

    The true pathophysiologic nature of Peyronie's disease continues to evolve. This pathology often results in a penile plaque(s), penile deformity, curvature, pain, and erectile dysfunction. Clinically, there are two distinct phases, acute and chronic. The focus of this review will center on the management of the acute phase of Peyronie's disease. While little data exists demonstrating disease resolution, disease stabilization is an important clinical goal for patients as this often allows acceptable sexual function. Thus, medical management during the acute phase of Peyronie's disease is aimed at limiting and stabilizing the degree of penile fibrosis, decreasing penile curvature, and reducing penile pain. In this manuscript we explain different therapies; oral, topical, intralesional injection and others like extracorporeal shockwave (ESWT), radiation and penile traction for acute phase of Peyronie's disease. Although no consensus exists for the treatment of acute phase Peyronie's disease, a majority of patients can achieve stabilization and in some cases regression of their disease with proper medical therapy. The goals of therapy should be discussed extensively with each patient, noting that erectile function will be likely despite some degree of curvature.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of viral fitness due to a single nucleotide polymorphism in the Marek's disease virus UL41 gene via an in vitro competition assay.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weifeng; Niikura, Masahiro; Silva, Robert F; Cheng, Hans H

    2008-03-01

    Marek's disease, a T cell lymphoma, is an economically important disease of poultry caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated alphaherpesvirus. A greater understanding of viral gene function and the contribution of sequence variation to virulence should facilitate efforts to control Marek's disease in chickens. To characterize a naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; AY510475:g.108,206C>T) in the MDV UL41 gene that results in a missense mutation (AAS01683:p.Arg377Cys), bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-derived MDVs that differed only in the UL41 SNP were evaluated using a head-to-head competition assay in vitro. Monitoring the frequency of each SNP by pyrosequencing during virus passage determined the ratio of each viral genome in a single monolayer, which is a very sensitive method to monitor viral fitness. MDV with the UL41*Cys allele showed enhanced fitness in vitro. To evaluate the mechanism of altered viral fitness caused by this SNP, the virion-associated host shutoff (vhs) activity of both UL41 alleles was determined. The UL41*Cys allele had no vhs activity, which suggests that enhanced fitness in vitro for MDV with inactive vhs was due to reduced degradation of viral transcripts. The in vitro competition assay should be applicable to other MDV genes and mutations.

  14. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  15. The relationship between viral RNA, myelin-specific mRNAs, and demyelination in central nervous system disease during Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1990-12-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (DAV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains. To elucidate the pathogenesis of DAV-induced demyelination, the authors investigated the spatial and chronologic relationship between virus (antigen and RNA), myelin-specific mRNAs, and demyelination in DAV-infected mice using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and slot blot hybridization analyses. In spinal cord white matter, viral RNA was detected easily in ventral root entry zones 1 to 2 weeks after infection. Viral RNA increased to maximum levels by 4 weeks after infection, which was associated with inflammation and mild demyelination. At 8 to 12 weeks after infection, when demyelination became most extensive, viral RNA was significantly decreased. Demyelination did not chronologically or spatially parallel the presence of viral RNA within the spinal cord. Decrease of myelin-specific mRNAs, including myelin-basic protein and proteolipid protein mRNAs, was observed within the demyelinating lesions with or without detectable viral RNA. These results indicate that a viral infection of white matter in the early phase of the infection initiates spinal cord disease leading to demyelination, but later an ongoing immunopathologic process contributes to the presence of extensive demyelination.

  16. The relationship between viral RNA, myelin-specific mRNAs, and demyelination in central nervous system disease during Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, M.; Zurbriggen, A.; Fujinami, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (DAV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains. To elucidate the pathogenesis of DAV-induced demyelination, the authors investigated the spatial and chronologic relationship between virus (antigen and RNA), myelin-specific mRNAs, and demyelination in DAV-infected mice using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and slot blot hybridization analyses. In spinal cord white matter, viral RNA was detected easily in ventral root entry zones 1 to 2 weeks after infection. Viral RNA increased to maximum levels by 4 weeks after infection, which was associated with inflammation and mild demyelination. At 8 to 12 weeks after infection, when demyelination became most extensive, viral RNA was significantly decreased. Demyelination did not chronologically or spatially parallel the presence of viral RNA within the spinal cord. Decrease of myelin-specific mRNAs, including myelin-basic protein and proteolipid protein mRNAs, was observed within the demyelinating lesions with or without detectable viral RNA. These results indicate that a viral infection of white matter in the early phase of the infection initiates spinal cord disease leading to demyelination, but later an ongoing immunopathologic process contributes to the presence of extensive demyelination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2260633

  17. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Takahiro; Kanai, Yuta; Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs) are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26901882

  18. Emerging viral threats in Gabon: health capacities and response to the risk of emerging zoonotic diseases in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bourgarel, M; Wauquier, N; Gonzalez, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EID) are currently the major threat to public health worldwide and most EID events have involved zoonotic infectious agents. Central Africa in general and Gabon in particular are privileged areas for the emergence of zoonotic EIDs. Indeed, human incursions in Gabonese forests for exploitation purposes lead to intensified contacts between humans and wildlife thus generating an increased risk of emergence of zoonotic diseases. In Gabon, 51 endemic or potential endemic viral infectious diseases have been reported. Among them, 22 are of zoonotic origin and involve 12 families of viruses. The most notorious are dengue, yellow fever, ebola, marburg, Rift Valley fever and chikungunya viruses. Potential EID due to wildlife in Gabon are thereby plentiful and need to be inventoried. The Gabonese Public Health system covers geographically most of the country allowing a good access to sanitary information and efficient monitoring of emerging diseases. However, access to treatment and prevention is better in urban areas where medical structures are more developed and financial means are concentrated even though the population is equally distributed between urban and rural areas. In spite of this, Gabon could be a good field for investigating the emergence or re-emergence of zoonotic EID. Indeed Gabonese health research structures such as CIRMF, advantageously located, offer high quality researchers and facilities that study pathogens and wildlife ecology, aiming toward a better understanding of the contact and transmission mechanisms of new pathogens from wildlife to human, the emergence of zoonotic EID and the breaking of species barriers by pathogens. PMID:22460397

  19. Comparative and kinetic analysis of viral shedding and immunological responses in MERS patients representing a broad spectrum of disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chan-Ki; Cheon, Shinhye; Ha, Na-Young; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Kim, Yuri; Aigerim, Abdimadiyeva; Shin, Hyun Mu; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Moon, Jae Young; Choi, Myung-Sik; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, Yeon-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ongoing spread of MERS, there is limited knowledge of the factors affecting its severity and outcomes. We analyzed clinical data and specimens from fourteen MERS patients treated in a hospital who collectively represent a wide spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild febrile illness to fatal pneumonia, and classified the patients into four groups based on severity and mortality. Comparative and kinetic analyses revealed that high viral loads, weak antibody responses, and lymphopenia accompanying thrombocytopenia were associated with disease mortality, whereas persistent and gradual increases in lymphocyte responses might be required for effective immunity against MERS-CoV infection. Leukocytosis, primarily due to increased neutrophils and monocytes, was generally observed in more severe and fatal cases. The blood levels of cytokines such as IL-10, IL-15, TGF-β, and EGF were either positively or negatively correlated with disease mortality. Robust induction of various chemokines with differential kinetics was more prominent in patients that recovered from pneumonia than in patients with mild febrile illness or deceased patients. The correlation of the virological and immunological responses with disease severity and mortality, as well as their responses to current antiviral therapy, may have prognostic significance during the early phase of MERS. PMID:27146253

  20. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  1. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Chang, Eun Jae; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  2. Nigerian response to the 2014 Ebola viral disease outbreak: lessons and cautions

    PubMed Central

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Crossey, Mary Margaret Elizabeth; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease outbreak that initially hit Guinea, Liberia and Senegal in 2014 was projected to affect Nigeria very badly when the first case was reported in July 2014. However, the outbreak was effectively and swiftly contained with only eight deaths out of 20 cases, confounding even the most optimistic predictions of the disease modelers. A combination of health worker and public education, a coordinated field epidemiology and laboratory training program (with prior experience in disease outbreak control in other diseases) and effective set-up of emergency operations centers were some of the measures that helped to confound the critics and contain what would have been an otherwise deadly outbreak in a densely populated country with a highly mobile population. This article highlights the measures taken in Nigeria and looks to the translatable lessons learnt for future disease outbreaks, whether that be from the Ebola virus or other infectious agents. PMID:26740841

  3. Engineering cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) for resistance to cotton leaf curl disease using viral truncated AC1 DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Jamil A; Zafar, Yusuf; Arshad, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid; Asad, Shaheen

    2011-04-01

    Several important biological processes are performed by distinct functional domains found on replication-associated protein (Rep) encoded by AC1 of geminiviruses. Two truncated forms of replicase (tAC1) gene, capable of expressing only the N-terminal 669 bp (5'AC1) and C-terminal 783 bp (3'AC1) nucleotides cloned under transcriptional control of the CaMV35S were introduced into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using LBA4404 strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to make use of an interference strategy for impairing cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) infection in transgenic cotton. Compared with nontransformed control, we observed that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing either N-terminal (5'AC1) or C-terminal (3'AC1) sequences confer resistance to CLCuV by inhibiting replication of viral genomic and β satellite DNA components. Molecular analysis by Northern blot hybridization revealed high transgene expression in early and late growth stages associated with inhibition of CLCuV replication. Of the eight T(1) transgenic lines tested, six had delayed and minor symptoms as compared to nontransformed control lines which developed disease symptoms after 2-3 weeks of whitefly-mediated viral delivery. Virus biological assay and growth of T(2) plants proved that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing 5'- and 3'AC1 displayed high resistance level up to 72, 81%, respectively, as compared to non-transformed control plants following inoculation with viruliferous whiteflies giving significantly high cotton seed yield. Progeny analysis of these plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting and virus biological assay showed stable transgene, integration, inheritance and cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) resistance in two of the eight transgenic lines having single or two transgene insertions. Transgenic cotton expressing partial AC1 gene of CLCuV can be used as virus resistance source in cotton breeding programs aiming to improve virus resistance in cotton crop. PMID

  4. Visualization of viral candidate cDNAs in infectious brain fractions from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by representational difference analysis.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Manuelidis, L

    1996-08-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), a neurodegenerative and dementing disease of later life, is caused by a viruslike entity that is incompletely characterized. As in scrapie, all more purified infectious brain preparations contain nucleic acids. However, it has not been possible to visualize unique bands that may derive from a viral genome. We here used a subtractive strategy known as representational difference analysis (RDA) to uncover such sequences. To reduce the complexity of starting target nucleic acids, sucrose gradients were first used to select nuclease resistant particles with a defined 120S size. In CJD this single 120S gradient peak is highly enriched for infectivity, and contains reduced amounts of PrP (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 92, 5124-8, 1995). Parallel 120S fractions from uninfected brain were made to generate subtractor sequences. 120S particles were lysed in GdnSCN, and ng amounts of released RNA were purified for random-primed cDNA synthesis. To capture representative fragments of 100-500 bp, cDNAs were cleaved with Mbo I for adaptor ligation and amplification. In the first experiment with moderate RDA selection, it was possible to visualize clones from CJD cDNA that did not hybridize to control cDNA. In the second experiment, more exhaustive subtractions yielded a discrete set of CJD derived gel bands. Competitive hybridization showed a subset of these bands were not present in either the control 120S cDNA or in the hamster genome. This represents the first demonstration of apparently CJD-specific nucleic acid bands in more purified infectious preparations. Although exhaustive cloning, sequencing and correlative titration studies need to be done, it is encouraging that most of the viral candidates selected thus far have no significant homology with any previously described sequence in the database.

