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Sample records for acute wound management

  1. Acute wounds.

    PubMed

    Ramasastry, Sai S

    2005-04-01

    The most important factors in the management of acute wounds are the history and physical examination. The goals of wound care are fivefold: avoid further tissue damage, achieve wound closure as rapidly as possible, restore function to the injured tissue, facilitate the patient's expedient return to normal daily activities, and restore the patient's quality of life. The treating physician must have a good understanding of the wound healing mechanism. One must rule out all associated occult injuries that may be life threatening. Proper wound assessment and management with minimal discomfort to the patient are crucial. The primary goal is to facilitate the healing process to achieve a cosmetically pleasing and functional result.

  2. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Acute wound management: revisiting the approach to assessment, irrigation, and closure considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Woo, Kevin; Nitzki-George, Diane; Sibbald, R. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background As millions of emergency department (ED) visits each year include wound care, emergency care providers must remain experts in acute wound management. The variety of acute wounds presenting to the ED challenge the physician to select the most appropriate management to facilitate healing. A complete wound history along with anatomic and specific medical considerations for each patient provides the basis of decision making for wound management. It is essential to apply an evidence‐based approach and consider each wound individually in order to create the optimal conditions for wound healing. Aims A comprehensive evidence‐based approach to acute wound management is an essential skill set for any emergency physician or acute care practitioner. This review provides an overview of current evidence and addresses frequent pitfalls. Methods A systematic review of the literature for acute wound management was performed. Results A structured MEDLINE search was performed regarding acute wound management including established wound care guidelines. The data obtained provided the framework for evidence‐based recommendations and current best practices for wound care. Conclusion Acute wound management varies based on the wound location and characteristics. No single approach can be applied to all wounds; however, a systematic approach to acute wound care integrated with current best practices provides the framework for exceptional wound management. PMID:21373312

  4. Management of acute and chronic open wounds: the importance of moist environment in optimal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ioannovich, John; Al-Amm, Christian A; El-Musa, Kusai A

    2002-09-01

    The history of wound care and management closely parallels that of military surgery which has laid down the principles and dictated the practices of wound cleansing, debridement and coverage. From a treatment standpoint, there are essentially two types of wounds: those characterized by loss of tissue and those in which no tissue has been lost. In the event of tissue loss it is critical to determine whether vital structures such as bone, tendons, nerves and vessels have been exposed. It is also important to determine the amount of soft tissue contusion and contamination. In any case primary wound healing by early closure either primarily or with the help of grafts or flaps is preferred to secondary healing and wound contraction with subsequent contractures which interfere with range of motion and function. Whether the wound is acute or chronic, essential principles of wound care must be observed in order to avoid wound sepsis and achieve rapid and optimal wound healing. - Tissues must be handled gently. - Caustic solutions capable of sterilizing the skin should never be applied to the wound. It is desirable never to put anything in the wound that cannot be tolerated comfortably in the conjunctival sac. - All devitalized tissues must be debrided either hydrodynamically, chemically, mechanically or surgically. - All dead space must be obliterated. - Exposed vital structures must be covered by well vascularized tissues. An essential part of any wound management protocol is wound dressing. It cannot be too strongly emphasized that a wound dressing may have a profound influence on healing particularly of secondary type healing, a critical feature being the extent to which such dressing restricts the evaporation of water from the wound surface. A review of available dressing materials is reported with emphasis on the newly developed concept of moist environment for optimal healing. a practical guide for dressing selection is also proposed.

  5. Wound management.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Maria E; Markovchick, Vincent J

    2007-08-01

    Wound management makes up an important part of the emergency physician's practice. Understanding the physiology of wound healing and the patient and wound factors affecting this process is essential for the proper treatment of wounds. There are many options available for wound closure. Each modality has its benefits and its drawbacks, and some are appropriate only for certain types of wounds. The goal is to achieve the best functional and cosmetically appealing scar while avoiding complications.

  6. Evaluation of a foam dressing for acute and chronic wound exudate management.

    PubMed

    Bullough, Lindsay; Johnson, Sue; Forder, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the use of a foam dressing for exudate management in both chronic and acute wounds, such as surgical wounds, pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds, and leg ulcers. The primary objective of the study was to observe patients' wound progression in terms of wound size and the condition of the wound bed, when using this foam dressing as either a primary or secondary dressing. The outcome of the evaluation demonstrated that ActivHeal Foam Contact dressing effectively managed exudate. It was also observed that the dressing can assist in autolysis and support improvements in peri-wound status. Choosing an appropriate dressing to manage a wound is essential. Clinicians working in the NHS are under pressure to deliver good-quality clinical outcomes, and the ActivHeal Foam Contact dressing supports this outcome.

  7. Topical negative pressure wound therapy: a review of its role and guidelines for its use in the management of acute wounds.

    PubMed

    Bovill, Estas; Banwell, Paul E; Teot, Luc; Eriksson, Elof; Song, Colin; Mahoney, Jim; Gustafsson, Ronny; Horch, Raymund; Deva, Anand; Whitworth, Ian

    2008-10-01

    Over the past two decades, topical negative pressure (TNP) wound therapy has gained wide acceptance as a genuine strategy in the treatment algorithm for a wide variety of acute and chronic wounds. Although extensive experimental and clinical evidence exists to support its use and despite the recent emergence of randomised control trials, its role and indications have yet to be fully determined. This article provides a qualitative overview of the published literature appertaining to the use of TNP therapy in the management of acute wounds by an international panel of experts using standard methods of appraisal. Particular focus is applied to the use of TNP for the open abdomen, sternal wounds, lower limb trauma, burns and tissue coverage with grafts and dermal substitutes. We provide evidence-based recommendations for indications and techniques in TNP wound therapy and, where studies are insufficient, consensus on best practice.

  8. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  9. Surgical Management of Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Benjamin R; Ha, Austin Y; Kwan, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we outline the important role the surgeon plays in the management of chronic wounds. Debridement and washout are required for grossly infected wounds and necrotizing soft tissue infections. Cutaneous cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas may contribute to chronic wounds and vice versa; if diagnosed, these should be treated with wide local excision. Arterial, venous, and even lymphatic flows can be restored in select cases to enhance delivery of nutrients and removal of metabolic waste and promote wound healing. In cases where vital structures, such as bones, joints, tendons, and nerves, are exposed, vascularized tissue transfers are often required. These tissue transfers can be local or remote, the latter of which necessitates anastomoses of arteries and veins. Pressure sores are managed by relieving pressure, treating acute trauma or infection, and using rotation fasciocutaneous flaps. Lastly, the surgeon must always consider the possibility of osteomyelitis and retained foreign body as etiology for chronic wounds.

  10. The efficacy of diazepam treatment for the management of acute wounding episodes in captive rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Fahey, Michele A; Rowlett, James K; Meyer, Jerrold S; Pouliot, Amber L; Jones, Brenda M; Novak, Melinda A

    2005-08-01

    The spontaneous development of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in singly housed monkeys poses a challenge for their management and well-being in captivity. Relatively little information is available on effective treatments for SIB. This study examined the effects of diazepam (Valium) on self-wounding and other abnormal behaviors in eight individually housed male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Each monkey's response to an anxiolytic dose of diazepam (1 mg/kg or greater orally) was compared with the animal's behavior during drug-free periods. When examined across all animals, treatment with diazepam did not significantly alter wounding frequency or rates of self-directed biting without wounding. However, closer examination of the data revealed that four of the animals showed significant decreases in self-biting and wounding frequency (positive responders, PR group), whereas the remaining monkeys showed a trend towards increased wounding frequency (negative responders, NR group). Subsequent examination of colony and veterinary records demonstrated that compared with NR monkeys, PR monkeys had spent significantly more years in individual cage housing and had experienced a greater number of minor veterinary procedures. PR animals also were significantly less likely to have a documented history of self-biting behavior. Our findings suggest that SIB is not a homogeneous disorder in rhesus monkeys; rather, distinct subtypes exist that require different treatment approaches.

  11. [Errors in wound management].

    PubMed

    Filipović, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

    2014-10-01

    Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions.

  12. Cryo-Induced Thermal Wounds: A Human Acute Wound Model.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Fox, Joshua D; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Maderal, Andrea D; Badiavas, Evangelos; Cargill, D Innes; Slade, Herbert B; Feldman, Steven R; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Clinical models are invaluable in studying wound healing. Challenges in studying human wounds include heterogeneity of patients and wounds, as well as prolonged study time, resulting in high costs. Animal models are an efficient method to study wound healing, but often lack correlation with human acute wound healing. Human wound models can be created using sharp instruments, suction, acids, heat and cold. In this observational study, we propose a practical human acute wound model where partial thickness wounds are induced by cryosurgery to create wounds that could facilitate wound healing research and development. On forearms of 8 healthy adult volunteers, freeze injuries were induced using liquid nitrogen spray delivered onto a target area of a 1 cm circular opening at a distance from the cryo-device to the skin of 0.5-1 cm. Several freeze-thaw time cycles were implemented by administering pulses ranging from 3 to 12 seconds. Clinical evaluation was performed at a 24-hour follow-up period. Blister roofs were histologically analyzed by a blinded dermatophathologist. Clinical assessment of time to heal was determined. Freeze-times greater than 5 seconds caused a majority of subjects to develop blisters, and freeze-times greater than 8 seconds resulted in uniform blister formation. Consistent histology of full thickness necrotic epidermis with intact detached basement membrane with minimal acute neutrophilic inflammatory infiltrate was observed in all blister specimens examined. The 8-second freeze-time group had a time to heal of 13-14 days, while the 12-second freeze-time group required 3 weeks to heal. After healing, an area of hypopigmented skin and slightly hypertrophic scarring remained. This novel cryo-induced wound model is a potential simple, efficient and reliable model for studying the dynamic processes involved in acute wound healing and to aid in the development of new wound healing therapies. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01253135.

  13. Topical antimicrobials in pediatric burn wound management.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priti P; Vasquez, Sylvia A; Granick, Mark S; Rhee, Samuel T

    2008-07-01

    Burn trauma continues to injure an estimated 1 million children each year in the United States alone, with many more injuries suffered worldwide. Several decades ago, advances in acute burn wound management, including development of topical antimicrobials, dramatically improved outcomes in pediatric burn injuries. However, infection remains the leading cause of burn wound mortality. With increasing antibiotic resistance in many medical centers, precise selection of topical antimicrobial therapy has grown in importance for pediatric burn management. Effective choice and application of topical antimicrobials require correct classification of burn wounds, appropriate understanding of the process of burn wound sepsis, and accurate identification of pathogens for individual patients as well as for their surrounding environment. This article examines the current and evolving role of topical antimicrobials in pediatric burn wound management. Burn wound classification, the biologic process of burn wound sepsis, wound cultures with pathogen profiling, and evaluations of commonly used topical antimicrobials are reviewed. Newer biologically active occlusive (bio-occlusive) and hybrid products are examined in the context of topical antimicrobial therapy and their increasing role in pediatric burn wound management.

  14. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  15. Hydro-responsive wound dressings simplify T.I.M.E. wound management framework.

    PubMed

    Ousey, Karen; Rogers, Alan A; Rippon, Mark G

    2016-12-01

    The development of wound management protocols and guidelines such as the T.I.M.E. acronym are useful tools to aid wound care practitioners deliver effective wound care. The tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance and edge of wound (T.I.M.E.) framework provides a systematic approach for the assessment and management of the majority of acute and chronic wounds. The debridement of devitalised tissue from the wound bed, the reduction in wound bioburden and effective management of wound exudate - i.e., wound bed preparation - are barriers to wound healing progression that are targeted by T.I.M.E. There are a large number of wound dressings available to experienced wound care practitioners to aid in their goal of healing wounds. Despite the systematic approach of T.I.M.E., the large number of wound dressings available can introduce a level of confusion when dressing choices need to be made. Any simplification in dressing choice, for example by choosing a dressing system comprising of a limited number of dressings that are able to address all aspects of T.I.M.E., would be a valuable resource for delivering effective wound care. This article briefly reviews the principles of T.I.M.E. and describes the evidence for the use of a two-dressing, moisture balance-oriented, dressing-based wound management system.

  16. Initial Management of Traumatic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-08-04

    When traumatic wounds are quickly and accurately treated, morbidity and costs can be significantly decreased. Several factors, such as time delay between injury and treatment, the degree of contamination, extension and depth of the wound, and the mechanism of injury, influence the treatment and prognosis and stress the importance of a patient-specific approach. Although all traumatic wounds are contaminated, antibiotic therapy is seldom required if correct wound management is installed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  18. Office management of minor wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

  19. The Roles of Physical Therapists in Wound Management: Part IV

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther

    2009-01-01

    Physical therapists are important members of the comprehensive wound management team. In addition to being able to provide standard wound care, they are well prepared to treat wounds with a variety of biophysical agents that introduce electromagnetic, acoustic, and mechanical energies that enhance healing. Physical therapists also address restoration of function that is frequently compromised in patients who suffer from chronically and acutely wounded tissues. PMID:24527128

  20. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  1. Epidermal Graft Accelerates the Healing of Acute Wound: A Self-controlled Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bystrzonowski, Nicola; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Richards, Toby; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Wound care represents a significant socioeconomic burden, with over half of chronic wounds taking up to a year to heal. Measures to accelerate wound healing are beneficial to patients and also reduce the cost and burden of wound management. Epidermal grafting (EG) is an emerging option for autologous skin grafting in the outpatient setting to improve wound healing. Although several case series have previously reported good clinical outcome with EG, the healing rate in comparison to conservative wound management is not known. In this report, we compare the weekly healing rate of 2 separate wounds in the same patient, one treated with EG and the other with dressings. The treated wound showed accelerated healing, with the healing rate being the highest at the first 2 weeks after EG. The average healing time of the treated wound was 40% faster compared with the control wound. EG accelerates healing of acute wounds, potentially reducing the healthcare cost and surgical burden. PMID:27975024

  2. Facial bite wounds: management update.

    PubMed

    Stefanopoulos, P K; Tarantzopoulou, A D

    2005-07-01

    Bite wounds are frequently located on the face; injuries inflicted by dogs are most common, especially in children. Bacteriology of infected dog and cat bite wounds includes Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, viridans streptococci, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and oral anaerobes. Infected human bites yield a similar spectrum of bacteria except for Pasteurellae and C. canimorsus; instead human bites are frequently complicated by Eikenella corrodens. Antibiotic therapy against these bacteria is indicated both for infected bite wounds and fresh wounds considered at risk for infection. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (and other combinations of extended-spectrum penicillins with beta-lactamase inhibitors) and moxifloxacin offer the best in vitro coverage of the pathogenic flora. Initial wound management consisting in irrigation and debridement is at least equally important with antibiotics for prevention of infection. The need for prophylaxis against systemic infectious complications, particularly tetanus, should also be evaluated. Primary surgical repair is the treatment of choice for most clinically uninfected facial bite wounds, whereas delayed closure should be reserved for certain high risk or already infected wounds. Avulsive injuries with significant tissue loss represent the most difficult cases for definitive management and are also those most likely to require hospitalization.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING AND OPEN WOUNDS IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this “On the Sidelines” clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:22666650

  4. Management of bleeding and open wounds in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Smith, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this "On the Sidelines" clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. 5.

