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Sample records for acute watery diarrhea

  1. Sociocultural Determinants of Anticipated Vaccine Acceptance for Acute Watery Diarrhea in Early Childhood in Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Sonja; Schaetti, Christian; Manianga, Cele; Lapika, Bruno; Hutubessy, Raymond; Chaignat, Claire-Lise; Weiss, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus and oral cholera vaccines have the potential to reduce diarrhea-related child mortality in low-income settings and are recommended by the World Health Organization. Uptake of vaccination depends on community support, and is based on local priorities. This study investigates local perceptions of acute watery diarrhea in childhood and anticipated vaccine acceptance in two sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2010, 360 randomly selected non-affected adults were interviewed by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Witchcraft and breastfeeding were perceived as potential cause of acute watery diarrhea by 51% and 48% of respondents. Despite misperceptions, anticipated vaccine acceptance at no cost was 99%. The strongest predictor of anticipated vaccine acceptance if costs were assumed was the educational level of the respondents. Results suggest that the introduction of vaccines is a local priority and local (mis)perceptions of illness do not compromise vaccine acceptability if the vaccine is affordable. PMID:23878187

  2. Evaluating the cost utility of racecadotril for the treatment of acute watery diarrhea in children: the RAWD model

    PubMed Central

    Rautenberg, Tamlyn Anne; Zerwes, Ute; Foerster, Douglas; Aultman, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Background The safety and efficacy of racecadotril to treat acute watery diarrhea (AWD) in children is well established, however its cost effectiveness for infants and children in Europe has not yet been determined. Objective To evaluate the cost utility of racecadotril adjuvant with oral rehydration solution (ORS) compared to ORS alone for the treatment of AWD in children younger than 5 years old. The analysis is performed from a United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) perspective. Methods A decision tree model has been developed in Microsoft® Excel. The model is populated with the best available evidence. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) have been performed. Health effects are measured as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and the model output is cost (2011 GBP) per QALY. The uncertainty in the primary outcome is explored by probabilistic analysis using 1000 iterations of a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Deterministic analysis results in a total incremental cost of −£379 in favor of racecadotril and a total incremental QALY gain in favor of racecadotril of +0.0008. The observed cost savings with racecadotril arise from the reduction in primary care reconsultation and secondary referral. The difference in QALYs is largely attributable to the timely resolution of symptoms in the racecadotril arm. Racecadotril remains dominant when base case parameters are varied. Monte Carlo simulation and PSA confirm that racecadotril is the dominant treatment strategy and is almost certainly cost effective, under the central assumptions of the model, at a commonly used willingness to pay proxy threshold range of £20,000–£30,000 per QALY. Conclusion Racecadotril as adjuvant therapy is more effective and less costly compared to ORS alone, from a UK payer perspective, for the treatment of children with acute diarrhea. PMID:22570557

  3. Lactobacillus casei strain GG in the treatment of infants with acute watery diarrhea: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN67363048

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Lindo, Eduardo; Miranda-Langschwager, Percy; Campos-Sanchez, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Sack, R Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Background Adjuvant therapy to ORT with probiotic bacteria for infants with acute watery diarrhea has been under active investigation. Most studies have been done in the developed world showing benefit only for viral mild gastroenteritis. We evaluated the effect of a milk formula containing one billion (109) cfu/ml of Lactobacillus casei strain GG (LGG) upon duration and severity of diarrhea in infants in an environment with more severe acute diarrhea, where etiologic agents other than rotavirus are involved more frequently, and where mixed infections are more prevalent. Methods Male infants aged 3–36 months brought for treatment of acute watery diarrhea of less than 48 hours were eligible. After rehydration was completed with the WHO's oral rehydration solution, patients were randomly assigned to receive a milk formula either containing LGG or not. Stool volume was periodically measured using a devise suited to collect stools separate from urine. Duration of diarrhea was estimated based on stools physical characteristics. Results Eighty nine patients received the placebo milk formula and ninety received the LGG containing formula. Both groups were comparable in their baseline characteristics. Total stool output was significantly larger (p = 0.047) in the LGG group (247.8 ml/kg) than in the placebo group (195.0 ml/kg). No significant differences were found in duration of diarrhea (58.5 hours with LGG vs. 50.4 hours with placebo), rate of treatment failure (21.1% with LGG vs. 18.0% with placebo), and proportion of patients with unresolved diarrhea after 120 hours (12.2% with LGG vs. 12.5% with placebo). The rate of stools with reducing substances after 24 hours of treatment increased significantly in both groups (from 41.4% to 72.2% with LGG and from 45.9% to 68.0% with placebo). Conclusion This study did not show a positive effect of LGG on the clinical course of acute watery diarrhea. Positive beneficial effects of LGG, as had been reported elsewhere, could have

  4. Hyperkalemia with concomitant watery diarrhea: an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jeremy G C; Zwillich, Clifford W; Kaehny, William D; Levi, Moshe; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2003-08-01

    Four patients presented to the emergency room with life-threatening hyperkalemia and concomitant watery diarrhea. Hypovolemia, acidosis, and renal insufficiency were present in all 4 cases. In 2 patients, hyperkalemia followed initiation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy, whereas 1 patient experienced hyperkalemia after a dose increase of an ACE inhibitor, and the fourth patient was on continuous ACE-inhibitor therapy at the time of the hyperkalemia episode. Two of the 3 patients with functioning kidneys required hemodialysis to correct the hyperkalemia, whereas the other patient was on long-term hemodialysis therapy. In the 2 patients in whom transtubular potassium (K+) gradients were available, their values ranged far below normal, indicating tubular failure to secrete K+. This abnormality was attributed to decreased distal delivery of sodium and water and to renin/angiotensin II/aldosterone blockade. It has been proposed that aldosterone blockade impairs the capacity of the colonic epithelial cells to secrete K+. In all 4 patients the watery diarrhea ceased in parallel with the correction of serum K+ to normal values. It is suggested that hyperkalemia, most likely by stimulating intestinal motility, induced the watery diarrhea in all 4 patients. The watery diarrhea, however, failed to compensate for the renal tubular failure to secrete K+.

  5. Emerging trends in the epidemiology of human astrovirus infection among infants, children and adults hospitalized with acute watery diarrhea in Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Pativada, Madhusudhan; Nataraju, Seegekote Mariyappa; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Rajendran, Krishnan; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Ganguly, Sandipan; Bhattacharya, Mihir Kumar; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Krishnan, Triveni

    2012-12-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) have now emerged as another common cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in humans worldwide. This study investigated the epidemiology and genetic diversity of human astrovirus strains circulating among infants, younger children (up to 6 years), older children and adolescents (>6-17 years) and adults (18 years and above) hospitalized for diarrhea and their role in AGE in Kolkata, India. A total of 2535 fecal samples were screened for the presence of known enteric viral, bacterial and parasitic etiologies by conventional microbiological assays and molecular methods. The overall incidences of sole or mixed infection of HAstV with known enteric viral, bacterial and parasitic pathogens were detected in 60 cases (2.4%) among all age groups. The clinical symptoms of astrovirus-associated acute watery diarrhea cases were recorded for all sole and mixed infection cases. A high number of sole (n = 13/60 [21.7%]) and mixed infection cases (n = 22/60 [36.7%]) were observed in adults (18 years old or more). Considering all age groups, 18 sole infection cases (n = 18/60 [30%]) and 42 mixed infection cases (n = 42/60 [70%]) with Rotavirus (n = 11/25 [44%]), Vibrio cholerae O1 (n = 6/24 [25%]) Cryptosporidium spp and Giardia lamblia (n = 5/13 [38.4%]) were observed. Further, eleven HAstV samples from infants and children (up to 6 years), children and adolescents (>6-17 years) and adults (18 years and above) were analyzed for their sequences of overlap region between ORF1b (RdRp) and ORF2 (capsid). Among these, ten strains were found to have close genetic relatedness to the Japanese strain HAstV_G1 [AB009985]. Additionally, the IDH2211 Kolkata strain showed a close genetic match with the Thai HAstV_G3 strain [EU363889]. Our study reports show that HAstVs as the sole agent and as mixed infection with other known enteric viral, bacterial, parasitic pathogens are also responsible for AGE among infants, children, adolescents and adults in

  6. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tobillo, E T; Schwartz, S M

    1998-10-01

    Diarrhea can result from damage to the intestinal lining caused by viruses or bacteria, malabsorption, inflammatory processes, bile salt and pancreatic enzyme deficiency, abnormal motility, or the presence of osmotically active solutes in the gut. While it is important to elicit information to determine the possible cause of diarrhea, be sure to check circulatory status first. Some patients may need rehydration therapy more urgently than they need a diagnosis. The main goals of treatment are to prevent dehydration and correct electrolyte imbalance, to provide supportive and symptomatic therapy, and to treat underlying disease. In most cases, a specific diagnosis is not necessary to guide initial treatment.

  7. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  8. Serum Zinc Concentrations in Children with Acute Bloody and Watery Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Chegini, Victoria; Sahmani, Mehdi; Oveisi, Sonia; Esmaeily, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The role of zinc in the pathogenesis of diarrhoea is controversial. This study was conducted to compare serum zinc levels in children with acute diarrhoea to those found in healthy children. Methods: This case-control study was carried out at the Qazvin Children’s Hospital in Qazvin, Iran, between July 2012 and January 2013. A total of 60 children with acute diarrhoea (12 children with bloody diarrhoea and 48 children with watery diarrhoea) and 60 healthy children were included. Zinc levels for all subjects were measured using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer and data were analysed and compared between groups. Results: Mean serum zinc levels in the patients with acute bloody diarrhoea, acute watery diarrhoea and the control group were 74.1 ± 23.7 μg/dL, 169.4 ± 62.7 μg/dL and 190.1 ± 18.0 μg/dL, respectively (P = 0.01). Hypozincaemia was observed in 50.0% of children with acute bloody diarrhoea and 12.5% of those with acute watery diarrhoea. None of the patients in the control group had hypozincaemia (P = 0.01). Conclusion: Children with acute bloody diarrhoea had significantly reduced serum zinc levels in comparison to healthy children. However, a study with a larger sample size is needed to examine the significance of this trend. PMID:26629379

  9. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... ages can get diarrhea. On average, adults In the United States have acute diarrhea once a year. ... consuming contaminated food or water. What causes diarrhea? The most common causes of diarrhea include Bacteria from ...

  10. [Double-blind controlled study of the efficacy of nifuroxazide versus placebo in the treatment of acute diarrhea in adults].

    PubMed

    Bourée, P; Chaput, J C; Krainik, F; Michel, H; Trépo, C

    1989-05-01

    In a double-blind, controlled randomized trial, 88 adult patients with acute diarrhea (more than three watery stools per day) received either 400 mg of nifuroxazide twice daily or placebo for 5 days. The mean duration of diarrhea in the nifuroxazide group was 2.09 days versus 3.26 days in the placebo group (p less than 0.004). The number of bowel movements per day diminished and mucus disappeared more quickly in patients treated by nifuroxazide than in patients of the placebo group. Nifuroxazide was well tolerated and no side effects were observed. Nifuroxazide is an effective therapy for acute diarrhea and can be prescribed from the onset of diarrhea without waiting for stool culture results which can be late or negative.

  11. Analysis of factors influencing the overall effect of racecadotril on childhood acute diarrhea. Results from a real-world and post-authorization surveillance study in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Jose

    2010-07-21

    Drug efficacy might differ from clinical trial results when performed in clinical daily conditions. Therefore, it is mandatory to conduct trials about effectiveness to improve external validity. This post-authorization, open-label, noncontrolled, prospective, multicenter, observational, and naturalistic trial was designed to search for factors influencing the racecadotril overall effect on childhood acute watery diarrhea in a real-world setting of Venezuela. There were 3,873 children with acute watery diarrhea treated with racecadotril, an enkephalin breakdown blocker plus oral rehydration therapy by 97 pediatricians. Evaluations were carried out daily until emission of two consecutive formed stools or absence of watery bowel movements for 24 hours. The primary end-point was time-to-relief, defined as the time from first racecadotril dose to the last watery bowel movement time. Age, gender, nursing type, nursing status during diarrhea, diarrhea severity, and co-medication were considered as factors in the statistical analysis. The primary end-point was evaluated by factors using UNIANOVA, and post-hoc tests were done. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to identify factors affecting drug performance, racecadotril effectiveness and tolerability overall assessment was searched by physicians and patients, and inter-observer agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. The mean time-to-relief was 18.5 +/- 12.5 hours [95% confidence interval 17.9-19.0] and the diarrhea severity was the only variable with significant and independent weight on racecadotril effectiveness explaining 23% of time-to-relief variance, but even in severe diarrhea cases this time was less than 24 hours. High agreement about satisfactory perception on effectiveness and tolerability was reached among physicians and patients. In conclusion, the racecadotril overall effect, evaluated in a real-world setting of Venezuela, was in agreement with results of some earlier controlled trials. It

  12. Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ralph E.

    1983-01-01

    The four major mechanisms of diarrhea are osmotic forces, secretory forces, exudation from a disrupted intestinal mucosa, and disturbed intestinal motility. In many illnesses, more than one mechanism produces diarrhea. The rotaviruses and the Norwalk viruses have recently been recognized as common causes of viral gastroenteritis. Also, the major cause of antibiotic-associated colitis is now known to be an overgrowth of Clostridium difficile. Campylobacter has also been identified as a common cause of acute bacterial diarrhea both abroad and in Canada. Most cases of travellers' diarrhea are caused by strains of Escherichia coli to which the traveller has little immunity. Most travellers who develop diarrhea benefit from treatment with diphenoxylate, loperamide or bismuth subsalicylate. The few patients who develop more severe, incapacitating diarrhea are candidates for treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Antibiotics should not be used to prevent travellers' diarrhea, because antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem. PMID:21283398

  13. Double blind trial of loperamide for treating acute watery diarrhoea in expatriates in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, F P; Bennish, M L; Speelman, P; Butler, C

    1989-01-01

    To determine if loperamide is effective and safe in treating watery diarrhoea, we randomly assigned 50 adult expatriates in Bangladesh with more than three unformed stools in the previous 24 hours and illness of less than 72 hours to receive loperamide or a placebo. On entry into the five day study patients took two capsules (one loperamide capsule = 2 mg) and one after each unformed stool up to a maximum of eight per day. The groups did not significantly differ in pretreatment features or pathogens identified. Mean number of stools on study day 1 was 2.6 in the loperamide group and 4.0 in the placebo group (p = 0.035); on day 2 it was 1.3 versus 3.4 (p less than 0.001). Differences in stool frequencies during the final three study days, or proportion of patients with cramps, nausea, or vomiting on any study day, were not significant. No serious side effects occurred in either group. We conclude that loperamide, by decreasing stool frequency during the early part of illness, may have a role in the symptomatic treatment of this self-limiting disease. PMID:2653972

  14. Smectite in acute diarrhea in children: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Madkour, A A; Madina, E M; el-Azzouni, O E; Amer, M A; el-Walili, T M; Abbass, T

    1993-08-01

    Dioctahedral smectite (DS) a natural adsorbent clay capable of adsorbing viruses, bacteria, and other intestinal irritants in vitro, is claimed to possess beneficial "antidiarrheal" properties. This study tested the effect of DS on the duration of diarrhea and the frequency and amount of liquid stools. Ninety well-nourished boys, aged 3-24 months, with acute watery diarrhea and mild, moderate, or severe dehydration were included in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After initial rehydration, they received DS or placebo (1.5 g freshly dissolved in 50 ml of water, four times daily for 3 days) along with oral rehydration solution (ORS) and adequate feeding. The clinical characteristics of both groups were comparable on admission. Patients in the smectite group had a significantly shorter duration of diarrhea (mean +/- SD, 54 +/- 16 vs. 73 +/- 13 h) and significantly fewer stools (2.6 +/- 0.8 vs. 3 +/- 0.7 on second day; 1.9 +/- 0.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.7 on third day; and 11.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 13.8 +/- 3 overall). The amount of liquid stools was not significantly reduced. Weight gain at 24, 48, and 72 h and on recovery was significantly higher in the smectite group despite the comparable fluid and food intake in both groups. These results suggest a beneficial effect of DS in shortening the duration of diarrhea and reducing the frequency of liquid stools in children rehydrated with ORS.

  15. Efficacy of Diosmectite (Smecta)® in the Treatment of Acute Watery Diarrhoea in Adults: A Multicentre, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Khediri, Faouzi; Mrad, Abdennebi Ilhem; Azzouz, Moussadek; Doughi, Hedi; Najjar, Taoufik; Mathiex-Fortunet, Hélène; Garnier, Philippe; Cortot, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Background. Although diosmectite has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of acute watery diarrhoea in children, its efficacy in adults still needs to be assessed. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the efficacy of diosmectite on the time to recovery in adults with acute diarrhoea. Methods. A total of 346 adults with at least three watery stools per day over a period of less than 48 hours were prospectively randomized to diosmectite (6 g tid) or placebo during four days. The primary endpoint was time to diarrhoea recovery. Results. In the intention-to-treat population, median time to recovery was 53.8 hours (range [3.7–167.3]) with diosmectite (n = 166) versus 69.0 hours [2.2–165.2] with placebo, (n = 163; P = .029), which corresponds to a difference of 15.2 hours. Diosmectite was well tolerated. Conclusion. Diosmectite at 6 g tid was well tolerated and reduced the time to recovery of acute watery diarrhoea episode in a clinically relevant manner. PMID:21760777

  16. Management of acute infectious diarrhea for children living in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan G, Miguel; Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; O'Ryan-Soriano, Miguel A; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-05-01

    Acute infectious gastroenteritis continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children below 5 years of age, with the majority of deaths concentrated in 35 'low income' countries. In these countries the under five years of age mortality rates reach 100 per 1000 live births, of which a significant proportion are associated with acute diarrhea. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella spp and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are the main pathogens causing disease in these settings, although other bacteria and parasites can cause moderate to severe disease in different regions and situations. Treatment of children in these setting should be focused on appropriate rehydration, early hospitalization of severely malnourished children, zinc supplementation, and in specific situations, antimicrobials should be considered. The rationale for antimicrobial use should be based on the potential benefits based on published literature and the opportunity for use. This review provides a pathogen-specific update on the potential benefits of antimicrobials and suggests an empirical management approach for children suffering an acute watery or bloody diarrhea in a resource-limited region.

  17. [Probiotics for the treating acute diarrhea and preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos

    2015-02-07

    Probiotics are helpful in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Several systematic reviews show that the use of probiotics shortens the duration of diarrhea in one day and reduces by 59% the risk of diarrhea lasting longer than 4 days. Hospital stay is 24 hours shorter in children treated with probiotics. The benefitial effect of probiotics is species-specific; Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the two species with proven efficacy in the treatment of acute diarrhea. The use of probiotics reduces by 50% the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. No significant side effects were found in the clinical trials but rare cases of invasive infections have been reported in immunosuppressed children or those with indwelling central venous catheters.

  18. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  19. A Bayesian approach to acute infectious diarrhea in adults.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea is a yearly occurrence for most Americans, and is associated with 1 million hospitalizations and about 6000 deaths in the United States annually. Up to 80% of acute infectious diarrhea is caused by noroviruses, which produce a clinically mild illness with a predictable short course and good outcome that make laboratory testing and antimicrobial treatment unnecessary. Most diarrhea-causing bacteria and protozoa can cause a clinical illness "like norovirus"; when they do so in healthy adults neither specialized testing nor antimicrobials is required. The presence or absence of epidemiologic evidence (such as travel, hospitalization, antibiotic use, other exposures)and clinical evidence (such as diarrhea frequency and duration, severity of abdominal pain and fever, character of stool, presence of chronic illness or immune deficiency) can change the probability of "not norovirus" from as low as 8% to as high as 100%. Such probabilities guide the use of laboratory testing and antimicrobial therapy in patients who have acute infectious diarrhea.

  20. [Hypokalemia-induced paraplegia secondary to acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Ortuño Andériz, F; Cabello Clotet, N; de Diego Gamarra, R; Salaverría Garzón, I; Vázquez Rizaldos, S

    2002-02-01

    Hypokalemia can give a variety of syntomatology but more often courses without it or with inespecific clinical manifestations. In our enviroment the etiology of hypokalemia is wide but one of the most common causes in third world countries are diarrheas. We describe a case of severe hypokalemia due to acute diarrhea which was manifested with severe neurologic symtoms but improves with conventional treatment.

  1. Analysis of factors influencing the overall effect of racecadotril on childhood acute diarrhea. Results from a real-world and post-authorization surveillance study in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Chacón, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Drug efficacy might differ from clinical trial results when performed in clinical daily conditions. Therefore, it is mandatory to conduct trials about effectiveness to improve external validity. This post-authorization, open-label, noncontrolled, prospective, multicenter, observational, and naturalistic trial was designed to search for factors influencing the racecadotril overall effect on childhood acute watery diarrhea in a real-world setting of Venezuela. There were 3,873 children with acute watery diarrhea treated with racecadotril, an enkephalin breakdown blocker plus oral rehydration therapy by 97 pediatricians. Evaluations were carried out daily until emission of two consecutive formed stools or absence of watery bowel movements for 24 hours. The primary end-point was time-to-relief, defined as the time from first racecadotril dose to the last watery bowel movement time. Age, gender, nursing type, nursing status during diarrhea, diarrhea severity, and co-medication were considered as factors in the statistical analysis. The primary end-point was evaluated by factors using UNIANOVA, and post-hoc tests were done. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to identify factors affecting drug performance, racecadotril effectiveness and tolerability overall assessment was searched by physicians and patients, and inter-observer agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. The mean time-to-relief was 18.5 ± 12.5 hours [95% confidence interval 17.9–19.0] and the diarrhea severity was the only variable with significant and independent weight on racecadotril effectiveness explaining 23% of time-to-relief variance, but even in severe diarrhea cases this time was less than 24 hours. High agreement about satisfactory perception on effectiveness and tolerability was reached among physicians and patients. In conclusion, the racecadotril overall effect, evaluated in a real-world setting of Venezuela, was in agreement with results of some earlier controlled trials. It

  2. [Acute infectious diarrhea in adults: epidemiology and management].

    PubMed

    Beaugerie, Laurent; Sokol, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Acute diarrhea is defined as an abnormally frequent discharge of semisolid or fluid fecal matter from the bowel, lasting less than 14 days. More than three millions cases of acute diarrhea, presumably due to intestinal infections, are seen in general practice every year in France. Most of the cases are benign and resolve under symptomatic treatment within 3 days, without need for biological tests or antibiotics. In special contexts (septicemic syndrome, visible blood in stools, severe dehydration, patients at risk of severe sepsis [valvulopathy]), biologic tests and probabilist antibiotic treatment are required. Hygiene, rehydration and diet recommendations are always part of the treatment of acute diarrhea, in addition to the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea and other digestive symptoms. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea is clinically benign in most cases, and attributed to transient dysbiosis of gut microbiota. In the remaining cases, diarrhea is the clinical expression of intestinal infection by Clostridium difficile, that should be treated with metronidazole, or the clinical expression of a Klebsiella oxytoca-associated colitis that usually spontaneously resolves after stopping antibiotics.

  3. Predictive value of stool examination in acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Cohen, P T; Neighbor, M; Larkin, H; Newman, M; Yajko, D; Hadley, K

    1987-08-01

    We prospectively evaluate the value of fecal blood and fecal leukocytes in predicting whether acute diarrhea in adults is associated with a stool culture positive for a bacterial pathogen. One hundred thirteen patients, aged 19 to 50 years, seen in a two-year period in an urban adult outpatient setting underwent stool culture for the presenting symptom of diarrhea. Heterosexual men represented 48% of the cohort, women represented 17%, and homosexual men represented 35%. Overall, 53 (47%) of the patients had positive stool cultures for enteric pathogens. Campylobacter jejuni was the most common organism in the entire cohort, but Shigella species were most common in homosexual men. The best predictive variables for a stool culture positive for a bacterial pathogen were the presence of both fecal leukocytes and fecal blood in the stool, compared with only one or neither. When both were present, the sensitivity was 81%, the specificity 74%, and the predictive values of a positive and negative test were 81% and 83%, respectively; the likelihood ratio was 4.87. When homosexual men and the rest of the cohort were analyzed separately, the combination of fecal leukocytes and fecal blood remained the best method of predicting a positive stool culture in both. Examination of stool for fecal leukocytes and fecal blood is a rapid, reliable, and inexpensive way to differentiate between bacterial and other causes of acute diarrhea in the adult acute care setting.

  4. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day. You may also have other symptoms. Causes of diarrhea include infections, food allergies and intolerances, digestive tract ... electrolytes to prevent dehydration. Doctors may treat some causes of diarrhea with prescription medicines. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition If ...

  5. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... be called food poisoning . Certain medicines may also cause diarrhea , including: Some antibiotics Chemotherapy drugs for cancer Laxatives ... healthy steps can help you prevent illnesses that cause diarrhea: Wash your hands often, especially after going to ...

  6. Gut Microbial Succession Follows Acute Secretory Diarrhea in Humans

    PubMed Central

    David, Lawrence A.; Weil, Ana; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Harris, Jason B.; Chowdhury, Fahima; Begum, Yasmin; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disability after childhood diarrhea is an important burden on global productivity. Recent studies suggest that gut bacterial communities influence how humans recover from infectious diarrhea, but we still lack extensive data and mechanistic hypotheses for how these bacterial communities respond to diarrheal disease and its treatment. Here, we report that after Vibrio cholerae infection, the human gut microbiota undergoes an orderly and reproducible succession that features transient reversals in relative levels of enteric Bacteroides and Prevotella. Elements of this succession may be a common feature in microbiota recovery from acute secretory diarrhea, as we observed similar successional dynamics after enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. Our metagenomic analyses suggest that multiple mechanisms drive microbial succession after cholera, including bacterial dispersal properties, changing enteric oxygen and carbohydrate levels, and phage dynamics. Thus, gut microbiota recovery after cholera may be predictable at the level of community structure but is driven by a complex set of temporally varying ecological processes. Our findings suggest opportunities for diagnostics and therapies targeting the gut microbiota in humans recovering from infectious diarrhea. PMID:25991682

  7. Severe acute bovine viral diarrhea in Ontario, 1993-1995.

    PubMed

    Carman, S; van Dreumel, T; Ridpath, J; Hazlett, M; Alves, D; Dubovi, E; Tremblay, R; Bolin, S; Godkin, A; Anderson, N

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains with enhanced virulence caused unprecedented outbreaks of severe acute bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) in dairy, beef, and veal herds in Ontario (Canada). Fever, pneumonia, diarrhea, and sudden death occurred in all age groups of cattle. Abortions often occurred in pregnant animals. Gross lesions in the alimentary tract were similar to those associated with mucosal disease, especially in animals >6 months of age. Cattle of all age groups had microscopic lesions in the alimentary tract similar to those seen with mucosal disease. The epidemic peaked in the summer of 1993, with 15% of all bovine accessions from diseased cattle presented to the diagnostic laboratory being associated with BVDV. The virus strains involved in the outbreak were analyzed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and the polymerase chain reaction. The virus isolates from these outbreaks of severe disease were determined to be type 2 BVDV. Type 2 BVDV has been present in Ontario at least since 1981 without causing widespread outbreaks of severe acute BVD, which suggests that type 2 designation in itself does not imply enhanced virulence. Cattle properly vaccinated with type 1 BVDV vaccines appear to be protected from clinical disease.

  8. Microbiologic and Clinical Study of Acute Diarrhea in Children in Aswan, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    outpatient with diarrhea. In contrast, rotavirus and G. lamblia were identified as frequently in stools from patients with diarrhea as from controls...comparable to the diarrheal group, Giardia was identified as frequently in controls as in cases of acute diarrhea. G. lamblia has beep found in a high

  9. [Feeding infants and young children with acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Chouraqui, J-P; Michard-Lenoir, A-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis remains a common and often severe illness among infants and children throughout the world. The management of a child with acute diarrhea includes rehydration and maintenance fluids with oral rehydration solutions (ORS), combined with continued age-appropriate nutrition. However, although substantial data support the role of continued nutrition in improving gastrointestinal function and anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical outcomes, the practice of continued feeding during diarrheal episodes has been difficult to establish as accepted standard of care. Recommendations for maintenance dietary therapy depend on the age and diet history of the patient. It has been clear for many years that, when affected by gastroenteritis, breastfed infants should be continued on breast milk without any need for interruption and, by that way, will get faster recovery and improved nutrition. Moreover, many well-conducted studies have provided evidence that in formula-fed children not severely dehydrated, a rapid return to full feeding is well tolerated. Lactose intolerance and/or secondary cow's milk allergy are not a clinical concern for the vast majority of patients. In fact early refeeding i.e resumption of normal diet, in amounts sufficient to satisfy energy and nutrient requirements, should be the rule. However, in children younger than 6 months of age, the lack of suitable studies must lead to caution and use of specific lactose-free or extensively hydrolysate formulae, especially in case of severe and/or prolonged diarrhea. Several studies support the use of zinc supplementation or probiotics for acute diarrhea but some doubts persist in infant in developed countries.

  10. Racecadotril for the treatment of severe acute watery diarrhoea in children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gharial, Jaspreet; Laving, Ahmed; Were, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea is the second most common cause of death in children under 5 years of age in Kenya. It is usually treated with oral rehydration, zinc and continued feeding. Racecadotril has been in use for over 2 decades; however, there is a paucity of data regarding its efficacy from Africa. Objectives The objectives of this study were: to compare the number of stools in the first 48 hours in children with severe gastroenteritis requiring admission and treated with either racecadotril or placebo, to study the impact of racecadotril on duration of inpatient stay as well as duration of diarrhoea and to describe the side effect profile of racecadotril. Methods This was a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. It enrolled children between the age of 3 and 60 months who were admitted with severe acute gastroenteritis. They received either racecadotril or placebo in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc and were followed up daily. Results 120 children were enrolled into the study. There were no differences in the demographics or outcomes between the 2 groups. Stools at 48 hours: median (IQR) of 5 (3–7) and 5 (2.5–7.5), respectively; p=0.63. The duration of inpatient stay: median (IQR): 4 days (1.5–6.5) and 4.5 (1.8–6.3); p=0.71. The duration of illness: 3 days (2–4) and 2 days (1–3); p=0.77. The relative risk of a severe adverse event was 3-fold higher in the drug group but was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.63 to 14.7); p=0.16. Conclusions Racecadotril has no impact on the number of stools at 48 hours, the duration of hospital stay or the duration of diarrhoea in children admitted with severe gastroenteritis and managed with ORS and zinc. Trial registration number PACTR201403000694398; Pre-results. PMID:28123772

  11. Characterization of Microbial Dysbiosis and Metabolomic Changes in Dogs with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Guard, Blake C.; Barr, James W.; Reddivari, Lavanya; Klemashevich, Cory; Jayaraman, Arul; Steiner, Jörg M.; Vanamala, Jairam; Suchodolski, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metabolic consequences of intestinal dysbiosis in dogs with acute onset of diarrhea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome, fecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), as well as serum and urine metabolites in healthy dogs (n=13) and dogs with acute diarrhea (n=13). The fecal microbiome, SCFAs, and serum/urine metabolite profiles were characterized by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, GC/MS, and untargeted and targeted metabolomics approach using UPLC/MS and HPLC/MS, respectively. Significantly lower bacterial diversity was observed in dogs with acute diarrhea in regards to species richness, chao1, and Shannon index (p=0.0218, 0.0176, and 0.0033; respectively). Dogs with acute diarrhea had significantly different microbial communities compared to healthy dogs (unweighted Unifrac distances, ANOSIM p=0.0040). While Bacteroidetes, Faecalibacterium, and an unclassified genus within Ruminococcaceae were underrepresented, the genus Clostridium was overrepresented in dogs with acute diarrhea. Concentrations of fecal propionic acid were significantly decreased in acute diarrhea (p=0.0033), and were correlated to a decrease in Faecalibacterium (ρ=0.6725, p=0.0332). The predicted functional gene content of the microbiome (PICRUSt) revealed overrepresentations of genes for transposase enzymes as well as methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins in acute diarrhea. Serum concentrations of kynurenic acid and urine concentrations of 2-methyl-1H-indole and 5-Methoxy-1H-indole-3-carbaldehyde were significantly decreased in acute diarrhea (p=0.0048, 0.0185, and 0.0330, respectively). These results demonstrate that the fecal dysbiosis present in acute diarrhea is associated with altered systemic metabolic states. PMID:26000959

  12. Characterization of microbial dysbiosis and metabolomic changes in dogs with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guard, Blake C; Barr, James W; Reddivari, Lavanya; Klemashevich, Cory; Jayaraman, Arul; Steiner, Jörg M; Vanamala, Jairam; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2015-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metabolic consequences of intestinal dysbiosis in dogs with acute onset of diarrhea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome, fecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), as well as serum and urine metabolites in healthy dogs (n=13) and dogs with acute diarrhea (n=13). The fecal microbiome, SCFAs, and serum/urine metabolite profiles were characterized by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, GC/MS, and untargeted and targeted metabolomics approach using UPLC/MS and HPLC/MS, respectively. Significantly lower bacterial diversity was observed in dogs with acute diarrhea in regards to species richness, chao1, and Shannon index (p=0.0218, 0.0176, and 0.0033; respectively). Dogs with acute diarrhea had significantly different microbial communities compared to healthy dogs (unweighted Unifrac distances, ANOSIM p=0.0040). While Bacteroidetes, Faecalibacterium, and an unclassified genus within Ruminococcaceae were underrepresented, the genus Clostridium was overrepresented in dogs with acute diarrhea. Concentrations of fecal propionic acid were significantly decreased in acute diarrhea (p=0.0033), and were correlated to a decrease in Faecalibacterium (ρ=0.6725, p=0.0332). The predicted functional gene content of the microbiome (PICRUSt) revealed overrepresentations of genes for transposase enzymes as well as methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins in acute diarrhea. Serum concentrations of kynurenic acid and urine concentrations of 2-methyl-1H-indole and 5-Methoxy-1H-indole-3-carbaldehyde were significantly decreased in acute diarrhea (p=0.0048, 0.0185, and 0.0330, respectively). These results demonstrate that the fecal dysbiosis present in acute diarrhea is associated with altered systemic metabolic states.

  13. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  14. [Clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of infectious acute diarrhea in children Peru - 2011].

    PubMed

    Gonzales S, Carlos; Bada M, Carlos; Rojas G, Raúl; Bernaola A, Guillermo; Chávez B, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines cover the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Diarrhea in Pediatric Infectious is a consice information about definition, inclusion and exclusion criteria; epidemiology and etiology of infectious diarrhea. The guidelines cover aspects of diagnosis and treatment (dehydration, antibiotics, supportive therapy), nutritional support and other aspects of transferences and prevention.

  15. Can Giardia lamblia infection lower the risk of acute diarrhea among preschool children?

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Cohen, Dani; Levine, Myron M

    2014-04-01

    There are inconsistent findings concerning the role of Giardia lamblia in pediatric diarrhea. A prospective cohort study of the incidence of acute diarrhea among Israeli Arab preschool children offered the opportunity to examine the association between G. lamblia infection (at baseline) and subsequent diarrhea. Following baseline screening by light microscopy for the presence of Giardia in their stools, a cohort was assembled of 142 children who were followed between October 2003 and August 2004 for the incidence of diarrhea. Surveillance was performed through maternal interviews. At baseline, 21 children tested Giardia-positive. During the prospective surveillance, acute diarrhea occurred less often among Giardia-positive children (9.5%) than among children who were not infected with Giardia (26.5%). G. lamblia infection was associated with lower risk of acute diarrhea; adjusted odds ratio of 0.18 (95% confidence interval 0.04-0.93) (p = 0.041). This prospective study provides additional evidence that Giardia may lower the risk of subsequent acute diarrhea among preschool children.

  16. Nitazoxanide in Acute Rotavirus Diarrhea: A Randomized Control Trial from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatro, Samarendra; Mahilary, Nijwm; Satapathy, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background. Acute diarrhea is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality, with rotavirus being an important pathogen. Nitazoxanide, an antiparasitic agent, has been shown to inhibit rotavirus. Objective. This double-blind, randomized trial was designed to study the role of nitazoxanide in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Methods. Of 174 children (12 months to 5 years) with acute diarrhea, 50 rotavirus positive cases were randomized. The intervention group received syrup nitazoxanide twice daily (100 mg in 12–47 months, 200 mg in ≥4 yr) for 3 days along with standard treatment of diarrhea. Duration of diarrhea was the primary outcome measure. Results. The median duration (hrs) of diarrhea (54 versus 80; 95% CI: –26 [–13.2 to –38.8]) and hospitalization (68 versus 90; 95% CI: –22 [–12.98 to –31.02]) was significantly shorter in the nitazoxanide group. No significant difference was seen in the median duration (hrs) of fever or vomiting or the proportion of children requiring parenteral rehydration. There was no report of any adverse events. Conclusions. Oral nitazoxanide is effective and safe in the management of acute rotavirus diarrhea in Indian children (CTRI REF/2016/10/012507). PMID:28331496

  17. Virus diversity of acute diarrhea in tropical highlands.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria Fernanda; Matiz, Adriana; Trespalacios, Alba Alicia; Parra, Miguel; Riaño, Marcela; Mercado, Marcela

    2006-01-01

    Infectious acute diarrhea (IAD) is an important health problem affecting a large number of Latin-American children. Several reports show that bacteria, parasites and virus are involved in the burden of this disease. Most reports reveal Rotavirus A as the responsible etiological agent, at the same time, there seems to be some correlation between IAD and seasonal weather changes. To learn about the type of microbial agents associated with IAD in children during mildly changing yearly climatic conditions, as found in a high altitude tropical city, and to identify the viral agents affecting this population, stool samples from 300 children under 5 years of age were studied throughout a one-year period. Bacteria and intestinal parasites were identified by routine methods, while viruses were detected and typed by EIA and PCR. 20.6% of the IAD studied was associated with bacteria; 9% with parasites and 40% with virus. Group C Rotavirus accounted for 20.2%, group A Rotavirus for 13% and Calicivirus 10%. During November-April (p < 0.007) more virus associated IAD was found, while bacteria (p < 0.03) or parasite (p < 0.00014) related IAD was prevalent from May to October. The mild seasonal weather changes don't seem to be associated with any other microbial agent.

  18. Acute Neurological Involvement in Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Thérésa; Elmaleh, Monique; Charbit, Marina; Launay, Emma Allain; Harambat, Jérôme; Brun, Muriel; Ranchin, Bruno; Bandin, Flavio; Cloarec, Sylvie; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhene; Piètrement, Christine; Champion, Gérard; Ulinski, Tim; Deschênes, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Neurologic involvement is the most threatening complication of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS). Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report a retrospective multicenter series of 52 patients with severe initial neurologic involvement that occurred in the course of D+HUS. Results: Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection was documented in 24. All except two patients had acute renal failure that required peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or both techniques. A first group of eight patients remained with normal consciousness; five of them had protracted seizures. A second group of 23 patients had stuporous coma; five of these had protracted severe seizures, and 18 had a neurologic defect including pyramidal syndrome, hemiplegia or hemiparesia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. A third group of 21 patients had severe coma. Plasma exchanges were undertaken in 25 patients, 11 of whom were treated within 24 hours after the first neurologic sign; four died, two survived with severe sequelae, and five were alive without neurologic defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 29 patients showed that (1) every structure of the central nervous system was susceptible to involvement; (2) no correlation seemed to exist between special profile of localization on early MRI and the final prognosis; and (3) MRI did not exhibit any focal lesions in three patients. The overall prognosis of the series was marked by the death of nine patients and severe sequelae in 13. Conclusions: Neurologic involvement is associated with a severe renal disease but does not lead systematically to death or severe disability. PMID:20498239

  19. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Acute and Persistent Diarrhea in Returned Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Schultsz, C.; van den Ende, J.; Cobelens, F.; Vervoort, T.; van Gompel, A.; Wetsteyn, J. C. F. M.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the role of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in acute and persistent diarrhea in returned travelers, a case control study was performed. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was detected in stool samples from 18 (10.7%) of 169 patients and 4 (3.7%) of 108 controls. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC) was detected in 16 (9.5%) patients and 7 (6.5%) controls. Diffuse adherent E. coli strains were commonly present in both patients (13%) and controls (13.9). Campylobacter and Shigella species were the other bacterial enteropathogens most commonly isolated (10% of patients, 2% of controls). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of ETEC was associated with acute diarrhea (odds ratio [OR], 6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 29.1; P = 0.005), but not with persistent diarrhea (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.4 to 7.4). EAggEC was significantly more often present in patients with acute diarrhea than in controls (P = 0.009), but no significant association remained after multivariate analysis. ETEC and EAggEC are frequently detected in returned travelers with diarrhea. The presence of ETEC strains is associated with acute but not with persistent diarrhea. PMID:11015362

  20. Microbial ecology of watery kimchi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biochemistry and microbial ecology of 2 similar types of watery (mul) kimchi, containing sliced and unsliced radish and vegetables (nabak and dongchimi, respectively), were investigated. Samples from kimchi were fermented at 4, 10, and 20 °C were analyzed by plating on differential and selective...

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus Mixture in Treatment of Children Hospitalized With Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jamie M; Petrova, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite unproven effectiveness, Lactobacillus acidophilus is a widely used probiotic in the treatment of pediatric diarrhea. In this report, we evaluated the association between length of stay (LOS) for 290 young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea and adjuvant therapy with a probiotic mixture containing 80% L acidophilus that was included in treatment for 22.4% of them. Overall, no association between LOS and use of L acidophilus was recorded after controlling for age, length of diarrhea symptoms, duration of intravenous fluids, and prior exposure to antibiotic. However, LOS was directly associated with use of L acidophilus in children with negative stool studies, and no such association was recorded in children with positive stool for rotavirus or other infections. We concluded that adjuvant therapy with L acidophilus mixture is not beneficial for young children hospitalized with acute diarrhea.

  2. Management of Acute Diarrhea: A Study on Community Pharmacists' Attitudes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Vaseghi, Golnaz; Eshraghi, Azadeh; Eslami, Neda; Masjedi, Moein; Mehrpooya, Maryam; Eshraghi, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea disease is one of the most important problem which leads to mortality and morbidity in under developing country. Pharmacists play an important role in providing health services to local communities for this common health issues. The purpose of our study was to assess diarrhea related attitude and knowledge of pharmacist in Iran. This study has been performed in Iranian Pharmacist Association congress in 2012. This is conducted as a questionnaire base, in 100 randomly Persian pharmacists, consists of questions about demographic data of pharmacists such as age, sex, college, year of study, attitude and knowledge of pharmacists on management of acute diarrhea. Pharmacists believed that it was important to ask about the age of patients (98%), initiation (98%) and frequency (95%) of diarrhea, blood (90%) in diarrhea, other symptoms such as fever or pain (95%) as well as recent foods consumption (91%). However there was a significance differences between male and female pharmacist about their diarrhea knowledge. Among pharmacists, 75% asked about the recent travel and 63% asked about other affected family members .Most pharmacists (78) dispensed ORS for the pediatric acute diarrhea. However, some believed in recommending ORS+antimotility drugs (9%), ORS+antismaspolitic (11%) and ORS+antibiotics (2 %). Although Iranian pharmacist were in a good attitude however the rule of periodic studies should highlighted.

  3. Enteropathogens Associated with Acute Diarrhea in Children from Households with High Socioeconomic Level in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Batthyány, Lara; Bianco, María Noel; Pérez, Walter; Pardo, Lorena; Algorta, Gabriela; Robino, Luciana; Suárez, Ramón; Navarro, Armando; Pírez, María Catalina; Schelotto, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea, a common disease of children, deserves permanent monitoring in all social groups. To know the etiology and clinical manifestations of acute diarrhea in children up to 5 years of age from high socioeconomic level households, we conducted a descriptive, microbiological, and clinical study. Stools from 59 children with acute community-acquired diarrhea were examined, and their parents were interviewed concerning symptoms and signs. Rotavirus, adenovirus, and norovirus were detected by commercially available qualitative immunochromatographic lateral flow rapid tests. Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, and Shigella were investigated by standard bacteriological methods and diarrheagenic E. coli by PCR assays. We identified a potential enteric pathogen in 30 children. The most frequent causes of diarrhea were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), viruses, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Only 2 patients showed mixed infections. Our data suggest that children with viral or Campylobacter diarrhea were taken to the hospital earlier than those infected with EPEC. One child infected with STEC O26 developed “complete” HUS. The microbiological results highlight the importance of zoonotic bacteria such as atypical EPEC, Campylobacter, STEC, and Salmonella as pathogens associated with acute diarrhea in these children. The findings also reinforce our previous communications about the regional importance of non-O157 STEC strains in severe infant food-borne diseases. PMID:25861274

  4. [Acute diarrhea: stool water loss in hospitalized infants and its correlation with etiologic agents and lactose content in the diet].

    PubMed

    Palma, D; Oliva, C A; Taddei, J A; Fagundes-Neto, U

    1997-01-01

    by FAO/WHO (100 kcal/day) which shows the impact of acute diarrhea on the decrease of food intake. The average volumes of watery fecal losses found among any of the studied subgroups may be considered quite relevant when compared to standard values. Especially within the L/EPEC+ group fecal losses, both on the first day (83.56 ml/kg/day) and, mainly, on the second (119.44 ml/kg/day) reached exceedingly high levels indicating a disastrous association between the presence of EPEC in the small intestine and lactose offer in the diet. Thus, the results show that there exists a positive and significant association between poor lactose absorption and the presence of EPEC in the feces. WHO's recommendation proposing the use of diluted cow milk, in universal and indiscriminate administration, in the two first days of the disease, may represent a risk factor, not only for malnutrition, but also for the survival rates of children with severe diarrhea, especially those under six months of age and hospitalized with EPEC enteroinfection.

  5. Bifidobacterium lactis in Treatment of Children with Acute Diarrhea. A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Soud, Neveen Helmy Abou; Said, Reem Nabil; Mosallam, Dalia Sayed; Barakat, Nahla Abdel Moniem; Sabry, Mohamed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics are becoming increasingly popular treatment for children diarrhea. Although there are several probiotic strains potentially useful, researches were often limited to certain strains. AIM: To test Bifidobacterium lactis on morbidity of acute diarrhea in children less than 2 years. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted in 50 children (1 - 23 months) admitted with acute diarrhea to the Pediatric Hospital, Cairo University and were randomly assigned to receive in addition to usual treatment of diarrhea according to WHO guidelines; one of two treatments either milk formula non-supplemented (n = 25) or supplemented (n = 25) with Bifidobacterium lactis 14.5 × 106 CFU/100 ml daily for one week. Primary outcomes were frequency and duration of diarrhea and hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were duration of fever and vomiting episodes. Safety and tolerance were also recorded. RESULTS: On admission, patients’ characteristics of both groups (50 cases) were similar. For children who received the probiotics for one week; mean duration of diarrhoea was shorter than in controls (3.12 ± 0.92 vs. 4.10 ± 0.94 days) (P = 0.02), number of motions per day was less than in controls (3.96 ± 0.62 vs. 4.46 ± 0.85) (P = 0.04) and discharge from hospital <2 days was more frequent than in controls (72% vs. 44%) (P = 0.048). There was no effect on fever (P = 0.63) or vomiting (P = 0.54). CONCLUSION: Bifidobacterium lactis probiotics in supplemented milk formula decreased significantly frequency, duration of diarrhea, and hospital stay than usual treatment alone in children with acute diarrhea. Additional researches on other uncommon local probiotic species should be encouraged. PMID:27275258

  6. Etiology of acute diarrhea in the elderly in China: A six-year observational study

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Qibin; Yang, Wanqi; Chen, Yu; Wu, Jianguo; Jing, Huaiqi; Yang, Weizhong; Li, Zhongjie

    2017-01-01

    Acute diarrhea leads to a substantial disease burden among the elderly worldwide. However, in the context of increasingly aging trend in China, the prevalence of etiological agents among elderly diarrheal patients was undetermined. This study aimed to explore the major enteropathogens of acute diarrhea among outpatients older than 65 years in China, and also the epidemiological features of the pathogens. Demographic and clinical data for acute diarrhea among outpatients older than 65 years were collected from 213 participating hospitals from 2009 to 2014. Stool specimens were collected and tested for 13 enteric viruses and bacteria. The proportion of outpatients positive for targeted pathogens was analyzed by residential areas and seasonal patterns. Among the 7,725 patients enrolled, 1,617 (20.9%)were positive for any one of the 13 study pathogens. The predominant pathogen was norovirus (9.0%), followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) (5.5%), rotavirus (3.9%), non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) (2.9%), and Shigella spp. (2.5%). The prevalence of Shigella spp. among rural patients (6.9%) was higher than that among urban patients (1.6%) (p < 0.001), with opposite trend for DEC (3.6% versus 5.9%, p = 0.007). An obvious seasonal pattern was observed for major pathogens, with peak for norovirus in autumn, rotavirus in winter and DEC, NTS, and Shigella spp. in summer. A wide variety of enteropathogens were detected among the elderly with acute diarrhea in China, with norovirus and DEC being the most commonly isolated pathogens. A strong seasonal pattern was observed for major pathogens of acute diarrhea among the elderly. PMID:28323855

  7. Non-polio enteroviruses and their association with acute diarrhea in children in India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Durga C; Ananda Babu, M; Raghavendra, A; Dhananjaya, D; Kumar, Sudheendra; Maiya, P P

    2013-07-01

    A causative agent in approximately 40% of diarrheal cases still remains unidentified. Though many enteroviruses (EVs) are transmitted through fecal-oral route and replicate in the intestinal cells, their association with acute diarrhea has not so far been recognized due to lack of detailed epidemiological investigations. This long-term, detailed molecular epidemiological study aims to conclusively determine the association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute diarrhea in comparison with rotavirus (RV) in children. Diarrheal stool specimens from 2161 children aged 0-2 years and 169 children between 2 and 9 years, and 1800 normal stool samples from age-matched healthy children between 0 and 9 years were examined during 2008-2012 for enterovirus (oral polio vaccine strains (OPVs) and NPEVs). Enterovirus serotypes were identified by complete VP1 gene sequence analysis. Enterovirus and rotavirus were detected in 19.01% (380/2330) and 13.82% (322/2330) diarrheal stools. During the study period, annual prevalence of EV- and RV-associated diarrhea ranged between 8% and 22%, but with contrasting seasonal prevalence with RV predominating during winter months and NPEV prevailing in other seasons. NPEVs are associated with epidemics-like outbreaks during which they are detected in up to 50% of diarrheic children, and in non-epidemic seasons in 0-10% of the patients. After subtraction of OPV-positive diarrheal cases (1.81%), while NPEVs are associated with about 17% of acute diarrhea, about 6% of healthy children showed asymptomatic NPEV excretion. Of 37 NPEV serotypes detected in diarrheal children, seven echovirus types 1, 7, 11, 13, 14, 30 and 33 are frequently observed, with E11 being more prevalent followed by E30. In conclusion, NPEVs are significantly associated with acute diarrhea, and NPEVs and rotavirus exhibit contrasting seasonal predominance. This study signifies the need for a new direction of research on enteroviruses involving systematic analysis of

  8. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for the detection of rotavirus, norovirus and adenovirus from children hospitalized with acute watery diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Kas, Monalisa P; Maure, Tobias; Soli, Kevin W; Umezaki, Masahiro; Morita, Ayako; Bebes, Sauli; Jonduo, Marinjho H; Larkins, Jo-Ann; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Siba, Peter M; Greenhill, Andrew R; Horwood, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the IP-Triple I immunochromatographic rapid test for the detection of rotavirus, norovirus and adenovirus using stool samples from children with diarrhoea. The detection of norovirus and adenovirus was poor compared to polymerase chain reaction assays. However, high sensitivity (92%) and specificity (99%) were obtained for the detection of rotavirus.

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute or Persistent Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Sean W; Warren, Cirle Alcantara; Guerrant, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Studies of microbial pathogens and the toxins they produce are important for determining the mechanisms by which they cause disease and spread throughout a population. Some bacteria produce secretory enterotoxins (such as choleratoxin or the heat-labile or stable enterotoxins produced by E. coli) that invade cells directly. Others produce cytotoxins (such as those produced by Shigella, enteroinvasive E. coli, or C. difficile) that damage cells or trigger host responses that cause small or large bowel diseases (such as enteroaggregative or enteropathogenic E. coli or Salmonella). Viruses (such as noroviruses and rotaviruses) and protozoa (such as Cryptosporidium, Giardia or Entameba histolytica) disrupt cell functions and cause short- or long-term disease. Much epidemiological data about these pathogens have been collected from community- and hospital-acquired settings, as well from patients with traveler’s or persistent diarrhea. These studies have led to practical approaches for prevention, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19457416

  10. Herbal and dietary supplements related to diarrhea and acute kidney injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wanitsriphinyo, Suphamat; Tangkiatkumjai, Mayuree

    2017-03-01

    Background There is very little evidence relating to the association of herbal medicine with diarrhea and the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). This study reports a case of diarrhea-induced AKI, possibly related to an individual ingesting copious amounts of homemade mixed fruit and herb puree. Case presentation A 45-year-old Thai man with diabetes had diarrhea for 2 days, as a result of taking high amounts of a puree made up of eight mixed fruits and herbs over a 3-day period. He developed dehydration and stage 2 AKI, with a doubling of his serum creatinine. He had been receiving enalapril, as a prescribed medication, over one year. After he stopped taking both the puree and enalapril, and received fluid replacement therapy, within a week his serum creatinine had gradually decreased. The combination of puree, enalapril and AKI may also have induced hyperkalemia in this patient. Furthermore, the patient developed hyperphosphatemia due to his worsening kidney function, exacerbated by regularly taking some dietary supplements containing high levels of phosphate. His serum levels of potassium and phosphate returned to normal within a week, once the patient stopped both the puree and all dietary supplements, and had begun receiving treatment for hyperkalemia. Results The mixed fruit and herb puree taken by this man may have led to his diarrhea due to its effect; particularly if the patient was taking a high concentration of such a drink. Both the puree and enalapril are likely to attenuate the progression of kidney function. The causal relationship between the puree and AKI was probable (5 scores) assessed by the modified Naranjo algorithm. This is the first case report, as far as the authors are aware, relating the drinking of a mixed fruit and herbal puree to diarrhea and AKI in a patient with diabetes. Conclusions This case can alert health care providers to the possibility that herbal medicine could induce diarrhea and develop acute kidney injury.

  11. Bacterial entropathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility in children with acute diarrhea in Babol, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad Reza; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Barari Sawadkohi, Rahim; Mosaiebnia Gatabi, Zahra; Poornasrollah, Mohammad; Mirzapour, Mohaddeseh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious diarrhea is one of common cause of children diarrhea causing mortality and morbidity worldwide. This study was performed to identify the common bacteria and their antimicrobial susceptibility in children with diarrhea. Methods: Children under 14 years old with acute diarrhea who referred to Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Mazandaran, North of Iran, were enrolled during the summer and fall of 2009. From each patient, two fecal specimens were collected. Samples were cultured and bacterial isolation was done by conventional methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by disk diffusion and micro dilution methods. Results: One hundred-seventy two patients with the mean age of 41.8±37.6 months were evaluated. The bacteria were isolated in 48 (27.9%) cases. The most common isolated bacteria was E.coli and then shigella in both bloody and nonbloody diarrheal patients. There was a significant difference between bacteria positive specimens and WBC in stool smear (p=0.003). All isolated shigella were susceptible to Ceftizoxime and ciprofloxacin and were resistant to Cefixime. Resistant to Nalidixic acid was seen in 14% of them. Conclusion: The results show that E.coli was the most frequently isolated pathogen in children with bloody and nonbloody diarrhea. Ceftizoxime is a good antibiotic for shigellosis in children in our area but Cefixime is not appropriate. PMID:24490011

  12. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Anemia among Young Children with Acute Diarrhea in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Adhikari, Ramesh K.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Strand, Tor A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still common in children under five years of age and may impair their growth and cognitive development. Diarrhea is the second most common reason for seeking medical care for young children in Nepal. However, neither screening programs nor effective preventive measures for anemia and iron deficiencies are in place among children with diarrhea in many developing countries. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency and explore their associations with clinical, socioeconomic, and anthropometric parameters in Nepalese children. This was a cross-sectional study based on 1232 children, six to 35 months old, with acute diarrhea participating in a zinc supplementation trial. The mean (SD) hemoglobin was 11.2 g/dL (1.2). Anemia was found in 493 children (40%); this estimate increased to 641 (52%) when we adjusted for the altitude of the study area (hemoglobin <11.3 g/dL). One in every three children had depleted iron stores and 198 (16%) of the children had both depleted iron stores and anemia, indicating iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of anemia among children presenting with acute diarrhea was high but the degree of severity was mainly mild or moderate. Iron deficiency explained less than half of the total anemia, indicating other nutritional deficiencies inducing anemia might be common in this population. PMID:27417782

  13. The 12 Gastrointestinal Pathogens Spectrum of Acute Infectious Diarrhea in a Sentinel Hospital, Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongwei; Zhang, Jinjin; Li, Yinghui; Xie, Sirou; Jiang, Yixiang; Wu, Yanjie; Ye, Yuhui; Yang, Hong; Mo, Haolian; Situ, Chaoman; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Acute infectious gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases among all ages, particularly in developing countries. The pathogen spectrum may differ among different regions and seasons. To investigate the etiology of acute diarrhea in Shenzhen, a prospective study was conducted from August 2014 to September 2015. Stools from 412 patients with diarrhea (286 of whom were adults) including the general epidemiological information of the patients were collected. The 19 pathogens were detected by conventional culture method or multiplex PCR assay, which included five viruses (rotavirus, adenovirus, sapovirus, norovirus, and astrovirus), 11 bacterial pathogens (Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, Enterohemorrhagic (EHEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC), enteroinvasive (EIEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC); and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)) and three parasites (Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium parvum). A potential pathogen and coinfection was found in 41.5 and 7.0% of cases, respectively. The bacterial infection was the dominant cause of diarrhea (32.3%), and the three most frequently identified organisms were Salmonella (12.1%), ETEC (8.0%), and Campylobacter jejuni (4.9%). Salmonella enteritidis was the leading serotype of Salmonella sp. Norovirus (8.3%) and sapovirus (2.2%) were the most common viral pathogens, followed by adenovirus (1.5%) and rotavirus (1.2%). No EHEC, L. monocytogenes, V. cholera, Shigella, and parasites were found. The single most important causes of diarrhea were Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, which points toward the need for testing and surveillance for these pathogens in this region. PMID:27965649

  14. [Prevention and treatment of acute diarrhea in infants].

    PubMed

    Turck, D

    2007-11-01

    The prognosis of acute diarrhoea in infants is most often satisfactory in industrialized countries. However, it has been estimated that 10 to 15 children die every year in France from acute dehydration due to acute diarrhoea. In spite of an increasing use over the least few years, oral rehydration solutions (ORS) are used in only 70% of infants presenting with acute diarrhoea. The use of homemade ORS, plain water or fizzy drink should be strictly avoided. In case of acute diarrhoea there is no indication to stop breastfeeding or the use of infant formula for more than 4 hours. Lactose intolerance is observed in only 5-10% of infants. Lactose free formulae should only be used in infants with severe, persistent or recurrent diarrhoea. Under 3-4 months of age, infants with severe diarrhoea should receive for a period of 2-4 weeks lactose free protein hydrolysate formulae. Racecadotril is the only drug with anti-diarrheal properties, with a reduction of the stool output of 50%. Oral antibiotics should only be used in case of Shigella infection or in case of bacterial infection with severe sepsis or underlying debilitating disease. Oral Rotavirus vaccine, that is not reimbursed yet in France, has been shown to dramatically reduce the number of severe cases of diarrhoea with dehydration, and has been associated with a striking reduction of both morbidity and mortality, as well as of the number of hospitalisations during periods of epidemics.