  5. Evaluation of disease and viral biomarkers as triggers for therapeutic intervention in respiratory mousepox - an animal model of smallpox.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Chen, Nanhai G; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Hruby, Dennis; Jordan, Robert; Lanier, Randall; Painter, George; Painter, Wesley; Sagartz, John E; Schriewer, Jill; Mark Buller, R

    2012-04-01

    The human population is currently faced with the potential use of natural or recombinant variola and monkeypox viruses as biological weapons. Furthermore, the emergence of human monkeypox in Africa and its expanding environs poses a significant natural threat. Such occurrences would require therapeutic and prophylactic intervention with antivirals to minimize morbidity and mortality of exposed populations. Two orally-bioavailable antivirals are currently in clinical trials; namely CMX001, an ether-lipid analog of cidofovir with activity at the DNA replication stage and ST-246, a novel viral egress inhibitor. Both of these drugs have previously been evaluated in the ectromelia/mousepox system; however, the trigger for intervention was not linked to a disease biomarker or a specific marker of virus replication. In this study we used lethal, intranasal, ectromelia virus infections of C57BL/6 and hairless SKH1 mice to model human disease and evaluate exanthematous rash (rash) as an indicator to initiate antiviral treatment. We show that significant protection can be provided to C57BL/6 mice by CMX001 or ST-246 when therapy is initiated on day 6 post infection or earlier. We also show that significant protection can be provided to SKH1 mice treated with CMX001 at day 3 post infection or earlier, but this is four or more days before detection of rash (ST-246 not tested). Although in this model rash could not be used as a treatment trigger, viral DNA was detected in blood by day 4 post infection and in the oropharyngeal secretions (saliva) by day 2-3 post infection - thus providing robust and specific markers of virus replication for therapy initiation. These findings are discussed in the context of current respiratory challenge animal models in use for the evaluation of poxvirus antivirals.

  6. Engineering cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) for resistance to cotton leaf curl disease using viral truncated AC1 DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Jamil A; Zafar, Yusuf; Arshad, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid; Asad, Shaheen

    2011-04-01

    Several important biological processes are performed by distinct functional domains found on replication-associated protein (Rep) encoded by AC1 of geminiviruses. Two truncated forms of replicase (tAC1) gene, capable of expressing only the N-terminal 669 bp (5'AC1) and C-terminal 783 bp (3'AC1) nucleotides cloned under transcriptional control of the CaMV35S were introduced into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using LBA4404 strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to make use of an interference strategy for impairing cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) infection in transgenic cotton. Compared with nontransformed control, we observed that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing either N-terminal (5'AC1) or C-terminal (3'AC1) sequences confer resistance to CLCuV by inhibiting replication of viral genomic and β satellite DNA components. Molecular analysis by Northern blot hybridization revealed high transgene expression in early and late growth stages associated with inhibition of CLCuV replication. Of the eight T(1) transgenic lines tested, six had delayed and minor symptoms as compared to nontransformed control lines which developed disease symptoms after 2-3 weeks of whitefly-mediated viral delivery. Virus biological assay and growth of T(2) plants proved that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing 5'- and 3'AC1 displayed high resistance level up to 72, 81%, respectively, as compared to non-transformed control plants following inoculation with viruliferous whiteflies giving significantly high cotton seed yield. Progeny analysis of these plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting and virus biological assay showed stable transgene, integration, inheritance and cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) resistance in two of the eight transgenic lines having single or two transgene insertions. Transgenic cotton expressing partial AC1 gene of CLCuV can be used as virus resistance source in cotton breeding programs aiming to improve virus resistance in cotton crop.

  7. Discordant Impact of HLA on Viral Replicative Capacity and Disease Progression in Pediatric and Adult HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Adland, Emily; Paioni, Paolo; Thobakgale, Christina; Laker, Leana; Mori, Luisa; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Csala, Anna; Clapson, Margaret; Flynn, Jacquie; Novelli, Vas; Hurst, Jacob; Naidoo, Vanessa; Shapiro, Roger; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Frater, John; Prendergast, Andrew; Prado, Julia G; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Carrington, Mary; Jooste, Pieter; Goulder, Philip J R

    2015-06-01

    HLA class I polymorphism has a major influence on adult HIV disease progression. An important mechanism mediating this effect is the impact on viral replicative capacity (VRC) of the escape mutations selected in response to HLA-restricted CD8+ T-cell responses. Factors that contribute to slow progression in pediatric HIV infection are less well understood. We here investigate the relationship between VRC and disease progression in pediatric infection, and the effect of HLA on VRC and on disease outcome in adult and pediatric infection. Studying a South African cohort of >350 ART-naïve, HIV-infected children and their mothers, we first observed that pediatric disease progression is significantly correlated with VRC. As expected, VRCs in mother-child pairs were strongly correlated (p = 0.004). The impact of the protective HLA alleles, HLA-B*57, HLA-B*58:01 and HLA-B*81:01, resulted in significantly lower VRCs in adults (p<0.0001), but not in children. Similarly, in adults, but not in children, VRCs were significantly higher in subjects expressing the disease-susceptible alleles HLA-B*18:01/45:01/58:02 (p = 0.007). Irrespective of the subject, VRCs were strongly correlated with the number of Gag CD8+ T-cell escape mutants driven by HLA-B*57/58:01/81:01 present in each virus (p = 0.0002). In contrast to the impact of VRC common to progression in adults and children, the HLA effects on disease outcome, that are substantial in adults, are small and statistically insignificant in infected children. These data further highlight the important role that VRC plays both in adult and pediatric progression, and demonstrate that HLA-independent factors, yet to be fully defined, are predominantly responsible for pediatric non-progression.

  8. Acute abdomen in adult Celiac disease: an intestinal intussusception case.

    PubMed

    Makay, Ozer; Kazimi, Mircelal; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Osmanoğlu, Necla; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that half of the cases admitted to hospital emergency services complain of abdominal pain and that nearly half of these cases are diagnosed with nonspecific abdominal pain. The population of patients with celiac sprue is rarely encountered at the emergency room. Although acute abdominal pain is rarely seen in adult celiac sprue, it should be added to the differential diagnosis. It should also be remembered that acute abdominal pain in these patients could be originating from perforation, intussusceptions and/or intestinal lymphoma. Herein we report a case of adult celiac sprue where successful surgical exploration was carried out because of entero-enteral intussusception. PMID:17602358

  9. Emerging viral disease risk to pollinating insects: ecological, evolutionary and anthropogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Robyn; Boots, Mike; Wilfert, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The potential for infectious pathogens to spillover and emerge from managed populations to wildlife communities is poorly understood, but ecological, evolutionary and anthropogenic factors are all likely to influence the initial exposure and subsequent infection, spread and impact of disease. Fast-evolving RNA viruses, known to cause severe colony losses in managed honeybee populations, deserve particular attention for their propensity to jump between host species and thus threaten ecologically and economically important wild pollinator communities. We review the literature on pollinator viruses to identify biological and anthropogenic drivers of disease emergence, highlight gaps in the literature, and discuss potential management strategies. We provide evidence that many wild pollinator species are exposed to viruses from commercial species, resulting in multiple spillover events. However, it is not clear whether species become infected as a result of spillover or whether transmission is occurring within these wild populations. Ecological traits of pollinating insects, such as overlapping ranges, niches and behaviours, clearly promote cross-species transmission of RNA viruses. Moreover, we conclude that the social behaviour and phylogenetic relatedness of social pollinators further facilitate within- and between-host transmission, leaving these species particularly vulnerable to emerging diseases. We argue that the commercial use of pollinators is a key driver of disease emergence in these beneficial insects and that this must be addressed by management and policy. Synthesis and applications. There are important knowledge gaps, ranging from disease distribution and prevalence, to pathogen life history and virulence, to the impacts of disease emergence, which need to be addressed as research priorities. It is clear that avoiding anthropogenic pathogen spillover is crucial to preventing and managing disease emergence in pollinators, with far-reaching effects on our

  10. The model of response to viral haemorrhagic fevers of the National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani".

    PubMed

    Armignacco, O; Lauria, F N; Puro, V; Macrì, G; Petrecchia, A; Ippolito, G

    2001-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are severe and life-threatening diseases caused by a range of viruses. However, only four agents of VHF are known to be readily capable of person-to-person spread: Lassa virus, Crimean/Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Ebola and Marburg viruses. Diseases caused by these viruses are endemic only in few areas in the world, most notably Africa and some rural parts of the Middle East and Eastern Europe. Nonetheless, the increasing volume of international travel presents a greater likelihood for the importation of these infections or of suspected cases in non endemic countries. Four conditions can lead to the importation and to the subsequent recognition of VHF within Europe: 1) patients arriving as a result of a planned medical evacuation; 2) persons who became sick on route to their destination; 3) persons discovered ill when entering a country, for example during routine clinical examination at the airport; 4) persons becoming sick after their arrival. Public health implications and the risk of secondary spread of pathogens in the above reported circumstances are very different. Similarly, preparedness and response should vary. This paper summarizes the present knowledge on the four VHF capable of person-to-person spread, describes the high isolation area constructed at the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome to respond to the occurrence of VHF. A brief overview of procedures and equipment adopted is provided.

  11. Detection of multiple viral infections in cattle and buffalo with suspected vesicular disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Sales, Érica Bravo; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; de Souza, Natália Mendes; da Silva, Josiane Aparecida Gonçalina; Souza, Giovana Gonçalves; Carani, Fernanda Rezek; Dos Santos, Alyane Figueiredo; Rivetti Júnior, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Vesicular diseases are of high importance for livestock, primarily because of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a high-morbidity disease that generates direct losses caused by low milk production, weight loss, and indirect losses because of the need for sanitary barriers. Other vesicular diseases are also of importance for livestock because of direct impacts or because their clinical signs may be confused with those of FMD. We report herein the detection of multiple infections in cattle with suspected vesicular disease in the Brazilian states of Amazonas (AM), Mato Grosso (MT), and Roraima. Thirty-seven epithelial samples from cattle and 1 sample from a buffalo were sent to the laboratory for testing for FMDV and similar disease agents. All samples from MT were positive for parapoxvirus (Pseudocowpox virus and Bovine papular stomatitis virus). In addition, 3 samples were positive for Bluetongue virus, and 5 samples were positive for Bovine herpesvirus 1 Among these samples, 1 was positive for all of these 3 agents. Only 2 samples from AM were negative for parapoxvirus. The molecular tests conducted in this study detected multiple infections, with a high prevalence of parapoxvirus. PMID:27154321