  5. Use of Multiple Adjunctive Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modalities to Manage Diabetic Lower-Extremity Wounds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various treatment options exist for wound healing; however, clinical assessment of the patient and the wound environment must be considered before determining an optimal wound treatment plan. Negative pressure wound therapy alone and/or with an instilled topical solution can be effective in adjunctive management of acute and chronic wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to contribute to the wound-healing process. A pilot evaluation using a multistep approach of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and a dwell time, standard negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy was explored to manage postsurgical, diabetic lower-extremity wounds with a significant bioburden. Methods: Three diabetic patients with lower-extremity ulcers were treated after surgical intervention. Multistep wound therapy consisted of (1) negative pressure wound therapy with instillation of normal saline with a 20-minute dwell time, followed by 2 hours of negative pressure at −150 mm Hg for 3 to 4 days; (2) 1 to 3 weeks of continuous negative pressure at −150 mm Hg; and (3) multiple treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: After surgery, wound closure was achieved within 4 weeks postinitiation of multistep wound therapy. All patients regained limb function and recovered with no long-term sequelae. Conclusions: In these 3 cases, a multistep wound therapy approach after surgery resulted in successful outcomes; however, larger prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the potential efficacy of this approach in the postsurgical management of complex, diabetic lower-extremity wounds. PMID:28077984

  6. Use of the wound healing trajectory as an outcome determinant for acute wound healing.

    PubMed

    Franz, M G; Kuhn, M A; Wright, T E; Wachtel, T L; Robson, M C

    2000-01-01

    Accurate and clinically practical methods for measuring the progress of acute wound healing is necessary before interventions designed to optimize and even accelerate acute wound healing can be applied. Complete wound closure rates and operative wound closure severity are irrelevant to most acute wounds since most are closed at the time of primary tissue repair and remain closed throughout healing. Analogous to chronic wound closure, the rate of increase of incision tensile strength progressively decreases as time passes and 100% unwounded tissue strength is never achieved making the endpoint definition of "healed" vague. Conceptualizing acute wound healing in terms of its design elements with reintegration into a final outcome lends itself to the description of acute wound healing as a mathematical trajectory. Frequently such an equation is a rate expressing the change in an acute healing parameter, most often tensile strength, over time. Such an approach also normalizes misinterpretations in analysis or errors in theory developed by measuring healing parameters at fixed points in time. Distributions of fractional strength gain times (e.g., 85% normal strength) can be determined using statistical methodology similar that used for failure time of survival analysis. Preclinical studies show that acute wound healing trajectories can be shifted to the left from a "normal" or "impaired" curve to an accelerated or more "ideal" curve. A useful method for measuring acute wound healing outcomes is therefore required before the basic science of acute wound healing is inevitably applied to the problem of acute surgical wounds.

  7. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds.

    PubMed

    O'Mathúna, Dónal P; Ashford, Robert L

    2014-07-29

    Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. To identify and review all relevant data to determine the effects of TT on healing acute wounds. In January 2014, for this fifth update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials, which compared the effect of TT with a placebo, another treatment, or no treatment control were considered. Studies which used TT as a stand-alone treatment, or as an adjunct to other therapies, were eligible. One author (DO'M) determined the eligibility for inclusion of all trials in the review. Both authors conducted data extraction and evaluation of trial validity independently. Each trial was assessed using predetermined criteria. No new trials were identified for this update. Four trials in people with experimental wounds were included. The effect of TT on wound healing in these studies was variable. Two trials (n = 44 & 24) demonstrated a significant increase in healing associated with TT, while one trial found significantly worse healing after TT and the other found no significant difference. All trials are at high risk of bias. There is no robust evidence that TT promotes healing of acute wounds.

  8. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds.

    PubMed

    O'Mathúna, Dónal P

    2016-08-23

    Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. To identify and review all relevant data to determine the effects of TT on healing acute wounds. In January 2014, for this fifth update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials, which compared the effect of TT with a placebo, another treatment, or no treatment control were considered. Studies which used TT as a stand-alone treatment, or as an adjunct to other therapies, were eligible. One author (DO'M) determined the eligibility for inclusion of all trials in the review. Both authors conducted data extraction and evaluation of trial validity independently. Each trial was assessed using predetermined criteria. No new trials were identified for this update. Four trials in people with experimental wounds were included. The effect of TT on wound healing in these studies was variable. Two trials (n = 44 & 24) demonstrated a significant increase in healing associated with TT, while one trial found significantly worse healing after TT and the other found no significant difference. All trials are at high risk of bias. There is no robust evidence that TT promotes healing of acute wounds.

  9. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds.

    PubMed

    O'Mathúna, Dónal P; Ashford, Robert L

    2012-06-13

    Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. To identify and review all relevant data to determine the effects of TT on healing acute wounds. For this fourth update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 27 January 2012); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1); Ovid MEDLINE (2010 to January Week 2 2012); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, January 26, 2012); Ovid EMBASE (2010 to 2012 Week 03); and EBSCO CINAHL (2010 to January 6 2012). All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials, which compared the effect of TT with a placebo, another treatment, or no treatment control were considered. Studies which used TT as a stand-alone treatment, or as an adjunct to other therapies, were eligible. One author (DO'M) determined the eligibility for inclusion of all trials in the review. Both authors conducted data extraction and evaluation of trial validity independently. Each trial was assessed using predetermined criteria. No new trials were identified for this update. Four trials in people with experimental wounds were included. The effect of TT on wound healing in these studies was variable. Two trials (n = 44 & 24) demonstrated a significant increase in healing associated with TT, while one trial found significantly worse healing after TT and the other found no significant difference. All trials are at high risk of bias. There is no robust evidence that TT promotes healing of acute wounds.

  10. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds.

    PubMed

    O'Mathúna, Dónal P

    2016-05-03

    Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter a meditative state and pass their hands above the patient's body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient's 'life energy' or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. To identify and review all relevant data to determine the effects of TT on healing acute wounds. In January 2014, for this fifth update, we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials, which compared the effect of TT with a placebo, another treatment, or no treatment control were considered. Studies which used TT as a stand-alone treatment, or as an adjunct to other therapies, were eligible. One author (DO'M) determined the eligibility for inclusion of all trials in the review. Both authors conducted data extraction and evaluation of trial validity independently. Each trial was assessed using predetermined criteria. No new trials were identified for this update. Four trials in people with experimental wounds were included. The effect of TT on wound healing in these studies was variable. Two trials (n = 44 & 24) demonstrated a significant increase in healing associated with TT, while one trial found significantly worse healing after TT and the other found no significant difference. All trials are at high risk of bias. There is no robust evidence that TT promotes healing of acute wounds.

  11. Evidence-Based Medicine: Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine M; Rothermel, Alexis T; Mackay, Donald R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the basic science of chronic wounds. 2. Discuss the general and local factors that should be considered in any patient with a chronic wound. 3. Discuss the rationale of converting a chronic wound into an acute wound. 4. Describe techniques used to prepare chronic wounds. 5. Discuss the appropriate use of different dressings presented in this article. 6. Discuss the pros and cons of the adjuncts to wound healing discussed in this article. This is the second Maintenance of Certification article on wound healing. In the first, Buchanan, Kung, and Cederna dealt with the mechanism and reconstructive techniques for closing wounds. In this article, the authors have concentrated on the chronic wound. The authors present a summary of the basic science of chronic wounds and the general and local clinical factors important in assessing any chronic wound. The evidence for interventions of these conditions is presented. The surgical and nonsurgical methods of wound preparation and the evidence supporting the use of the popular wound dressings are presented. The authors then present the evidence for some of the popular adjuncts for wound healing, including hyperbaric oxygen, electrotherapy, and ultrasound. A number of excellent articles on negative-pressure wound therapy have been written, and are not covered in this article.

  12. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  13. Current management of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-06-01

    While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved.

  14. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention.

  15. Management of Sports-Induced Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Danny T.; Rowedder, Laura J.; Reese, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Skin wounds are common in sports but are rarely documented by the certified athletic trainer. The literature is unclear about wound types, and none of the articles reviewed reported frequencies. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the frequency of common athletic skin wounds and their specific management. Management of skin wounds can sometimes be problematic. Hydrogen peroxide has been used on wounds since 1947, yet some researchers report that hydrogen peroxide and iodophor solution can delay or interfere with wound healing, or cause damage to the wounded area if use is intense and prolonged. Occlusive dressings have been reported to have considerable advantage in maintaining a moist wound bed and in decreasing healing time. Infection rates beneath occlusive dressings, however, are similar to those associated with other types of dressings. Complications to wounds, with or without the use of occlusive dressings, such as keloids and seborrheic dermatitis, occur in low frequencies. Due to a lack of specific information about sports-induced skin wounds and their management, we recommend that standardized documentation for common wounds be developed along with further study of techniques for management. PMID:16558324

  16. Complex wound management utilizing an artificial dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Muangman, Pornprom; Engrav, Loren H; Heimbach, David M; Harunari, Nobuyuki; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S; Klein, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    The benefits of the Integra Dermal Regeneration Template in the management of extensive burn injuries have been well documented. Integra can reduce donor- and graft-site scarring and has been reported to be capable of vascularizing over small areas of exposed bone and tendon. Given these potential advantages, we have used Integra for a variety of other reconstruction applications. We performed a retrospective review of patients with complex wounds treated with Integra at our burn center. Integra was used in the management of a variety of wounds, including necrotizing fasciitis, extremity degloving injury, meningococcemia, Marjolin ulcer, postburn lip reconstruction, and fourth-degree burns with exposed bone or tendon. Engraftment rates of Integra and autograft were 98% +/- 4% and 97% +/- 4%, respectively. All areas of graft loss healed without need for regrafting. The benefits of Integra in the management of acute burn wounds can be extended to other traumatic and complex wounds.

  17. Overview of Wound Healing and Management.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan R; Murthy, Ananth S

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly complex chain of events, and although it may never be possible to eliminate the risk of experiencing a wound, clinicians' armamentarium continues to expand with methods to manage it. The phases of wound healing are the inflammatory phase, the proliferative phase, and the maturation phase. The pathway of healing is determined by characteristics of the wound on initial presentation, and it is vital to select the appropriate method to treat the wound based on its ability to avoid hypoxia, infection, excessive edema, and foreign bodies.

  18. Exploring the concept of a team approach to wound care: MANAGING WOUNDS AS A TEAM.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Background The growing prevalence and incidence of nonhealing acute and chronic wounds is a worrying concern. A major challenge is the lack of united services aimed at addressing the complex needs of individuals with wounds. However, the WHO argues that interprofessional collaboration in education and practice is key to providing the best patient care, enhancing clinical and health-related outcomes and strengthening the health system. It is based on this background that the team approach to wound care project was conceptualised. The project was jointly initiated and realised by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC-USA), the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) and the European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Aim The aim of this project was to develop a universal model for the adoption of a team approach to wound care. Objective The overarching objective of this project was to provide recommendations for implementing a team approach to wound care within all clinical settings and through this to develop a model for advocating the team approach toward decision makers in national government levels. Method An integrative literature review was conducted. Using this knowledge, the authors arrived at a consensus on the most appropriate model to adopt and realise a team approach to wound care. Results Eighty four articles met the inclusion criteria. Following data extraction, it was evident that none of the articles provided a definition for the terms multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary in the context of wound care. Given this lack of clarity within the wound care literature, the authors have here developed a Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care to fill this gap in our current understanding. Conclusion We advocate that the patient should be at the heart of all decision-making, as working with the Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care begins with the needs of the patient. To facilitate this

  19. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0836 TITLE: Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carlson...SUBTITLE Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Traumatic Wound 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11...and manufacture of our hemostatic devices. In addition, we improved our prototypes to deliver foaming technology for the treatment of noncompressible

  20. Wound healing in acutely injured fascia.

    PubMed

    Lau, Frank H; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-05-01

    Fascial healing following acute injury, such as that occurring during surgical procedures, is defined functionally. For example, failure of fascial healing following celiotomy is only identified when incisional hernias are diagnosed. Such hernias incur billions of dollars per year in medical costs. Despite the importance of fascial healing, there is a paucity of data regarding the quality such healing. In clinical settings, the quantification of fascial wound healing is limited to a binary state: either there is no clinically apparent functional deficit and full fascia healing is assumed, or an incisional hernia or other functional failure is visible and the fascia did not heal. There are no clinical methods to isolate and functionally test fascia in patients. Recent studies have revealed unexpected findings regarding the recovery of tensile strength, specific surgical methods that optimize fascial healing, and the potential impact of biological pharmaceuticals in eliminating fascial healing failure. However, much remains unknown about the biology of fascial healing. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Overview and Management of Sternal Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kimberly; Anderson, Erica; Harper, J. Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Sternal wound infection is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery associated with high morbidity and mortality. Past treatment options have included closed suction and continuous irrigation. Current paradigms in the management of sternal wound infection include surgical debridement, vacuum-assisted closure therapy, flap coverage, and sternal plating. We provide a general overview of sternal wound infection and treatment options for the plastic surgeon. PMID:22294940

  2. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs.

  3. Postoperative wound management after cleft lip surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztián; Mommaerts, Maurice Y

    2011-09-01

    Our aim was to describe the postoperative management and wound care protocol after primary cleft lip closure, as it has been used in the Bruges Cleft and Craniofacial Center at the supraregional teaching hospital AZ St. Jan, Bruges, between June 1, 1991, and July 1, 2009. The postoperative management and wound care included the use of a Logan bow, long-acting local anesthetic, elbow restraints, antibiotic therapy, crust removal with normal saline solution, and a special local wound ointment that was prepared at our center. During the last 19 years, 199 unilateral and 103 bilateral cleft lip patients have been repaired. 2.6% showed postoperative infection and/or dehiscence. One percent required readmission for reoperation. In 1.6%, inflammatory reaction was treated with oral antibiotics. The specific wound dressing ointment, as it is prepared in our department, could meet the requirements of primary wound management after cleft lip closure.

  4. Angiogenesis Is Induced and Wound Size Is Reduced by Electrical Stimulation in an Acute Wound Healing Model in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Sebastian, Anil; Giddings, Pamela; Colthurst, James; Whiteside, Sigrid; Morris, Julie; Nuccitelli, Richard; Pullar, Christine; Baguneid, Mo; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14). The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised), treated with ES (post-ES) and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control). Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p<0.001 respectively), surface area was reduced on days 10 (p = 0.001) and 14 (p<0.001) and wound diameter reduced on days 10 (p = 0.009) and 14 (p = 0.002). Blood flow increased significantly post-ES on D10 (p = 0.002) and 14 (p = 0.001). Angiogenic markers were up-regulated following ES application; protein analysis by IHC showed an increase (p<0.05) in VEGF-A expression by ES treatment on days 7, 10 and 14 (39%, 27% and 35% respectively) and PLGF expression on days 3 and 7 (40% on both days), compared to normal healing. Similarly, WB demonstrated an increase (p<0.05) in PLGF on days 7 and 14 (51% and 35% respectively). WB studies showed a significant increase of 30% (p>0.05) on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up

  5. [Wound management with enzyme alginogels : Expert consensus].