  15. Etiology of acute diarrhea among United States Embassy personnel and dependents in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haberberger, R L; Lissner, C R; Podgore, J K; Mikhail, I A; Mansour, N S; Kemp, L; Spees, D; Glenn, J C; Hawn, R S; Woody, J N

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the enteropathogens causing acute diarrheal disease in Americans living in the North Africa/Middle East region during a 34-month period from February 12, 1985 to December 30, 1987 to guide preventive and therapeutic measures. Stool specimens were examined and an epidemiologic questionnaire was administered to patients with acute diarrhea at the Outpatient Health Unit of the United States Embassy in Cairo, Egypt. The subjects consisted of 126 American employees and dependents of the U. S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt with diarrhea of less than two-weeks duration. Subjects received routine medical care administered by the U.S. Embassy Medical staff. A possible etiologic agent was detected in 41% of the subjects. Enteroadherent Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated enteropathogen. A high degree of antimicrobial resistance was noted among the bacterial isolates, but all were susceptible to the quinolone antibiotics. Episodes of acute diarrhea occurring among American expatriates in Cairo, Egypt were primarily of bacterial etiology, but only a small portion were caused by the bacterial pathogens routinely identified in a standard clinical bacteriology laboratory. Most of the diarrheal episodes were due to noninvasive enteroadherent E. coli that may cause prolonged disease requiring antimicrobial therapy.

  16. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  17. [Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of acute diarrhea in adults at a hospital from Cordoba city].

    PubMed

    Polo Friz, H; Toloza, S; Acosta, H; Toloza, C; Unsain, F; Marconetto, G; Massanet, P; Canova, S; Celli, J; Abdala, O; Gandini, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the clinical and epidemiologic presentation features of adult acute diarrhea in a general hospital form Córdoba City. All the patients older than 14 years old who assisted to the Hospital Nacional de Clínicas Central Guard for acute diarrhea, during the periods: A (15-12-89 to 15-03-90), B (15-12-93 to 15-03-94) and C (15-12-94 to 15-03-95), were included. 594 patients were studied: 337 female (56.7%) and 257 male, 143 in the period A, 250 in B and 201 in C. The means +/- SD age was 34.6 +/- 13.3 and stool loose per day at admission 7.3 +/- 4.7. Eighty six percent of patients presented liquid consistent stool, 89.6% abdominal pain, 44.7% vomiting and 18.8% bloody stools. The rate of patients who consulted Central Guard referring acute diarrhea increased from period A (2.4%) to B (3.61%); p = 0.002 and decreased form B to C (2.85%); p = 0.01. The mean (+/- SD) days transcurred from the beginning of diarrhea episode till consultation was 3.5 +/- 2.7; 2.7 +/- 2.3 y 2.9 +/- 3.5 in the periods A, B and C respectively, statistically significant difference between A and B, p < 0.01. Thirty six percent, 21.1% and 23.1% of patients presented mucus with their stools in the periods A, B and C (p = 0.01), and high temperature 61.1%, 48.1% and 48.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Twenty seven percent of stools samples cultures became positive in the periods A, 17.6% in B and 11.5% in C, statistically significant difference between A and C; p = 0.008. The results show that in a general hospital from Córdoba City the adult acute diarrhea is a frequent cause of consult. In the last years there were modifications in its clinical an epidemiologic presentation features.

  18. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health.

  19. [Occurrence of acute infectious diarrhea during the lunar phases].

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, M; Schréter, I

    1993-08-23

    A chronobiometric analysis of 753 cases of acute infectious diarrhoea in adults in 1981-1990 in Kosice confirmed to a surprising extent recently reached conclusions of an investigation made by authors from Bratislava. The Kosice group comprised 352 cases of bacillary dysentery, 305 patients with salmonellosis, 72 with campylobacteriosis and 24 with yersiniosis. Statistically significantly fewer patients (p < 0.0001) were hospitalized during full moon, moon quarterly and new moon. In the intervals there were periods with a short-term increase of the daily admissions by cca 25%. This 7.38-day periodicity cannot be explained by the influence of the social 7-day week, as during observations extending over several years this rhythm is eliminated by a gradual shift across different phases of the moon. The authors did not find similar reports in the literature. For explanation, not only the organism of the host (variable immunity?) but also the infectious agent must be taken into account. More profound understanding of the mechanism may open the road to practical application of the described lunar relationship. Its knowledge can help already now to improve the organization of the health service.

  20. [Detection of bocavirus in 4-week-old puppies with acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Rudolf, S; Neiger, R; König, M

    2016-01-01

    Two 4-month-old female Doberman puppies were presented with clinical signs of acute diarrhea and emesis. They also showed sneezing and nasal discharge. The clinical presentation and neutropenia were suggestive of a parvovirus infection. The puppies were hospitalized for several days and treated symptomatically. Fecal samples tested negative for parasites. Virological examination of feces using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immune electron microscopy failed to confirm a parvovirus infection. With a recently developed PCR, bocavirus could be identified, thus making an infection with this virus a possible diagnosis. This case report presents a less well-known viral puppy disease and its successful therapy.

  1. Surveillance for Enteric Pathogens in a Case-Control Study of Acute Diarrhea in Western Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    2002;185:497–502. 7 Mugoya I, Kariuki S, Galgalo T et al. Rapid spread of Vibrio cholerae O1 throughout Kenya, 2005. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2008;78:527–33. 8...frequently identified pathogens of acute diarrhea are bacteria (diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio spp., Salmon- ella, Shigella, and...resistant cholera in Kenya and East Africa. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1988;39:484–90. 38 WHO. The treatment of diarrhoea: A manual for physicians and other senior

  2. Seasonal variation of enteropathogens in infants and preschoolers with acute diarrhea in western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Larrosa-Haro, Alfredo; Macias-Rosales, Rocío; Sánchez-Ramírez, Carmen A; Cortés-López, M Carmen; Aguilar-Benavides, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    The present study estimates the prevalence of some enteropathogens in infants and preschoolers with acute diarrhea. From 2006 to 2007, 5459 consecutive stool samples were evaluated. Cryptosporidium parvum was the parasite identified with the higher frequency (5.1%), followed by Giardia lamblia (1.2%). Campylobacter jejuni was isolated in 858 cases (15.7%) and was the most frequent enteropathogen overall. The rates of C parvum, Shigella, and Salmonella were higher in the summer. Rotavirus had the expected winter peak and it was the third enteropathogen because of its frequency. Overall frequency of stool-reducing substances was 15.6% and was associated with a rotavirus-positive test.

  3. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  4. Genetic analysis of hepatitis A virus variants circulating among children presenting with acute diarrhea in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Forbi, Joseph C; Agwale, Simon M; Ndip, Lucy M; Esona, Mathew D

    2012-05-01

    Molecular investigation was undertaken of circulating hepatitis A virus (HAV) associated with cases of acute diarrhea among children under 5 years of age in Kumba-Cameroon. Reverse transcription PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of a 371 bp segment of the VP1/P2A junction of six isolates obtained from stool samples showed the exclusive emergence of genetically related HAV subgenotype IA. All the isolates clustered within a unique lineage exhibiting a 99.5% nucleotide identity suggesting infection from a common source. The Cameroonian HAV isolates did not intermix or cluster with those from other regions of Africa and the rest of the world. Tajima's neutralization tests using the six sequences suggested HAV/IA population expansion (D = -1.37; P = 0.016). This is the first description of indigenous HAV genotypes circulating in Cameroon revealing a community-wide spread and predominance of HAV/1A infection in the Kumba area. These findings stress the need for routine molecular tracking of HAV infection as a contributory cause of acute diarrhea in Cameroonian children.

  5. Following Watery Relations in Early Childhood Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica; Clark, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Working methodologically and theoretically with the hydro-logics of bodies of water, this article addresses the limitations of humanistic perspectives on water play in early childhood classrooms, and proposes pedagogies of watery relations. The article traces the fluid, murky, surging, creative, unpredictable specificities of bodies of water that…

  6. Giardiasis in a patient undergoing chemotherapy for retinoblastoma and acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Sakaki-Nakatsubo, Hisano; Taneichi, Hiromichi; Nomura, Keiko; Miyawaki, Toshio; Tokoro, Masaharu; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2013-08-01

    Giardiasis is a common cause of diarrhea in undeveloped countries, but is very rare in developed countries. A patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and retinoblastoma presented with a high fever and severe watery diarrhea during induction chemotherapy. On microscopy, cysts were seen in her stool, suggesting Giardia intestinalis, which was confirmed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). G. intestinalis was also detected in the patient's asymptomatic parents, who may have transmitted it to the patient. Giardiasis should be tested for in patients with severe and persistent diarrhea during chemotherapy, when other etiologies have been excluded. PCR used to amplify the DNA of G. intestinalis is rapid and sensitive.

  7. [Lactose intolerance in hospitalized infants with acute diarrhea due to classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coil (EPEC)].

    PubMed

    Moreira, C R; Fagundes-Neto, U

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred and eleven hospitalized weaned infants with acute diarrhea, all under 12 months of age, were studied in order to evaluate the development of lactose intolerance and its association with age, nutritional status, birth weight, dehydration and enteropathogenic agents identified in fecal samples. After been rehydrated the infants received whole cow' milk assuring the intake of 100 kcal/kg per day. Lactose intolerance was defined according t the following criteria: 1) persistence of diarrhea associated with weight loss during 48 hours, 2) development of vomiting and/or abdominal distention associated with excretion of carbohydrate in feces and/or acids tools, 3) metabolic acidosis associated with abdominal distention at anytime of refeeding period. Lactose intolerance was detected in 52.1% (162/311) of the patients and it was significantly associated with age under 6 months (P < 0.01), birth weight under 3000 grams (P < 0.01), development of dehydration (P < 0.01) and with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) serotypes infection (P < 0.01).

  8. Acute Diarrhea in West African Children: Diverse Enteric Viruses and a Novel Parvovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tung G.; Vo, Nguyen P.; Bonkoungou, Isidore J. O.; Kapoor, Amit; Barro, Nicolas; O'Ryan, Miguel; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunling

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses cause a variety of mild to severe symptoms or asymptomatic infections in humans and animals. During a viral metagenomic analysis of feces from children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso, we identified in decreasing prevalence nucleic acids from anelloviruses, dependoviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses, bocaviruses, noroviruses, adenoviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, cosavirus, astroviruses, and hepatitis B virus. Sequences from a highly divergent parvovirus, provisionally called bufavirus, were also detected whose NS1 and VP1 proteins showed <39% and <31% identities to those of previously known parvoviruses. Four percent of the fecal samples were PCR positive for this new parvovirus, including a related bufavirus species showing only 72% identity in VP1. The high degree of genetic divergence of these related genomes from those of other parvoviruses indicates the presence of a proposed new Parvoviridae genus containing at least two species. Studies of the tropism and pathogenicity of these novel parvoviruses will be facilitated by the availability of their genome sequences. PMID:22855485

  9. Acute diarrhea in West African children: diverse enteric viruses and a novel parvovirus genus.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Vo, Nguyen P; Bonkoungou, Isidore J O; Kapoor, Amit; Barro, Nicolas; O'Ryan, Miguel; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunling; Delwart, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Parvoviruses cause a variety of mild to severe symptoms or asymptomatic infections in humans and animals. During a viral metagenomic analysis of feces from children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso, we identified in decreasing prevalence nucleic acids from anelloviruses, dependoviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses, bocaviruses, noroviruses, adenoviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, cosavirus, astroviruses, and hepatitis B virus. Sequences from a highly divergent parvovirus, provisionally called bufavirus, were also detected whose NS1 and VP1 proteins showed <39% and <31% identities to those of previously known parvoviruses. Four percent of the fecal samples were PCR positive for this new parvovirus, including a related bufavirus species showing only 72% identity in VP1. The high degree of genetic divergence of these related genomes from those of other parvoviruses indicates the presence of a proposed new Parvoviridae genus containing at least two species. Studies of the tropism and pathogenicity of these novel parvoviruses will be facilitated by the availability of their genome sequences.

  10. Does Measles Vaccination Reduce the Risk of Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) and Diarrhea in Children: A Multi-Country Study?

    PubMed Central

    Bawankule, Rahul; Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Kaushalendra; Shetye, Sadanand

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia and diarrhea occur either as complications or secondary infections in measles affected children. So, the integrated Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) by WHO and UNICEF includes measles vaccination as preventive measure in children. The objective of the study is to examine the effect of measles vaccination on Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) and diarrhea in children in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Methods We analyzed data from the most recent rounds of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in the selected countries. We included children age 12–59 months in the analysis. We used multivariable binary logistic regression to examine the effect of measles vaccination on ARI and diarrhea in children. We also estimated Vaccination Effectiveness (VE). Findings More than 60 percent of the children age 12–59 months were given measles vaccine before the survey in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine were less likely to suffer from ARI than unvaccinated children in India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine had a lower risk of diarrhea than those who did not receive it in all the selected countries except Ethiopia. Measles vaccination was associated with reduction in ARI cases by 15–30 percent in India and Pakistan, and diarrhea cases by 12–22 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Conclusion The receipt of the measles vaccine was associated with decrease in ARI and diarrhea in children. The immunization program must ensure that each child gets the recommended doses of measles vaccine at the appropriate age. The measles vaccination should be given more attention as a preventive intervention under the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) in all low and middle-income countries. PMID:28076428

  11. A Comprehensive Comparison of the Efficacy and Tolerability of Racecadotril with Other Treatments of Acute Diarrhea in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Wolfgang; Andresen, Viola; Eberlin, Marion; Mueck, Tobias; Layer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril is a guideline-recommended treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea. A systematic review of randomized studies was performed comparing efficacy and safety of treatment with racecadotril to that with placebo or active treatments in adults. In five double-blind studies, racecadotril and placebo had comparable tolerability, but racecadotril was more effective. This was consistent across multiple efficacy parameters including duration of diarrhea, number of diarrheic stools, abdominal pain, and meteorism; it was also consistent across countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. In six randomized studies in outpatients comparing racecadotril to loperamide, resolution of symptoms occurred with similar speed and efficacy; however, racecadotril treatment was associated with less rebound constipation and less abdominal discomfort. The seventh comparative study performed in geriatric nursing home residents reported a superior efficacy of racecadotril. In direct comparison with Saccharomyces boulardii treatment, racecadotril exhibited similar tolerability but was more efficacious. One study compared racecadotril to octreotide in patients with acute diarrhea requiring hospitalization, rehydration, and antibiotic treatment; in this cohort, octreotide was more efficacious than racecadotril. In conclusion, in adults with acute diarrhea, racecadotril is more efficacious than placebo or S. boulardii, similarly efficacious as loperamide and, in patients with moderate to severe disease as add-on to antibiotics, less than octreotide. The tolerability of racecadotril is similar to that of placebo or S. boulardii and better than that of loperamide, particularly with regard to risk of rebound constipation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that racecadotril is a suitable treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea in adults. PMID:27790616

  12. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  13. Incidences and Costs of Illness for Diarrhea and Acute Respiratory Infections for Children < 5 Years of Age in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Halder, Amal K; Luby, Stephen P; Akhter, Shamima; Ghosh, Probir K; Johnston, Richard B; Unicomb, Leanne

    2017-02-06

    Understanding illness costs associated with diarrhea and acute respiratory infections (ARI) could guide prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to determine incidence of childhood diarrhea and ARI and costs of homecare, hospitalization, and outpatient treatment by practitioner type in rural Bangladesh. From each of 100 randomly selected population clusters we sampled 17 households with at least one child < 5 years of age. Childhood diarrhea incidence was 3,451 and ARI incidence was 5,849/1,000 child-years. For diarrhea and ARI outpatient care per 1,000 child-years, parents spent more on unqualified ($2,361 and $4,822) than qualified health-care practitioners ($113 and $947). For outpatient care, visits to unqualified health-care practitioners were at least five times more common than visits to qualified practitioners. Costs for outpatient care treatment by unqualified health-care practitioners per episode of illness were similar to those for qualified health-care practitioners. Homecare costs ($0.16 and $0.24), as well as hospitalization costs per episode, were similar for diarrhea and ARI, respectively. On average, rural Bangladeshi households with children < 5 years of age spent 1.3% ($12 of $915) of their annual income managing diarrhea and ARI for those children. The majority of childhood illness management cost comprised visits to unqualified health-care practitioners. Policy makers should consider strategies to increase the skills of unqualified health-care practitioners, use community health workers to provide referral, and promote homecare for diarrhea and ARI. Incentives to motivate existing qualified physicians who are interested to work in rural Bangladesh could also be considered.

  14. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  15. Forecasting Non-Stationary Diarrhea, Acute Respiratory Infection, and Malaria Time-Series in Niono, Mali

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Daniel C.; Findley, Sally E.; Guindo, Boubacar; Doumbia, Seydou

    2007-01-01

    Background Much of the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, exhibits high levels of morbidity and mortality associated with diarrhea, acute respiratory infection, and malaria. With the increasing awareness that the aforementioned infectious diseases impose an enormous burden on developing countries, public health programs therein could benefit from parsimonious general-purpose forecasting methods to enhance infectious disease intervention. Unfortunately, these disease time-series often i) suffer from non-stationarity; ii) exhibit large inter-annual plus seasonal fluctuations; and, iii) require disease-specific tailoring of forecasting methods. Methodology/Principal Findings In this longitudinal retrospective (01/1996–06/2004) investigation, diarrhea, acute respiratory infection of the lower tract, and malaria consultation time-series are fitted with a general-purpose econometric method, namely the multiplicative Holt-Winters, to produce contemporaneous on-line forecasts for the district of Niono, Mali. This method accommodates seasonal, as well as inter-annual, fluctuations and produces reasonably accurate median 2- and 3-month horizon forecasts for these non-stationary time-series, i.e., 92% of the 24 time-series forecasts generated (2 forecast horizons, 3 diseases, and 4 age categories = 24 time-series forecasts) have mean absolute percentage errors circa 25%. Conclusions/Significance The multiplicative Holt-Winters forecasting method: i) performs well across diseases with dramatically distinct transmission modes and hence it is a strong general-purpose forecasting method candidate for non-stationary epidemiological time-series; ii) obliquely captures prior non-linear interactions between climate and the aforementioned disease dynamics thus, obviating the need for more complex disease-specific climate-based parametric forecasting methods in the district of Niono; furthermore, iii) readily decomposes time-series into seasonal components thereby

  16. Epidemiology and genetic diversity of group A rotavirus in acute diarrhea patients in pre-vaccination era in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunxian; Yin, Jianwen; Yang, Jinhui; Tian, Liguang; Li, Dandi; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Jiaxu; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Xiaonong

    2017-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is one of the leading cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, the RVA-related disease burden and the genotypes of RVA is important reference to introduce RVA variance to national immunisation programmes, 1,121 diarrhea cases and 319 healthy controls were recruited from four sentinel hospital outpatient from July 2014 to June 2015. The prevalence of RVA was 244 (21.8%) in gastroenteritis cases and in 12 (3.8%) in healthy controls across all age group (OR = 7.12, 95%CI = 3.93-12.89); the detection rate of RVA in diarrhea patients under 5 years was more higher than in diarrhea cases over 5 years (26.1%, 222/850; 8.1%, 22/271, respectively, P = 0.000). Of 244 RVA strains isolated from acute diarrhea cases, G9 (66.4%) was predominant G genotype, followed by G3 (18.7%), G1 (8.9%), and G1G3 (3.8%); P[8] was the overwhelming prevalence P genotype, followed by P[4] (4.7%); G9P[8] (54.9%) was most common G and P Combination, followed by G3P[8] (17.6%) and G1[8] (8.6%). The conclusion of the study was important to provide reference for introducing the RVA vaccine to prevent and control RVA-associated disease burden. J. Med. Virol. 89:71-78, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Accuracy of Inferior Vena Cava Ultrasound for Predicting Dehydration in Children with Acute Diarrhea in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Payal; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Nasrin, Sabiha; Guy, Allysia; Rege, Soham; Noble, Vicki E.; Alam, Nur H.; Levine, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although dehydration from diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five, existing methods of assessing dehydration status in children have limited accuracy. Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound measurement of the aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration in children. Methods A prospective cohort study of children under five years with acute diarrhea was conducted in the rehydration unit of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b). Ultrasound measurements of aorta-to-IVC ratio and dehydrated weight were obtained on patient arrival. Percent weight change was monitored during rehydration to classify children as having “some dehydration” with weight change 3–9% or “severe dehydration” with weight change > 9%. Logistic regression analysis and Receiver-Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy of aorta-to-IVC ratio as a predictor of dehydration severity. Results 850 children were enrolled, of which 771 were included in the final analysis. Aorta to IVC ratio was a significant predictor of the percent dehydration in children with acute diarrhea, with each 1-point increase in the aorta to IVC ratio predicting a 1.1% increase in the percent dehydration of the child. However, the area under the ROC curve (0.60), sensitivity (67%), and specificity (49%), for predicting severe dehydration were all poor. Conclusions Point-of-care ultrasound of the aorta-to-IVC ratio was statistically associated with volume status, but was not accurate enough to be used as an independent screening tool for dehydration in children under five years presenting with acute diarrhea in a resource-limited setting. PMID:26766306

  18. Reinfection of adult cattle with rotavirus B during repeated outbreaks of epidemic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Michiko; Murakami, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Yoshizumi; Takai, Hikaru; Ide, Hisahiro; Awang, Ainani; Suzuki, Tohru; Miyazaki, Ayako; Nagai, Makoto; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus B (RVB) infection in cattle is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological features of repeated outbreaks of epidemic diarrhea due to RVB infection in adult cattle on a large dairy farm complex in Japan. In October 2002, approximately 550 adult cows and approximately 450 in February 2005 had acute watery diarrhea at several farms on the complex. Four months before the first outbreak, RVB antibody-positive rates at subsequently affected farms were significantly lower than at non-affected farms (30% to 32% versus 61% to 67%). During the acute phase of both outbreaks, RVB antibody-positive rates in diarrheal cows tested were as low as 15% to 26%. Most of the farms affected in the second outbreak were also involved in the first outbreak. Some adult cows with RVB diarrhea in the first outbreak showed not only RVB seroresponse, but also RVB shedding in the second outbreak, although none of these cows developed diarrhea. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7 and VP4 genes revealed a close relationship between RVB strains in both outbreaks. Taken together, these results indicate that outbreaks of epidemic RVB diarrhea in adult cows might be influenced by herd immunity and could occur repeatedly at the same farms over several years. To our knowledge, this is the first report on repeated RVB infections in the same cattle.

  19. Reinfection of adult cattle with rotavirus B during repeated outbreaks of epidemic diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Michiko; Murakami, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Yoshizumi; Takai, Hikaru; Ide, Hisahiro; Awang, Ainani; Suzuki, Tohru; Miyazaki, Ayako; Nagai, Makoto; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus B (RVB) infection in cattle is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological features of repeated outbreaks of epidemic diarrhea due to RVB infection in adult cattle on a large dairy farm complex in Japan. In October 2002, approximately 550 adult cows and approximately 450 in February 2005 had acute watery diarrhea at several farms on the complex. Four months before the first outbreak, RVB antibody-positive rates at subsequently affected farms were significantly lower than at non-affected farms (30% to 32% versus 61% to 67%). During the acute phase of both outbreaks, RVB antibody-positive rates in diarrheal cows tested were as low as 15% to 26%. Most of the farms affected in the second outbreak were also involved in the first outbreak. Some adult cows with RVB diarrhea in the first outbreak showed not only RVB seroresponse, but also RVB shedding in the second outbreak, although none of these cows developed diarrhea. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7 and VP4 genes revealed a close relationship between RVB strains in both outbreaks. Taken together, these results indicate that outbreaks of epidemic RVB diarrhea in adult cows might be influenced by herd immunity and could occur repeatedly at the same farms over several years. To our knowledge, this is the first report on repeated RVB infections in the same cattle. PMID:27408331

  20. Rapid cessation of acute diarrhea using a novel solution of bioactive polyphenols: a randomized trial in Nicaraguan children

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Arthur; Patel, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Goal. We assessed the effectiveness of bioactive polyphenols contained in solution (LX) to restore normal bowel function in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. Background. While providing oral rehydration solution (ORS) is standard treatment for diarrhea in developing countries, plant-derived products have been shown to positively affect intestinal function. If a supplement to ORS resolves diarrhea more rapidly than ORS alone, it is an improvement to current care. Study. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study, 61 pediatric patients with uncontrolled diarrhea were randomized to receive either ORS + LX on day 1 and then ORS + water on day 2 (study arm) or ORS + water on day 1 and then ORS + LX on day 2 (control arm). Time to resolution and number of bowel movements were recorded. Results. On day 1, the mean time to diarrhea resolution was 3.1 h (study arm) versus 9.2 h (control arm) (p = 0.002). In the study arm, 60% of patients had normal stool at their first bowel movement after consumption of the phenolic redoxigen solution (LX). On day 2, patients in the study arm continued to have normal stool while patients in the control arm achieved normal stool within 24 h after consuming the test solution. Patients in the control arm experienced a reduction in the mean number of bowel movements from day 1 to day 2 after consuming the test solution (p = 0.0001). No adverse events were observed. Conclusions. Significant decreases in bowel movement frequency and rapid normalization of stool consistency were observed with consumption of this novel solution. PMID:26038724

  1. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  2. Importance of cholera and other etiologies of acute diarrhea in post-earthquake Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Charles, Macarthur; Delva, Glavdia G; Boutin, Jethro; Severe, Karine; Peck, Mireille; Mabou, Marie Marcelle; Wright, Peter F; Pape, Jean W

    2014-03-01

    We estimated the proportion of diarrhea attributable to cholera and other pathogens during the rainy and dry seasons in patients seen in two urban health settings: a cholera treatment center (CTC) and oral rehydration points (ORPs). During April 1, 2011-November 30, 2012, stool samples were collected from 1,206 of 10,845 patients who came to the GHESKIO CTC or to the community ORPs with acute diarrhea, cultured for Vibrio cholerae, and tested by multiplex polymerase reaction. Vibrio cholerae was isolated from 409 (41.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 38.7-44.9%) of the 979 specimens from the CTC and in 45 (19.8%, 95% CI = 14.8-25.6%) of the 227 specimens from the ORPs. Frequencies varied from 21.4% (95% CI = 16.6-26.7%) during the dry season to 46.8% (95% CI = 42.9-50.7%) in the rainy season. Shigella, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, rotavirus, and Cryptosporidium were frequent causes of diarrhea in children less than five years of age.

  3. Cost-benefit analysis of the probiotic treatment of children hospitalized for acute diarrhea in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phavichitr, Nopaorn; Puwdee, Praewpun; Tantibhaedhyangkul, Ruangvith

    2013-11-01

    We studied the cost-benefit of using probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum) in the treatment of 106 children hospitalized with acute diarrhea using a double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The median length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the probiotics group than in the controlled group (2 versus 3 days, p=0.049), but the median duration of diarrhea and direct medical costs were not significantly different (4 versus 5 days, p=0.068 and 4,418.75 versus 4,778.75 Thai Baht, p=0.342). Taking into consideration parental income loss, a non-significant lower expense was seen in the probiotics group (6,800.33 versus 7,970.92 Thai Baht, p=0.177). A greater cost-benefit with the probiotic treatment is probable, but was not statistically significant in this small study. In conclusion, the probiotics tested shortened the duration of hospitalization of children with diarrhea but the total expenses were not different.

  4. Rotavirus type A and other enteric pathogens in stool samples from children with acute diarrhea on the Colombian northern coast.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Delfina; Arzuza, Octavio; Young, Gregorio; Parra, Edgar; Castro, Raimundo; Puello, Marta

    2003-03-01

    The present study, conducted from March 1998 to July 2000, determined the etiology of acute diarrhea in 253 young children and infants from Cartagena and Sincelejo, Colombia. In 253 stool samples, the following enteric pathogens were recovered: rotavirus type A (36.6%) as the major agent, Salmonella spp (9.0%), Shigella spp (8.0%), enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli (6.0%), enteric hemorragic Esc. coli (2.8%), Providencia alcalifaciens (2.8%), Aeromonas hydrophila (2.0%), Yersinia enterocolitica (0.8%), Entamoeba hystolitica (10%), Giardia lamblia (4%), Endolimax nana (3.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides (2.8%), Ent. coli (1.2%), Balantidium coli (0.8%), Blastocystis hominis (0.8%), Dypilidium caninum (0.4%) and hook worm sp. (0.4%). Infection with more than one pathogen occurred in 96 (37.9%) patients. Rotavirus and enteric pathogenic Esc. coli were frequent. Concurrent infection by more than one parasite occurred in 18.6% of the infants. Most rotavirus infections (76.7%) occurred in infants under 12 months. Vomiting, severe dehydration and fever were frequent in children with rotavirus infection. At least one fecal marker of inflammatory diarrhea was registered in patients with bacterial infection. To our knowledge, this is first report of P. alcalifaciens associated with infantile diarrhea in Colombia and the first description of Esc. coli O157:H7 and Y. enterocolitica in our region.

  5. Importance of Cholera and Other Etiologies of Acute Diarrhea in Post-Earthquake Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Macarthur; Delva, Glavdia G.; Boutin, Jethro; Severe, Karine; Peck, Mireille; Mabou, Marie Marcelle; Wright, Peter F.; Pape, Jean W.

    2014-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of diarrhea attributable to cholera and other pathogens during the rainy and dry seasons in patients seen in two urban health settings: a cholera treatment center (CTC) and oral rehydration points (ORPs). During April 1, 2011–November 30, 2012, stool samples were collected from 1,206 of 10,845 patients who came to the GHESKIO CTC or to the community ORPs with acute diarrhea, cultured for Vibrio cholerae, and tested by multiplex polymerase reaction. Vibrio cholerae was isolated from 409 (41.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 38.7–44.9%) of the 979 specimens from the CTC and in 45 (19.8%, 95% CI = 14.8–25.6%) of the 227 specimens from the ORPs. Frequencies varied from 21.4% (95% CI = 16.6–26.7%) during the dry season to 46.8% (95% CI = 42.9–50.7%) in the rainy season. Shigella, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, rotavirus, and Cryptosporidium were frequent causes of diarrhea in children less than five years of age. PMID:24445205

  6. [Strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality caused by acute diarrhea in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1990-01-01

    Following the World Health Organization guidelines, the Latin American Diarrheal Disease Control Programs have directed its efforts towards the promotion of Oral Hydration Therapy (OHT) and appropriate dietary management during the diarrheal episode and convalescent period, aimed at diminishing the mortality secondary to diarrhea. In developing countries, OHT is preventing, annually, one million of childhood deaths due to dehydration. Yet, only one fourth of the total population of children suffering diarrhea are being treated with this therapy. Among the strategies to decrease diarrhea morbidity, breast-feeding and hand washing are top priorities. The fundamental strategy has been to promote educational programs to train health personnel and community members. To continue these actions, we suggested the creation of more secondary and tertiary level hospitals and the installation of community units of OHT. They should become self-sufficient and self-manageable and include other programs of primary health care, such as immunization, growth and development surveillance, family planning and pregnancy control.

  7. Detection and characterization of Human caliciviruses associated with sporadic acute diarrhea in adults in Djibouti (horn of Africa).

    PubMed

    Maslin, Jérôme; Nicand, Elisabeth; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Fouet, Christine; Kaplon, Jérôme; Haus, Rachel; Pothier, Pierre; Kohli, Evelyne

    2008-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have allowed us to recognize Human caliciviruses (HuCVs) as important agents of acute diarrhea in industrialized countries. Their prevalence and genetic diversity in developing countries remains unknown. We report on the characterization of HuCVs among adults presenting acute diarrheas in Djibouti; 108 stool samples collected were screened by EIA, RTPCR, or cell cultures for the group A Rotaviruses, Adenoviruses, Astroviruses, and HuCVs, which were further characterized by genotyping. Among stool samples screened for HuCVs, 25.3% were positive. The other enteric viruses were less prevalent. The 11 HuCV strains sequenced revealed a large diversity (3 sapoviruses and 8 noroviruses). GII strains noroviruses were predominant, five were newly described genotypes, and two were recombinant with a pol gene related to GGIIb strains with the particularity to associate a unique pol gene to different capsid genes. These results could help to the knowledge of HuCV infections in Tropical Africa.

  8. The Effect of Black Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze) on Pediatrics With Acute Nonbacterial Diarrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Doustfatemeh, Sareh; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Mohagheghzade, Abdolali; Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Torkamani, Zahra; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Farahangiz, Saman; Salehi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the antidiarrheal effect of black tea in pediatric patients with acute nonbacterial diarrhea. This single-blind randomized clinical trial study was performed on 2 to 12-year-old patients, with acceptable criteria for acute nonbacterial diarrhea in Shiraz, Iran. In total, 120 patients took part in this study. Blocked randomization method was used to allocate them into 2 groups of intervention (black tea tablet + standard treatment) and control group (standard treatment; 60 patients in each). Frequency of defecation, volume, and consistency of stool were registered on arrival and 24 hours later. We used χ(2) test, t test, and Mann-Whitney U test. After a 24-hour follow-up, the proportion of patients with formed stool was higher in the intervention group when compared with the control group (P < .001). There was a significant difference between the mean number of defecations per 24 hours in both groups, after treatment (P < .001). We found a possible antidiarrheal effect of black tea.

  9. A Multicenter, Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Additional Benefit of a Multistrain Synbiotic (Prodefen®) in the Clinical Management of Acute Viral Diarrhea in Children

    PubMed Central

    García-Menor, Emilia; García-Marín, Fátima; Vecino-López, Raquel; Horcajo-Martínez, Gloria; de Ibarrondo Guerrica-Echevarría, María-José; Gómez-González, Pedro; Velasco-Ortega, Syra; Suárez-Almarza, Javier; Nieto-Magro, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, open-label study evaluated the additional benefits of the synbiotic Prodefen® in the clinical management of acute diarrhea of suspected viral origin in children between 6 months and 12 years of age. Study outcomes included the duration of diarrhea, the recovery from diarrhea, and the tolerability and acceptance of the treatment. The proportion of patients without diarrhea over the study period was greater in the synbiotic group than in the control group at all study time points, showing a statistically significant difference on the fifth day (95% vs 79%, p < 0.001). The duration of diarrhea (median and interquartile range) was reduced by 1 day in the synbiotic-treated patients (3 [2-5] vs 4 [3-5], p = 0.377). The tolerability of the treatment regimen, as evaluated by the parents, was significantly better in those receiving the synbiotic than in the control group. Overall, 96% of the parents of children receiving the synbiotic reported being satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment regimen. The results of this study indicate that the addition of the synbiotic Prodefen® is a well-tolerated and well-accepted approach that provides an additional benefit to the standard supportive therapy in the management of acute viral diarrhea in children. PMID:28229091

  10. Prospective study on the overuse of blood test-guided antibiotics on patients with acute diarrhea in primary hospitals of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinghui; Tong, Xueke; Jin, Liyin; Ha, Minghao; Cao, Feng; Xu, Fengxia; Chi, Yongbin; Zhang, Denghai; Xu, Limin

    2017-01-01

    Background Overuse with antibiotics in the treatment of infectious diseases has become a central focus of public health over the years. The aim of this study was to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the blood test-guided antibiotic use on patients with acute diarrhea in primary hospitals of China. Materials and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 330 patients with acute diarrhea in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China, from March 2013 to February 2016. These patients were treated with or without antibiotics based on the results of their blood tests, including examinations of C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cells (WBC), and the percentage of neutrophils (Neu%). The infection types, which included bacterial, viral, and combination diarrhea, were determined by microbiological culture methods. Antibiotics used in non-bacterial diarrhea patients were considered misused and overused. Results There were significant overall differences in the clinical characteristics and blood tests between patients with diarrhea with a bacterial infection and patients with other types of infections. The patients were divided into four grading groups (0–3) according to the number of the positive results from three blood testes (CRP, WBC, and Neu%). The misuse rates of antibiotics in each group (0–3) were 81.3%, 71.1%, 72.4%, and 64.9%, respectively. Conclusion In this prospective study, the current diagnostic criteria (CRP, WBC, and Neu%) based on blood tests are not reliable in diagnosing bacterial diarrhea or guiding antibiotics use. To limit antibiotic overuse, a rapid and accurate differentiation of bacterial diarrhea from other types of diarrhea is pivotal. PMID:28352160

  11. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease.

  12. Acute renal replacement therapy in children with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: a single center 16 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Grisaru, Silviu; Morgunov, Melissa A; Samuel, Susan M; Midgley, Julian P; Wade, Andrew W; Tee, James B; Hamiwka, Lorraine A

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is becoming more prevalent among hospitalized children, its etiologies are shifting, and new treatment modalities are evolving; however, diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) remains the most common primary disease causing AKI in young children. Little has been published about acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT) and its challenges in this population. We describe our single center's experience managing 134 pediatric patients with D+HUS out of whom 58 (43%) required ARRT over the past 16 years. In our cohort, all but one patient were started on peritoneal dialysis (PD). Most patients, 47 (81%), received acute PD on a pediatric inpatient ward. The most common recorded complications in our cohort were peritoneal fluid leaks 13 (22%), peritonitis 11 (20%), and catheter malfunction 5 (9%). Nine patients (16%) needed surgical revision of their PD catheters. There were no bleeding events related to PD despite a mean platelets count of 40.9 (±23.5) × 10(3)/mm(3) and rare use of platelets infusions. Despite its methodological limitations, this paper adds to the limited body of evidence supporting the use of acute PD as the primary ARRT modality in children with D+HUS.

  13. Greater numbers of nucleotide substitutions are introduced into the genomic RNA of bovine viral diarrhea virus during acute infections of pregnant cattle than of non-pregnant cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains circulating in domestic livestock herds show significant sequence variation. Conventional wisdom states that most sequence variation arises during acute infections in response to immune or other environmental pressures. A recent study showed that more nucle...

  14. Clinical efficacy comparison of Saccharomyces boulardii and yogurt fluid in acute non-bloody diarrhea in children: a randomized, controlled, open label study.

    PubMed

    Eren, Makbule; Dinleyici, Ener C; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the clinical efficacy and cost/effectiveness of Saccharomyces boulardii compared with yogurt fluid (YF) in acute non-bloody diarrhea in children. This randomized, prospective open-label clinical trial includes 55 children (36 boys, 19 girls; mean age 21.2 +/- 28.2 months). Group A (N = 28) received lyophilized S. boulardii and group B (N = 27) received YF. The duration of diarrhea was shorter with S. boulardii but the hospital stay was reduced with YF, although these differences were not significant. However, diarrhea had resolved in significantly more children on day 3 in the S. boulardii group (48.5% versus 25.5%; P < 0.05). In outpatient cases, yogurt treatment was cheaper than S. boulardii whereas in hospitalized patients, treatment cost was similar. In conclusion, the effect of daily freshly prepared YF was comparable to S. boulardii in the treatment of acute non-bloody diarrhea in children. The duration of diarrhea was shorter in the S. boulardii group, expressed as a significantly higher number of patients with normal stools on day 3.

  15. Enteropathogens associated with acute diarrhea in community and hospital patients in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Oyofo, Buhari A; Subekti, Decy; Tjaniadi, Periska; Machpud, Nunung; Komalarini, S; Setiawan, B; Simanjuntak, C; Punjabi, Narain; Corwin, Andrew L; Wasfy, Momtaz; Campbell, James R; Lesmana, Murad

    2002-10-11

    The prevalence of bacteria, parasite and viral pathogens in 3875 patients with diarrhea in community and hospital settings from March 1997 through August 1999 in Jakarta, Indonesia was determined using routine bacteriology and molecular assay techniques. Bacterial pathogens isolated from hospital patients were, in decreasing frequency, Vibrio cholerae O1, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, while S. flexneri, V. cholerae O1, Salmonella spp. and C. jejuni were isolated from the community patients. V. cholerae O1 was isolated more frequently (P<0.005) from the hospital patients than the community patients. Overall, bacterial pathogens were isolated from 538 of 3875 (14%) enrolled cases of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli were detected in 218 (18%) of 1244 rectal swabs. A small percentage of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (1%) and of Clostridium difficile (1.3%) was detected. Parasitic examination of 389 samples resulted in 43 (11%) positives comprising Ascaris lumbricoides (1.5%), Blastocystis hominis (5.7%), Giardia lamblia (0.8%), Trichuris trichiura (2.1%) and Endolimax nana (0.5%). Rotavirus (37.5%), adenovirus (3.3%) and Norwalk-like virus (17.6%) were also detected. Antimicrobial resistance was observed among some isolates. Bacterial isolates were susceptible to quinolones, with the exception of some isolates of C. jejuni which were resistant to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and norfloxacin. Data obtained from this community- and hospital-based study will enable the Indonesian Ministry of Health to plan relevant studies on diarrheal diseases in the archipelago.

  16. Transmissible Gastroenteritis MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR DIARRHEA IN AN ACUTE VIRAL ENTERITIS IN PIGLETS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, D. G.; Gali, D. G.; Kelly, M. H.; Hamilton, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    We studied 3-wk-old piglets 40 h after experimental infection with transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus to identify the mechanisms of diarrhea in this disease and to better understand infectious diarrhea in humans. Using continuous segmental marker perfusion in four regions along the gut, we found significant increases in net intraluminal accumulation of water and electrolytes only in the proximal jejunum, the region infected by the virus. In this jejunal segment studied in vivo, unidirectional sodium flux, extracellular fluid (ECF) to lumen, significantly increased, lumen to ECF significantly decreased, compared with matchfed littermates. The standard perfusate rendered hypertonic by adding mannitol (450 mosmol/kg), in the same segment of normal pigs, caused only an increase in ECF to lumen flux of sodium. TGE did not alter gross villous structure or intraluminal bacteria, bile salts, lactate, pH, or osmolality. Epithelial cell migration was accelerated in the jejunum of infected pigs. Isolated in suspension, these cells from TGE pigs exhibited increased active and passive sodium efflux, cells from mannitol-perfused pigs exhibited only increased active sodium efflux. In this viral enteritis, altered sodium transport occurring in the jejunum, the region of the intestine infected appears to be associated with defective epithelial cell function. The precise nature of the abnormalities in sodium transport, their relationship to disturbances of transport of other solutes, and to virus epithelial cell interaction remain to be defined. Images PMID:4825228

  17. The Prevention and Control of Epidemics of Acute Undifferentiated Diarrhea of Beef Calves in Western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Radostits, O. M.; Acres, S. D.

    1980-01-01

    It is frequently evident that outbreaks of diarrhea occur in spite of apparent “good management” and “good calving conditions”. This observation underlies the fact that we still do not understand many of the epidemiological factors which contribute to calf diarrhea outbreaks. For example, we still lack biological criteria by which to judge the degree of crowding and the degree of stress. Nevertheless, application of the principles described above will prevent or decrease the severity of many annual epidemics. To be successful, a program of prevention and control should be discussed with producers long before the calving season, preferably during the preceding summer or fall. Implementation of a complete program may take several calving seasons and producers should be made aware that prevention by improved management is an on-going, evolutionary process. More and improved vaccines are becoming available; however, as is the case with most biologicals, their impact cannot be determined until after they have been used for several years. They should be recognized as only one of several managent tools at the disposal of the veterinarian and livestock producer. PMID:7438007

  18. Immune response of children who develop persistent diarrhea following rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Azim, T; Ahmad, S M; Sefat-E-Khuda; Sarker, M S; Unicomb, L E; De, S; Hamadani, J D; Salam, M A; Wahed, M A; Albert, M J

    1999-09-01

    A prospective study was conducted with Bangladeshi children with rotavirus (RV) diarrhea to assess whether nutritional and clinical parameters, RV serotypes, levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and RV-specific antibody titers in plasma and stool were associated with the development of persistent diarrhea. Children with watery diarrhea for 6 to 8 days, selected from the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), were enrolled in the study and monitored until diarrhea improved. Children were classified as having acute diarrhea (AD) if diarrhea resolved within 14 days of onset and as having persistent diarrhea (PD) if diarrhea persisted for more than 14 days after onset. Uninfected, control children (n = 13) from the Nutrition Follow-Up Unit of ICDDR,B were also enrolled. Of the 149 children with diarrhea enrolled, 29 had diarrhea with RV alone, of which 19 had AD and 10 developed PD. Samples of stool and blood were collected from all children on enrollment. Stool samples were collected again from children when they developed PD. Of the 10 children who had an initial RV infection and then developed PD, only one had persistent RV infection. Plasma levels of IL-10 and TNF-alpha were higher in children with diarrhea compared to uninfected controls but were similar in children with AD and PD. Plasma IFN-gamma levels were higher in children who developed PD than in those with AD (P = 0.008) or uninfected controls (P = 0.001). In stools, the levels of TNF-alpha, the only cytokine detected, were similar in the three groups of children. RV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers in plasma were higher in uninfected children than in those with AD (P < 0.001) or PD (P = 0.024) but titers were similar in children with AD and PD. RV-specific IgA titers in plasma and stool were similar in the three groups of children. From all observed parameters, only

  19. Gastro 2013 APDW/WCOG Shanghai working party report: chronic diarrhea: definition, classification, diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Lawrence R; Pardi, Darrell S; Spiller, Robin; Semrad, Carol E; Surawicz, Christina M; Giannella, Ralph A; Krejs, Guenter J; Farthing, Michael J G; Sellin, Joseph H

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is best defined as passage of loose stools often with more frequent bowel movements. For clinical purposes, the Bristol Stool Form Scale works well to distinguish stool form and to identify loose stools. Laboratory testing of stool consistency has lagged behind. Acute diarrhea is likely to be due to infection and to be self-limited. As diarrhea becomes chronic, it is less likely to be due to infection; duration of 1 month seems to work well as a cut-off for chronic diarrhea, but detailed scientific knowledge is missing about the utility of this definition. In addition to duration of diarrhea, classifications by presenting scenario, by pathophysiology, and by stool characteristics (e.g. watery, fatty, or inflammatory) may help the canny clinician refine the differential diagnosis of chronic diarrhea. In this regard, a careful history remains the essential part of the evaluation of a patient with diarrhea. Imaging the intestine with endoscopy and radiographic techniques is useful, and biopsy of the small intestine and colon for histological assessment provides key diagnostic information. Endomicroscopy and molecular pathology are only now being explored for the diagnosis of chronic diarrhea. Interest in the microbiome of the gut is increasing; aside from a handful of well-described infections because of pathogens, little is known about alterations in the microbiome in chronic diarrhea. Serological tests have well-defined roles in the diagnosis of celiac disease but have less clearly defined application in autoimmune enteropathies and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of peptide hormones is of value in the diagnosis and management of endocrine tumors causing diarrhea, but these are so rare that these tests are of little value in screening because there will be many more false-positives than true-positive results. Chemical analysis of stools is of use in classifying chronic diarrhea and may limit the differential diagnosis that must be considered, but

  20. The gene for congenital chloride diarrhea maps close to but is distinct from the gene for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J.; de la Chapelle, A.; Holmberg, C. ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki )

    1993-11-15

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is characterized by watery stools with high chloride content beginning prenatally and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Perfusion studies have established a basic defect in ileal and colonic Cl[sup [minus

  1. Prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea: a clinical pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Rampal, P

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea represents a major health problem for travelers to developing countries. Although the syndrome is usually self-limited and recovery occurs in the majority of cases without any specific form of therapy, there is a need for safe and effective ways of preventing and treating it. Since the syndrome is most often caused by an infection acquired by ingesting fecally contaminated food or beverages, precautions regarding dietary habits remain the cornerstone of prophylaxis, but dietary self-restrictions do not always translate to reduced rates of diarrheal illness. Administration of probiotics (e.g. lactobacilli or Saccharomyces boulardii) and immunoprophylaxis with the newer oral cholera vaccines have been tried with promising results. Antimicrobials remain, however, the most successful form of prophylaxis, being effective in up to 90% of travelers. For those with impaired health who will take prophylaxis, systemic agents with proved efficacy should be recommended. For other otherwise healthy persons, poorly absorbed agents are preferable in order to avoid the serious, albeit rare, toxicity of systemic drugs. The key factor in the management of acute watery traveler's diarrhea, particularly in infants and young children, is the restoration of water and electrolyte balance. This does not reduce the duration of the illness but will limit dehydration and prevent acidosis. Many patients will require no additional therapy, whereas some will need pharmacologic treatment to shorten the duration of diarrhea or to relieve the accompanying symptoms, like abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. A typical 3- to 5-day illness can be reduced to approximately 1 day by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) combination. Some other systemic antimicrobials have been successfully used but, during the last few years, the 4-fluoroquinolone drugs have received considerable attention and have been shown to be highly effective in reducing the duration of traveler's diarrhea. These

  2. IBS Patients Show Frequent Fluctuations between Loose/Watery and Hard/Lumpy Stools: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Olafur S.; Baggish, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Marsha J.; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine how variable stool consistency is in patients with irritable bowel (IBS) and assess the relationship between stool consistency and gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods Individuals with a physician diagnosis of IBS were recruited by advertisement. Enrollment questionnaires included the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire and IBS Symptom Severity Scale. Then 185 patients meeting Rome criteria for IBS rated the consistency (using the Bristol Stool Scale) of each bowel movement (BM) for 90 days and whether the BM was accompanied by pain, urgency, or soiling. Each night they transferred BM ratings from a paper diary to an internet form and also reported the average daily intensity of abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit dissatisfaction, and life interference of bowel symptoms. Only the longest sequence of consecutive days of diary data was used in analysis (average of 73 days). Results Patients were 89% female with average age 36.6 years. 78% had both loose/watery and hard/lumpy stools; the average was 3 fluctuations between these extremes per month. The proportion of loose/watery stools correlated r=.78 between the first and second months and the proportion of hard/lumpy stools correlated r=.85 between months. Loose/watery stools were associated with more BM-related pain, urgency, and soiling than hard/lumpy or normal stools; however, IBS-C patients had significantly more BM-unrelated abdominal pain, bloating, dissatisfaction with bowel habits, and life interference than IBS-D. Questionnaires overestimated the frequency of abnormal stool consistency and gastrointestinal symptoms compared to diaries. Conclusions Stool consistency varies greatly within individuals. However, stool patterns are stable within an individual from month to month. The paradoxical findings of greater symptom severity after individual loose/watery BMs vs. greater overall symptom severity in IBS-C implies different physiological mechanisms for symptoms in constipation compared to

  3. [Effects of nifuroxazide (Ercefuryl), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and bactisubtil in acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bulbulović-Telalbasić, S

    1991-01-01

    The clinical effects of Nifuroxasid (N), Trimetoprim sulphametoxasol (TS) and Bactisubtil (B) on bacillar dysentery and alimentary toxicoinfections in the patients treated at the Clinic from January 1984 to the end of December 1989 have been analysed. According to the clinical signs, patients have been divided in ten categories of light, mild and heavy forms. In total, 329 cases of bacillar dysentery and 89 cases of alimentary toxicoinfections have been analysed. The following was established: A. Bacilar dysentery: the fastest normalization of the stool was achieved with N in every clinical form (averages 2.2, 3.5 and 4.05 days). With TS the effects were slower (3.0, 3.9 and 4.4 days), but the slowest normalization was recorded with B (3.4, 4.6 and 5.4 days). However, with TS, some Shigella strains showed resistance (in 23 out of 94 antibiograms), which diminished the effects. B. Alimentary toxicoinfections were treated only with N and B, since these forms of diarrhea caused by toxigenic factors were milder. Better results were achieved with N in this case as well.

  4. Short-term effect of prebiotics administration on stool characteristics and serum cytokines dynamics in very young children with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Nachum; Press, Josef; Leibovitz, Eugene; Boehm, Güenther; Barak, Vivian

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effect of a mixture of long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and acidic oligosaccharides on the number and consistency of stools and on immune system biomarkers in 104 supplemented and non-supplemented subjects (aged 9-24 months) with acute diarrhea. Interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and sIL-2R cytokine levels were determined. The significant decrease in number of stools and increase in stool consistency in the supplemented group was of little clinical relevance. The only significant change in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines was decreased TNF-α levels in the supplemented group. Prebiotic supplementation during acute diarrhea episodes did not influence the clinical course.

  5. [Effect of a new amino acid solution in the oral hydration of nursing infants with acute diarrhea. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Jones, L; Mota-Hernández, F

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two one- to 12-month-old male infants with diarrheal dehydration treated with either the oral rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), or the same solution modified by the addition of glycerine (60 mmol/L) and glycil-glycine (30 mmol/L), with a total osmolality of 379 mOsm/kg. The patients belonging to the latter group exhibited greater stool losses (10.3 +/- 8.3 vs 8.0 +/- 6.4 mL/kg/hour) and a greater urine volume (10.4 +/- 14.2 vs 4.6 +/- 4.0 mL/kg/6 hours), during the first four to six hours of the rehydration period. The results of this study show, that in contrast with those of other series, the addition of glycine and glycil-glycine to the WHO solution, at the concentrations used in the study, produces greater fecal water losses in children with dehydration due to acute diarrhea.

  6. Isolation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from a South American Camelid (Lama guanicoe) with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, E. C.; Rodríguez, S. M.; Elizondo, A. M.; Marcoppido, G.; Parreño, V.

    2004-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli belonging to serotype O26:H11 was isolated from a 2-month-old guanaco with severe watery diarrhea. E. coli colonies carried the stx1 and eae genes, showed localized adherence to HEp-2 cells, and produced enterohemolysin. A serological response to lipopolysaccharide O26 was observed at the onset of diarrhea. PMID:15472347

  7. Predicting Grade 3 Acute Diarrhea During Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer Using a Cutoff-Dose Logistic Regression Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Understanding the dose-volume relationship of small bowel irradiation and severe acute diarrhea may help reduce the incidence of this side effect during adjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated curatively for rectal cancer were reviewed, and the maximum grade of acute diarrhea was determined. The small bowel was outlined on the treatment planning CT scan, and a dose-volume histogram was calculated for the initial pelvic treatment (45 Gy). Logistic regression models were fitted for varying cutoff-dose levels from 5 to 45 Gy in 5-Gy increments. The model with the highest LogLikelihood was used to develop a cutoff-dose normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Results: There were a total of 152 patients (48% preoperative, 47% postoperative, 5% other), predominantly treated prone (95%) with a three-field technique (94%) and a protracted venous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (78%). Acute Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 21%. The largest LogLikelihood was found for the cutoff-dose logistic regression model with 15 Gy as the cutoff-dose, although the models for 20 Gy and 25 Gy had similar significance. According to this model, highly significant correlations (p <0.001) between small bowel volumes receiving at least 15 Gy and toxicity exist in the considered patient population. Similar findings applied to both the preoperatively (p = 0.001) and postoperatively irradiated groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea was significantly correlated with the volume of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy using a cutoff-dose NTCP model.

  8. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  9. Comparison between children treated at home and those requiring hospital admission for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens associated with acute diarrhea in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Pitson, G A; Grimwood, K; Coulson, B S; Oberklaid, F; Hewstone, A S; Jack, I; Bishop, R F; Barnes, G L

    1986-01-01

    The etiology of acute diarrhea in children less than 42 months of age attending one pediatric hospital in Melbourne, Australia, was studied during a 7-month period encompassing the winter of 1984. Pathogens identified in 157 children treated as outpatients with mild disease were compared with those in 232 children hospitalized with severe disease. The pathogens (and frequencies among outpatients and inpatients, respectively) detected were rotaviruses (32.5 and 50.9%), enteric adenoviruses (8.9 and 7.4%), Campylobacter jejuni (7.2 and 1.3%), and Salmonella sp. (4.0 and 1.7%). Electropherotypes of rotavirus strains from outpatients and inpatients were compared. Two strains predominated during the 7 months of this study and were observed with equal frequency from outpatients and inpatients. Rotaviruses of the same electropherotype caused a wide spectrum of disease, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe, life-threatening diarrhea. The similarity of etiological agents identified from children with mild and severe forms of acute diarrhea suggests that the etiology of community enteric illness can be reasonably inferred from the etiology of inpatient disease in children in the same geographic area. During the winter epidemic period, the severity of symptoms associated with rotavirus infection in young children is likely to be determined by the inherent susceptibility of the host rather than by genetic differences in the strains of infecting rotaviruses. Images PMID:3020082

  10. Simultaneous investigation of influenza and enteric viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting in general practice for acute diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms are not an uncommon manifestation of an influenza virus infection. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the presence of influenza viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting their general practitioner for uncomplicated acute diarrhea (AD) and the proportion of concurrent infections by enteric and influenza viruses. Method A case-control study was conducted from December 2010 to April 2011. Stool specimens were collected and tested for influenza viruses A (seasonal A/H3N2 and pandemic A/H1N1) and B, and for four enteric viruses (astrovirus, group A rotavirus, human enteric adenovirus, norovirus of genogroups I – NoVGI - and genogroup II - NoVGII). Results General practitioners enrolled 138 cases and 93 controls. Of the 138 stool specimens collected, 92 (66.7%) were positive for at least one of the four enteric viruses analysed and 10 (7.2%) tested positive for one influenza virus. None of these 10 influenza positive patients reported respiratory symptoms. In five influenza-positive patients (3.6%), we also detected one enteric virus, with 4 of them being positive for influenza B (2 had co-detection with NoVGI, 1 with NoVGII, and 1 with astrovirus). None of the 93 controls tested positive for one of the enteric and/or other influenza viruses we investigated. Conclusions In this study we showed that the simultaneous detection of influenza and enteric viruses is not a rare event. We have also reported, for the first time in general practice, the presence of seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses in the stools of adult patients consulting for uncomplicated AD. A simultaneous investigation of enteric and influenza viruses in patients complaining of gastrointestinal symptoms could be useful for future studies to better identify the agents responsible for AD. PMID:22709374

  11. High-Risk Enteric Pathogens Associated with HIV-Infection and HIV-Exposure in Kenyan Children with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    PAVLINAC, PB; JOHN-STEWART, GC; NAULIKHA, JM; ONCHIRI, FM; DENNO, DM; ODUNDO, EA; SINGA, BO; RICHARDSON, BA; WALSON, JL

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-infection is an established risk for diarrheal severity, less is known about specific enteric pathogens associated with HIV status. We determined associations of selected enteric pathogens with HIV-infection and HIV-exposure among Kenyan children. Design Cross-sectional study among 6 months to 15 year olds presenting to two Western Kenya District hospitals with acute diarrhea between 2011–2013. Methods Stool was tested using standard bacterial culture and microscopy for ova and parasites. HIV testing was obtained on children and mothers. Enteric pathogen prevalence was compared between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children and between HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and HIV-unexposed. Unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) for selected pathogens by HIV-status were estimated using relative risk (RR) regression and P-values. Age, site, income, household crowding, water source/treatment, anthropometrics, cotrimoxazole use, and breastfeeding history were accounted for in multivariable models. Results Among 1,076 children, median age was 22 months (interquartile range: 11–42), 56 (5.2%) were HIV-infected, and 10.3%(105/1020) of HIV-uninfected children were HIV-exposed. The following organisms were most frequently isolated from stool: enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (13.3%), Giardia spp. (11.1%) Campylobacter (6.3%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (6.1%) and Cryptosporidium spp. (3.7%). Accounting for age, HIV-infection was associated with EPEC infection (PR: 3.70, P=0.002) while HIV-exposure was associated with Cryptosporidium among HIV-uninfected children (PR: 2.81, P=0.005). Conclusion EPEC and Cryptosporidium infections were more common in HIV-infected and HIV-exposed children, respectively. This could explain the increased mortality attributed to these pathogens in other studies. Interventions targeting EPEC and Cryptosporidium may reduce morbidity and mortality in high HIV-prevalence settings. PMID:25028987

  12. [Monitoring and research on pathogen spectrum in patients with acute diarrhea from sentinel hospital of Zhejiang Province during 2009 to 2014].