  12. Viral capsid assembly as a model for protein aggregation diseases: Active processes catalyzed by cellular assembly machines comprising novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Bader, Verian; Selvarajah, Suganya; Dey, Debendranath; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Korth, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Viruses can be conceptualized as self-replicating multiprotein assemblies, containing coding nucleic acids. Viruses have evolved to exploit host cellular components including enzymes to ensure their replicative life cycle. New findings indicate that also viral capsid proteins recruit host factors to accelerate their assembly. These assembly machines are RNA-containing multiprotein complexes whose composition is governed by allosteric sites. In the event of viral infection, the assembly machines are recruited to support the virus over the host and are modified to achieve that goal. Stress granules and processing bodies may represent collections of such assembly machines, readily visible by microscopy but biochemically labile and difficult to isolate by fractionation. We hypothesize that the assembly of protein multimers such as encountered in neurodegenerative or other protein conformational diseases, is also catalyzed by assembly machines. In the case of viral infection, the assembly machines have been modified by the virus to meet the virus' need for rapid capsid assembly rather than host homeostasis. In the case of the neurodegenerative diseases, it is the monomers and/or low n oligomers of the so-called aggregated proteins that are substrates of assembly machines. Examples for substrates are amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, prions in the prion diseases, Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in subsets of chronic mental illnesses, and others. A likely continuum between virus capsid assembly and cell-to-cell transmissibility of aggregated proteins is remarkable. Protein aggregation diseases may represent dysfunction and dysregulation of these assembly machines analogous to the aberrations induced by viral infection in which cellular homeostasis is pathologically reprogrammed. In this view, as for viral infection, reset of assembly machines to normal homeostasis should be the goal of protein aggregation

  13. Replicative homeostasis II: Influence of polymerase fidelity on RNA virus quasispecies biology: Implications for immune recognition, viral autoimmunity and other "virus receptor" diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sallie, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Much of the worlds' population is in active or imminent danger from established infectious pathogens, while sporadic and pandemic infections by these and emerging agents threaten everyone. RNA polymerases (RNApol) generate enormous genetic and consequent antigenic heterogeneity permitting both viruses and cellular pathogens to evade host defences. Thus, RNApol causes more morbidity and premature mortality than any other molecule. The extraordinary genetic heterogeneity defining viral quasispecies results from RNApol infidelity causing rapid cumulative genomic RNA mutation a process that, if uncontrolled, would cause catastrophic loss of sequence integrity and inexorable quasispecies extinction. Selective replication and replicative homeostasis, an epicyclical regulatory mechanism dynamically linking RNApol fidelity and processivity with quasispecies phenotypic diversity, modulating polymerase fidelity and, hence, controlling quasispecies behaviour, prevents this happening and also mediates immune escape. Perhaps more importantly, ineluctable generation of broad phenotypic diversity after viral RNA is translated to protein quasispecies suggests a mechanism of disease that specifically targets, and functionally disrupts, the host cell surface molecules – including hormone, lipid, cell signalling or neurotransmitter receptors – that viruses co-opt for cell entry. This mechanism – "Viral Receptor Disease (VRD)" – may explain so-called "viral autoimmunity", some classical autoimmune disorders and other diseases, including type II diabetes mellitus, and some forms of obesity. Viral receptor disease is a unifying hypothesis that may also explain some diseases with well-established, but multi-factorial and apparently unrelated aetiologies – like coronary artery and other vascular diseases – in addition to diseases like schizophrenia that are poorly understood and lack plausible, coherent, pathogenic explanations. PMID:16115320

  14. The long-term prognosis of acute kidney injury: acute renal failure as a cause of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    There is a widespread opinion that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rather harmless complication and that survival is determined not by renal dysfunction per se, but by the severity of the underlying disease. This opinion is in sharp contrast to evidence from several recent experimental and clinical investigations indicating that AKI is a condition which exerts a fundamental impact on the course of the disease, the evolution of associated complications and on prognosis, independently from the type and severity of the underlying condition. In conclusion, severe AKI in the critically ill patient is associated with high rates of morbidity, mortality and consumption of health care resources.

  15. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  16. Late-onset BK viral nephropathy in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Mathew, J C; Holanda, D G; Figanbaum, T L; Fraer, M; Thomas, C P

    2014-09-01

    BK polyoma viral infection occurs as an asymptomatic infection in a high proportion of normal hosts without obvious sequelae. In the kidney transplant population, the virus is reactivated because of reduced immunity and, if not appropriately managed, can lead to BK viral nephropathy, which has emerged as a common cause of acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease in renal transplant recipients. BK viremia almost always occurs during the first 2 years after transplantation, when immunosuppressive therapy is high, or at other periods when immunosuppression is intensified. BK viremia is now detected by routine screening of transplant patients for the first few years, and BK viral nephropathy is considered to be high in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in recently transplanted patients. We report a case of BK viral nephropathy developing 10 years after transplantation and present the challenges of managing advanced disease.

  17. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases.

  18. Management of Acute Exacerbation of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Suau, Salvador J; DeBlieux, Peter M C

    2016-02-01

    Acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are the most common respiratory diseases requiring emergent medical evaluation and treatment. Asthma and COPD are chronic, debilitating disease processes that have been differentiated traditionally by the presence or absence of reversible airflow obstruction. Asthma and COPD exacerbations impose an enormous economic burden on the US health care budget. In daily clinical practice, it is difficult to differentiate these 2 obstructive processes based on their symptoms, and on their nearly identical acute treatment strategies; major differences are important when discussing anatomic sites involved, long-term prognosis, and the nature of inflammatory markers. PMID:26614239

  19. Quantitation of HIV-1 RNA viral load using nucleic acid sequence based amplification methodology and comparison with other surrogate markers for disease progression.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, R; Pinho, J R

    1998-01-01

    In this study, HIV-1 viral blood quantitation determined by Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) was compared with other surrogate disease progression markers (antigen p24, CD4/CD8 cell counts and beta-2 microglobulin) in 540 patients followed up at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HIV-1 RNA detection was statistically associated with the presence of antigen p24, but the viral RNA was also detected in 68% of the antigen p24 negative samples, confirming that NASBA is much more sensitive than the determination of antigen p24. Regarding other surrogate markers, no statistically significant association with the detection of viral RNA was found. The reproducibility of this viral load assay was assessed by 14 runs of the same sample, using different reagents batches. Viral load values in this sample ranged from 5.83 to 6.27 log (CV = 36%), less than the range (0.5 log) established to the determination of significant viral load changes. PMID:9698880

  20. [Understanding current practice of clinical medicine in the tropics (II). Bacterial and viral diseases. Malnutrition].

    PubMed

    Ramos, J M; de Górgolas, M; Cuadros, J; Fanjul, E

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, a significant number of physicians want to spend part of their medical training in health facilities in developing countries. In this setting, clinical skills are extremely important due to the limited available diagnostic resources. Bacterial diseases are common, but bacterial cultures are rarely accessible. In Africa, tuberculosis affects over 200 cases per 100,000 persons, and more than 22 million people live with HIV infection; both diseases are a serious public health problem. Malnutrition is endemic in many countries in Africa and is compounded by the continuous humanitarian and food crisis. In this paper, basic concepts of epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of major diseases that can be found in a rural health post in the tropics are discussed. PMID:22425146

  1. Cloned Viral Protein Vaccine for Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Responses in Cattle and Swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleid, Dennis G.; Yansura, Daniel; Small, Barbara; Dowbenko, Donald; Moore, Douglas M.; Grubman, Marvin J.; McKercher, Peter D.; Morgan, Donald O.; Robertson, Betty H.; Bachrach, Howard L.

    1981-12-01

    A DNA sequence coding for the immunogenic capsid protein VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus A12, prepared from the virion RNA, was ligated to a plasmid designed to express a chimeric protein from the Escherichia coli tryptophan promoter-operator system. When Escherichia coli transformed with this plasmid was grown in tryptophan-depleted media, approximately 17 percent of the total cellular protein was found to be an insoluble and stable chimeric protein. The purified chimeric protein competed equally on a molar basis with VP3 for specific antibodies to foot-and-mouth disease virus. When inoculated into six cattle and two swine, this protein elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody and protection against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus.

  2. Viral CTL Escape Mutants Are Generated in Lymph Nodes and Subsequently Become Fixed in Plasma and Rectal Mucosa during Acute SIV Infection of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vanderford, Thomas H.; Bleckwehl, Chelsea; Engram, Jessica C.; Dunham, Richard M.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Garber, David A.; Betts, Michael R.; Silvestri, Guido

    2011-01-01

    SIVmac239 infection of rhesus macaques (RMs) results in AIDS despite the generation of a strong antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, possibly due to the emergence of viral escape mutants that prevent recognition of infected cells by CTLs. To determine the anatomic origin of these SIV mutants, we longitudinally assessed the presence of CTL escape variants in two MamuA*01-restricted immunodominant epitopes (Tat-SL8 and Gag-CM9) in the plasma, PBMCs, lymph nodes (LN), and rectal biopsies (RB) of fifteen SIVmac239-infected RMs. As expected, Gag-CM9 did not exhibit signs of escape before day 84 post infection. In contrast, Tat-SL8 escape mutants were apparent in all tissues by day 14 post infection. Interestingly LNs and plasma exhibited the highest level of escape at day 14 and day 28 post infection, respectively, with the rate of escape in the RB remaining lower throughout the acute infection. The possibility that CTL escape occurs in LNs before RBs is confirmed by the observation that the specific mutants found at high frequency in LNs at day 14 post infection became dominant at day 28 post infection in plasma, PBMC, and RB. Finally, the frequency of escape mutants in plasma at day 28 post infection correlated strongly with the level Tat-SL8-specific CD8 T cells in the LN and PBMC at day 14 post infection. These results indicate that LNs represent the primary source of CTL escape mutants during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection, suggesting that LNs are the main anatomic sites of virus replication and/or the tissues in which CTL pressure is most effective in selecting SIV escape variants. PMID:21625590

  3. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  4. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of Tree Shrews Differs from That of Mice in the Severity of Acute Infection and Viral Transcription in the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihong; Li, Zhuoran; Wang, Erlin; Yang, Rui; Xiao, Yu; Han, Hongbo; Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Xia, Yujie; Gao, Feng; Li, Qihan; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of humans are limited by the use of rodent models such as mice, rabbits, and guinea pigs. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) are small mammals indigenous to southwest Asia. At behavioral, anatomical, genomic, and evolutionary levels, tree shrews are much closer to primates than rodents are, and tree shrews are susceptible to HSV infection. Thus, we have studied herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in the tree shrew trigeminal ganglion (TG) following ocular inoculation. In situ hybridization, PCR, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirm that HSV-1 latently infects neurons of the TG. When explant cocultivation of trigeminal ganglia was performed, the virus was recovered after 5 days of cocultivation with high efficiency. Swabbing the corneas of latently infected tree shrews revealed that tree shrews shed virus spontaneously at low frequencies. However, tree shrews differ significantly from mice in the expression of key HSV-1 genes, including ICP0, ICP4, and latency-associated transcript (LAT). In acutely infected tree shrew TGs, no level of ICP4 was observed, suggesting the absence of infection or a very weak, acute infection compared to that of the mouse. Immunofluorescence staining with ICP4 monoclonal antibody, and immunohistochemistry detection by HSV-1 polyclonal antibodies, showed a lack of viral proteins in tree shrew TGs during both acute and latent phases of infection. Cultivation of supernatant from homogenized, acutely infected TGs with RS1 cells also exhibited an absence of infectious HSV-1 from tree shrew TGs. We conclude that the tree shrew has an undetectable, or a much weaker, acute infection in the TGs. Interestingly, compared to mice, tree shrew TGs express high levels of ICP0 transcript in addition to LAT during latency. However, the ICP0 transcript remained nuclear, and no ICP0 protein could be seen during the course of mouse and tree shrew TG

  6. Induction of systemic IFITM3 expression does not effectively control foot-and-mouth disease viral infection in transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Zheng, Haixue; Qian, Ping; Xu, Jinfang; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, and can cause severe economic loss. Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins constitute a family of viral restriction factors that can inhibit the replication of several types of viruses. Our previous study showed that overexpression of swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) impeded replication of the FMD virus (FMDV) in BHK-21 cells and mice. In this study, sIFITM3-transgenic (TG) pigs were produced by handmade cloning. Results showed that sIFITM3 was highly overexpressed in many organs of sIFITM3-TG pigs compared to wild-type pigs. After a virulent FMDV strain (O/ES/2001) was intramuscularly inoculated, the sIFITM3-TG pigs showed slightly higher susceptibility to FMDV infection than wild-type pigs. Both groups displayed comparable degrees of clinical symptoms throughout the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the induction of systemic sIFITM3 expression does not protect pigs against FMDV infection. Based on these observations, we propose that a combination of interferons and vaccines be used to control FMDV infections and subsequent FMD outbreaks. PMID:27374903

  7. Field-deployable real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viral ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W C; Stallknecht, D E; Mecham, J O

    2004-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequence information from molecular evolution studies of bluetongue virus (BTV) and related epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) strains has resulted in a large database of genomic information. Published sequence data and sequence data from our laboratory were used to design real-time field-deployable reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of BTV or EHDV viral RNA. The assays used standard RNA extraction and TaqMan chemistries and the entire process was completed in disease outbreaks.