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Assenheimer, B; Augustin, M; Hämmerle, G; Läuchli, S; Pundt, B; Stern, G; Storck, M; Ulrich, C

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of modern wound management, such as the treatment of chronic wounds and their phase-specific handling, are demanding and require optimally adapted therapeutic measures. The principles of moist wound care as well as an adequate debridement have priority here. To support these necessary measures, different options are available, e.g., a new product group operating across several wound phases. A new treatment principle in modern wound management based on an expert consensus is presented. On the basis of clinical experience reports and published evidence, the current and new principles of wound treatment were discussed in a panel of experts and formulated as a consensus statement. Enzyme alginogels represent a combination of agents that allow phase-specific wound care. They exhibit autolytic, absorbent, and antimicrobial properties and simultaneously cover three components of wound management based on the TIME framework. Thus, according to the experts, they differ from other wound healing products and can be classified in a distinct product group. Clinical studies, as well as clinical experiences, provide evidence for the efficacy of enzyme alginogels. According to the experts, the potential of enzyme alginogels used considering the principles of moist wound care, comprises the three-fold effect (continuous and significantly simplified debridement, maintaining a moist wound environment and antimicrobial effect without cytotoxicity), the ease of use, and the flexible application. In addition, the flexibility of the product class regarding frequency of application, duration of treatment and combinability with secondary dressings, are of economic benefit in the health care sector.

  6. Extremity trauma, dressings, and wound infection: should every acute limb wound have a silver lining?

    PubMed

    Eardley, William G P; Watts, Sarah A; Clasper, Jon C

    2012-09-01

    The manner in which high-energy transfer limb injuries are dressed can alter the wound environment through manipulation of the bacterial burden, thus minimizing tissue degradation and influencing healing potential. Infection is the principal complication of such wounds, and antiseptic soaked gauze is accepted in early coverage of extremity wounds despite a lack of evidence to support this practice. There has been resurgence in the use of silver in acute wounds, through dressings manipulated to deliver sustained elemental silver to the wound interface. In vitro and in vivo experimentation of silver dressings are characterized however by methodological compromise, primarily through lack of similarity of models to the physiology of the healing wound. Results from in vitro studies caution against the use of silver because of evidence of cytotoxicity, but this is not reproduced in in vivo or clinical experimentation, leading to ambiguity. Review of silver dressing application in burns and chronic wound studies fails to support its use over other dressing systems. Similarly, evidence for the use of silver in acute limb wounds is lacking. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the use of silver dressings in acute wound care and highlights in particular the paucity of evidence regarding its routine use in extremity injury.

  7. Contemporary issues in facial gunshot wound management.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoav; Cole, Patrick; Hollier, Larry

    2008-03-01

    Facial gunshot wounds pose a significant challenge for reconstructive surgeons, particularly when composed of significant soft and bone tissue defects. Often the result of assault, accident, or suicide attempt, facial defects must be thoroughly evaluated to devise an appropriate tissue repair and replacement with the likely prospect of secondary revision. In the acute setting after injury, the primary concern is patient stabilization centered on advanced trauma life support. Thorough examination along with appropriate imaging is critical for identifying any existing defects. As opposed to past surgical management that advocated delayed definitive treatment using serial debridement, today's management favors the use of more immediate reconstruction. Recent improvements in microsurgical technique have shifted favor from local tissue advancement to distant free-flap transfers, which improve cosmesis and function. This has reduced the number of surgeries necessary to achieve reconstruction. Given the diversity and complexity of facial gunshot injuries, a systematic algorithm is essential to help manage the different stages of healing and to ensure that the best outcome is ultimately achieved.

  8. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  9. Wound Healing Angiogenesis: Innovations and Challenges in Acute and Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Formation of new blood vessels, by either angiogenesis or vasculogenesis, is critical for normal wound healing. Major processes in neovascularization include (i) growth-promoting or survival factors, (ii) proteolytic enzymes, (iii) activators of multiple differentiated and progenitor cell types, and (iv) permissible microenvironments. A central aim of wound healing research is to “convert” chronic, disease-impaired wounds into those that will heal. The problem Reduced ability to re-establish a blood supply to the injury site can ultimately lead to wound chronicity. Basic/Clinical Science Advances (1) Human fetal endothelial progenitor cells can stimulate wound revascularization and repair following injury, as demonstrated in a novel mouse model of diabetic ischemic healing. (2) Advances in bioengineering reveal exciting alternatives by which wound repair may be facilitated via the creation of vascularized microfluidic networks within organ constructs created ex vivo for wound implantation. (3) A “personalized” approach to regenerative medicine may be enabled by the identification of protein components present within individual wound beds, both chronic and acute. Clinical Care Relevance Despite the development of numerous therapies, impaired angiogenesis and wound chronicity remain significant healthcare problems. As such, innovations in enhancing wound revascularization would lead to significant advances in wound healing therapeutics and patient care. Conclusion Insights into endothelial progenitor cell biology together with developments in the field of tissue engineering and molecular diagnostics should not only further advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating wound repair but also offer innovative solutions to promote the healing of chronic and acute wounds in vivo. PMID:24527273

  10. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    PubMed

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  11. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient.

  12. The palliative management of fungating malignant wounds.

    PubMed

    Grocott, P

    2000-01-01

    This study focused on the palliative management of fungating malignant wounds and individual experiences of living with such a wound. Dressings were evaluated for the ability to contain these wounds and reduce their impact on daily life. The project extended to collaboration with industry for the development and evaluation of dressings designed to meet patient needs. A longitudinal multiple case study design was adopted. The methodology evolved through three principal phases: quasi-experimental design; emergent collaborative design; and emergent theory-driven evaluation. The radical departure from the initial approach was in response to the methodological problems encountered in a study of individuals with uncontrolled disease. A non-probability sampling plan was adopted, mainly because of the lack of homogeneity in the patient population; 45 participants were included. The length of time patients remained in the study depended on how long they lived. This ranged from a few days to more than two years. A sampling plan was, however, adopted for the data collection. The study had a dual focus: methodology, and the generation of explanations for dressing performance and the management of fungating wounds. The methodological aspect included development of the Teler system as a method of measuring dressing performance against goals of optimal practice in fungating wound management. The second component was a system of reasoning developed as an analytical strategy for abstracting general issues from individual case study data in order to construct explanations. Theory was used to generalize beyond the individual cases. Two forms of explanation for fungating wound management were constructed. These included explanations of individual experiences of living with such a wound and knowledge of the elements of fungating wound management. The impact on the individual was explained in terms of the stigma attached to public disability and a revulsion in society for uncontrolled

  13. Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Dini, Valentina; Oranges, Teresa; Rotella, Luca; Romanelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, burdensome, debilitating disease of the hair follicle. It presents with recurrent painful inflamed and noninflamed lesions usually in specific body areas such as axillary, inguinal, perineal, and genital areas. It is associated with a large range of other diseases and conditions, such as obesity, arthropathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and sqaumous cell carcinoma. Medical therapy may be systemic or topical, mainly based on antibiotics, retinoids, hormones and immunosuppressive drugs, including biological therapies. Surgical and laser therapies may be a valid therapeutic approach in order to treat locally recurring lesions. The aim of this article is to review the wound healing options after skin excision and laser treatments, with a focus on lesions left to heal by secondary intention, analyzing the efficacy of moist wound dressings, negative pressure wound therapy, bioactive dressings, such as platelet-rich plasma gel and hylarunoic acid scaffold, or autologous keratinocyte suspension in platelet concentrate and skin-grafting tecniques.

  14. The use of acellular, fetal bovine dermal matrix for acute, full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Chen, T Minsue; Nguyen, Tri H

    2008-08-01

    Skin substitutes may be used as part of the management of acute surgical wounds. The ideal skin substitute should be biocompatible, inexpensive, free of potential pathogens, easy to store, prepare, and utilize. To discuss the authors' direct clinical experience with an acellular, fetal bovine dermal matrix for the treatment of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) wound management. After the cutaneous malignancies were cleared by MMS, a sheet of the product was prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions, trimmed to fit the defect, and then secured to the wound to enhance contact with the wound bed. Between June 2006 and July 2007, the product was used on a total of 10 wounds in 7 patients. Comorbidities included organ transplantation, Sezary syndrome with hepatitis C, and graft-versus-host disease. Seventy percent of the lesions were located on the lower extremities. The average defect area was 13.4 cm2 (range: 4.0-32.0 cm2). The dermal substitute was fully incorporated in 80% of defects and those that did not fully incorporate had exposed bone and tendon without the periosteum and peritendon, respectively. Skin substitutes may provide temporary coverage of acute, full-thickness surgical wounds allowed to heal by second intent. They may facilitate wound management with acceptable aesthetic outcomes. Alternate reconstructive options, however, such as cutaneous flaps, should be considered when there is exposed bone and/or tendon without their periosteum and/or peritendon.

  15. [Wound management for cuts and lacerations].

    PubMed

    Kluwe, Wolfram

    2015-02-01

    Skin cuts and lacerations are frequent injuries. A perfect result of the treatment is going without saying for the patient and its relatives. But there are some aspects to note for an adequate wound management. The main aims of wound management are clear: assist in hemostasis, to avoid infection and pain, and to ensure an esthetically pleasing scar. For these we have to treat not only the wound. Taking care for the hole patient and treating the sore pain and preventing painfull manipulations is the goal for the patients satisfaction. The basic aspects of wound healing and wound management will be described. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be also more cost-effective. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. Please do not forget in every case to ask for the tetanus immunization and to think about an antibiotic therapy in case of human or animal bites and for wounds in risk areas and with contamination.

  16. Wound management should not be a pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, June; Williams, Heather

    2017-09-01

    Pain is a complex sensation with a variety of qualities rather than a single sensation varying in intensity. People find it difficult to describe their pain mainly because its nature and intensity vary so much, not only between individuals but also for a person over time. This article provides an overview of wound pain, its causes and assessment, with a focus on the procedure of dressing change itself. The wound care industry has manufactured dressings to assist in reducing the pain experience and it is incumbent on health care professionals to make the most appropriate dressing selection for the individual patient and wound, rather than a 'one type of dressing fits all' approach. The choice of primary product is important and is the aspect of focus for this discussion. This paper discusses the use of Flaminal (an enzyme alginogel) to assist practitioners in managing painful wounds.

  17. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.

  18. Acute and chronic wound fluids influence keratinocyte function differently.

    PubMed

    Thamm, Oliver C; Koenen, Paola; Bader, Nicola; Schneider, Alina; Wutzler, Sebastian; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Spanholtz, Timo A

    2015-04-01

    Wound healing requires a proper functioning of keratinocytes that migrate, proliferate and lead to a competent wound closure. Impaired wound healing might be due to a disturbed keratinocyte function caused by the wound environment. Basically, chronic wound fluid (CWF) differs from acute wound fluid (AWF). The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of AWF and CWF on keratinocyte function. We therefore investigated keratinocyte migration and proliferation under the influence of AWF and CWF using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] test and scratch assay. We further measured the gene expression by qRT-PCR regarding growth factors and matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in regeneration processes. AWF had a positive impact on keratinocyte proliferation over time, whereas CWF had an anti-proliferative effect. Keratinocyte migration was significantly impaired by CWF in contrast to an undisturbed wound closure under the influence of AWF. MMP-9 expression was strongly upregulated by CWF compared with AWF. Keratinocyte function was significantly impaired by CWF. An excessive induction of MMP-9 by CWF might lead to a permanent degradation of extracellular matrix and thereby prevent wounds from healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of an off-the-shelf mobile telemedicine model in emergency department wound assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Van Dillen, Christine; Silvestri, Salvatore; Haney, Marisa; Ralls, George; Zuver, Christian; Freeman, Dave; Diaz, Lissa; Papa, Linda

    2013-02-01

    We examined the agreement between a videoconference-based evaluation and a bedside evaluation in the management of acute traumatic wounds in an emergency department. Adult and paediatric patients with acute wounds of various severities to the face, trunk and/or extremities presenting to the emergency department within 24 hours of injury were enrolled. Research assistants transmitted video images of the wound to an emergency physician using a laptop computer. The physician completed a standard wound assessment form before conducting a bedside evaluation and then completing a second assessment form. The primary outcome measure was wound length and depth. We also assessed management decision-making. A total of 173 wounds were evaluated. The correlation coefficient between video and bedside assessments was 0.96 for wound length. The mean difference between the lengths was 0.02 cm (SD 0.91). Management of the wound would have been the same in 94% of cases. The agreement on wound characteristics and wound management ranged from 84-100%. The highest correlation was 0.92 in suture material used and the lowest correlation was 0.64 in wound type. The ability of video images to distinguish between a minor and non-minor wound, and predicting the need for hospital management, had high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. The study showed that wound characteristics and management decisions appear to correlate well between video and bedside evaluations.

  20. Hydrogel Dressings for Advanced Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Francesko, Antonio; Petkova, Petya; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2017-09-20

    Composed in a large extent of water and due to their non-adhesiveness, hydrogels found their way to the wound dressing market as materials that provide a moisture environment for healing while being comfortable to the patient. Hydrogels' exploitation is constantly increasing after evidences of their even broader therapeutic potential due to resemblance to dermal tissue and ability to induce partial skin regeneration. The innovation in advanced wound care is further directed to the development of so-called active dressings, where hydrogels are combined with components that enhance the primary purpose of providing a beneficial environment for wound healing. The aim of this mini-review is to concisely describe the relevance of hydrogel dressings as platforms for delivery of active molecules for improved management of difficult-to-treat wounds. The emphasis is on the most recent advances in development of stimuli-responsive hydrogels, which allow for control over wound healing efficiency in response to different external modalities. Novel strategies for monitoring of the wound status and healing progress based on incorporation of sensor molecules into the hydrogel platforms are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-09-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds.

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies. Recent Advances: Encouraged by the results of NPWT in noncombat-related wounds, the military surgeons during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom used this novel method in a large percentage of combat wounds, with gratifying results. The mechanism of NPWT in wound healing is multifactorial and often complex reconstructive procedure can be avoided in a combat trauma setting. Critical Issues: Wounds sustained in military trauma are heavily contaminated with dirt, patient clothing, and frequently associated with extensive soft tissue loss and osseous destruction. Delay in evacuation during an ongoing conflict carries the risk of systemic infection. Early debridement is indicated followed by delayed closure of wounds. NPWT helps to provide temporary wound cover during the interim period of debridement and wound closure. Future Directions: Future area of research in combat wounds is related to abdominal trauma with loss of abdominal wall. The concept of negative pressure incisional management system in patients with a high risk of wound breakdown following surgery is under review, and may be of relevance in combat wounds. PMID:27679749

  3. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in the Exotic Pets

    PubMed Central

    Mickelson, Megan A.; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regards to the animal’s temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency towards secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately impact wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that impact healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  4. Quality of measurements of acute surgical and traumatic wounds using a digital wound-analysing tool.

    PubMed

    Landa, Dymmie Lc; van Dishoeck, Anne-Margreet; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Hovius, Steven Er

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of measurements using a wound-analysing tool and their interpretability. Wound surface areas and tissue types, such as granulation, slough and necrosis, in twenty digital photographs were measured using a specific software program. The ratio of these tissue types in a wound was calculated using a wound profile. We calculated the intraclass coefficient or κ for reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC). The inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0·99 for surface area, 0·76 for granulation, 0·67 for slough and 0·22 for necrosis. The profiles gave an overall κ of 0·16. For test-retest reliability, the ICC was 0·99 for surface area, 0·81 for granulation, 0·80 for slough and 0·97 for necrosis. The agreement of the applied profiles in the test-retest was 66% (40-100). SEM and SDC for surface area were 0·10/0·27; for granulation, 6·88/19·08; for slough, 7·17/19·87; and for necrosis, 0·35/0·98, respectively. Measuring wound surface area and tissue types by means of digital photo analysis is a reliable and applicable method for monitoring wound healing in acute wounds in daily practice as well as in research.