    PubMed

    Zheng, S F; Yu, F; Chen, X; Cui, D W; Yang, X Z; Xie, G L; Wang, Y Y; Yu, J X; Li, Z J; Chen, Y

    2016-12-06

    Objective: To explore pathogen spectrum constitution of acute diarrhea in outpatient and emergency of Zhejiang Province, and provide basis for treatment, prevention and control of the disease. Methods: During January 2009 to December 2014, we selected seven sentinel hospitals in different regions of Zhejiang, monitored and researched on pathogen spectrum in patients with acute diarrhea from outpatient and emergency. We recorded patients' personal basic information, the main symptoms and signs, and collected stool samples (5 g). Eight kinds of bacteria (Vibrio cholerae, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Diarrheagenic E. coli, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterocolitica and Plesiomonas shigelloides) and five kinds of viruses (Rotavirus, Norovirus, Sappovirus, Astrovirus and Adenovirus) were detected. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact probability method were used to compare different characteristics of patients with single bacterial infection, single virus infection and multiple infection (bacteria-bacteria, bacteria-viruses, virus-virus). Results: During 2009 to 2014, 9 364 fecal samples from acute diarrhea patients were collected and tested, among which 3 500 cases were tested positive, with total positive rate of 37.38%. Positive rates of bacteria and viruses were 13.14% (1 230 cases) and 20.75% (1 943 cases), respectively. Mixed infection positive rate of multiple pathogens was 3.49% (327 cases). Positive rate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (5.96% , 558 cases) was the highest among bacterial pathogens, followed by pathogenic Escherichia coli (3.86%, 361 cases). Viruses were mainly Norovirus (10.73%, 1 005 cases) and rotavirus (8.35%, 782 cases). A big difference existed in diarrheogenic pathogen spectrum between patients less than 15 years old and patients equal or older than 15 years old. Pathogens for patients less than 15 years old were mainly virus, with the positive rate of 32.69% (1 014 cases). However, the positive rate of bacteria was

  13. Diarrhea (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drinking water contaminated with organisms like bacteria and parasites. Medications can also cause diarrhea, especially antibiotics, laxatives containing magnesium, and chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

  14. G2 rotavirus within an emergent VP7 evolutionary lineage circulating in children with acute diarrhea in Guangxi Province of China, 2014.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui Jin; Qian, Yuan; Zhang, You; Zhao, Lin Qing; Zhu, Ru Nan; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhao Jun; Li, Rong Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Routine surveillance revealed that the prevalence of P[4] rotaviruses circulating in children with acute diarrhea in Guangxi Province, China, increased in 2014. However, VP7 genotyping for these P[4] rotaviruses was unsuccessful. Exhaustive database searching and sequence analysis indicated that the G genotype of these P[4] rotaviruses was G2, and the VP7 genes clustered with recently emerging G2 strains in several countries within an emergent evolutionary lineage that was distinct from the previously designated lineages I-IV as well as lineage V including porcine rotaviruses. Further studies are essential to monitor the potential global spread of this emerging G2 rotavirus.

  15. Prevalence of malnutrition, diarrhea, and acute respiratory infections among under-five children of Sugali tribe of Chittoor district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Venkatashiva B.; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.; Pandav, Chandrakant S.; Goswami, Anil Kumar; Krishnan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over a period, tribal population has migrated to cities in search of livelihood. Data on various health problems of the tribes are sparse. Sugalis constitute the third largest tribe in Andhra Pradesh and have settlements in urban areas. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of malnutrition, diarrhea, and acute respiratory infections (ARI) among under-five children of Sugali tribe living in Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh state in South India. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in four community blocks/mandals in 2012. A total of 500 Sugali households with under-five were identified. Demographic details, episodes of diarrhea, and ARI among under-five children and treatment/care seeking behavior were collected from mothers/care givers by interview. Nutritional status was assessed using new WHO standards. Results: Of the total 669 children in these 500 households, 343 (51.3%) were girls and 326 (48.7%) were boys. In the last 1 month, 21.4% (18.4-24.6) reported diarrhea and 51.6% (47.7-55.3) reported ARI. The prevalence of underweight, wasting, and stunting among under-five children was 32.7% (29.1-36.4), 18.3% (15.3-21.4), and 38.3% (34.2-41.9), respectively. Majority (70%) sought treatment for illness in modern system of medicine and only few continued with the practice of herbs and traditional medicine. Discussion: Despite living in urban area, the tribal children had high prevalence of malnutrition, diarrhea, and ARI, though lower compared to other tribes in India possibly due to improved access to health care services. Efforts need to be strengthened for social inclusion of tribes into mainstream. PMID:27433066

  16. Simultaneous weekly supplementation of iron and zinc is associated with lower morbidity due to diarrhea and acute lower respiratory infection in Bangladeshi infants.

    PubMed

    Baqui, Abdullah H; Zaman, K; Persson, Lars Ake; El Arifeen, Shams; Yunus, Mohammad; Begum, Nazma; Black, Robert E

    2003-12-01

    Given the high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies and infectious diseases in infants in developing countries, an evaluation of the efficacy of different micronutrient formulations on infant morbidity is a priority. The efficacy of weekly supplementation of four different micronutrient formulations on diarrhea and acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) morbidity was evaluated in Bangladeshi infants. In a double-blind, randomized, controlled community trial, 799 infants aged 6 mo were randomly assigned to one of the following 5 groups: 1) 20 mg elemental iron with 1 mg riboflavin, 2) 20 mg elemental zinc with 1 mg riboflavin, 3) 20 mg iron and 20 mg zinc with 1 mg riboflavin, 4) a micronutrient mix (MM) containing 20 mg iron, 20 mg zinc, 1 mg riboflavin along with other minerals and vitamins and 5) a control treatment, 1 mg riboflavin only. Health workers visited each infant weekly until age 12 mo to feed the supplement and to collect data on diarrhea and ALRI morbidity. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and serum zinc levels of a sample of infants were measured at 6 and 12 mo. Compared with the control group, at 12 mo, serum ferritin levels were higher in the iron + zinc group, and serum zinc levels were higher in the zinc and iron + zinc groups. Simultaneous supplementation with iron + zinc was associated with lower risk of severe diarrhea, 19% lower in all infants and 30% lower in less well-nourished infants with weight-for-age Z-score below -1. Iron + zinc supplementation was also associated with 40% lower risk of severe ALRI in less well-nourished infants. MM supplementation was associated with a 15% higher risk of diarrhea in all infants and 22% higher risk in less well-nourished infants. Intermittent simultaneous supplementation with iron + zinc seems promising; it will be useful to determine whether higher doses would provide greater benefits.

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strains JSLS-1/2015 and JS-2/2015 Isolated from China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Li, Benqiang; Zhang, Chunling; Liu, Huili

    2016-11-10

    Two porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strains, JSLS-1/2015 and JS-2/2015, were isolated from piglets with watery diarrhea in South China. Two genomic sequences were highly homologous to the attenuated DR13 strain. Furthermore, JSLS-1/2015 contains a 24-amino-acid deletion in open reading frame 1b, which was first reported in PEDV isolates.

  18. Toddler's Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... better on their own by school age. What Causes Toddler’s Diarrhea? The cause isn’t exactly known but intestinal ... laxatives if enough is consumed. What else can cause this diarrhea? After discussion of the symptoms and a physical ...

  19. Cholestyramine improves tropical-related diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Balagani, Rajesh; Wills, Brandon; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2006-01-01

    Patients exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria develop an illness characterized by secretory diarrhea, conjunctival irritation, skin lesions, and varying degrees of neurologic manifestations. The anion-exchange resin, cholestyramine has been reported in one small case series to be an effective treatment of severe diarrhea associated with Pfiesteria intoxication. A 54-year-old man traveled to the Dominican Republic where he went swimming in what he describes as "dirty ocean water". Within an hour, he noted a generalized burning and itching of his skin. Later on, he noted pruritic vesicular skin lesions, intense frontal headache, and conjunctivitis. A few days later, he complained of abdominal cramping, nausea, and hourly episodes of watery, non-bloody diarrhea. Due to the constellation of symptoms, Pfiesteria intoxication was suspected. On arrival in the United States, he sought medical care for continued symptoms. Physical examination was remarkable for conjunctival injection, linear vesicular lesions (5 cm in length) over his right ankle and left orbit as well as erythema over foreskin of his penis. Mental status and memory were normal. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated serum creatinine, which eventually normalized, and stool studies were negative for leukocytes, blood, and enteric pathogens. Intense diarrhea persisted until he was started on cholestyramine (4 g PO tid). The diarrhea resolved within 2 hours of starting treatment. The headache was initially treated with narcotic agents but only resolved with IV diphenhydramine (25 mg q 4 h). Cholestyramine and diphenhydramine appear to be effective therapeutic agents for tropical-related diarrhea and headache, respectively.

  20. Appropriate Management of Acute Diarrhea in Children Among Public and Private Providers in Gujarat, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christa L Fischer; Taneja, Sunita; LeFevre, Amnesty; Black, Robert E; Mazumder, Sarmila

    2015-05-07

    Diarrhea remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. In 2006, the Indian government formally endorsed the World Health Organization guidelines that introduced zinc supplementation and low-osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) for the treatment of diarrhea. Despite this, zinc is rarely prescribed and has not been available in the public sector in India until very recently. The Diarrhea Alleviation Through Zinc and ORS Treatment (DAZT) project was implemented in Gujarat between 2011 and 2013 to accelerate the uptake of zinc and ORS among public and private providers in 6 rural districts. As part of an external evaluation of DAZT, we interviewed 619 randomly selected facility- and community-based public and private providers 2-3 months after a 1-day training event had been completed (or, in the case of private providers, after at least 1 drug-detailing visit by a pharmaceutical representative had occurred) and supplies were in place. The purpose of the interviews was to assess providers' knowledge of appropriate treatment for diarrhea in children, reported treatment practices, and availability of drugs in stock. More than 80% of all providers interviewed reported they had received training or a drug-detailing visit on diarrheal treatment in the past 6 months. Most providers in all cadres (range, 68% to 100%) correctly described how to prepare ORS and nearly all (range, 90% to 100%) reported routinely prescribing it to treat diarrhea in children. Reported routine prescription of zinc was lower, ranging from 62% among private providers to 96% among auxiliary nurse-midwives. Among providers who reported ever not recommending zinc (n = 242), the 2 most frequently reported reasons for not doing so were not completely understanding zinc for diarrhea treatment and not having zinc in stock at the time of contact with the patient. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, recent training or

  1. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  2. Diarrhea among children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nataro, James P

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea continues to stand among the most important causes of global morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Although the introduction of oral rehydration and other case-management strategies have reduced acute diarrhea fatalities, many of the survivors develop persistent diarrhea and/or deficiencies of growth and cognition. Thus understanding the true global burden of diarrhea requires attention to acute diarrhea as well is its sequelae. To understand the etiology of moderate to severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia we performed a comprehensive case-control study of children under 5 years of age at seven sites. Each site employed an identical case-control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. Results of the studies will inform diarrhea prevention and management efforts worldwide.

  3. Infectious diarrhea: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon; Surawicz, Christina M

    2014-08-01

    Diarrheal disease, which is most often caused by infectious pathogens, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children. This is particularly true in developing countries. Recent outbreaks of infectious diarrhea in developed countries, including the USA, are often attributed to food handling and distribution practices and highlight the need for continued vigilance in this area. Another common cause of infectious diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), has historically been associated with the use of antibiotics and exposure to a health-care setting but is now increasingly common in the community in persons who lack the typical risk factors. Recent scientific advances have also led to new and proposed new therapies for infectious diarrhea, including fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI), probiotics for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and CDI, and the use of zinc supplementation in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Other therapies that have been in use for decades, such as the oral rehydration solution (ORS), continue to be the targets of scientific advancement in an effort to improve delivery and efficacy. Finally, post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is an increasingly recognized occurrence. Attempts to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon are underway and may provide insight into potential treatment options.

  4. Functional diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a frequent and challenging problem in clinical medicine. In a considerable subgroup of these, no underlying cause is identified and this is referred to as functional diarrhea. A consensus definition for functional diarrhea is based on loose stool consistency and chronicity and absence of coexisting irritable bowel syndrome. Underlying pathophysiology includes rapid intestinal transit, which may be worsened by stress or be triggered by a preceding infectious gastroenteritis. Diagnostic work-up aims at exclusion of underlying organic disease. Treatment starts with dietary adjustments, aiming at decreasing nutrients that enhance transit and stool and at identifying precipitating food items.

  5. VP4 and VP7 Genotyping by Reverse Transcription-PCR of Human Rotavirus in Mexican Children with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Castillo, Araceli; Villa, Andrés Velasco; Ramírez González, José Ernesto; Mayén Pimentel, Elvira; Melo Munguía, Martín; Díaz de Jesús, Benita; Olivera Díaz, Hiram; García Lozano, Herlinda

    2000-01-01

    Dual typing (VP4 and VP7) of rotavirus obtained from 257 Mexican children during three epidemiological seasons was performed by reverse transcription-PCR. The P1G1 genotype was the most prevalent (40%), followed by P1G3 (19%) and P2G2 (16%). Thirty-one specimens (12%) presented mixed infections, while some genotypes were not found. This is the first dual typing of isolates from diarrhea cases in Mexico. PMID:11015426

  6. Clinical characteristics of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized Romanian infants.

    PubMed

    Lesanu, Gabriela; Becheanu, Cristina Adriana; Vlad, Raluca Maria; Pacurar, Daniela; Tincu, Iulia Florentina; Smadeanu, Roxana Elena

    2013-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of rotavirus enteritis were evaluated by comparison with acute diarrhea of other etiologies. We reviewed the medical records of children (aged 0-12 months) admitted with acute diarrhea in our hospital between January and December 2011. Of the 839 patients, 49.3% had rotavirus diarrhea. The incidence of severe disease was significantly higher for rotavirus diarrhea (65.2%, P < 0.01) than for other types of diarrheal disease.

  7. Diarrhea in infants

    MedlinePlus

    When your infant has diarrhea; When your baby has diarrhea; BRAT diet; Diarrhea in children ... Children who have diarrhea may have less energy, dry eyes, or a dry, sticky mouth. They may also not wet their diaper as ...

  8. Magnetic separation of iron-based nanosorbents from watery solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Irina; Bakhteeva, Iuliia; Zhakov, Sergey; Baerner, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Iron and iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) both naked and with chemically modified surface are promising agents for different environmental applications, in particular for water purification and for analytical control of water and soil pollution. The MNP can be used as sorbents with selective abilities due to designed surface functionalization. While a lot of research has been devoted to the impurity sorption processes, the second part, that is the efficient removal of the MNP sorbents from the watery solution, has not been sufficiently studied so far. For that particles with magnetic cores are especially attractive due to the possibility of their subsequent magnetic separation from water without using coagulants, i.e. without a secondary water pollution, just by applying external magnetic fields B. In order to remove magnetic sorbent nanoparticles ( 10-100 nm) effectively from the water solution gradient magnetic fields are required. Depending on the MNP size, the magnetic moment, the chemical properties of the solution, the water purification conditions , either the low gradient magnetic separation (LGMS) with dB/dz < 100 T/m or the high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) with dB/dz > 100 T/m is used. The gradient magnetic field is provided by permanent magnets or electromagnets of different configuration. In this work the sedimentation dynamics of naked Fe3O4 and Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles (10-30 nm) in water was studied in a vertical gradient magnetic field (B1 ≤ 0.3T, dB/dz ≤ 0.13 T/cm). By this LGMS , the sedimentation time of the naked Fe3O4 NP is reduced down from several days to several minutes. The sedimentation time for Fe3O4@SiO2 decreases from several weeks to several hours and to several minutes when salts Na2SO4, CaCl2, NaH2PO4 are added to the solution. The results are interpreted in terms of MNP aggregate formation caused by electrostatic, steric and magnetic inter-particle interactions in the watery solution. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The work was

  9. Update on chronic diarrhea: a run-through for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Davinder K; Surawicz, Christina

    2012-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a common patient complaint, with an estimated prevalence of 5 %. Diarrhea is defined as >200 g/day of stool with decreased consistency, and chronic diarrhea is defined as lasting more than 4 weeks. The purpose of this review is to guide the clinician's diagnostic evaluation and management of chronic diarrhea, rather than providing a textbook comprehensive review of the subject, focusing on the patient in developed countries and excluding the immune suppressed patient. While the investigation and treatment of chronic diarrhea can be challenging due to its myriad causes, when the clinician employs a practical approach, dividing chronic diarrhea into bloody, fatty, and watery causes, it simplifies and streamlines the work-up and management plan and leads to improved patient outcomes.

  10. Vibrio mimicus diarrhea following ingestion of raw turtle eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, E; Bolaños, H; Acuña, M T; Díaz, G; Matamoros, M C; Raventós, H; Sánchez, L M; Sánchez, O; Barquero, C

    1996-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of diarrhea associated with Vibrio mimicus were identified in 33 hospitalized patients referred to the Costa Rican National Diagnostic Laboratory Network between 1991 and 1994. The relevant symptoms presented by patients included abundant watery diarrhea, vomiting, and severe dehydration that required intravenous Dhaka solution in 83% of patients but not fever. Seroconversion against V. mimicus was demonstrated in four patients, from whom acute- and convalescent-phase sera were obtained. Those sera did not show cross-reaction when tested against Vibrio cholerae O1 strain VC-12. All the V. mimicus isolates from these cases produced cholera toxin (CT) and were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics. Attempts to isolate this bacterium from stool samples of 127 healthy persons were not successful. Consumption of raw turtle eggs was recalled by 11 of the 19 (58%) individuals interviewed. All but two V. mimicus diarrheal cases were sporadic. These two had a history of a common source of turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) eggs for consumption, and V. mimicus was isolated from eggs from the same source (a local market). Among the strains, variations in the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were observed. None of the strains recovered from market turtle eggs nor the four isolates from river water showed CT production. Further efforts to demonstrate the presence of CT-producing V. mimicus strains in turtle eggs were made. Successful results were obtained when nest eggs were tested. In this case, it was possible to isolate CT- and non-CT-producing strains, even from the same egg. For CT detection we used PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Y-1 cell assay, obtaining a 100% correlation between ELISA and PCR results. Primers Col-1 and Col-2, originally described as specific for the V. cholerae O1 ctxA gene, also amplified a 302-bp segment with an identical restriction map from V. mimicus. These results have important

  11. Refractory diarrhea: A paraneoplastic syndrome of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Wang, Huan-Min

    2015-07-07

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Diarrheal NB is quite rare and is not easy to diagnose in the early stage. Six cases of diarrheal NB in our hospital treated from 1996 to 2006 were retrospectively analyzed, including characteristics such as electrolyte imbalance, pathologic features, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunohistochemical staining results, treatment, and prognosis. All patients were boys with 3-8 loose or watery stools each day and routine fecal tests were normal. Abdominal tumors were identified by B-ultrasound. Drugs were ineffective. Three patients underwent surgery, and the remaining three patients received surgery and chemotherapy. Diarrhea stopped after treatment in five patients. Two patients died due to intractable hypokalemia. The tumor was located in the adrenal gland in four patients, in the upper retroperitoneum in one patient, and in the presacral area in one patient. Pathologic findings were NB and ganglioneuroblastoma. Five patients were at clinical stage I-II, and one was at stage III. Four patients survived (followed-up for 6 mo to 4 years). Immunohistochemical staining for VIP was positive. Refractory diarrhea is a paraneoplastic syndrome of NB and is rare. Patients aged 1-3 years who present with chronic intractable diarrhea should be followed closely. Intractable diarrhea, hypokalemia, and dysplasia are the initial clinical manifestations. Increased VIP is characteristic of this disease. Potassium supplementation plays a vital role in the treatment procedure, especially preoperatively. The prognosis of diarrheal NB is good following appropriate treatment.

  12. [Congenital chloride diarrhea mimicking meconium ileus in newborn].

    PubMed

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhoea is a rare autosomal recessive disease and the diagnosis is frequently delayed. The disease is most common in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait 1:3200-13 000 births, Finland - 1:30 000-40 000, and in Poland - 1:200 000. Congenital chloride diarrhoea begins in fetal life. The main clinical sign is watery diarrhea that in utero leads to dilated bowel loops, polyhydramnios and often premature birth. Newborns have distended abdomens, absence of meconium, dilated bowel loops in ultrasonography and watery diarrhea which can sometimes be mistaken for urine. The absence of meconium and the distended abdomen suggest meconium ileus or Hirschsprung disease and can lead to unnecessary surgical intervention. The article is a report on a 3-months old boy with the history of dilated bowel loops in prenatal ultrasonograhy, low birth weight and abdominal distention. Because of the suspicion of mechanical bowel obstruction he had laparotomy on the second day of his life. Mechanical obstruction was excluded and enterostomy was performed. Hyponatremia, hypokaliemia and metabolic alkalosis were found in laboratory tests. The electrolyte disturbances were corrected and enterostomy was closed after six weeks. The final diagnosis of congenital chloride diarrhea was established two months later, when the patient was admitted to hospital again with severe watery diarrhea, metabolic alkalosis, hypochloraemia and hypokalemia. The stool chloride concentration was >90 mmol/L. Water and electrolyte deficits had been corrected. The patient was discharged home with supplementation of sodium, potassium and chloride. His follow-up was uneventful. He remains under the care of the pediatric clinic.

  13. Study on the stability and antioxidant effect of the Allium ursinum watery extract

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organosulfur compounds usually present a reduced stability especially in the presence of oxygen. This research aimed to study the stability and antioxidant potential of the Allium ursinum watery extract. Results The decrease of the antioxidant capacity verifies an exponential relation which may be formally associated to a kinetically pseudomonomolecular process. The exponential regression equation allows the half-life of the degradation process to be determined, this being 14 hours and 49 minutes in a watery environment at room temperature. Conclusions The watery extract of Allium ursinum changes its proprieties in time. This might be explained by the network of hydrogen bonds in a watery environment which has a protective effect on the dissolved allicin molecule. PMID:23369571

  14. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E

    1973-03-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness.

  15. Age-specific prevalence of Escherichia coli with localized and aggregative adherence in Venezuelan infants with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    González, R; Díaz, C; Mariño, M; Cloralt, R; Pequeneze, M; Pérez-Schael, I

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate the epidemiological significance of HEp-2 cell-adherent Escherichia coli isolates in diarrheal disease, we performed a study with 513 Venezuelan infants with diarrhea and 241 age-matched controls to determine the prevalence of enteropathogenic E. coli (enteroadherent E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli) and their correlation with O:H serotypes. E. coli isolates exhibiting localized and aggregative adherence in the HEp-2 cell assay were significantly more frequently isolated from the patients (8.5 and 26.9%, respectively) than from the controls (1.7 and 15%, respectively). This difference was significant for the group 0 to 2 months of age but for older infants. Regardless of age, E. coli isolates with diffuse adherence were found at similar frequencies in both the patients and the controls. A striking correlation between classic O serogroups and localized adherence was also observed. These findings confirm the pathogenic role of E. coli with localized and aggregative adherence in diarrheal disease, as well as the epidemiological importance of O:H serotyping for characterizing localized-adhering E. coli.

  16. Aphid watery saliva counteracts sieve-tube occlusion: a universal phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Will, Torsten; Kornemann, Sarah R; Furch, Alexandra C U; Tjallingii, W Fred; van Bel, Aart J E

    2009-10-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins in the watery saliva of Megoura viciae counteract Ca2+-dependent occlusion of sieve plates in Vicia faba and so prevent the shut-down of food supply in response to stylet penetration. The question arises whether this interaction between aphid saliva and sieve-element proteins is a universal phenomenon as inferred by the coincidence between sieve-tube occlusion and salivation. For this purpose, leaf tips were burnt in a number of plant species from four different families to induce remote sieve-plate occlusion. Resultant sieve-plate occlusion in these plant species was counteracted by an abrupt switch of aphid behaviour. Each of the seven aphid species tested interrupted its feeding behaviour and started secreting watery saliva. The protein composition of watery saliva appeared strikingly different between aphid species with less than 50% overlap. Secretion of watery saliva seems to be a universal means to suppress sieve-plate occlusion, although the protein composition of watery saliva seems to diverge between species.

  17. Detection and molecular characterization of caliciviruses (vesivirus and norovirus) in an outbreak of acute diarrhea in kittens from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castro, Tatiana X; Cubel Garcia, Rita de Cássia N; Fumian, Tulio M; Costa, Erika M; Mello, Renata; White, Peter A; Leite, José Paulo G

    2015-10-01

    Feline caliciviruses (FCVs) have occasionally been described in cats in association with enteric disease, but an etiological role for these viruses in acute gastroenteritis is still unclear. In this study, molecular characterization of FCV and feline norovirus (FNoV) was undertaken using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and sequence analysis of the ORF1 region in fecal specimens from 29 diarrheic cats. The specimens were also screened for parvovirus, coronavirus, astrovirus and group A rotavirus. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was also performed to detect and quantitate NoV genogroup IV and the role of these animal caliciviruses in feline gastroenteritis was investigated. This is the first description of enteric FCV and FNoV in South America.

  18. [Acute diarrhea outbreak caused by Shigella flexneri at a school in Madrid, Cundinamarca: phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Realpe, María Elena; Muñoz, Nélida; Sicard, Diego; Silva, Esperanza; Agudelo, Clara Inés; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute diarrhoeal disease that is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In 1997, the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Salud Microbiology Group organized a network surveillance program with the country's Public Health Laboratories (PHLs) to monitor the principal etiological agents responsible for acute diarrhoeal disease. In May, 2001, the PHL of the state of Cundinamarca reported a food poisoning outbreak involving an elementary school community. The main goal of the Microbiology Group involvement was to establish the molecular relationships among the isolates from the outbreak by phenotypic and genotypic methods of characterization. Stool cultures were obtained from 22 of 195 affected individuals. The Microbiology Group confirmed the identification of the isolates by biochemical and serological probes. The antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested against the following battery of antibiotics: chloramphenicol, trimehoprim-sulfamethozazole, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. The isolates were subjected to pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the following CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) protocols: Xbal restriction enzyme, Shigella sonnei CDC F2353 as the reference standard, and lambda phage as a molecular weight marker. In 15 of 22 (68%) stool cultures Shigella was recovered, all isolates were identified as Shigella flexneri serotype 6 biotype Newcastle with the same antimicrobial susceptibility profile. PFGE showed that 3 (20%) isolates were identical (100% genetic similarity) and the other 12 (80%) were very closely related (genetic similarity between 86-98%). The network system permitted the INS ready access to the isolates and the implementation of the PFGE permitted a quantitative characterization of the clonal relationship among the isolates from the outbreak.

  19. [Epidemiology and etiology of infectious diarrheas. The case of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gomez, J L; García-Garcia, M L; Del Rio-Zolezzi, A; Giono-Cerezo, S; Salcedo-Alvarez, R A; Sepúlveda-Amor, J

    1994-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections represent a health problem. It is estimated that 1647 million cases of diarrhea and 3.2 million deaths due to this cause occur among children less than five years of age per year. Those belonging to this age group have 15 times more risk of dying because of diarrhea. Cases of liquid acute diarrhea with blood represent 80% of cases, diarrhea with blood represent 10%. Most frequent causes of liquid diarrhea are enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and rotaviruses and most frequent causes of bloody diarrhea are Shigella, E. coli (EHEC and EPEC). Campylobacter jejuni and Entamoeba histolytica. Annually 15,000 cases of typhoid fever are reported that continue being a public health problem. A negative correlation has been observed between the use of oral rehydration and infant mortality due to diarrhea. After prevention and control measures for cholera, a decrease in morbidity and mortality due to diarrhea has been observed. However, to reduce mortality due to this cause, it is necessary to treat the cases of acute dysentery and persistent diarrhea as well as to increase coverage of health care, to standardize the studies of etiology of diarrhea in Mexico, to establish surveillance centers for the study of diarrhea that give information on the distribution, frequency and trends of microbial agents and to achieve standardized microbiological and parasitological studies of etiology of diarrhea that support public health interventions as vaccination and selective administration of antibiotics.

  20. Probiotics for Infectious Diarrhea and Traveler's Diarrhea - What Do We Really Know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibberd, Patricia L.

    Worldwide, diarrhea is the sixth leading cause of premature death (Lopez et al., 2006), accounting for more than two million deaths each year. The majority of the burden is borne in lower and middle income countries, and in children under age 5 (Kosek et al., 2003). Even in the United States where there is easy access to “safe” food and water, there are an estimated 211-375 million episodes of acute diarrhea each year, resulting in 900,000 hospitalizations and 6,000 deaths (Herikstad et al., 2002; Mead et al., 1999). While mortality from diarrhea has decreased over the last 30 years, the incidence and morbidity associated with diarrhea has not improved (Kosek et al., 2003). During the same time period an ever increasing number of enteric pathogens as well as non-infectious conditions have been recognized as causes of acute diarrhea (Guerrant et al., 2001).

  1. Community Diarrhea Incidence Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Meléndez, Marlon; Liu, Lan; Enrique Zambrana, Luis; Paniagua, Margarita; Weber, David J.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Cáceres, Mercedes; Källeståll, Carina; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix; Peña, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    We estimated the incidence of watery diarrhea in the community before and after introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in León, Nicaragua. A random sample of households was selected before and after rotavirus vaccine introduction. All children < 5 years of age in selected households were eligible for inclusion. Children were followed every 2 weeks for watery diarrhea episodes. The incidence rate was estimated as numbers of episodes per 100 child-years of exposure time. A mixed effects Poisson regression model was fit to compare incidence rates in the pre-vaccine and vaccine periods. The pre-vaccine cohort (N = 726) experienced 36 episodes per 100 child-years, and the vaccine cohort (N = 826) experienced 25 episodes per 100 child-years. The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 0.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40, 0.91) during the vaccine period versus the pre-vaccine period, indicating a lower incidence of watery diarrhea in the community during the vaccine period. PMID:23817336

  2. Rotavirus genotypes in sewage treatment plants and in children hospitalized with acute diarrhea in Italy in 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Franco M; Bonomo, Paolo; Ianiro, Giovanni; Battistone, Andrea; Delogu, Roberto; Germinario, Cinzia; Chironna, Maria; Triassi, Maria; Campagnuolo, Rosalba; Cicala, Antonella; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Castiglia, Paolo; Serra, Caterina; Gaggioli, Andrea; Fiore, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular surveillance network RotaNet-Italy provides useful nationwide data on rotaviruses causing severe acute gastroenteritis in children in Italy, scarce information is available on rotavirus circulation in the general Italian population, including adults with mild or asymptomatic infection. We investigated the genotypes of rotaviruses present in urban wastewaters and compared them with those of viral strains from clinical pediatric cases. During 2010 and 2011, 285 sewage samples from 4 Italian cities were tested by reverse transcription-PCRs (RT-PCRs) specific for rotavirus VP7 and VP4 genes. Rotavirus was detected in 172 (60.4%) samples, 26 of which contained multiple rotavirus G (VP7 gene) genotypes, for a total of 198 G types. Thirty-two samples also contained multiple P (VP4 gene) genotypes, yielding 204 P types in 172 samples. Genotype G1 accounted for 65.6% of rotaviruses typed, followed by genotypes G2 (20.2%), G9 (7.6%), G4 (4.6%), G6 (1.0%), G3 (0.5%), and G26 (0.5%). VP4 genotype P[8] accounted for 75.0% of strains, genotype P[4] accounted for 23.0% of strains, and the uncommon genotypes P[6], P[9], P[14], and P[19] accounted for 2.0% of strains altogether. These rotavirus genotypes were also found in pediatric patients hospitalized in the same areas and years but in different proportions. Specifically, genotypes G2, G9, and P[4] were more prevalent in sewage samples than among samples from patients, which suggests either a larger circulation of the latter strains through the general population not requiring medical care or their greater survival in wastewaters. A high level of nucleotide identity in the G1, G2, and G6 VP7 sequences was observed between strains from the environment and those from patients.

  3. Rotavirus Genotypes in Sewage Treatment Plants and in Children Hospitalized with Acute Diarrhea in Italy in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Franco M.; Bonomo, Paolo; Ianiro, Giovanni; Battistone, Andrea; Delogu, Roberto; Germinario, Cinzia; Chironna, Maria; Triassi, Maria; Campagnuolo, Rosalba; Cicala, Antonella; Giammanco, Giovanni M.; Castiglia, Paolo; Serra, Caterina; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular surveillance network RotaNet-Italy provides useful nationwide data on rotaviruses causing severe acute gastroenteritis in children in Italy, scarce information is available on rotavirus circulation in the general Italian population, including adults with mild or asymptomatic infection. We investigated the genotypes of rotaviruses present in urban wastewaters and compared them with those of viral strains from clinical pediatric cases. During 2010 and 2011, 285 sewage samples from 4 Italian cities were tested by reverse transcription-PCRs (RT-PCRs) specific for rotavirus VP7 and VP4 genes. Rotavirus was detected in 172 (60.4%) samples, 26 of which contained multiple rotavirus G (VP7 gene) genotypes, for a total of 198 G types. Thirty-two samples also contained multiple P (VP4 gene) genotypes, yielding 204 P types in 172 samples. Genotype G1 accounted for 65.6% of rotaviruses typed, followed by genotypes G2 (20.2%), G9 (7.6%), G4 (4.6%), G6 (1.0%), G3 (0.5%), and G26 (0.5%). VP4 genotype P[8] accounted for 75.0% of strains, genotype P[4] accounted for 23.0% of strains, and the uncommon genotypes P[6], P[9], P[14], and P[19] accounted for 2.0% of strains altogether. These rotavirus genotypes were also found in pediatric patients hospitalized in the same areas and years but in different proportions. Specifically, genotypes G2, G9, and P[4] were more prevalent in sewage samples than among samples from patients, which suggests either a larger circulation of the latter strains through the general population not requiring medical care or their greater survival in wastewaters. A high level of nucleotide identity in the G1, G2, and G6 VP7 sequences was observed between strains from the environment and those from patients. PMID:25344240

  4. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Shedding and Antibody Response in Swine Farms: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Bertasio, Cristina; Giacomini, Enrico; Lazzaro, Massimiliano; Perulli, Simona; Papetti, Alice; Lavazza, Antonio; Lelli, Davide; Alborali, Giovanni; Boniotti, Maria B.

    2016-01-01

    The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes an acute and highly contagious enteric disease characterized by severe enteritis, vomiting, watery diarrhea, and a high mortality rate in seronegative neonatal piglets. In the last few years, PED had a large economic impact on the swine industries in Asia and the US, and in 2014, the PEDV also re-emerged in Europe. Two main PEDV variants circulate worldwide but only the S INDEL variant, considered a mild strain, is spreading in Europe. To gain insights into the pathogenicity of this variant, its viral load and temporal shedding pattern were evaluated in piglets from infected farms. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting the spike gene, was validated according to the minimum information for quantitative real-time PCR experiments guidelines. The qPCR was applied to longitudinal studies conducted in four swine farms naturally infected with the PEDV S INDEL variant. Clinical data, fecal swabs, and blood samples were collected from 103 piglets at 15–30-day intervals for 2–5 months. On all four farms, diarrhea was observed in sows during gestation and in farrowing units, and the mortality rates of piglets were 18, 25, 30, and 35%. Different clinical pictures (0-50% of diarrhea positivity), viral titer levels (mean 5.3-7.2 log10 genome copies/mL), and antibody conditions (30-80% of positivity) were registered among sows on the four farms. The percentage of qPCR positive piglets varied greatly from the beginning (63–100%) to the end (0%) of the infection course. Clinical signs were present in 96% of the qPCR positive animals. Viral loads ranged from 8.5 log10 to 4 log10 genome copies/mL in suckling pigs at 3–6 days of age and were not statistically different among farms, despite the different patterns observed in sows. After 2–3 weeks, only a few piglets still showed detectable viral levels and clinical signs, and they developed antibody responses. Moreover, co-infections with other pathogens and biosecurity

  5. Late-onset of immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked syndrome (IPEX) with intractable diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zama, Daniele; Cocchi, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo; Specchia, Fernando; Alvisi, Patrizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lima, Mario; Pession, Andrea

    2014-10-18

    The syndrome of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. Diarrhea, diabetes and dermatitis are the hallmark of the disease, with a typical onset within the first months of life. We describe the case of a twelve-year old male affected by a very late-onset IPEX with intractable enteropathy, which markedly improved after starting Sirolimus as second-line treatment. This case suggests that IPEX should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of watery intractable diarrhea, despite its unusual onset.

  6. [The verbal autopsy on children with a respiratory infection and acute diarrhea. An analysis of the disease-care-death process].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H; Tomé, P; Guiscafré, H; Martínez, H; Romero, G; Portillo, E; Rodríguez, R; Gutiérrez, G

    1993-01-01

    The study focuses on children between 72 hours and five years of age who died of acute respiratory infection (ARI) or acute diarrhea (AD) in the State of Tlaxcala. Peer Review Mortality Committee of the State contributed with the staff to the deaths analysis. Cases were included only when diagnosis was confirmed by verbal autopsy (VA). One hundred and thirty two cases were included (98 corresponding to ARI deaths and 34 to AD). The process related to medical care-seeking behaviors and prescribing practices by private and non-private physicians was analyzed through the VA. During the study period, 60% of children with ARI and 58.9% of children with AD died at home. More than 80% of these children had received medical care within three days preceding their death, and 50% of them had been seen by a physician within 12 hours prior to their death. Most of these visits were to a private doctor (71% for ARI and 86% for AD). Forty seven percent of treatments prescribed for ARI were judged to be wrong, either because of a bad choice of antibiotic or because the physician did not prescribe an antibiotic when the patient required it. Similarly, 65% of treatments for AD were considered erroneous, either due to the use of an antibiotic which was not justified or due to the lack of oral rehydration therapy when it was needed. Additionally, late referral to a hospital was considered as having direct influence at the death in half of the consultation. Families were too late in demanding medical care or demanded no care at all in 21.9% of cases of ARI and in 6.1% of cases of AD. We have found the VA to be useful in identifying problems related to the process of health-seeking behaviors and medical care. Our results suggest interventions that may lower the high mortality rates in Tlaxcala, such as training workshops directed to institutional and private physicians, and the implementation of top-of-line treatment centers where high-risk patients can be referred and also the health

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Low-osmolarity ORS vs. Modified Rehydration Solution for Malnourished Children for Treatment of Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition and Diarrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ruchika; Kumar, Praveen; Aneja, S; Kumar, Virendra; Rehan, Harmeet S

    2015-12-01

    World Health Organization-recommended rehydration solution for malnourished children (ReSoMal) for rehydrating severe acute malnourished children is not available in India. In present study, 110 consecutive children aged 6-59 months with severely acute malnourishment and acute diarrhea were randomized to low-osmolarity oral rehydration solution (ORS) (osmolarity: 245, sodium: 75) with added potassium (20 mmol/l) or modified ReSoMal (osmolarity: 300, sodium: 45). In all, 15.4% of modified ReSoMal group developed hyponatremia as compared with 1.9% in low-osmolarity ORS, but none developed severe hyponatremia or hypernatremia. Both groups had equal number of successful rehydration (52 each). Both types of ORS were effective in correcting hypokalemia and dehydration, but rehydration was achieved in shorter duration with modified ReSoMal.

  8. Chronic diarrhea due to duodenal candidiasis in a patient with a history of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Majalan, Nader; Moghaddasi, Sarasadat; Qane, Mohammad Davud; Shefaie, Farzane; Masoumi Dehshiri, Roghayyeh; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kassem; Baghbanian, Mahmoud

    2014-11-01

    Candida infection in the small intestine is uncommon. We report an unusual case of duodenal candidiasis that presented as chronic diarrhea in a patient who had previously undergone kidney transplantation. A 60-year-old man presented with profuse watery diarrhea that had lasted 6 months 13 years after kidney transplantation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results indicated candidiasis within the esophagus and duodenum. Biopsy results revealed active duodenitis with hyphal and yeast forms of Candida overlying the duodenal epithelium in periodic acid Schiff staining. The patient was successfully treated with fluconazole. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaint of diarrhea. Duodenal candidiasis may be the result of chronic diarrhea in patients with a history of kidney transplantation.

  9. BLASTOCYSTIS SP. AND BLASTOCYSTIS RATTI IN A BRAZILIAN PORCUPINE (COENDOU PREHENSILIS) WITH DIARRHEA.

    PubMed

    Goe, Alexandra M; Heard, Darryl J; Easley, J Roger; Weeden, Amy L; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-06-01

    A hand-raised, 5-mo-old, intact male Brazilian porcupine (Coendou prehensilis) was evaluated for chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and anorexia. On presentation the porcupette was dull, dehydrated, and passing yellow, malodourous, watery diarrhea. Cytologic examination of feces revealed a large number of organisms, morphologically consistent with Blastocystis. Blastocystis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on feces was positive. Direct sequencing on two sequential samples confirmed the presence of Blastocystis ratti and a novel Blastocystis sequence. The porcupette was treated supportively, which included a 4-wk metronidazole course. Diarrhea resolved within 2 wk of treatment, and the animal's growth rate dramatically improved. Recheck PCR was negative for Blastocystis. Although an important and controversial cause of diarrhea in immunocompromised humans, this organism is not well recognized as a potential pathogen and zoonosis in zoo animals. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for disease associated with this organism, especially in immunocompromised animals.

  10. Proteome Analysis of Watery Saliva Secreted by Green Rice Leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Makoto; Komatsu, Setsuko; Noda, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    The green rice leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps, is a vascular bundle feeder that discharges watery and gelling saliva during the feeding process. To understand the potential functions of saliva for successful and safe feeding on host plants, we analyzed the complexity of proteinaceous components in the watery saliva of N. cincticeps. Salivary proteins were collected from a sucrose diet that adult leafhoppers had fed on through a membrane of stretched parafilm. Protein concentrates were separated using SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions. Six proteins were identified by a gas-phase protein sequencer and two proteins were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis with reference to expressed sequence tag (EST) databases of this species. Full -length cDNAs encoding these major proteins were obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR) and degenerate PCR. Furthermore, gel-free proteome analysis that was performed to cover the broad range of salivary proteins with reference to the latest RNA-sequencing data from the salivary gland of N. cincticeps, yielded 63 additional protein species. Out of 71 novel proteins identified from the watery saliva, about 60 % of those were enzymes or other functional proteins, including GH5 cellulase, transferrin, carbonic anhydrases, aminopeptidase, regucalcin, and apolipoprotein. The remaining proteins appeared to be unique and species- specific. This is the first study to identify and characterize the proteins in watery saliva of Auchenorrhyncha species, especially sheath-producing, vascular bundle-feeders.

  11. WateriD User Manual (WERF Report INFR9SG09a)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Infrastructure Database (WATERiD; http://waterid.org ) is designed to be a knowledge base where water and wastewater utilities can upload and gather information about asset management technology and practice experiences. The main emphasis is on pipe location, condition...

  12. Proteome Analysis of Watery Saliva Secreted by Green Rice Leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Makoto; Komatsu, Setsuko; Noda, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    The green rice leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps, is a vascular bundle feeder that discharges watery and gelling saliva during the feeding process. To understand the potential functions of saliva for successful and safe feeding on host plants, we analyzed the complexity of proteinaceous components in the watery saliva of N. cincticeps. Salivary proteins were collected from a sucrose diet that adult leafhoppers had fed on through a membrane of stretched parafilm. Protein concentrates were separated using SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions. Six proteins were identified by a gas-phase protein sequencer and two proteins were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis with reference to expressed sequence tag (EST) databases of this species. Full -length cDNAs encoding these major proteins were obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR) and degenerate PCR. Furthermore, gel-free proteome analysis that was performed to cover the broad range of salivary proteins with reference to the latest RNA-sequencing data from the salivary gland of N. cincticeps, yielded 63 additional protein species. Out of 71 novel proteins identified from the watery saliva, about 60 % of those were enzymes or other functional proteins, including GH5 cellulase, transferrin, carbonic anhydrases, aminopeptidase, regucalcin, and apolipoprotein. The remaining proteins appeared to be unique and species- specific. This is the first study to identify and characterize the proteins in watery saliva of Auchenorrhyncha species, especially sheath-producing, vascular bundle-feeders. PMID:25909947

  13. Prescription patterns and appropriateness of antibiotics in the management of cough/cold and diarrhea in a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Malik, Sadiqa; Mohanta, Guru Prasad; Parimalakrishnan, S.; Patel, Isha; Dhingra, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis and respiratory illnesses are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prescription pattern of antibiotic utilization during the treatment of cough/cold and/or diarrhea in pediatric patients. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted for 6 months in pediatric units of a tertiary care hospital in South India. Children under 5 years of age presenting with illness related to diarrhea and/or cough/cold were included in this study. Data were collected by reviewing patient files and then assessed for its appropriateness against the criteria developed in view of the Medication Appropriateness Index and Guidelines of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics. The results were expressed in frequencies and percentages. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 303 patients were studied during the study period. The mean age of the patients was 3.5 ± 0.6 years. The majority of children were admitted mainly due to chief complaint of fever (63%) and cough and cold (56.4%). The appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions was higher in bloody and watery diarrhea (83.3% and 82.6%; P < 0.05). Cephalosporins (46.2%) and penicillins (39.9%) were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics, though the generic prescriptions of these drugs were the lowest (13.5% and 10%, respectively). The seniority of prescriber was significantly associated with the appropriateness of prescriptions (P < 0.05). Antibiotics prescription was higher in cold/cough and diarrhea (93.5%) in comparison to cough/cold (85%) or diarrhea (75%) alone. Conclusions: The study observed high rates of antibiotic utilization in Chidambaram during the treatment of cough/cold and/or diarrhea in pediatric patients. The findings highlight the need for combined interventions using education and expert counseling, targeted to the

  14. A Prospective Study of Acute Diarrhea in a Cohort of United States Military Personnel on Deployment to the Multinational Force and Observers, Sinai, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Mark S.; Rockabrand, David M.; Schlett, Carey; Monteville, Marshall R.; Frenck, Robert W.; Romine, Marcy; Ahmed, Salwa F.; Sanders, John W.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the epidemiology of diarrhea in deployed personnel to the Middle East, a prospective cohort study of travelers' diarrhea (TD) was conducted between May 2004 and January 2005 at the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) camp in the southern Sinai. A baseline entry questionnaire and stool specimen was provided on study entry, and volunteers were followed every 6 weeks. Of 211 volunteers, 145 (68.7%) completed one or more follow-up visits. In total, 416 follow-up surveys were completed, which described an overall incidence of 25.2 episodes per 100 person months (95% confidence interval = 21.2–30.0). Additionally, stools were collected in 72 of 77 diarrhea-associated clinic visits, with bacterial pathogens most commonly isolated (enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in 30 [42%] samples and Campylobacter jejuni in 7 [10%] samples) Despite modern preventive methods, diarrhea is still a common problem for deployed US military personnel in Egypt, frequently resulting in diminished ability to work. PMID:21212203

  15. Congenital Chloride Diarrhea: Diagnosis by Easy-Accessible Chloride Measurement in Feces.

    PubMed

    Gils, C; Eckhardt, M-C; Nielsen, P E; Nybo, M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding the intestinal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger and is clinically characterized by watery, profound diarrhea, electrolyte disturbances, and metabolic alkalosis. The CCD diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and measurement of high chloride concentration in feces (>90 mmol/L) and is confirmed by DNA testing. Untreated CCD is lethal, while long-term clinical outcome improves when treated correctly. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old woman had an emergency caesarian due to pain and discomfort in gestational week 36 + 4. The newborn boy had abdominal distension and yellow fluid per rectum. Therapy with intravenous glucose and sodium chloride decreased his stool frequency and improved his clinical condition. A suspicion of congenital chloride diarrhea was strongly supported using blood gas analyzer to measure an increased chloride concentration in the feces; the diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing. Discussion. Measurement of chloride in feces using an ordinary blood gas analyzer can serve as a preliminary analysis when congenital chloride diarrhea is suspected. This measurement can be easily performed with a watery feces composition. An easy-accessible chloride measurement available will facilitate the diagnostics and support the initial treatment if CCD is suspected.

  16. Congenital Chloride Diarrhea: Diagnosis by Easy-Accessible Chloride Measurement in Feces

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, M.-C.; Nielsen, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding the intestinal Cl−/HCO3− exchanger and is clinically characterized by watery, profound diarrhea, electrolyte disturbances, and metabolic alkalosis. The CCD diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and measurement of high chloride concentration in feces (>90 mmol/L) and is confirmed by DNA testing. Untreated CCD is lethal, while long-term clinical outcome improves when treated correctly. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old woman had an emergency caesarian due to pain and discomfort in gestational week 36 + 4. The newborn boy had abdominal distension and yellow fluid per rectum. Therapy with intravenous glucose and sodium chloride decreased his stool frequency and improved his clinical condition. A suspicion of congenital chloride diarrhea was strongly supported using blood gas analyzer to measure an increased chloride concentration in the feces; the diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing. Discussion. Measurement of chloride in feces using an ordinary blood gas analyzer can serve as a preliminary analysis when congenital chloride diarrhea is suspected. This measurement can be easily performed with a watery feces composition. An easy-accessible chloride measurement available will facilitate the diagnostics and support the initial treatment if CCD is suspected. PMID:27635272

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus modulation of monocyte derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a single stranded, positive sense RNA virus and is the causative agent of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD). Disease can range from persistently infected (PI) animals displaying no clinical symptoms of disease to an acute, severe disease. Presently, limited studies ha...

  18. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  19. Case of acute pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Rumiko; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Yoshida, Yukio

    2014-06-21

    A 25-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaints of right flank pain, watery diarrhea, and fever. Blood tests revealed high levels of inflammatory markers, and infectious enteritis was diagnosed. A stool culture obtained on admission revealed no growth of any significant pathogens. Conservative therapy was undertaken with fasting and fluid replacement. On day 2 of admission, the fever resolved, the frequency of defecation reduced, the right flank pain began to subside, and the white blood cell count started to decrease. On hospital day 4, the frequency of diarrhea decreased to approximately 5 times per day, and the right flank pain resolved. However, the patient developed epigastric pain and increased blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes. Abdominal computed tomography revealed mild pancreatic enlargement. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed, and conservative therapy with fasting and fluid replacement was continued. A day later, the blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes peaked out. On hospital day 7, the patient passed stools with fresh blood, and Campylobacter jejuni/coli was detected by culture. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy performed on hospital day 8 revealed diffuse aphthae extending from the terminal ileum to the entire colon. Based on the findings, pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis was diagnosed. In the present case, a possible mechanism of onset of pancreatitis was invasion of the pancreatic duct by Campylobacter and the host immune responses to Campylobacter.

  20. Hookworm infection in a healthy adult that manifested as severe eosinphilia and diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Lee, Sai-Cheong; Huang, Shie-Shian; Chang, Liang-Che

    2011-12-01

    A 54-year-old male was admitted because of having suffered from progressive watery diarrhea for 12 days. He had no history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease, organ transplantation, or malignancy. After admission, he still complained of diarrhea despite medical treatment. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis with eosinophilia and a stool examination by the concentration method was negative four times. When a sigmoidoscopy was performed as a part of an explorative survey, a single protruding mass consisting if a moving adult hookworm was found. The fifth stool examination by the concentration method identified hookworm ova. The patient was treated with oral mebendazole 100 mg twice a day for 3 days. The diarrhea and eosinophilia subsided after this treatment.

  1. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  2. [Chronic, non-infectious diarrhea: diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Korinna; Layer, Peter; Andresen, Viola

    2016-09-01

    Chronic, non-infectious diarrhea can be caused by a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. In anamnesis, it is important to take accompanying warning symptoms and specific triggers into account. The fecal inflammatory marker calprotectin may help differentiating between organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders, but it is not specific. Among other options, gelling fibres, Loperamide and Cholestyramine as well as probiotics are available for the symptomatic treatment of chronic diarrhea. For long-term treatment of chronic diarrhea with the enkephalinase inhibitor racecadotril, which is approved for acute diarrhea, only limited data are available. Eluxadolin presents a new therapeutic option. It can alleviate abdominal pain and diarrhea by modulation of opioid receptors in the enteric nervous system. Additional approaches in intractable irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) include 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, the antibiotic Rifaximin as well as low-dose tricyclic antidepressants. Specific diets such as the low-FODMAP diet can also relieve symptoms in IBS.

  3. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-01-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  4. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions.

  5. Watery eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of excess tearing is dry eyes . Drying causes the eyes to become uncomfortable, which stimulates the body to produce too many tears. One of the main tests for tearing is to check whether the eyes ...

  6. Pellagra: dermatitis, dementia, and diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Juraj; Schwartz, Robert A; Hegyi, Vladimír

    2004-01-01

    Pellagra defines systemic disease as resulting from a marked cellular deficiency of niacin. It is characterized by 4 "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia, and death. Diagnosis of pellagra is difficult in the absence of the skin lesions, and is often facilitated by the presence of characteristic ones. The dermatitis begins as an erythema. Acute pellagra resembles sunburn in its first stages, but tanning occurs more slowly than typically in sunburn. Exacerbation follows re-exposure to sunlight. In this work we review the findings of this once mysterious disorder, one that still challenges clinicians world-wide.

  7. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females.

  8. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  9. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger contributes to stool transport in mice with experimental diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    NISHIYAMA, Kazuhiro; TANIOKA, Kohta; AZUMA, Yasu-Taka; HAYASHI, Satomi; FUJIMOTO, Yasuyuki; YOSHIDA, Natsuho; KITA, Satomi; SUZUKI, Sho; NAKAJIMA, Hidemitsu; IWAMOTO, Takahiro; TAKEUCHI, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) is a bidirectional transporter that is controlled by membrane potential and transmembrane gradients of Na+ and Ca2+. To reveal the functional role of NCX on gastrointestinal motility, we have previously used NCX1 and NCX2 heterozygote knockout mice (HET). We found that NCX1 and NCX2 play important roles in the motility of the gastric fundus, ileum and distal colon. Therefore, we believed that NCX1 and NCX2 play an important role in transport of intestinal contents. Here, we investigated the role of NCX in a mouse model of drug-induced diarrhea. The fecal consistencies in NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET were assessed using a diarrhea induced by magnesium sulfate, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET, exacerbated magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea by increasing watery fecals. Likewise, 5-HT-induced diarrheas were exacerbated in NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET. However, NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET demonstrated PGE2 induced diarrhea similar to those of wild-type mice (WT). As well as the result of the distal colon shown previously, in the proximal and transverse colons of WT, the myenteric plexus layers and the longitudinal and circular muscle layers were strongly immunoreactive to NCX1 and NCX2. In this study, we demonstrate that NCX2 has important roles in development of diarrhea. PMID:27928109

  10. The evolution of bovine viral diarrhea: a review.

    PubMed

    Goens, S Denise

    2002-12-01

    The economic importance of bovine viral diarrhea is increasing with the emergence of seemingly more virulent viruses, as evidenced by outbreaks of hemorrhagic syndrome and severe acute bovine viral diarrhea beginning in the 1980s and 1990s. It appears that evolutionary changes in bovine viral diarrhea virus were responsible for these outbreaks. The genetic properties of the classical bovine viral diarrhea virus that contribute to the basis of current diagnostic tests, vaccines, and our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms are now being reevaluated because of these "new" virus strains. This shift in virulence has confounded both nomenclature and the significance of current bovine viral diarrhea virus categorization. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of bovine viral diarrhea virus with a chronological review of prevailing scientific tenets and practices as described in clinical and scientific North American veterinary journals and textbooks. The first part of this review describes how we have arrived at our current understanding of the viruses, the diseases, and their nomenclature. The second part of the review deals with current concepts in virology and how these concepts may both explain and predict bovine viral diarrhea virus pathogenesis. By reviewing how knowledge of bovine viral diarrhea has evolved and the theories of how the virus itself is able to evolve, the interpretation of diagnostic tests are more effectively utilized in the control and treatment of bovine viral diarrhea virus associated disease.

  11. Characteristics of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Hospitalized Children in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Shala, Muje; Azemi, Mehmedali; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta; Avdiu, Muharrem; Spahiu, Shqipe; Jaha, Luan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children. Authors reviewed epidemiological and clinical data of the rotavirus diarrhea in Kosovo. Methods: This is a prospective study carried between January 1st and December 31st 2011. All data, comprising demographics, nutrition, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, management and outcome of the rotavirus diarrhea are collected on the specially designed form. Results: 116 children with rotavirus diarrhea are included in the study. The majority boys (74.4%) and children aged 0 – 12 months (82.75%). Mean age of children in the study was 16.38 months. Almost every third child in the study was hypotrophic (29.2%). More than half of the infants (55.2%) were on mixed food, somewhat more than every third was breast feeding (36.45%), and every twelfth (8.33%) was on artificial milk (animal or formula). Apart from diarrhea, present in all patients, vomiting (97.41%) and fever (43.96%) were characteristics of the clinical presentation of the diarrhea. Two thirds of the children had mild grade dehydration (70.7%). All patients recovered with no sequels. Conclusion: Rotavirus continues to be responsible for a significant portion of acute diarrhea in Kosovo. Clinical features, epidemiological data and the agglutination test are safe enough to establish the diagnosis. Treated correctly rotavirus diarrhea has a favorable outcome. PMID:25568634

  12. Microbial succession and metabolite changes during fermentation of dongchimi, traditional Korean watery kimchi.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Hyeon; Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok

    2013-06-03

    Dongchimi, one of the most common types of watery kimchi in Korea, was prepared using radish and its pH values, microbial cell numbers, bacterial communities, and metabolites were monitored periodically to investigate the fermentation process of watery kimchi. The bacterial abundance increased quickly during the early fermentation period and the pH values concurrently decreased rapidly without any initial pH increase. After 15 days of fermentation, the bacterial abundance decreased rapidly with the increase of Saccharomyces abundance and then increased again with a decrease of Saccharomyces abundance after 40 days of fermentation, suggesting that bacteria and Saccharomyces have a direct antagonistic relationship. Finally, after 60 days of fermentation, a decrease in bacterial abundance and the growth of Candida were concurrently observed. Community analysis using pyrosequencing revealed that diverse genera such as Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Weissella were present at initial fermentation (day 0), but Leuconostoc became predominant within only three days of fermentation and remained predominant until the end of fermentation (day 100). Metabolite analysis using (1)H NMR showed that the concentrations of free sugars (fructose and glucose) were very low during the early fermentation period, but their concentrations increased rapidly although lactate, mannitol, and acetate were produced. After 30 days of fermentation, quick consumption of free sugars and production of glycerol and ethanol were observed concurrently with the growth of Saccharomyces, levels of which might be considered for use as a potential indicator of dongchimi quality and fermentation time.