  8. Viral Genome-Linked Protein (VPg) Is Essential for Translation Initiation of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Binbin; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), the causative agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease, is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, limiting the study of the pathogenesis of RHDV. In addition, the mechanisms underlying RHDV translation and replication are largely unknown compared with other caliciviridae viruses. The RHDV replicon recently constructed in our laboratory provides an appropriate model to study the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon, we demonstrated that the viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for RHDV translation in RK-13 cells for the first time. In addition, we showed that VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in vivo and in vitro and that eIF4E silencing inhibits RHDV translation, suggesting the interaction between VPg and eIF4E is involved in RHDV translation. Our results support the hypothesis that VPg serves as a novel cap substitute during the initiation of RHDV translation. PMID:26599265

  9. Viral Genome-Linked Protein (VPg) Is Essential for Translation Initiation of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Binbin; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), the causative agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease, is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, limiting the study of the pathogenesis of RHDV. In addition, the mechanisms underlying RHDV translation and replication are largely unknown compared with other caliciviridae viruses. The RHDV replicon recently constructed in our laboratory provides an appropriate model to study the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon, we demonstrated that the viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for RHDV translation in RK-13 cells for the first time. In addition, we showed that VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in vivo and in vitro and that eIF4E silencing inhibits RHDV translation, suggesting the interaction between VPg and eIF4E is involved in RHDV translation. Our results support the hypothesis that VPg serves as a novel cap substitute during the initiation of RHDV translation. PMID:26599265

  10. Detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in specimens from cattle in South Africa and possible association with clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Kabongo, N; Van Vuuren, M

    2004-06-01

    Studies covering all aspects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) have been conducted in several countries in Europe, Asia and America. In southern Africa, more information is required about the nature of BVDV infection, the prevalence of different strains and the economic importance of the disease. The presence of BVDV in southern Africa has been known since the early 1970s through serological surveys but few reports confirming its presence by virus isolation and correlation with clinical disease are available. Specimens (n = 312) collected in 1998/99, from live and dead cattle from different farming systems, were obtained from private practitioners, feedlot consultants and abattoirs throughout the country. Specimens (n = 37) from African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park were also included. All specimens were processed for virus isolation in cell culture with confirmation by means of immunofluorescent antibody tests and some also by means of an antigen capture ELISA. BVDV was isolated from 15 (4.7%) cattle and were all noncytopathic biotypes. BVDV was not detected in 37 lymph nodes obtained from buffaloes in the Kruger National Park. Of the clinical signs in cattle from which virus were isolated, respiratory signs was the most frequent (10/15), followed by diarrhoea (5/15). Abortion, congenital malformations, haemorrhagic diarrhoea and poor growth were also included as criteria for selection of animals for specimen collection, but no BVD viruses were isolated from cattle manifesting these clinical signs.

  11. Incidence and viral aetiologies of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in the United States: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, P G; Blumkin, A; Treanor, J J; Gallivan, S; Albertin, C; Lofthus, G K; Schnabel, K C; Donahue, J G; Thompson, M G; Shay, D K

    2016-07-01

    We conducted prospective, community-wide surveillance for acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in Rochester, NY and Marshfield, WI during a 3-month period in winter 2011. We estimated the incidence of ARIs in each community, tested for viruses, and determined the proportion of ARIs associated with healthcare visits. We used a rolling cross-sectional design to sample participants, conducted telephone interviews to assess ARI symptoms (defined as a current illness with feverishness or cough within the past 7 days), collected nasal/throat swabs to identify viruses, and extracted healthcare utilization from outpatient/inpatient records. Of 6492 individuals, 321 reported an ARI within 7 days (4·9% total, 5·7% in Rochester, 4·4% in Marshfield); swabs were collected from 208 subjects. The cumulative ARI incidence for the entire 3-month period was 52% in Rochester [95% confidence interval (CI) 42-63] and 35% in Marshfield (95% CI 28-42). A specific virus was identified in 39% of specimens: human coronavirus (13% of samples), rhinovirus (12%), RSV (7%), influenza virus (4%), human metapneumovirus (4%), and adenovirus (1%). Only 39/200 (20%) had a healthcare visit (2/9 individuals with influenza). ARI incidence was ~5% per week during winter. PMID:26931351

  12. Israeli acute paralysis virus associated paralysis symptoms, viral tissue distribution and Dicer-2 induction in bumblebee workers (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Although it is known that Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) can cause bee mortality, the symptoms of paralysis and the distribution of the virus in different body tissues and their potential to respond with an increase of the siRNA antiviral immune system have not been studied. In this project we worked with Bombus terrestris, which is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe and an important pollinator for wild flowers and many crops in agriculture. Besides the classic symptoms of paralysis and trembling prior to death, we report a new IAPV-related symptom, crippled/immobilized forelegs. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that IAPV accumulates in different body tissues (midgut, fat body, brain and ovary). The highest levels of IAPV were observed in the fat body. With fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we detected IAPV in the Kenyon cells of mushroom bodies and neuropils from both antennal and optic lobes of the brain in IAPV-infected workers. Finally, we observed an induction of Dicer-2, a core gene of the RNAi antiviral immune response, in the IAPV-infected tissues of B. terrestris workers. According to our results, tissue tropism and the induction strength of Dicer-2 could not be correlated with virus-related paralysis symptoms.

  13. Israeli acute paralysis virus associated paralysis symptoms, viral tissue distribution and Dicer-2 induction in bumblebee workers (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Although it is known that Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) can cause bee mortality, the symptoms of paralysis and the distribution of the virus in different body tissues and their potential to respond with an increase of the siRNA antiviral immune system have not been studied. In this project we worked with Bombus terrestris, which is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe and an important pollinator for wild flowers and many crops in agriculture. Besides the classic symptoms of paralysis and trembling prior to death, we report a new IAPV-related symptom, crippled/immobilized forelegs. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that IAPV accumulates in different body tissues (midgut, fat body, brain and ovary). The highest levels of IAPV were observed in the fat body. With fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we detected IAPV in the Kenyon cells of mushroom bodies and neuropils from both antennal and optic lobes of the brain in IAPV-infected workers. Finally, we observed an induction of Dicer-2, a core gene of the RNAi antiviral immune response, in the IAPV-infected tissues of B. terrestris workers. According to our results, tissue tropism and the induction strength of Dicer-2 could not be correlated with virus-related paralysis symptoms. PMID:27230225

  14. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed.

  15. The ecology of ticks and epidemiology of tick-borne viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, Agustín; de la Fuente, José

    2014-08-01

    A number of tick-borne diseases of humans have increased in incidence and geographic range over the past few decades, and there is concern that they will pose an even greater threat to public health in future. Although global warming is often cited as the underlying mechanism favoring the spread of tick-borne diseases, climate is just one of many factors that determine which tick species are found in a given geographic region, their population density, the likelihood that they will be infected with microbes pathogenic for humans and the frequency of tick-human contact. This article provides basic information needed for microbiologists to understand the many factors that affect the geographic range and population density of ticks and the risk of human exposure to infected ticks. It first briefly summarizes the life cycle and basic ecology of ticks and how ticks and vertebrate hosts interact, then reviews current understanding of the role of climate, sociodemographic factors, agricultural development and changes in human behavior that affect the incidence of tick-borne diseases. These concepts are then illustrated in specific discussions of tick-borne encephalitis and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

  16. The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease I: viral pathways in cattle.

    PubMed

    Arzt, J; Juleff, N; Zhang, Z; Rodriguez, L L

    2011-08-01

    In 1898, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) earned a place in history as the first disease of animals shown to be caused by a virus. Yet, despite over a century of active investigation and elucidation of many aspects of FMD pathogenesis, critical knowledge about the virus-host interactions is still lacking. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of FMD pathogenesis in cattle spanning from the earliest studies to recently acquired insights emphasizing works which describe animals infected by methodologies most closely resembling natural infection (predominantly aerosol or direct/indirect contact). The three basic phases of FMD pathogenesis in vivo will be dissected and characterized as: (i) pre-viraemia characterized by infection and replication at the primary replication site(s), (ii) sustained viraemia with generalization and vesiculation at secondary infection sites and (iii) post-viraemia/convalescence including resolution of clinical disease that may result in long-term persistent infection. Critical evaluation of the current status of understanding will be used to identify knowledge gaps to guide future research efforts.

  17. Prospective cohort studies of dengue viral transmission and severity of disease.

    PubMed

    Endy, Timothy P; Yoon, In-Kyu; Mammen, Mammen P

    2010-01-01

    As the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) systematically spread throughout the tropical and subtropical regions globally, dengue is increasingly contributing to the overall morbidity and mortality sustained by populations and thereby challenging the health infrastructures of most endemic countries. DENV-human host-mosquito vector interactions are complex and cause in humans either asymptomatic or subclinical DENV infection, mild to severe dengue fever (DF), severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Over the past decade, we have seen an increase in research funding and public health efforts to offset the effects of this pandemic. Though multiple vaccine development efforts are underway, the need remains to further characterize the determinants of varying severities of clinical outcomes. Several long-term prospective studies on DENV transmission and dengue severity have sought to define the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this disease. Yet, more studies are required to quantify the disease burden on different populations, explore the impact of DENV serotype-specific transmission on host-responses and dengue severity and measure the economic impact of dengue on a population. In this section, we will review the critical past and recent findings of dengue prospective studies on our understanding of the disease and the potential role of future prospective cohort studies in advancing issues required for vaccine field evaluations.