  5. [Definition and management of wound infections].

    PubMed

    Maier, S; Körner, P; Diedrich, S; Kramer, A; Heidecke, C-D

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) in the postoperative period represent the sword of Damocles in surgery. In spite of the medical progress in recent years these infections cannot always be avoided and occur in 25% of all nosocomial infections in Germany. They also generate up to 50% of the required costs in this context. The consequences vary from extended duration of hospitalization to elevated mortality. The degree of contamination of surgical wounds is of great importance as well as the patient's immune status and comorbidities. Prevention of infected surgical wounds is essential and important measures should begin even prior to the surgical procedure. In addition, during and following the surgical procedure several standards have to be followed. Rapid confirmation of diagnosis and correct management of surgical site infections are essential for the course of the disease. This study provides information on development, prevention and therapy of surgically infected wounds.

  6. Limb wounding and antisepsis: iodine and chlorhexidine in the early management of extremity injury.

    PubMed

    Eardley, William G P; Watts, Sarah A; Clasper, Jon C

    2012-09-01

    Extremity injury and contamination as consequence are features of high-energy wounding. A leading cause of disability and the commonest cause of late complications, prevention of wound infection determines the ultimate outcome in these populations. Multiple variables influence the development of infection, one of which is the dressing used on the wound. Antiseptic-soaked gauze dressings feature in the early management of limb trauma despite a lack of evidence to support this. Iodine and chlorhexidine are ubiquitous in other aspects of health care however, and a plethora of studies detail their role in skin antisepsis, the recommendations from which are often anecdotally applied to acute wounding. To contextualize the role for antiseptic dressing use in acute, significant limb injury this review explores the evidence for the use of chlorhexidine and iodine in skin antisepsis. The paucity of experimental data available for antiseptic use in early wound management and the need for further research to address this evidence void is highlighted.

  7. A review of negative-pressure wound therapy in the management of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Kantak, Neelesh A; Mistry, Riyam; Halvorson, Eric G

    2016-12-01

    Negative pressure has been employed in various aspects of burn care and the aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for each of those uses. The PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were queried for articles in the following areas: negative pressure as a dressing for acute burns, intermediate treatment prior to skin grafting, bolster for skin autografts, dressing for integration of dermal substitutes, dressing for skin graft donor sites, and integrated dressing in large burns. Fifteen studies met our inclusion criteria. One study showed negative pressure wound therapy improved perfusion in acute partial-thickness burns, 8 out of 9 studies showed benefits when used as a skin graft bolster dressing, 1 out of 2 studies showed improved rate of revascularization when used over dermal substitutes, and 1 study showed increased rate of re-epithelialization when used over skin graft donor sites. Negative pressure can improve autograft take when used as a bolster dressing. There is limited data to suggest that it may also improve the rate of revascularization of dermal substitutes and promote re-epithelialization of skin graft donor sites. Other uses suggested by studies that did not meet our inclusion criteria include improving vascularity in acute partial-thickness burns and as an integrated dressing for the management of large burns. Further studies are warranted for most clinical applications to establish negative pressure as an effective adjunct in burn wound care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Painful dressing changes for chronic wounds: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Solowiej, Kazia; Upton, Dominic

    Wound pain can arise from the wound itself, continuing wound treatment and anticipatory pain, which occurs in some patients as a consequence of negative experiences of care. Specifically, pain caused by the removal and application of dressings has been identified as a major contributor to wound pain, from both patient and health professional perspectives. This article reviews literature on the impact of pain at dressing change, and provides practical suggestions for assessment and management of pain during wound care.

  9. Evolution or revolution? Adapting to complexity in wound management.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith; Gray, David; Timmons, John; Hurd, Theresa

    2007-06-01

    Wound clinics are seeing an increase in the number of 'complex' wounds, which arise as the result of the interaction between multiple coexisting systemic pathologies, environmental factors and local wound factors. These complex wounds require an approach to diagnosis and management that can encapsulate all these factors. Unified wound assessment approaches such as HEIDI (History, Examination, Investigations, Diagnosis and management plan), wound bed preparation and applied wound management systems are essential to reach a definitive diagnosis and to ensure that management is agreed between the various clinical specialities that may be involved. A series of case histories is presented that illustrate the benefits of a unified approach to wound management. Results of a study into the cost-effectiveness of an improved foam dressing are presented, and the problems of demonstrating the ability to make long-term savings through short-term expenditure are discussed.

  10. Clinical use of polihexanide on acute and chronic wounds for antisepsis and decontamination.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, T; Assadian, O

    2010-01-01

    Polihexanide is an antimicrobial compound suitable for clinical use in critically colonized or infected acute and chronic wounds. Its beneficial characteristic is attributable particularly to its broad antimicrobial spectrum, good cell and tissue tolerability, ability to bind to the organic matrix, low risk of contact sensitization, and wound healing promoting effect. In addition, no development of microorganism resistance during polihexanide use has been detected to date, nor does this risk appear imminent. The aim of therapy using polihexanide is to reduce the pathogen burden in a critically colonized or infected acute or chronic wound. An increasing number of articles on the subject of wound antisepsis with polihexanide can be found in the medical literature. However, there is still little published information on the practical use of polihexanide-containing wound antiseptics. The purpose of this review article is to describe the handling and the different possibilities of use of polihexanide-containing preparations, including the currently approved indications, contraindications and reservations. The use of polihexanide is not the only therapeutic option in management of wounds; therefore, priority is also given to prior surgical debridement and clarification of the cause of the underlying disease, including appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of

  12. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  13. Clinical acceptability of a dressing with matrix technology: a multisite evaluation of acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, J; Potter, R

    2016-08-01

    This article will describe the findings of an evaluation on the performance and clinical acceptability of Urgotul Absorb Border (Urgo Medical), a silicone border adhesive foam dressing containing technology lipidocolloid (TLC) healing matrix technology, as either a primary or secondary dressing in the management of acute and chronic wounds in a multisite evaluation. The purpose of the evaluation was to establish the effectiveness of the silicone border dressing for managing exudate, ease of use, patient comfort and acceptability of the clinician for the dressing to meet with treatment objectives Method: The patient experiences given through verbal or written feedback were also documented. Local Health Board evaluation forms were used to capture data and the authors of this article created a data evaluation tool to collate and subsequently report all study findings. A total of 100 patients with wounds considered suitable for the application of the dressing were selected to take part in the study. In less than a four week period, 38 patients achieved wound healing with a further 36 patients demonstrating wound improvements within the same time period. The dressing was found to have met both the clinicians and patients aims when used as either a primary or secondary dressing and was considered suitable for use in both acute and chronic wounds of varying duration.

  14. Negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James T; Marks, Malcolm W

    2007-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has become an increasingly important part of wound management. Over the last decade, numerous uses for this method of wound management have been reported, ranging from acute and chronic wounds, to closure of open sternal and abdominal wounds, to assistance with skin grafts. The biophysics behind the success of this treatment largely have focused on increased wound blood flow, increased granulation tissue formation, decreased bacterial counts, and stimulation of wound healing pathways through shear stress mechanisms. The overall success of negative pressure wound therapy has led to a multitude of clinical applications, which are discussed in this article.

  15. Aloe vera for treating acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Dat, Anthony D; Poon, Flora; Pham, Kim B T; Doust, Jenny

    2012-02-15

    Aloe vera is a cactus-like perennial succulent belonging to the Liliaceae Family that is commonly grown in tropical climates. Animal studies have suggested that Aloe vera may help accelerate the wound healing process. To determine the effects of Aloe vera-derived products (for example dressings and topical gels) on the healing of acute wounds (for example lacerations, surgical incisions and burns) and chronic wounds (for example infected wounds, arterial and venous ulcers). We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (9 September 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (2005 to August Week 5 2011), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 September 2011), Ovid EMBASE (2007 to 2010 Week 35), Ovid AMED (1985 to September 2011) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 9 September 2011). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We included all randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of Aloe vera, aloe-derived products and a combination of Aloe vera and other dressings as a treatment for acute or chronic wounds. There was no restriction in terms of source, date of publication or language. An objective measure of wound healing (either proportion of completely healed wounds or time to complete healing) was the primary endpoint. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment, checked by a third review author. Seven trials were eligible for inclusion, comprising a total of 347 participants. Five trials in people with acute wounds evaluated the effects of Aloe vera on burns, haemorrhoidectomy patients and skin biopsies. Aloe vera mucilage did not increase burn healing compared with silver sulfadiazine (risk ratio (RR) 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 2.85). A reduction in healing time with Aloe vera was noted after haemorrhoidectomy (RR 16.33 days, 95% CI 3.46 to 77.15) and there was

  16. Situating wound management: technoscience, dressings and 'other' skins.

    PubMed

    Rudge, T

    1999-09-01

    This paper addresses the notion of wound care as a technology of skin and other skins imbued with the combined power of technology and science. It presents the discourses of wound care evident in the accounts of patients and nurses concerning this care, and discussions about wounds in wound care interest groups, journals, and advertising material about wound care products. The discussion focuses on wounds and wound dressings as effects immanent in the power relations of discourses of wound care. These effects colour and influence nurses' responses to wounds and wound care products. Moreover, the discourses that portray these practices are evidence of the complex articulation between technoscience and gender. Nurses and patients are fascinated by wound technoscience and lured towards it by its potential for mastery and control over wounds. Such seductions are evident in the texts of nurses, patients, and pharmaceutical advertisements for wound care products. Finally, the ways that these representations are used to talk about and market wound care products are shown as exemplifying the finer points of wound management as a nursing technoscience.

  17. Acticoat™ stimulates inflammation, but does not delay healing, in acute full-thickness excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Carol A; Rode, Heinz; Kramer, Beverley

    2016-12-01

    Acticoat™ has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects which aid wound healing. However, in vitro studies indicate that Acticoat™ is cytotoxic and clinical and in vivo studies suggest that it may delay healing in acute wounds. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of Acticoat™ on healing in acute full-thickness excisional wounds. Using a porcine model, healing was assessed on days 3, 6, 9 and 15 post-wounding. Five wounds dressed with Acticoat™ and five wounds dressed with polyurethane film (control) were assessed per day (n = 40 wounds). The rate of healing, inflammatory response, restoration of the epithelium and blood vessel and collagen formation were evaluated. No difference was found in the rate of healing between wounds treated with Acticoat™ and the control wounds. Inflammation was increased in Acticoat™-treated wounds on day 3 post-wounding compared to the control wounds. However, by day 15 post-wounding, the epithelium of the Acticoat™-treated wounds closely resembled normal epithelium. Acticoat™-treated wounds also contained a higher proportion of mature blood vessels, and differences in collagen deposition were apparent. Despite inducing an inflammatory response, Acticoat™ did not delay healing in acute wounds. Conversely, the improved quality of the epithelium and blood vessels within Acticoat™-treated wounds indicates that Acticoat™ has a beneficial effect on healing. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluating and managing open skin wounds: colonization versus infection.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Annette B

    2002-08-01

    Open skin wounds are colonized with bacteria, and optimal wound care is required to prevent progression to infection. Intact skin normally provides protection from external environmental assaults. Disruption of the skin or tissue creating an open skin wound can result in infection, dehydration, hypothermia, scarring, compromised immunity, and changes in body image. Biofilms and bacterial genomics are areas of intense scientific investigation in the face of the emerging threat of bacterial resistance. Optimal wound care to prevent progression from colonization to infection remains the foundation of good clinical practice. On the basis of wound conditions, cleansing, debridement, measures to increase oxygenation and perfusion, adequate nutrition, and appropriate use of topical agents and antibiotics, when indicated, are the keys to managing open skin wounds. This article provides a targeted review of normal skin flora, wound healing, prevention of skin infection, colonization versus infection, biofilms, genomics and infectious disease, and management of open skin wounds.

  19. [Precise management of extraordinary agent wound by establishment of a multidisciplinary cooperation mechanism].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    With the development of social economy, people's lifestyle has changed accompanied with the problem of population aging. The spectrum of disease also varied accordingly, thus led to complicated and varied wound aetiology, along with the formation of innumerably changed acute and chronic wounds. Therefore, it is hard to meet the requirement of multidisciplinary knowledge and technique in the diagnosis and treatment of some extraordinary agent wound with a single discipline. The extraordinary agent wound is caused by some uncommon or rare etiological factors, the specialty of which lays on the unique mechanism of wound formation, and a lot of disciplines were involved in the diagnosis and management of the wound. A unification of multiple disciplines is needed to integrate the relevant theory and technique to care the wound by giving consideration of the symptom and the aetiology. The primary diseases which induced the uncommon agent wound should be targeted and treated effectively; meanwhile, a comprehensive treatment combined with multiple new wound management techniques should be carried out to realize the objective of precise treatment.

  20. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  1. [Nursing management of wound care pain].

    PubMed

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2007-06-01

    Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject.

  2. Trauma and wound management: gunshot wounds in horses.

    PubMed

    Munsterman, Amelia S; Hanson, R Reid

    2014-08-01

    Bullet wounds in horses can cause a wide array of injuries, determined by the type of projectile, the energy of the bullet on entry, and the type of tissue the bullet encounters. Treatment includes identification of all structures involved, debridement of the permanent cavity, and establishing adequate drainage. Bullet wounds should be treated as contaminated, and broad-spectrum antibiotics, including those with an anaerobic spectrum, are indicated. Although musculoskeletal injuries resulting from gunshots are most common in horses, they carry a good prognosis for survival and return to function.

  3. Skin stretching for primary closure of acute burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Pauline D H M; Bloemen, Monica C T; van der Wal, Martijn B A; Vloemans, Adrianus F P M; Tempelman, Fenike R H; Beerthuizen, Gerard I J M; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2014-12-01

    In burn care, a well-acknowledged problem is the suboptimal scar outcome from skin grafted burn wounds. With the aim of improving this, we focused on a new technique: excision of the burn wound followed by primary closure, thereby using a skin-stretching device to stretch the adjacent healthy skin. The short- and long-term effect of Skin Stretch was compared to split skin grafting (SSG) in a randomized controlled trial. Patients with burn wounds were randomized for SSG or primary wound closure using Skin Stretch. Follow-up was performed at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. The scar surface area was calculated and the scar quality was assessed, using subjective and objective measurement methods. No significant differences between the SSG and the Skin Stretch group were found for scar surface area. In the Skin Stretch group, a significant reduction of the surface area from 65.4cm(2) (13.6-129.1) to 13.4cm(2) (3.0-36.6) was found at 3 months (p=0.028) and at 12 months postoperatively (65.4cm(2) (13.6-129.1) to 33.0cm(2) (8.9-63.7), p=0.046, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). Skin Stretch for primary closure of acute burn wounds is a suitable technique and can be considered for specific circumscript full-thickness burn wounds. However, future research should be performed to provide additional scientific evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring the prevalence and management of wounds in an urban area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Julie Jordan; Moore, Zena; Connolly, Bernie; Concannon, Fiona; McLain, Niamh; Strapp, Helen; Wilson, Pauline

    2016-03-01

    This study explores the prevalence and management of wounds within an urban setting in Ireland. It employs a cross-sectional survey design, using a predesigned, validated data-collection instrument. The point prevalence of wounds was 3.7% (n=445), with surgical wounds being the most prevalent (43%; n=189). Wound care was provided across a wide variety of clinical settings, with the majority of patients (60%; n=271) managed in the acute care setting. Most dressings were changed 2-3 times a week (60%; n=271). The mean dressing time was 15 minutes (SD: 12.4 minutes), varying from 2 minutes to 90 minutes. The mean nurse travel time was 3 minutes (SD: 6.5 minutes), varying from 0-60 minutes. Among participants managed using silver and iodine dressings, 53% (n=10, silver) and 78% (n=50, iodine) were prescribed for wounds described as being not infected. Alginate dressings were used incorrectly in 75% of cases, foam dressings in 63% of cases and Hydrofiber dressings in 63% of cases. Wound management within the explored geographical area is an important clinical intervention. This study identified areas of practice that need to be addressed, primarily those related to the topical management of the wound and use of offloading. The data has been used to inform practice, education, and further research in this important clinical specialty.