  13. Experimental Survival of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Watery Soil, a Potential Source of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Roger D. B.; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir of Mycobacterium ulcerans causing Buruli ulcer (BU) remains unknown. Here, sterilized watery soil was mixed with 2 × 106 colony-forming units (CFU)/g of M. ulcerans Agy99 or M. ulcerans ATCC 33728 and incubated in a microaerophilic atmosphere in the presence of negative controls. Both M. ulcerans strains survived in soil for 4 months with a final inoculum of 300–440 CFU/g. Further, three groups of five mice with and without footpad scarification were exposed to control soil or M. ulcerans-inoculated soil. Although no specific clinical and histopathological lesions were observed in control animals, red spots observed on 8/20 scarified feet in 8/10 challenged mice yielded inflammatory infiltrates and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of M. ulcerans DNA in five mice. BU can be acquired as an inoculation infection with watery soil as a transient source of infection. These experimental observations warrant additional field observations. PMID:26526927

  14. Acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence leads to depletion and redistribution of WC1(+) γδ T cells in lymphoid tissues of beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Sakamoto, Kaori; Walz, Heather L; Brock, Kenny V; Hurley, David J

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of γδ T lymphocytes in lymphoid tissue during acute infection with high (HV) or low virulence (LV) non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in beef calves. This study was performed using tissue samples from a previous experiment in which thirty beef calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: LV [n=10; animals inoculated intranasally (IN) with LV BVDV-1a (strain SD-1)], HV [n=10; animals inoculated IN with HV BVDV-2 (strain 1373)], and control (n=10; animals inoculated with cell culture medium). On day 5 post inoculation, animals were euthanized, and samples from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to assess the abundance of WC1(+) γδ T cells. A higher proportion of calves challenged with BVDV showed signs of apoptosis and cytophagy in MLN and spleen samples compared to the control group. A significantly lower number of γδ T cells was observed in spleen and MLN from calves in HV and LV groups than in the control calves (P<0.05). In conclusion, acute infection with HV or LV BVDV resulted in depletion of WC1(+) γδ T cells in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues at five days after challenge in beef calves. This reduction in γδ T cells in the studied lymphoid tissues could be also due to lymphocyte trafficking to other tissues.

  15. Complementary foods associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Mini; Dwivedi, Reeta

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization regards illness due to contaminated food as one of the most widespread health problems in the contemporary world. Food safety especially in the weaning groups is one of the major concerns that have posed a threat to health of the children. Millions of children in the world die each year from diarrheal diseases; hundreds of millions suffer from frequent episodes of diarrhea and consequent impairment of nutritional status. Contaminated foods play a major role in the occurrence of diarrheal diseases. Apart from food contamination, transmission of infection occurs by direct contact, highly favored by the habits and customs of the people. Improper storage and handling of cooked food is equally responsible for food-borne illnesses, as during storage especially at ambient temperature (28-38 degrees C) there is the risks of multiplication of pathogenic organisms increase. Food safety education is a critical prerequisite and is an essential element in control and prevention of diarrheal diseases. However, no preventive measures can ever be successful without the acute involvement of the caretakers, other family members and the community. To sensitize the community in a catalytic manner, health workers, community leaders and community volunteers can act as effective change agent, to bring about a behavior that can lead to improvement in their real life practices, thereby reducing the prevalence of diarrheal episodes in young children. Food Safety Education Programs that involve volunteers are cost effective as they can be reached to a maximum number of people through limited health personnels, and by this, the community can be made responsible for its own health problems.

  16. Apoptosis and G2/M arrest induced by Allium ursinum (ramson) watery extract in an AGS gastric cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Song, Guo-qing; Yu, Yan-qiu; Ma, Hai-ying; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-nan

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to determine whether Allium ursinum L (ramson) could inhibit the proliferation of human AGS gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, we attempted to determine whether this inhibition could occur by targeting regulatory elements of the cell cycle. Methods Flow cytometry was used to observe apoptosis and the cell cycle in AGS cell lines treated or not treated with ramson watery extract. Proteins related to the cell cycle were detected by Western blotting. Caspase activity was measured using a colorimetric assay kit according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results Ramson watery extract induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in AGS cells. Western blotting showed that cyclin B was inhibited by ramson watery extract. However, G1 phase-related proteins remain unchanged after treatment. Conclusion Our results indicate that ramson effectively sup pressed proliferation and induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest in AGS cells by regulating elements of the cell cycle. PMID:23836991

  17. Diarrhea in the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Krones, Elisabeth; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with immunocompromising conditions. The etiologic spectrum differs from patients with diarrhea who have a normal immune system. This article reviews the most important causes of diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, ranging from infectious causes to noninfectious causes of diarrhea in the setting of HIV infection as a model for other conditions of immunosuppression. It also deals with diarrhea in specific situations, eg, after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation, diarrhea induced by immunosuppressive drugs, and diarrhea in congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

  18. Eldercare at Home: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluids and nutrients Offer clear liquids. Chicken broth, tea, ginger ale, Popsicles, apple, cranberry, or grape juice, ... the diarrhea has stopped. Limit caffeine. Coffee, strong teas, sodas, and chocolate all contain caffeine. Caffeine makes ...

  19. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  20. Functional Evaluation of Proteins in Watery and Gel Saliva of Aphids

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Aart J. E.; Will, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Gel and watery saliva are regarded as key players in aphid–pIant interactions. The salivary composition seems to be influenced by the variable environment encountered by the stylet tip. Milieu sensing has been postulated to provide information needed for proper stylet navigation and for the required switches between gel and watery saliva secretion during stylet progress. Both the chemical and physical factors involved in sensing of the stylet’s environment are discussed. To investigate the salivary proteome, proteins were collected from dissected gland extracts or artificial diets in a range of studies. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of either collection method. Several proteins were identified by functional assays or by use of proteomic tools, while most of their functions still remain unknown. These studies disclosed the presence of at least two proteins carrying numerous sulfhydryl groups that may act as the structural backbone of the salivary sheath. Furthermore, cell-wall degrading proteins such a pectinases, pectin methylesterases, polygalacturonases, and cellulases as well as diverse Ca2+-binding proteins (e.g., regucalcin, ARMET proteins) were detected. Suppression of the plant defense may be a common goal of salivary proteins. Salivary proteases are likely involved in the breakdown of sieve-element proteins to invalidate plant defense or to increase the availability of organic N compounds. Salivary polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases and oxidoreductases were suggested to detoxify, e.g., plant phenols. During the last years, an increasing number of salivary proteins have been categorized under the term ‘effector’. Effectors may act in the suppression (C002 or MIF cytokine) or the induction (e.g., Mp10 or Mp 42) of plant defense, respectively. A remarkable component of watery saliva seems the protein GroEL that originates from Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate symbiont of aphids and probably reflects an excretory product that induces plant

  1. Functional Evaluation of Proteins in Watery and Gel Saliva of Aphids.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Aart J E; Will, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Gel and watery saliva are regarded as key players in aphid-pIant interactions. The salivary composition seems to be influenced by the variable environment encountered by the stylet tip. Milieu sensing has been postulated to provide information needed for proper stylet navigation and for the required switches between gel and watery saliva secretion during stylet progress. Both the chemical and physical factors involved in sensing of the stylet's environment are discussed. To investigate the salivary proteome, proteins were collected from dissected gland extracts or artificial diets in a range of studies. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of either collection method. Several proteins were identified by functional assays or by use of proteomic tools, while most of their functions still remain unknown. These studies disclosed the presence of at least two proteins carrying numerous sulfhydryl groups that may act as the structural backbone of the salivary sheath. Furthermore, cell-wall degrading proteins such a pectinases, pectin methylesterases, polygalacturonases, and cellulases as well as diverse Ca(2+)-binding proteins (e.g., regucalcin, ARMET proteins) were detected. Suppression of the plant defense may be a common goal of salivary proteins. Salivary proteases are likely involved in the breakdown of sieve-element proteins to invalidate plant defense or to increase the availability of organic N compounds. Salivary polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases and oxidoreductases were suggested to detoxify, e.g., plant phenols. During the last years, an increasing number of salivary proteins have been categorized under the term 'effector'. Effectors may act in the suppression (C002 or MIF cytokine) or the induction (e.g., Mp10 or Mp 42) of plant defense, respectively. A remarkable component of watery saliva seems the protein GroEL that originates from Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate symbiont of aphids and probably reflects an excretory product that induces plant defense

  2. Determination of the infectious titer and virulence of an original US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus PC22A strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Lin, Chun-Ming; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Zhongyan; Esseili, Malak A; Jung, Kwonil; El-Tholoth, Mohamed; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-09-25

    The infectious dose of a virus pool of original US PEDV strain PC22A was determined in 4-day-old, cesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived (CDCD) piglets. The median pig diarrhea dose (PDD50) of the virus pool was determined as 7.35 log10 PDD50/mL, similar to the cell culture infectious titer, 7.75 log10 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL. 100 PDD50 caused watery diarrhea in all conventional suckling piglets (n = 12) derived from a PEDV-naive sow, whereas 1000 and 10 000 PDD50 did not cause diarrhea in piglets derived from two PEDV-field exposed-recovered sows. This information is important for future PEDV challenge studies and validation of PEDV vaccines.

  3. Acute phase response elicited by experimental bovine diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection is associated with decreased vitamin D and E status of vitamin-replete preruminant calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in young animals have shown an association between vitamin deficiencies and increased risk of infectious disease; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the impact of acute infection on the vitamin status of the vitamin-replete neonate. In order to characterize the effects of a...

  4. Characterization of an outbreak of astroviral diarrhea in a group of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Atkins, Adrienne; Wellehan, James F X; Childress, April L; Archer, Linda L; Fraser, William A; Citino, Scott B

    2009-04-14

    A Mamastrovirus was identified in an outbreak of diarrhea in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Five young adult and two adult cheetahs presented with lethargy, anorexia, watery diarrhea and regurgitation over an 11-day period. Fecal samples were submitted for electron microscopy and culture. Electron microscopy results revealed particles morphologically consistent with an astrovirus, and no other viral pathogens or significant bacterial pathogens were identified. The astrovirus was confirmed and sequenced using consensus astroviral PCR, resulting in a 367 base pair partial RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) product and a 628 base pair partial capsid product. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were performed on both the RdRp and the capsid protein segments. All animals were monitored and treated with bismuth subsalicylate tablets (524mg PO BID for 5 days), and recovered without additional intervention. This is the first report we are aware of documenting an astrovirus outbreak in cheetah.

  5. [Parasitic diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D

    2003-12-01

    In many areas, Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are found together and their microscopic appearance is identical. Biochemical tests which can show cell wall differences are often falsely negative and the only possible way is to treat with metronidazole when amoebiasis is suspected. In case of clinical failure of metronidazole, a bacterial diarrhea is frequently found. Giardia is an other protozoa frequently found in stools of children in endemic areas. Diarrheas due to Giardia are possible in normal children and frequent in malnourished. They can determine severe atrophy of jejunal mucosa and must be treated. Cryptoridiosis is frequently asymptomatic but induces diarrhea in malnourished children. Diarrhea due to helminths is rare and only Strongyloides stercoralis induces severe diarrhea in malnourished child and must be treated in emergency with Ivermectin to avoid dissemination. In immune deficiency induced by corticosteroid treatment or cancer chemotherapy, a prophylactic treatment with Ivermectin against Strongyloides stercoralis must be given in endemic areas or after return, and probably also with metronidazole against Giardia.

  6. [Diarrhea from the infectologist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-02-22

    Gastroenteritis is a nonspecific term for various pathologic states of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastroenteritis causing pathogens are the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the developed countries diarrhea is the most common reason for missing work, while in the developing world, it is a leading cause of death. Internationally, the mortality rate is 5-10 million deaths each year. "Traveller's diarrhea" is a polyetiologic common health problem of international travellers which affects travellers generally for days, but it can result in chronic postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome as well. Infectious agents usually cause acute gastroenteritis either by adherence of the intestinal mucosa, or by mucosal invasion, enterotoxin production, and/or cytotoxin production. The incubation period can often suggest the cause of etiology. When symptoms occur within 6 hours of eating, ingestion of preformed toxin of S. aureus or Bacillus cereus should be suspected. The incidence of hypervirulent C. difficile associated colitis is an emerging problem as a healthcare system associated infection. While infectious agents do not commonly cause chronic diarrhea, those that do include C. difficile, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium, Aeromonas and Yersinia . Amoebiasis is the second to malaria as a protozoal cause of death. Infection with HIV is also a common cause of diarrhea.

  7. Traveler’s diarrhea diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk for getting traveler's diarrhea by avoiding water, ice, and food that may be contaminated. The goal of the traveler's diarrhea diet is to make your symptoms better and prevent you from getting ...

  8. Molecular detection of bovine coronavirus in a diarrhea outbreak in pasture-feeding Nellore steers in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Juliane; Lorenzetti, Elis; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide diarrhea outbreaks in cattle herds are more frequently detected in calves being that diarrhea outbreaks in adult cattle are not common. Winter dysentery (WD) is a bovine coronavirus (BCoV) enteric infection that is more reported in Northern hemisphere. Seasonal outbreaks of WD in adult cattle occur mainly in dairy cows. WD has not been described in beef cattle herds of tropical countries. This study describes the molecular detection of BCoV in a diarrhea outbreak in beef cattle steers (Nellore) raised on pasture in Parana, southern Brazil. During the outbreak, the farm had about 600 fattening steers. Watery and bloody diarrhea unresponsive to systemic broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy reveals a morbidity rate of approximately 15 %. The BCoV N gene was identified in 42.9 % (6/14) of the diarrheic fecal samples evaluated by semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (SN-PCR) technique. Other enteric microorganisms occasionally identified in adult cattle and evaluated in this study such as bovine groups A, B, and C rotavirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine torovirus, aichivirus B, and Eimeria sp. were not identified in the fecal samples. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first description of the BCoV diagnosis in fecal samples collected in a diarrhea outbreak in adult beef cattle grazing in the grass in a tropical country.

  9. Diarrhea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old ... > For Parents > Diarrhea Print A A A What's in this ...

  10. Pediatric Norovirus Diarrhea in Nicaragua▿

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemon; Nordgren, Johan; Carlsson, Beatrice; Paniagua, Margarita; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Espinoza, Felix; Svensson, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Information about norovirus (NoV) infections in Central America is limited. Through a passive community and hospital pediatric diarrhea surveillance program, a total of 542 stool samples were collected between March 2005 and February 2006 in León, Nicaragua. NoV was detected in 12% (65/542) of the children; of these, 11% (45/409) were in the community and 15% (20/133) were in the hospital, with most strains (88%) belonging to genogroup II. NoV infections were age and gender associated, with children of <2 years of age (P < 0.05) and girls (P < 0.05) being most affected. Breast-feeding did not reduce the number of NoV infections. An important proportion (57%) of NoV-infected children were coinfected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. A significant proportion (18/31) of NoV-positive children with dehydration required intravenous rehydration. Nucleotide sequence analysis (38/65) of the N-terminal and shell region in the capsid gene revealed that at least six genotypes (GI.4, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, GII.17, and a potentially novel cluster termed “GII.18-Nica”) circulated during the study period, with GII.4 virus being predominant (26/38). The majority (20/26) of those GII.4 strains shared high nucleotide homology (99%) with the globally emerging Hunter strain. The mean viral load was approximately 15-fold higher in children infected with GII.4 virus than in those infected with other G.II viruses, with the highest viral load observed for the group of children infected with GII.4 and requiring intravenous rehydration. This study, the first of its type from a Central American country, suggests that NoV is an important etiological agent of acute diarrhea among children of <2 years of age in Nicaragua. PMID:18562593

  11. Severe diarrhea due to Isospora belli in a patient with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Rezaian, Mostafa; Mirzaei, Ali Zare; Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Faghihi, Amir Hossein; Oormazdi, Hormazd; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2009-12-01

    Opportunistic isosporidial infection of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently encountered in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is considered to be an AIDS-defining illness. Chronic severe watery diarrhea due to Isospora belli has also been reported in other immunodeficiency states. This report describes severe chronic debilitating diarrhea due to isosporiasis in a patient with mediastinal thymoma, a common tumor of the anterior mediastinum, originating from the epithelial cells of the thymus. Numerous oocysts of I. belli were detected in direct smear preparation of the diarrheic stool sample of the patient, who had an 8-month history of recurrent diarrhea. Duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies revealed slight degrees of atrophic changes associated with infiltration of the lamina propria by an appreciable number of eosinophiles and the presence of unizoit tissue cysts of I. belli in the surface epithelium of the duodenal mucosa. The patient was first treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and subsequently underwent complete thymectomy. Later, due to recurrence of the diarrhea, he was treated with ciprofloxacin.

  12. Dietary clays alleviate diarrhea of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Liu, Y; Soares, J A; Che, T M; Osuna, O; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether 3 different clays in the nursery diet reduce diarrhea of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli. Weaned pigs (21 d old) were housed in individual pens of disease containment chambers for 16 d [4 d before and 12 d after the first challenge (d 0)]. The treatments were in a factorial arrangement: 1) with or without an E. coli challenge (F-18 E. coli strain; heat-labile, heat-stable, and Shiga-like toxins; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose daily for 3 d from d 0) and 2) dietary treatments. The ADG, ADFI, and G:F were measured for each interval (d 0 to 6, 6 to 12, and 0 to 12). Diarrhea score (DS; 1 = normal; 5 = watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Feces were collected on d 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 and plated on blood agar to differentiate β-hemolytic coliforms (HC) from total coliforms (TC) and on MacConkey agar to verify E. coli. Their populations on blood agar were assessed visually using a score (0 = no growth; 8 = very heavy bacterial growth) and expressed as a ratio of HC to TC scores (RHT). Blood was collected on d 0, 6, and 12 to measure total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts, packed cell volume (PCV), and total protein (TP). In Exp. 1 (8 treatments; 6 replicates), 48 pigs (6.9 ± 1.0 kg of BW) and 4 diets [a nursery control diet (CON), CON + 0.3% smectite (SM), CON + 0.6% SM, and CON until d 0 and then CON + 0.3% SM] were used. The SM treatments did not affect growth rate of the pigs for the overall period. In the E. coli challenged group, the SM treatments reduced DS for the overall period (1.77 vs. 2.01; P < 0.05) and RHT on d 6 (0.60 vs. 0.87; P < 0.05) and d 9 (0.14 vs. 0.28; P = 0.083), and altered differential WBC on d 6 (neutrophils, 48 vs. 39%, P = 0.092; lymphocytes, 49 vs. 58%, P = 0.082) compared with the CON treatment. In Exp. 2 (16 treatments; 8 replicates), 128 pigs (6.7 ± 0.8 kg of BW) and 8 diets [CON and 7 clay treatments (CON + 0.3% SM

  13. Dietary management of childhood diarrhea in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current WHO guidelines on the management and treatment of diarrhea in children strongly recommend continued feeding alongside the administration of oral rehydration solution and zinc therapy, but there remains some debate regarding the optimal diet or dietary ingredients for feeding children with diarrhea. Methods We conducted a systematic search for all published randomized controlled trials evaluating food-based interventions among children under five years old with diarrhea in low- and middle-income countries. We classified 29 eligible studies into one or more comparisons: reduced versus regular lactose liquid feeds, lactose-free versus lactose-containing liquid feeds, lactose-free liquid feeds versus lactose-containing mixed diets, and commercial/specialized ingredients versus home-available ingredients. We used all available outcome data to conduct random-effects meta-analyses to estimate the average effect of each intervention on diarrhea duration, stool output, weight gain and treatment failure risk for studies on acute and persistent diarrhea separately. Results Evidence of low-to-moderate quality suggests that among children with acute diarrhea, diluting or fermenting lactose-containing liquid feeds does not affect any outcome when compared with an ordinary lactose-containing liquid feeds. In contrast, moderate quality evidence suggests that lactose-free liquid feeds reduce duration and the risk of treatment failure compared to lactose-containing liquid feeds in acute diarrhea. Only limited evidence of low quality was available to assess either of these two approaches in persistent diarrhea, or to assess lactose-free liquid feeds compared to lactose-containing mixed diets in either acute or persistent diarrhea. For commercially prepared or specialized ingredients compared to home-available ingredients, we found low-to-moderate quality evidence of no effect on any outcome in either acute or persistent diarrhea, though when we restricted these

  14. Probiotics for Prevention and Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Alfredo; Guandalini, Stefano; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of diarrhea more in children than in adults. Given the broad spectrum of diarrhea, this review focuses on the main etiologies: acute gastroenteritis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). For each, we reviewed randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and guidelines. For acute gastroenteritis we found 12 guidelines: 5 recommended probiotics and 7 did not. However, the guidelines containing positive recommendations provided proof of evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Saccharomyces boulardii had the most compelling evidence of efficacy as they reduced the duration of the disease by 1 day. For AAD 4 meta-analyses were found, reporting variable efficacy of probiotics in preventing diarrhea, based on the setting, patient's age, and antibiotics. The most effective strains were LGG and S. boulardii. For NEC, we found 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 meta-analyses, and 4 position papers. Probiotics reduced the risk of NEC enterocolitis and mortality in preterm babies. Guidelines did not support a routine use of probiotics and asked for further data for such sensitive implications. In conclusion, there is strong and solid proof of efficacy of probiotics as active treatment of gastroenteritis in addition to rehydration. There is solid evidence that probiotics have some efficacy in prevention of AAD, but the number needed to treat is an issue. For both etiologies LGG and S. boulardii have the strongest evidence. In NEC the indications are more debated, yet on the basis of available data and their implications, probiotics should be carefully considered.

  15. [Observation on clinical efficacy of Baoerkang san on spleen-deficiency and dampness-obstructing diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-xue

    2015-04-01

    The study aims to observe the clinical efficacy of Baoerkang san on spleen-deficiency and dampness-obstructing diarrhea in children. Children diarrhea divided into acute diarrhea (group I) and chronic persistent diarrhea (group II). A randomized, double-blind, positive control test was conducted for dose finding. The 340 cases with acute diarrhea in group I were divided into three groups: the high dose group (112 patients), the low dose group (113 patients) and the positive control group (115 patients), which were treated for 3 days. Their clinical efficacies were compared to evaluate the clinical safety of Baoerkang san. The 167 patients with chronic persistent diarrhea in group If were divided into the high dose group (56 patients), the low dose group (55 patients) and the control group (56 patients), which were treated for 5 days. Their clinical efficacy were compared to evaluate the clinical safety of Baoerkang san. According to the results, the cure rate and the effective rate of acute diarrhea and chronic persistent diarrhea in the high dose group and the low dose group were significantly higher than that of the positive control group (P <0. 05, P < 0.01). In the treatment of spleen-deficiency and dampness-obstructing diarrhea with traditional Chinese medicines, the cure rate and the effective rate of acute diarrhea and chronic persistent diarrhea in the high dose group and the low dose group were significantly higher than that of the positive control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). During the test, all of the three groups did not suffer any adverse event, with no any abnormality in general physical indexes. In conclusion, Baoerkang san shows a significant efficacy in treating acute diarrhea and chronic persistent diarrhea (spleen-deficiency and dampness-obstructing) and safe clinical application.

  16. Prevalence of VP7 and VP4 genotypes of human group A rotavirus in infants and children with acute diarrhea in a northern city of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, S K; Hossain, M A; Ahmed, M U; Alam, M M; Musa, A K; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Islam, M N; Saha, S K

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this cross sectional prospective study was to determine rotavirus etiology and prevalence of the different rotavirus genotypes causing acute gastroenteritis in infants and children (

  17. Supplementation with vitamin A reduces watery diarrhoea and respiratory infections in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Long, Kurt Z; Rosado, Jorge L; DuPont, Herbert L; Hertzmark, Ellen; Santos, Jose Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Previous clinical vitamin A trials have found no consistent effect on diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infection. These inconsistent results may be due to the distinct effects vitamin A supplementation has among children stratified by factors related to socio-economic status, nutritional status and season. We evaluated the effect of supplementation on the overall incidence of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections and on the incidence among children stratified by these factors. A total of 188 children, aged 6-15 months, from periurban, marginalized communities of Mexico City were assigned to receive vitamin A ( < 12 months of age, 20,000 IU retinol; >or= 12 months, 45,000 IU retinol) or a placebo every 2 months, and were followed for up to 15 months. Project personnel visited households twice a week to determine the onset and duration of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections. Vitamin A supplementation had no significant effect on risk of overall diarrhoeal disease but reduced mild watery diarrhoea (incidence rate ratio (RR) 0.69; 95 % CI 0.50, 0.93) and cough with fever (RR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.48, 0.98). Vitamin A supplementation decreased diarrhoeal disease during the summer (RR 0.74; 95 % CI 0.57, 0.94), among non-stunted children (RR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.52, 0.93) and among children from households with better socio-economic measures. Heterogeneity in the response to vitamin A supplementation may reflect heterogeneity in the aetiology and epidemiology of diarrhoeal disease and respiratory tract infections and the impact that supplementation has on the immune response.

  18. Management of the Returning Traveler with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Traveler's diarrhea (TD) strikes 20—60% of travelers visiting developing countries. It occurs shortly after the return and can be distinguished into two categories: acute and persistent TD. Acute TD, mostly caused by bacterial and viral pathogens, is usually mild and self-limited, and deserves empirical symptomatic and/or antibiotic therapy in selected cases. Fluoroquinolones are progressively superseded in this indication by azithromycin, a well tolerated macrolide active against most bacteria responsible for TD, including the quinolone-resistant species of Campylobacter jejuni that are now pervasive, especially in Southeast Asia and India. Persistent TD in the returning traveler is much rarer than its acute counterpart and may be associated with three types of causes. Persistent infections, among which Giardia and possibly Entamoeba predominate, account for a significant proportion of cases. Postinfectious processes represent a second cause and comprise temporary lactose malabsorption and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, now considered a major cause of persistent TD. Finally, apparently unrelated chronic diseases causing diarrhea are occasionally unmasked by TD and represent a third type of persistent TD, among which the well established case of incident inflammatory bowel disease poses intriguing pathogenesis questions. This review discusses recent advances in the field and provides practical recommendations for the management of TD in adult, immunocompetent returning travelers. PMID:21180583

  19. pic gene of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and its association with diarrhea in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Durand, David; Contreras, Carmen A; Mosquito, Susan; Ruíz, Joaquim; Cleary, Thomas G; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) causes acute and persistent diarrhea among children, HIV-infected patients, and travelers to developing countries. We have searched for 18 genes-encoding virulence factors associated with aggregative adherence, dispersion, biofilm, toxins, serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) and siderophores, analyzed in 172 well-characterized EAEC strains (aggR(+)) isolated from stool samples of 97 children with diarrhea and 75 healthy controls from a passive surveillance diarrhea cohort study in Peru. Eighty-one different genetic profiles were identified, 37 were found only associated with diarrhea and 25 with control samples. The most frequent genetic profile was aggC(+)aatA(+)aap(+)shf(+)fyuA(+), present in 19 strains, including diarrhea and controls. The profile set1A(+)set1B(+)pic(+) was associated with diarrhea (P < 0.05). Of all genes evaluated, the most frequent were aatA (CVD 342) present in 159 strains (92.4%) and fyuA in 157 (91.3%). When EAEC strains were analyzed as a single pathogen (excluding co-infections), only pic was associated with diarrhea (P < 0.05) and with prolonged diarrhea (diarrhea ≥ 7 days) (P < 0.05). In summary, this is the first report on the prevalence of a large set of EAEC virulence genes and its association with diarrhea in Peruvian children. More studies are needed to elucidate the exact role of each virulence factor.

  20. Dietary plant extracts alleviate diarrhea and alter immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Almeida, J A S; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2013-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of 3 different plant extracts on diarrhea, immune response, intestinal morphology, and growth performance of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sixty-four weaned pigs (6.3±0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens in disease containment chambers for 15 d: 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2×4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge (toxins: heat-labile toxin, heat-stable toxin b, and Shiga-like toxin 2; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose; daily for 3 d from d 0) and 4 diets [a nursery basal diet (CON) or 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin]. The growth performance was measured on d 0 to 5, 5 to 11, and 0 to 11. Diarrhea score (1, normal, to 5, watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Frequency of diarrhea was the percentage of pig days with a diarrhea score of 3 or greater. Blood was collected on d 0, 5, and 11 to measure total and differential white blood cell counts and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin. On d 5 and 11, half of the pigs were euthanized to measure villi height and crypt depth of the small intestine and macrophage and neutrophil number in the ileum. The E. coli infection increased (P<0.05) diarrhea score, frequency of diarrhea, white blood cell counts, serum TNF-α and haptoglobin, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils but reduced (P<0.05) villi height and the ratio of villi height to crypt depth of the small intestine on d 5. In the challenged group, feeding plant extracts reduced (P<0.05) average diarrhea score from d 0 to 2 and d 6 to 11 and frequency of diarrhea and decreased (P<0.05) TNF-α and haptoglobin on d 5, white blood cell counts and neutrophils on d 11, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils on d 5. Feeding plant extracts increased (P<0

  1. Risk factors of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized children in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is a major public health concern throughout the world because the prevalence of morbidity of diarrhea has not changed significantly in the past decade. It remains the third leading cause of death among children less than 5 years of age. Recent surveillance studies have shown that rotavirus is a significant cause of pediatric hospitalization and death due to diarrhea. Indonesia has limited data on risk factors, disease burden, and deaths in children due to rotavirus diarrhea. The objective of this study was to examine the above mentioned factors related to rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized children in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar from April 2009 to December 2011. The present study was part of a nationwide study on Extension for Hospital-based Surveillance and Strain Characterization of Rotavirus Diarrhea Indonesia involving four hospitals throughout Indonesia as a part of the Asian Rotavirus Surveillance Network. We studied children aged <5 years who were hospitalized with acute diarrhea, and analyzed their stool samples using an immunoassay that detects the rotavirus antigen. Results A total of 656 patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Of 5805 patients under the age of 5 who were hospitalized between April 2009 and December 2011, the prevalence of diarrhea among hospitalized pediatric patients was 11.3% and the prevalence of rotavirus diarrhea was 49.8%. The male to female ratio of those affected by rotavirus was 1.6:1. The occurrence of vomiting was significantly higher in rotavirus diarrhea than in non-rotavirus diarrhea (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.70; p = 0.004). Conclusions Diarrhea remains an important cause of hospitalization in children, and rotavirus was the most important etiology. We found that boys had a greatest risk of rotavirus infection than girls. Good nutritional status and breastfeeding provided the same protection against rotavirus and

  2. Diarrhea incidence and intestinal infections among rotavirus vaccinated infants from a poor area in Brazil: a spatial analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhea is the second leading cause of mortality among children under 5 years of age in developing countries. The pathogen most strongly associated with diarrhea is rotavirus followed by enteric pathogens such as bacteria, helminthes and protozoan. Adequate sanitation and water supply contribute to decrease acute diarrhea incidence of most etiologic agents, although vaccination remains the most important intervention to control rotavirus acute diarrhea. This study aimed to describe environmental conditions and analyze spatially the acute diarrhea and intestinal infection among rotavirus vaccinated infants from Laranjeiras-Sergipe, Brazil. Methods Children were enrolled between 2 and 11 months of age and followed through 12 months. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental data were obtained from a questionnaire, and immunization data were obtained from children vaccination card. Children stool samples were collected each month in order to run laboratory analyses. The household spatial localization was obtained by using a Global Positioning System (GPS). Spatial analysis was performed using the TerraView computer program and Kernel intensity estimation. Results A total of 1,113 stool samples were collected with 80 being diarrhea associated. Diarrhea incidence rate was 0.5 ± 1.0 episodes/child/year. The overall infection rates by Ascaris lumbricoides, Endolimax nana, Giardia lamblia and rotavirus were 5.1%, 3.0%, 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively. 3.8% of diarrhea-associated stool samples were positive for rotavirus and 11.3% were positive for helminths and protozoans. There were some changes on spatial distribution of intestinal infections and diarrhea episodes along the four trimesters evaluated. Conclusions The studied infants live equally in precarious conditions of sanitation which probably explain the significant rates of parasitic infections appearing in early life. The low acute diarrhea incidence in the studied rotavirus vaccinated

  3. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Genetic change in the open reading frame of bovine viral diarrhea virus is introduced more rapidly during the establishment of a single persistent infection than by multiple acute infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are ubiquitous viral pathogens of cattle. There is a high degree of sequence diversity between strains circulating in livestock herds. The driving force behind change in sequence is not known but the inaccurate replication of the genomic RNA by a viral RNA polyme...

  5. Excessive sulfate and poor water quality as a cause of sudden deaths and an outbreak of diarrhea in horses

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Brandy A.; Lohmann, Katharina L.; Blakley, Barry R.

    2010-01-01

    Sudden deaths and an outbreak of diarrhea in horses occurred in southern Saskatchewan in 2006. Five horses died while survivors presented with diarrhea and, in 1 case, acute neurologic signs attributed to hyponatremia. Diagnostic testing of affected horses and environmental testing suggested poor water quality, specifically high salinity and high sulfate concentration as the cause. PMID:20514251

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Human Diarrhea: Viral Detection and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Phillip I.; Klein, Eileen J.; Kirkwood, Carl D.; Wang, David

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 1.8 million children die from diarrhea annually, and millions more suffer multiple episodes of nonfatal diarrhea. On average, in up to 40% of cases, no etiologic agent can be identified. The advent of metagenomic sequencing has enabled systematic and unbiased characterization of microbial populations; thus, metagenomic approaches have the potential to define the spectrum of viruses, including novel viruses, present in stool during episodes of acute diarrhea. The detection of novel or unexpected viruses would then enable investigations to assess whether these agents play a causal role in human diarrhea. In this study, we characterized the eukaryotic viral communities present in diarrhea specimens from 12 children by employing a strategy of “micro-mass sequencing” that entails minimal starting sample quantity (<100 mg stool), minimal sample purification, and limited sequencing (384 reads per sample). Using this methodology we detected known enteric viruses as well as multiple sequences from putatively novel viruses with only limited sequence similarity to viruses in GenBank. PMID:18398449

  7. Calcium ameliorates diarrhea in immune compromised children

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sam X.; Bai, Harrison X.; Gonzalez-Peralta, Regino; Mistry, Pramod K.; Gorelick, Fred S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of infectious diarrheas remains a challenge, particularly in immunocompromised patients in whom infections usually persist and resultant diarrhea is often severe and protracted. Children with infectious diarrhea who become dehydrated are normally treated with oral or intravenous rehydration therapy. Although rehydration therapy can replace the loss of fluid, it does not ameliorate diarrhea. Thus, over the past decades, there has been continuous effort to search for ways to safely stop diarrhea. Herein, we report three cases of immunocompromised children who developed severe and/or protracted infectious diarrhea. Their diarrheas were successfully “halted” within 1-2 days following the administration of calcium. PMID:23343935

  8. Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review.

    PubMed

    Atia, Antwan N; Buchman, Alan L

    2009-10-01

    The use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) has revolutionized the management of acute diarrhea. The implementation of the standard World Health Organization ORS (WHO-ORS) has resulted in decreased mortality associated with acute diarrheal illnesses in children, although in general stool volume and diarrhea durations are not reduced. Decreased morbidity and mortality have occurred because of improved hydration status. Decreased morbidity has also been described in adults who used this therapy. Various modifications to the standard ORS have been derived. These modifications have included hypo-osmolar or hyperosmolar solutions, use of rice-based ORS, zinc supplementation, and the use of amino acids, including glycine, alanine, and glutamine. Some of these variations have been successful, some have not, and others are still under investigation. ORS has been used for travelers' diarrhea and to decrease intravenous (IV) fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) who require parenteral nutrition (PN). This paper reviews the standard WHO-ORS and its mechanism of action, followed by more contemporary reduced osmolarity ORS and rice-based ORS in non-cholera diarrhea. Various modifications to improve ORS are also discussed.

  9. When your child has diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Use low-fat milk, cheese, or yogurt. If dairy products are making the diarrhea worse or causing gas ... child may need to stop eating or drinking dairy products for a few days. Children should be allowed ...

  10. [Sodium concentrations in solutions for oral rehydration in children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Morales-Barradas, J A

    1990-04-01

    Using the appropriate treatment for dehydration due to diarrhea, over a million deaths a year in children under five are being prevented. After analyzing the information related to the concentration of sodium in solutions used for oral rehydration, the following conclusions can be made: 1. Solutions with high glucose content, as well as hyperosmolar foods, favor the development of hypernatremia. Not so, sodium concentrations of up to 90 mmol/L, with glucose under 2.5%. 2. There are other factors which correlate with the presence of hypernatremia: abundant watery diarrhea, a good state of nutrition, under six months of age and the administration of solute loads, orally (boiled milk) as well as intravenously. 3. The WHO oral rehydration solution which contains, in mmol/L: sodium 90, glucose 111 (2%), chloride 80, potassium 20 and citrate 10, with a total osmolarity of 311 or 331 mOsm/L, is the one which more closely resembles the ideal concentration and has shown to be effective, not only in the treatment of dehydration due to diarrhea, but has also been to be useful in the prevention and maintenance of rehydration, independently from the etiology, the patient's age or the state of nutrition. 4. The use of oral serum with a sodium concentration of 90 mmol/L, reduces the natremia more slowly, therefore protecting the patient with hypernatremic dehydration from developing convulsions during treatment. This sodium concentration is also the best for cases of hyponatremic dehydration. 5. Using the recommended norms in cases of children with diarrhea, including continuing regular feeding habits and the adding of complementary liquids, no cases of hypernatremia have been recorded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection: Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Saif, Linda J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a member of the genera Alphacoronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and high mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. For the last three decades, PEDV infection has resulted in significant economic losses in the European and Asian pig industries, but in 2013-2014 the disease was also reported in the US, Canada and Mexico. The PED epidemic in the US, from April 2013 to the present, has led to the loss of more than 10% of the US pig population. The disappearance and re-emergence of epidemic PED indicates that the virus is able to escape from current vaccination protocols, biosecurity and control systems. Endemic PED is a significant problem, which is exacerbated by the emergence (or potential importation) of multiple PEDV variants. Epidemic PEDV strains spread rapidly and cause a high number of pig deaths. These strains are highly enteropathogenic and acutely infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites. PEDV infections cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by viremia that leads to profound diarrhea and vomiting, followed by extensive dehydration, which is the major cause of death in nursing piglets. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenic characteristics of epidemic or endemic PEDV strains is needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis as well as immunoprophylaxis against PEDV infection.

  12. Colon-derived uremic biomarkers induced by the acute toxicity of Kansui radix: A metabolomics study of rat plasma and intestinal contents by UPLC-QTOF-MS(E).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Hou, Jin-Jun; Qi, Peng; Yang, Min; Yan, Bing-Peng; Bi, Qi-Rui; Feng, Rui-Hong; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2016-07-15

    Kansui radix (KR) is a poisonous Chinese herbal medicine recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, and the acute toxicity obstructs its clinical applications. To explore its acute toxicity mechanism to enhance clinical safety, a metabolomics study based on UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS(E) was performed. Wistar rats were exposed for 4h to the aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts prepared from KR at a high dose (25g/kg). The contents of six different sections of rat intestine, including the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum were collected as samples for the first time, as well as the rat plasma. The interesting results showed that only those rats exposed to the ethyl acetate extract showed a watery diarrhea, similar to the observed acute human toxicity. The identified biomarkers found in the plasma, such as phenol sulfate, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresol sulfate were significantly perturbed in the rats. These biomarkers are known as colon-derived uremic compounds, which were first reported with respect to KR. The three essential amino acids which produced these biomarkers were only found in the contents of colon and rectum. A hypothesis was proposed that only the colon-derived uremic compounds induced by KR might be responsible for the acute toxicity. Three traditional process methods to reduce the toxicity of KR were compared based on these biomarkers, and different levels of toxicity modulation were observed. These results may be helpful to further understand the mechanism of acute toxicity, and the relevance of the traditional process methods to ameliorate the adverse effects of KR.

  13. A case of severe hemorrhagic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sumrall, Ashley; McMullan, Lindsey; Abrasley, Chris; East, Honey

    2007-12-01

    A 50-year-old white female presented to the emergency department with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and hematochezia. The illness started four days prior to presentation and escalated to 10-15 bowel movements daily. She was tachycardic and hypotensive upon presentation with a diffusely tender abdomen. Her anemia and persistent hematochezia prompted endoscopy by a gastroenterologist. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed to the splenic flexure and revealed evidence of severe active colitis. The mucosa was friable and severely ulcerated. Numerous biopsies were obtained that revealed acute colitis with fibrinopurulent exudates. A stool culture showed Escherichia coli O157:H7, which was confirmed by the Mississippi State Board of Health. Infection with E. coli O157:H7 affects nearly 1.1 per 100,000 Americans annually. It accounts for about 3% of all bacterial and protozoal causes of foodborne illnesses and possesses a mortality rate of about 1-2%.

  14. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis precipitated by diarrhea.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Jacob, Sunitha; Mahmood, Aza K

    2007-01-01

    Metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is a serious metabolic complication that occurs because of metformin accumulation in patients who become dehydrated or developed acute renal failure. Bicarbonate hemodialysis treatment should take place early in the course of management, especially in patients with severe metabolic acidosis who fail to respond to intravenous bicarbonate therapy or in whom renal failure is present. We report a case of MALA in which acute renal failure resulting from dehydration secondary to diarrhea and poor oral intake likely caused MALA. Early recognition of this condition and initiation of effective treatment can improve outcome.

  15. Efficacy of a single dose of oral antibiotic given within two hours of birth in preventing watery mouth disease and illthrift in colostrum-deficient lambs.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, J C; Brebner, J; Mckendrick, I J

    1999-07-17

    An antibiotic with a product licence limited to the treatment and control of infectious bacterial enteritis associated with Escherichia coli in piglets was tested for its ability to control watery mouth disease in neonatal lambs. Three groups of lambs were kept in conditions commonly encountered in intensive lambing systems, where high levels of environmental bacterial contamination may be expected. They were allocated at birth to: a control group (group 1) consisting of 18 colostrum-deprived lambs; group 2, consisting of 17 lambs given one feed of colostrum when they were two hours old; and group 3, consisting of 18 colostrum-deprived lambs given spectinomycin orally when they were two hours old. Nine group 1 lambs became diseased and were killed for humane reasons. Blood biochemical changes included hyperglycaemia followed by hypoglycaemia, lactacidaemia, hypoproteinaemia and metabolic acidosis, and postmortem examination of the diseased lambs showed signs consistent with endotoxaemia and a clinical diagnosis of watery mouth disease. Coliforms were isolated from the blood of all group 1 lambs and from half the lambs in groups 2 and 3, but endotoxaemia and watery mouth disease occurred only in group 1 lambs. The results for groups 2 and 3 showed that neither colostrum nor antibiotic at the rates and frequency used prevented bacteraemia, although consecutive samples were positive only on three occasions. Group 3 lambs consistently grew more rapidly than the surviving group 1 lambs and as rapidly as group 2 lambs. There was no evidence that male lambs were more prone to watery mouth disease than female lambs. The results indicated that the antibiotic spectinomycin did not induce endotoxaemia during low-grade bacteraemia and that a single oral dose given within two hours of birth protected colostrum-deprived lambs delivered into a contaminated indoor environment against watery mouth disease.

  16. [Clostridium-difficile-associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, Luis; Cosme, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized patients. The inflammation is produced as a result of a non-specific response to toxins. In the last few years, a hypervirulent strain, NAP1/BI/027, has been reported. Symptoms usually consist of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient who develops diarrhea during antibiotic therapy or 6-8 weeks after treatment. Diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of CD toxin in stool and by colonoscopy in special situations. The treatment of choice is metronidazole or vancomycin. In some patients who do not respond to this therapy or who have complications, subtotal colectomy may be required. Relapse is frequent and must be distinguished from reinfection. Prevention and control in healthcare settings requires careful attention.

  17. Successful pregnancy in a female patient with congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) and renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshio; Kamoda, Tomohiro; Nagata, Michio; Yoh, Keigyo; Hashimoto, Yuko; Matsui, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Koyama, Akio

    2009-01-01

    We report a successful case of pregnancy in a female patient with congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) and reduced renal function due to interruption of treatment. CLD is an autosomal recessive disorder of intestinal electrolyte absorption caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3) gene, and continuous production of watery diarrhea induces dehydration, metabolic alkalosis and many kinds of electrolyte disturbances in CLD patients. The patient in our case was a 24-year-old female CLD patient with moderate renal impairment; a renal biopsy specimen showed minimal glomerular changes, but tubulointerstitial damage by crystal formation, consistent with renal function data. One year after our initial examination and reinstitution of therapy, the patient got married and soon conceived. There were no major problems during the course of pregnancy, and the patient successfully delivered a healthy full-term infant vaginally. The symptoms and clinical course of the patient were particularly mild, and we discuss possible reasons for these observations from a perspective of genotype, phenotype and environmental conditions.

  18. Crofelemer for the treatment of chronic diarrhea in patients living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Twisha S; Crutchley, Rustin D; Tucker, Anne M; Cottreau, Jessica; Garey, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common comorbidity present in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) who are treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. With a multifactorial etiology, this diarrhea often becomes difficult to manage. In addition, some antiretrovirals are associated with chronic diarrhea, which potentially creates an adherence barrier to antiretrovirals and may ultimately affect treatment outcomes and future therapeutic options for HIV. A predominant type of diarrhea that develops in HIV patients has secretory characteristics, including increased secretion of chloride ions and water into the intestinal lumen. One proposed mechanism that may lead to this type of secretory diarrhea is explained by the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated chloride channels. Crofelemer is a novel antidiarrheal agent that works by inhibiting both of these channels. The efficacy and safety of crofelemer has been evaluated in clinical trials for various types of secretory diarrhea, including cholera-related and acute infectious diarrhea. More recently, crofelemer was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the symptomatic relief of noninfectious diarrhea in adult patients with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy. Results from the ADVENT trial showed that crofelemer reduced symptoms of secretory diarrhea in HIV/AIDS patients. Because crofelemer is not systemically absorbed, this agent is well tolerated by patients, and in clinical trials it has been associated with minimal adverse events. Crofelemer has a unique mechanism of action, which may offer a more reliable treatment option for HIV patients who experience chronic secretory diarrhea from antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23888120

  19. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight loss. A stomach or intestinal illness can cause diarrhea. It can also be a side effect of ... vitamins, herbs, or supplements my child is taking cause diarrhea? Are there medicines I should stop giving my ...

  20. The Day Care Center Diarrhea Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Larry K.

    1986-01-01

    Prevention and control of diarrhea in day care settings depends on: maintenance of hygienic standards; disease surveillance; adhering to a policy for exclusion of children with diarrhea; and education of staff. When diarrhea afflicts several children, isolating together can stop the spread of disease without interrupting normal operation. (KH)

  1. Tolerance to glucose polymers in malnourished infants with diarrhea and disaccharide intolerance.

    PubMed

    Fagundes-Neto, U; Viaro, T; Lifshitz, F

    1985-02-01

    The response of infants with diarrhea and lactose intolerance to feedings containing soy protein and sucrose (Sobee), and/or to a carbohydrate free formula (RCF), to which glucose polymers (GP) were added, was assessed in twenty patients. They all were less than ten months of age and had varying degrees of malnutrition. Eleven had acute diarrhea and nine had chronic diarrhea. None of them had classical enteropathogenic strains and parasites in the stools. All had lactose intolerance when feedings were begun with cow's milk formula and some also had sucrose intolerance when fed sucrose containing soy formulas. They had persistent loose stools and excreted feces with an acid pH and with carbohydrates, thus they were given dietary treatment with RCF with GP. There were 9 patients with acute diarrhea and lactose intolerance (1 of them also had sucrose intolerance), who improved on RCF with GP feedings; but 2 patients (lactose and sucrose intolerant) failed to respond to this diet. There were six patients with chronic diarrhea and lactose intolerance (four of them also had sucrose intolerance), who improved on RCF with GP formula, but there were three patients who failed on this treatment. These data show that some infants with diarrhea, malnutrition, and lactose-sucrose intolerance may also develop intolerance to GP and require further dietary management with glucose as the source of carbohydrate in the diet.

  2. Factors that explain excretion of enteric pathogens by persons without diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Levine, Myron M; Robins-Browne, Roy M

    2012-12-01

    Excretion of enteropathogens by subjects without diarrhea influences our appreciation of the role of these pathogens as etiologic agents. Characteristics of the pathogens and host and environmental factors help explain asymptomatic excretion of diarrheal pathogens by persons without diarrhea. After causing acute diarrhea followed by clinical recovery, some enteropathogens are excreted asymptomatically for many weeks. Thus, in a prevalence survey of persons without diarrhea, some may be excreting pathogens from diarrheal episodes experienced many weeks earlier. Volunteer challenges with Vibrio cholerae O1, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia document heterogeneity among enteropathogen strains, with some inexplicably not eliciting diarrhea. The immune host may not manifest diarrhea following ingestion of a pathogen but may nevertheless asymptomatically excrete. Some human genotypes render them less susceptible to symptomatic or severe diarrheal infection with certain pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae O1 and norovirus. Pathogens in stools of individuals without diarrhea may reflect recent ingestion of inocula too small to cause disease in otherwise susceptible hosts or of animal pathogens (eg, bovine or porcine ETEC) that do not cause human illness.

  3. Diarrhea in Children: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian; Johnson, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common pediatric problem. Careful attention to hygiene in diapered children in group settings can help prevent the problem. The proper presentation of stool specimens to the lab will facilitate the diagnosis. Correct electrolyte, glucose, and water solutions, followed by appropriate introduction of solid foods, will speed recovery. PMID:21253170

  4. Diarrhea in children: two cases.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I; Johnson, P

    1988-05-01

    Diarrhea is a common pediatric problem. Careful attention to hygiene in diapered children in group settings can help prevent the problem. The proper presentation of stool specimens to the lab will facilitate the diagnosis. Correct electrolyte, glucose, and water solutions, followed by appropriate introduction of solid foods, will speed recovery.

  5. Hypokalemia associated with acute colonic pseudo-obstruction in an ESRD patient.

    PubMed

    Boobés, Khaled; Rosa, Robert M; Batlle, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, or acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, is characterized by massive dilation of the colon without mechanical obstruction. Water and electrolytes often can be sequestered in the dilated intestinal loops resulting in profuse and watery diarrhea as well as hypokalemia. We report an anuric, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who developed acute colonic pseudo-obstruction causing a prolonged hospitalization. He also developed severe hypokalemia with a serum potassium (K+) as low as 2.4 mEq/L and required 180 - 240 mEq of potassium chloride per day for more than a month to correct it. While PD K+ losses often contribute to hypokalemia, the PD K+ loss was estimated to be only 39 mEq/day. Therefore, PD could only contribute modestly to the recalcitrant hypokalemia observed during the episode of pseudo-obstruction. It has been shown, however, that patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction have enhanced colonic K+ secretion. In addition, experimental studies in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have demonstrated that colonic K+ excretion can be up to 3 times greater than in individuals with normal renal function. This increase may involve an upregulation of the large conductance K+ channel (maxi-K), also known as the BK channel, in the apical border of the colonocytes. We suggest that ESRD may have placed our patient at a greater risk of developing hypokalemia as his colon may have already adapted to secrete more K+. Clinicians should be aware of this extrarenal K+ wasting etiology in patients with colonic pseudo-obstruction, particularly in those with CKD where such a severe K+ deficit is not anticipated and, therefore, may inhibit more rigorous K+ replacement.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Variant Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain CH/HNZZ47/2016 Isolated from Suckling Piglets in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinsheng; Zhang, Qiaoling; Fang, Yuzhen; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yanzhen; Xiao, Shuai; Dong, Zhaoliang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) could cause an acute and highly contagious enteric disease in swine. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of PEDV strain CH/HNZZ47/2016 isolated from suckling piglets with mild diarrhea in Henan Province, China. It will help understand the molecular and evolutionary characteristics of PEDV in China. PMID:28254990

  7. [Characterisation of viral agents with potential to cause diarrhea in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Maslin, J; Kohli, E; Leveque, N; Chomel, J J; Nicand, E; Fouet, C; Haus, R; Depina, J J; Mathecowitsch, P; Dampierre, H

    2007-06-01

    Due to limited laboratory facilities in the tropics, the exact role of enteric viruses in causing diarrhea among adults in the tropics is unknown. The purpose of this report is to describe a multicenter study undertaken in Djibouti to determine the prevalence of a large panel of enteric viruses using immunochromatography; antigenic detection by ELISA, RT-PCR cellular inoculation, sequence analysis; and indirect serology. Study samples were collected from 108 patients presenting acute and sporadic diarrhea. Although they are well known causes of diarrhea in children, rotavirus and adenovirus were identified in only 2 and 5% of adults respectively. In contrast human caliciviruses (HuCVs) and enterovirus were identified in 25 and 42% of adult cases respectively. Uncommon genotypes of HuCVs and recombinant forms (junction pol/l cap) as well as a significant number of sapovirus (30%) were identified. Further study is needed to clarify the role of enterovirus (echovirus) in the etiology of acute diarrhea in adults. No polivirus was identified. These new data from the Horn of Africa increase our knowledge about the epidemiology of acute infectious diarrhea that is a major public health problem and potential danger for travelers.

  8. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption.

  9. [Arteriovenous fistula of the spleen revealed by ascites and profuse diarrhea. A case report including ultrasonography and arteriography findings (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wenger, J J; Matter, D; Dupeyron, J P; Kretz, J G; Challan-Belval, P; Warter, P

    1981-05-01

    Abdominal pain, ascites and diarrhea revealed acute portal hypertension in a young woman. Ultrasonography and angiography demonstrated the causative congenital arterio-venous fistula of the splenic vessels. Surgery was successfully performed.

  10. Acute renal failure by ingestion of Euphorbia paralias.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Karima; Ounissi, Mondher; Brahmi, Nozha; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Abdellah, Taieb Ben; El Younsi, Fethi; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2013-05-01

    Euphorbia paralias is known in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, a purgative and for its local anesthetic property. To the best our knowledge, renal toxicity of this substance has not been previously reported. In this paper, we report the case of a 29-year-old male who developed renal damage following ingestion of Euphorbia paralias. He had been on follow-up for nephrotic syndrome since 1986, although irregularly, with several relapses but each responding well to steroid therapy. A kidney biopsy had not been performed earlier due to refusal by the patient. He was off steroids since April 2008 because the patient developed osteoporosis. He was admitted with general malaise and oliguria to our department in May 2009, following repeated vomiting and watery diarrhea for three days. On examination, he was edematous but had normal vital signs except for a pulse rate of 120/min. Hemoglobin was only 5.5 g/dL but with normal white cell and platelet counts. Blood biochemistry showed evidence of advanced renal failure with a serum creatinine level of 1835 μmol/L and urea at 44.6 mmol/L, sodium of 132 μmol/L and potassium at 4.3 mmol/L. He had features of nephrotic syndrome with severe hypoproteinamia and 24-h urinary protein of 10.45 g. Ultrasonography revealed enlarged kidneys with a reduced echogenecity of the medulla and the papillae. Subsequently, after hemodialysis with blood transfusion, a kidney biopsy was performed that showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with an acute tubular injury. On intensive interrogation, the patient gave a history of ingesting boiled Euphorbia paralias as a native treatment for edema, ten days prior to the onset of the current illness. A diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from the possible nephrotoxic effect of Euphorbia paralias poisoning was made. He was treated with intermittent hemodialysis and corticosteroids. Serum creatinine values improved after 48 days. At six months following the

  11. Effects of olestra and sorbitol consumption on objective measures of diarrhea: impact of stool viscosity on common gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    McRorie, J; Zorich, N; Riccardi, K; Bishop, L; Filloon, T; Wason, S; Giannella, R

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of olestra and sorbitol consumption on three accepted objective measures of diarrhea (stool output >250 g/day, liquid/watery stools, bowel movement frequency >3/day), and how stool composition influences reports of common gastrointestinal symptoms. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of sorbitol (40 g/day in candy), a poorly absorbed sugar-alcohol with known osmotic effects, with those of olestra (20 or 40 g/day in potato chips), a nonabsorbed fat, on objective measures of stool composition and GI symptoms. Sixty-six subjects resided on a metabolic ward for 12 days: 2 days lead-in, 4 days baseline, 6 days treatment. Sorbitol 40 g/day resulted in loose/liquid stools within 1-3 h of consumption. In contrast, olestra resulted in a dose-responsive stool softening effect after 2-4 days of consumption. Subjects reported "diarrhea" when mean stool apparent viscosity (peak force (PF), g) decreased from a perceived "normal" (mean +/- SE, 1355 +/- 224 g PF; firm stool) to loose (260 +/- 68 g PF) stool. Mean apparent viscosity of stool during treatment: placebo, 1363 +/- 280 g (firm); olestra 20 g/day 743 +/- 65 g (soft); olestra 40 g/day, 563 +/- 105 g (soft); and sorbitol 40 g/day, 249 +/- 53 g (loose). Of the 1098 stool samples collected, 38% (419/1098) were rated by subjects as "diarrhea," yet only 2% of treatment days (all in the sorbitol treatment group) met commonly accepted criteria for a clinical diarrhea. Sorbitol, but not olestra, increased the severity of abdominal cramping, urgency and nausea compared to placebo. Olestra consumption, at levels far in excess of normal snacking conditions, resulted in a gradual stool softening effect after several days of consumption, did not meet any of the three objective measures of diarrhea, and did not increase GI symptoms. Sorbitol consumption, at only 80% of the dose requiring a "laxative effect" information label, resulted in rapid onset loose

  12. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  13. Rotavirus diarrhea severity is related to the VP4 type in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, Felipe; Calva, Juan José; Gutiérrez-Camacho, Claudia; Villa-Contreras, Sofía; Arias, Carlos F; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Guiscafré-Gallardo, Héctor; de Lourdes Guerrero, María; López, Susana; Muñoz, Onofre; Contreras, Juan F; Cedillo, Roberto; Herrera, Ismael; Puerto, Fernando I

    2003-07-01

    This report is of a community-based case control study to assess whether the severity of acute diarrhea by rotavirus (RV) in young children is associated with a particular VP7 (G) or VP4 (P) RV serotype. Five hundred twenty children younger than 2 years of age with diarrhea lasting less than 3 days were age and gender matched with 520 children with no diarrhea. The G and P serotypes were determined with specific monoclonal antibodies, and the VP4 serotype specificity in a subgroup was confirmed by genotyping. Infection with a G3 serotype led to a higher risk of diarrhea than infection with a G1 serotype. Infection with a G3-nontypeable-P serotype was associated with more severe gastroenteritis than infection with a G3 (or G1) P1A[8] serotype. A child with diarrhea-associated dehydration was almost five times more likely to be infected with a G3-nontypeable-P serotype than a child without dehydration (P < 0.001). Moreover, the two predominant monotypes within serotype P1A[8] had significantly different clinical manifestations. In this study, the severity of RV-associated diarrhea was related to different P serotypes rather than to G serotypes. The relationship between serotype and clinical outcomes seems to be complex and to vary among different geographic areas.

  14. Rotavirus Diarrhea Severity Is Related to the VP4 Type in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Mota-Hernández, Felipe; José Calva, Juan; Gutiérrez-Camacho, Claudia; Villa-Contreras, Sofía; Arias, Carlos F.; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Guiscafré-Gallardo, Héctor; Guerrero, María de Lourdes; López, Susana; Muñoz, Onofre; Contreras, Juan F.; Cedillo, Roberto; Herrera, Ismael; Puerto, Fernando I.