  18. Vector-borne viral diseases in Sweden--a short review.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, B; Vene, S

    1996-01-01

    Ockelbo disease, caused by a Sindbis-related virus transmitted to man by mosquitoes, was first described in the central part of Sweden in the 1960s as clusters of patients with fever, arthralgia and rash. An average annual rate of 30 cases was recorded in the 1980s but no cases have been diagnosed during the last few years. Nephropathia epidemica (NE) characterized by fever, abdominal pain and renal dysfunction has been known to cause considerable morbidity in Sweden during the last 60 years but the etiologic agent (Puumala virus) was not isolated until 1983. This virus's main reservoir is the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). NE is endemic in the northern two thirds of Sweden where more than a hundred cases are diagnosed each year. Tick-borne encephalitis transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks is restricted to the archipelago and Lake M-alaren on the east coast close to Stockholm. Between 30 and 110 cases are diagnosed every year. Inkoo virus, a California encephalitis group virus, has been isolated from mosquitoes in Sweden. The antibody prevalence to Inkoo virus is very high in a normal population, but no disease has as yet been associated with this virus in Sweden. Among the vector-borne virus diseases imported to Sweden, dengue is the most important, with approximately 50 cases recorded every year.

  19. Vector-borne viral diseases in Sweden--a short review.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, B; Vene, S

    1996-01-01

    Ockelbo disease, caused by a Sindbis-related virus transmitted to man by mosquitoes, was first described in the central part of Sweden in the 1960s as clusters of patients with fever, arthralgia and rash. An average annual rate of 30 cases was recorded in the 1980s but no cases have been diagnosed during the last few years. Nephropathia epidemica (NE) characterized by fever, abdominal pain and renal dysfunction has been known to cause considerable morbidity in Sweden during the last 60 years but the etiologic agent (Puumala virus) was not isolated until 1983. This virus's main reservoir is the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). NE is endemic in the northern two thirds of Sweden where more than a hundred cases are diagnosed each year. Tick-borne encephalitis transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks is restricted to the archipelago and Lake M-alaren on the east coast close to Stockholm. Between 30 and 110 cases are diagnosed every year. Inkoo virus, a California encephalitis group virus, has been isolated from mosquitoes in Sweden. The antibody prevalence to Inkoo virus is very high in a normal population, but no disease has as yet been associated with this virus in Sweden. Among the vector-borne virus diseases imported to Sweden, dengue is the most important, with approximately 50 cases recorded every year. PMID:8800805

  20. Upregulation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in environmental and viral inflammation-driven rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Ruth M; Okine, Bright N; Finn, David P; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has become evident that Parkinson's disease is associated with a self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, with dying neurons activating microglia, which, once activated, can release several factors that kill further neurons. One emerging pharmacological target that has the potential to break this cycle is the microglial CB2 receptor which, when activated, can suppress microglial activity and reduce their neurotoxicity. However, very little is known about CB2 receptor expression in animal models of Parkinson's disease which is essential for valid preclinical assessment of the anti-Parkinsonian efficacy of drugs targeting the CB2 receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate and compare the changes that occur in CB2 receptor expression in environmental and inflammation-driven models of Parkinson's disease. To do so, male Sprague Dawley rats were given unilateral, intra-striatal injections of the Parkinson's disease-associated agricultural pesticide, rotenone, or the viral-like inflammagen, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly (I:C)). Animals underwent behavioural testing for motor dysfunction on days 7, 14 and 28 post-surgery, and were sacrificed on days 1, 4, 14 and 28. Changes in the endocannabinoid system and neuroinflamamtion were investigated by qRT-PCR, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. After injection of rotenone or Poly (I:C) into the rat striatum, we found that expression of the CB2 receptor was significantly elevated in both models, and that this increase correlated significantly with an increase in microglial activation in the rotenone model. Interestingly, the increase in CB2 receptor expression in the inflammation-driven Poly (I:C) model was significantly more pronounced than that in the neurotoxic rotenone model. Thus, this study has shown that CB2 receptor expression is dysregulated in animal models of Parkinson's disease, and has also revealed significant

  1. Multiplex diagnosis of viral infectious diseases (AIDS, hepatitis C, and hepatitis A) based on point of care lateral flow assay using engineered proteinticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Seo, Hyuk Seong; Kwon, Jung-Hyuk; Kim, Hee-Tae; Kwon, Koo Chul; Sim, Sang Jun; Cha, Young Joo; Lee, Jeewon

    2015-07-15

    Lateral flow assay (LFA) is an attractive method for rapid, simple, and cost-effective point of care diagnosis. For LFA-based multiplex diagnosis of three viral intractable diseases (acquired immune deficiency syndrome and hepatitis C and A), here we developed proteinticle-based 7 different 3D probes that display different viral antigens on their surface, which were synthesized in Escherichia coli by self-assembly of human ferritin heavy chain that was already engineered by genetically linking viral antigens to its C-terminus. Each of the three test lines on LFA strip contains the proteinticle probes to detect disease-specific anti-viral antibodies. Compared to peptide probes, the proteinticle probes were evidently more sensitive, and the proteinticle probe-based LFA successfully diagnosed all the 20 patient sera per each disease without a false negative signal, whereas the diagnostic sensitivities in the peptide probe-based LFAs were 65-90%. Duplex and triplex assays performed with randomly mixed patient sera gave only true positive signals for all the 20 serum mixtures without any false positive signals, indicating 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It seems that on the proteinticle surface the antigenic peptides have homogeneous orientation and conformation without inter-peptide clustering and hence lead to the enhanced diagnostic performance with solving the problems of traditional diagnostic probes. Although the multiplex diagnosis of three viral diseases above was demonstrated as proof-of-concept here, the proposed LFA system can be applied to multiplex point of care diagnosis of other intractable diseases.

  2. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  3. Acute hepatic failure in children.

    PubMed Central

    Riely, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Many diseases may present as acute hepatic failure in the pediatric age group, including viral hepatitis A and B, adverse drug reactions, both toxic and "hepatitic," and inherited metabolic disorders such as tyrosinemia, alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Management is primarily supportive, with care taken to anticipate the known complications of hepatic failure. Few "curative" therapies are known, although attempts at stimulating hepatic regeneration may be helpful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6433587

  4. Atypical presentation of acute and chronic coronary artery disease in diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Khafaji, Hadi AR Hadi; Suwaidi, Jassim M Al

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of mortality and chest pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with stable and acute coronary artery disease. However, there is little knowledge concerning the pervasiveness of uncommon presentations in diabetics. The symptomatology of acute coronary syndrome, which comprises both pain and non-pain symptoms, may be affected by traditional risk factors such as age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Such atypical symptoms may range from silent myocardial ischemia to a wide spectrum of non-chest pain symptoms. Worldwide, few studies have highlighted this under-investigated subject, and this aspect of ischemic heart disease has also been under-evaluated in the major clinical trials. The results of these studies are highly diverse which makes definitive conclusions regarding the spectrum of atypical presentation of acute and even stable chronic coronay artery disease difficult to confirm. This may have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease in diabetics. In this up-to-date review we will try to analyze the most recent studies on the atypical presentations in both acute and chronic ischemic heart disease which may give some emphasis to this under-investigated topic. PMID:25228959

  5. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  6. Seroprevalence and associated risk factors of important pig viral diseases in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Monger, V R; Stegeman, J A; Koop, G; Dukpa, K; Tenzin, T; Loeffen, W L A

    2014-11-01

    A cross-sectional serological study was conducted in Bhutan between October 2011 and February 2012 to determine the prevalence of antibodies to classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), swine influenza virus (SIV) subtype H1N1 and Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV). Furthermore, risk factors for the seropositive status were investigated. Antibodies to SIV, subtype H1N1 (likely pandemic H1N1 2009) were detected in 49% of the pigs in the government farms, and 8% of the village backyard pigs. For PCV2, these percentages were 73% and 37% respectively. For CSFV, the percentages were closer together, with 62% and 52% respectively. It should be taken into consideration that vaccination of piglets is routine in the government herds, and that piglets distributed to backyard farms are also vaccinated. No direct evidence of CSFV infections was found, either by clinical signs or virus isolation. Antibodies to PRRSV and Aujeszky's disease, on the other hand, were not found at all. Risk factors found are mainly related to practices of swill feeding and other biosecurity measures. For CSFV, these were swill feeding (OR=2.25, 95% CI: 1.01-4.99) and contact with neighbour's pigs (OR=0.31, 95% CI: 0.13-0.75). For PCV2 this was lending of boars for local breeding purposes (OR=3.30, 95% CI: 1.43-7.59). The results of this study showed that PCV2 and SIV infections are important in pigs in Bhutan and thus appropriate control strategies need to be designed and applied which could involve strict regulation on the import of live pigs and vaccination against these diseases.

  7. Wilson's disease: acute and presymptomatic laboratory diagnosis and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, D; Fell, G; O'Reilly, D

    2000-01-01

    Wilson's disease, the most common inherited disorder of copper metabolism, is a recessive genetic condition. The clinical presentation of Wilson's disease is very variable. It is characterised by low serum copper and caeruloplasmin concentrations coupled with the pathological accumulation of copper in the tissues. However, there are diagnostic difficulties and these are discussed. The current value of DNA diagnosis, both in gene tracking in families or as applied to de novo cases, is examined. Wilson's disease can be treated successfully but treatment must be life long. Patients are best treated by specialist centres with experience and expertise in the condition. Key Words: Wilson's disease • copper • diagnosis PMID:11127261

  8. Dual-role FilmArray® diagnostics for high-impact viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M; Meehan, B; Michalski, W P; Heine, H G; Foord, A J; Carlile, G; Wang, J; McCullough, S; Zuelke, K

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we explored the potential utility of the human-focused FilmArray® Respiratory Panel for the diagnosis of a broad range of influenza viruses of veterinary concern as compared with the standard portfolio of recommended TaqMan®-based diagnostic tests. In addition, we discuss some potential operational advantages associated with the use of such integrated sample extraction, amplification and analysis devices in the context of a future long-term, dual-role strategy for the detection of emergency diseases of both human and veterinary concern. PMID:26914951

  9. The influence of Borna disease viral infection on dairy cow reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Katsuro; Ando, Tatsuya; Koiwa, Masateru

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the influence of Borna disease virus (BDV) infection on the clinical state of dairy cows. Sera from 149 cows were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting detect antibodies to the BDV-nucleoprotein antigen. Among 149 investigated cows, 25 (16.8%) showed a positive reaction to BDV antigen. No significant difference existed in milk production or medical history between seropositive and seronegative cows. Although the estrus cycle appeared normal even in the seropositive cows, the frequency of artificial insemination and calving-to-conception intervals significantly increased in seropositive cows. Therefore, fertilization failure was recognized in the BDV-antibody positive cows. PMID:22123302

  10. [Acute rhinosinusitis in adults--EPOS 2012 Part II].

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, H; Giotakis, A; Kral, F

    2013-11-01

    Rhinosinusitis (RS) is an inflammatory disorder of the mucous membranes of the nose and paranasal sinuses, which are almost always affected concurrently. The EPOS2012 position paper initiated by the European Rhinologic Society and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is a recent comprehensive source on this common disease affecting approximately 20% of the population worldwide. Inflammation, not infection, is considered the cornerstone of RS, which is considered a temporal and pathophysiologic disease continuum with various subtypes. Acute rhinosinusitis is diagnosed, if typical symptoms last less than 12 weeks. It affects approximately 10% of the European population. Acute RS is further subdivided into acute viral, acute postviral and acute bacterial RS. Acute viral RS lasts less than 10 days with decreasing symptom intensity, while acute postviral RS is characterized by longer duration or a sudden increase of symptom severity around the 5th day ('double sickening'). Acute bacterial RS is assumed if 3 of the following 5 criteria are additionally met: Discoloured discharge (with unilateral predominance), severe local pain (with unilateral predominance), fever (>38ºC), elevated ESR/CRP, and 'double-sickening'. For the treatment of acute viral RS, nasal saline irrigations and OTC cold remedies are advised. In acute postviral RS, additional topical steroids are suggested. Advantages and disadvantages of antibiotic treatment in acute bacterial RS are detailed. Overall, the new EPOS position paper infers a reorientation in this area of high medical, pharmaceutical and economic relevance.