  5. Management of small fragment wounds in war: current research.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Rice, P

    1995-03-01

    The majority of war wounds are caused by antipersonnel fragments from munitions such as mortars and bomblets. Modern munitions aim to incapacitate soldiers with multiple wounds from very small fragments of low available kinetic energy. Many of these fragments may be stopped by helmets and body armour and this has led to a predominance of multiple wounds to limbs in those casualties requiring surgery. The development of an appropriate management strategy for these multiple wounds requires knowledge of the contamination and extent of soft tissue injury; conservative management may be appropriate. The extent of skin and muscle damage associated with a small fragment wound, the way in which these wounds may progress without intervention and their colonisation by bacteria has been determined in an experimental animal model. Results from 12 animals are presented. There was a very small (approximately 1 mm) margin of nonviable skin around the entrance wound. The amount of devitalised muscle in the wound tract was a few hundred milligrams. Some muscles peripheral to the wound track also showed signs of damage 1 h after wounding, but this improved over 24 h; the proportion of fragmented muscle fibres in the tissue around the track decreased as time went on. There was no clinical sign or bacteriological evidence of the track becoming infected up to 24 h after wounding. This preliminary work suggests that, in the absence of infection, the amount of muscle damage caused by small fragment wounds begins to resolve in the first 24 h after injury, even without surgical intervention.

  6. Wound infection: a clinician's guide to assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2013-09-01

    Wound infection significantly increases the cost of wound care and has significant detrimental effects on patients' quality of life. It is imperative that all health-care professionals are able to promptly recognise and assess for wound infection and initiate effective management. Clinicians must be able to recognise the different levels of bacterial bioburden and to act accordingly. This article provides clear guidance for recognising an infected wound, understanding the different levels of wound bioburden and practical guidance on different forms and appropriateness of antimicrobial agents.

  7. [General principles of wound management in emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Zacher, M T; Högele, A M; Hanschen, M; von Matthey, F; Beer, A-K; Gebhardt, F; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2016-04-01

    Wound management is one of the major tasks in emergency departments. The surrounding intact skin but not the wound itself should be disinfected before starting definitive wound treatment. Hair should first be removed by clipping to 1-2 mm above the skin with scissors or clippers as shaving the area with a razor damages the hair follicles and increases the risk of wound infections. Administration of local anesthetics should be performed directly through the exposed edges of the wound. After wound examination, irrigation is performed with Ringer's solution, normal saline or distilled water. The next step is débridement of contaminated and devitalized tissue. There are several wound closure techniques available, including adhesive tapes, staples, tissue adhesives and numerous forms of sutures. Management of specific wounds requires particular strategies. A bleeding control problem frequently occurs with scalp lacerations. Superficial scalp lacerations can be closed by alternative wound closure methods, for example by twisting and fixing hair and the use of tissue adhesives, i.e. hair apposition technique (HAT). For strongly bleeding lacerations of the scalp, the epicranial aponeurosis should be incorporated into the hemostasis. Aftercare varies depending on both the characteristics of the wound and those of the patient and includes adequate analgesia as well as minimizing the risk of infection. Sufficient wound aftercare starts with the treating physician informing the patient about the course of events, potential complications and providing relevant instructions.

  8. [Use of hyperbaric oxygenation for wound management].

    PubMed

    Berner, Juan Enrique; Vidal, Pedro; Will, Patrick; Castillo, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation consists in exposing patients to increased gas pressures while inhaling pure oxygen. It involves the use of hyperbaric chambers that can double or triple gas pressure inside them. Hyperbaric oxygenation may be useful in different clinical situations, but mostly for the treatment of decompression syndrome. In the last decades, it has been used for the management of different kinds of wounds. Hyperbaric oxygenation not only increases the delivery of oxygen to damaged tissues, but also stimulates angiogenesis, collagen synthesis, stem cell migration and local immune response. Clinical trials that have addressed the use of hyperbaric oxygenation are difficult to compare due to their heterogeneity in terms of experimental design, kind of injuries involved and assessment of outcome. Even though, most studies support the concept that hyperbaric oxygenation accelerates the healing process.

  9. Topical treatments in equine wound management.

    PubMed

    Dart, Andrew J; Dowling, Brad A; Smith, Christine L

    2005-04-01

    Wound repair is a complex series of coordinated events regulated by a delicately orchestrated cascade of cytokines and growth factors that restore the structural integrity of damaged tissue. Manipulation of the growth factor profile or wound environment through topical application of therapeutic agents could positively influence the rate and quality of wound repair. Transforming growth factor-beta,platelet-rich plasma, activated macrophage supernatant, and growth hormone are sources of mediators that may facilitate wound healing. Solcoseryl, ketanserin, tripeptide- and tetrapeptide-copper complexes, maltodextrin, live yeast cell derivative, corticosteroids,aloe vera, acemannan, phenytoin, honey, sugar, and maggots may modify the wound environment and promote repair. The process of wound healing is complex, however, and it is currently unknown whether any one agent can ameliorate all issues of repair or cover all vulnerabilities of impaired wound healing.

  10. Wound healing: an overview of acute, fibrotic and delayed healing.

    PubMed

    Diegelmann, Robert F; Evans, Melissa C

    2004-01-01

    Acute wounds normally heal in a very orderly and efficient manner characterized by four distinct, but overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Specific biological markers characterize healing of acute wounds. Likewise, unique biologic markers also characterize pathologic responses resulting in fibrosis and chronic non-healing ulcers. This review describes the major biological processes associated with both normal and pathologic healing. The normal healing response begins the moment the tissue is injured. As the blood components spill into the site of injury, the platelets come into contact with exposed collagen and other elements of the extracellular matrix. This contact triggers the platelets to release clotting factors as well as essential growth factors and cytokines such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Following hemostasis, the neutrophils then enter the wound site and begin the critical task of phagocytosis to remove foreign materials, bacteria and damaged tissue. As part of this inflammatory phase, the macrophages appear and continue the process of phagocytosis as well as releasing more PDGF and TGF beta. Once the wound site is cleaned out, fibroblasts migrate in to begin the proliferative phase and deposit new extracellular matrix. The new collagen matrix then becomes cross-linked and organized during the final remodeling phase. In order for this efficient and highly controlled repair process to take place, there are numerous cell-signaling events that are required. In pathologic conditions such as non-healing pressure ulcers, this efficient and orderly process is lost and the ulcers are locked into a state of chronic inflammation characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration with associated reactive oxygen species and destructive enzymes. Healing proceeds only after the inflammation is controlled. On the opposite end of the spectrum, fibrosis is characterized by

  11. Fluorescence Technology for Point of Care Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Ersilia L; Falola, Reuben A; Kim, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    As the prevalence of chronic wounds continues to rise, the need for point of care wound assessment has also increased. While a variety of technologies have been developed to improve diagnostic abilities and monitoring of wounds, none have proven completely effective in all settings. Further, many of the stalwart wound management techniques remain costly, time consuming, and technically challenging. The two key pivotal events of ischemia and infection can lead to limb loss. A relatively new crop of fluorescence-based technologies, including devices that measure pathogenic auto-fluorescence, fluorescence angiography, or map cutaneous oxygenation, are increasingly being utilized for adjunct wound assessment-both clinical and operative settings can address these events. These technologies offer rapid, efficient, visual, and quantitative data that can aid the wound provider in evaluating the viability of tissues, ensuring adequate perfusion, and optimizing wound bed preparation. In the following review, pathogenic auto-fluorescence is compared to gross evaluation of wound infection and culture based diagnostics, indocyanine green fluorescence angiography is compared to various methods of visual and physical assessments of tissue perfusion by the practitioner, and cutaneous oxygenation is compared to clinical signs of ischemia. We focus on the current applications of fluorescence technologies in wound management, with emphasis placed on the evidence for clinical and operative implementation, a safety analyses, procedural limitations, and the future direction of this growing field of wound assessment.

  12. The use of mobile phones for acute wound care: attitudes and opinions of emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Neal; Carlin, Katrina N; Pines, Jesse; Pirri, Michael; Strauss, Ryan; Rahimi, Faisil

    2012-01-01

    There are a significant number of emergency department (ED) visits for lacerations each year. When individuals experience skin, soft tissue, or laceration symptoms, the decision to go to the ED is not always easy on the basis of the level of severity. For such cases, it may be feasible to use a mobile phone camera to submit images of their wound to a remote medical provider who can review and help guide their care choice decisions. The authors aimed to assess patient attitudes toward the use of mobile phone technology for laceration management. Patients presenting to an urban ED for initial care and follow-up visits for lacerations were prospectively enrolled. A total of 194 patients were enrolled over 8 months. Enrolled patients answered a series of questions about their injury and a survey on attitudes about the acceptability of making management decisions using mobile phone images only. A majority of those surveyed agreed that it was acceptable to send a mobile phone picture to a physician for a recommendation and diagnosis. Patients also reported few concerns regarding privacy and security and believe that this technology could be cost effective and convenient. In this study, the majority of patients had favorable opinions of using mobile phones for laceration care. Mobile phone camera images (a) may provide a useful modality for assessment of some acute wound care needs and (b) may decrease ED visits for a high-volume complaint such as acute wounds.

  13. Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

  14. Cytocompatible Anti-microbial Dressings of Syzygium cumini Cellulose Nanocrystals Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles Accelerate Acute and Diabetic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Singla, Rubbel; Soni, Sourabh; Patial, Vikram; Kulurkar, Pankaj Markand; Kumari, Avnesh; S, Mahesh; Padwad, Yogendra S; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-09-05

    The ever increasing incidences of non-healing skin wounds have paved way for many efforts on the convoluted process of wound healing. Unfortunately, the lack of relevance and success of modern wound dressings in healing of acute and diabetic wounds still remains a matter of huge concern. Here, an in situ three step approach was embraced for the development of nanocomposite (NCs) dressings by impregnating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) onto a matrix of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) isolated from Syzygium cumini leaves using an environmental friendly approach. Topical application of NCs (ointments and strips) on acute and diabetic wounds of mice documented enhanced tissue repair (~99% wound closure) via decrease in inflammation; increase in angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and rate of neo-epithelialization that ultimately led to formation of aesthetically sound skin in lesser time than controls. Due to the synergistic action of CNCs (having high water uptake capacity) and AgNPs (anti-microbial agents), NCs tend to increase the expression of essential growth factors (FGF, PDGF and VEGF) and collagen while decreasing the pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) at the same time, thus accelerating healing. The results suggested the potential of these developed anti-microbial, cytocompatible and nanoporous NCs having optimized AgNPs concentration as ideal dressings for effective wound management.

  15. In vivo performance of chitosan/soy-based membranes as wound-dressing devices for acute skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tírcia C; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P; Silva, Simone S; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Mano, João F; Castro, António G; Reis, Rui L; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-04-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard(®)-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance-thus, valuable properties for wound dressings.

  16. Beneficial effects of honey dressings in wound management.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Ailsa

    Honey was commonly used to treat wounds until the introduction of antibiotics. However, increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria mean that alternative treatment options, such as honey, are receiving renewed interest. This article provides an overview of the use of honey in wound management and reviews the evidence to support its effectiveness.

  17. What is important to patients in wound management.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Helen; Crouch, Robert; Lowe, Kate

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic wounds are a common reason for patients to attend emergency departments. There are many ways of managing these wounds from glue to suturing. The authors conducted a patient survey to identify the outcome measures most important to patients after closure of traumatic wounds. The results showed that having the least chance of infection was the most important outcome, followed by being looked after by caring staff and a quick recovery. These finding were consistent regardless of the anatomical location of the wound or age of the patient. This information is being used to guide the authors in the most appropriate outcome measures for further research.

  18. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation. A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years. From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds. The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided. PMID:26554805

  19. [Management of wound infection after spinal operation].

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Zhong-Jun

    2005-02-15

    To elucidate the treatment of wound infection after spinal operation. Thirty-six cases of wound infection after spinal operation were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen cases had debridement and dressing changing, 20 cases had debridement and irrigation-suction system. Thirty-four cases had wound healed and 2 case dead of septicemia. Irrigation-suction had better result than that of only debridement. Among the 11 cases of internal fixation, 9 cases reserved the implants. (1) Wound infection after spinal operation is a serious postoperative complication and should be treated carefully; (2) Nutrition support, reasonable antibiotic and irrigation-suction are effective methods; (3) When wound infection occurs, removing the implants out is not indispensible.

  20. Emergency Department Wounds Managed by Combat Medics: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A

    2017-03-01

    Combat medics are an integral part of their unit helping to conserve the fighting strength. Minor wounds are a common problem in the deployed settings that affect a soldier's ability to partake in operations. While the medics often manage wound care, there is very little data on the outcomes. Cases were acquired as part of a quality assurance project providing training feedback to medics on wound management. Laceration management is delegated to the medic at the direction of the provider. Follow-up included a series of short questions regarding wound outcomes: infection, revision, and cosmetic outcome (extremely satisfied = 1, unsatisfied = 5). Chart review was used when direct follow-up with the patient was not available for the remainder of the wounds. The project period was from May 2014 to June 2015. During this time there were 30 wound repairs documented. Direct contact follow-up was available for 57% of the encounters, the remainder was via chart review. The location of the wounds were as follows: facial 5, head/neck 0, upper extremity (excluding hand) 3, hand 16, lower extremity 5, and trunk 1. The average wound length was 2.98 cm (range, 0.8-8.0 cm). No wounds became infected. No wounds required revision. The average cosmetic rating was 1.8 (95% confidence interval = 1.48-2.12). In this series of wounds closed by medics in the emergency department no complications or revisions were necessary. Further research is needed to determine if this can be extrapolated to other military settings. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Topical therapies and antimicrobials in the management of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Honari, Shari

    2004-03-01

    With new technologies and techniques, the practice of treating burn patients has become increasingly specialized. A thorough understanding of the properties of topical wound product choices and nursing management of the dressing therapy is essential.