    2003-01-01

    This report is of a community-based case control study to assess whether the severity of acute diarrhea by rotavirus (RV) in young children is associated with a particular VP7 (G) or VP4 (P) RV serotype. Five hundred twenty children younger than 2 years of age with diarrhea lasting less than 3 days were age and gender matched with 520 children with no diarrhea. The G and P serotypes were determined with specific monoclonal antibodies, and the VP4 serotype specificity in a subgroup was confirmed by genotyping. Infection with a G3 serotype led to a higher risk of diarrhea than infection with a G1 serotype. Infection with a G3-nontypeable-P serotype was associated with more severe gastroenteritis than infection with a G3 (or G1) P1A[8] serotype. A child with diarrhea-associated dehydration was almost five times more likely to be infected with a G3-nontypeable-P serotype than a child without dehydration (P < 0.001). Moreover, the two predominant monotypes within serotype P1A[8] had significantly different clinical manifestations. In this study, the severity of RV-associated diarrhea was related to different P serotypes rather than to G serotypes. The relationship between serotype and clinical outcomes seems to be complex and to vary among different geographic areas. PMID:12843057

  15. Does Childhood Diarrhea Influence Cognition Beyond the Diarrhea-Stunting Pathway?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-31

    Does Childhood Diarrhea Influence Cognition Beyond the Diarrhea -Stunting Pathway? Christa L. Fischer Walker1*, Laura Lamberti1, Linda Adair2, Richard...States of America Abstract Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity among children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries...yet the additional effects and sequelae, such as cognitive impairment associated with diarrhea , have not been quantified. Methods: We quantified the

  16. Beyond immunization: travelers' infectious diseases. 1--Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Travelers' diarrhea is the most common illness in persons traveling from resource-rich to resource-poor regions of the world. The fear of developing diarrhea while traveling is common among travelers to any part of the developing world. This concern is realistic; 40 to 60% of travelers to these countries may develop diarrhea. Diarrheal diseases represent one of the five leading causes of death worldwide. Morbidity and mortality are significant even in the United States where diarrhea is more often than not a "nuisance disease" in the normally healthy individual.

  17. Characterization of clinical and immune response in a rotavirus diarrhea model in suckling Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Angels

    2007-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are the leading pathogens causing diarrhea in children and animals. The present study was designed to establish an experimental model of RV infection and immune response in suckling rats. Wistar (W) and Lewis (L) suckling rats were inoculated orally with two different doses of a simian RV SA-11 strain. RV infection was evaluated by growth rate and clinical indexes. Virus-shedding and serum anti-RV antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mucosal interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), specific splenocyte proliferation, and spleen and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) phenotype were analyzed. No diarrhea was observed in any inoculated Ws. All Ls developed acute moderate diarrhea, and a high score and incidence of diarrhea were found in rats infected with higher titers of RV. Specific humoral and cell systemic immune response was confirmed by splenocyte proliferation and by the presence of serum anti-RV antibodies. Moreover, RV infection induced changes in IEL composition, which showed an increase in the proportion of innate immune cells with respect to cells involved in acquired immunity. This acute moderate diarrhea process constitutes a good experimental model that also provides some immune biomarkers that may allow establishing modulation by drugs or diet components.

  18. Predictors of poor outcomes in patients with wild mushroom-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taerim; Lee, Danbi; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify early predictive markers of poor outcomes in patients with acute liver injury from wild mushroom intoxication. METHODS This observational, retrospective record review involved adults aged ≥ 18 years admitted to emergency department with mushroom intoxication from January 2005 to December 2015. The diagnosis of mushroom intoxication was based on the following: (1) a positive history of recent wild mushroom intake (either raw or cooked); (2) the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms, such as watery diarrhea, vomiting, and/or abdominal pain, after ingestion; and (3) the exclusion of other possible causes of acute liver injury. Acute liver injury was defined by a > 5-fold elevation of liver enzymes or moderate coagulopathy [international normalized ratio (INR) > 2.0]. Clinical and laboratory findings were compared in survivors and non-survivors. RESULTS Of 93 patients with mushroom intoxication, 23, 11 men (47.8%) and 12 women (52.2%), of median age 61 years, developed acute liver injury. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 43.5% (10/23). Among the laboratory variables, mean serum alkaline phosphatase (73.38 ± 10.89 mg/dL vs 180.40 ± 65.39 mg/dL, P < 0.01), total bilirubin (2.312 ± 1.16 mg/dL vs 7.16 ± 2.94 mg/dL, P < 0.01) concentrations and indirect/direct bilirubin (2.45 ± 1.39 mg/dL vs 0.99 ± 0.45 mg/dL, P < 0.01) ratio as well as prothrombin time (1.88 ± 0.83 mg/dL vs 10.43 ± 4.81 mg/dL, P < 0.01), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT; 32.48 ± 7.64 s vs 72.58 ± 41.29 s, P = 0.01), were significantly higher in non-survivors than in survivors. Logistic regression analysis showed that total bilirubin concentration (OR = 3.58, 95%CI: 1.25-10.22), indirect/direct bilirubin ratio (OR = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.02-0.94) and aPTT (OR = 1.30, 95%CI: 1.04-1.63) were significantly associated with mortality. All patients with total bilirubin > 5 mg/dL or aPTT > 50 s on day 3 died. CONCLUSION Monitoring of bilirubin concentrations and aPTT may

  19. The dynamics of Chinese variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus production in Vero cells and intestines of 2-day old piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhui; Gao, Xiaojing; Yao, Yali; Zhang, Yunjing; Lv, Chaochao; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Yuzhou; Jia, Xiangrui; Zhuang, Jinshan; Xiao, Yan; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Kegong

    2015-10-02

    A severe porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) epizootic has been affecting pigs of all ages that are characterized by high mortality among suckling piglets in China since late 2010, causing significant economic losses. Obtaining a current-circulating PEDV variant isolate that can grow efficiently in cell culture is prerequisite for the development of efficient vaccines. In this study, PEDV strain HN1303 was isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin, and the isolate has been serially propagated in cell culture for over 95 passages. The infectious titers of the virus during the first 10 passages ranged from 10(2.6) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50)/ml, and the titers of 20-95 passages ranged from 10(6.2) to 10(8.0)TCID50/ml. The growth curve of Vero cell-adapted HN1303 in cell culture was determined, and dynamics of virus production was confirmed by immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on spike gene indicate that the HN1303 strain belongs to genotype IIa. In addition, the fourth passage cell-culture HN1303 was subjected to 2-day old piglets. All piglets orally inoculated developed severe watery diarrhea and vomiting within 24 hours post-inoculation (hpi) and died within 72 hpi. The results of animal experiments reveal that this strain is highly pathogenic to 2-day old piglets.

  20. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself? About Stephen J. Schueler, M.D News Advertising How It Works FAQ for Consumers FAQ for Physicians Testimonials Site Map Terms of Use Contact Us FreeMD is provided for information purposes only and should not be used as a ...

  1. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes to 2 hours after eating or drinking dairy products?YesNoHave you eaten food that might be spoiled, ... trouble digesting the sugar in milk and other dairy products.Self CareIf you think you have lactose intolerance, ...

  2. Mutations in SPINT2 Cause a Syndromic Form of Congenital Sodium Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Müller, Thomas; Krabichler, Birgit; Schranz, Melanie; Becker, Christian; Rüschendorf, Franz; Nürnberg, Peter; Rossier, Bernard; Vujic, Mihailo; Booth, Ian W.; Holmberg, Christer; Wijmenga, Cisca; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; Rosipal, Stefan; Mistrik, Martin; Kappler, Matthias; Michaud, Laurent; Dóczy, Ludwig-Christoph; Siu, Victoria Mok; Krantz, Marie; Zoller, Heinz; Utermann, Gerd; Janecke, Andreas R.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD) is characterized by perinatal onset of a persistent watery diarrhea with nonproportionally high fecal sodium excretion. Defective jejunal brush-border Na+/H+ exchange has been reported in three sporadic patients, but the molecular basis of the disease has not been elucidated. We reviewed data from a large cohort of CSD patients (n = 24) and distinguished CSD associated with choanal or anal atresia, hypertelorism, and corneal erosions—i.e., a syndromic form of CSD—occurring in ten families from an isolated form—i.e., classic CSD—presenting in seven families. Patients from both groups have a high risk of mortality due to immediate electrolyte imbalances and complications from long-term parenteral nutrition in the first years of life, but survivors can eventually adapt to partial or complete enteral nutrition. A genome-wide SNP scan was applied and identified a homozygous c.593−1G→A splicing mutation in SPINT2, encoding a Kunitz-type serine-protease inhibitor, in one extended kindred with syndromic CSD. The same mutation and four distinct, homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations (p.Y163C, c.1A→T, c.337+2T→C, c.553+2T→A) were identified in all syndromic patients. No SPINT2 mutations were found in classic-CSD patients. SPINT2 mutations were associated with loss of protein synthesis or failure to inhibit the serine protease trypsin in vitro. We delineate syndromic CSD as a distinct disease entity caused by SPINT2 loss-of-function mutations. SPINT2 mutations might lead to an excess of yet unknown serine protease activity in affected tissues. PMID:19185281

  3. Microbial ecology of the watery ecosystems of Evros river in North Eastern Greece and its influence upon the cultivated soil ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Vavias, S; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Stefanis, C; Voidarou, C; Stavropoulou, E; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbial ecosystem of cultivated soils along the Evros river in NE Greece. Evros river together with its derivative rivers constitute the capital source of life and sustainable development of the area. Along this riverside watery ecosystem systematic agro-cultures were developed such as wheat, corn and vegetable cultures. The evaluation of the ecosystem microbial charge was conducted in both axes which are the watery ecosystem and the riverside cultivated soil area. Considerable discrimination of water quality was observed when considering chemical and microbiological parameters of the Evros river ecosystem. Ardas river possesses a better water quality than Evros and Erythropotamos, which is mainly due to the higher quantities that these two rivers accumulate from industrial, farming and urban residues leading to higher degree of pollution. An increased microbial pollution was recorded in two of the three rivers monitored and a direct relation in microbial and chemical charging between water and cultivated-soil ecosystems was observed. The protection of these ecosystems with appropriate cultivated practices and control of human and animal activities will define the homeostasis of the environmental area.

  4. Calcium-sensing receptor: A new target for therapy of diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sam Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    Management of acute diarrhea remains a global challenge, particularly in resource-limiting countries. Oral rehydration solution (ORS), a passive rehydrating therapy developed approximately 40 years ago, remains the mainstay treatment. Although ORS is effective for hydration, since it does not inhibit enterotoxin-mediated excessive secretion, reduced absorption and compromised barrier function - the primary mechanisms of diarrhea, ORS does not offer a rapid relief of diarrhea symptom. There are a few alternative therapies available, yet the use of these drugs is limited by their expense, lack of availability and/or safety concerns. Novel anti-diarrheal therapeutic approaches, particularly those simple affordable therapies, are needed. This article explores intestinal calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a newly uncovered target for therapy of diarrhea. Unlike others, targeting this host antidiarrheal receptor system appears “all-inclusive”: it is anti-secretory, pro-absorptive, anti-motility, and anti-inflammatory. Thus, activating CaSR reverses changes of both secretory and inflammatory diarrheas. Considering its unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators, it is possible that through targeting of CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, novel oral rehydrating solutions that are inexpensive and practical to use in all countries may be developed. PMID:26973410

  5. In vitro anti-rotavirus activity of some medicinal plants used in Brazil against diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J L S; Lopes, R C; Oliveira, D B; Costa, S S; Miranda, M M F S; Romanos, M T V; Santos, N S O; Wigg, M D

    2005-07-14

    Acute diarrhea, especially in children, is a very common disease with worldwide distribution and with a significant public health impact. Rotaviruses have been recognized as the major agents of diarrhea in infants and young children in developed as well as developing countries. In Brazil, diarrhea is one of the principal causes of death, mainly in the infant population. To fight diarrhea, traditional Brazilian medicine uses a great variety of plants. In this work, 12 medicinal plant species were screened for simian (SA-11) and human (HCR3) rotaviruses inhibition in vitro. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, the extracts from Artocarpus integrifolia L. (Moraceae) bark (480 microg/ml) and Spondias lutea L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (160 microg/ml) had antiviral activity against both viruses. They showed inhibition of 99.2% and 97%, respectively, for human rotavirus, and 96.4% and 96.2% for simian rotavirus. The extracts from Myristica fragrans Houtt (Myristicaceae) seeds (160 microg/ml) and Spongias lutea bark (40 microg/ml) inhibited human rotavirus (90% and 82.2% inhibition, respectively), whereas the extracts from Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (4 microg/ml) and Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) leaves (8 microg/ml) showed activity only against simian rotavirus (82.2% and 93.8% inhibition, respectively). Our results indicate that the extracts of Artocarpus integrifolia, Myristica fragrans and Spongias lutea can be useful in the treatment of human diarrhea if the etiologic agent is a rotavirus.

  6. Enteroadherent Escherichia coli as a cause of diarrhea among children in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, J J; Oberhelman, R A; Dupont, H L; Javier de la Cabada, F; Garibay, E V

    1987-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) often exhibits localized adherence or diffuse adherence to HEp-2 cells. We recently provided evidence that HEp-2 cell-adherent or enteroadherent E. coli (EAEC) not belonging to EPEC serogroups was the cause of diarrhea among U.S. travelers to Mexico. In the present study, we looked for EAEC and EPEC in stool specimens from 154 children with acute diarrhea and 137 well children seen at several outpatient clinics in Guadalajara, Mexico. EAEC showing localized adherence (EAEC-L) was isolated from 13.0% of the patients and 0.7% of the controls (P less than 0.0001). EAEC showing diffuse adherence (EAEC-D) was recovered from 20.8% of the patients and 7.3% of the controls (P less than 0.001). EPEC was isolated from 4.5 and 6.7% of the patients and controls, respectively. Among all enteropathogens, only enterotoxigenic E. coli occurred as commonly (21.4%) as EAEC-D and EAEC-L did in children with diarrhea. Of the EAEC-L strains isolated from children with diarrhea, 20% belonged to recognized EPEC serogroups, and 3.1% of EAEC-D strains belonged to recognized EPEC serogroups. This study suggests that EAEC may be an important pediatric enteropathogen in Mexican children with diarrhea and further supports the observation that adherence to HEp-2 cells may be a marker of virulence independent of EPEC serogroup among E. coli strains. PMID:3312288

  7. Microbiological diagnosis of severe diarrhea in kidney transplant recipients by use of multiplex PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Coste, Jean-François; Vuiblet, Vincent; Moustapha, Betoul; Bouin, Alexis; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; de Rougemont, Alexis; Benejat, Lucie; Megraud, Francis; Wolak-Thierry, Aurore; Villena, Isabelle; Chemla, Cathy; Le Magrex, Elisabeth; de Champs, Christophe; Andreoletti, Laurent; Rieu, Philippe; Leveque, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Diarrhea is a frequent complication after kidney transplantation, ascribed to adverse effects of the immunosuppressive therapy in case of negative microbiological examination of the stools. The aim of this study was to improve the microbiological diagnosis by implementing molecular tests. Fifty-four severe diarrhea events that occurred in 49 adult kidney transplant recipients from September 2010 to November 2011 were investigated. One or several enteric pathogens were detected in 13 (23%) stool samples using classical microbiological methods versus 39 (72%) for the seven commercially available multiplex PCR assays used retrospectively (P = 0.006). Interestingly, molecular diagnosis identified 15 multiple infections compared to none using classical techniques. The primary pathogens detected were enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (n = 15; 38%), Campylobacter spp. (n = 15; 38%), and Norovirus (n = 14; 36%). Specificities for Campylobacter and Norovirus infection diagnosis were 75 and 100%, respectively, by comparison to reference methods. Based on molecular findings, a cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil combination was identified as a risk factor for developing Norovirus-induced diarrhea. Norovirus infections were also responsible for higher weight loss than all the other causes of diarrhea. In samples from asymptomatic immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, EPEC but not Norovirus and Campylobacter infections were detected at a frequency similar to that observed in symptomatic kidney transplant recipients. In conclusion, molecular tools significantly improved the detection of single and multiple enteric infections by comparison to classical techniques and could quickly become the key element in the management of severe acute diarrhea in transplant recipients.

  8. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  9. Parasitic diarrhea in normal and malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D; Treluyer, J M; Richard-Lenoble, D

    2003-04-01

    Diarrhea is only one of the many manifestations of intestinal parasites. Environmental influences are inescapable, regardless of an individual's state of health: in a highly endemic region, intestinal parasitic colonization is almost the rule. The clinical expression of the parasitoses, however, is largely determined by host defenses; and when they are weakened, parasitic diarrhea is frequent and severe. Protein-energy malnutrition is by far the most important cause of immune deficiency in developing countries. Diarrhea caused by Strongyloides or Giardia is common and severe in malnourished children, while well-nourished children remain healthy carriers. These parasites require specific treatment in the malnourished; and the well-nourished should have preventive treatment when they are to receive corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents. Diarrhea caused by Cryptosporidium spp. may be severe in malnourished or immunodeficient children, and recovery is achieved only after renutrition or treatment of the immunodeficiency.

  10. Chronic Diarrhea: A Concern After Gallbladder Removal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid malabsorption in chronic diarrhea: Pathophysiology and treatment. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology. 2013;27:653. Bonis PAL, ... org," "Mayo Clinic Healthy Living," and the triple-shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation ...

  11. [Chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2011-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a clinically important and sometimes dose-limiting toxicity of cancer treatment, including standard-dose chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Consequently, dose reductions or treatment delays resulting from mucositis may impair treatment effectiveness. Symptoms are oral mucositis, dysphagia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, depending on the affected site. Although the underlying pathobiology of oral mucositis has been considerably elucidated over the past decade, there are few interventions for the prevention or treatment validated by randomized trials. The most commonly accepted intervention is basic oral care. Diarrhea is most common in patients treated with irinotecan and in some cases, life-threatening. No definitive interventions for the prevention of diarrhea exist, but there is evidence that loperamide and octreotide are effective for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. In future, there is a need for well designed trials, preferably including a placebo or no treatment control, validating more effective interventions for managing chemotherapy- induced mucositis.

  12. A Localized Adherence-Like Pattern as a Second Pattern of Adherence of Classic Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HEp-2 Cells That Is Associated with Infantile Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Scaletsky, Isabel C. A.; Pedroso, Margareth Z.; Oliva, Carlos A. G.; Carvalho, Rozane L. B.; Morais, Mauro B.; Fagundes-Neto, Ulysses

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains that cause nonbloody diarrhea in infants are known to present three distinct patterns of adherence to epithelial cells, namely, localized (LA), diffuse (DA), and aggregative (AA) adherence. Strains with LA (typical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli [EPEC]) are well recognized as a cause of secretory diarrhea, but the role of strains with DA (DAEC) is controversial, and strains with AA (EAEC) have been more frequently related to persistent diarrhea whereas its relationship with acute diarrhea is not well defined. To determine the relationship of the different types of E. coli adherence patterns with acute diarrhea (lasting less than 14 days) and persistent diarrhea (lasting more than 14 days) in São Paulo, Brazil, we studied stool specimens from 40 infants under 1 year of age with diarrhea and 40 age-matched control infants without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Twenty-eight (35.0%) of eighty cases yielded adherent E. coli (HEp-2 cells). Strains with localized and aggregative adherence were associated with acute and persistent diarrhea. A total of 11.2% of the adherent strains were typical EPEC serotypes and hybridized with the enteroadherence factor probe; 5.0% were EAEC and hybridized with the EAEC probe. DAEC strains were isolated from 10.0% of patients and 7.5% of controls and did not hybridize with the two probes used (daaC and AIDA-I). Strains with a localized adherence-like pattern (atypical EPEC) were found significantly more frequently (P = 0.028) in cultures from children with diarrhea (17.5%) than in controls (2.5%). PMID:10377120

  13. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease Regulates Its Interferon Antagonism by Cleaving NEMO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Shi, Yanling; Zhang, Huan; Gao, Li; Peng, Guiqing; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Kui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an enteropathogenic coronavirus causing lethal watery diarrhea in piglets. Since 2010, a PEDV variant has spread rapidly in China, and it emerged in the United States in 2013, posing significant economic and public health concerns. The ability to circumvent the interferon (IFN) antiviral response, as suggested for PEDV, promotes viral survival and regulates pathogenesis of PEDV infections, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease, nsp5, is an IFN antagonist that proteolytically cleaves the nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO), an essential adaptor bridging interferon-regulatory factor and NF-κB activation. NEMO is cleaved at glutamine 231 (Q231) by PEDV, and this cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate downstream IFN production and to act as a signaling adaptor of the RIG-I/MDA5 pathway. Mutations specifically disrupting the cysteine protease activity of PEDV nsp5 abrogated NEMO cleavage and the inhibition of IFN induction. Structural analysis suggests that several key residues outside the catalytic sites of PEDV nsp5 probably impact NEMO cleavage by modulating potential interactions of nsp5 with their substrates. These data show that PEDV nsp5 disrupts type I IFN signaling by cleaving NEMO. Previously, we and others demonstrated that NEMO is also cleaved by 3C or 3C-like proteinases of picornavirus and artertivirus. Thus, NEMO probably represents a prime target for 3C or 3C-like proteinases of different viruses. IMPORTANCE The continued emergence and reemergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) underscore the importance of studying how this virus manipulates the immune responses of its hosts. During coevolution with its hosts, PEDV has acquired mechanisms to subvert host innate immune responses for its survival advantage. At least two proteins encoded by PEDV have been identified as interferon (IFN

  14. Etiological epidemiology of viral diarrhea on the basis of sentinel surveillance in children younger than 5 years in Gansu, northwest China, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Meng, Lei; Li, Juansheng; Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Yana; Yu, Deshan; Ren, Xiaowei; Liu, Haixia; Shen, Xiping; Wang, Peng; Hu, Xiaobin; Wei, Kongfu; Pei, Hongbo; Kang, Qian

    2015-12-01

    To explore the etiological spectrum of diarrhea and its epidemiological characteristics in diarrhea symptoms surveillance cases younger than 5 years from 2009 to 2013 in Gansu province, northwest China. Systematic diarrhea symptoms surveillance were conducted in 27 sentinel sites in Gansu province and outpatients with three or more loose, watery, or sticky pus stools per day were defined as surveillance cases. All stool specimens were tested for Rotavirus, Human calicivirus, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus. Totally, 1,119 cases (51.54%) were identified as any enteric virus. The average isolation rate of Rotavirus was 51.13%, Astrovirus was 10.84%, Adenovirus was 6.94%, and Human calicivirus was 6.60% (P < 0.01). Rotavirus was identified with the highest frequency among these enteric pathogens except in 2011, with a notable downward trend over time (P < 0.01). Rotavirus A was the most proportion in rotavirus, G3P[8] and G9P[8] were the most common combination. Rotavirus mixed Human calicivirus infections was the most common mixed infected patterns. Viral-positive rate was higher among children aged group of 0-12 and 13-24 months (P < 0.01, respectively). The isolation rates of four enteric viral pathogens showed a similar distinct seasonal variation with a higher rate in spring, autumn, and winter months. Rotavirus was the major epidemiological viral pathogen in diarrhea symptom surveillance cases in Gansu province, northwest China, during period 2009-2013. Seasonal and age-related variations were observed in enteric viral pathogen isolation rate. The comprehensive and continuous surveillance is needed to identify the prevalence of different enteric viral pathogens.

  15. Perineal skin care for patients with frequent diarrhea or fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Haugen, V

    1997-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an overview of normal skin and a description of perineal skin injury. The focus is to identify the goals for treatment for persons with frequent diarrhea or fecal incontinence as it relates to their perineal skin care. Specific algorithms for acute care and ambulatory settings are defined, and two case studies are presented. The treatment goals include evaluation of and recommendations for reviewing and choosing perineal skin products.

  16. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolated from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) crias with diarrhea in the Andean Region of Cusco, Peru.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Antonio E; Lopez, Wellington; Ortega, Nastassja; Chamorro, Marycris J

    2015-10-22

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos), a species of South American camelids (SAC), suffer high morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of alpaca cria mortality in Peru and elsewhere. In order to develop appropriate control and/or treatment, it is necessary to identify infectious pathogens that cause diarrhea in crias. Rotavirus was isolated in cell culture from feces collected from crias with acute diarrhea that tested positive to rotaviral antigen by rapid immunochromatographic methods in an earlier study. The isolates were identified as rotaviruses by RT-PCR run with specific primers for human rotavirus VP7 coding sequences using total RNA extracted from cells displaying cytopathic effects as template. These alpaca isolates were further identified as group A rotaviruses by means of a VP6-specific PCR and were designated as ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3368-10 and ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3386-10. Molecular G and P typing, placed the former as G3/P11 and the latter as G3/P?. Sequence analysis of two genome segments (coding for VP4 and VP7) from the alpaca isolates revealed partial homologies to swine and human rotaviruses, respectively. These results demonstrate that rotaviruses are associated with a proportion of cases of diarrhea in crias, although prevalence and impact remain to be determined. The isolation of rotaviruses from alpaca crias with diarrhea will contribute positively to further understand the pathogen and its role in the diarrhea complex.

  17. Induction of immunomodulatory miR-146a and miR-155 in small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients at acute stage of cholera

    PubMed Central

    Melgar, Silvia; Aung, Kyaw Min; Rahman, Arman; Qadri, Firdausi; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Shirin, Tahmina

    2017-01-01

    The potential immunomodulatory role of microRNAs in small intestine of patients with acute watery diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 or enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was investigated. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from study-participants at the acute (day 2) and convalescent (day 21) stages of disease, and from healthy individuals. Levels of miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-375 and target gene (IRAK1, TRAF6, CARD10) and 11 cytokine mRNAs were determined by qRT-PCR. The cellular source of microRNAs in biopsies was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The ability of V. cholerae bacteria and their secreted products to cause changes in microRNA- and mRNA levels in polarized tight monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. miR-146a and miR-155 were expressed at significantly elevated levels at acute stage of V. cholerae infection and declined to normal at convalescent stage (P<0.009 versus controls; P = 0.03 versus convalescent stage, pairwise). Both microRNAs were mainly expressed in the epithelium. Only marginal down-regulation of target genes IRAK1 and CARD10 was seen and a weak cytokine-profile was identified in the acute infected mucosa. No elevation of microRNA levels was seen in ETEC infection. Challenge of tight monolayers with the wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706 and clinical isolates from two study-participants, caused significant increase in miR-155 and miR-146a by the strain C6706 (P<0.01). One clinical isolate caused reduction in IRAK1 levels (P<0.05) and none of the strains induced inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, secreted factors from these strains caused markedly increased levels of IL-8, IL-1β, and CARD10 (P<0.001), without inducing microRNA expression. Thus, miR-146a and miR-155 are expressed in the duodenal epithelium at the acute stage of cholera. The inducer is probably the V. cholerae bacterium. By inducing microRNAs the bacterium can limit the innate immune response of the host, including inflammation

  18. Diarrhea of travelers to Mexico. Relative susceptibility of United States and Latin American students attending a Mexican University.

    PubMed

    Dupont, H L; Haynes, G A; Pickering, L K; Tjoa, W; Sullivan, P; Olarte, J

    1977-01-01

    A clinic was established at Universidad de las Americas, Cholula, Puebla, Mexico for the study of acute diarrhea rates in newly-arrived students and full-time students. Diarrhea occurred in 22 of 55 newlly-arrived U.S. summer students (40%), compared to 28 of 142 U.S. full-time students (20%), 4 of 29 Venezuelan summer and full-time students (14%) and 7 of 66 Mexican full-time students (11%) (the differences were significant, p less than 0.005). Recurrent episodes of diarrhea during the month of study occurred in 15% of U.S. summer students, 4% of U.S. full-time students, and were non-existent in students from Latin America. As well as the 61 students with diarrhea enrolled in the incidence study, all students who developed diarrhea at the univeristy were encouraged to visit the clinic. This gave a total population of 130 cases of diarrhea. The illness that developed in students form the U.S. varied widely, but it typically consisted of seven to 13 unformed stools during the first 48 hours of illness, with illness persiting three to five days. Illness tended to be more severe in the U.S. students. Fifty per cent of the U.S. students with diarrhea had "severe" illness (greater than or equal to 10 unformed stools in first 48 hours) compared to 23% of the Latin Americans. This study indicates that the agents responsible for diarrhea in Latin America are widespread and that resistance to infection develops after prolonged or repeated exposure.

  19. Syndromic (phenotypic) diarrhea in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Vinson, Christine; Roquelaure, Bertrand; Brousse, Nicole; Bodemer, Christine; Cézard, Jean-Pierre

    2008-02-28

    Syndromic diarrhea (SD), also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD) or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE), is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN). To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000-400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorphism including prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism. Hairs are woolly, easily removed and poorly pigmented. Severe and persistent diarrhea starts within the first 6 months of life (

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biotypes and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Deregt, D; Loewen, K G

    1995-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus continues to produce significant economic losses for the cattle industry and challenges investigators with the complexity of diseases it produces and the mechanisms by which it causes disease. This paper updates and attempts to clarify information regarding the roles of noncytopathic and cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in persistent infections and mucosal disease. It also covers, in brief, what is known of the new diseases: thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic disease, and a disease resembling mucosal disease that is apparently caused solely by noncytopathic virus. Although a good understanding of the roles of the 2 biotypes in the production of persistent infections and the precipitation of mucosal disease has been obtained, there are still unanswered questions regarding the origin of cytopathic viruses and the mechanism by which they cause pathological changes in cells. It is apparent, however, that cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses arise by mutation of noncytopathic viruses, and it is known that p80 is the marker protein for cytopathic viruses. The previous distinction between mild bovine viral diarrhea and fatal mucosal disease has been eroded with the emergence of new virulent bovine viral diarrhea viruses. The new diseases pose a threat to the cattle industry and present a new challenge for investigators. Index Veterinarius (1984-1994) and Medline (1985-1994) databases and personal files updated since 1987 from BIOSIS Previews and Biosciences Information Services were used to search the literature. Images Figure 1. PMID:7648541

  1. Etiology of childhood diarrhea in Beijing, China.

    PubMed Central

    Kain, K C; Barteluk, R L; Kelly, M T; He, X; de Hua, G; Ge, Y A; Proctor, E M; Byrne, S; Stiver, H G

    1991-01-01

    To determine the role of recently recognized enteropathogens in childhood diarrhea in China, 221 children with diarrhea and 108 controls seen at the Beijing Children's Hospital were studied during April and May 1989. Stools were examined for ova, parasites, and rotavirus, cultured for bacterial pathogens, and probed for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteropathogenic adherence factor-positive (EAF+) E. coli. Pathogens were identified in 56.5% of children with diarrhea and 43.5% of controls (P = 0.04). Detection of enteropathogens was significantly greater in patients examined within 1 week of symptom onset (65%) than in patients examined later (39%; P = 0.01). ETEC was the most frequently detected pathogen in children with diarrhea, accounting for 20% of the cases. Other agents identified in patients included the following: salmonellae, 12%; rotavirus, 7%; EIEC, 7%; EHEC, 7%; members of the Aeromonas hydrophila group, 6%; EAF+ E. coli, 5%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 3%; shigellae, 3%; campylobacters, 2%; and Vibrio spp., 0.5%. The isolation rates of salmonellae (P = 0.02), EAF+ E. coli (P = 0.04), and mixed pathogens (P = 0.05) were significantly greater for diarrhea patients than for controls. Resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents occurred in 39% of the Salmonella isolates, 22% of the Aeromonas isolates, and 17% of the Shigella isolates. Multiresistant salmonellae (P = 0.05) and shigellae were recovered from diarrheal stools only. Ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, and imipenem were the only agents tested to which all bacterial isolates were susceptible in vitro. These results suggest that both traditional and newly recognized agents are important causes of childhood diarrhea in Beijing and that therapy may be complicated by indigenous antimicrobial resistance. PMID:1993771

  2. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight loss. A stomach or intestinal illness can cause diarrhea. It can be a side effect of medical ... the medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  3. Diarrhea - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/diarrhea.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diarrhea - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ...

  4. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared..., and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production....

  5. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared..., and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production....

  6. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared..., and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production....

  7. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared..., and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production....

  8. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared..., and immunogenic shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production....

  9. Prevalence of Microscopic Colitis in Patients with Chronic Diarrhea in Egypt: A Single-center Study

    PubMed Central

    Gado, Ahmed S.; Ebeid, Basel A.; El Hindawi, Ali A.; Akl, Maha M.; Axon, Anthony T.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Microscopic colitis (MC) is diagnosed when a patient with chronic watery non-bloody diarrhea (CWND) has an endoscopically normal colon, but colonic biopsies show unique inflammatory changes characteristic of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis. MC is a disorder of unknown etiology. Studies comparing the prevalence of the disease in developing countries as compared to developed countries may shed more light on the possibility of a post-infectious etiology. Most data on the incidence and prevalence of MC are from developed countries where it accounts for 4-13% of cases of CWND. There are only a few reports from developing countries. Two studies from Peru and Tunis, with high prevalence of infectious gastroenteritis, revealed MC in 40% and 29.3% of cases of CWND, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MC in patients presenting with CWND in Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 44 patients with CWND of unexplained etiology who had undergone full colonoscopy with no macroscopic abnormalities between January 2000 and January 2010 were assessed retrospectively. Results: The histological appearance of MC was identified in 22 (50%) patients. Twelve (55%) patients were male and 10 (45%) female. Mean age was 40 years (range: 20-65 years). Twenty (91%) of MC cases had lymphocytic colitis and 2 (9%) had collagenous colitis. Conclusions: The prevalence of MC in Egyptian patients with CWND is high when compared to that in developed countries. MC mainly affects young and middle-aged patients and it is more commonly of the lymphocytic type. PMID:22064335

  10. Travelers' diarrhea: Risk reduction and management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Karen S

    2015-11-15

    Travelers' diarrhea is a common complaint for patients traveling abroad. Onset of illness, symptoms experienced, and the duration of symptoms are greatly impacted by the causative agent. This article explores the causes, prevention recommendations, and treatment methodologies recommended for this common condition.

  11. Acupuncture for chronic diarrhea in adults

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Li, Bo; Wu, Jiani; Tian, Jinhui; Xie, Shang; Mao, Zhi; Zhou, Jing; Kim, Tae-Hun; Liu, Zhishun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: As 2 major common types of chronic diarrhea, functional diarrhea (FD) and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) affect 1.54% to 1.72% of people in China. Acupuncture is commonly used in clinical practice for patients with chronic diarrhea. Here, we present a protocol of systematic review aimed at systematically review all the clinical evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating FD and IBS-D in adults. Methods: The review will be performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We will search the following databases from their inception to January 2017: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, China Biology Medicine disc, Wan-Fang Data, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Citation Information by National Institute of Informatics, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System by Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, and Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator (J-stage). Clinical trial registrations will also be searched. Primary outcome measures are the change of bowel movements. The secondary outcomes include stool consistency, quality of life scales, other standardized rating scales, patient satisfaction, and acupuncture-related adverse effects assessment. Ethics and dissemination: This review does not require ethical approval and will be disseminated electronically or in print. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015017574. PMID:28121941

  12. Travelers' diarrhea in children visiting tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipe Glória; Figueiredo, António; Varandas, Luis

    2009-01-01

    We studied a group of 174 Portuguese children (aged 2 mo-16 y) who mostly traveled to tropical Portuguese-speaking countries and found an attack rate of 21.8% for travelers' diarrhea, much lower than previously described. We also showed that African rate analysis by region may hide significant differences between countries.

  13. Travelers' diarrhea and toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L; Kean, B H; Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Bessudo, D

    1975-05-01

    In a group of 133 United States students studied for 18 days after arriving in Mexico, diarrhea developed in 38 (29 per cent). Diarrhea rarely began before the fourth day, and the mean onset was 13 days after arrival. Symptoms lasted an average of 3.4 days but persisted in 21 per cent of sick students. Heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escheria coli was found in the stools of 72 per cent of sick and 15 per cent of healthy students. None had heat-labile Esch. coli when they entered Mexico. The incubation period was short, generally 24 to 48 hours, and the carrier state was five days or less in 82 per cent of students surveyed. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 6 per cent of cases of diarrhea, but not salmonella, shigella or penetrating Esch. coli. These studies suggest that approximately 70 per cent of travelers' diarrhea in Mexico is associated with heat-labile toxigenic strains of Esch. coli.

  14. Diarrhea Management Training in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnail, Scott D.; Artz, Lynn M.; Geiger, Brian F.; Petri, Cynthia J.; Bailey, Rebecca; Mason, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the health of young children and how to safely and effectively care for children with diarrhea in the home and in early child care settings. Discusses specific intervention and program activities, including specially designed materials for mixing homemade oral rehydration usage. (Author/SD)

  15. Review: Management of postprandial diarrhea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Money, Mary E; Camilleri, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Unexpected, urgent, sometimes painful bowel movements after eating are common complaints among adults. Without a clear etiology, if pain is present and resolves with the movements, this is usually labeled "irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea" based solely on symptoms. If this symptom-based approach is applied exclusively, it may lead physicians not to consider treatable conditions: celiac disease, or maldigestion due to bile acid malabsorption, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or an a-glucosidase (sucrase, glucoamylase, maltase, or isomaltase) deficiency. These conditions can be misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (or functional diarrhea, if pain is not present). Limited testing is currently available to confirm these conditions (antibody screens for celiac disease; fecal fat as a surrogate marker for pancreatic function). Therefore, empirical treatment with alpha amylase, pancreatic enzymes, or a bile acid-binding agent may simultaneously treat these patients and serve as a surrogate diagnostic test. This review will summarize the current evidence for bile acid malabsorption, and deficiencies of pancreatic enzymes or a-glucosidases as potential causes for postprandial diarrhea, and provide an algorithm for treatment options.

  16. Infectious diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, P D; Janoff, E N

    1988-09-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly diarrhea, are common in patients with AIDS. Recent evidence indicates that enteric pathogens can be identified in most of these cases. Appreciating the clinical features caused by protozoal, fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens will assist the clinician in effectively evaluating the gastrointestinal symptoms. Antimicrobial agents now are available for many of these pathogens.

  17. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and eliminate the infection, which typically causes acute, self-limited watery diarrhea lasting 5 to 10 days. However, in patients with defects in ...cellular immune responses (e.g., AIDS, malnutrition, or defects in the CD40- CD154 system), Cryptosporidium frequently causes persistent or chronic...diarrhea and may also involve the biliary tract (40). In malnourished children, persistent diarrhea is associated with increased susceptibility to recurrent

  18. Entamoeba moshkovskii Is Associated With Diarrhea in Infants and Causes Diarrhea and Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Chikako; Kabir, Mamun; Taniuchi, Mami; Mondal, Dinesh; Kobayashi, Seiki; Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Sobuz, Shihab U.; Senba, Masachika; Houpt, Eric; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2012-01-01

    Background.Entamoeba moshkovskii is prevalent in developing countries and morphologically indistinguishable from pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and nonpathogenic Entamoeba dispar. It is not known if E. moshkovskii is pathogenic. Methods.Mice were intracecally challenged with the trophozoites of each Entamoeba spp. to test the ability to cause diarrhea, and infants in Bangladesh were prospectively observed to see if newly acquired E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. Results.E. moshkovskii and E. histolytica caused diarrhea and weight loss in susceptible mice. E. dispar infected none of the mouse strains tested. In Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh, E. moshkovskii, E. histolytica, and E. dispar were identified in 42 (2.95%), 66 (4.63%), and 5 (0.35%), respectively, of 1426 diarrheal episodes in 385 children followed prospectively from birth to one year of age. Diarrhea occurred temporally with acquisition of a new E. moshkovskii infection: in the 2 months preceding E. moshkvskii-associated diarrhea, 86% (36 of 42) of monthly surveillance stool samples were negative for E. moshkovskii. Conclusions.E. moshkovskii was found to be pathogenic in mice. In children, the acquisition of E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. These data are consistent with E. moshkovskii causing disease, indicating that it is important to reexamine its pathogenicity. PMID:22723640

  19. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ+ T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens. PMID:27853451

  20. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ(+) T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens.

  1. Household costs of seeking outpatient care in Egyptian children with diarrhea: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Abeer; Halawa, Eman Fawzy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Addressing difficulties of seeking and getting health care would lower the burden of diarrhea among ill children from developing countries as Egypt. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the economic burden of diarrhea associated with outpatient visits of children in Egypt by identifying the different types of related costs. Methods This cross-sectional clinic-based survey was done by interviewing parents of 763 children presenting with diarrhea to the outpatient clinics of Pediatric Hospital of Cairo University. Estimated costs included tangible costs (direct, indirect) and intangible costs (forms of suffering). Insurance status of the children was also described. Descriptive statistics were presented in frequency tables, median, minimum, maximum, interquartile range, mean and standard deviation, whenever appropriate. Results It was found that 90. 7% of the studied children were of low and middle socioeconomic standard with a median monthly family income of US$83 and a median monthly expenditure of LE US$79. The average direct and indirect costs of acute diarrhea per case were US$13.2±19.5 and US$11.3±93.1 respectively. The mean cost per diarrheal episode is US$24.5 which almost consumes 29.5% of the mean monthly income. About 61% of cases sought medical care before visiting our hospital, 43.6% of them visited more than one provider. Awareness about health insurance was found in 72.7% and coverage by a health insurance system in 33%. Of insured patients only 41.4% utilized the insurance services. Conclusion Diarrhea causes great socio-economic burden for families in Egypt, which could result in significant delay in seeking health care. PMID:23560125

  2. 5-Fluorouracil induces diarrhea with changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and aquaporins in mouse intestines.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Nishizaki, Maiko; Shoji, Tetsuro; Horie, Syunji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced diarrhea remain unclear, accumulating evidence has indicated that changes in the mucosal immune system and aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in its pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the possible changes in the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and AQPs in the intestines of mice with 5-FU-induced diarrhea. In the present study, the expressions of mRNAs that encode inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Il-17A and IL-22, were significantly increased throughout the entire colon of mice that exhibited diarrhea following 5-FU administration. In contrast, the gene expression of IFNγ was upregulated only in the distal colon. These increases were significantly reduced by the administration of etanercept. However, 5-FU-induced diarrhea was not recovered by etanercept. On the other hand, the genes for AQPs 4 and 8 were markedly present in the colon, and these expressions in the intestines were significantly decreased by treatment with 5-FU. These decreases were not reversed by etanercept. These findings suggest TNF-α neutralization had no effect on the acutely 5-FU-induced diarrhea and impaired AQPs but reduced dramatically several inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. PMID:27635209

  4. Looking for evidence that personal hygiene precautions prevent traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Shlim, David R

    2005-12-01

    In the 50 years during which traveler's diarrhea has been studied, it has always been assumed that personal hygiene precautions can prevent or reduce the likelihood of developing traveler's diarrhea. However, 7 of 8 studies that specifically addressed this issue showed no correlation between the types of food selected and the risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. The eighth study showed a correlation between a few dietary mistakes and a decreased risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. A further increase in the number of dietary mistakes, however, did not continue to increase the risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. Personal hygiene precautions, when performed under the direct supervision of an expatriate operating his or her own kitchen, can prevent traveler's diarrhea, but poor restaurant hygiene in most developing countries continues to create an insurmountable risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea.

  5. A Study to Determine the Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections in Infants and Children Ages 4 Months to 6 Years With Febrile Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nibhanipudi, Kumara V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in infants and children (4 months to 6 years of age) with febrile diarrhea, as outpatients. Methods: This was a prospective institutional review board–approved study. patients (between 4 months and 6 years of age) were enrolled in the study who presented to the pediatric emergency room with a complaint of fever (rectal temperature 101°F or more) and diarrhea (watery stools >3 in number). The patients were evaluated for state of hydration, and also urine samples were collected. For those children not toilet trained, urine specimens were collected by bladder catheterization, and for those children toilet trained, urine specimens were obtained by midstream collection method. The urine samples obtained were sent for analysis and culture. Results: Eighty patients were enrolled in the study. The number of specimens obtained by clean catch midstream was 20, and by bladder catheterization was 60. None of the urine specimens obtained by both methods of collection grew any organism. There was no increased incidence of infections in male children whether circumcised (10/60) or uncircumcised (50/60). The mean temperature was 102.8°F (range = 101°F to 105°F). Statistics: Using in silico online 2 × 2 χ2 test by comparing both the positive and negative urine culture results, 2-tailed P value is <.0001. Conclusions: Our prospective randomized study concluded that there is no increased incidence of UTIs in infants and children (4 months to 6 years of age) with febrile diarrhea. PMID:27660810

  6. Humoral immune response to the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli in naturally acquired diarrhea and antitoxin determination by passive immune hemolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Evans, D E; DuPont, H L; Pickering, L K; Olarte, J

    1977-01-01

    Acute- and convalescent-phase sera from 132 students attending a university in rural Mexico were assayed for antibody against the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli by neutralization of LT activity in the Y-1 adrenal cell assay and by passive immune hemolysis of LT-sensitized sheep erythrocytes. The two titration methods produced comparable results with respect to antitoxin responses detected. An inverse relationship was found between acute geometric mean antitoxin titer and the occurrence of diarrhea associated with LT-producing E. coli, especially in newly arrived students from the U.S.A. A significant correlation (P less than 0.00 5) was found between a rise in antitoxin titer detectable by the passive immune hemolysis technique and diarrhea with LT-producing E. coli isolated. Thus, humoral antitoxin titers appear to be a useful indicator of immune status with respect to enterotoxigenic (LT) E. coli diarrhea. PMID:330395

  7. [Trial chemoprophylaxis of traveler's diarrhea using nifuroxazide].

    PubMed

    Bourée, P; Kouchner, G

    1986-06-01

    Traveler's diarrhea is a very common condition that affects approximately 12 million subjects each year. This disorder is benign but nevertheless interferes with the traveler's plans in 40% of cases. Several drugs have been used for prophylaxis, in association with appropriate precautions concerning food and drink. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cyclines are effective but may induce adverse effects. Nifuroxazide in a dose of 400 mg each day throughout the trip has proved effective. Tolerance was outstanding with no adverse effects.

  8. [Bovine viral diarrhea control in Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Guliukin, M I; Iurov, K P; Glotov, A G; Donchenko, N A

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is one of the greatest challenges for breeding and commercial livestock. It is characterized by lesions of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, abortion, infertility, immune deficiency, and persistence of the pathogen. In this work, a set of measures for the rehabilitation and prevention of BVD in cattle is described. It includes the data of the literature, guidance documents for the diagnosis and control of BVD adopted by OIE, EU countries, USA, as well as the results of this research.

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 in vivo infection modulates TLR4 responsiveness in differentiated Myeloid cells which is associated with decreased MyD88 expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causes clinical signs in cattle ranging from mild to severe acute infection which can lead to increased susceptibility to secondary bacteria. In this study we examined the effects of BVDV genotype 2 (BVDV2) infection on the ability of myeloid lineage cells derived...

  10. Comparison of the breadth and complexity of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) populations circulating in 34 persistently infected cattle generated in one outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) may result in acute and persistent infections. Persistent infections are the consequence of in utero exposure during the first trimester of gestation. The resulting persistently infected (PI) animals are immunotolerant to the virus. Clinical presen...

  11. Performance assessment of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus to assess PEDV transmission in growing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PEDV was first diagnosed in the U.S. in April 2013 as sporadic cases of diarrhea in young piglets with high mortality. Real-time RT-PCR is a high throughput test system that has potential to detect PEDV during the acute phase of the infection or pre-seroconversion. A study in nursery pigs was conduc...

  12. Identification of amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from alpaca that may be involved in host adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are most commonly associated with infections of cattle. However, BVDV is often isolated from closely related ruminants with a number of BVDV-1b viruses being isolated from alpacas that were both acutely and persistently infected (PI). The complete nucleotide se...

  13. An overview of calf diarrhea - infectious etiology, diagnosis, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Il; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Calf diarrhea is a commonly reported disease in young animals, and still a major cause of productivity and economic loss to cattle producers worldwide. In the report of the 2007 National Animal Health Monitoring System for U.S. dairy, half of the deaths among unweaned calves was attributed to diarrhea. Multiple pathogens are known or postulated to cause or contribute to calf diarrhea development. Other factors including both the environment and management practices influence disease severity or outcomes. The multifactorial nature of calf diarrhea makes this disease hard to control effectively in modern cow-calf operations. The purpose of this review is to provide a better understanding of a) the ecology and pathogenesis of well-known and potential bovine enteric pathogens implicated in calf diarrhea, b) describe diagnostic tests used to detect various enteric pathogens along with their pros and cons, and c) propose improved intervention strategies for treating calf diarrhea.

  14. An overview of calf diarrhea - infectious etiology, diagnosis, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-il

    2014-01-01

    Calf diarrhea is a commonly reported disease in young animals, and still a major cause of productivity and economic loss to cattle producers worldwide. In the report of the 2007 National Animal Health Monitoring System for U.S. dairy, half of the deaths among unweaned calves was attributed to diarrhea. Multiple pathogens are known or postulated to cause or contribute to calf diarrhea development. Other factors including both the environment and management practices influence disease severity or outcomes. The multifactorial nature of calf diarrhea makes this disease hard to control effectively in modern cow-calf operations. The purpose of this review is to provide a better understanding of a) the ecology and pathogenesis of well-known and potential bovine enteric pathogens implicated in calf diarrhea, b) describe diagnostic tests used to detect various enteric pathogens along with their pros and cons, and c) propose improved intervention strategies for treating calf diarrhea. PMID:24378583

  15. Celiac Crisis in a 64-Year-Old Woman: An Unusual Cause of Severe Diarrhea, Acidosis, and Malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Mrad, Rachel Abou; Ghaddara, Hussein Abou; Green, Peter H.; El-Majzoub, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) rarely presents with life-threatening complications in older individuals. We report a 64-year-old woman who presented with profuse diarrhea, weight loss, hemodynamic instability, hypokalemia, hypoproteinemia, acidosis, and vitamin and iron deficiency. Pathologic and serologic studies confirmed CD presenting with celiac crisis with extensive and severe intestinal disease. Although celiac crisis occurs mostly in childhood and early adulthood, it should be considered in adults presenting with acute severe diarrheal illness, electrolyte abnormalities, and malabsorption. PMID:26157925

  16. Epidemiology of rotavirus A diarrhea in Chókwè, Southern Mozambique, from February to September, 2011.

    PubMed

    Langa, Jerónimo S; Thompson, Ricardo; Arnaldo, Paulo; Resque, Hugo Reis; Rose, Tatiana; Enosse, Sonia M; Fialho, Alexandre; de Assis, Rosane Maria Santos; da Silva, Marcelle Figueira Marques; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi

    2016-10-01

    Acute diarrhea disease caused by Rotaviruses A (RVA) is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children ≤5 years old in developing countries. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted between February and September, 2011 to determine the proportion of acute diarrhea caused by RVA. A total of 254 stool specimens were collected from children ≤5 years old with acute diarrhea, including outpatients (222 children) and inpatients (32 children), in three local health centers in Chókwè District, Gaza Province, South of Mozambique. RVA antigens were detected using enzyme immunoassay (EIA); the RVA G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR or analysis sequencing. Sixty (24%) out of 254 fecal specimens were positive for RVA by EIA; being 58 (97%) from children ≤2 years of age. RVA prevalence peaks in June and July (coldest and drier months) and the G[P] binary combination observed were G12P[8] (57%); G1P[8] (9%); G12P[6] (6%); and 2% for each of the following genotypes: G1P[6], G2P[6] G4P[6], and G9P[8]. Non-Typeable (NT) G and/or P genotypes were observed as follows: G12P [NT] (6%); G1P [NT], G3P[NT] and GNTP[NT] (4%). Considering the different GP combinations, G12 represented 67% of the genotypes. This is the first data showing the diversity of RVA genotypes in Mozambique highlighting the epidemiological importance of these viruses in acute diarrhea cases in children ≤2 years old. In addition, these findings will provide a baseline data before the introduction of the RVA monovalent (Rotarix(®) ) vaccine in the National Immunization Program in September 2015. J. Med. Virol. 88:1751-1758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in New World camelids.

    PubMed

    Belknap, E B; Collins, J K; Larsen, R S; Conrad, K P

    2000-11-01

    A virus known to cause multiple problems in cattle, bovine viral diarrhea virus, was isolated from 3 different cases in New World camelids. Virus isolation, immunoperoxidase staining, and fluorescent antibody staining were used to detect the virus. The herds involved were screened for antibody titers to bovine viral diarrhea and virus isolation from the buffy coat. Bovine viral diarrhea virus should be considered as a cause of death in young and old New World camelids.

  18. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli associated with diarrhea in children in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Behiry, Iman K; Abada, Emad A; Ahmed, Entsar A; Labeeb, Rania S

    2011-01-01

    In this study we isolate and identify the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) causing diarrhea in children less than five years in Cairo, Egypt, during different seasons. Children younger than five years with diarrhea, attending the Pediatric Gastroenterology Intensive Care Unit of the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital in one year period were our group of study. Our control group was age and sex matched concurrent healthy children. The identified E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial disc diffusion susceptibility test and further identified for EPEC serotype by slide agglutination test, using antiserum E. coli somatic trivalent I (O111, O55, O26) according to the instructions of the manufacturer. Out of 134 patients 5.2% of them revealed EPEC in the fecal sample, while the 20 children control group showed no EPEC isolates in their samples. Our EPEC frequency showed variations from the compared results of other studies. Higher rate of EPEC (18.7%) was found in patients between 2 to 3 years, while EPEC rate was (7.5%) in patients less than 6 months old, with P < 0.05. EPEC was identified from fecal specimens as a unique pathogen or associated with other pathogens in acute and chronic diarrhea in children. EPEC were detected in all seasons except in winter, and was predominant in summer season. Four (57%) EPEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ticarcillin, and cotrimoxazole, and (14.3%) to the third generation cephalosporins.

  19. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Associated with Diarrhea in Children in Cairo, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Behiry, Iman K.; Abada, Emad A.; Ahmed, Entsar A.; Labeeb, Rania S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we isolate and identify the Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) causing diarrhea in children less than five years in Cairo, Egypt, during different seasons. Children younger than five years with diarrhea, attending the Pediatric Gastroenterology Intensive Care Unit of the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital in one year period were our group of study. Our control group was age and sex matched concurrent healthy children. The identified E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial disc diffusion susceptibility test and further identified for EPEC serotype by slide agglutination test, using antiserum E. coli somatic trivalent I (O111, O55, O26) according to the instructions of the manufacturer. Out of 134 patients 5.2% of them revealed EPEC in the fecal sample, while the 20 children control group showed no EPEC isolates in their samples. Our EPEC frequency showed variations from the compared results of other studies. Higher rate of EPEC (18.7%) was found in patients between 2 to 3 years, while EPEC rate was (7.5%) in patients less than 6 months old, with P < 0.05. EPEC was identified from fecal specimens as a unique pathogen or associated with other pathogens in acute and chronic diarrhea in children. EPEC were detected in all seasons except in winter, and was predominant in summer season. Four (57%) EPEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ticarcillin, and cotrimoxazole, and (14.3%) to the third generation cephalosporins. PMID:22262949

  20. N-Acetylcysteine treatment of rotavirus-associated diarrhea in children.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Torres, Diana P; García, Leidy L; Guerrero, Rafael A; Acosta, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Rotaviruses are the leading cause of severe, acute, and dehydrating diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age worldwide. Despite an important reduction in rotavirus-caused deaths as a consequence of the rotavirus vaccine, alternative or complementary strategies for preventing or treating rotavirus-associated diarrhea are needed mainly in the poorest countries. We describe the cases of four rotavirus-unvaccinated 12-13-month-old girls and a 5-year-old boy who developed rotavirus-associated diarrhea confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, and immunochemistry analyses. After the first day of diarrheal episodes, three of the five patients were immediately administered oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) 60 mg/kg daily, divided into three equal doses every 8 hours. The other two patients did not receive NAC and served as controls. Administration of NAC resulted in a decreased number of diarrheal episodes, excretion of fecal rotavirus antigen, and resolution of symptoms after 2 days of treatment. Our results suggest that NAC treatment after the first diarrheal episode could be an efficient strategy for treating rotavirus-affected children and preventing the associated severe life-threatening accompanying dehydration.

  1. [Outbreak of diarrhea by rotavirus in Bom Jesus city, Piauí State].

    PubMed

    Araújo, Telma Maria Evangelista de; Dantas, Jordânia Miranda; Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo Feitosa; Costa, Maria Amélia de Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    This study focused a diarrhea outbreak caused by rotavirus in a city of Piauí State aiming to identify the etiology, protocol of assistance to cases. A case series was carried out with 22 children assisted for acute diarrhea in 2006 in Health Units of Bom Jesus city. The data were collected by means of interviews utilizing forms that were with the help of the children's parents and analysis of the appointment files was performed. Most of the families (59.1%) had a monthly income inferior to the minimum wage, 59.1% utilized septic cesspool, 77.3% consumed water from the public supply system and 54.5% did not drink filtered water. As to age, 54.5% ranged from one to four years, the majority of them featuring an adequate nutritional condition. Among the 22 samples rectal swab collected for coproculture, the following were isolated: E. coli (69.6%), Klebsiella sp (95.6%), Proteus Mirabilis (47.8%). Regarding the 16 samples of feces in natura for the assessment of rotavirus, 100% were positive for G2 genotype; 93.3% for P4 serotype and 7.2% were not typified. We concluded that a continuous monitoring of circulating genotypes is essential, which implies the need of training health professionals to tackle diarrhea down.

  2. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Sergeev, Alexander A.; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687

  3. Experience with Clinically Diagnosed Down Syndrome Children Admitted with Diarrhea in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Rina; Sarker, Anupam; Saha, Haimanti; Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem; Shahunja, K M; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2015-01-01

    There is lack of information in the medical literature on clinically diagnosed Down syndrome children presenting with diarrhea. Our aim was to describe our experience with Down syndrome patients admitted with diarrhea by evaluating the factors associated with Down syndrome presenting with diarrheal illness. In this retrospective chart analysis, we enrolled all the diarrheal children aged 0-59 months admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr, b), from March 2011 to February 2013. Down syndrome children with diarrhea constituted cases and randomly selected threefold diarrheal children without Down syndrome constituted controls. Among 8422 enrolled children 32 and 96 were the cases and the controls, respectively. Median age (months) of the cases and the controls was comparable (7.6 (4.0, 15.0) versus 9.0 (5.0, 16.8); p = 0.496). The cases more often presented with severe acute malnutrition, developmental delay, congenital heart disease, hypothyroidism, sepsis, hypocalcemia, developed hospital acquired infection (HAI) during hospitalization, and required prolonged stay at hospital compared to the controls (for all p < 0.05). Thus, diarrheal children with clinically diagnosed Down syndrome should be investigated for these simple clinical parameters for their prompt management that may prevent HAI and prolonged hospital stay.

  4. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  5. 'Blueberry' Layers Indicate Watery Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic image, taken at the outcrop region dubbed 'El Capitan' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, reveals millimeter-scale (.04 inch-scale) layers in the lower portion. This same layering is hinted at by the fine notches that run horizontally across the sphere-like grain or 'blueberry' in the center left. The thin layers do not appear to deform around the blueberry, indicating that these geologic features are concretions and not impact spherules or ejected volcanic material called lapilli. Concretions are balls of minerals that form in pre-existing wet sediments. This image was taken by the rover's microscopic imager on the 29th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The observed area is about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  6. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Alexandre; Martinez-Vinson, Christine; Goulet, Olivier; Badens, Catherine

    2013-01-09

    Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases.