  11. Outcomes before and after the Implementation of a Critical Pathway for Patients with Acute Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyu Chul; Lee, Hye Sun; Park, Joon Min; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Ko, Young-Guk; Park, Incheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, can be life-threatening vascular conditions. In this study, we compared outcomes before and after the implementation of a critical pathway (CP) for patients with acute aortic disease at the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective observational cohort study. The CP was composed of two phases: PRE-AORTA for early diagnosis and AORTA for prompt treatment. We compared patients who were diagnosed with acute aortic disease between pre-period (January 2010 to December 2011) and post-period (July 2012 to June 2014). Results Ninety-four and 104 patients were diagnosed with acute aortic disease in the pre- and post-periods, respectively. After the implementation of the CP, 38.7% of acute aortic disease cases were diagnosed via PRE-AORTA. The door-to-CT time was reduced more in PRE-AORTA-activated patients [71.0 (61.0, 115.0) min vs. 113.0 (56.0, 170.5) min; p=0.026]. During the post-period, more patients received emergency intervention than during the pre-period (22.3% vs. 36.5%; p=0.029). Time until emergency intervention was reduced in patients, who visited the ED directly, from 378.0 (302.0, 489.0) min in the pre-period to 200.0 (170.0, 299.0) min in the post-period (p=0.001). The number of patients who died in the ED declined from 11 to 4 from the pre-period to the post-period. Hospital mortality decreased from 26.6% to 14.4% in the post-period (p=0.033). Conclusion After the implementation of a CP for patients with acute aortic disease, more patients received emergency intervention within a shorter time, resulting in improved hospital mortality. PMID:26996561

  12. Molecular evolutionary signatures reveal the role of host ecological dynamics in viral disease emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Duke-Sylvester, Scott M.; Biek, Roman; Real, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    RNA viruses account for numerous emerging and perennial infectious diseases, and are characterized by rapid rates of molecular evolution. The ecological dynamics of most emerging RNA viruses are still poorly understood and difficult to ascertain. The availability of genome sequence data for many RNA viruses, in principle, could be used to infer ecological dynamics if changes in population numbers produced a lasting signature within the pattern of genome evolution. As a result, the rapidly emerging phylogeographic structure of a pathogen, shaped by the rise and fall in the number of infections and their spatial distribution, could be used as a surrogate for direct ecological assessments. Based on rabies virus as our example, we use a model combining ecological and evolutionary processes to test whether variation in the rate of host movement results in predictive diagnostic patterns of pathogen genetic structure. We identify several linearizable relationships between host dispersal rate and measures of phylogenetic structure suggesting genetic information can be used to directly infer ecological process. We also find phylogenetic structure may be more revealing than demography for certain ecological processes. Our approach extends the reach of current analytic frameworks for infectious disease dynamics by linking phylogeography back to underlying ecological processes. PMID:23382419

  13. Viral diseases of wild and farmed European eel Anguilla anguilla with particular reference to the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, Steven J; Engelsma, Marc Y; Roozenburg, Ineke; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal A; van Tulden, Peter W; Kerkhoff, Sonja; van Nieuwstadt, Anton P; Davidse, Aart; Haenen, Olga L M

    2012-10-10

    Diseases are an important cause of losses and decreased production rates in freshwater eel farming, and have been suggested to play a contributory role in the worldwide decline in wild freshwater eel stocks. Three commonly detected pathogenic viruses of European eel Anguilla anguilla are the aquabirnavirus eel virus European (EVE), the rhabdovirus eel virus European X (EVEX), and the alloherpesvirus anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1). In general, all 3 viruses cause a nonspecific haemorrhagic disease with increased mortality rates. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on the aetiology, prevalence, clinical signs and gross pathology of these 3 viruses. Reported experimental infections showed the temperature dependency and potential pathogenicity of these viruses for eels and other fish species. In addition to the published literature, an overview of the isolation of pathogenic viruses from wild and farmed A. anguilla in the Netherlands during the past 2 decades is given. A total of 249 wild A. anguilla, 39 batches of glass eels intended for farming purposes, and 239 batches of farmed European eels were necropsied and examined virologically. AngHV1 was isolated from wild yellow and silver A. anguilla from the Netherlands from 1998 until the present, while EVEX was only found sporadically, and EVE was never isolated. In farmed A. anguilla AngHV1 was also the most commonly isolated virus, followed by EVE and EVEX.

  14. Anti-Viral Agents in Neurodegenerative Disorders: New Paradigm for Targeting Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Faldu, Khushboo G; Shah, Jigna S; Patel, Snehal S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting geriatric populations for which several causes have been proposed. These include a relationship with known pathogens although the exact nature of such a relationship remains uncertain. Herpes simplex virus-1 has been proposed as potential cause of AD because of its ability to form ß amyloid(Aß) and neurofibrillary tangles due to tau hyperphosphorylation and action of beta & gamma secretase on amyloid precursor protein(APP) together with genetic association with apolipoprotein-E4(ApoE-Ɛ4), which points out to latent Herpes Simplex virus-1 as an agent causing AD. There are numerous studies that linked HSV-1 with AD like anti-HSV-1 IgM antibodies, nectin-2, heme oxygenase-1, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-2A, caspase-8 and nucleus-specific alteration of raphe neurons. Various possible mechanisms by which HSV-1 might lead to development of AD such as ApoE, ß-amyloid, tau phosphorylation, inflammation and oxidative stress are also discussed. Thus, this review discusses patent information and a strong relationship between latent HSV-1 and AD and also proposes antiviral therapy for AD. PMID:25963683

  15. History and Global Burden of Viral Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Hubert E

    2016-01-01

    Between 1963 and 1989, 5 hepatotropic viruses have been discovered that are the major causes of viral hepatitides worldwide: hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis delta virus and hepatitis E virus. Their epidemiology and pathogenesis have been studied in great detail. Furthermore, the structure and genetic organization of their DNA or RNA genome including the viral life cycle have been elucidated and have been successfully translated into important clinical applications, such as the specific diagnosis, therapy and prevention of the associated liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevalence of acute and chronic viral hepatitis A-E shows distinct geographic differences. The global burden of disease (prevalence, incidence, death, disability-adjusted life years) has been analyzed in seminal studies that show that the worldwide prevalence of hepatitis A-E has significantly decreased between 1990 and 2013. During the same time, the incidence of HBV-related liver cirrhosis and HCC, respectively, also decreased or increased slightly, the incidence of the HCV-related liver cirrhosis remained stable and the incidence of HCV-related HCC showed a major increase. During the coming years, we expect to improve our ability to prevent and effectively treat viral hepatitis A-E, resulting in the control of these global infections and the elimination of their associated morbidities and mortalities. PMID:27170381

  16. Recovery of Viral RNA and Infectious Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus from Positive Lateral-Flow Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Veronica L.; Bankowski, Bartlomiej M.; Armson, Bryony; Di Nardo, Antonello; Valdazo-Gonzalez, Begoña; Reid, Scott M.; Barnett, Paul V.; Wadsworth, Jemma; Ferris, Nigel P.; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease Virus (FMDV) is an economically important, highly contagious picornavirus that affects both wild and domesticated cloven hooved animals. In developing countries, the effective laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is often hindered by inadequate sample preservation due to difficulties in the transportation and storage of clinical material. These factors can compromise the ability to detect and characterise FMD virus in countries where the disease is endemic. Furthermore, the high cost of sending infectious virus material and the biosecurity risk it presents emphasises the need for a thermo-stable, non-infectious mode of transporting diagnostic samples. This paper investigates the potential of using FMDV lateral-flow devices (LFDs) for dry transportation of clinical samples for subsequent nucleic acid amplification, sequencing and recovery of infectious virus by electroporation. FMDV positive samples (epithelial suspensions and cell culture isolates) representing four FMDV serotypes were applied to antigen LFDs: after which it was possible to recover viral RNA that could be detected using real-time RT-PCR. Using this nucleic acid, it was also possible to recover VP1 sequences and also successfully utilise protocols for amplification of complete FMD virus genomes. It was not possible to recover infectious FMDV directly from the LFDs, however following electroporation into BHK-21 cells and subsequent cell passage, infectious virus could be recovered. Therefore, these results support the use of the antigen LFD for the dry, non-hazardous transportation of samples from FMD endemic countries to international reference laboratories. PMID:25313787

  17. Recovery of viral RNA and infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus from positive lateral-flow devices.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; Bankowski, Bartlomiej M; Armson, Bryony; Di Nardo, Antonello; Valdazo-Gonzalez, Begoña; Reid, Scott M; Barnett, Paul V; Wadsworth, Jemma; Ferris, Nigel P; Mioulet, Valérie; King, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease Virus (FMDV) is an economically important, highly contagious picornavirus that affects both wild and domesticated cloven hooved animals. In developing countries, the effective laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is often hindered by inadequate sample preservation due to difficulties in the transportation and storage of clinical material. These factors can compromise the ability to detect and characterise FMD virus in countries where the disease is endemic. Furthermore, the high cost of sending infectious virus material and the biosecurity risk it presents emphasises the need for a thermo-stable, non-infectious mode of transporting diagnostic samples. This paper investigates the potential of using FMDV lateral-flow devices (LFDs) for dry transportation of clinical samples for subsequent nucleic acid amplification, sequencing and recovery of infectious virus by electroporation. FMDV positive samples (epithelial suspensions and cell culture isolates) representing four FMDV serotypes were applied to antigen LFDs: after which it was possible to recover viral RNA that could be detected using real-time RT-PCR. Using this nucleic acid, it was also possible to recover VP1 sequences and also successfully utilise protocols for amplification of complete FMD virus genomes. It was not possible to recover infectious FMDV directly from the LFDs, however following electroporation into BHK-21 cells and subsequent cell passage, infectious virus could be recovered. Therefore, these results support the use of the antigen LFD for the dry, non-hazardous transportation of samples from FMD endemic countries to international reference laboratories. PMID:25313787

  18. Dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Y K; Singh, S; Singh, T

    1998-02-01

    Dengue viral infection produces a spectrum of disease. For example, mild dengue disease is characterized by biphasic fever, myalgia, arthralgia, leukopenia, and lymphadenopathy, while dengue hemorrhagic fever is an often fatal disease characterized by hemorrhages and shock syndrome. The disease, especially in its severe form, is seen more often among children than among adults. With focus upon India, dengue's etiology, epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, clinical manifestations of both the mild and severe forms of dengue viral infection, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis are discussed.

  19. Acute myopericarditis associated with cat scratch disease in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Barson, William J; Honegger, J Robert; Texter, Karen

    2014-09-01

    Cat scratch disease is generally characterized by a self-limited chronic regional lymphadenopathy, but numerous other clinical manifestations involving a variety of organ systems have been reported. Cardiac involvement is unusual and when reported, it has been associated with culture-negative endocarditis in adults. We present the case of an adolescent male with typical cat scratch disease and associated myopericarditis.