  2. Management of Hard Tissue Avulsive Wounds and Management of Orofacial Fractures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-30

    D-AiBB 265 MANAGEMENT OF HARD TISSUE AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND / MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURESLU) BATTELLE COLUMBUS DIV ON C R HASSLER 30 APR 85 DAMD17...AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURES Annual Report April 30, 1985 nSupported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND Fort...775A825 AA 044 11. TITLE (Include Security Clasification) (U) Management of Hard Tissue Avulsive Wounds and Management of Orofacial Fractures 12

  3. Nurse-managed wound clinic. A case study in success.

    PubMed

    Crumbley, D R; Ice, R C; Cassidy, R

    1999-01-01

    The wound Care Clinic at Naval Hospital Charleston is a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic that has demonstrated the successful application of nursing case management in caring for patients with chronic and complex wounds. Nursing case management is an outcomes-based system of assessment, planning, provision of nursing services, coordination of interdisciplinary efforts, education, and referral. Nursing case management has been shown, in the literature and at Naval Hospital Charleston, to be an extension of role of professional nursing practice and results in decreased costs, improved quality of care, faster wound healing times, decreased complications, and greater coordination of care between specialty disciplines. These positive results are illustrated in several case studies. Nursing case management has many implications for the successful implementation of any healthcare delivery system where decreased costs and improved quality of care are valued, and it has special benefit in the complex management of chronically ill patients.

  4. Effects of nanofiber/stem cell composite on wound healing in acute full-thickness skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Liao, Susan; He, Liumin; Lu, Jia; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Chan, Casey K

    2011-05-01

    Acute full-thickness skin wounds (FTSW) caused by extensive burns or high-energy trauma are not adequately addressed by current clinical treatments. This study hypothesized that biomimetic nanofiber scaffolds (NFSs) functionalized with rich attachment of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can promote wound healing in acute FTSW. Results in a rat model showed that both NFS and BM-MSCs contributed to the wound healing. Wounds in NFS group with a higher density of BM-MSCs achieved complete closure 8 days earlier than the control group. Implanted BM-MSCs were found to promote epithelial edge ingrowth and collagen synthesis. The colocation of BM-MSCs (tagged with quantum-dots) with the expression of keratin 10 and filaggrin indicated the participation of BM-MSCs in epidermal differentiation at early and intermediate stages under the local wounding environment. Overall, this study suggests a great potential of using NFS/BM-MSC composites for the treatment of acute FTSW.

  5. Management of Abdominal Wounds in Thermally Injured Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Acute inflammatory disease 5 Superior mesenteric artery syndrome 4 Biliary tract disease 4 surface in the patients with abdominal burns, and only...ity of these critically ill patients were equally affected by polypropylene was used for fascial closure, the wound ileus , sepsis, abdominal distention

  6. Surgical tip: Repair of acute Achilles rupture with Krackow suture through a 1.5 cm medial wound.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2010-03-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures is one of the commonest tendon injury of the foot and ankle. The management of this problem is still controversial. Treatment can be classified into non-surgical and surgical types. Surgical management can be subdivided into open repair, percutaneous with or without adjunct of arthroscopy. In compare with non-surgical management, surgical management will decrease the tendon re-rupture rate. However, the possible surgical complications including wound breakdown and sural nerve injury are still quite significant. Percutaneous repair technique has the advantage of less chance of wound breakdown, but the rate of tendon re-rupture is higher than that after open tendon repair, because the repair is usually weaker than that achieved in open repair. Lui have described an endoscopic assisted repair with the Krackow locking suture. However, the technique is complicated and six portal wounds are needed. A simpler way of applying the Krackow suture through the portal wound has been described for reattachment of Achilles tendon insertion after endoscopic calcaneoplasty. We describe a mini-open approach of Achilles tendon repair with the Krackow locking suture. By means of release of the medial edge of the investing fascia, the Achilles tendon can be mobilized easily and the Krackow locking suture can be applied through a 1.5cm medial wound. Hopefully, this can improve the strength of repair and maintaining the advantage of minimally invasive tendon repair.

  7. [Adequate management of stab and gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Tonus, C; Preuss, M; Kasparek, S; Nier, H

    2003-11-01

    It is difficult to verify the treatment of stab and gunshot wounds with prospective randomized studies. That is why the results of observational studies are so important. From 1 January 1989 to 31 December 1998, we saw 74 patients because of stab (64) and gunshot (ten) wounds. Most of the patients, whose injuries were caused mainly for criminal reasons (criminal 54, autoaggressive 14, accidental 4, unknown 2), came to hospital on weekends. We saw 38 abdominal, 23 thoracic, and 13 mixed injuries. On average, 3.8 h passed between the time of injury and getting first aid. Concerning abdominal injuries, we counted 21 negative intraoperative results. Two of 12 thoracic injuries showed no further damage. The patients stayed in hospital for 13.1 days on average. The morbidity was 28.38%, and mortality was 5.41%. Abdominal gunshot wounds need immediate surgical treatment. Concerning stab wounds, obligatory as well as selective surgical methods are both acceptable. Because of valid diagnostic options, thoracic stab wounds allow several ways of treatment.

  8. In Vivo Performance of Chitosan/Soy-Based Membranes as Wound-Dressing Devices for Acute Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tírcia C.; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P.; Silva, Simone S.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Mano, João F.; Castro, António G.; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard®-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance—thus, valuable properties for wound dressings. PMID:23083058

  9. Effect of topically applied Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute porcine wounds: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Partlow, Jessica; Blikslager, Anthony; Matthews, Charles; Law, Mac; Daniels, Joshua; Baker, Rose; Labens, Raphael

    2016-04-11

    Normal wound healing progresses through a series of interdependent physiological events: inflammation, angiogenesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Alterations in this process as well as the bacterial type and load on a wound may alter the wound healing rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute cutaneous wounds, using a prospective, controlled, experimental study, with six purpose bred landrace pigs. All wounds healed without apparent complications. Comparison of the mean 3D and 2D wound surface area measurements showed no significant difference between treatment groups as wounds decreased similarly in size over the duration of the study. A significant reduction in wound surface area was identified sooner using 3D assessments (by day 9) compared to 2D assessments (by day 12) (P < 0.001). There was no significant effect of treatment group on the number of multiple isolates or the most common isolates obtained relative to control wounds. There was no histologically appreciable difference between the wounds of the different groups. Topical application of Saccharomyces boulardii does not hasten wound healing or change the wounds' microbiome under the conditions reported in this study.

  10. Cutaneous Imaging Technologies in Acute Burn and Chronic Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Ghatak, Subhadip; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Roy, Sashwati; Gordillo, Gayle M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wound assessment relies on visual evaluation by physicians. Such assessment is largely subjective and presents the opportunity to explore the use of emergent technologies. Methods Emergent and powerful noninvasive imaging technologies applicable to assess burn and chronic wounds are reviewed. Results The need to estimate wound depth is critical in both chronic wound and burn injury settings. Harmonic ultrasound technology is powerful to study wound depth. It addresses the limitations of optical imaging with limited depth of penetration. What if a wound appears epithelialized by visual inspection, which shows no discharge yet is covered by repaired skin that lacks barrier function? In this case although the wound is closed as defined by current standards, it remains functionally open, presenting the risk of infection and other postclosure complications. Thus, assessment of skin barrier function is valuable in the context of assessing wound closure. Options for the study of tissue vascularization are many. If noncontact and noninvasive criteria are of importance, laser speckle imaging is powerful. Fluorescence imaging is standard in several clinical settings and is likely to serve the wound clinics well as long as indocyanine green injection is not of concern. A major advantage of harmonic ultrasound imaging of wound depth is that the same system is capable of providing information on blood flow dynamics in arterial perforators. Conclusion With many productive imaging platforms to choose from, wound care is about to be transformed by technology that would help assess wound severity. PMID:27556752

  11. Non-thermal air plasma promotes the healing of acute skin wounds in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kubinova, S.; Zaviskova, K.; Uherkova, L.; Zablotskii, V.; Churpita, O.; Lunov, O.; Dejneka, A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has nonspecific antibacterial effects, and can be applied as an effective tool for the treatment of chronic wounds and other skin pathologies. In this study we analysed the effect of NTP on the healing of the full-thickness acute skin wound model in rats. We utilised a single jet NTP system generating atmospheric pressure air plasma, with ion volume density 5 · 1017 m−3 and gas temperature 30–35 °C. The skin wounds were exposed to three daily plasma treatments for 1 or 2 minutes and were evaluated 3, 7 and 14 days after the wounding by histological and gene expression analysis. NTP treatment significantly enhanced epithelization and wound contraction on day 7 when compared to the untreated wounds. Macrophage infiltration into the wound area was not affected by the NTP treatment. Gene expression analysis did not indicate an increased inflammatory reaction or a disruption of the wound healing process; transient enhancement of inflammatory marker upregulation was found after NTP treatment on day 7. In summary, NTP treatment had improved the healing efficacy of acute skin wounds without noticeable side effects and concomitant activation of pro-inflammatory signalling. The obtained results highlight the favourability of plasma applications for wound therapy in clinics. PMID:28338059

  12. Acute and chronic wound fluids inversely influence adipose-derived stem cell function: molecular insights into impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Paola; Spanholtz, Timo A; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa; Brockamp, Thomas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Thamm, Oliver C

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that requires a well-orchestrated interaction of mediators as well as resident and infiltrating cells. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells play a crucial role as they are attracted to the wound site and influence tissue regeneration by various mechanisms. In chronic wounds, these processes are disturbed. In a comparative approach, adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were treated with acute and chronic wound fluids (AWF and CWF, respectively). Proliferation and migration were investigated using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and transwell migration assay. Gene expression changes were analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. AWF had a significantly stronger chemotactic impact on ASC than CWF (77·5% versus 59·8% migrated cells). While proliferation was stimulated by AWF up to 136·3%, CWF had a negative effect on proliferation over time (80·3%). Expression of b-FGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was strongly induced by CWF compared with a mild induction by AWF. These results give an insight into impaired ASC function in chronic wounds. The detected effect of CWF on proliferation and migration of ASC might be one reason for an insufficient healing process in chronic wounds.

  13. Gentamicin ointment versus petrolatum for management of auricular wounds.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ross M; Perlis, Clifford S; Fisher, Emily; Gloster, Hugh M

    2005-06-01

    Surgeons frequently create defects on the ear in the treatment of cutaneous malignancies. Potentially significant complications of second-intention healing on the ear are suppurative and inflammatory chondritis. Consequently, many physicians advocate the use of oral or topical prophylactic antibiotics after auricular surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of gentamicin ointment with that of petrolatum for the prevention of suppurative chondritis during second-intention healing of auricular wounds after Mohs surgery. One hundred forty-two patients with a total of 147 second-intention wounds were prospectively selected to receive either gentamicin ointment or petrolatum postoperatively. One hundred forty-four wounds were evaluated in a follow-up examination or by telephone interview. Eight (5.56%) wounds developed suppurative chondritis. Four wounds received gentamicin and four received petrolatum, for incidences of 4.76% and 6.67%, respectively. Twelve (8.33%) other wounds developed inflammatory chondritis. Ten (11.90%) received gentamicin and two (3.33%) received petrolatum. There is no statistically significant difference between the use of gentamicin ointment and petrolatum in the prevention of postoperative auricular suppurative chondritis. The data also demonstrate a disproportionate number of cases of inflammatory chondritis in the gentamicin-treated group. This study supports the cost-effective and potentially less irritating use of petrolatum for wound care in this difficult to manage area.

  14. An Analytical Study of Mammalian Bite Wounds Requiring Inpatient Management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Geun; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammalian bite injuries create a public health problem because of their frequency, potential severity, and increasing number. Some researchers have performed fragmentary analyses of bite wounds caused by certain mammalian species. However, little practical information is available concerning serious mammalian bite wounds that require hospitalization and intensive wound management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to perform a general review of serious mammalian bite wounds. Methods We performed a retrospective review of the medical charts of 68 patients who were referred to our plastic surgery department for the treatment of bite wounds between January 2003 and October 2012. The cases were analyzed according to the species, patient demographics, environmental factors, injury characteristics, and clinical course. Results Among the 68 cases of mammalian bite injury, 58 (85%) were caused by dogs, 8 by humans, and 2 by cats. Most of those bitten by a human and both of those bitten by cats were male. Only one-third of all the patients were children or adolescents. The most frequent site of injury was the face, with 40 cases, followed by the hand, with 16 cases. Of the 68 patients, 7 were treated with secondary intention healing. Sixty-one patients underwent delayed procedures, including delayed direct closure, skin graft, composite graft, and local flap. Conclusions Based on overall findings from our review of the 68 cases of mammalian bites, we suggest practical guidelines for the management of mammalian bite injuries, which could be useful in the treatment of serious mammalian bite wounds. PMID:24286042

  15. Does honey have a role in paediatric wound management?

    PubMed

    Bittmann, Stefan; Luchter, Elisabeth; Thiel, Michael; Kameda, Genn; Hanano, Ralph; Längler, Alfred

    Topical honey treatment has been shown to possess antimicrobial properties, promote autolytic debridement, stimulate growth of wound tissues to hasten healing, and to start the healing process in dormant wounds, stimulating anti-inflammatory activity that rapidly reduces pain, oedema and exudate production. This article provides an overview of the use of honey as a medicinal substance, particularly its use in wound treatment, and reviews the published data concerning honey as a form of complementary and alternative medicine in paediatric wound management. The literature reviewed was found by searching the PubMed, BIOSIS, and ISI Web of Science databases for the term honey. Exclusion criteria were articles where honey was used in a mixture with other therapeutic substances.

  16. Medical simulation: Overview, and application to wound modelling and management

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dinker R.; Singh, Simerjit

    2012-01-01

    Simulation in medical education is progressing in leaps and bounds. The need for simulation in medical education and training is increasing because of a) overall increase in the number of medical students vis-à-vis the availability of patients; b) increasing awareness among patients of their rights and consequent increase in litigations and c) tremendous improvement in simulation technology which makes simulation more and more realistic. Simulation in wound care can be divided into use of simulation in wound modelling (to test the effect of projectiles on the body) and simulation for training in wound management. Though this science is still in its infancy, more and more researchers are now devising both low-technology and high-technology (virtual reality) simulators in this field. It is believed that simulator training will eventually translate into better wound care in real patients, though this will be the subject of further research. PMID:23162218

  17. Involvements of γδT Lymphocytes in Acute and Chronic Skin Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Fu, Xiujun; Xiao, Nin; Guo, Yuanyuan; Pei, Qing; Peng, Yinbo; Zhang, Yifan; Yao, Min

    2017-08-01

    Wound healing involves three stages including inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling. The underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. The inflammation is characterized by spatially and temporally changing patterns of various leukocyte subsets. It is regarded as the most crucial stage since the inflammatory response is instrumental to supplying various factors and cytokines that orchestrate healing events. As a subtype of T lymphocytes, γδ T cells play an important role in skin homeostasis, tumor immunosurveillance, and wound repair. However, either the dynamics of γδ T cells in healing process or the anticipated association of γδ T cells with chronic or refractory wounds were not well understood. In this study, we determine the dynamics of γδ T cells and γδ T cell-produced effectors during acute and chronic wound repair by establishing a third-degree burn model in mice skin or human skin from diabetic patients. Our data show that the involvement of γδ T cells in acute and chronic skin wound healing. The protein levels and mRNA expressions of γδ T cell-produced effectors were increased in acute healing model, whereas those effectors were decreased in chronic repair, suggesting γδ T cells are essential for wound repair. This study probes into the significant relevance of γδ T cells with effective wound repair and provides new enlightenments for the mechanisms of the formation of chronic and/or refractory wounds.