  7. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report…

  8. Management of Diarrhea in Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Issenman, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    Diarrhea affecting infants and children is an important primary-care problem. Most winter infections are caused by rotavirus, but newer viral, bacterial and protozoan pathogens have been discovered. Fluid and electrolyte therapy is the mainstay of therapy. Antiemetic, antibiotic and antidiarrheal medications can usually be avoided. Commercial clear fluid products have been reformulated to allow effective rehydration and maintenance of hydration, thus avoiding hospitalization or use of intravenous therapy. Patients are quickly advanced to nutrient feedings using breast milk or formula. There is strong evidence that Canadian physicians should use these protocols which work as well in North America as in the countries of the developing world. PMID:21263937

  9. [Rotavirus and other viruses of diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bajolet, O; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C

    1998-01-01

    Rotaviruses represent 80% of recognized viral etiologies and 140 million cases of diarrhea per year. They strike young children with similar frequency throughout the world, but the mortality rate is high in developing countries only, with some 870,000 deaths per year (WHO, 1997). Rotaviruses belong to the family of Reoviridae; they are segmented bicatenary RNA viruses, which explains their genetic variability, the presence of mixed infections, the establishment for some time already of a molecular epidemiology by electrophore types. The viruses are "naked" and thus resistant to the outside environment; their massive elimination, 10(8) to 10(10)viral particles per gram of faeces, begins with the first day of diarrhea. They are found in used water and can also be concentrated by shellfish; the environment thus constitutes a notable reservoir for the virus. Oral-faecal transmission is facilitated by deficient sanitary conditions. The 11 fragments of the genome each codify for 1 viral protein; 2 surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, bring about the formation of neutralizing antibodies, which are important for the protection and determination of different serotypes. A non structural protein--NSP4--would seem to intervene in the cytopathogenic effect and may act as a veritable viral enterotoxine. Numerous animal species are infected by rotaviruses which are district from the human ones. The pathology as it affects animals is of economic importance and of interest as an experimental and vaccinal model. Between human and animal rotaviruses there can be genetic rematchings and the VP6 protein is an antigen common to the group. The description of the other viruses responsible for diarrhea has benefited from widespread use of electronic microscopes from the very first years of study of rotaviruses. These other viruses belong to 6 different types: adenovirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, Norwalk agent and related viruses, coronavirus, enterovirus. They therefore have a structural and

  10. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: global status.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia F

    2010-03-01

    Despite the success of regional bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) eradication programs, infections remain a source of economic loss for producers. The wide variation among BVDV results in differences in genotype, biotype, virulence, and types of infections. BVDV infect a range of domestic and wild ruminants. Clinical presentation varies depending on strain of virus, species of host, immune status of host, reproductive status of host, age of host, and concurrent infections. Recent advances in BVDV research and diagnostics have led to the development of regional eradication/control programs, the most efficacious of which focus on biosecurity, surveillance, and control.

  11. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae diarrhea, Bangladesh, 2004.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu Syed G; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Chowdhury, Fahima; Nair, Gopinath B; Salam, Mohammed A; Sack, David A; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2005-07-01

    Flooding in Dhaka in July 2004 caused epidemics of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was almost as prevalent as Vibrio cholerae O1 in diarrheal stools. ETEC that produced heat-stable enterotoxin alone was most prevalent, and 78% of strains had colonization factors. Like V. cholerae O1, ETEC can cause epidemic diarrhea.

  12. Overview of the causes of chronic diarrhea in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major causes and the prevalence of chronic diarrhea differ between developed and developing countries. In the developing world, chronic diarrhea is typically associated with serial enteric infections and malnutrition; it is manifested by a chronic enteropathy, with impaired mucosal healing, and ...

  13. The knowledge of intensive care professionals about diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lordani, Cláudia Regina Felicetti; Eckert, Raquel Goreti; Tozetto, Altevir Garcia; Lordani, Tarcísio Vitor Augusto; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the opinions and practices of intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea in critically ill patients. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among health care professionals working at three adult intensive care units. Participants responded individually to a self-administered questionnaire about their length of work experience in intensive care; the definition, characterization, and causes of diarrhea; types of records in the patient's medical record; and training received. Results A total of 78 professionals participated in this study, of whom 59.0% were nurse technicians, 25.7% were nurses, and 15.3% were physicians; 77.0% of them had worked in intensive care for over 1 year. Only 37.2% had received training on this topic. Half of the interviewees defined diarrhea as "liquid and/or pasty stools" regardless of frequency, while the other 50.0% defined diarrhea based on the increased number of daily bowel movements. The majority of them mentioned diet as the main cause of diarrhea, followed by "use of medications" (p<0.001). Distinct nutritional practices were observed among the analyzed professionals regarding episodes of diarrhea, such as discontinuing, maintaining, or reducing the volume of enteral nutrition; physicians reported that they do not routinely communicate the problem to other professionals (for example, to a nutritionist) and do not routinely record and quantify diarrhea events in patients' medical records. Conclusion Different opinions and practices were observed in intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea. PMID:25295825

  14. [Chronic diarrhea in the diabetic. A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Frías Ordoñez, Juan Sebastián; Otero Regino, William

    2016-01-01

    The association of diarrhea with diabetes mellitus has been known for more than 70 years. In diabetic patients its prevalence is around 20%.Its clinical manifestations are diverse, and represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.There are certain diagnoses of higher prevalence in diabetic patients than in the general population.The different related etiologies can be adequately diagnosed through the clinical history and complementary diagnostic tests.The medications used by the diabetic patient to manage their disease often cause chronic diarrhea, so the pharmacological background should be studied at the time of the study of diarrhea.Diabetic patients can present other associated pathological conditions, such as celiac disease or microscopic colitis, which only discomfort is diarrhea.Exocrine pancreatic function may be decreased in the diabetic patient, frequently leading to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Dietary factors, such as sugar-free sweeteners and other agents, can cause diarrhea in the diabetic patient.The presence of conditions such as autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy secondary to diabetes mellitus may explain disorders such as anorectal dysfunction and faecal incontinence. Finally, diabetic enteropathy alone or with associated bacterial overgrowth can cause diarrhea.Achieving adequate glycemic control is the pillar of the treatment of diarrhea in the diabetic, after which there are additional measures that are applied according to the specific context of the patient.This article reviews the causes of higher diarrhea incidence in the diabetic patient and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved.

  15. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea among young children in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Richie, E; Punjabi, N H; Corwin, A; Lesmana, M; Rogayah, I; Lebron, C; Echeverria, P; Simanjuntak, C H

    1997-07-01

    The incidence of diarrhea and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was evaluated in children six months to five years of age from an urban community in Jakarta, Indonesia. From January through May 1994, 408 children were monitored in their homes for diarrheal disease. Thirty-six percent (148 of 408) of the study children had at least one episode of diarrhea during the study period. Twenty-nine (19.6%) of the 148 children with diarrhea had ETEC isolated from a rectal swab sample at least once during the surveillance period; five children had ETEC isolated from two distinct episodes of diarrhea, giving a total of 34 episodes of ETEC positive diarrhea in the study group. Ten of 34 episodes were associated with heat-labile toxin, 15 of 34 with heat-stable toxin, and seven of 34 with both toxins. The mean age of children with diarrhea (1.7 years), whether ETEC positive or negative, was significantly lower than those who did not have diarrhea (2.4 years) during the study period; 82% of the children with ETEC were less than two years of age. This study demonstrates a high incidence of ETEC diarrhea among young children in Jakarta, and suggests this site would be suitable for ETEC vaccine efficacy trials.

  16. Alterations in the Colonic Microbiota in Response to Osmotic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Trajanoski, Slave; Lackner, Stefan; Stocker, Gernot; Hinterleitner, Thomas; Gülly, Christian; Högenauer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Diseases of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract are often accompanied by diarrhea with profound alterations in the GI microbiota termed dysbiosis. Whether dysbiosis is due to the disease itself or to the accompanying diarrhea remains elusive. With this study we characterized the net effects of osmotic diarrhea on the composition of the GI microbiota in the absence of disease. Methods We induced osmotic diarrhea in four healthy adults by oral administration of polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG). Stool as well as mucosa specimens were collected before, during and after diarrhea and 16S rDNA-based microbial community profiling was used to assess the microbial community structure. Results Stool and mucosal microbiotas were strikingly different, with Firmicutes dominating the mucosa and Bacteroidetes the stools. Osmotic diarrhea decreased phylotype richness and showed a strong tendency to equalize the otherwise individualized microbiotas on the mucosa. Moreover, diarrhea led to significant relative shifts in the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes and to a relative increase in the abundance of Proteobacteria on the mucosa, a phenomenon also noted in several inflammatory and diarrheal GI diseases. Conclusions Changes in microbial community structure induced by osmotic diarrhea are profound and show similarities to changes observed in other GI diseases including IBD. These effects so must be considered when specimens from diarrheal diseases (i.e. obtained by stratification of samples according to diarrheal status) or conditions wherein bowel preparations like PEG (i.e. specimens obtained during endoscopy) are used. PMID:23409050

  17. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Jordan G; Eppes, Stephen C; Klein, Joel D

    2003-05-01

    This retrospective cohort analysis examined the risk factors, symptoms, and severity of disease associated with C. difficile in pediatric inpatients. Risk factors for a C. difficile-positive test were an oncologic diagnosis, diarrhea of more than 2 days' duration, and gastrointestinal symptoms, especially abdominal pain. Over a 3.5-year period, there was a total of 22 C. difficile-positive patients, and most had mild, self-limiting diarrheal illness. No cases of C. difficile diarrhea were identified. Seventy-eight percent of the C. difficile-positive patients were found to have alternate risk factors for diarrhea. Our data indicate that C. difficile rarely causes severe diarrhea in pediatric inpatients and that C. difficile testing should be limited to patients with severe prolonged diarrhea and abdominal pain.

  18. Nutritional supplementation: effects on child stunting because of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lutter, C K; Mora, J O; Habicht, J P; Rasmussen, K M; Robson, D S; Sellers, S G; Super, C M; Herrera, M G

    1989-07-01

    Research has shown that the positive effect of nutritional supplementation on child growth in malnourished populations is small relative to the large negative effect of diarrheal disease. To test the hypothesis that the effects of supplementation and diarrhea are synergistic in that supplementation modifies the negative effect of diarrhea on linear growth, length and diarrheal morbidity were compared at 36 mo of age for two cohorts of Colombian children: supplemented from birth and unsupplemented. Among unsupplemented children diarrhea was negatively associated with length. Among supplemented children diarrhea had no effect on length and differed from that of unsupplemented children. Thus, supplementation completely offset the negative effect of diarrheal disease on length. Targeting supplementation programs to the critical period of high diarrheal prevalence among infants and young children should increase the effectiveness of such programs in preventing growth retardation associated with diarrhea.

  19. Production of cattle immunotolerant to bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed Central

    McClurkin, A W; Littledike, E T; Cutlip, R C; Frank, G H; Coria, M F; Bolin, S R

    1984-01-01

    Inoculation of bovine virus diarrhea virus into 58 to 125 day old fetuses of bovine virus diarrhea virus seropositive pregnant cows, or inoculation of bovine virus diarrhea virus into seronegative cows 42 to 114 days pregnant, may produce clinically normal calves which are persistently infected with the specific isolate of bovine virus diarrhea virus yet seronegative to the homologous and heterologous isolates. Reinoculation of these persistently infected cattle with their homologous isolate produced no neutralizing antibody response to bovine virus diarrhea virus. These persistently infected cattle were immunocompetent as they developed neutralizing serotiters to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza-3 viruses and agglutinating serotiters to Pasteurella hemolytica . Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6326980

  20. Travelers' diarrhea among American Peace Corps volunteers in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Blacklow, N R; Sanford, L B; Cukor, G G

    1981-06-01

    Diarrheal disease was studied prospectively in 35 Peace Corps volunteers during their first five weeks in rural Thailand. Twenty (57%) developed the syndrome of travelers' diarrhea. Recognized bacterial enteric pathogens were isolated from stools during 47% of 39 episodes of travelers' diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was isolated during 26% and Shigella during 13% of the episodes. Of the 20 volunteers, 50% had bacteriologic and/or serologic evidence of infection with enterotoxigenic E. coli. Sixty-one percent of isolates of enterotoxigenic E. coli and 92% of isolates of Shigella were resistant to doxycycline. Other enteric pathogens, including Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella, rotavirus, Norwalk agent, and Entamoeba histolytica, were associated with episodes of travelers' diarrhea. Aeromonas hydrophila, isolated from 31% of 39 episodes of travelers' diarrhea, was of unknown pathogenic importance. Thus, episodes of travelers' diarrhea in Thailand were associated with a variety of organisms, among which antibiotic-resistant bacterial enteropathogens were common.

  1. Breastfeeding and the risk for diarrhea morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lack of exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and no breastfeeding among children 6-23 months of age are associated with increased diarrhea morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We estimate the protective effects conferred by varying levels of breastfeeding exposure against diarrhea incidence, diarrhea prevalence, diarrhea mortality, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for diarrhea illness. Methods We systematically reviewed all literature published from 1980 to 2009 assessing levels of suboptimal breastfeeding as a risk factor for selected diarrhea morbidity and mortality outcomes. We conducted random effects meta-analyses to generate pooled relative risks by outcome and age category. Results We found a large body of evidence for the protective effects of breastfeeding against diarrhea incidence, prevalence, hospitalizations, diarrhea mortality, and all-cause mortality. The results of random effects meta-analyses of eighteen included studies indicated varying degrees of protection across levels of breastfeeding exposure with the greatest protection conferred by exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and by any breastfeeding among infants and young children 6-23 months of age. Specifically, not breastfeeding resulted in an excess risk of diarrhea mortality in comparison to exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age (RR: 10.52) and to any breastfeeding among children aged 6-23 months (RR: 2.18). Conclusions Our findings support the current WHO recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life as a key child survival intervention. Our findings also highlight the importance of breastfeeding to protect against diarrhea-specific morbidity and mortality throughout the first 2 years of life. PMID:21501432

  2. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  3. Diarrhea induced by Treponema hyodysenteriae: a young chick cecal model for swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, M; Adachi, Y

    1990-01-01

    The experimental infection of 25 young chicks with Treponema hyodysenteriae was carried out. Treponemes were isolated from 21 of 25 chicks on day 21 after inoculation. The ceca of chicks infected with treponemes were atrophied. The lumen was filled with a white watery fluid instead of digested feed. In some infected chicks, a cecal core was observed with the fluid in the cecum. The cecal core was grayish, hard, and rod shaped. It consisted of eroded cells and debris of treponemes and resembled the pseudomembrane. Bloody mucus was also observed in one chick. The thickness of the mucosae in 17 of 25 chicks were markedly increased. The histological changes were classified into two types. In the case of regressive changes of epithelial cells which mean severe erosion, the laminae propriae were exposed. Hemorrhage, edema, and heterophil infiltration in the laminae propriae were also confirmed. Numerous treponemes were observed within the edematous area under the remaining epithelia and also invaded the epithelial cells and laminae propriae. In the other case, progressive changes, that is, hyperplasia of mucosal epithelial cells and elongation of the crypt, were observed. The epithelia consisted mainly of cuboidal basophilic cells, mitotic cells, and goblet cells. The mitotic cells increased in number and were also observed near the superficial luminal surface of the ceca. Mucous goblet cells were also considerably increased in number. The erosion of superficial luminal epithelial cells was not so severe, but edema in laminae propriae was frequently observed. Electron-microscopic observation demonstrated that the basophilic epithelial cells were polyribosome rich, mitochondria poor, and lipid droplet poor. Furthermore, tonofibril-like structures under the terminal web in cytoplasms were lost, and numerous membrane-bound vesicles at the terminal web with free ribosomes were observed. In places, a number of vesicles were observed between microvilli, and some vesicles were

  4. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause diarrhea, loose or watery stools, cramping, flatulence (gas) and other abdominal illness. CDC recommends that ... that cause diarrhea, loose or watery stools, cramping, flatulence (gas) and other abdominal illness. This test is ...

  5. Catch-up growth occurs after diarrhea in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Richard, Stephanie A; Black, Robert E; Gilman, Robert H; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Lanata, Claudio F; Mølbak, Kåre; Rasmussen, Zeba A; Sack, R Bradley; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Checkley, William

    2014-06-01

    Diarrhea and linear growth faltering continue to burden low-income countries and are among the most important contributors to poor health during early childhood. Diarrhea is thought to adversely affect linear growth, but catch-up growth can occur if no additional insults are experienced. We sought to characterize catch-up growth in relation to diarrhea burden in a multisite dataset of 1007 children. Using longitudinal anthropometry and diarrheal surveillance data from 7 cohort studies in 4 countries, we examined the relation between diarrhea prevalence and growth in 3- to 6-mo periods using linear mixed-effect models. Growth during each period was calculated as a function of age using linear splines. We incorporated the longitudinal prevalence of diarrhea in both current and previous periods into the model. Diarrhea during the current period was associated with slower linear and ponderal growth. Faster (catch-up) growth in length was observed in children with no diarrhea in age groups immediately after an age group in which diarrhea was experienced [age group >6-12 mo: 0.03 mm/mo for each percentage diarrhea prevalence in the previous period (95% CI: 0.007, 0.06) relative to 11.3 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >12-18 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.02, 0.06) relative to 8.9 mm/mo mean growth rate; age group >18-24 mo: 0.04 mm/mo (95% CI: 0.003, 0.09) relative to 7.9 mm/mo mean growth rate]. The associations were stronger in boys than in girls when separate models were run. Similar results were observed when weight was the outcome variable. When diarrheal episodes are followed by diarrhea-free periods in the first 2 y of life, catch-up growth is observed that may allow children to regain their original trajectories. The finding of a greater effect of diarrhea on linear growth in boys than in girls was unexpected and requires additional study. Diarrhea burdens are high throughout the first 2 y of life in these study sites, therefore reducing the likelihood of catch

  6. Optimal control of diarrhea transmission in a flood evacuation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwina, N.; Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.

    2014-03-01

    Evacuation of residents and diarrhea disease outbreak in evacuation zone have become serious problem that frequently happened during flood periods. Limited clean water supply and infrastructure in evacuation zone contribute to a critical spread of diarrhea. Transmission of diarrhea disease can be reduced by controlling clean water supply and treating diarrhea patients properly. These treatments require significant amount of budget, which may not be fulfilled in the fields. In his paper, transmission of diarrhea disease in evacuation zone using SIRS model is presented as control optimum problem with clean water supply and rate of treated patients as input controls. Existence and stability of equilibrium points and sensitivity analysis are investigated analytically for constant input controls. Optimum clean water supply and rate of treatment are found using optimum control technique. Optimal results for transmission of diarrhea and the corresponding controls during the period of observation are simulated numerically. The optimum result shows that transmission of diarrhea disease can be controlled with proper combination of water supply and rate of treatment within allowable budget.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of diarrhea morbidity among under-five children in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Enakshi; Sharma, Pawan K; Bunker, Clareann H

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhea accounts for a huge burden of infectious diseases in under-five children. Objective This systematic review was carried out to study the prevalence and associated risk factors of diarrhea among Indian children aged <5 years. Methods Papers were identified by a comprehensive electronic search of relevant medical subject heading (MeSH) terms in PubMed. Identified articles were independently reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria and rated for quality. 15 articles were abstracted and reviewed to identify the reported prevalence and risk factors for childhood diarrhea. Meta-analysis was done for calculating the pooled prevalence of diarrhea and point estimates of risk factors using random effects model with use of appropriate population weights, and depicted using forest plot. Results The overall prevalence of diarrhea between 2002 and 2013 was 21.70% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.24–34.46). The significantly associated risk factors were malnutrition (odds ratio [OR]: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.53–1.96) and anemia (OR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.29–2.28) in child, and low socioeconomic status (OR: 7.14, 95% CI: 2.19–23.32). Age of the child <24 months, not breastfeeding, mothers’ low literacy status and untreated drinking water did not show a significant association. Sex of the child, religion, higher education of mothers, and seasonality were found to be inconsistently associated in single studies. Conclusion It was concluded that there is sufficient evidence on the association of childhood diarrhea with socio-demographic factors, but evidence on other contributory factors including breastfeeding and vaccination is inconclusive. There is need to conduct more analytical studies on lesser known risk factors of diarrhea to establish their risk factors in Indian children. PMID:26925453

  8. Zinc treatment for 5 or 10 days is equally efficacious in preventing diarrhea in the subsequent 3 months among Bangladeshi children.

    PubMed

    Alam, Dewan S; Yunus, Mohammad; El Arifeen, Shams; Chowdury, Hafizur R; Larson, Charles P; Sack, David A; Baqui, Abdullah H; Black, Robert E

    2011-02-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled, community trial in rural Bangladesh in children 4-59 mo of age to compare the efficacy of a 5- and 10-d course of zinc therapy on the incidence and duration of diarrhea over the subsequent 90-d follow-up after initial treatment for an acute childhood diarrheal (ACD) episode. Children (n = 1622) with ACD were randomly allocated to either 5 or 10 d of zinc treatment. Female field workers visited each child daily, supervised the administration of zinc, recorded the duration of current episode, and the occurrence and duration of diarrhea over the subsequent 3 mo. The incidence of diarrhea over the 90 d of follow-up did not differ between the 5-d (1.08 ± 1.38 episodes) and 10-d (1.02 ± 1.35 episodes) groups (P = 0.35). Children in both groups experienced a comparable duration of diarrheal episodes (3.1 ± 5.6 d vs. 2.9 ± 5.6 d, 5-d vs. 10-d, respectively; P = 0.64) with a mean difference between groups within the defined range of equivalence. Time to onset of the first episode and the proportion children experiencing diarrhea during the 90-d follow-up also did not differ between groups. These findings suggest that among Bangladeshi children, a 5-d zinc treatment for ACD is as efficacious as 10 d in preventing diarrhea in the subsequent 3 mo.

  9. Statistical Analysis of the Different Factors Affecting the Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Qamruz; Khan, Imtiaz

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea is a worldwide problem facing both developing countries and developed countries, especially in pediatric population. Because of shortage of health facilities and lack of good food in developing countries, it is known fact that developing countries are facing this death taking problem more. The main purpose of this study was to examine the various factors which affect the recovery time of diarrhea. A multiple linear regression was applied to analyze the data and to select a model. The response variable for the study was the recovery time of diarrhea. The results of the analysis show that the Zinc is the main factor which affect the recovery time in Peshawar. PMID:23408274

  10. Llama Nanoantibodies with Therapeutic Potential against Human Norovirus Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I.; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y.; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:26267898

  11. Llama nanoantibodies with therapeutic potential against human norovirus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis.

  12. Prevention and Self-Treatment of Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Diemert, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Of the millions who travel from the industrialized world to developing countries every year, between 20% and 50% will develop at least one episode of diarrhea, making it the most common medical ailment afflicting travelers. Although usually a mild illness, traveler's diarrhea can result in significant morbidity and hardship overseas. Precautions can be taken to minimize the risk of developing traveler's diarrhea, either through avoidance of potentially contaminated food or drink or through various prophylactic measures, including both nonpharmacological and antimicrobial strategies. If diarrhea does develop despite the precautions taken, effective treatment—usually a combination of an antibiotic and an antimotility agent—can be brought by the traveler and initiated as soon as symptoms develop. In the future, vaccines—several of which are in the advanced stages of clinical testing—may be added to the list of prophylactic measures. PMID:16847088

  13. What is the Best Way to Treat Diarrhea?

    MedlinePlus

    ... called electrolyte solutions, have been designed to replace water and salts lost during diarrhea. They are extremely helpful for the home management of mild to moderately severe illness. Do not ...

  14. Diarrhea and school toilet hygiene in Cali, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Koopman, J S

    1978-05-01

    In a 4-week period in early 1976 in a poor, working class area of Cali, Colombia, the prevalences of diarrhea, vomiting, common cold, and head lice in schoolchildren were measured in relation to classroom size and to the condition of the school toilets. The study found that unhygienic toilet conditions were related to diarrhea, and it was estimated that if all schools could reach the modest level of hygiene of the two schools with the relatively best facilities, diarrhea would be reduced by 44% and vomiting by 34%. Toilet hygiene was found to be unrelated to colds or head lice, which have similar social class distributions to diarrhea and vomiting. Crowding was found to be related to a small percentage of the prevalences of vomiting, head lice and colds.

  15. [Travel diarrhea: attempt at a clinical-epidemiologic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Kollaritsch, H; Kremsner, P G; Tobisch, P; Ambrosch, F; Stemberger, H

    1987-06-30

    Traveller's diarrhea is the most common tourist's disease in the tropics. Therefore epidemiological data for the evaluation of factors influencing the attack rates and the severity of the disease are being required. This paper deals with the data of 1058 Austrian tourists travelling to warm climate countries. 47.3% of all travellers suffered from an episode of traveller's diarrhea during their stay. However, it could be evaluated that besides the destination seasonal influences were very important. Factors like individual hygiene and accommodation did not influence the attack rates. Age and environmental conditions, however, did partially influence the frequency of diarrhea. Furthermore, additional symptoms were interpreted and it could be seen that suspected heterogenicity of etiology leads to a similar pattern of clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation proves that traveller's diarrhea is commonly not severe, but due to the incidence and duration of the disease it is a major health problem in modern tourism.

  16. Astrovirus-associated diarrhea among Guatemalan ambulatory rural children.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, J R; Bartlett, A V; Herrmann, J E; Cáceres, P; Blacklow, N R; Cano, F

    1992-01-01

    Fecal excretion of astroviruses was monitored in 321 children, 0 to 3 years old, living in the rural highlands of Guatemala. During the longitudinal study, from February 1987 to February 1989, we examined 5,000 stool specimens, including 1,805 collected during 1,369 episodes of diarrhea, 830 collected during the convalescent week, and 216 and 244 collected 2 weeks and 1 week, respectively, before the onset of diarrhea. Routine specimens were taken once a month from every child who had been free from diarrhea for at least three consecutive weeks. Of the children, 124 (38.6%) excreted astroviruses during the study. In total, we identified 184 infections by astroviruses. Of the samples collected 2 weeks and 1 week before the initiation of symptoms, 0.9 and 4.9%, respectively, were positive, while 7.3% of the diarrhea episodes were associated with astroviruses. Of the convalescent specimens, 3.4% were shown to be positive; 2.4% of the 1,905 specimens taken in diarrhea-free periods contained astroviruses. Infections by other potential enteropathogens were documented in 54 and 65% of the asymptomatic and symptomatic astrovirus infections, respectively. Diarrhea associated with astroviruses alone had a median duration of 5 days and was associated with vomiting in 8.6%, with fever in 17.1%, with dehydration in 5.7%, and with loss of appetite in 34.3% of the episodes. Diarrhea due to astroviruses was accompanied by negative changes in weight gain. Astrovirus diarrhea contributes to the high morbidity observed in young children living under poor conditions and has a deleterious effect on their nutritional status. PMID:1583111

  17. [Diagnostic workup and therapy of infectious diarrhea. Current standards].

    PubMed

    Stallmach, A; Hagel, S; Lohse, A W

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diarrhea is very common; its severity ranges from uncomplicated, self-limiting courses to potentially life-threatening disease. A rapid diagnostic workup providing detailed information on the suspected pathogen should be performed only in patients at risk, analyzing one single stool sample for Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Norovirus. In the presence of risk factors, such as a history of antibiotic exposure within the last 3 months, testing for Clostridium difficile should be performed. Immunocompetent patients do not require specific antibiotic therapy. Exceptions exist in patients with severe comorbidities, immunodeficiency, fever/SIRS, and in patients with Shigella or C. difficile infection. Empirical antibiotic treatment should be considered in patients with fever and/or bloody diarrhea and in patients at risk. In patients with traveler's diarrhea, microbiological diagnosis is required only in patients with fever, bloody diarrhea, prolonged course of disease (more than 5 days), severe clinical course with hypotension or dehydration, and during outbreaks. In these patients one single fecal sample should be collected for stool cultures of Campylobacter, Shigella, and Salmonella, as well as microscopic examination for amoebiasis and Giardiasis. The main therapeutic measure for infectious diarrhea is sufficient oral rehydration. As in community-acquired diarrhea, azithromycin or ciprofloxacin are recommended-taking into account local antimicrobial resistance in the country of travel and possible side effects.

  18. Intestinal parasitic diarrhea among children in Baghdad--Iraq.

    PubMed

    AL-Kubaisy, Waqar; AL-Talib, Hassanain; Al-khateeb, Alyaa; Shanshal, Mohammad Mazin

    2014-09-01

    Parasitic diarrhea among children is a significant health problem worldwide. This cross sectional study described the burden of parasitic diarrhea among children. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of risk factors on the parasitic diarrhea, and to determine the parasitic profile among children in Baghdad-Iraq, during the period extending from September 2003 to June 2004. A total number of 2033 cases were included in the study. The estimated prevalence rate of parasitic diarrhea was 22%. We identified the following major diarrhea determinants were large households size, residential location, water source, low socioeconomic status, and low parent education. Giardia lamblia was found to be the most prevalent parasite with an infection rate of 45.54% followed by Entamoeba histolytica 23.44%, Enterobius vermicularis 12.7%, Hymenolepis nana 9.82%, Trichuris trichiura 5.4%, and Ascaris lumbricoides 2.2%. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that poor sanitation, inadequate environmental conditions, and low socioeconomic status are the main determining factors that predispose children to parasitic diarrhea. Mass deworming programs are recommended for school children, as this population is easily accessible.

  19. Manipulation of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus genome using targeted RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Li, Zhen; Zou, Yong; Wicht, Oliver; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2013-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe economic losses in the swine industry in China and other Asian countries. Infection usually leads to an acute, often lethal diarrhea in piglets. Despite the impact of the disease, no system is yet available to manipulate the viral genome which has severely hampered research on this virus until today. We have established a reverse genetics system for PEDV based on targeted RNA recombination that allows the modification of the 3'-end of the viral genome, which encodes the structural proteins and the ORF3 protein. Using this system, we deleted the ORF3 gene entirely from the viral genome and showed that the ORF3 protein is not essential for replication of the virus in vitro. In addition, we inserted heterologous genes (i.e. the GFP and Renilla luciferase genes) at two positions in the viral genome, either as an extra expression cassette or as a replacement for the ORF3 gene. We demonstrated the expression of both GFP and Renilla luciferase as well as the application of these viruses by establishing a convenient and rapid virus neutralization assay. The new PEDV reverse genetics system will enable functional studies of the structural proteins and the accessory ORF3 protein and will allow the rational design and development of next generation PEDV vaccines.

  20. Rice solution and World Health Organization solution by gastric infusion for high stool output diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Bross-Soriano, D; Pérez-Ricardez, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1991-08-01

    We sought to determine the efficacy of three different types of treatment in children with acute diarrhea who, during the oral rehydration period, had high stool output (greater than 10 mL/kg per hour). Sixty-six children, aged 1 to 18 months, with an average stool output of 22.6 mL/kg per hour were randomly distributed into three groups: group 1 received a rice flour solution, group 2 received the World Health Organization rehydration solution by gastric infusion, and group 3 continued to receive this solution orally. In all three groups, a decrease in stool output was observed, with the higher decrease observed in group 1 patients. Such a decrease facilitated rehydration of all 22 patients in group 1 (100%) in 3.3 +/- 1.5 hours, 16 (73%) in group 2 in 4.3 +/- 2.1 hours, and 15 (69%) in group 3 in 4.9 +/- 2.0 hours. No complications were observed. These data indicate that the rice flour solution is effective in children with high stool output diarrhea.

  1. Pyridopyrimidine derivatives as inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide synthesis: Application for treatment of diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Y.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Estrella-Jimenez, Maria E.; Warren, Cirle A.; Gilbertson, Scott R.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Acute secretory diarrhea induced by infection with enterotoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli involves binding of stable toxin (STa) to its receptor on the intestinal brush border, guanylyl cyclase type C (GC-C). Intracellular cGMP is elevated, inducing increase in chloride efflux and subsequent accumulation of fluid in the intestinal lumen. We have screened a library of compounds and identified a pyridopyrimidine derivatives {5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5,11-dihydro-1H-indeno[2′,1′:5,6]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4,6-trione; BPIPP} as an inhibitor of GC-C that can suppress STa-stimulated cGMP accumulation by decreasing GC-C activation in intact T84 human colorectal carcinoma cells. BPIPP inhibited stimulation of guanylyl cyclases, including types A and B and soluble isoform in various cells. BPIPP suppressed stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and significantly decreased the activities of adenylyl cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis and edema toxin of Bacillus anthracis. The effects of BPIPP on cyclic nucleotide synthesis were observed only in intact cells. The mechanism of BPIPP-dependent inhibition appears to be complex and indirect, possibly associated with phospholipase C and tyrosine-specific phosphorylation. BPIPP inhibited chloride-ion transport stimulated by activation of guanylyl or adenylyl cyclases and suppressed STa-induced fluid accumulation in an in vivo rabbit intestinal loop model. Thus, BPIPP may be a promising lead compound for treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. PMID:18559851

  2. Surveillance of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Diarrhea Cases from Children, Adults and Elderly at Northwest of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Flores-Villaseñor, Héctor M.; Gonzalez-Nuñez, Edgar; Velazquez-Roman, Jorge; Vidal, Jorge E.; Muro-Amador, Secundino; Alapizco-Castro, Gerardo; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. Alberto; León-Sicairos, Nidia

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains are a main cause of gastrointestinal disease in developing countries. In this study we report the epidemiologic surveillance in a 4-year period (January 2011 to December 2014) of DEC strains causing acute diarrhea throughout the Sinaloa State, Mexico. DEC strains were isolated from outpatients of all ages with acute diarrhea (N = 1,037). Specific DEC pathotypes were identified by PCR-amplification of genes encoding virulence factors. The adhesion phenotype and antibiotic resistance were also investigated. DEC strains were detected in 23.3% (242/1037) of cases. The most frequently DEC strain isolated was EAEC [(12.2%), 126/242] followed by EPEC [(5.1%), 53/242], ETEC [(4.3%), 43/242] DAEC [(1.4%), 15/242], STEC [(0.3%), 3/242], and EIEC [(0.2%), 2/242]. EHEC strains were not detected. Overall DEC strains were more prevalent in children ≤2 years of age with EPEC strains the most common of DEC pathotypes. While ∼65% of EAEC strains were classified as typical variant based on the aggregative adherence to in vitro cultures of HEp-2 cells, a high proportion of EPEC strains was classified as atypical strains. EAEC, EPEC, ETEC, and DAEC strains were distributed in the north, central and south regions of Sinaloa state. Among all DEC strains, >90% were resistant to at least one commonly prescribed antibiotic. Strains were commonly resistant to first-line antibiotics such as tetracycline, ampicillin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. Furthermore, more than 80% of DEC isolates were multi-drug resistant and EPEC and DAEC were the categories with major proportion of this feature. In conclusion, in nearly one out of four cases of acute diarrhea in Northwestern Mexico a multi-drug resistant DEC strain was isolated, in these cases EAEC was the most prevalent (52%) pathotype. PMID:27965648

  3. Surveillance of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Diarrhea Cases from Children, Adults and Elderly at Northwest of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Flores-Villaseñor, Héctor M; Gonzalez-Nuñez, Edgar; Velazquez-Roman, Jorge; Vidal, Jorge E; Muro-Amador, Secundino; Alapizco-Castro, Gerardo; Díaz-Quiñonez, J Alberto; León-Sicairos, Nidia

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains are a main cause of gastrointestinal disease in developing countries. In this study we report the epidemiologic surveillance in a 4-year period (January 2011 to December 2014) of DEC strains causing acute diarrhea throughout the Sinaloa State, Mexico. DEC strains were isolated from outpatients of all ages with acute diarrhea (N = 1,037). Specific DEC pathotypes were identified by PCR-amplification of genes encoding virulence factors. The adhesion phenotype and antibiotic resistance were also investigated. DEC strains were detected in 23.3% (242/1037) of cases. The most frequently DEC strain isolated was EAEC [(12.2%), 126/242] followed by EPEC [(5.1%), 53/242], ETEC [(4.3%), 43/242] DAEC [(1.4%), 15/242], STEC [(0.3%), 3/242], and EIEC [(0.2%), 2/242]. EHEC strains were not detected. Overall DEC strains were more prevalent in children ≤2 years of age with EPEC strains the most common of DEC pathotypes. While ∼65% of EAEC strains were classified as typical variant based on the aggregative adherence to in vitro cultures of HEp-2 cells, a high proportion of EPEC strains was classified as atypical strains. EAEC, EPEC, ETEC, and DAEC strains were distributed in the north, central and south regions of Sinaloa state. Among all DEC strains, >90% were resistant to at least one commonly prescribed antibiotic. Strains were commonly resistant to first-line antibiotics such as tetracycline, ampicillin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. Furthermore, more than 80% of DEC isolates were multi-drug resistant and EPEC and DAEC were the categories with major proportion of this feature. In conclusion, in nearly one out of four cases of acute diarrhea in Northwestern Mexico a multi-drug resistant DEC strain was isolated, in these cases EAEC was the most prevalent (52%) pathotype.

  4. Saffold Cardiovirus in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis, Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xiao, Yan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Lan; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    To understand Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) distribution, prevalence, and clinical relevance in China, we retrospectively studied SAFV in children with acute gastroenteritis and found SAFV in 12 (3.2%) of 373. Sequence homology of virus protein 1 genes suggested these strains belong to the SAFV-1 sublineage. SAFVs were found in samples positive for other diarrhea-causing viruses. PMID:19788828

  5. Diagnostic Yields in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Admitted With Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio A.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Stosor, Valentina; Ison, Michael G.; Angarone, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although diarrhea is a frequent complaint among solid organ transplant recipients, the contribution of infectious etiologies remains incompletely defined. We sought to define the etiologies of diarrhea and the yields of testing at our institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis over an 18-month period of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients. We stratified diarrhea by community onset vs hospital onset of diarrhea. Results. We identified 422 admissions (representing 314 unique patients) with community-onset diarrhea, and 112 admissions (representing 102 unique patients) with hospital-onset diarrhea. The majority of community- and hospital-onset diarrheal episodes had no identified etiology (60.9% and 75.9%, respectively; P = .03), yet were also self-limited (91% and 91%, respectively; P = .894). Thereafter, the most frequently encountered infectious etiologies were Clostridium difficile infection (13.3% and 11.8%, respectively), norovirus enteritis (8.2% and 3%), cytomegalovirus disease or colitis (6.3% and 2.7%), and bacterial enterocolitis (0.9% and 0%) (P = .03). In aggregate, these entities represented 93.7% and 90.5% of the identified infectious etiologies, respectively. Protozoan causes were rarely seen. Coinfection, or the simultaneous detection of ≥2 pathogens, occurred in 8 (1.9%) and 2 (1.8%) community- and hospital-onset diarrheal admissions, respectively (P = .99). Conclusions. In solid organ transplant recipients who presented at our institution with diarrhea, approximately one-third had infectious etiologies identified, consisting predominantly of C. difficile, norovirus, cytomegalovirus, and bacterial enterocolitis. Other infectious etiologies were rare. PMID:25371488

  6. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity.

  7. Nosocomial diarrhea: evaluation and treatment of causes other than Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Polage, Christopher R; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-10-01

    Diarrhea is common among hospitalized patients but the causes are distinct from those of diarrhea in the community. We review existing data about the epidemiology of nosocomial diarrhea and summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of diarrhea. Clinicians should recognize that most cases of nosocomial diarrhea have a noninfectious etiology, including medications, underlying illness, and enteral feeding. Apart from Clostridium difficile, the frequency of infectious causes such as norovirus and toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides fragilis remains largely undefined and test availability is limited. Here we provide a practical approach to the evaluation and management of nosocomial diarrhea when tests for C. difficile are negative.

  8. A Prospective Longitudinal Cohort to Investigate the Effects of Early Life Giardiasis on Growth and All Cause Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R.; Alam, Masud; Kabir, Mamun; Ma, Jennie Z.; Nazib, Forida; Platts-Mills, James A.; Bartelt, Luther A.; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Growth stunting in children under 2 years of age in low-income countries is common. Giardia is a ubiquitous pathogen in this age group but studies investigating Giardia's effect on both growth and diarrhea have produced conflicting results. Methods. We conducted a prospective longitudinal birth cohort study in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with monthly Giardia and continuous diarrheal surveillance. Results. 629 children were enrolled within the first 72 hours of life, and 445 completed 2 years of the study. 12% of children were stunted at birth with 57% stunted by 2 years. 7% of children had a Giardia positive surveillance stool in the first 6 months of life, whereas 74% had a positive stool by 2 years. The median time to first Giardia positive surveillance stool was 17 months. Presence of Giardia in a monthly surveillance stool within the first 6 months of life decreased length-for-age Z score at 2 years by 0.4 (95% confidence interval, −.80 to −.001; P value .05) whereas total number of Giardia positive months over the 2-year period of observation did not. Neither variable was associated with weight-for-age Z score at 2 years. In our model to examine predictors of diarrhea only exclusive breastfeeding was significantly associated with decreased diarrhea (P value <.001). Concomitant giardiasis was neither a risk factor nor protective. Conclusions. Early life Giardia was a risk factor for stunting at age 2 but not poor weight gain. Presence of Giardia neither increased nor decreased odds of acute all cause diarrhea. PMID:27313261

  9. Community-acquired diarrhea among children and adults in urban settings in Senegal: clinical, epidemiological and microbiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only limited data are available relating to the etiology of diarrhea in children and adults in Senegal. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the epidemiology and etiology of community-acquired diarrheal infections in children and adults living in urban settings. Methods A prospective study was carried out from March 2009 to December 2010, in the urban region of Dakar, Senegal. Patients with acute diarrhea were enrolled, interviewed to collect their clinical history, and their stools were tested for bacteria, virus and parasites. Results A total of 223 patients (including 112 children younger than five years old) with diarrhea were included. At least one enteropathogen was detected in 81% (180/223) of the patients: 29% (64/223) had bacterial infections (mainly diarrheagenic E. coli and Shigella spp), 21% (39/185) viral infections (mainly rotavirus) and 14% (31/223) parasitic infections. Co-infection was identified in 17.8% (32/180) of the patients. Viral infection was significantly more frequent in children under five years old during the dry season. Bacteria and parasites were equally frequent in all age groups. There was a seasonal variation of bacterial infections during the study period, with a higher proportion of infections being bacterial, and due to Salmonella spp. in particular, during the rainy season. Conclusion Our study suggests that in urban settings in Senegal, rotavirus is the principal cause of pediatric diarrhea during the dry season and that the proportion of bacterial infections seems to be higher during the rainy season. Further work is needed to document the burden of diarrheal diseases in sub-Saharan urban communities and to identify risk factors, including those linked to the rapid and unplanned urbanization in Africa. PMID:24321175

  10. Improved Childhood Diarrhea Treatment Practices in Ghana: A Pre-Post Evaluation of a Comprehensive Private-Sector Program

    PubMed Central

    El-Khoury, Marianne; Banke, Kathryn; Sloane, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diarrhea is the fourth leading cause of child mortality in Ghana. In 2010, Ghana endorsed guidelines from the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund for use of zinc with low-osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) for the treatment of acute childhood diarrhea. From late 2011 through 2014, the Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) project implemented a comprehensive program in 3 regions of Ghana to increase the availability and use of ORS and zinc and to decrease incorrect use of antibiotics and antidiarrheals. The program included (1) partnering with local pharmaceutical firms to introduce and market locally produced zinc products, (2) collaborating with the Ghanaian Pharmacy Council to provide training and supportive supervision of private-sector providers on diarrhea management, and (3) conducting mass media campaigns to raise caregiver awareness. We evaluated the effect of this program using a baseline survey of 754 caregivers of children under 5 with diarrhea at the start of the intervention in 2012 and a follow-up survey of 751 caregivers in 2014. Regression analysis showed that use of ORS with zinc increased from 0.8% in 2012 to 29.2% in 2014 (P<.001), and antibiotic use declined from 66.2% to 38.2% (P<.001) during the same period. The magnitude and statistical significance of these results remained the same after including potential confounding factors as covariates. Inappropriate antibiotic use, however, remained high at follow-up. We conclude that similar programs applied in other settings have the potential to rapidly scale up use of ORS and zinc. Additional efforts are required to reduce persistent incorrect antibiotic use. PMID:27353619

  11. Multicentric Castleman's Disease in a Child Revealed by Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare benign and unexplained lymphoproliferative disorder that is extremely uncommon in children. It presents with fever, systemic symptoms, generalized lymphadenopathy, and laboratory markers of inflammation. Its treatment is not standardized and its prognosis is poor. We report a novel case of multicentric Castleman's disease in a 13-year-old girl who had presented with chronic diarrhea as the only initial presenting symptom. The diagnosis of celiac or inflammatory bowel diseases was suspected, but two and a half years later, the diagnosis of multicentric Castleman's disease was brought following the appearance of abdominal mass whose biopsy revealed Castleman's disease in the plasma cell form. The outcome was favorable after treatment by corticosteroid, chemotherapy, and surgery. The occurrence of diarrhea as the initial symptom of multicentric Castleman's disease without lymph node involvement is very rare. This case report underlines the diagnostic difficulties and the long interval between onset and diagnosis when diarrhea occurs first. PMID:25737793

  12. Colestipol hydrochloride prophylaxis of diarrhea during pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Chung, C.K.; Layser, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    Thirty-three patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy to receive the bile acid-sequestering resin colestipol hydrochloride, 5 grams qid, during the entire time of their therapy or diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate 2.5-20 mg per day (control) if they experienced diarrhea. The colestipol patients also took diphenoxylate if they had diarrhea. The patients in the colestipol group often experienced nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps and 8 were forced to discontinue the drug. There was no difference in the weekly stool frequency between the colestipol and the control patients but the colestipol patients who took at least 50% of the prescribed dose required fewer diphenoxylate tablets than the controls. The data suggest that colestipol hydrochloride is not of value in preventing radiation-induced diarrhea because of the side effects associated with the drug, but the theory on which the use of bile acid-sequestering agents is based may be correct.

  13. Management of diarrhea in HIV-affected infants and children.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Tickell, Kirkby D; Walson, Judd L

    2015-01-01

    Globally, diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children less than 5 years of age. HIV-infected and HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children are at high risk of dying from diarrhea and may be more susceptible to the highest risk enteric pathogens. This increased risk associated with HIV infection and HIV exposure is likely multifactorial. Factors such as immunosuppression, proximity to individuals more likely to be shedding pathogens, and exposure to antimicrobial prophylaxis may alter the risk profile in these children. Current international guidelines do not differentiate management strategies on the basis of whether children are infected or affected by HIV, despite likely differences in etiologies and consequences. Reducing diarrhea mortality in high HIV prevalence settings will require strengthening of HIV testing and treatment programs; improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene interventions targeted at HIV-affected households; and reconsideration of the use of empiric antimicrobial treatment of pathogens known to infect HIV-infected and HEU children disproportionately.

  14. A study on neonatal calf diarrhea induced by rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Ferrari, M; Frigeri, F; Traldi, V; Angelillo, V

    1994-01-01

    This review summarizes the results of a study on rotaviruses isolated from calves affected by neonatal diarrhea. The results indicated that rotavirus infection is widespread and supported the evidence for an etiologic role of these viruses in neonatal diarrhea. Differences in virulence among bovine rotaviruses appeared also to be confirmed. Conventionally reared calves were fully susceptible to the experimental infection induced by rotaviruses originating from heterologous hosts, i.e. monkeys, pigs and rabbits. When rotavirus strains of bovine, simian and rabbit origin were compared by cross neutralization tests, it was found the simian and porcine strains were indistinguishable and both appeared to relate antigenically to the bovine strain. Finally, it was proven that feeding newborn calves with colostrum and first milk of their dams, previously vaccinated with an inactivated adjuvanted rotavirus vaccine, could prevent the neonatal diarrhea from occurring.

  15. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  16. Role of FODMAP content in enteral nutrition-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Halmos, Emma P

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea are common complications of enteral nutrition (EN); however, the cause is unclear. Mode of EN delivery that alters digestion and possibly absorption is suggested to contribute to the high incidence of diarrhea; however, enteral formula is frequently blamed. Most research has focused on fiber-supplemented EN, with a meta-analysis showing that fiber reduces the incidence of diarrhea in non-intensive care unit studies. Other hypotheses include formula osmolality and FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) content. FODMAPs are poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates that exert an osmotic effect. Dietary FODMAPs have been shown to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, in those with irritable bowel syndrome and, given a high-enough dose, will induce a laxative effect in most people. As FODMAPs are commonly added to enteral formula and EN is frequently used as the main source of nutrition, it is reasonable to hypothesize that EN provides more FODMAPs than usual dietary intake and increases risk for developing diarrhea. This hypothesis was assessed through a retrospective study showing that the standard-use enteral formula Isosource 1.5 had a protective effect of developing diarrhea. The only characteristic unique to Isosource 1.5 was the lower FODMAP content as determined through methodologies previously validated for food analysis. Methodologies for application to enteral formulas are currently undergoing formal validation. Once confirmed for application in enteral formula, future directions include FODMAP analysis of specific ingredients to increase understanding of potential problems associated with enteral formula and a randomized, controlled trial investigating the role of formula FODMAP content.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of a Hot-Water Extract of Leaves of Japanese Big-Leaf Magnolia (Magnolia obovata) on Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea in Mouse Pups

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takeshi; Tomono, Takuma; Hamauzu, Yasunori; Tanaka, Katsumi; Yasui, Hisako

    2014-01-01

    The leaf of Japanese big-leaf magnolia (Magnolia obovata Thunb.) has long been used as a natural packaging material for traditional foods in Japan. However, many of the physiological functions of the leaves against oral infection and resultant illness remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a hot-water extract of the leaves of Magnolia obovata on diarrhea induced by rotavirus (RV), a major cause of acute diarrhea. RV strain SA11 was mixed with the M. obovata leaf extract and inoculated orally to neonatal BALB/c mouse pups. Simultaneous inoculation of SA11 with the extract significantly decreased the incidence of diarrhea. In addition, the extract significantly inhibited cytopathic effects and mRNA expression of viral proteins in SA11-infected MA104 cells. Two flavonoid glycosides, quercitrin and rutin, were strongly suggested to be major anti-RV agents in the extract by serial solvent extraction and reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. Our results suggest that the hot-water extract of M. obovata leaves can be used as a medicine or food additive to prevent and ameliorate RV-induced diarrhea in individuals that may have difficulty in benefitting from the RV vaccines. PMID:25580150

  18. A new insight into pathophysiological mechanisms of zinc in diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Sarker, Rafiquel; Guggino, Sandra E; Tse, Chung-Ming

    2009-05-01

    An increasing amount of data showing the beneficial use of zinc (Zn) in treating diarrhea continues to emerge from epidemiological and clinical trials. However, without a thorough understanding of physiological mechanisms of Zn, it does not support policy recommendation to advocate the therapeutic use of Zn. Our data demonstrate that Zn is a potential antidiarrheal agent that provides substantial benefit by stimulating sodium absorption and inhibiting chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Thus, inclusion of Zn in oral rehydration solution (ORS) has the potential to markedly augment the effectiveness of ORS in the treatment of diarrhea.

  19. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome: A Rare Case of Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Aamar, Ali; Madhani, Kamraan; Virk, Hafeezulhassan; Butt, Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is caused by hypersecretion of gastrin from duodenal or pancreatic gastrinomas. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who presented with chronic diarrhea. CT abdomen showed multiple liver masses. Liver biopsy suggested metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. Serum gastrin level was markedly elevated. MRI abdomen, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and endoscopic ultrasound failed to reveal primary site of the tumor. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed hyperplastic gastric folds and multiple duodenal ulcers consistent with ZES. Patient was started on high-dose omeprazole and octreotide resulting in improvement in diarrhea. PMID:28058079

  20. Micronutrients as adjunct therapy of acute illness in children: impact on the episode outcome and policy implications of current findings.

    PubMed

    Mahalanabis, D; Bhan, M K

    2001-05-01

    Role of micronutrients namely vitamin A, zinc and folate, as adjunct therapy of illness episodes in children in developing countries have been discussed in the light of health policy. Apart from a selective review, attempts have been made to statistically combine results of several studies to address policy issues. In children, vitamin A supplementation during illness has (a) a profound effect in reducing mortality in measles, (b) possibly a significant effect in reducing persistent diarrhea episodes in children with acute diarrhea, and (c) no benefit in pneumonia. Use of large dose vitamin A is recommended during measles episodes but not in non-measles pneumonia. Its use in acute diarrhea is debatable but recommended in persistent diarrhea and in severe malnutrition as a component of a micronutrient mixture. Large dose vitamin A supplementation should be used with caution in young infants as there are unresolved concerns about its safety particularly, bulging fontanelle observed in infants when co-administered at immunization. In children, zinc supplementation during illness, (a) had a marked effect in reducing prolonged episodes and a modest effect on episode duration in acute diarrhea, (b) resulted in reduced rate of treatment failure and death in persistent diarrhea, (c) had no effect in measles and non-measles pneumonia, and (d) probably had a detrimental effect of increasing death rate when a large dose was used in severely malnourished children. The desirability of routine zinc supplementation therapy of undernourished children with acute diarrhea should be assessed further. Concerning policy, zinc supplementation as a component of a micronutrient mixture is recommended in the rehabilitation of severely malnourished children and in persistent diarrhea. However, recommendation for its routine use in all cases of acute diarrhea in children needs additional studies on effectiveness, cost, operations and safety. In two randomized controlled trials folate has

  1. [Research progress in causes of persistent or chronic diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Jing; You, Jie-Yu

    2012-08-01

    The disease course of children with persistent or chronic diarrhea lasts from two weeks to two months or over. Diarrhea is a clinical syndrome caused by a group of multiple etiologies. This paper reviews common causes of persistent or chronic diarrhea in children, including intestinal infections, nonspecific inflammatory bowel diseases, food allergy, lactose intolerance, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, neural regulation abnormality, immunodeficiency disease, malnutrition, Celiac disease and zinc deficiency.

  2. The persistence of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Brock, Kenny V

    2003-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) has a unique capacity to cause persistent infections of foetuses exposed within the first 150 days of gestation. Preventing foetal BVDV infection will aid in improved control. This unique ability gives BVDV a selective advantage allowing continual mutation and antigenic variation within cattle populations. Therefore, BVDV has become widespread and causes economic losses due to respiratory, reproductive and enteric disease. Vaccination (modified-live or killed) can provide some protection from acute disease and the development of persistently infected foetuses. However, vaccination programmes alone cannot control or eliminate BVDV. In naturally exposed and vaccinated herds, BVDV infections are not self-limiting and may persistent over time. This underscores the ability of the BVDV genome to remain fluid and adapt under selective pressures. Factors influencing persistence of BVDV infections in cattle populations include: non-lytic infections; evasion of host immune responses; foetal infections; acute infections; management practices; contaminated biologics; secondary hosts; defective replicated intermediates; antigenic variation; and replication in privileged anatomical sites.

  3. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  4. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  5. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  6. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  7. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  8. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  9. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus among Farmed Pigs, Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John; Ellis, Richard J.; Steinbach, Falko; Williamson, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea occurred in the summer of 2014 in Ukraine, severely affecting piglets <10 days of age; the mortality rate approached 100%. Full genome sequencing showed the virus to be closely related to strains reported from North America, showing a sequence identity of up to 99.8%. PMID:26584081

  10. Microbiological Contamination of Drinking Water Associated with Subsequent Child Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Stephen P.; Halder, Amal K.; Huda, Tarique Md.; Unicomb, Leanne; Sirajul Islam, M.; Arnold, Benjamin F.; Johnston, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    We used a prospective, longitudinal cohort enrolled as part of a program evaluation to assess the relationship between drinking water microbiological quality and child diarrhea. We included 50 villages across rural Bangladesh. Within each village field-workers enrolled a systematic random sample of 10 households with a child under the age of 3 years. Community monitors visited households monthly and recorded whether children under the age of 5 years had diarrhea in the preceding 2 days. Every 3 months, a research assistant visited the household and requested a water sample from the source or container used to provide drinking water to the child. Laboratory technicians measured the concentration of Escherichia coli in the water samples using membrane filtration. Of drinking water samples, 59% (2,273/3,833) were contaminated with E. coli. Of 12,192 monthly follow-up visits over 2 years, mothers reported that their child had diarrhea in the preceding 2 days in 1,156 (9.5%) visits. In a multivariable general linear model, the log10 of E. coli contamination of the preceding drinking water sample was associated with an increased prevalence of child diarrhea (prevalence ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.23). These data provide further evidence of the health benefits of improved microbiological quality of drinking water. PMID:26438031

  11. Chronic diarrhea and pancolitis caused by paracoccidioidomycosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Eduar A; Zegarra, Arturo J; Piscoya, Alejandro; Pinto, José L; de Los Rios, Raúl E; Prochazka, Ricardo A; Huerta-Mercado, Jorge L; Mayo, Nancy L; Tagle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    South American blastomycosis is a systemic micosis caused by infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The most frequently affected sites are the lower lip buccal mucous membrane, palate, tongue, sublingual region, lymph glands, and lungs. However, colonic involvement is not a common expression of Paracoccidioidomycosis. We report a case of chronic diarrhea and pancolitis caused by Paracoccidioidomycosis with fatal outcome.

  12. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  13. Bacterial pathogens associated with bloody diarrhea in Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Mota, M I; Gadea, M P; González, S; González, G; Pardo, L; Sirok, A; Rivas, M; Algorta, G; Schelotto, F; Varela, G

    2010-01-01

    Diarrheal disease continues to be a serious health problem, especially in developing countries. Bloody diarrhea represents approximately 20-30% of all cases and has higher morbidity and mortality. Treatment with antibiotics is beneficial in cases of Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia and Salmonella infection, principally in those children with a higher risk of invasive disease. The aims of this study were to detect the bacterial agents associated with bloody diarrhea in children and to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Between June 2001 and January 2008, 249 children with bloody diarrhea were studied. Shigella and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) were recovered from 48 (19.3%) and 3 (1.2%) of the total of cases, respectively. In 49 out of 249 children, in whom other enteropathogens were investigated, we recovered Campylobacter jejuni from 7 children (14.3%), Salmonella spp. from 2 (4.1%) and Aeromonas spp. from 1 (2%) in addition to Shigella from 7 children (14.3%). Thirty-four (70%) Shigella isolates showed resistance to ampicillin and 13 (27%) to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. All Shigella isolates were susceptible to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone. Salmonella and STEC isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics assayed. Thus, the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or ampicillin would not be appropriate for the empirical treatment of Shigella - associated diarrhea.

  14. Human Picobirnaviruses Identified by Molecular Screening of Diarrhea Samples▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Marije; Williams, Marisol M. W.; Koraka, Penelope; Simon, James H.; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    The global threat of (re)emerging infectious viruses requires a more effective approach regarding virus surveillance and diagnostic assays, as current diagnostics are often virus species specific and not able to detect highly divergent or unknown viruses. A systematic exploration of viruses that infect humans is the key to effectively counter the potential public health threat caused by new and emerging infectious diseases. The human gut is a known reservoir of a wide variety of microorganisms, including viruses. In this study, Dutch clinical diarrhea samples for which no etiological agent could be identified by available cell culture, serological, or nucleic acid-based tests were gathered. Large-scale molecular RNA virus screening based on host nucleic acid depletion, sequence-independent amplification, and sequencing of partially purified viral RNA from a limited number of clinical diarrhea samples revealed four eukaryotic virus species. Among the detected viruses were a rhinovirus and a new picobirnavirus variant. In total, ∼20% of clinical diarrhea samples contained human picobirnavirus sequences. The Dutch picobirnaviruses belonged to different phylogenetic clades and did not group with other picobirnaviruses according to year of isolation or host species. Interestingly, the average age of patients infected with picobirnavirus was significantly higher than that of uninfected patients. Our data show that sequence-independent amplification of partially purified viral RNA is an efficient procedure for identification of known and highly divergent new RNA viruses in clinical diarrhea samples. PMID:20335418

  15. Probiotics for the Prevention of Pediatric Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Shelby R; Vargas, Ashley J

    Goldenberg JZ, Lytvyn L, Steurich J, Parkin P, Mahant S, Johnston BC. Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea.Cochrane Database Syst Rev2015, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD004827. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD004827.pub4.

  16. Outbreak investigation of porcine epidemic diarrhea in swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Tim; Furness, Mary Catherine; Alves, David; Aubry, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first diagnosed in Ontario in January of 2014. An outbreak investigation was conducted and it was hypothesized that feed containing spray-dried porcine plasma contaminated with the virus was a risk factor in the introduction and spread of the disease in Ontario.