  20. Susceptibility to viral infection is enhanced by stable expression of 3A or 3AB proteins from foot-and-mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect

    Rosas, Maria F.; Vieira, Yuri A.; Postigo, Raul; Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-10-10

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3A protein is involved in virulence and host range. A distinguishing feature of FMDV 3B among picornaviruses is that three non-identical copies are encoded in the viral RNA and required for optimal replication in cell culture. Here, we have studied the involvement of the 3AB region on viral infection using constitutive and transient expression systems. BHK-21 stably transformed clones expressed low levels of FMDV 3A or 3A(B) proteins in the cell cytoplasm. Transformed cells stably expressing these proteins did not exhibit inner cellular rearrangements detectable by electron microscope analysis. Upon FMDV infection, clones expressing either 3A alone or 3A(B) proteins showed a significant increase in the percentage of infected cells, the number of plaque forming units and the virus yield. The 3A-enhancing effect was specific for FMDV as no increase in viral multiplication was observed in transformed clones infected with another picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or the negative-strand RNA virus vesicular stomatitis virus. A potential role of 3A protein in viral RNA translation was discarded by the lack of effect on FMDV IRES-dependent translation. Increased viral susceptibility was not caused by a released factor; neither the supernatant of transformed clones nor the addition of purified 3A protein to the infection medium was responsible for this effect. Unlike stable expression, high levels of 3A or 3A(B) protein transient expression led to unspecific inhibition of viral infection. Therefore, the effect observed on viral yield, which inversely correlated with the intracellular levels of 3A protein, suggests a transacting role operating on the FMDV multiplication cycle.

  1. Local Nitric Oxide Production in Viral and Autoimmune Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, D. Craig; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.; Kean, Rhonda; Numagami, Yoshihiro; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Koprowski, Hilary

    1995-06-01

    Because of the short half-life of NO, previous studies implicating NO in central nervous system pathology during infection had to rely on the demonstration of elevated levels of NO synthase mRNA or enzyme expression or NO metabolites such as nitrate and nitrite in the infected brain. To more definitively investigate the potential causative role of NO in lesions of the central nervous system in animals infected with neurotropic viruses or suffering from experimental allergic encephalitis, we have determined directly the levels of NO present in the central nervous system of such animals. Using spin trapping of NO and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we confirm here that copious amounts of NO (up to 30-fold more than control) are elaborated in the brains of rats infected with rabies virus or borna disease virus, as well as in the spinal cords of rats that had received myelin basic protein-specific T cells.

  2. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Acute aortic syndrome: A systems approach to a time-critical disease.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masashi; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic syndrome represents a group of potentially lethal aortic diseases, including classic acute aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. Among these conditions, type A aortic dissection is the most common acute presentation. Only surgical interventions are recommended in guidelines as lifesaving procedures for type A dissection. Despite new diagnostic imaging methods, advanced surgical strategy, and improved postoperative management in the over 250-year history of aortic dissection, in-hospital mortality and morbidity rates still remain high. Recently, several new system-based approaches, such as implementation of multidisciplinary experienced high-volume centers and establishment of regional systematic management flow have been reported to improve the outcome. Here, we will describe the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment as well as the new systematic approach to treat acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27650339

  4. Acute myocardial infarction following scorpion sting in a case with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Satish, K; Singla, Vivek; Ravindranath, K S

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) following a scorpion sting has been very rarely reported in the previous literature. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms include severe hypotension due to hypovolaemic shock and coronary spasm with subsequent thrombosis of coronary vessels developed after the release of vasoactive, inflammatory and thrombogenic substances contained in the scorpion venom. All of the previously reported cases had normal coronary angiogram. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with severe scorpion sting and was treated with prazosin. But a few hours later, she developed acute anterior wall MI. Coronary angiogram revealed the presence of significant stenosis in coronary arteries. As acute MI owing to significant coronary artery disease can be evident after severe scorpion envenomation, so every case of acute coronary syndrome following scorpion sting needs early diagnosis, thorough cardiovascular evaluation and appropriate treatment. PMID:23715842

  5. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  6. Viral gene transfer of APPsα rescues synaptic failure in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fol, Romain; Braudeau, Jerome; Ludewig, Susann; Abel, Tobias; Weyer, Sascha W; Roederer, Jan-Peter; Brod, Florian; Audrain, Mickael; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Buchholz, Christian J; Korte, Martin; Cartier, Nathalie; Müller, Ulrike C

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synaptic failure, dendritic and axonal atrophy, neuronal death and progressive loss of cognitive functions. It is commonly assumed that these deficits arise due to β-amyloid accumulation and plaque deposition. However, increasing evidence indicates that loss of physiological APP functions mediated predominantly by neurotrophic APPsα produced in the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway may contribute to AD pathogenesis. Upregulation of APPsα production via induction of α-secretase might, however, be problematic as this may also affect substrates implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we used a gene therapy approach to directly overexpress APPsα in the brain using AAV-mediated gene transfer and explored its potential to rescue structural, electrophysiological and behavioral deficits in APP/PS1∆E9 AD model mice. Sustained APPsα overexpression in aged mice with already preexisting pathology and amyloidosis restored synaptic plasticity and partially rescued spine density deficits. Importantly, AAV-APPsα treatment also resulted in a functional rescue of spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. Moreover, we demonstrate a significant reduction of soluble Aβ species and plaque load. In addition, APPsα induced the recruitment of microglia with a ramified morphology into the vicinity of plaques and upregulated IDE and TREM2 expression suggesting enhanced plaque clearance. Collectively, these data indicate that APPsα can mitigate synaptic and cognitive deficits, despite established pathology. Increasing APPsα may therefore be of therapeutic relevance for AD.

  7. Management of rodent viral disease outbreaks: one institutions (r)evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail L

    2010-01-01

    At first blush, an outbreak of mouse hepatitis virus or epizootic diarrhea of infant mice virus in a research colony of laboratory mice may not seem like a disaster. However, irrespective of magnitude, such an outbreak at an academic institution is disruptive for researchers at all levels. It can be a disaster for the graduate student who may have just a few experiments to finish before writing the thesis or for the postdoctoral fellow who is in the lab for only 1 or 2 years. Infectious disease outbreaks also limit the ability of principal investigators to share their animals with collaborators at their home institution as well as with those at extramural sites, thereby thwarting the expectation that research materials supported by federal funds will be made readily available to colleagues. This article traces the evolution of a change in culture at a large, well-funded academic institution with over 1,800 active IACUC protocols, more than 1,000 of which include mice. During a period of less than 5 years, the institution evolved from virtual paralysis in the face of such outbreaks to the implementation of policies and practices that enable effective outbreak management and the timely resumption of research functionality. This evolution required not only support from the highest levels of leadership in the university and its school of medicine but also a huge outlay of financial resources.

  8. Prevalence of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhoea virus and/or border disease virus in domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Zaghawa, A

    1998-08-01

    A total of 62 sera collected from cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats and camels were investigated for the presence of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus. The prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to BVD virus was 49.2, 52.0, 27.5, 31.4 and 52.5% in cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats and camels, respectively. The positive sera were titrated against BVD virus (BVDV) strains NADL and Oregon C24V; the latter is closely related to border disease (BD) virus. The frequency distributions of the antibody titres to both strains are presented. The statistical analysis shows no significant difference between the antibody titres to BVDV strains NADL and Oregon C24V in cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats and camels. On the other hand antibody titres to BVDV were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in cattle and buffalo in comparison with sheep, goats and camels. The cell-bound immunoassay (CBIA) is a serological rest established for the detection and titration of antibodies to BVD virus and BD virus. The percentage of agreement between the CBIA and the neutralizing peroxidase-linked antibody (NPLA) test was 96.1 and 95.3% in cattle and buffalo, respectively. The sensitivity of the CBIA in comparison with the NPLA was 100% while the specificity was 92.3 and 90.3% when testing the sera of cattle and buffalo, respectively. The method is easy to perform, cheap and suitable for the conditions in Egypt.

  9. Gene Therapy Delivery Systems for Enhancing Viral and Nonviral Vectors for Cardiac Diseases: Current Concepts and Future Applications

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Williams, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy is one of the most promising fields for developing new treatments for the advanced stages of ischemic and monogenetic, particularly autosomal or X-linked recessive, cardiomyopathies. The remarkable ongoing efforts in advancing various targets have largely been inspired by the results that have been achieved in several notable gene therapy trials, such as the hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Rate-limiting problems preventing successful clinical application in the cardiac disease area, however, are primarily attributable to inefficient gene transfer, host responses, and the lack of sustainable therapeutic transgene expression. It is arguable that these problems are directly correlated with the choice of vector, dose level, and associated cardiac delivery approach as a whole treatment system. Essentially, a delicate balance exists in maximizing gene transfer required for efficacy while remaining within safety limits. Therefore, the development of safe, effective, and clinically applicable gene delivery techniques for selected nonviral and viral vectors will certainly be invaluable in obtaining future regulatory approvals. The choice of gene transfer vector, dose level, and the delivery system are likely to be critical determinants of therapeutic efficacy. It is here that the interactions between vector uptake and trafficking, delivery route means, and the host's physical limits must be considered synergistically for a successful treatment course. PMID:24164239

  10. The nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 targets Newcastle disease virus matrix protein to the nucleoli and facilitates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jian; Xu, Haixu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Liu, Huimou; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-03-01

    The cellular nucleolar proteins are reported to facilitate the replication cycles of some human and animal viruses by interaction with viral proteins. In this study, a nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 was identified to interact with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix (M) protein. We found that NDV M protein accumulated in the nucleolus by binding B23 early in infection, but resulted in the redistribution of B23 from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm later in infection. In vitro binding studies utilizing deletion mutants indicated that amino acids 30-60 of M and amino acids 188-245 of B23 were required for binding. Furthermore, knockdown of B23 by siRNA or overexpression of B23 or M-binding B23-derived polypeptides remarkably reduced cytopathic effect and inhibited NDV replication. Collectively, we show that B23 facilitates NDV replication by targeting M to the nucleolus, demonstrating for the first time a direct role for nucleolar protein B23 in a paramyxovirus replication process.

  11. Gene therapy delivery systems for enhancing viral and nonviral vectors for cardiac diseases: current concepts and future applications.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Williams, Richard D; Bridges, Charles R

    2013-11-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most promising fields for developing new treatments for the advanced stages of ischemic and monogenetic, particularly autosomal or X-linked recessive, cardiomyopathies. The remarkable ongoing efforts in advancing various targets have largely been inspired by the results that have been achieved in several notable gene therapy trials, such as the hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Rate-limiting problems preventing successful clinical application in the cardiac disease area, however, are primarily attributable to inefficient gene transfer, host responses, and the lack of sustainable therapeutic transgene expression. It is arguable that these problems are directly correlated with the choice of vector, dose level, and associated cardiac delivery approach as a whole treatment system. Essentially, a delicate balance exists in maximizing gene transfer required for efficacy while remaining within safety limits. Therefore, the development of safe, effective, and clinically applicable gene delivery techniques for selected nonviral and viral vectors will certainly be invaluable in obtaining future regulatory approvals. The choice of gene transfer vector, dose level, and the delivery system are likely to be critical determinants of therapeutic efficacy. It is here that the interactions between vector uptake and trafficking, delivery route means, and the host's physical limits must be considered synergistically for a successful treatment course.