  18. Mature B cells accelerate wound healing after acute and chronic diabetic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Sîrbulescu, Ruxandra F; Boehm, Chloe K; Soon, Erin; Wilks, Moses Q; Ilieş, Iulian; Yuan, Hushan; Maxner, Ben; Chronos, Nicolas; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Normandin, Marc D; El Fakhri, Georges; Orgill, Dennis P; Sluder, Ann E; Poznansky, Mark C

    2017-09-18

    Chronic wounds affect 12-15% of patients with diabetes and are associated with a drastic decrease in their quality of life. Here we demonstrate that purified mature naïve B220(+) /CD19(+) /IgM(+) /IgD(+) B cells improve healing of acute and diabetic murine wounds after a single topical application. B cell treatment significantly accelerated acute wound closure by 2-3 days in wild-type mice and 5-6 days in obese diabetic mice. The treatment led to full closure in 43% of chronic diabetic wounds, as compared to only 5% in saline-treated controls. Applying equivalent numbers of T cells or disrupted B cells failed to reproduce these effects, indicating that live B cells mediated pro-healing responses. Topically-applied B cell treatment was associated with significantly reduced scar size, increased collagen deposition and maturation, enhanced angiogenesis and increased nerve growth into and under the healing wound. β-III tubulin+ nerve endings in scars of wounds treated acutely with B cells showed increased relative expression of growth-associated protein 43. The improved healing associated with B cell treatment was supported by significantly increased fibroblast proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the wound bed and edges, altered kinetics of neutrophil infiltration, as well as an increase in TGF-β and a significant reduction in MMP2 expression in wound granulation tissue. Our findings indicate that the timeline and efficacy of wound healing can be experimentally manipulated through the direct application of mature, naive B cells, which effectively modify the balance of mature immune cell populations within the wound microenvironment and accelerate the healing process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Chronic leg ulcers in Sweden: a survey of wound management.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, K; Nyberg, P; Apelqvist, J

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to survey management of leg ulcers by staff in Swedish primary healthcare (PHC) and home care services (HCS) run by the municipalities (n = 933), with emphasis on wound care and education. A questionnaire was completed by 933 staff (78% response rate). Diagnostic investigation and documentation in specific wound records was performed by 46.6% of respondents in PHC and 12.8% in HCS, most commonly by nurses in PHC compared to nurse auxiliaries (NAs) in the HCS. Topical treatment was most commonly chosen by nurses (82.1%). Nurse auxiliaries in PHC had greatest access to structured wound management programmes (40.0% compared with 30.1% in HCS, p < 0.05). Instruction courses, mainly organised by pharmaceutical companies (43.2%), were the most common form of education (20.4%) identified. The most time-consuming wound dressings and the highest number of patients treated at home and by NAs were found in the municipalities. For topical treatment 29 products were identified. Nurses in both PHC and the HCS used a wider range of products, e.g. hydrocolloids and absorptive dressings, than NAs in nursing homes, who used dry gauze/protective dressings and wet saline gauze to a greater extent. Substantial differences in qualifications, wound management experience and resource utilisation were found between staff in PHC and the HCS.

  20. Growth factors, silver dressings and negative pressure wound therapy in the management of hard-to-heal postoperative wounds in obstetrics and gynecology: a review.

    PubMed

    Stanirowski, Paweł Jan; Wnuk, Anna; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2015-10-01

    The last two decades witnessed the development of numerous innovative regimens for the management of patients with abnormally healing and infected wounds. Growth factors, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and antiseptic dressings containing silver are examples of methods with best documented efficacy, being widely used in the treatment of acute and chronic post-traumatic wounds, burns and ulcers of various etiology. As far as obstetrics and gynecology are concerned, prevention and treatment of infected, hard-to-heal postoperative wounds is of crucial importance. This article reviews the available literature to discuss the possibilities for use, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of growth factors, NPWT and silver dressings in the treatment of difficult-to-heal postsurgical wounds in obstetrics and gynecology. An extensive search of the English and Polish literature via PubMed and EMBASE databases was undertaken for articles published between January 1960 and April 30, 2014 to identify articles that described and assessed use, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of growth factors, silver dressings and NPWT in patients with hard-to-heal postoperative wounds following obstetric or gynecological surgery. Literature review regarding the use of growth factors, NPWT and silver dressings suggests that these methods may play an important role in the management of wounds after invasive obstetric and gynecological procedures. Obese patients, patients after vulvectomy or prior radiation therapy may benefit most, however, due to non-numerous randomized reports, prospective studies on the use of above-mentioned methods in the treatment of postsurgical wounds following obstetric and gynecological interventions are required.

  1. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  2. Management of Hard Tissue Avulsive Wounds and Management of Orofacial Fractures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    OROFACIAL FRACTURES(U) BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABS OH C R HASSLER ET AL...8217, ,,, . ’ ’. - . - -,-. . . .. .- . . ."’ " . . . . . . . .. . ,+ + , , ,+. . .+, - , . . . ..+ • , , ,. ,, . • . . . - V.- #/sa REPORT NUMBER 7 VIMAANA WENT OF HARD TISSUE AVULSIMV WOUNDS AND MNAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURES . ~ I) ANNUAL REPORT Craig 1. Hassler...authorized documents. -*. o . C,. °. *.. .. . . . REPORT NUMBER 7 MANAGEMENT OF HARD TISSUE AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL

  3. Evaluation of a decision tree for management of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melchior-MacDougall, F; Lander, J

    1995-03-01

    Nurses routinely make complex clinical decisions under conditions of uncertainty. They collect large, unwieldy data sets in the process of making these clinical decisions. To assist nurses in collecting and organizing data and in making complex clinical decisions, some nursing scholars recommend decision support systems. One such support system, a decision tree leads the nurse from general to specific assessments and ultimately to a decision choice or outcome. In this study, a decision tree was examined for its utility in promoting accuracy in decision making for management of chronic wounds among home care nurses. Home care nurses who used the decision tree made better decisions about staging and product choices for chronic wounds. More research is necessary to discover whether decision trees for the management of chronic wounds translate into improved client outcomes.

  4. The Innate Immune System in Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Amanda S.; Mansbridge, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: This review article provides an overview of the critical roles of the innate immune system to wound healing. It explores aspects of dysregulation of individual innate immune elements known to compromise wound repair and promote nonhealing wounds. Understanding the key mechanisms whereby wound healing fails will provide seed concepts for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Recent Advances: Our understanding of the complex interactions of the innate immune system in wound healing has significantly improved, particularly in our understanding of the role of antimicrobials and peptides and the nature of the switch from inflammatory to reparative processes. This takes place against an emerging understanding of the relationship between human cells and commensal bacteria in the skin. Critical Issues: It is well established and accepted that early local inflammatory mediators in the wound bed function as an immunological vehicle to facilitate immune cell infiltration and microbial clearance upon injury to the skin barrier. Both impaired and excessive innate immune responses can promote nonhealing wounds. It appears that the switch from the inflammatory to the proliferative phase is tightly regulated and mediated, at least in part, by a change in macrophages. Defining the factors that initiate the switch in such macrophage phenotypes and functions is the subject of multiple investigations. Future Directions: The review highlights processes that may be useful targets for further investigation, particularly the switch from M1 to M2 macrophages that appears to be critical as dysregulation of this switch occurs during defective wound healing. PMID:26862464

  5. Community-Based Care for Chronic Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In August 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) presented a vignette to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) on a proposed targeted health care delivery model for chronic care. The proposed model was defined as multidisciplinary, ambulatory, community-based care that bridged the gap between primary and tertiary care, and was intended for individuals with a chronic disease who were at risk of a hospital admission or emergency department visit. The goals of this care model were thought to include: the prevention of emergency department visits, a reduction in hospital admissions and re-admissions, facilitation of earlier hospital discharge, a reduction or delay in long-term care admissions, and an improvement in mortality and other disease-specific patient outcomes. OHTAC approved the development of an evidence-based assessment to determine the effectiveness of specialized community based care for the management of heart failure, Type 2 diabetes and chronic wounds. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site at: www.health.gov.on.ca/ohtas to review the following reports associated with the Specialized Multidisciplinary Community-Based care series. Specialized multidisciplinary community-based care series: a summary of evidence-based analyses Community-based care for the specialized management of heart failure: an evidence-based analysis Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis Please note that the evidence-based analysis of specialized community-based care for the management of diabetes titled: “Community-based care for the management of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based analysis” has been published as part of the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform at this URL: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/ohtas/tech_diabetes_20091020.html Please visit the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative Web site at: http

  6. Acute propranolol infusion stimulates protein synthesis in rabbit skin wound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Meng, Chengyue; Chinkes, David L; Finnerty, Celeste C; Aarsland, Asle; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N

    2009-05-01

    Propranolol administration has been demonstrated to improve cardiac work, decrease energy expenditure, and attenuate lipolysis in burned patients; however, its effect on wound healing has not been reported. In rabbits, a partial-thickness skin donor site wound was created on the back, and catheters were placed in the carotid artery and jugular vein. A nasogastric feeding tube was placed for enteral feeding. On day 5 after injury, stable isotope tracers were infused to determine protein and DNA kinetics in the wound. Propranolol hydrochloride was injected in 1 group during the tracer infusion to decrease heart rate, and the other group without propranolol injection served as a control. The propranolol infusion decreased heart rate by 21%. The protein fractional synthetic rate in the wound was greater in the propranolol group (8.6 +/- 0.9 vs 6.1 +/- 0.5%/day, P < .05). Wound protein fractional breakdown rates were not significantly different. The rate of protein deposition (synthesis - breakdown) was increased in the propranolol group (5.0 +/- 1.2 vs 2.8 +/- 0.7%/day, P = .07). Wound DNA fractional synthetic rates were comparable. The protein fractional synthetic rate was correlated with percent decrease in heart rate, but expression of the beta-adrenergic receptors and downstream signaling cascades in local wounds were not affected after propranolol treatment. Propranolol infusion increased wound protein synthetic rate and tended to increase wound protein deposition rate, which might be beneficial to wound healing. These changes might reflect a systemic response to the beta-adrenergic blockade.

  7. Acute and impaired wound healing: pathophysiology and current methods for drug delivery, part 1: normal and chronic wounds: biology, causes, and approaches to care.

    PubMed

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians' understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing.

  8. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing. PMID:22713781

  9. Management of Hard Tissue Avulsive Wounds and Management of Orofacial Fractures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    D-A134 143 MANAGEMENT OF HARD TISSUE AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND i/I MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURES(U) BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABS OH L G MCCOV El AL- AUG 88...TISSUE AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURES . 4 •ANNUAL REPORT Larry G. McCoy and Craig R. Hasuler .9 A August 1980 ". Supported by U.S...10 28 006 REPORT NUMBER 6 MANAGEMENT OF HARD TISSUE AVULSIVE WOUNDS AND MANAGEMENT OF OROFACIAL FRACTURES -4., ANNUAL REPORT Larry G. McCoy and Craig R

  10. Brewing complications: the effect of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Radek, Katherine A.; Ranzer, Matthew J.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol consumption is linked to a higher incidence of traumatic wounds and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality following surgical or traumatic injury. One of the most profound effects of acute ethanol exposure on wound healing occurs during the inflammatory response, and altered cytokine production is a primary component. Acute ethanol exposure also impairs the proliferative response during healing, causing delays in epithelial coverage, collagen synthesis, and blood vessel regrowth. The accumulated data support the paradigm that acute ethanol intoxication prior to injury significantly diminishes a patient’s ability to heal efficiently. PMID:19675208

  11. [Management of groin wound infection after arterial surgery using negative-pressure wound therapy].

    PubMed

    Krejčí, M; Staffa, R; Gladiš, P

    2015-11-01

    infection can be treated conservatively using NPWT. The method is most efficient in the management of early infections. Wounds infected with P. aeruginosa or those with suture line exposure require special treatment. Long-term follow-up is necessary due to the risk of recurrent infection.

  12. Wound exudate assessment and management: a challenge for clinicans.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-11-11

    The production of wound exudate is a natural and normal consequence of healing. However, it is when the constituents, volume and consistency of the exudate alter that problems can occur. This article discusses the different types of exudate, particularly highly viscous exudate, its impact on both the patient and the clinician, and appropriate exudate assessment, effective management and dressing selection.

  13. Disaster-Related Injury Management: High Prevalence of Wound Infection After Super Typhoon Haiyan.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Won; Kim, Seong Yeop; Kim, Hoon; Ahn, Moo Eob; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hong, Eun Seok

    2016-02-01

    After Super Typhoon Haiyan, a category 5 tropical cyclone, insufficient resources were available for medical management. Many patients in the Philippines were wounded as a result of the disaster. We examined the prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of disaster-related wounds and wound infection in the post-disaster period. We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients admitted to a Korean Disaster Relief Team clinic at St. Paul's Hospital, Tacloban City, Republic of Philippines, between December 9 and 13, 2013. Traumatic injury patients were included; patients not exhibiting a wound were excluded. Of the 160 patients enrolled in the study, 71 (44.4%) had infected wounds. There were no significant differences in the age, sex, past medical history, wound site, wound depth, injury mechanism, or inducer of injury between the uninfected and infected groups. In the univariate analysis, a foreign-body-contaminated wound, a chronic wound, elapsed time from injury to medical contact, an inadequately cared for wound, and need for subsequent wound management were associated with wound infection (P<0.05). The multivariate analysis revealed that foreign body contamination and having an inadequately cared for wound were associated with wound infection (odds ratio [OR]: 10.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.59-28.56; OR: 3.51, 95% CI: 1.07-11.51, respectively). In the post-disaster situation, many wound infections required definitive care. Wound infection was associated with inadequately cared for wounds and foreign-body-contaminated wounds.

  14. Rapid creation of skin substitutes from human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers for acute full-thickness wound repair.

    PubMed

    Mahjour, Seyed Babak; Fu, Xiaoling; Yang, Xiaochuan; Fong, Jason; Sefat, Farshid; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-12-01

    Creation of functional skin substitutes within a clinically acceptable time window is essential for timely repair and management of large wounds such as extensive burns. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of fabricating skin substitutes via a bottom-up nanofiber-enabled cell assembly approach and using such substitutes for full-thickness wound repair in nude mice. Following a layer-by-layer (L-b-L) manner, human primary skin cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes) were rapidly assembled together with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen (3:1, w/w; 8%, w/v) nanofibers into 3D constructs, in which fibroblasts and keratinocytes were located in the bottom and upper portion respectively. Following culture, the constructs developed into a skin-like structure with expression of basal keratinocyte markers and deposition of new matrix while exhibiting good mechanical strength (as high as 4.0 MPa by 14 days). Treatment of the full-thickness wounds created on the back of nude mice with various grafts (acellular nanofiber meshes, dermal substitutes, skin substitutes and autografts) revealed that 14-day-cultured skin substitutes facilitated a rapid wound closure with complete epithelialization comparable to autografts. Taken together, skin-like substitutes can be formed by L-b-L assembling human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers and they are effective to heal acute full-thickness wounds in nude mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Aide memoire for the management of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, C.