  17. Furazolidone versus ampicillin in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, H L; Ericsson, C D; Galindo, E; Wood, L V; Morgan, D; Bitsura, J A; Mendiola, J G

    1984-01-01

    Ninety-four U.S. students who acquired diarrhea in Mexico were treated with furazolidone (47 subjects) or ampicillin (47 subjects) on a double-blind random basis. Of 47 students, 26 (55%) who received furazolidone (100 mg four times daily for 5 days) recovered from illness within 48 h after initiation of therapy, in contrast to 15 of 47 (32%) who received ampicillin (500 mg four times daily for 5 days) (P less than 0.05). Altogether, 74% of students treated with furazolidone and 49% of those receiving ampicillin were well within 72 h (P less than 0.05). When furazolidone was compared with ampicillin, clinical illness was shortened on the average from 65 to 61 h for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea, from 83 to 58 h for shigellosis, from 82 to 51 h for diarrhea unassociated with a detectable agent, and from 72 to 57 h for all cases irrespective of etiology. Although not dramatically effective in the current trial, the broad spectrum of activity of furazolidone is of interest. Because of in vitro activity against Campylobacter strains and known effectiveness in treating giardiasis, furazolidone should be considered in therapy for diarrhea of unknown etiology in certain settings when laboratory processing of stools for etiological agent is not feasible. PMID:6385838

  18. Microbiological Contamination of Drinking Water Associated with Subsequent Child Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Luby, Stephen P; Halder, Amal K; Huda, Tarique Md; Unicomb, Leanne; Islam, M Sirajul; Arnold, Benjamin F; Johnston, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    We used a prospective, longitudinal cohort enrolled as part of a program evaluation to assess the relationship between drinking water microbiological quality and child diarrhea. We included 50 villages across rural Bangladesh. Within each village field-workers enrolled a systematic random sample of 10 households with a child under the age of 3 years. Community monitors visited households monthly and recorded whether children under the age of 5 years had diarrhea in the preceding 2 days. Every 3 months, a research assistant visited the household and requested a water sample from the source or container used to provide drinking water to the child. Laboratory technicians measured the concentration of Escherichia coli in the water samples using membrane filtration. Of drinking water samples, 59% (2,273/3,833) were contaminated with E. coli. Of 12,192 monthly follow-up visits over 2 years, mothers reported that their child had diarrhea in the preceding 2 days in 1,156 (9.5%) visits. In a multivariable general linear model, the log10 of E. coli contamination of the preceding drinking water sample was associated with an increased prevalence of child diarrhea (prevalence ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.23). These data provide further evidence of the health benefits of improved microbiological quality of drinking water.

  19. New parvovirus in child with unexplained diarrhea, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pothier, Pierre; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    A divergent parvovirus genome was the only eukaryotic viral sequence detected in feces of a Tunisian child with unexplained diarrhea. Tusavirus 1 shared 44% and 39% identity with the nonstructural protein 1 and viral protein 1, respectively, of the closest genome, Kilham rat parvovirus, indicating presence of a new human viral species in the Protoparvovirus genus.

  20. Effect of diet and tylosin on chronic diarrhea in beagles.

    PubMed

    Westermarck, Elias; Frias, Rafael; Skrzypczak, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Seven beagles in a colony of dogs had chronic diarrhea for at least 30 days. The dogs were subsequently treated with tylosin 20 mg/kg BW q24h PO for 10 days. During the treatment period, the feces became firmer but remained loose. When the treatment was discontinued, the diarrhea reappeared in 3 weeks. The feces remained abnormally loose in all dogs treated with metronidazole, trimethoprim-sulfadiazine, or doxycycline and prednisone. The diet was then changed for 10 days from a highly digestible moist pet food to a dry food developed for normal adult dogs. The feces again became firmer, although still loose in some dogs. The period was then extended to 3 month, but the fecal consistency continued to fluctuate from ideal to diarrhea. The dogs were treated a 2nd time with tylosin 20 mg/kg BW q24h PO for 10 days. The feces then became significantly firmer and remained so throughout a 3-month follow-up. We conclude that the combination of diet and tylosin was more effective than either agent alone in control of chronic diarrhea.

  1. Chronic Diarrhea and Pancolitis Caused by Paracoccidioidomycosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Eduar A.; Zegarra, Arturo J.; Piscoya, Alejandro; Pinto, José L.; de los Rios, Raúl E.; Prochazka, Ricardo A.; Huerta-Mercado, Jorge L.; Mayo, Nancy L.; Tagle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    South American blastomycosis is a systemic micosis caused by infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The most frequently affected sites are the lower lip buccal mucous membrane, palate, tongue, sublingual region, lymph glands, and lungs. However, colonic involvement is not a common expression of Paracoccidioidomycosis. We report a case of chronic diarrhea and pancolitis caused by Paracoccidioidomycosis with fatal outcome. PMID:20671977

  2. Control of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document is a consensus statement, produced at the request of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine that reflects the opinion of an expert panel regarding the prevalence and host range, clinical manifestations, and the potential for ultimate eradication of bovine viral diarrhea v...

  3. Some infectious causes of diarrhea in young farm animals.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, R E

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli, rotaviruses, and Cryptosporidium parvum are discussed in this review as they relate to enteric disease in calves, lambs, and pigs. These microorganisms are frequently incriminated as causative agents in diarrheas among neonatal food animals, and in some cases different strains or serotypes of the same organism cause diarrhea in humans. E. coli causes diarrhea by mechanisms that include production of heat-labile or heat-stable enterotoxins and synthesis of potent cytotoxins, and some strains cause diarrhea by yet undetermined mechanisms. Rotaviruses and C. parvum induce various degrees of villous atrophy. Rotaviruses infect and replicate within the cytoplasm of enterocytes, whereas C. parvum resides in an intracellular, extracytoplasmic location. E. coli, rotavirus, and C. parvum infections are of concern to producers, veterinarians, and public health officials. These agents are a major cause of economic loss to the producer because of costs associated with therapy, reduced performance, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, diarrheic animals may harbor, incubate, and act as a source to healthy animals and humans of some of these agents. Images PMID:2224836

  4. Drug-induced secretory diarrhea: A role for CFTR.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Reddy, Vadde Sudhakar; Arora, Kavisha; Helmrath, Michael A; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-12-01

    Many medications induce diarrhea as a side effect, which can be a major obstacle to therapeutic efficacy and also a life-threatening condition. Secretory diarrhea can be caused by excessive fluid secretion in the intestine under pathological conditions. The cAMP/cGMP-regulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the primary chloride channel at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and plays a major role in intestinal fluid secretion and homeostasis. CFTR forms macromolecular complexes at discreet microdomains at the plasma membrane, and its chloride channel function is regulated spatiotemporally through protein-protein interactions and cAMP/cGMP-mediated signaling. Drugs that perturb CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes in the intestinal epithelium and upregulate intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP levels can hyperactivate the CFTR channel, causing excessive fluid secretion and secretory diarrhea. Inhibition of CFTR chloride-channel activity may represent a novel approach to the management of drug-induced secretory diarrhea.

  5. SKIV2L Mutations Cause Syndromic Diarrhea, or Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Alexandre; Charroux, Bernard; Martinez-Vinson, Christine; Roquelaure, Bertrand; Odul, Egritas; Sayar, Ersin; Smith, Hilary; Colomb, Virginie; Andre, Nicolas; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Goulet, Olivier; Lacoste, Caroline; Sarles, Jacques; Royet, Julien; Levy, Nicolas; Badens, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Syndromic diarrhea (or trichohepatoenteric syndrome) is a rare congenital bowel disorder characterized by intractable diarrhea and woolly hair, and it has recently been associated with mutations in TTC37. Although databases report TTC37 as being the human ortholog of Ski3p, one of the yeast Ski-complex cofactors, this lead was not investigated in initial studies. The Ski complex is a multiprotein complex required for exosome-mediated RNA surveillance, including the regulation of normal mRNA and the decay of nonfunctional mRNA. Considering the fact that TTC37 is homologous to Ski3p, we explored a gene encoding another Ski-complex cofactor, SKIV2L, in six individuals presenting with typical syndromic diarrhea without variation in TTC37. We identified mutations in all six individuals. Our results show that mutations in genes encoding cofactors of the human Ski complex cause syndromic diarrhea, establishing a link between defects of the human exosome complex and a Mendelian disease. PMID:22444670

  6. Electroacupuncture for patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome or functional diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Li, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Fang; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zheng, Hua-Bin; Zhu, Wen-Zeng; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Rong, Pei-Jing; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Wang, Fu-Chun; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Shi-Jun; Zhou, Mei-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Shun; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and functional diarrhea (FD) are highly prevalent, and the effectiveness of acupuncture for managing IBS-D and FD is still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture with loperamide. It was a prospective, randomized, parallel group controlled trial. A total of 448 participants were randomly assigned to He electroacupuncture group (n = 113), Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 111), He-Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 112), or loperamide group (n = 112). Participants in the 3 acupuncture groups received 16 sessions of electroacupuncture during a 4-week treatment phase, whereas participants in the loperamide group received oral loperamide 2 mg thrice daily. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in stool frequency at the end of the 4-weeks treatment. The secondary outcomes were the Bristol scale, the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the proportion of adverse events. Stool frequency was significantly reduced at the end of the 4-week treatment in the 4 groups (mean change from baseline, 5.35 times/week). No significant difference was found between the 3 electroacupuncture groups and the loperamide group in the primary outcome (He vs. loperamide group [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4]; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3]; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8]). Both electroacupuncture and loperamide significantly improved the mean score of Bristol scale and increased the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the mean scores of SF-36; they were equivalent in these outcomes. However, the participants in electroacupuncture groups did not report fewer adverse events than those in the loperamide group. Similar results were found in a subgroup analysis of separating patients with IBS-D and FD patients

  7. Characterization of the human gut microbiome during travelers' diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Campbell, Frederick; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota are correlated with ailments such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diarrhea. Up to 60% of individuals traveling from industrialized to developing countries acquire a form of secretory diarrhea known as travelers' diarrhea (TD), and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and norovirus (NoV) are the leading causative pathogens. Presumably, TD alters the gut microbiome, however the effect of TD on gut communities has not been studied. We report the first analysis of bacterial gut populations associated with TD. We examined and compared the gut microbiomes of individuals who developed TD associated with ETEC, NoV, or mixed pathogens, and TD with no pathogen identified, to healthy travelers. We observed a signature dysbiotic gut microbiome profile of high Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratios in the travelers who developed diarrhea, regardless of etiologic agent or presence of a pathogen. There was no significant difference in α-diversity among travelers. The bacterial composition of the microbiota of the healthy travelers was similar to the diarrheal groups, however the β-diversity of the healthy travelers was significantly different than any pathogen-associated TD group. Further comparison of the healthy traveler microbiota to those from healthy subjects who were part of the Human Microbiome Project also revealed a significantly higher Firmicutes:Bacteriodetes ratio in the healthy travelers and significantly different β-diversity. Thus, the composition of the gut microbiome in healthy, diarrhea-free travelers has characteristics of a dysbiotic gut, suggesting that these alterations could be associated with factors such as travel. PMID:25695334

  8. The effect of probiotics on Clostridium difficile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pochapin, M

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomially acquired intestinal infection in the United States, affecting virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis and up to 20% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Even after receiving antibiotic treatment with either metronidazole or vancomycin, 20% of patients will have recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea. An innovative approach to the problem involves the introduction of competing, nonpathogenic (probiotic) organisms into the intestinal tract to restore microbial balance. The theoretical premise behind this approach is that the protective intestinal microflora is damaged by antibiotic treatment; the initial antibiotic exposure thus leaves the host susceptible to colonization and subsequent infection by Clostridium difficile. A so-called "second-hit" to the intestinal microflora occurs when the infected host is treated with flagyl or vancomycin, further destroying susceptible bacterial flora. Probiotic agents, such as Lactobacillus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii, have been studied for the treatment of Clostridium difficile. We are currently running a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG in combination with standard antibiotics for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Although it is too early to draw statistically significant conclusions, two patterns seem to be emerging: Lactobacillus GG is effective in reducing the 3-wk recurrence rate of Clostridium difficile, and patients feel better when taking Lactobacillus GG, as compared with the placebo, with early disappearance of abdominal cramps and diarrhea. In conclusion, the use of probiotics for the treatment of primary and recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea looks promising. Patients seem to have less recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea and early symptomatic improvement when using the probiotic Lactobacillus GG.

  9. Detection and molecular characterization of diarrhea causing viruses in single and mixed infections in children: a comparative study between Bangladesh and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Ahmed, Selim; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2014-07-01

    The incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea differ among countries. The prevalence of different enteric viruses, their molecular characteristics, and infections with multiple viruses might affect the disease incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and molecular characteristics of enteric viruses in children with diarrhea in Turkey and Bangladesh. A total of 288 stool samples that were negative for group A rotavirus were collected from children aged <5 years with acute diarrhea who presented to hospitals in Turkey and Bangladesh. The samples were screened for human bocavirus (HBoV), astrovirus (HAstV), norovirus (NoV), and adenovirus (AdV). Phylogenetic analyses of the targeted virus genes were performed. In Turkey, viruses were detected in 87/150 samples (58%), which included 69 (79.3%) with single viruses and 18 (20.7%) with multiple viruses. AdV was the most common virus, followed by HBoV. In Bangladesh, viruses were detected in 123/138 samples (89.1%), which included 29 (23.6%) with single viruses and 94 (76.4%) with multiple viruses. NoV GII was the most common, followed by AdV. The dominant genotypes among the virus species were HBoV 2A, HAstV 1, NoV GI type 1, and AdV 40. For NoV GII, the Hunter variant of genotype 4 in Turkey and genotype 17 in Bangladesh were the most common among the sequenced strains. It was concluded that the distribution of the viruses associated with diarrhea in Turkish and Bangladeshi children was different. Enteric viruses and mixed infections were more prevalent in Bangladesh than in Turkey.

  10. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  11. Epidemiology of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Houe, H

    1995-11-01

    Prevalence studies around the world show that BVDV is widespread in most cattle raising countries. There are significant differences, however, in prevalence between areas, probably the result of differences in cattle population structure and management practice. Direct contact with PI animals is probably the most important method of transmission of infection; however, field studies have shown that some limited spread of infection also occurs in the absence of PI animals. This may be due to contact with acutely infected animals or contact with other species infected with BVDV. Different ways of indirect transmission such as contaminated needles and equipment have been proven experimentally, and indirect transmission is considered to have some importance. If a PI animal is introduced directly into a dairy herd, most animals will be infected within a few months. On many occasions, however, a herd gets infected by other means than direct introduction of PI animals. In these cases, the infection is often spread to only a few animals after which the infections stops. The infection is then reinforced when PI animals are born. Slow and hence prolonged spread of infection in herds without PI animals also has been described, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Family lines of PI animals delivering PI calves are fairly common and can cause the infection to continue for several years. The clinical manifestations, acute BVDV, reproductive disorders, birth of malformed, weak and undersized calves, unthrifty PI animals, and mucosal disease often appear within certain periods. Large variation, however, can occur between herd outbreaks due to variation in virulence of the BVDV strain, housing of the cattle, and variation in transmission patterns. The extensive transmission of infection from PI animals makes different surveillance methods possible. Thus testing of a screening sample of a few young stock of antibodies and determination of antibody titer in bulk milk will often

  12. Prevalence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Aeromonas spp. isolated from children with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi; Mazaheri Nezhad Fard, Ramin; Kavan Talkhabi, Morteza; Aghaiyan, Leyla; Salehipour, Zohre

    2016-01-01

    Background Aeromonas spp. cause various intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. These bacteria are usually isolated from fecal samples, especially in children under five years old. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Aeromonas spp. and their antimicrobial resistance profile in children with diarrhea referred to the Children Medical Center in Tehran, between 2013 and 2014. Methods A total number of 391 stool samples were collected from children with ages between 1 day and 14 years old, with diarrhea (acute or chronic), referred to the Children Hospital, Tehran, Iran, between 2013 and 2014. Samples were enriched in alkaline peptone water broth for 24 hours at 37 °C and then cultured. Suspicious colonies were analyzed through biochemical tests. Furthermore, antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out for the isolates. Isolates were further studied for act, ast, alt, aerA and hlyA virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction. Results In total, 12 isolates (3.1%) were identified as Aeromonas spp.; all were confirmed using the API-20E test. Of these isolates, five A. caviae (42%), four A. veronii (33%) and three A. hydrophila (25%) were identified in cases with gastroenteritis. Second to ampicillin (which was included in the growth medium used), the highest rate of antimicrobial resistance was seen against nalidixic acid and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (5 isolates each, 41.6%) and the lowest rate of antimicrobial resistance was seen against gentamicin, amikacin and cefepime (none of the isolates). Results included 76.4% act, 64.7% ast, 71.5% alt, 83.3% aerA and 11.7% hlyA genes. Conclusion Aeromonas spp. are important due to their role in diarrhea in children; therefore, isolation and identification of these fecal pathogens should seriously be considered in medical laboratories. Since virulence genes play a significant role in gastroenteritis symptoms caused by these bacteria, Aeromonas species that include virulence genes are potentially

  13. Reduced sodium/proton exchanger NHE3 activity causes congenital sodium diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Yin, Jianyi; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Lechner, Silvia; Fuchs, Irene; Melancon, Serge; Uhlig, Holm H; Travis, Simon; Marinier, Evelyne; Perisic, Vojislav; Ristic, Nina; Gerner, Patrick; Booth, Ian W; Wedenoja, Satu; Baumgartner, Nadja; Vodopiutz, Julia; Frechette-Duval, Marie-Christine; De Lafollie, Jan; Persad, Rabindranath; Warner, Neil; Tse, C Ming; Sud, Karan; Zachos, Nicholas C; Sarker, Rafiquel; Zhu, Xinjun; Muise, Aleixo M; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Witt, Heiko; Zoller, Heinz; Donowitz, Mark; Müller, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD) refers to an intractable diarrhea of intrauterine onset with high fecal sodium loss. CSD is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Syndromic CSD is caused by SPINT2 mutations. While we recently described four cases of the non-syndromic form of CSD that were caused by dominant activating mutations in intestinal receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C), the genetic cause for the majority of CSD is still unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine the genetic cause for non-GC-C non-syndromic CSD in 18 patients from 16 unrelated families applying whole-exome sequencing and/or chromosomal microarray analyses and/or direct Sanger sequencing. SLC9A3 missense, splicing and truncation mutations, including an instance of uniparental disomy, and whole-gene deletion were identified in nine patients from eight families with CSD. Two of these nine patients developed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) at 4 and 16 years of age. SLC9A3 encodes Na(+)/H(+) antiporter 3 (NHE3), which is the major intestinal brush-border Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. All mutations were in the NHE3 N-terminal transport domain, and all missense mutations were in the putative membrane-spanning domains. Identified SLC9A3 missense mutations were functionally characterized in plasma membrane NHE null fibroblasts. SLC9A3 missense mutations compromised NHE3 activity by reducing basal surface expression and/or loss of basal transport function of NHE3 molecules, whereas acute regulation was normal. This study identifies recessive mutations in NHE3, a downstream target of GC-C, as a cause of CSD and implies primary basal NHE3 malfunction as a predisposition for IBD in a subset of patients.

  14. The burden of pediatric diarrhea: a cross-sectional study of incurred costs and perceptions of cost among Bolivian families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute gastroenteritis represents an enormous public health threat to children under five years of age, causing one billion episodes and 1.9 to 3.2 million deaths per year. In Bolivia, which has one of the lower GDPs in South America, an estimated 15% of under-five deaths are caused by diarrhea. Bolivian caregiver expenses related to diarrhea are believed to be minimal, as citizens benefit from universal health insurance for children under five. The goals of this report were to describe total incurred costs and cost burden associated with caregivers seeking treatment for pediatric gastroenteritis, and to quantify relationships among costs, cost burden, treatment setting, and perceptions of costs. Methods From 2007 to 2009, researchers interviewed caregivers (n=1,107) of pediatric patients (<5 years of age) seeking treatment for diarrhea in sentinel hospitals participating in Bolivia’s diarrheal surveillance program across three main geographic regions. Data collected included demographics, clinical symptoms, direct costs (e.g. medication, consult fees) and indirect costs (e.g. lost wages). Results Patient populations were similar across cities in terms of gender, duration of illness, and age, but familial income varied significantly (p<0.05) when stratified on appointment type. Direct, indirect, and total costs to families were significantly higher for inpatients as compared to outpatients of urban (p<0.001) and rural (p<0.05) residence. Consult fees and indirect costs made up a large proportion of total costs. Forty-five percent of patients’ families paid ≥1% of their annual household income for this single diarrheal episode. The perception that cost was affecting family finances was more frequent among those with higher actual cost burden. Conclusions This study demonstrated that indirect costs due to acute pediatric diarrhea were a large component of total incurred familial costs. Additionally, familial costs associated with a single

  15. [Childhood diarrhea in rural Nicaragua: beliefs and traditional health practices].

    PubMed

    Gorter, A C; Sánchez, G; Pauw, J; Pérez, R M; Sandiford, P; Smith, G D

    1995-11-01

    In Nicaragua, the principal cause of infant mortality is diarrhea, which is responsible for 40% of these deaths annually. This statistic reflects the low usage of health services and oral rehydration therapy (ORT). In an effort to improve the situation, several studies were carried out in Villa Carlos Fonseca municipio. This report describes two of those studies, one ethnographic and the other epidemiologic (conducted in 1989 and 1990, respectively), to find out beliefs and traditional health practices and their influence on the way in which mothers responded to their children's diarrheal illness. The ethnographic study involved interviewing 70 mothers with an average age of 28 years who had children under 2 years of age. The children represented two groups: one at high risk for diarrhea and the other at low risk. The objectives were to learn the traditional names for diarrhea, the perception of risk, and the treatments that were used. The epidemiologic study included 391 mothers over 14 years of age with one or more children under age 5 years, of whom 215 had had diarrhea in the two weeks preceding the survey. The objectives were to describe local beliefs and health practices and to determine the incidence of diarrheas according to the diagnosis made by the mothers. At least 12 types of diarrhea were identified, for which terms such as "empacho" and "sol de vista" were used. In most cases, the mothers had more confidence in folkloric treatments that they themselves or the traditional healers (curanderos) applied than in the services offered at health centers. This attitude limited their use of health services and ORT, although it was observed that in certain cases traditional treatments were used in combination with those of western medicine. There was a direct but nonsignificant correlation between the level of schooling of the mothers and the frequency with which they visited the health center. The authors suggest the effects of massages, herbal baths, and other

  16. Lactobacillus GG for treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea: An open labelled, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sunny; Upadhyay, Amit; Shah, Dheeraj; Teotia, Neeraj; Agarwal, Astha; Jaiswal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Randomized controlled trials in developed countries have reported benefits of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the treatment of acute watery diarrhoea, but there is paucity of such data from India. The study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Lactobacillus GG in the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children from a semi-urban city in north India. Methods: In this open labelled, randomized controlled trial 200 children with acute watery diarrhoea, aged between 6 months to 5 years visiting outpatient department and emergency room of a teaching hospital in north India were enrolled. The children were randomized into receiving either Lactobacillus GG in dose of 10 billion cfu/day for five days or no probiotic medication in addition to standard WHO management of diarrhoea. Primary outcomes were duration of diarrhoea and time to change in consistency of stools. Results: Median (inter quartile range) duration of diarrhoea was significantly shorter in children in LGG group [60 (54-72) h vs. 78 (72-90) h; P<0.001]. Also, there was faster improvement in stool consistency in children receiving Lactobacillus GG than control group [36 (30-36) h vs. 42 (36-48) h; P<0.001]. There was significant reduction in average number of stools per day in LGG group (P<0.001) compared to the control group. These benefits were seen irrespective of rotavirus positivity in stool tests. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the use of Lactobacillus GG in children with acute diarrhoea resulted in shorter duration and faster improvement in stool consistency as compared to the control group. PMID:24820831

  17. Identifying Etiological Agents Causing Diarrhea in Low Income Ecuadorian Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vasco, Gabriela; Trueba, Gabriel; Atherton, Richard; Calvopiña, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Andrade, Thamara; Eguiguren, Martha; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Continued success in decreasing diarrheal disease burden requires targeted interventions. To develop such interventions, it is crucial to understand which pathogens cause diarrhea. Using a case-control design we tested stool samples, collected in both rural and urban Ecuador, for 15 pathogenic microorganisms. Pathogens were present in 51% of case and 27% of control samples from the urban community, and 62% of case and 18% of control samples collected from the rural community. Rotavirus and Shigellae were associated with diarrhea in the urban community; co-infections were more pathogenic than single infection; Campylobacter and Entamoeba histolytica were found in large numbers in cases and controls; and non-typhi Salmonella and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were not found in any samples. Consistent with the Global Enteric Multicenter Study, focused in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, we found that in Ecuador a small group of pathogens accounted for a significant amount of the diarrheal disease burden. PMID:25048373

  18. Molecular diagnosis of infectious diarrhea: focus on enteric protozoa.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, Hans P; Sobuz, Shihab U; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    Robust detection of enteric protozoa is a critical step toward determining the etiology of diarrhea. Widespread use of conventional microscopy, culturing and antigen detection in both industrial and developing countries is limited by relatively low sensitivity and specificity. Refinements of these conventional approaches that reduce turnaround time and instrumentation have yielded strong alternatives for clinical and research use. However, advances in molecular diagnostics for protozoal, bacterial, viral and helminth infections offer significant advantages in studies seeking to understand pathogenesis, transmission and long-term consequences of infectious diarrhea. Quantitation of enteropathogen burden and highly multiplexed platforms for molecular detection dramatically improve predictive power in emerging models of diarrheal etiology, while eliminating the expense of multiple tests.

  19. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-03-19

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  20. Extremely rare cause of congenital diarrhea: enteric anendocrinosis.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Ersin; Islek, Ali; Yilmaz, Aygen; Akcam, Mustafa; Flanagan, Sarah E; Artan, Reha

    2013-10-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders consist of a variety of chronic enteropathies. There are approximately 30 different diseases that can be classified into four groups according to the mechanisms involved in pathogenesis: (i) absorption and transport of nutrients and electrolytes; (ii) enterocyte differentiation and polarization; (iii) enteroendocrine cell differentiation; and (iv) modulation of the intestinal immune response. Affected patients often present with life-threatening diarrhea, in the first few weeks of life. A new disorder, enteric anendocrinosis, which is characterized by severe malabsorptive diarrhea and a lack of intestinal enteroendocrine cells has recently been described in six patients with recessively inherited mutations in the Neurogenin-3 gene. In this report we describe a seventh case with a review of the literature.

  1. Parvovirus-like particles associated with diarrhea in unweaned piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Dea, S; Elazhary, M A; Martineau, G P; Vaillancourt, J

    1985-01-01

    Numerous parvovirus-like particles, 18 to 26 nm in diameter, were detected by electron microscopy in the intestinal contents of two to three week old piglets with mild to severe diarrhea, in six Quebec pig herds. Hemagglutination of guinea pig and African green monkey red blood cells was obtained with clarified intestinal contents. Two isolates were found to be antigenically related to porcine and canine parvoviruses, while another differed from the porcine parvovirus using the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Three isolates could be cultivated in cell cultures as demonstrated by the development of a cytopathic effect, hemagglutination activity, immunofluorescence and identification of the virions in the cell culture fluids by electron microscopy. The possibility of a primary etiological role for these parvoviruses in diarrhea of unweaned piglets is discussed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2412678

  2. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-01-01

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:28335505

  3. Gut Microbiome Composition in Young Nicaraguan Children during Diarrhea Episodes and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Allali, Imane; Monteagudo, Andrea; Vilchez, Samuel; Hudgens, Michael G.; Rogawski, Elizabeth T.; Carroll, Ian M.; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Espinoza, Felix; Andrea Azcarate-Peril, M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the gut microbiota is affected by diarrhea episodes may help explain alterations in intestinal function among children in low-income settings. This study examined the composition of the gut microbiome of Nicaraguan children both during diarrhea episodes and while free of diarrhea for at least 2 months. Relative abundances of bacterial taxa, phylogenetic diversity, and species richness were determined by 16S amplicon sequencing and compared between paired diarrhea and recovery samples. A total of 66 stools were provided by 25 children enrolled in a 1-year cohort study of diarrhea etiologies. Children in our cohort had a mean age of 21.9 months; 64% were breast-fed, and 10% had received an antibiotic during the diarrhea episode. Overall, phylogenetic diversity and species richness did not differ significantly between diarrhea and recovery stools. However, of children who had a bacterial enteropathogen detected in any diarrhea stool, none experienced an increase in phylogenetic diversity in recovery, whereas of those in whom no bacterial enteropathogens were detected in their diarrhea stool(s), 59% experienced an increase in phylogenetic diversity in recovery (P = 0.008). This preliminary study suggests that recovery of the gut microbiota after a diarrhea episode may take longer time than previously thought and may be pathogen specific. PMID:26350452

  4. Kampo Extract of Shinbuto Improved Refractory Diarrhea in Milroy's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Horiba, Yuko; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Milroy's disease is a hereditary congenital lymphedema caused by lymphatic obstruction. The legs are most commonly affected, but impaired intestinal lymphatic flow can cause loose bowel movements. Here, we report the use of the Kampo extract of shinbuto for successful treatment of and abdominal pain in a patient with Milroy's disease. Milroy's disease was diagnosed because of left leg lymph-edema with onset at birth. Conservative therapy with a compression bandage was applied. However, when the patient moved to Manila at 35 years of age, she was exposed to drastic temperature changes between the air-conditioned cold environment in her room and the hot and humid environment outside. She developed a constitutional state of coldness as in hiesho (冷え症). Then sudden lower abdominal pain and diarrhea began to occur 3 times per week and lasted at least 1 hour, sometimes accompanied by vomiting. It happened particularly when she was exposed to the cold environment and was not related to meals. Conventional anti-cholinergic or antidiarrhetic drugs had no therapeutic effect. These attacks continued in the same frequency for 3 years, so the patient visited a Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine) clinic, where her diagnosis of Milroy's disease–associated diarrhea and abdominal pain was augmented by the Kampo diagnosis of hiesho, suitai (body fluid retention). She was prescribed 7.5 g of shinbuto extract per day (TJ-30; Tsumura Co, Tokyo, Japan). The shinbuto extract significantly reduced abdominal pain and refractory diarrhea to about 2 days per month, and it tapered off completely in 3 months. Shinbuto is usually used against cold-induced diarrhea. Rewarming and water movement by shinbuto resulted in significant improvement in symptoms induced by hiesho and suitai triggered by the cold environment, though the patient's leg swelling did not change. PMID:24278839

  5. Kampo Extract of Shinbuto Improved Refractory Diarrhea in Milroy's Disease.

    PubMed

    Horiba, Yuko; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Milroy's disease is a hereditary congenital lymphedema caused by lymphatic obstruction. The legs are most commonly affected, but impaired intestinal lymphatic flow can cause loose bowel movements. Here, we report the use of the Kampo extract of shinbuto for successful treatment of and abdominal pain in a patient with Milroy's disease. Milroy's disease was diagnosed because of left leg lymph-edema with onset at birth. Conservative therapy with a compression bandage was applied. However, when the patient moved to Manila at 35 years of age, she was exposed to drastic temperature changes between the air-conditioned cold environment in her room and the hot and humid environment outside. She developed a constitutional state of coldness as in hiesho (え). Then sudden lower abdominal pain and diarrhea began to occur 3 times per week and lasted at least 1 hour, sometimes accompanied by vomiting. It happened particularly when she was exposed to the cold environment and was not related to meals. Conventional anti-cholinergic or antidiarrhetic drugs had no therapeutic effect. These attacks continued in the same frequency for 3 years, so the patient visited a Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine) clinic, where her diagnosis of Milroy's disease-associated diarrhea and abdominal pain was augmented by the Kampo diagnosis of hiesho, suitai (body fluid retention). She was prescribed 7.5 g of shinbuto extract per day (TJ-30; Tsumura Co, Tokyo, Japan). The shinbuto extract significantly reduced abdominal pain and refractory diarrhea to about 2 days per month, and it tapered off completely in 3 months. Shinbuto is usually used against cold-induced diarrhea. Rewarming and water movement by shinbuto resulted in significant improvement in symptoms induced by hiesho and suitai triggered by the cold environment, though the patient's leg swelling did not change.

  6. Adherence to zinc supplementation guidelines for the treatment of diarrhea among children under–five in Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Laura M; Walker, Christa L Fischer; Taneja, Sunita; Mazumder, Sarmila; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on adherence to the recommended dose and duration of zinc supplementation for diarrheal episodes in children under five years of age. In selected districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, we sought to assess adherence to the nationally advised zinc treatment regimen (ie, 10 mg/day for ages 2–6 months and 20 mg/day for ages 7–59 months for 14 days) among caregivers of zinc–prescribed children. Methods We identified and conducted follow–up visits to children advised zinc for the treatment of diarrhea. At the initial visit, we collected data on the treatment instructions received from providers. Caregivers were asked to record treatments administered on a pictorial tracking form and were asked to retain all packaging for collection at follow–up. We quantified the average dose and duration of zinc therapy and built logistic regression models to assess the factors associated with caregiver adherence to national guidelines. Results Caregivers administered zinc for an average of 10.7 days (standard deviation (SD) = 3.9 days; median = 13 days), and 47.8% continued treatment for the complete 14 days. Among children receiving zinc syrups and tablets respectively, the age appropriate dose was received by 30.8% and 67.3%. Adherence to age appropriate dose and continuation of zinc for 14 days were highly associated with having received appropriate provider instructions. Conclusions Our results indicate moderate–to–good adherence to national zinc treatment guidelines for diarrhea among caregivers in rural India. Our findings also highlight the importance of provider guidance in ensuring adherence to zinc dose and duration. Programs aiming to scale–up zinc treatment for childhood diarrhea should train providers to successfully communicate dosing instructions to caregivers, while also addressing the tendency of caregivers to terminate treatment once a child appears to have recovered from an acute diarrheal episode. PMID

  7. Breastfeeding and protection against diarrhea: an integrative review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Floriacy Stabnow; Santos, Felipe César Stabnow; dos Santos, Leonardo Hunaldo; Leite, Adriana Moraes; de Mello, Débora Falleiros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, in national and international journals, the studies conducted in Brazil related to breast feeding and reducing cases of diarrhea in children under 2 years of age, featuring health interventions more used. Methods Descriptive study, based on an integrative review of literature from PubMed and LILACS data published between January 1992 and August 2011. The keywords “breastfeeding AND diarrhea” was searched in Portuguese, English and Spanish in PubMed and LILACS. The guiding question was: “What was knowledge produced about breast feeding and prevention of diarrhea in children under 2 years between 1992 and 2011 in studies conducted in Brazil?” Results We selected 11 studies that showed the importance of breast feeding in the prevention and protection against diarrhea in children under 6 months, especially among children in exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Public health policies should be directed to the context of each locality, in order to reduce the problems that involve the early weaning. PMID:26061078

  8. Effect of apitherapy in piglets with preweaning diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Hwa; Cho, Seong Koo; Kang, Seong Soo; Bae, Chun Sik; Bai, Young Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoo; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the therapeutic effect of honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) venom in piglets with bacterial diarrhea Comparison between bee venom- and drug-treated groups was our main concern in the present study. Preweaning piglets were assigned to treated and non-treated control groups. In the treated group, 47 piglets were acupunctured with the worker honeybee once a day for three consecutive days. Two acupoints, GV-1 (Jiao-chao) and ST-25 (Hai-men), were selected for apitherapy. In the control group, 44 piglets were intramuscularly injected with a standard dose of a known antibacterial drug, colistin sulfate (300,000 IU/kg of body weight), and an antidiarrheal drug (berberine, 2 ml/kg) once a day for three consecutive days. At post-treatment, 90.9% of the control piglets and 93.6% of piglets in the treated group recovered from bacterial diarrhea. Bee acupuncture therapy did not show any side effects such as allergy, intoxication, hemorrhage or infection. It is concluded that bee venom therapy was effective in controlling bacterial diarrhea in preweaning piglets.

  9. [Six years evaluation of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Ercis, Serpil; Ergin, Alper; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile toxin in the stool samples of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea or pseudomembranous colitis, and to relate its presence with the clinical findings of the patients. Between January 1997-April 2003, a total of 726 stool samples were investigated for C. difficile toxin A and/or B by enzyme immunoassay. Of them, 68 (9.4%) were found positive for C. difficile toxin (62 were toxin A, 6 were toxin B). C. difficile associated diarrhea were found to be related mostly with the use of beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (32/68), followed by aminoglycosides (12/68), and cephalosporins (8/68). The ages of the patients were between 1-86 years old (mean: 43.3 years), and 36 (52.9%) of them had an underlying conditions. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic renal failure were the underlying disease in 18, malignancy in 11, and others (diabetes, hepatitis, transplantation, multiple sclerosis) in 7 of the patients. In conclusion, toxin detection and knowledge of the risk factors are the beneficial guidelines for the diagnosis of C. difficile associated diarrhea in the routine setting.

  10. Management of diarrhea in HIV-affected infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B.; Tickell, Kirkby D; Walson, Judd L

    2015-01-01

    Globally, diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children less than 5 years of age. HIV-infected and HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children are at high risk of dying from diarrhea and may be more susceptible to the highest risk enteric pathogens. This increased risk associated with HIV infection and HIV exposure is likely multifactorial. Factors such as immunosuppression, proximity to individuals more likely to be shedding pathogens, and exposure to antimicrobial prophylaxis may alter the risk profile in these children. Current international guidelines do not differentiate management strategies on the basis of whether children are infected or affected by HIV, despite likely differences in etiologies and consequences. Reducing diarrhea mortality in high HIV prevalence settings will require strengthening of HIV testing and treatment programs; improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene interventions targeted at HIV-affected households; and reconsideration of the use of empiric antimicrobial treatment of pathogens known to infect HIV-infected and HEU children disproportionately. PMID:25384353

  11. Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, María Pía; Carreño, Monica

    2015-10-29

    Acute otitis media is one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed in children. Antibiotic treatment use remains controversial. This summary aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of antibiotics in children with acute otitis media. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 18 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded antibiotics reduce pain at 48-72 hours and reduce the risk of tympanic perforations in children with acute otitis media, but they do not reduce late recurrences and increase the risk of side effects (rash, vomiting and diarrhea).

  12. A study to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility and impact of packaged interventions (“Diarrhea Pack”) for prevention and treatment of childhood diarrhea in rural Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrhea remains one of the leading public health issues in developing countries and is a major contributor in morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Interventions such as ORS, Zinc, water purification and improved hygiene and sanitation can significantly reduce the diarrhea burden but their coverage remains low and has not been tested as packaged intervention before. This study attempts to evaluate the package of evidence based interventions in a “Diarrhea Pack” through first level health care providers at domiciliary level in community based settings. This study sought to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility and impact of diarrhea Pack on diarrhea burden. Methods A cluster randomized design was used to evaluate the objectives of the project a union council was considered as a cluster for analysis, a total of eight clusters, four in intervention and four in control were included in the study. We conducted a baseline survey in all clusters followed by the delivery of diarrhea Pack in intervention clusters through community health workers at domiciliary level and through sales promoters to health care providers and pharmacies. Four quarterly surveillance rounds were conducted to evaluate the impact of diarrhea pack in all clusters by an independent team of Field workers. Results Both the intervention and control clusters were similar at the baseline but as the study progress we found a significant increase in uptake of ORS and Zinc along with the reduction in antibiotic use, diarrhea burden and hospitalization in intervention clusters when compared with the control clusters. We found that the Diarrhea Pack was well accepted with all of its components in the community. Conclusion The intervention was well accepted and had a productive impact on the uptake of ORS and zinc and reduction in the use of antibiotics. It is feasible to deliver interventions such as diarrhea pack through community health workers in community settings

  13. Growth assessment in Egyptian infants and children with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ei-Deeb, Marwa T; Hamid, Dalia H Abdel

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the various growth parameters among patients presenting with chronic diarrhea and highlight the most common causes of chronic diarrhea among a sample of Egyptian infants and children. This cross-sectional study included 146 patients with chronic diarrhea. They were 87 males and 59 females, with age ranging between 2 and 198 months and a mean age of 27.3 +/- 34.5 months. Each patient was subjected to medical history taking including age of onset and duration of diarrhea, consistency of stools, presence of blood and mucus, vomiting with or without hematemesis, fever, allergic manifestations and family history of atopy. Dietetic history included milk feeding during the first 6 months and age of weaning and age of introduction of cow's milk products. Anthropometric measurements included weight and height and weight for height were assessed and z-scores were calculated using software WHO anthro v3.2.2. Laboratory investigations included stool analysis and culture, CBC and all other investigations necessary for diagnosis of the definite cause including RAST for specific IgE against cow's milk proteins, serology for celiac disease (anti-gliadin and anti tTG), Breath hydrogen test, endoscopy (colonoscopy or esophago-gastrodudenoscopy) and histopathologic assessment of endoscopic biopsies. CMA was diagnosed on basis of withdrawal and open re-challenge technique. Causes included chronic infections (40.4%), CMA (34.9%), celiac disease (10.3%), inflammatory bowel disease (6.8%) and lactose intolerance (3.4%). Rare causes were chronic non-specific diarrhea (1.3%), cystic fibrosis (0.7%), post-surgery short bowel syndrome (0.7%), neuroblastoma (0.7%) and IBS (0.7%).78.7% of patients enrolled in the study had a low WFA z-score (< -2), 75% had low length for age z-score (<-2) and 50.7% showed wasting with low weight for height z-scores (< -2). Patients with IBD had the lowest mean value of WFA and HFA z-scores (-4.03 +/- 3.23, -6.31 +/- 3.74 respectively

  14. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease-Mediated Nucleocapsid Processing: Possible Link to Viral Cell Culture Adaptability.

    PubMed

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2017-01-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe diarrhea and high mortality rates in newborn piglets, leading to massive losses to the swine industry worldwide during recent epidemics. Intense research efforts are now focusing on defining viral characteristics that confer a growth advantage, pathogenicity, or cell adaptability in order to better understand the PEDV life cycle and identify suitable targets for antiviral or vaccine development. Here, we report a unique phenomenon of PEDV nucleocapsid (N) cleavage by the PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease (3Cpro) during infection. The identification of the 3Cpro cleavage site at the C terminus of N supported previous observations that PEDV 3Cpro showed a substrate requirement slightly different from that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3Cpro and revealed a greater flexibility in its substrate recognition site. This cleavage motif is present in the majority of cell culture-adapted PEDV strains but is missing in emerging field isolates. Remarkably, reverse-genetics-derived cell culture-adapted PEDVAVCT12 harboring uncleavable N displayed growth retardation in Vero E6-APN cells compared to the wild-type virus. These observations altogether shed new light on the investigation and characterization of the PEDV nucleocapsid protein and its possible link to cell culture adaptation.

  15. Assessment of the temperature effect on childhood diarrhea using satellite imagery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiwei; Liu, Yang; Ma, Zongwei; (Sam) Toloo, Ghasem; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2014-01-01

    A quasi-Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to quantify the main effect of temperature on emergency department visits (EDVs) for childhood diarrhea in Brisbane from 2001 to 2010. Residual of the model was checked to examine whether there was an added effect due to heat waves. The change over time in temperature-diarrhea relation was also assessed. Both low and high temperatures had significant impact on childhood diarrhea. Heat waves had an added effect on childhood diarrhea, and this effect increased with intensity and duration of heat waves. There was a decreasing trend in the main effect of heat on childhood diarrhea in Brisbane across the study period. Brisbane children appeared to have gradually adapted to mild heat, but they are still very sensitive to persistent extreme heat. Development of future heat alert systems should take the change in temperature-diarrhea relation over time into account. PMID:24953087

  16. A placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG to prevent diarrhea in undernourished Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Oberhelman, R A; Gilman, R H; Sheen, P; Taylor, D N; Black, R E; Cabrera, L; Lescano, A G; Meza, R; Madico, G

    1999-01-01

    This article features a placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG (L-GG) for diarrhea prevention in undernourished children in Peru. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of L-GG as prophylactic treatment for diarrhea. The study population included 204 undernourished children aged 6-24 months, 99 of which were on L-GG and 105 on placebo. Subjects were followed by daily home visits to document diarrhea episodes and diagnostic studies were conducted. Results revealed that children receiving L-GG experienced fewer episodes of diarrhea, which were more pronounced among 18-29 month old children and largely limited to non-breast-fed children. Moreover, the duration of diarrhea episodes and its causes were similar in both groups, except that adenovirus was detected more frequently in the placebo group. In conclusion, L-GG supplementation would decrease diarrhea incidence in high-risk children.

  17. A rare case intractable diarrhea secondary to Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    John, Santhosh Gheevarghese; Dominguez, Cristian; Chandiramani, Vijay; Vemulappalli, Tejo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 63 Final Diagnosis: Cytomegalo virus (CMV) infection Symptoms: Diarrhea Medication:— Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Coinfection with cytomegalovirus in a patient with Clostridium difficile persistent diarrhea and colitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Case Report: A 63-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip, status post surgical resection and currently on chemoradiation presented with intractable diarrhea and abdominal pain. Initial workup showed Clostridium difficile diarrhea with pancolitis. Diarrhea persisted despite being on antibiotics and bacteriological cure for C. difficile. Further noninvasive work up revealed associated cytomegalovirus infection, and patient had a dramatic response to ganciclovir without any relapse. Conclusions: Physicians should be cognizant about other causes of diarrhea and colitis in immunocompromised patient when treatment for primary diagnosis fails to resolve their symptoms. PMID:24298304

  18. Assessment of the temperature effect on childhood diarrhea using satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiwei; Liu, Yang; Ma, Zongwei; Sam Toloo, Ghasem; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2014-06-23

    A quasi-Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to quantify the main effect of temperature on emergency department visits (EDVs) for childhood diarrhea in Brisbane from 2001 to 2010. Residual of the model was checked to examine whether there was an added effect due to heat waves. The change over time in temperature-diarrhea relation was also assessed. Both low and high temperatures had significant impact on childhood diarrhea. Heat waves had an added effect on childhood diarrhea, and this effect increased with intensity and duration of heat waves. There was a decreasing trend in the main effect of heat on childhood diarrhea in Brisbane across the study period. Brisbane children appeared to have gradually adapted to mild heat, but they are still very sensitive to persistent extreme heat. Development of future heat alert systems should take the change in temperature-diarrhea relation over time into account.

  19. Outbreak of acute colitis on a horse farm associated with tetracycline-contaminated sweet feed.

    PubMed Central

    Keir, A A; Stämpfli, H R; Crawford, J

    1999-01-01

    Exposure of a group of horses to tetracycline-contaminated feed resulted in acute colitis and subsequent death in one horse and milder diarrhea in 3 others. The most severely affected animal demonstrated clinical and pathological findings typical of colitis X. The other herdmates responded well to administration of zinc bacitracin. PMID:10572668

  20. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B.; Carr, Anthony P.; Gaunt, M. Casey

    2016-01-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  1. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  2. Sub-acute intestinal obstruction by Strongyloides stercolaris.

    PubMed

    al-Bahrani, Z R; al-Saleem, T; al-Gailani, M A

    1995-01-01

    Strongyloides stercolaris infestation is rather rare in Iraq. Individuals with infection confined to the intestinal tract are often asymptomatic. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss and other non-specific complaints. The diagnosis depends upon repeated examination of stool and duodenal aspirate. Two cases presenting as sub-acute intestinal obstruction and mimicking primary intestinal lymphoma (PIL) on presentation are presented. Differentiation between the two conditions regarding presenting features, barium studies and pathology are discussed.

  3. [Isolation of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H16 identified in a diarrhea case in a child and his household contacts in La Pampa Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Silveyra, Ivana M; Pereyra, Adriana M; Alvarez, María G; Villagran, Mariana D; Baroni, Andrea B; Deza, Natalia; Carbonari, Claudia C; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Rivas, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major causative agent of acute diarrhea in children in developing countries. This pathotype is divided into typical EPEC (tEPEC) and atypical EPEC (aEPEC), based on the presence of the bfp virulence factor associated with adhesion, encoded in the pEAF plasmid. In the present study, the isolation of aEPEC O157:H16 from a bloody diarrhea case in a child and his household contacts (mother, father and sister) is described. The strain was characterized as E. coli O157:H16 eae-ɛ-positive, sorbitol fermenter with β-glucuronidase activity, susceptible to all antimicrobials tested, and negative for virulence factors stx1, stx2, ehxA and bfp. XbaI-PFGE performed on all isolates showed the AREXHX01.1040 macrorestriction pattern, with 100% similarity. These results highlight the importance of epidemiological surveillance of E. coli O157-associated diarrhea cases identified in children and their family contacts, as well as the incorporation of molecular techniques that allow the detection of the different E. coli pathotypes.

  4. Ataxia and secretory diarrhea: two unusual paraneoplastic syndromes occurring concurrently in the same patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Smith, Charles R; Gerstle, J Ted; Weitzman, Sheila S; Chan, Helen S L

    2004-09-01

    The presence of rare paraneoplastic syndromes, the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome (OMA), presumably caused by antineuronal antibody production, and diarrhea, caused by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) secreted by neuroblastoma, may strongly signal the presence of neuroblastoma. The authors describe a child who presented with both syndromes concurrently; this has never been described previously in the same patient. However, diagnosis of neuroblastoma was delayed by a workup focused on the prolonged diarrhea rather than the ataxia. The diarrhea resolved after tumor resection, whereas OMA required further therapy. Increased awareness of VIP-secretory diarrhea, especially in an ataxic child, might contribute to an earlier diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

  5. Octreotide in Preventing Diarrhea in Patients Who Are Undergoing Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Diarrhea; Endometrial Cancer; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Sarcoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  6. Mineral Tells Tale of Watery Past-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This spectrum, taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer, shows the presence of an iron-bearing mineral called jarosite in the collection of rocks dubbed 'El Capitan.' 'El Capitan' is located within the outcrop that lines the inner edge of the small crater where Opportunity landed. The pair of yellow peaks specifically indicates a jarosite phase, which contains water in the form of hydroxyl as a part of its structure. These data suggest water-driven processes exist on Mars. Three other phases are also identified in this spectrum: a magnetic phase (blue), attributed to an iron-oxide mineral; a silicate phase (green), indicative of minerals containing double-ionized iron (Fe 2+); and a third phase (red) of minerals with triple-ionized iron (Fe 3+).

  7. Mineral Tells Tale of Watery Past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This spectrum, taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer, shows the presence of an iron-bearing mineral called jarosite in the collection of rocks dubbed 'El Capitan.' 'El Capitan' is located within the rock outcrop that lines the inner edge of the small crater where Opportunity landed. The pair of yellow peaks specifically indicates a jarosite phase, which contains water in the form of hydroxyl as a part of its structure. These data suggest water-driven processes exist on Mars. Three other phases are also identified in this spectrum: a magnetic phase (blue), attributed to an iron-oxide mineral; a silicate phase (green), indicative of minerals containing double-ionized iron (Fe 2+); and a third phase (red) of minerals with triple-ionized iron (Fe 3+).

  8. First isolation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4 from a diarrhea case in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Claudia C; Deza, Natalia; Flores, Mario; Gasparini, Alejandra; Manfredi, Eduardo; Rivas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first isolation of an enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) O104:H4 strain associated with an acute diarrhea case in Argentina. Two multiplex PCRs (mPCR) were performed as screening of genes mPCR1 (eae, lt, and st) and mPCR2 (IpaH, aggR, stx1 and stx2). A mPCR to detect the rfbO104, fliCH4 and terD genes, and PCR assays for the detection of pCVD432 plasmid, aaiC and lpfO113 genes were included. Biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility assays as well as serotyping were performed. The identified E. coli strain was susceptible to all antimicrobials tested and harbored the aggR, aaiC, pCVD432 plasmid, lpfO113, rfbO104, fliCH4 and terD genes. Although serotype EAEC O104:H4 rarely spreads and sporadic cases have been reported, global concern increased after the large-scale outbreak in Europe in 2011. The finding of EAEC O104:H4 reinforces the need for improved methodologies for the detection of all E. coli pathotypes.

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs.

  10. A study of some pathogenetic aspects of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Frigeri, F; Osburn, B I; Ferrari, M; Sawyer, M M; Aldrovandi, V

    1990-01-01

    The cytopathic (CP) TVM-2 strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) induced in calves a severe disease, characterized by the clinical picture which is usually reported for the acute primary infection observed under natural conditions. In contrast, the calves inoculated with a different biotype of BVDV, the non-cytopathic (NCP) New York-1 strain, remained clinically normal with the only evidence of virus replication in these calves being the recovery of the virus from their pharyngeal swabbings and blood and also the detection of specific neutralizing antibody in their serums. When calves were immunosuppressed with dexamethasone (DMS), they underwent an overt systemic disease of such a severity that in most of the cases it ended with the death of the animals. This result was obtained with either the CP and the NCP strain of BVDV. Finally, the mixed infection that was obtained in the calves with the CP and the NCP BVDV did not result in any particular unexpected pathological situation. It was speculated that the immunosuppressive activity of BVDV could be a property peculiar to certain isolates of the virus.

  11. An experimental contribution to the study of the pathogenesis of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Osburn, B I; Ferrari, M; Traldi, V

    1992-07-01

    This presentation summarizes the results of a study on the pathogenesis of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) infection. The cytopathic (CP) strain TVM-2 of BVDV induced in calves an overt clinical disease which is usually recorded as the acute primary BVDV infection observed under natural conditions. In contrast the non-cytopathic (NCP) strain New York-1 of BVDV did not cause any significant signs of disease. However, when the calves were immunosuppressed by treatment with dexamethasone (DMS) the biotype of BVDV involved did not seem to be as important as it appeared to be in an immunologically normal animal. This was shown in this study by the NCP BVDV which caused a fatal disease in calves treated with DMS. A mixed infection given to calves by injecting them with both CP and NCP BVDV, did not result in any particularly serious disease. So, the potential immunosuppressive activity of BVDV itself for the host has not been proven under the experimental procedures used in this experiment. Finally, a modified-live CP BVDV vaccine was unable to cause clinical disease when injected into calves that had been infected previously with strain New York-1 of BVDV.

  12. A single-tube multiplex PCR for rapid detection in feces of 10 viruses causing diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Khamrin, Pattara; Okame, Makiko; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nantachit, Nattika; Nishimura, Shuichi; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    A novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to identify 10 viruses in a single tube. The assay was targeted to detect group A and C rotaviruses, adenovirus, norovirus GI, norovirus GII, sapovirus, astrovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus, and enterovirus. A total of 235 stool samples were collected from infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Kyoto, Japan, from 2008 to 2009, then tested by this novel multiplex PCR and compared with a multiplex PCR described previously, which used 3 primer sets. The novel multiplex PCR could detect the targeted viruses in 111 of the 235 (47.2%) stool samples. Of these, 9 out of 10 types of viruses were identified, including group A rotavirus, norovirus GII, enterovirus, sapovirus, adenovirus, parechovirus, group C rotavirus, astrovirus, and norovirus GI. In contrast, the multiplex PCR that used 3 sets of primers could detect the targeted viruses in 109 of the 235 (46.4%) stool samples. Among these, 8 types of viruses were identified, including group A rotavirus, norovirus GII, enterovirus, adenovirus, parechovirus, group C rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus. The results suggested that the new multiplex PCR is useful as a rapid and cost effective diagnostic tool for the detection of major pathogenic viruses causing diarrhea.

  13. Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea in a tertiary care medical center

    PubMed Central

    Obritsch, Marilee D.; Carnahan, Ryan M.; Scheck, David N.

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective, case-control study aimed to identify variables associated with the incidence of Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea (CDAD) in acute care facilities and to specifically identify the relationship of fluoroquinolones and acid suppressive agents in the development of CDAD. Seventy-one symptomatic patients positive for C. difficile toxin A or B hospitalized for at least 72 hours were compared with 142 control patients hospitalized for at least 72 hours who were not positive for C. difficile toxin A or B. Two controls were matched to one case patient for age within 5 years, unit of admission, and date of admission. The mean ages for cases and controls were 63.5 and 62.7 years, respectively. After adjusting for two confounding variables—hospital stay within 3 months and Charlson Comorbidity Index—conditional multiple logistic regression identified six risk factors for development of CDAD: gastrointestinal procedures within 60 days (odds ratio [OR] 9.1, P < 0.013), levofloxacin exposure (OR 8.2, P < 0.033), moxifloxacin exposure (OR 4.1, P < 0.026), imipenem exposure (OR 14.9, P < 0.014), laxative use (OR 20.2, P < 0.0001), and immunosuppressive use (OR 20.7, P < 0.034). The risk of CDAD after exposure to levofloxacin or moxifloxacin was not significantly different. Acid suppressive therapy was not a risk factor for CDAD development. PMID:20944758

  14. Farm characteristics and calf management practices on dairy farms with and without diarrhea: a case-control study to investigate risk factors for calf diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Klein-Jöbstl, D; Iwersen, M; Drillich, M

    2014-01-01

    Calf diarrhea is one of the most important problems in calf rearing on dairy farms worldwide. Besides pathogens, several noninfectious management factors, especially management around birth, colostrum management, calf housing, feeding, and hygiene are important in the pathogenesis of diarrhea. To date, few data are available concerning calf rearing management on small and medium-sized dairy farms that are typical for Austria and the alpine region. Consequently, the objectives of this case-control study were to evaluate routine calf management practices on Austrian dairy farms and to examine differences in management between farms with and without the presence of calf diarrhea to identify risk factors. Overall, 100 dairy farms were visited. Of these farms, 50 were chosen based on the history and presence of calf diarrhea (case farms). Another 50 farms with no presence of calf diarrhea were chosen to serve as a standard of comparison (control farms). On farms, management was evaluated by face-to-face interview, and health status and hygiene were surveyed. Several calf rearing management procedures were similar on all of the visited farms, especially in areas regulated by national and European law. These factors include colostrum management and feeding. Consequently, no influence of these factors on the appearance of calf diarrhea could be detected. In contrast, other areas such as hygiene measures differed between farms and showed a partial association with the presence of calf diarrhea on farm. Variables related to diarrhea on farm were farm size; that is, the number of cows on farm. Farms with diarrhea cases were larger (median 40 cows, interquartile range 24.5 to 64.0) compared with farms with no presence of diarrhea (median 28 cows, interquartile range 18.8 to 44.0). Other risk factors that influenced the presence of diarrhea were the presence of other farm animal species on the farm [odds ratio (OR) 26.89, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.64 to 273.5], frequency

  15. Basic fibroblast growth factor among children with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ray, Patricio; Acheson, David; Chitrakar, Ramona; Cnaan, Avital; Gibbs, Kathleen; Hirschman, Gladys H; Christen, Erica; Trachtman, Howard

    2002-03-01

    Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is characterized by endothelial injury and activation of inflammatory cytokines. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is an angiogenic peptide released in response to vascular damage. The plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of bFGF during the course of D+HUS were determined, in comparison with the levels of various inflammatory cytokines, and changes were correlated with clinical and laboratory features of the disease. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected from 31 children with D+HUS, during the acute (days 1 to 7 of hospitalization) and recovery (through day 60 after discharge from the hospital) phases of the disease. The patients were enrolled in the multicenter trial of SYNSORB Pk (SYNSORB Biotech, Calgary, Alberta, Canada) treatment for D+HUS. bFGF, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. bFGF was detected in urine and plasma samples more frequently than were IL-1alpha, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. There was an acute increase in urinary bFGF excretion, which returned to normal during convalescence. Urinary excretion of bFGF during the acute phase was higher among patients who required dialysis, compared with those who did not (48.9 +/- 15.0 and 28.9 +/- 9.0 pg/ml, respectively; P < 0.05). Plasma bFGF concentrations were persistently elevated throughout the period of hospitalization and the follow-up period among patients with D+HUS. Urinary excretion and plasma levels of bFGF were comparable for the SYNSORB Pk-treated (n = 19) and placebo-treated (n = 12) groups. Measurements of urinary and plasma concentrations of bFGF among patients with D+HUS may be useful indices for assessment of the severity of acute renal disease and the timing and adequacy of the systemic angiogenic process during early convalescence.