  12. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP).

  13. Novel Inhibitors of Neurotropic Alphavirus Replication That Improve Host Survival in a Mouse Model of Acute Viral Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sindac, Janice; Yestrepsky, Bryan D.; Barraza, Scott J.; Bolduc, Kyle L.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Keep, Richard F.; Irani, David N.; Miller, David J.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Arboviral encephalitis is a potentially devastating human disease with no approved therapies that target virus replication. We previously discovered a novel class of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-based inhibitors active against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) in cultured cells. In this report we describe initial development of these novel antiviral compounds, including bioisosteric replacement of the 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole core with indole to improve metabolic stability and the introduction of chirality to assess target enantioselectivity. Selected modifications enhanced antiviral activity while maintaining low cytotoxicity, increased stability to microsomal metabolism, and also revealed striking enantiospecific activity in cultured cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate improved outcomes (both symptoms and survival) following treatment with indole analog 9h (CCG-203926) in an in vivo mouse model of alphaviral encephalitis that closely correlate with the enantiospecific in vitro antiviral activity. These results represent a substantial advancement in the early preclinical development of a promising class of novel antiviral drugs against virulent neurotropic alphaviruses. PMID:22428985

  14. Seasonal effects on the reported incidence of acute diarrhoeal disease in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pinfold, J V; Horan, N J; Mara, D D

    1991-09-01

    This paper examines the seasonal variation in the reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for selected areas in the northeast of Thailand. Charts are presented which show rainfall, temperature and reported incidence of acute diarrhoea for the period 1982 to 1987. Incidence of diarrhoea appears to be inversely related to a sharp decrease in temperature around January each year. Although rainfall does not appear to have a direct effect on the relative incidence of acute diarrhoea, there is always a consistent reduction during July or August, after the rains have begun. Seasonal changes in climate may be indirectly related to other factors which have an important bearing on diarrhoeal disease. Rainwater collection is an important water source in this region and the affect this has on water use is discussed in relation to faeco-oral disease transmission.

  15. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  16. Acute myocardial infarction after heart irradiation in young patients with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, H.

    1989-02-01

    Forty-seven patients younger than 40 years at the time of the diagnosis, and irradiated to the mediastinum for Hodgkin's disease at Turku University Central Hospital from 1977 to 1982, were regularly followed for 56 to 127 months after therapy. Two patients developed an acute myocardial infarction ten and 50 months after cardiac irradiation at the age of only 28 and 24 years, respectively. None of the patients died from lymphoma within five years from the diagnosis, but one of the infarctions was eventually fatal. Since acute myocardial infarction is rare in this age group, the result suggests strongly that prior cardiac irradiation is a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. The possibility of radiation-induced myocardial infarction should be taken into account both in treatment planning and follow-up of patients with Hodgkin's disease.

  17. Surveillance strategies for foot and mouth disease to prove absence of disease and absence of viral circulation.

    PubMed

    Caporale, V; Giovannini, A; Zepeda, C

    2012-12-01

    Free trade of animals and their products is based on the international or bilateral recognition of the health status of the animal populations being traded. This recognition is based on documentation of their health status by the exporting country, based on the results of continuing surveillance. According to the Terrestrial Animal Health Code of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), this may be based on various methods of surveillance, such as: documenting non-specific surveillance (clinical surveillance, passive notification of suspect cases, etc.); documenting activities that increase the sensitivity of non-specific surveillance (training activities, rewards/sanctions for notification/failure to notify, etc.); documenting all specific surveillance and its results (random surveys, targeted and risk-based surveillance, convenience-testing activities, etc.). Usually, the infection is the subject of the declaration of freedom. While clinical and passive surveillance can provide a high level of confidence that foot and mouth disease (FMD) infection is absent, this is not the case in vaccinated populations. In these populations, specific surveillance becomes much more important than non-specific clinical surveillance. Specific surveillance is severely restricted by the performance of the test(s) employed. The imperfect specificity of any serological test is further complicated when techniques to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) are used, because imperfect purification of the antigen used for vaccination may foster the production of undesired antibodies in the vaccinated animals. The authors discuss various approaches to overcome this problem; their merits and flaws in documenting the absence of infection or virus circulation for animal diseases in general, and for FMD in particular. Particular attention is paid to finding methods that can be applied in a variety of epidemiological conditions and organisational structures, since these

  18. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  19. World Health Organization Estimates of the Global and Regional Disease Burden of 22 Foodborne Bacterial, Protozoal, and Viral Diseases, 2010: A Data Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Martyn D.; Pires, Sara M.; Black, Robert E.; Caipo, Marisa; Crump, John A.; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Döpfer, Dörte; Fazil, Aamir; Fischer-Walker, Christa L.; Hald, Tine; Hall, Aron J.; Keddy, Karen H.; Lake, Robin J.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Torgerson, Paul R.; Havelaar, Arie H.; Angulo, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foodborne diseases are important worldwide, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. To our knowledge, we present the first global and regional estimates of the disease burden of the most important foodborne bacterial, protozoal, and viral diseases. Methods and Findings We synthesized data on the number of foodborne illnesses, sequelae, deaths, and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), for all diseases with sufficient data to support global and regional estimates, by age and region. The data sources included varied by pathogen and included systematic reviews, cohort studies, surveillance studies and other burden of disease assessments. We sought relevant data circa 2010, and included sources from 1990–2012. The number of studies per pathogen ranged from as few as 5 studies for bacterial intoxications through to 494 studies for diarrheal pathogens. To estimate mortality for Mycobacterium bovis infections and morbidity and mortality for invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica infections, we excluded cases attributed to HIV infection. We excluded stillbirths in our estimates. We estimate that the 22 diseases included in our study resulted in two billion (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1.5–2.9 billion) cases, over one million (95% UI 0.89–1.4 million) deaths, and 78.7 million (95% UI 65.0–97.7 million) DALYs in 2010. To estimate the burden due to contaminated food, we then applied proportions of infections that were estimated to be foodborne from a global expert elicitation. Waterborne transmission of disease was not included. We estimate that 29% (95% UI 23–36%) of cases caused by diseases in our study, or 582 million (95% UI 401–922 million), were transmitted by contaminated food, resulting in 25.2 million (95% UI 17.5–37.0 million) DALYs. Norovirus was the leading cause of foodborne illness causing 125 million (95% UI 70–251 million) cases, while Campylobacter spp. caused 96 million (95% UI 52–177 million) foodborne

  20. Viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Puigdomènech, Isabel; de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Machado, José-David

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have developed different survival strategies in host cells by crossing cell-membrane compartments, during different steps of their viral life cycle. In fact, the non-regenerative viral membrane of enveloped viruses needs to encounter the dynamic cell-host membrane, during early steps of the infection process, in which both membranes fuse, either at cell-surface or in an endocytic compartment, to promote viral entry and infection. Once inside the cell, many viruses accomplish their replication process through exploiting or modulating membrane traffic, and generating specialized compartments to assure viral replication, viral budding and spreading, which also serve to evade the immune responses against the pathogen. In this review, we have attempted to present some data that highlight the importance of membrane dynamics during viral entry and replicative processes, in order to understand how viruses use and move through different complex and dynamic cell-membrane structures and how they use them to persist. PMID:21966556

  1. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  2. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  3. Brief communication: Legionnaire's disease successfully treated in acute myelocytic leukemia during severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H; Mahizhnan, P

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia developed progressive lung infiltrates and unremitting fevers during a profound neutropenic state. Legionnaire's disease was diagnosed by simple immunologic studies and successfully treated with erythromycin. This index case alerts physicians toward a treatable infection which would not normally be susceptible to the empiric antibiotic regimens given neutropenic patients with fevers.

  4. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  5. [Prognostication of malignization and acute complications of gastric ulcer disease, using multiparametric neuronet clasterization].

    PubMed

    Dzyubanovskiy, I Ya; Selskiy, P R; Viytovych, L E

    2015-03-01

    Results of examination of 20 gastric ulcer disease patients were analyzed for delineation of a high risk group for an acute complications occurrence, and in whom the conduction of organ preserving preventive operative interventions is expedient. For prognostication such following indices were applied: quantity of cells-producents of various immunoglobulins, mitotic and apoptotic indices, relative volume of damaged epitheliocytes, the patients' age.

  6. CD8+ T-cells count in acute myocardial infarction in HIV disease in a predominantly male cohort.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Oluwatosin A; Chang, Chung-Chou; So-Armah, Kaku A; Tracy, Russell P; Baker, Jason V; Rimland, David; Butt, Adeel A; Gordon, Adam J; Rinaldo, Charles R; Kraemer, Kevin; Samet, Jeffrey H; Tindle, Hilary A; Goetz, Matthew B; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Bedimo, Roger; Gibert, Cynthia L; Leaf, David A; Kuller, Lewis H; Deeks, Steven G; Justice, Amy C; Freiberg, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV-) infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men) enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC). Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065 cells/mm3) had increased AMI risk (adjusted HR=1.82, P<0.001, 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28). There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts≥200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts<200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone.

  7. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  8. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Viral Infections among Children under Two Years Old in Southern Vietnam 2009-2010: Clinical Characteristics and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Juliet E.; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Tran Dac, Nguyen Anh; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Le Binh, Bao Tinh; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno; van Doorn, H. Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a high burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections among children, data on demographic and clinical characteristics of RSV are scarce in low and middle income countries. This study aims to describe the viral etiologies, the demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of children under two years of age who were hospitalized with a lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), focusing on RSV (prevalence, seasonality, subgroups, viral load) and its association with disease severity. Methods A prospective study among children under two years of age, hospitalized with LRTI was conducted in two referral pediatric hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, from May 2009 to December 2010. Socio-demographic, clinical data and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected on enrolment and discharge. Multiplex real-time RT-PCR (13 viruses) and quantitative RSV RT-PCR were used to identify viral pathogens, RSV load and subgroups. Results Among 632 cases, 48% were RSV positive. RSV infections occurred at younger age than three other leading viral infections i.e rhinovirus (RV), metapneumovirus (MPV), parainfluenza virus (PIV-3) and were significantly more frequent in the first 6 months of life. Clinical severity score of RSV infection was significantly higher than PIV-3 but not for RV or MPV. In multivariate analysis, RV infection was significantly associated with severity while RSV infection was not. Among RSV infections, neither viral load nor viral co-infections were significantly associated with severity. Young age and having fever at admission were significantly associated with both RSV and LRTI severity. A shift in RSV subgroup predominance was observed during two consecutive rainy seasons but was not associated with severity. Conclusion We report etiologies, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of LRTI among hospitalized children under two years of age and risk factors of RSV and LRTI severity. PMID:27500954

  10. Diagnostic challenges of Wilson's disease presenting as acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and jaundice.

    PubMed

    Nussinson, Elchanan; Shahbari, Azmi; Shibli, Fahmi; Chervinsky, Elena; Trougouboff, Philippe; Markel, Arie

    2013-11-27

    Wilson's disease is a rare disorder of copper transport in hepatic cells, and may present as cholestatic liver disease; pancreatitis and cholangitis are rarely associated with Wilsons's disease. Moreover, cases of Wilson's disease presenting as pigmented gallstone pancr