  16. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  17. [Diarrhea in urban agricultural workers in Nouakchott in Mauritania].

    PubMed

    Gagneux, S; Schneider, C; Odermatt, P; Cisse, G; Cheikh, D; Salem, M L; Toure, A; Tanner, M

    1999-01-01

    Nearly 200 million people in the developing world are dependent or urban gardening for food and income. This practice has been accelerated by the droughts of recent decades which have forced more and more migrants into urban areas. Numerous potential health hazards have been attributed to urban gardening but the exact risks in Sahelian areas remain unclear. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the incidence of diarrhea at the Tel Zatar gardening site in urban Nouakchott, Mauritania. In addition, a case-control study was carried out to identify risk factors for diarrhea in function of gardeners' activity and living conditions. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and logistical regression methods. The annual incidence of diarrhea ranged from 6.9 (IC95 p. 100 = 5.0-8.8) to 8.5 (IC95 p. 100 = 6.2-10.8) episodes per gardener and year. Multivariate analysis identified four significant risk factors. Two of these factors were unrelated to gardening, i.e., not having spent more than USD 3.50 the previous day (odds ratio (OR = 2.8, IC95 p. 100 = 1.01-7.81) and poor food hygiene (cooking outside (OR = 4.69, IC95 p. 100 = 1.06-20.83). The other two factors were regular consumption of raw vegetables (OR = 25.5, IC95 p. 100 = 2.0-32.0) and use of untreated well water (OR = 3.85, IC95 p. 100 = 1.08-14.29). Unprotected well water was the cause of 59.2 p. 100 of diarrheal episodes reported by gardeners at Tel Zatar. The results of this study confirm that vegetable production in urban gardens such as Tel Zatar is associated with health risks. Public health measures should address not only the garden sites but also domestic hygiene.

  18. Etiology of Childhood Infectious Diarrhea in a Developed Region of China: Compared to Childhood Diarrhea in a Developing Region and Adult Diarrhea in a Developed Region

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hao; Xia, Shengli; Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Xiao, Yuchun; Qiu, Haiyan; Shan, Guangliang; Jing, Huaiqi

    2015-01-01

    In China, great differences in economy, social characteristics and hygiene exist between developing and developed regions. A comparative study of infectious diarrhea between two regions was needed. Three groups of diarrheal patients were collected: children ≤5 year-olds from Beijing (developed region) and Henan Province (developing region), and adults over 18 year-olds from Beijing. A questionnaire was used to survey and feces samples were examined for 16 enteropathogens. We enrolled 1422 children and 1047 adults from developed region and 755 children from developing region. Virus positive rates were 32.98% for children and 23.67% for adults in developed region. The most prevalent pathogen for children was rotavirus whereas for adults was norovirus. Bacterial isolation rates were 13.92% for children from developed region, while 29.14% for children from the developing regions. For the greatest difference, Shigella accounted for 50.79% and was the dominant pathogen in the developing region, whereas in the developed region it was only 1.45%. There was no significant relationship between the local levels of development with diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC) categories. But it was seen the notable differences between the population with different age: enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E.coli (EAggEC) were the primary classes of DEC in children from both regions, whereas it was enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC) in adults. The symptoms of Shigella and Salmonella infection, such as bloody stools, white blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) positivity and fever were similar in children, which may lead to the misidentification. Yersinia enterocolitica and shiga toxin-producing E.coli (STEC) infections were firstly reported in Beijing. There was a large difference in etiology of bacterial diarrhea between children in developing and developed regions of China. PMID:26528820

  19. Etiology of Childhood Infectious Diarrhea in a Developed Region of China: Compared to Childhood Diarrhea in a Developing Region and Adult Diarrhea in a Developed Region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hao; Xia, Shengli; Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Xiao, Yuchun; Qiu, Haiyan; Shan, Guangliang; Jing, Huaiqi

    2015-01-01

    In China, great differences in economy, social characteristics and hygiene exist between developing and developed regions. A comparative study of infectious diarrhea between two regions was needed. Three groups of diarrheal patients were collected: children ≤5 year-olds from Beijing (developed region) and Henan Province (developing region), and adults over 18 year-olds from Beijing. A questionnaire was used to survey and feces samples were examined for 16 enteropathogens. We enrolled 1422 children and 1047 adults from developed region and 755 children from developing region. Virus positive rates were 32.98% for children and 23.67% for adults in developed region. The most prevalent pathogen for children was rotavirus whereas for adults was norovirus. Bacterial isolation rates were 13.92% for children from developed region, while 29.14% for children from the developing regions. For the greatest difference, Shigella accounted for 50.79% and was the dominant pathogen in the developing region, whereas in the developed region it was only 1.45%. There was no significant relationship between the local levels of development with diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC) categories. But it was seen the notable differences between the population with different age: enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E.coli (EAggEC) were the primary classes of DEC in children from both regions, whereas it was enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC) in adults. The symptoms of Shigella and Salmonella infection, such as bloody stools, white blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) positivity and fever were similar in children, which may lead to the misidentification. Yersinia enterocolitica and shiga toxin-producing E.coli (STEC) infections were firstly reported in Beijing. There was a large difference in etiology of bacterial diarrhea between children in developing and developed regions of China.

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Liao, Jinhu; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Xinjun; Wang, Jianye; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-08-30

    Cattle are the natural hosts of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), which causes mucosal disease, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections, and reproductive problems in cattle. However, BVDV can also infect goats, sheep, deer, and pigs. The prevalence of BVDV infection in pig herds has substantially increased in the last several years, causing increased economic losses to the global pig breeding industry. This article is a summary of BVDV infections in pigs, including a historical overview, clinical signs, pathology, source of infection, genetic characteristics, impacts of porcine BVDV infection for diagnosis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), differentiation of infection with CSFV and BVDV, and future prospects of porcine BVDV infection.

  1. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness.

  2. Prevention and Control of Childhood Pneumonia and Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Leung, Daniel T; Chisti, Mohammod J; Pavia, Andrew T

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia and diarrhea are the 2 leading infectious causes of death in children younger than 5 years worldwide, most of which occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. The past decade has seen large reductions in global childhood mortality, partly due to expansion of nonspecific public health interventions and vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and rotavirus in LMICs. Further progress in this field depends on the international community's commitment to fund and implement programs using currently available vaccines and development of new vaccines against pathogens common to children in LMICs.

  3. The incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ford-Jones, E L; Mindorff, C M; Gold, R; Petric, M

    1990-04-01

    For determination of the incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital, all patients admitted to general pediatrics, cardiology, and neurosurgery wards without diarrhea between January 1 and July 31, 1985 were followed 5 days per week for presence of diarrhea, etiologic agent, and possible risk factors. A total of 1,530 patients were followed for 3,642 days. Of these patients, 69 developed 80 nosocomial diarrhea episodes after 72 hours in hospital for a nosocomial diarrhea rate of 4.5 infected children per 100 admissions. Of 358 patients with an infected roommate, 37 (10.3%) developed nosocomial diarrhea. Etiologic agents recognized included rotavirus (43%), calicivirus (16%), astrovirus (14%), minreovirus (12%), adenovirus (8%), Salmonella sp. (4%), and parvo/picornavirus (3%). The nosocomial diarrhea rate by age was: 0-11 months, 8.8%; 12-35 months, 3.6%; and 36 months or more, 0.6%. The rate by length of stay was: 3-7 days, 8.4%; 8-14 days, 10.4%; 15-21 days, 7.9%; and 22 days or more, 8.8%, and by number of roommates/1,000 patient-days it was: 0-1, 15.7; 2 to 3, 27.7; and 4 or more, 45.2. Patients who acquired diarrhea were more likely to be diapered (9.6% vs. 1.8%, p less than 0.001). Playroom use was not significantly different in the two groups. A total of 64 patients developed diarrhea within 72 hours of admission (community diarrhea rate = 4.2). Nosocomial viral-associated diarrhea is almost exclusively a disease of diapered children less than age 36 months and occurs at any time during hospital stay. It is more common in multibed rooms, but does occur in single-bed rooms.

  4. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Strains Isolated from the Nigerian Cholera Outbreak in 2010.

    PubMed

    Dupke, Susann; Akinsinde, Kehinde A; Grunow, Roland; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Olukoya, Daniel K; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    We examined clinical samples from Nigerian patients with acute watery diarrhea for Vibrio cholerae during the 2010 cholera outbreak. A total of 109 suspected isolates were characterized, but only 57 V. cholerae strains could be confirmed using multiplex real-time PCR as well as rpoB sequencing and typed as V. cholerae O:1 Ogawa biotype El Tor. This finding highlighted the need for accurate diagnosis of cholera in epidemic countries to implement life-saving interventions.

  5. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Strains Isolated from the Nigerian Cholera Outbreak in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Dupke, Susann; Akinsinde, Kehinde A.; Grunow, Roland; Iwalokun, Bamidele A.; Olukoya, Daniel K.; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2016-01-01

    We examined clinical samples from Nigerian patients with acute watery diarrhea for Vibrio cholerae during the 2010 cholera outbreak. A total of 109 suspected isolates were characterized, but only 57 V. cholerae strains could be confirmed using multiplex real-time PCR as well as rpoB sequencing and typed as V. cholerae O:1 Ogawa biotype El Tor. This finding highlighted the need for accurate diagnosis of cholera in epidemic countries to implement life-saving interventions. PMID:27487957

  6. Claudin-2 expression is upregulated in the ileum of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Haruka; Oshima, Tadayuki; Sei, Hiroo; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Kondo, Takashi; Tozawa, Katsuyuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial barrier function is impaired in irritable bowel syndrome patients. Claudins are highly expressed in cells with tight junctions and are involved in the intestinal epithelial barrier function. The expression pattern of tight junction proteins in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome have not been fully elucidated. We therefore recruited 17 diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients and 20 healthy controls. The expression of the tight junction-related proteins was examined in the ileal, cecal, and rectal mucosa of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients using real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. Claudin-2 expression was high in the ileum of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients. Claudin-2 expression was the same in cecum and rectal mucosa of control and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients. Similarly, the expression of clauidn-1, claudin-7, JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 in the ileal, cecal, and rectal mucosa did not change between control and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome samples. Infiltration of eosinophil and mast cells in the mucosa of ileum, cecum and rectum was evaluated using immunohistochemical staining and was not affected by diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Claudin-2 was expressed on the apical side of villi and crypts of ileal mucosal epithelial cells. Clauidn-2 expression is upregulated in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients and may contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:28366996

  7. Cancer treatment-induced diarrhea: interventions to minimize the roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This program used a case-study approach to discuss interventions that nurses can implement in their daily clinical environment to minimize cancer treatment-induced diarrhea. Manifestations of cancer treatment-induced diarrhea, medical treatment options, and nutritional interventions were covered.

  8. Reovirus-like agent associated with neonatal diarrhea in pronghorn antelope.

    PubMed

    Reed, D E; Daley, C A; Shave, H J

    1976-10-01

    Reovirus-like particles were demonstrated by negative stain electron microscopic examination of the feces from antelope fawns with diarrhea. Fluorescent antibody tests on frozen sections of ileum from one dead antelope fawn and immunoelectron microscopy tests on feces from two live fawns provided evidence that the antelope agent was serologically related to the neonatal calf diarrhea reovirus-like agent.

  9. Periparturient infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 causes hemorrhagic proctocolitis in a cow

    PubMed Central

    Laureyns, Jozef; Pardon, Bart; Letellier, Carine; Deprez, Piet

    2011-01-01

    After 3 cows of a dairy herd had died from severe hemorrhagic diarrhea, a 4th sick cow was transported to the clinic. Blood analyses revealed the complete absence of white blood cells, the presence of a type 1b strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and seroconversion to BVDV. PMID:22467972

  10. Determining bovine viral diarrhea virus genotypes and biotypes circulating in cattle populations in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is the disease in cattle that results from infection with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV). BVDV is found in cattle populations throughout the world. While the term BVD encompasses a wide range of clinical manifestations, including severe respiratory disease, gastroe...

  11. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mois, Emil Ioan; Graur, Florin; Sechel, Roxana; Al-Hajjar, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible.

  12. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    MOIS, EMIL IOAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; SECHEL, ROXANA; AL-HAJJAR, NADIM

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible. PMID:27152085

  13. Probiotics for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Doron, Shira Idit; Hibberd, Patricia L; Gorbach, Sherwood L

    2008-07-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) occurs in approximately 25% of patients receiving antibiotics. Hospitalized patients with AAD are at increased risk for nosocomial infections and have a higher mortality. Probiotics are living microorganisms used to restore gut health by changing the intestinal microbiota. Several have been studied for the prevention of AAD. Five meta-analyses of trials of probiotics for the prevention of AAD have been performed. The results showed an overall reduction in the risk of AAD when probiotics were coadministered with antibiotics. McFarland conducted the largest meta-analysis to date analyzing 25 randomized controlled trials of probiotics for the prevention of AAD including 2810 subjects. More than half of the trials demonstrated efficacy of the probiotic. In particular, Lactobacillus GG, Saccharomyces boulardii, and the probiotic mixtures were effective. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews published a review of the literature on the use of probiotics for the prevention of pediatric AAD, including 10 randomized trials testing 1986 children. The per protocol pooled analysis, but not the intent-to-treat analysis, showed that probiotics are effective for preventing AAD with the number needed to treat to prevent 1 case of diarrhea being 10. Lactobacillus GG, Bacillus coagulans, and S. boulardii appeared to be most effective. Probiotics are generally safe, however, they should be used with caution in patients who have compromise of either the immune system or the integrity of the intestinal mucosa, and in the presence of a central venous catheter.

  14. [Oral rehydration in newborns with dehydration caused by diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Rillman-Pinagel, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-08-01

    The clinical experience obtained while treating 43 dehydrated newborns due to diarrhea with oral rehydration solution (ORS) using the formula recommended by the World Health Organization is reported. Of the 43 patients, 26 were severely dehydrated (greater than equal to 10% of weight recovery once rehydrated). The averaged time need to correct the dehydration was 4.7 +/- 2.7 hours, with a average intake of ORS of 26.5 +/- 7.5 mL/kg/hour. Children who were being breastfed continued so during the rehydration period. Two of the patients were hospitalized for intravenous treatment, one was due to persistent vomiting during rehydration and probably due to sepsis, and the other due to necrosing enterocolitis. The oral rehydration therapy was successful in 95% of the newborns included in the study, which proved the method to be safe and adequate for the correction of dehydration due to diarrhea among these patients. Similar experiences are reported in Mexico as well as from other countries, which also suggest the use of this therapeutic procedure in children of this age.

  15. Isospora belli Infection with Chronic Diarrhea in an Alcoholic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun-Chae; Chai, Jee-Won

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea with a 35 kg weight loss (75 kg to 40 kg) occurred during 2 years in an alcoholic patient was diagnosed with Isospora belli infection in the Republic of Korea. The patient, a 70-year old Korean male, had been a heavy drinker for more than 30 years. He was admitted to the Seoul National University Hospital because of long-standing diarrhea and severe weight loss. He had an increased white blood cell (WBC) count with high peripheral blood eosinophilia (36.8-39.9%) and lowered protein and albumin levels but without any evidence of immunosuppression. A parasitic infection was suspected and fecal examination was repeated 3 times with negative results. Peroral endoscopy with mural biopsy was performed in the upper jejunum. The biopsy specimens revealed villous atrophy with loss of villi together with various life cycle stages of I. belli, including trophozoites, schizonts, merozoites, macrogamonts, and microgamonts. The patient was treated successfully with oral doses of trimethoprim 160-320 mg and sulfamethoxazole 800-1,600 mg daily for 4 weeks. A follow-up evaluation at 2.5 years later revealed marked improvement of body weight (68 kg), increased protein and albumin levels, and normal WBC count with low eosinophils (3.1%). This is the first clinical case of isoporiasis with demonstration of various parasitic stages in the Republic of Korea. PMID:23710089

  16. Molecular Diagnosis of Diarrhea: Current Status and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, James A; Operario, Darwin J

    2011-01-01

    Determining the microbiologic etiology of enteric infection remains an elusive goal. Conventional approaches, including culture, microscopy, and antigen-based tests have significant limitations such as limit of detection and the need for multiple procedures. Molecular diagnostics, especially PCR based tests, are rapidly changing research and practice in infectious diseases. Diarrheal disease, with its broad range of potential infectious etiologies, is well suited for multiplex molecular testing. This review highlights examples of currently employed molecular tests, as well as ways in which these tests can be applied in the future. The absence of a gold standard for the microbiologic cause of diarrhea means that the clinical significance of detected organisms may not always be clear. Conventional wisdom is that there should be one main pathogen causing diarrhea, however our thinking is challenged by increased detection of mixed infections. Thus, the successful incorporation of molecular diagnostics for diarrheal disease into practice will require both a careful understanding of the technical aspects and research to define their clinical utility. PMID:22116640

  17. The role of physical proximity in nosocomial diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Chang, V T; Nelson, K

    2000-09-01

    To examine physical proximity as a risk factor for the nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) and of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), we assessed a retrospective cohort of 2859 patients admitted to a community hospital from 1 March 1987 through 31 August 1987. Of these patients, 68 had nosocomial CDAD and 54 had nosocomial AAD. In multivariate analysis, physical proximity to a patient with CDAD (relative risk [RR], 1.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.28), exposure to clindamycin (RR, 4.22; 95% CI, 2.11-8.45), and the number of antibiotics taken (RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.81) were significant. For patients with nosocomial AAD, exposure to a roommate with AAD (RR, 3.94; 95% CI, 1. 27-12.24), a stay in an intensive care unit or cardiac care unit (RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.05-3.53), and the number of antibiotics taken (RR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.67-2.40) were significant risk factors. Physical proximity may be an independent risk factor for acquisition of nosocomial CDAD and AAD.

  18. Bacterial overgrowth in a patient with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Mahaney-Price, A F

    1995-09-01

    A case study is presented of a 47-year old, white female with a 1-year progressive history of diarrhea up to 20 liquid stools per day, accompanied by an 18-pound weight loss. She had presented with previous workup of gastroscopy revealing two stomach ulcers; colonoscopy revealing nonspecific colitis and one polyp that was subsequently removed and found to be benign; and a negative abdominal ultrasound. She was Helicobacter pylori negative and HIV negative. Her stools had been negative for blood, ova and parasites, and culture. She had been using well water from a new well for 2 years. String test was negative for Giardia. She had no diarrhea during a day of fasting. Carbon 14 D-xylose breath test was positive. She was discharged on a 14-day course of 500 mg. Augmentin (amoxicillin 500 mg. with clavulanate potassium 125 mg.) by mouth every 8 hours. Seven weeks later, she was having four to five formed stools per day and had gained 16 pounds.

  19. Pathogen-induced secretory diarrhea and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mandal, S; Patil, P; Tomar, S K

    2016-11-01

    Secretory diarrhea is a historically known serious health implication around the world which primarily originates through pathogenic microorganisms rather than immunological or genetical disorders. This review highlights infective mechanisms of non-inflammatory secretory diarrhea causing pathogens, known therapeutics and their efficacy against them. These non-inflammatory diarrheal pathogens breach cell barriers, induce inflammation, disrupt fluid secretion across the epithelium by alteration in ion transport by faulting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), calcium activated chloride channels and ion exchanger functions. Currently, a variety of prevention strategies have been used to treat these symptoms like use of antibacterial drugs, vaccines, fluid and nutritional therapy, probiotics and prebiotics as adjuncts. In progression of the need for a therapy having quick physiological effects, withdrawing the symptoms with a wide and safe therapeutic index, newer antisecretory agents like potent inhibitors, agonists and herbal remedies are some of the interventions which have come into light through greater understanding of the mechanisms and molecular targets involved in intestinal fluid secretion. Although these therapies have their own pros and cons inside the host, the quest for new antisecretory agents has been a successful elucidation to reduce burden of diarrheal disease.

  20. Healthcare and economic impact of diarrhea in patients with carcinoid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Michael S; Chang, Eunice; Romanus, Dorothy; Cherepanov, Dasha; Neary, Maureen P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine healthcare resource utilization patterns and costs accrued by carcinoid syndrome (CS) patients with and without diarrhea. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using MarketScan® data from 1/1/2002-12/31/2012. Newly diagnosed CS patients had 1 medical claim for CS (ICD-9-CM code 259.2) plus either ≥ 1 additional claim for CS or for carcinoid tumors (ICD-9-CM 209.x), and had no evidence of CS for 1 year prior to index CS diagnosis, in commercially-insured patients < 65 years old. Patients were required to have continuous enrollment one year prior and after index date (first claim with CS diagnosis in the ID period). We identified patients with evidence of non-infectious diarrhea (ICD-9-CM codes 564.5 and 787.91) within one year from the index date. Overall and CS-related healthcare resource utilization and costs were compared between patients with and without non-infectious diarrhea during the one year period after the index date. RESULTS: There were 2822 newly diagnosed CS patients; 534 (18.9%) had evidence of non-infectious diarrhea. Compared to patients without non-infectious diarrhea, non-infectious diarrhea patients more commonly had at ≥ 1 CS-related hospitalization (13.7% vs 7.2%), ≥ 1 CS-related ED visit (11.0% vs 4.4%), and CS-related office visits in one year (6.9 vs 4.1; all P < 0.001). After adjusting for demographics, region, number of chronic conditions and the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the proportions of patients with any and with CS-related hospitalizations were 9.7% and 6.8% higher, respectively, among non-infectious diarrhea patients compared to those with without non-infectious diarrhea (P < 0.001). Unadjusted costs were significantly higher among non-infectious diarrhea patients vs those without non-infectious diarrhea. The non-infectious diarrhea group was also more costly, with adjusted mean annual costs of $81610, compared to $51719 in the group without non-infectious diarrhea (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION

  1. Feeding of young children during diarrhea: caregivers' intended practices and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Pantenburg, Birte; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ecker, Lucie; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2014-09-01

    Childhood diarrhea is an important cause of malnutrition, which can be worsened when caretakers limit nutritional support. We queried 390 caregivers and their children in a peri-urban community in Lima, Peru regarding general perceptions of feeding and feeding practices during diarrhea. Overall, 22.1% of caregivers perceived feeding during diarrhea to be harmful. At baseline, 71.9% of caregivers would discontinue normal feeding or give less food. Most would withhold milk, eggs, and meats. Approximately 40% of caregivers would withhold vegetables and fruits. A pilot educational intervention was performed to improve feeding during diarrhea. At follow-up survey 3 months later, none of the caregivers would recommend withholding food. Only 23.2% would recommend discontinuing normal feeding and 1.8% perceived food to be damaging. Misperceptions of the role of feeding during diarrhea pose a significant health risk for children, but a simple educational intervention might have a major impact on these perceptions and practices.

  2. Role of the Gut Microbiota of Children in Diarrhea Due to the Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Carol A.; Petri, Sarah E.; Schneider, Brittany N.; Reichman, Daniel J.; Jiang, Nona; Begum, Sharmin; Watanabe, Koji; Jansen, Caroline S.; Elliott, K. Pamela; Burgess, Stacey L.; Ma, Jennie Z.; Alam, Masud; Kabir, Mamun; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. An estimated 1 million children die each year before their fifth birthday from diarrhea. Previous population-based surveys of pediatric diarrheal diseases have identified the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, the etiological agent of amebiasis, as one of the causes of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Methods. We prospectively studied the natural history of E. histolytica colonization and diarrhea among infants in an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Results. Approximately 80% of children were infected with E. histolytica by the age of 2 years. Fecal anti-galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin immunoglobulin A was associated with protection from reinfection, while a high parasite burden and expansion of the Prevotella copri level was associated with diarrhea. Conclusions. E. histolytica infection was prevalent in this population, with most infections asymptomatic and diarrhea associated with both the amount of parasite and the composition of the microbiota. PMID:26712950

  3. Notes from the Field: Ongoing Cholera Outbreak - Kenya, 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    George, Githuka; Rotich, Jacob; Kigen, Hudson; Catherine, Kiama; Waweru, Bonface; Boru, Waqo; Galgalo, Tura; Githuku, Jane; Obonyo, Mark; Curran, Kathryn; Narra, Rupa; Crowe, Samuel J; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Macharia, Daniel; Montgomery, Joel; Neatherlin, John; De Cock, Kevin M; Lowther, Sara; Gura, Zeinab; Langat, Daniel; Njeru, Ian; Kioko, Jackson; Muraguri, Nicholas

    2016-01-29

    On January 6, 2015, a man aged 40 years was admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, with acute watery diarrhea. The patient was found to be infected with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Inaba. A subsequent review of surveillance reports identified four patients in Nairobi County during the preceding month who met either of the Kenya Ministry of Health suspected cholera case definitions: 1) severe dehydration or death from acute watery diarrhea (more than four episodes in 12 hours) in a patient aged ≥5 years, or 2) acute watery diarrhea in a patient aged ≥2 years in an area where there was an outbreak of cholera. An outbreak investigation was immediately initiated. A confirmed cholera case was defined as isolation of V. cholerae O1 or O139 from the stool of a patient with suspected cholera or a suspected cholera case that was epidemiologically linked to a confirmed case. By January 15, 2016, a total of 11,033 suspected or confirmed cases had been reported from 22 of Kenya's 47 counties (Table). The outbreak is ongoing.

  4. Childhood Diarrhea Exhibits Spatiotemporal Variation in Northwest Ethiopia: A SaTScan Spatial Statistical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Azage, Muluken; Kumie, Abera; Worku, Alemayehu; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood diarrhea continues to be a public health problem in developing countries, including Ethiopia. Detecting clusters and trends of childhood diarrhea is important to designing effective interventions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate spatiotemporal clustering and seasonal variability of childhood diarrhea in northwest Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective record review of childhood diarrhea was conducted using quarterly reported data to the district health office for the seven years period beginning July 1, 2007. Thirty three districts were included and geo-coded in this study. Spatial, temporal and space-time scan spatial statistics were employed to identify clusters of childhood diarrhea. Smoothing using a moving average was applied to visualize the trends and seasonal pattern of childhood diarrhea. Statistical analyses were performed using Excel® and SaTScan programs. The maps were plotted using ArcGIS 10.0. Results Childhood diarrhea in northwest Ethiopia exhibits statistical evidence of spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal clustering, with seasonal patterns and decreasing temporal trends observed in the study area. A most likely purely spatial cluster was found in the East Gojjam administrative zone of Gozamin district (LLR = 7123.89, p <0.001). The most likely spatiotemporal cluster was detected in all districts of East Gojjam zone and a few districts of the West Gojjam zone (LLR = 24929.90, p<0.001), appearing from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011. One high risk period from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2010 (LLR = 9655.86, p = 0.001) was observed in all districts. Peak childhood diarrhea cases showed a seasonal trend, occurring more frequently from January to March and April to June. Conclusion Childhood diarrhea did not occur at random. It has spatiotemporal variation and seasonal patterns with a decreasing temporal trend. Accounting for the spatiotemporal variation identified in the study areas is advised for the prevention and control of

  5. Shigellosis in Subjects with Traveler's Diarrhea versus Domestically Acquired Diarrhea: Implications for Antimicrobial Therapy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Carlos; Sarria, Ana Arroyo, Ana; Iglesias, Nuria; Enríquez, Ana; Baquero, Margarita; de Guevara, Concepción Ladrón

    2015-01-01

    An increase of sexually transmitted shigellosis is currently being reported in developed countries. In addition, travel-related shigellosis can introduce resistant strains that could be disseminated within this new scenario. Epidemiological features and antimicrobial susceptibility of shigellosis depending on where infection was acquired were investigated. From 2008 to 2013, subjects with shigellosis were studied. Patients were classified according to acquisition of Shigella as traveler's diarrhea (TD) or domestically acquired diarrhea (DAD). Ninety cases of shigellosis were identified: 76 corresponding to the TD group and 14 to the DAD group. In the DAD group, most of patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), being shigellosis associated to male sex (P = 0.007) and HIV infection (P < 0.0001). S. sonnei (47.8%) and S. flexneri (42.2%) were the predominant species. The highest resistance was detected for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (81.8%), followed by ampicillin (AMP) (37.8%) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (23.3%). Resistant Shigella strains were more frequent in subjects with TD than those with DAD, although only for CIP the difference was significant (P = 0.034). Continuous monitoring of patients with shigellosis is necessary to control the spread of resistant Shigella strains and for effective therapy. Men with shigellosis who have not traveled to an endemic area should be screened for HIV infection. PMID:26195465

  6. Shigellosis in Subjects with Traveler's Diarrhea Versus Domestically Acquired Diarrhea: Implications for Antimicrobial Therapy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos; Arroyo, Ana; Sarria, Ana; Iglesias, Nuria; Enríquez, Ana; Baquero, Margarita; de Guevara, Concepción Ladrón

    2015-09-01

    An increase of sexually transmitted shigellosis is currently being reported in developed countries. In addition, travel-related shigellosis can introduce resistant strains that could be disseminated within this new scenario. Epidemiological features and antimicrobial susceptibility of shigellosis depending on where infection was acquired were investigated. From 2008 to 2013, subjects with shigellosis were studied. Patients were classified according to acquisition of Shigella as traveler's diarrhea (TD) or domestically acquired diarrhea (DAD). Ninety cases of shigellosis were identified: 76 corresponding to the TD group and 14 to the DAD group. In the DAD group, most of patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), being shigellosis associated to male sex (P = 0.007) and HIV infection (P < 0.0001). S. sonnei (47.8%) and S. flexneri (42.2%) were the predominant species. The highest resistance was detected for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (81.8%), followed by ampicillin (AMP) (37.8%) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (23.3%). Resistant Shigella strains were more frequent in subjects with TD than those with DAD, although only for CIP the difference was significant (P = 0.034). Continuous monitoring of patients with shigellosis is necessary to control the spread of resistant Shigella strains and for effective therapy. Men with shigellosis who have not traveled to an endemic area should be screened for HIV infection.

  7. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  8. Acute Hepatorenal Failure in a Patient Following Consumption of Mushrooms: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Ghavidel, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the highly toxic mushrooms that are common in the northwest region of Iran is Amanita phalloides, which might result in renal or liver failure. Case Presentation: This is a case report of a patient referred a few days after consumption of wild mushrooms to emergency department having gastrointestinal complaint whose experiments indicated liver and renal failure. The supportive treatment was given to the patient prescribing N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and Livergol (silymarin) along with hemodialysis. A few days after admission to the hospital, the patient died due to severe clinical symptoms. Conclusions: The patient was poisoned by A. phalloides complaining gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea; vomiting and watery diarrhea about six hours after consumption and then, amatoxin in the mushroom caused damage to hepatocytes and renal cells and finally led to hepatorenal failure. Deaths caused by this type of mushroom are extremely high and necessary trainings should be provided to the people by the health system not to consume wild mushrooms, especially in spring and summer. PMID:26019894

  9. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) By Mayo Clinic Staff Viral gastroenteritis is an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and ...

  10. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moyer, N P

    1987-11-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts.

  11. [A solitary kidney patient with diarrhea of 2 weeks duration].

    PubMed

    Díaz Aguilar, C M; Recio Ramirez, J M; Vega Romero, M M; Calero Rojas, M T

    2014-01-01

    The case is presented of a 78 year old woman with a history of congenital right renal, who suffered from diarrhea of approximately 2 weeks duration and discomfort due to cramp in both legs. The laboratory results showed severe hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, and slightly elevated creatinine levels, with no symptoms associated with this finding and with the rest of the normal laboratory results. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for treatment, and when her results returned to normal she was transferred to internal medicine. Among the other tests performed, the ACTH was shown to be high, and a left adrenal adenoma was found in the MR scan. The final diagnosis was Addison's syndrome. She was treated with mineralocorticoids with follow-up by internal medicine as an outpatient.

  12. Clinical significance of Aeromonas species isolated from patients with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, N P

    1987-01-01

    A total of 248 strains of Aeromonas spp. were isolated from 3,334 human fecal specimens submitted to a state public health laboratory over a 2-year period to be cultured for enteric pathogens. Cary-Blair transport medium, blood ampicillin agar, and alkaline peptone water enrichment provided optimal recovery of Aeromonas spp. A questionnaire requesting clinical and epidemiological information was sent to physicians, who submitted stool samples for testing, with each laboratory report for 107 consecutive stool isolates of Aeromonas spp. The 56 questionnaires which were completed and returned were analyzed to determine the seasonal distribution of illness and the age and sex distribution of patients; characteristic symptoms; and predisposing factors for gastrointestinal disease caused by Aeromonas spp. It was concluded that some A. hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. caviae strains are capable of causing diarrhea and that antibiotic therapy and the drinking of untreated water are significant risk factors for susceptible hosts. PMID:3693537

  13. Impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea on performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Julio; Sarradell, Javier; Morrison, Robert; Perez, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) infection on the US pork industry has mainly been attributed to the mortality that it causes in suckling piglets, and, consequently, much effort has been invested in the quantification of its effect in sow farms. However, no information on the performance of surviving pigs that were exposed to the PEDv as piglets is available. Here, a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv) infection on growing pigs' performance, as indicated by mortality, average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) was performed using production records from weaned pigs in nursery and wean-to-finish sites from sow farms that became PEDv-infected between May 2013 and June 2014. Production records from the first batch of growing pigs weaned in infected flows after the PEDv outbreak ("infected batches") were compared with those from pigs weaned within the previous 14 to 120 days ("control batches"). Performance records from infected and control batches, paired by flow, were compared using non-parametric paired tests. Mortality, ADG and FCR were significantly different in PEDv-positive (infected) compared with PEDv-negative (control) batches, with a mean increase of mortality and FCR of 11% and 0.5, respectively, and a decrease of ADG of 0.16 lb/day. Our results demonstrate a poorer performance of growing pigs weaned after a PEDv outbreak compared with those weaned within the previous 14-120 days, suggesting that in addition to the mortality induced by PEDv in suckling pigs, the disease also impairs the performance of surviving pig. These findings help to quantify the impact of PEDv infection in the US and, ultimately, contribute to efforts to quantify the cost-effectiveness of disease prevention and control measures.

  14. Changes in Childhood Diarrhea Incidence in Nicaragua Following 3 Years of Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Dominik, Rosalie; Cao, Hongyuan; Shah, Naman K.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Moreno, Gilberto; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Background While the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was highly efficacious against rotavirus diarrhea in clinical trials, the vaccine’s effectiveness under field conditions in the developing world is unclear. In October, 2006, Nicaragua became the first developing nation to implement universal infant immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. To assess the impact of the immunization program, we examined the incidence of diarrhea episodes between 2003 and 2009 among children in the state of León, Nicaragua. Methods We extracted data on diarrhea episodes from health ministry records. We used scaled Poisson regression models to estimate diarrhea incidence rate ratios (IRR) for the period following the program’s implementation to the period before implementation. Results Following implementation of the immunization program, diarrhea episodes among infants were reduced (IRR 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–1.02) during the rotavirus season, but appear to have increased during other months. Conclusions While the immunization program appears effective in reducing diarrhea episodes during the rotavirus season, a large burden of diarrhea persists during the remainder of the year. PMID:20881511

  15. Relationship between diarrhea and peripheral leukocyte population in neonatal Japanese black calves.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Mukai, Machiko; Tanami, Erika; Tokita, Mayumi; Hashiba, Yayoi; Kohiruimaki, Masayuki; Shibano, Ken-Ichi; Miura, Kiyoshi; Morris, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal Japanese Black (JB) calves show a high incidence of diarrhea. The objective of this study was to analyze the immune cell populations of neonatal JB calves in detail and examine its correlation with the incidence of diarrhea immediately after birth. Understanding the immune cell populations is helpful in clinics in order to determine the condition of the immune system for prevention of diseases. Blood samples were obtained from JB calves on the day of birth. The peripheral leukocyte populations were analyzed separately for calves that had diarrhea within 2 weeks after birth (diarrhea group; n = 26) and for calves without diarrhea (control group; n = 74). The numbers of the peripheral blood CD3(+)TcR1-N12(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly lower in the diarrhea group compared with the control group. These findings suggest that the congenital lower peripheral γδ and CD8(+) T cells results in a high risk of diarrhea in neonatal JB calves.

  16. Diarrhea Prevalence, Care, and Risk Factors among Poor Children Under 5 Years of Age in Mesoamerica

    PubMed Central

    Colombara, Danny V.; Hernández, Bernardo; McNellan, Claire R.; Desai, Sima S.; Gagnier, Marielle C.; Haakenstad, Annie; Johanns, Casey; Palmisano, Erin B.; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Zyznieuski, Nicholas; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Care practices and risk factors for diarrhea among impoverished communities across Mesoamerica are unknown. Using Salud Mesoamérica Initiative baseline data, collected 2011–2013, we assessed the prevalence of diarrhea, adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines, and potential diarrhea correlates in poor and indigenous communities across Mesoamerica. This study surveyed 14,500 children under 5 years of age in poor areas of El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico (Chiapas State), Nicaragua, and Panama. We compared diarrhea prevalence and treatment modalities using χ2 tests and used multivariable Poisson regression models to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for potential correlates of diarrhea. The 2-week point prevalence of diarrhea was 13% overall, with significant differences between countries (P < 0.05). Approximately one-third of diarrheal children were given oral rehydration solution and less than 3% were given zinc. Approximately 18% were given much less to drink than usual or nothing to drink at all. Antimotility medication was given to 17% of diarrheal children, while antibiotics were inappropriately given to 36%. In a multivariable regression model, compared with children 0–5 months, those 6–23 months had a 49% increased risk for diarrhea (aRR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.95). Our results call for programs to examine and remedy low adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines. PMID:26787152

  17. Diarrhea Prevalence, Care, and Risk Factors Among Poor Children Under 5 Years of Age in Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Colombara, Danny V; Hernández, Bernardo; McNellan, Claire R; Desai, Sima S; Gagnier, Marielle C; Haakenstad, Annie; Johanns, Casey; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Zyznieuski, Nicholas; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2016-03-01

    Care practices and risk factors for diarrhea among impoverished communities across Mesoamerica are unknown. Using Salud Mesoamérica Initiative baseline data, collected 2011-2013, we assessed the prevalence of diarrhea, adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines, and potential diarrhea correlates in poor and indigenous communities across Mesoamerica. This study surveyed 14,500 children under 5 years of age in poor areas of El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico (Chiapas State), Nicaragua, and Panama. We compared diarrhea prevalence and treatment modalities using χ(2) tests and used multivariable Poisson regression models to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for potential correlates of diarrhea. The 2-week point prevalence of diarrhea was 13% overall, with significant differences between countries (P < 0.05). Approximately one-third of diarrheal children were given oral rehydration solution and less than 3% were given zinc. Approximately 18% were given much less to drink than usual or nothing to drink at all. Antimotility medication was given to 17% of diarrheal children, while antibiotics were inappropriately given to 36%. In a multivariable regression model, compared with children 0-5 months, those 6-23 months had a 49% increased risk for diarrhea (aRR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.95). Our results call for programs to examine and remedy low adherence to evidence-based treatment guidelines.

  18. Systems Approach to Climate, Water, and Diarrhea in Hubli-Dharwad, India.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Jonathan; Kumpel, Emily; Ercumen, Ayse; Zimmerman, Julie

    2016-12-06

    Anthropogenic climate change will likely increase diarrhea rates for communities with inadequate water, sanitation, or hygiene facilities including those with intermittent water supplies. Current approaches to study these impacts typically focus on the effect of temperature on all-cause diarrhea while excluding precipitation and diarrhea etiology while not providing actionable adaptation strategies. We develop a partially mechanistic, systems approach to estimate future diarrhea prevalence and design adaptation strategies. The model incorporates downscaled global climate models, water quality data, quantitative microbial risk assessment, and pathogen prevalence in an agent-based modeling framework incorporating precipitation and diarrhea etiology. It is informed using water quality and diarrhea data from Hubli-Dharwad, India-a city with an intermittent piped water supply exhibiting seasonal water quality variability vulnerable to climate change. We predict all-cause diarrhea prevalence to increase by 4.9% (Range: 1.5-9.0%) by 2011-2030, 11.9% (Range: 7.1-18.2%) by 2046-2065, and 18.2% (Range: 9.1-26.2%) by 2080-2099. Rainfall is an important modifying factor. Rotavirus prevalence is estimated to decline by 10.5% with Cryptosporidium and E. coli prevalence increasing by 9.9% and 6.3%, respectively, by 2080-2099 in this setting. These results suggest that ceramic water filters would be recommended as a climate adaptation strategy over chlorination. This work highlights the vulnerability of intermittent water supplies to climate change and the urgent need for improvements.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  20. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. Results The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). Conclusions These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea. PMID:26645247

  1. Distribution of genes encoding virulence factors and molecular analysis of Shigella spp. isolated from patients with diarrhea in Kerman, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Nave, Hossein; Mansouri, Shahla; Emaneini, Mohammad; Moradi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Shigella is one of the important causes of diarrhea worldwide. Shigella has several virulence factors contributing in colonization and invasion of epithelial cells and eventually death of host cells. The present study was performed in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors genes in Shigella spp. isolated from patients with acute diarrhea in Kerman, Iran as well as the genetic relationship of these isolates. A total of 56 isolates including 31 S. flexneri, 18 S. sonnei and 7 S. boydii were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of 11 virulence genes (ipaH, ial, set1A, set1B, sen, virF, invE, sat, sigA, pic and sepA). Then, the clonal relationship of these strains was analyzed by multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) method. All isolates were positive for ipaH gene. The other genes include ial, invE and virF were found in 80.4%, 60.7% and 67.9% of the isolates, respectively. Both set1A and set1B were detected in 32.3% of S. flexneri isolates, whereas 66.1% of the isolates belonging to different serogroup carried sen gene. The sat gene was present in all S. flexneri isolates, but not in the S. sonnei and S. boydii isolates. The result showed, 30.4% of isolates were simultaneously positive and the rest of the isolates were negative for sepA and pic genes. The Shigella isolates were divided into 29 MLVA types. This study, for the first time, investigated distribution of 11 virulence genes in Shigella spp. Our results revealed heterogeneity of virulence genes in different Shigella serogroups. Furthermore, the strains belonging to the same species had little diversity.

  2. Full-length genomic analysis of porcine rotavirus strains isolated from pigs with diarrhea in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Monini, Marina; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Ianiro, Giovanni; Lavazza, Antonio; Vaccari, Gabriele; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2014-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause acute dehydrating diarrhea in young of man and many animal species, including pigs. Swine RVA has an important economic impact on the farming industry, and pigs represent a potential reservoir for zoonotic transmission of RVA to humans. To investigate the genetic diversity of porcine RVA strains in Italy and identify their possible zoonotic characteristics, 25 RVA-positive feces were collected from diarrheic pigs in Northern Italy, in 2009-2010; all viral strains were characterized by G and P genotyping RT-PCR. Three samples were selected for full genome sequencing. Sequencing of the NSP3 genes of all samples was also performed. Rotavirus diagnosis was carried out by ELISA and electron microscopy. RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed in a one-tube format, using primer sets specific for each of the 11 genome segments. Analysis of the G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes showed that all strains identified were typical porcine RVAs (G4, G5, G9; P[6], P[13], P[23]). Full-length genome sequencing was performed on selected G9 isolates. Most segments belonged to the genotype constellation 1 (Wa-like), which is shared by most human RVA strains, but gene types such as I5 (VP6) and A8 (NSP1), which are typical of porcine and rare among human RVAs, were also detected. We identified RVA strains showing the T7 genotype, an NSP3 gene type that was previously reported in unusual strains of possible porcine or bovine origin from children with diarrhea. Recent reports suggested that G9 RVA may have been introduced from swine to human populations involving gene reassortment events. The observation that some of the RVA genotypes from swine in Italy were similar to viruses characterized in children underlines the importance of animal RVA surveillance, to clarify and monitor the role of animals as genetic reservoirs of emerging RVA strains pathogenic for humans.

  3. Etiology and pharmacologic management of noninfectious diarrhea in HIV-infected individuals in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Rodger D; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea remains a common problem for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) and can negatively affect patient quality of life and lead to discontinuation or switching of HAART regimens. In the era of HAART, diarrhea from opportunistic infections is uncommon, and HIV-associated diarrhea often has noninfectious causes, including HAART-related adverse events and HIV enteropathy. Diarrhea associated with HAART is typically caused by protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), which may damage the intestinal epithelial barrier (leaky-flux diarrhea) and/or alter chloride ion secretion (secretory diarrhea). HIV enteropathy may result from direct effects of HIV on gastrointestinal tract cells and on the gastrointestinal immune system and gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which may be active sites of HIV infection and ongoing inflammation and mucosal damage. New therapies targeting the pathogenic mechanisms of noninfectious diarrheas are needed.

  4. Diarrhea and the social marketing of oral rehydration salts in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Green, E C

    1986-01-01

    An anthropological study of knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to child diarrhea and specifically to ORS was carried out in Bangladesh. The purpose of the study was to help design a culturally-sensitive social marketing program. Information was gathered on indigenous classification of diarrheas, patterns of therapy recourse and diarrhea management, and understanding of dehydration symptoms as well as use and attitudes regarding ORS. Among the findings were that 58% of households sampled had tried ORS at least once; ORS was perceived as a medicine with several positive attributes; literacy was positively related to ORS use; and there were no significant cultural barriers to ORS adoption.

  5. Spontaneous diabetes mellitus associated with persistent bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus infection in young cattle.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, H; Ushiki, T; Tajima, M; Kurosawa, T; Kitamura, N; Takahashi, K; Matsukawa, K; Itakura, C

    1995-05-01

    Histologic and immunohistochemical studies were carried out on four young cattle with diabetes mellitus associated with persistent bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus infection. Clinical findings included persistent hyperglycemia, decreased glucose tolerance, glycosuria, polydipsia, and severe emaciation. Macroscopically, multiple erosions and ulcers in the mucosa of upper and lower alimentary tracts and swollen lymph nodes were commonly observed. Erosions and ulcers in the mucosa of tongue, esophagus, and forestomach were represented histologically by necrosis of squamous epithelium with neutrophilic infiltration. In the small and large intestines, villous atrophy and suppurative cryptitis were often observed, along with diffuse infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and fibroplasia in the lamina propria. In the pancreas of all cattle, there was a reduction in the number of islet cells, and most of the residual islet cells had hydropic degeneration and a decreased number of secretory granules. Immunohistochemical examination confirmed that these cells were severely degranulated beta-cells. In addition, many islets containing necrotic islet cells were observed. These islet cells had increased eosinophilia and shrinkage of cytoplasm, as well as pyknotic nuclei. Inflammation of the islets with mild infiltration of lymphocytes was observed in all pancreatic lobes. In addition, bovine IgG-immunoreactive cells were identified immunohistochemically in the affected pancreatic islets. The BVD virus antigen was not identified in the cytoplasm of the islet cells by immunohistochemical study, although it was identified in the epithelial cells of the small intestine. The histologic and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the pancreatic lesions in these animals were similar to those caused by acute insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in human beings.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. G and P genotypes of rotavirus circulating among children with diarrhea in the Colombian northern coast.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Delfina; Rodríguez, Juan G; Arzuza, Octavio; Parra, Edgar; Young, Gregorio; Castro, Raimundo; del-Portillo, Patricia

    2004-06-01

    A study on the prevalence of rotavirus G and P genotypes was carried out based on 253 stool specimens obtained from children living in the Colombia northern coast region who were less than 3-years-old and who suffered from acute diarrhea. A previous study had detected the presence of rotavirus A in 90 (36.5%) of the 246 samples tested by enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and these strains were investigated in the present study. Of these, 50 strains yielded an RNA electropherotype, most of which (80.0%) had long profiles and 20.0% of which had short profiles. Genotyping of 84 positive samples indicated that 67.9% of the strains could be typed. G1 (57.9%), was the most predominant VP7 genotype, followed by G3 (21.1%), G9 (15.8%) and G2 (5.3%). Among the VP4 genotypes, P[4] (49.1%) was the most prevalent, followed by P[6] 36.4% and P[8] (14.5%). Neither G4 nor G8 nor P[9] types were detected. The most common G-P combinations were G3 P[4] (8.8%) and G9 P[6] (7.0%), followed by G1 P[4] and G1 P[8] (5.3% each). All G1 P[8] strains showed long RNA profiles, whereas G3 P[4] and G9 P[6] displayed both long and short patterns. Mixed infections involved 21.0% of strains. There was a marked diversity among strains collected, and novel strains, including G9, as well as other atypical combinations of G and P genotypes, such as G9 P[6] and G3 P[4], were found.

  7. The use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea with special interest in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Cynthia L; Bartolini, Vickie; Jones, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobials are effective agents used to combat virulent bacterial, yeast, and fungal infections that may otherwise cause rampant disease leading to skyrocketing social/economic costs and possible epidemic morbidity and mortality rates. Antibiotics are designed to attack specific bacterial pathogens but, in the process, indiscreetly reduce the number of beneficial human microbiota that is part of the gut-associated lymphatic tissue. Broad-spectrum antibiotics can upset this uniquely balanced gut ratio, allowing pathogens to propagate in a largely unrestrained environment, which may result in antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Critical illness, age, immunosuppression, exposure to nosocomial microorganisms, and the length of hospitalization are additional factors that contribute to the overgrowth of opportunistic pathogens. In mild to moderate cases of diarrhea, absorptive impairment may occur, thereby reducing micro/macronutrient assimilation, resulting in malnutrition and growth issues in children. In severe cases, infectious diarrhea can have devastating complications. Of particular interest is the bacterium Clostridium difficile, which has the potential to cause a host of symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to severe life-threatening conditions. C. difficile infection can increase mortality rates by 10%-30%. Probiotic supplementation may prevent and treat antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Specific probiotics may modulate the intestinal mucosa by antagonizing pathogens through the production of antimicrobial compounds and chemicals, thereby reducing the rate of nosocomial infection and recurrence of C. difficile.

  8. The rate of co-infection for piglet diarrhea viruses in China and the genetic characterization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and porcine kobuvirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-P; Yang, Z; Lin, W-D; Wang, W-Y; Yang, J; Jin, W-J; Qin, A-J

    2016-03-01

    Piglet diarrhea epidemics result in major economic losses for the swine industry. Four viruses are closely linked to porcine diarrhea: porcine kobuvirus (PKV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), and porcine rotavirus (PRoV). We have conducted an epidemiology study to determine the frequency of infection and co-infection with these viruses in China, and characterized the genetic variation of the isolated PEDV and PKV strains. Stool and intestinal samples (n = 314) were collected from piglets with diarrhea in China from years 2012 to 2014. RT-PCR was used to detect PKV, PEDV, TGEV, and PRoV. Phylogenetic relationships between reference strains and the isolated PEDV and PKV strains were determined based on the M and 3D gene sequence. The rates of infection with PKV, PEDV, TGEV and PRoV were 29.9%, 24.2%, 1.91%, and 0.31%, respectively. Co-infections with PKV and the other three viruses were very common. Co-infection of PKV and PEDV was detected in 15.0% (47/314) of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the PKV 3D gene indicated that there were some phylogenetic differences in the PKV strains across regions within China. However, according to the PEDV M gene, strains clustered into three groups and the primary group was distinct from the vaccine strain CV777. This study provides insights in to the prevalence of diarrhea viruses and their prevention and control in China.

  9. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  10. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  11. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  12. Risk factors of delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children: for early detection of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jea Yeon; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Hann, Tchah; Kim, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the risk factors of a delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children undergoing an appendectomy. Methods This retrospective study involved children aged below 18 years, who underwent an appendectomy. After dividing them into a delayed diagnosis group and nondelayed diagnosis group according to the time interval between the initial hospital visit and final diagnosis, the risk factors of delayed diagnosis were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results Among 712 patients, 105 patients (14.7%) were classified in the delayed diagnosis group; 92 patients (12.9%) were diagnosed using ultrasonography (US), and both US and computed tomography were performed in 38 patients (5.3%). More patients in the delayed diagnosis group underwent US (P=0.03). Spring season and prior local clinic visit were significantly associated with a delayed diagnosis. Fever and diarrhea were more common in the delayed diagnosis group (fever: odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.81; diarrhea: OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.08–3.46; P<0.05). These patients showed symptoms for a longer duration (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.78–3.78; P<0.05), and the admission course (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11–1.44; P<0.05) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.19–1.82; P<0.05) were associated with the delayed diagnosis. Conclusion To decrease the rate of delayed diagnoses of acute appendicitis, symptoms such as fever and diarrhea, seasonal variations, admission course, and CRP levels should be considered and children with a longer duration of symptoms should be closely monitored. PMID:27721841

  13. John G. Bartlett: Contributions to the discovery of Clostridium difficile antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Sherwood L

    2014-09-15

    In 1975 John Bartlett began trials investigating the problem of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. His work led the discovery of Clostridium difficile and he identified it as the leading cause of hospital-associated infections.

  14. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Diarrhea, Shanghai, China, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianxing; Ye, Chuchu; Lai, Shengjie; Zhu, Weiping; Zhang, Zike; Geng, Qibin; Xue, Caoyi; Yang, Weizhong; Wu, Shuyu; Hall, Aron J.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted sentinel-based surveillance for norovirus in the Pudong area of Shanghai, China, during 2012–2013, by analyzing 5,324 community surveys, 408,024 medical records, and 771 laboratory-confirmed norovirus infections among 3,877 diarrhea cases. Our analysis indicated an outpatient incidence of 1.5/100 person-years and a community incidence of 8.9/100 person-years for norovirus-associated diarrhea. PMID:28098539

  15. Concurrent Bovine Virus Diarrhea and Bovine Papular Stomatitis Infection in a Calf

    PubMed Central

    Bohac, J. G.; Yates, W. D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A case of concurrent infection with the viruses of bovine virus diarrhea and papular stomatitis in a calf is reported. The difficulties posed by such situations are described and the criteria used for diagnosis outlined. The two diseases are reviewed briefly and the possible mechanisms whereby bovine virus diarrhea virus is suspected of facilitating infection by other agents are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7459795

  16. Studies of osmotic diarrhea induced in normal subjects by ingestion of polyethylene glycol and lactulose.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, H F; Santa Ana, C A; Schiller, L R; Fordtran, J S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of pure osmotic diarrhea and the osmotic diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption. Diarrhea was induced in normal volunteers by ingestion of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which is nonabsorbable, not metabolized by colonic bacteria, and carries no electrical charge. In PEG-induced diarrhea, (a) stool weight was directly correlated with the total mass of PEG ingested; (b) PEG contributed 40-60% of the osmolality of the fecal fluid, the remainder being contributed by other solutes either of dietary, endogenous, or bacterial origin; and (c) fecal sodium, potassium, and chloride were avidly conserved by the intestine, in spite of stool water losses exceeding 1,200 g/d. Diarrhea was also induced in normal subjects by ingestion of lactulose, a disaccharide that is not absorbed by the small intestine but is metabolized by colonic bacteria. In lactulose-induced diarrhea, (a) a maximum of approximate 80 g/d of lactulose was metabolized by colonic bacteria to noncarbohydrate moieties such as organic acids; (b) the organic acids were partially absorbed in the colon; (c) unabsorbed organic acids obligated the accumulation of inorganic cations (Na greater than Ca greater than K greater than Mg) in the diarrheal fluid; (d) diarrhea associated with low doses of lactulose was mainly due to unabsorbed organic acids and associated cations, whereas with larger doses of lactulose unmetabolized carbohydrates also played a major role; and (e) the net effect of bacterial metabolism of lactulose and partial absorption of organic acids on stool water output was done dependent. With low or moderate doses of lactulose, stool water losses were reduced by as much as 600 g/d (compared with equimolar osmotic loads of PEG); with large dose, the increment in osmotically active solutes within the lumen exceeded the increment of the ingested osmotic load, and the severity of diarrhea was augmented. PMID:2794043

  17. Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Claudia; Hagbom, Marie; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles. IMPORTANCE We show that RV-infected mice have increased intestinal motility at the onset of diarrhea, and that this is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. These new observations will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in RV diarrhea. PMID:24371070

  18. Prevalence of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children with Diarrhea in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoki; Liu, Chengxu; Kato, Haru; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Nakamura, Haruhi; Iwai, Naoichi; Ueno, Kazue

    1999-01-01

    In age-matched controlled studies performed in Japan, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis was isolated from 14.9% of 114 children aged 1 to 14 years with antibiotic-unassociated diarrhea (AUD) and 6.5% of 108 children aged 1 to 6 years with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). The difference in comparison with control children, was significant for AUD children but not AAD children. PMID:9986859

  19. Heavy Rainfall Events and Diarrhea Incidence: The Role of Social and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Elizabeth J.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Goldstick, Jason; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Levy, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The impact of heavy rainfall events on waterborne diarrheal diseases is uncertain. We conducted weekly, active surveillance for diarrhea in 19 villages in Ecuador from February 2004 to April 2007 in order to evaluate whether biophysical and social factors modify vulnerability to heavy rainfall events. A heavy rainfall event was defined as 24-hour rainfall exceeding the 90th percentile value (56 mm) in a given 7-day period within the study period. Mixed-effects Poisson regression was used to test the hypothesis that rainfall in the prior 8 weeks, water and sanitation conditions, and social cohesion modified the relationship between heavy rainfall events and diarrhea incidence. Heavy rainfall events were associated with increased diarrhea incidence following dry periods (incidence rate ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.87) and decreased diarrhea incidence following wet periods (incidence rate ratio = 0.74, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.92). Drinking water treatment reduced the deleterious impacts of heavy rainfall events following dry periods. Sanitation, hygiene, and social cohesion did not modify the relationship between heavy rainfall events and diarrhea. Heavy rainfall events appear to affect diarrhea incidence through contamination of drinking water, and they present the greatest health risks following periods of low rainfall. Interventions designed to increase drinking water treatment may reduce climate vulnerability. PMID:24256618

  20. Celiac Disease Presenting as Profound Diarrhea and Weight Loss – A Celiac Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bul, Vadim; Sleesman, Brett; Boulay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Celiac crisis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chronic diarrhea • lightheadedness • weakness • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Celiac disease is a hypersensitivity enteropathy that can have various presentations in adults. Rarely, patients can present with severe lab abnormalities, dehydration and weight loss caused by celiac disease – a celiac crisis. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a past medical history significant for diabetes mellitus, type 2 (DM2) and recently treated Bell’s Palsy presented to the emergency room complaining of weakness, diarrhea and lightheadedness. On presentation, the patient had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 60 mm Hg and a lactic acidosis with pH of 7.28. Infectious etiologies of diarrhea were ruled out. The patient had an EGD which showed erythema of the duodenal bulb. Serum anti-gliadin and anti-TTG IgA were both elevated suggesting Celiac disease. Biopsies showed histopathology consistent with celiac disease. The patient’s diarrhea resolved after initiation of a gluten free diet. He gained 25 kilograms after discharge and did not require further hospitalizations for diarrhea. Conclusions: Celiac crisis is a very rare presentation of celiac disease in adults but nonetheless should be considered in patients with marked metabolic derangements in the setting of osmotic diarrhea. Treatment consists of a gluten free diet and may require management with steroids and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). PMID:27492679