    2002-01-01

    The hospitals in Johannesburg deal with about 4,000 gunshot wounds a year. Although most are from hand guns, a number are from high velocity, military-type weapons. Extensive experience has been built up and many lessons learned. Attention is directed to the actual damage inflicted rather than on theoretical predictions based on presumed velocity of the bullets involved, as this can often be misleading. Some patients are delayed in their presentation to emergency departments, in other cases several gunshot wound patients arrive at the same time, requiring appropriate triage and urgent management. PMID:12215024

  16. Acute wounding alters the beta2-adrenergic signaling and catecholamine synthetic pathways in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sivamani, Raja K; Shi, Biao; Griffiths, Elizabeth; Vu, Shirley M; Lev-Tov, Hadar A; Dahle, Sara; Chigbrow, Marianne; La, Thi Dinh; Mashburn, Chelcy; Peavy, Thomas R; Rivkah Isseroff, R

    2014-08-01

    Keratinocyte migration is critical for wound re-epithelialization. Previous studies showed that epinephrine activates the beta2-adrenergic receptor (B2AR), impairing keratinocyte migration. Here, we investigated the keratinocyte catecholamine synthetic pathway in response to acute trauma. Cultured keratinocytes were scratch wounded and expression levels of the B2AR and catecholamine synthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase were assayed. The binding affinity of the B2AR was measured. Wounding downregulated B2AR, tyrosine hydroxylase, and phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase expression, but pre-exposure to timolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, delayed this effect. In wounded keratinocytes, B2AR-binding affinity remained depressed even after its expression returned to prewounding levels. Keratinocyte-derived norepinephrine increased after wounding. Norepinephrine impaired keratinocyte migration; this effect was abrogated with B2AR-selective antagonist ICI-118,551 but not with B1AR-selective antagonist bisoprolol. Finally, for clinical relevance, we determined that norepinephrine was present in freshly wounded skin, thus providing a potential mechanism for impaired healing by local B2AR activation in wound-edge keratinocytes. Taken together, the data show that keratinocytes modulate catecholamine synthetic enzymes and release norepinephrine after scratch wounding. Norepinephrine appears to be a stress-related mediator that impairs keratinocyte migration through activation of the B2AR. Future therapeutic strategies evaluating modulation of norepinephrine-related effects in the wound are warranted.

  17. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  18. Deficiencies in tetanus prophylaxis in wound management in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fatunde, O J; Familusi, J B

    2002-01-01

    In a review of 94 paediatric patients treated for post-neonatal tetanus over a period of 11 years at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, reliable data regarding the care received for wounds that eventually resulted in tetanus was available in 58 patients. Seventeen of these patients had orthodox medical care for their wounds before developing tetanus. While some of the patients had received antibiotics and/or tetanus toxoid, no patient received antitetanus serum despite the fact that most of them had no previous immunization against tetanus. All the 3 victims of road traffic accidents were given tetanus toxoid but none of the 6 patients with chronic suppurative otitis media had any form of tetanus prophylaxis. The findings highlight the adverse consequences of failure to adhere to basic guidelines for management of the tetanus-prone wound.

  19. Supplemental vitamin A prevents the acute radiation-induced defect in wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, S.M.; Gruber, C.A.; Rettura, G.; Gruber, D.K.; Demetriou, A.A.; Seifter, E.

    1984-10-01

    Acute radiation injury leads to thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal ulceration, and impaired wound healing. The authors hypothesized that supplemental vitamin A would mitigate these adverse effects in rats exposed to acute whole-body radiation. To test their hypothesis, dorsal skin incisions and subcutaneous implantation of polyvinyl alcohol sponges were performed in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at varying times following sham radiation or varying doses of whole-body radiation (175-850 rad). In each experiment, the control diet (which contains about 18,000 IU vit. A/kg chow (3 X the NRC RDA for normal rats)) was supplemented with 150,000 IU vit. A/kg diet beginning at, before, or after sham radiation and wounding or radiation and wounding. The supplemental vitamin A prevented the impaired wound healing and lessened the weight loss, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, thymic involution, adrenal enlargement, decrease in splenic weight, and gastric ulceration of the radiated (750-850 rad) wounded rats. This was true whether the supplemental vitamin A was begun before (2 or 4 days) or after (1-2 hours to 4 days) radiation and wounding; the supplemental vitamin A was more effective when started before or up to 2 days after radiation and wounding. The authors believe that prevention of the impaired wound healing following radiation by supplemental vitamin A is due to its enhancing the early inflammatory reaction to wounding, including increasing the number of monocytes and macrophages at the wound site; possible effect on modulating collagenase activity; effect on epithelial cell (and possible mesenchymal cell) differentiation; stimulation of immune responsiveness; and lessening of the adverse effects of radiation.

  20. Therapeutic effects of topical application of ozone on acute cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Noh, Sun Up; Han, Ye Won; Kim, Kyoung Moon; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical ozonated olive oil on acute cutaneous wound healing in a guinea pig model and also to elucidate its therapeutic mechanism. After creating full-thickness skin wounds on the backs of guinea pigs by using a 6 mm punch biopsy, we examined the wound healing effect of topically applied ozonated olive oil (ozone group), as compared to the pure olive oil (oil group) and non-treatment (control group). The ozone group of guinea pig had a significantly smaller wound size and a residual wound area than the oil group, on days 5 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01 and P<0.05) after wound surgery, respectively. Both hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson-trichrome staining revealed an increased intensity of collagen fibers and a greater number of fibroblasts in the ozone group than that in the oil group on day 7. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated upregulation of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions, but not fibroblast growth factor expression in the ozone group on day 7, as compared with the oil group. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that topical application of ozonated olive oil can accelerate acute cutaneous wound repair in a guinea pig in association with the increased expression of PDGF, TGF-beta, and VEGF.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Topical Application of Ozone on Acute Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Su; Noh, Sun Up; Han, Ye Won; Kim, Kyoung Moon; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of topical ozonated olive oil on acute cutaneous wound healing in a guinea pig model and also to elucidate its therapeutic mechanism. After creating full-thickness skin wounds on the backs of guinea pigs by using a 6 mm punch biopsy, we examined the wound healing effect of topically applied ozonated olive oil (ozone group), as compared to the pure olive oil (oil group) and non-treatment (control group). The ozone group of guinea pig had a significantly smaller wound size and a residual wound area than the oil group, on days 5 (P<0.05) and 7 (P<0.01 and P<0.05) after wound surgery, respectively. Both hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson-trichrome staining revealed an increased intensity of collagen fibers and a greater number of fibroblasts in the ozone group than that in the oil group on day 7. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated upregulation of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions, but not fibroblast growth factor expression in the ozone group on day 7, as compared with the oil group. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that topical application of ozonated olive oil can accelerate acute cutaneous wound repair in a guinea pig in association with the increased expression of PDGF, TGF-β, and VEGF. PMID:19543419

  2. Interactive role of trauma cytokines and erythropoietin and their therapeutic potential for acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Bader, Augustinus; Lorenz, Katrin; Richter, Anja; Scheffler, Katja; Kern, Larissa; Ebert, Sabine; Giri, Shibashish; Behrens, Maria; Dornseifer, Ulf; Macchiarini, Paolo; Machens, Hans-Günther

    2011-02-01

    If controllable, stem cell activation following injury has the therapeutic potential for supporting regeneration in acute or chronic wounds. Human dermally-derived stem cells (FmSCs) were exposed to the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the presence of erythropoietin (EPO). Cells were cultured under ischemic conditions and phenotypically characterized using flow cytometry. Topical EPO application was performed in three independent clinical wound healing attempts. The FmSCs expressed the receptor for EPO. EPO had a strong inhibitory effect on FmSC growth in the absence of IL-6 and TNF-α. With IL-6, the EPO effects were reversed to that of growth stimulation. TNF-α had the strongest stimulatory effect. In contrast, IL-1β had an inhibitory effect. Topically applied EPO considerably enhanced wound healing and improved wound conditions of acute and chronic wounds. Site specificity of stem cell activation is mediated by IL-6 and TNF-α. In trauma, EPO ceases its inhibitory role and reverts to a clinically relevant boosting function. EPO may be an important therapeutic tool for the topical treatment of acute and chronic wounds.

  3. Selective Nonoperative Management of Abdominal Stab Wounds.

    PubMed

    Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Ashragian, Sogol; Liou, Doug Z; Barmparas, Galinos; Chung, Rex; Alban, Rodrigo F; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Stab wounds (SW) to the abdomen traditionally require urgent exploration when associated with shock, evisceration, or peritonitis. Hemodynamically stable patients without evisceration may benefit from serial exams even with peritonitis. We compared patients taken directly to the operating room with abdominal SWs (ED-OR) to those admitted for serial exams (ADMIT). We retrospectively reviewed hemodynamically stable patients presenting with any abdominal SW between January 2000 and December 2012. Exclusions included evidence of evisceration, systolic blood pressure ≤110 mm Hg, or blood transfusion. NON-THER was defined as abdominal exploration without identification of intra-abdominal injury requiring repair. Of 142 patients included, 104 were ED-OR and 38 were ADMIT. When ED-OR was compared with ADMIT, abdominal Abbreviated Injury Score was higher (2.4 vs 2.1; P = 0.01) and hospital length of stay was longer (4.8 vs 3.3 days; P = 0.04). Incidence of NON-THER was higher in ED-OR cohort (71% vs 13%; P ≤ 0.001). In a regression model, ED-OR was a predictor of NON-THER (adjusted odds ratio 16.6; P < 0.001). One patient from ED-OR expired after complications from NON-THER. There were no deaths in the ADMIT group. For those patients with abdominal SWs who present with systolic blood pressure ≥110 mm Hg, no blood product transfusion in the emergency department and lacking evisceration, admission for serial abdominal exams may be preferred regardless of abdominal exam.

  4. Soft tissue and wound management of blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheean, Andrew J; Tintle, Scott M; Rhee, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    The management of blast-related soft tissue wounds requires a comprehensive surgical approach that acknowledges extensive zones of injury and the likelihood of massive contamination. The experiences of military surgeons during the last decade of war have significantly enhanced current understandings of the optimal means of mitigating infectious complications, the timing of soft tissue coverage attempts, and the reconstructive options available for definitive wound management. Early administration of antibiotics in the setting of soft tissue wounds and associated open fractures is the single most important aspect of open fracture care. Both civilian and military reports have elucidated the incidence of invasive fungal infection in the setting of high-energy injuries with significant wound burdens, and novel treatment protocols have emerged. The type of reconstruction is predicated upon the zone of injury and location of the soft tissue defect. Multiple reports of military cohorts have suggested the equivalency of various techniques and types of soft tissue coverage. Longer-term follow-up will inform future perspectives on the durability of these surgical approaches.

  5. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  6. Feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of RGN107 in the palliative wound care management of chronic wound symptoms.

    PubMed

    Madisetti, M; Kelechi, T J; Mueller, M; Amella, E J; Prentice, M A

    2017-01-02

    To assess the feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of RGN107 use, a natural powder blend of Arnica Montana, Calendula Officinalis, Mentha Arvensis and Santalum Album, among hospice patients and their wound caregivers in the palliative wound care management of chronic wound symptoms at end-of-life. Data were collected between May 2013 and November 2015. A pilot trial conducted among 50 hospice patients with symptomatic (pain, odour, or exudate) chronic wounds. Caregivers received initial RGN107 protocol training, actively applied the powder to patient wounds for 4-weeks, and completed an 8-week retrospective survey. Feasibility was assessed by measuring process outcomes, including the number and proportion of participants referred, screened eligible, enrolled, withdrawn and successfully completed. Acceptability measures included: a protocol training evaluation, caregiver pre and post self-efficacy ratings, retrospective usability, symptom control management and comparative technique caregiver ratings, and recorded open-ended comments. Tolerability was assessed through a 12-week cumulative review of the study adverse event profile. Feasibility, tolerability and acceptability of use of the RGN107 powder for chronic wounds were established. Recruitment goals were achieved and 92 % of the patients successfully completed the study. 95 % of wound caregivers would recommend the powder for use in this population. This study supports the feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of a wound care powder that espouses a multi-symptom palliative comfort care approach for hospice patients with chronic wounds at end-of-life. Further research is needed to establish the efficacy of the powder.

  7. Early management in children with burns: Cooling, wound care and pain management.

    PubMed

    Baartmans, M G A; de Jong, A E E; van Baar, M E; Beerthuizen, G I J M; van Loey, N E E; Tibboel, D; Nieuwenhuis, M K

    2016-06-01

    Early management in burns, i.e. prior to admission in a burn center, is essential for an optimal process and outcome of burn care. Several publications have reported suboptimal early management, including low levels of pain medication after trauma, especially in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice in the Netherlands and factors related to early management in pediatric burns, i.e. cooling, wound covering and pain management. To study possible change and improvement over time, two study periods were compared. This study involved two periods; January 2002-March 2004 (period 1) and January 2007-August 2008 (period 2). All children (0-15 years of age) with acute burns admitted within 24h after burn to one of the three Dutch Burn centers with a formal referral were eligible. Data were obtained from patient records, both retrospectively and prospectively. A total of 323 and 299 children were included in periods 1 and 2, respectively. The vast majority of children in both study periods had been cooled before admission (>90%). Over time, wound covering increased significantly (from 64% to 89%) as well as pain treatment (from 68% to 79%). Predominantly paracetamol and morphine were used. Referral from ambulance services (OR=41.4, 95%CI=16.6-103.0) or general practitioners (OR=59.7, 95%CI=25.1-141.8) were strong independent predictors for not receiving pre-burn center pain medication. On the other hand, flame burns (OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.5) and more extensive burns (TBSA 5-10%: OR=0.4, 95%CI=-0.2 to 0.8; TBSA≥10%: OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.4) were independent predictors of receiving pain medication. Referring physicians of children with burns were overall well informed: they cool the wound after burns and cover it before transport to prevent hypothermia and reduce the pain. Additional studies should be conducted to clarify the duration and temperature for cooling to be effective. Furthermore, there is room and a need for improvement regarding early

  8. Optimizing the Moisture Management Tightrope with Wound Bed Preparation 2015©.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, R Gary; Elliott, James A; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Somayaji, Ranjani

    2015-10-01

    To provide an overview of moisture management and its importance in wound care. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Summarize causes and treatments for moisture balance issues of chronic wounds.2. Recognize the properties of dressings used for treatment for moisture management of chronic wounds and antiseptic agent cytotoxicity.3. Explain study findings of the effectiveness of dressing choices for treatment of chronic wounds. To provide an overview of moisture management and its importance in wound care. The authors evaluate the impact of moisture management for optimal wound care and assess current wound management strategies relating to antisepsis and moist wound healing utilizing the wound bed preparation paradigm 2015 update. The discussion distinguishes the form and function of wound care dressing classes available for optimal moisture management. Moisture management for chronic wounds is best achieved with modern moist interactive dressings if the wound has the ability to heal.

  9. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  10. Field surgery on a future conventional battlefield: strategy and wound management.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, J. M.; Cooper, G. J.; Haywood, I. R.; Milner, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Most papers appearing in the surgical literature dealing with wound ballistics concern themselves with wound management in the civilian setting. The pathophysiology of modern war wounds is contrasted with ballistic wounds commonly encountered in peacetime, but it should be noted that even in peacetime the modern terrorist may have access to sophisticated military weaponry, and that patients injured by them may fall within the catchment area of any civilian hospital. Management problems associated with both wound types are highlighted; areas of controversy are discussed. The orthodox military surgical approach to ballistic wounds is expounded and defended. Images Figure 2 Figure Figure 4 PMID:1996857

  11. Obstacles and opportunities for the multidisciplinary wound care team. A report for the clinical symposium on wound management.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, S; Salzberg, C A; Staley, M J; Thomas, D R; Ayello, E A

    1998-01-01

    On the last day of the 12th Annual Clinical Symposium on Wound Management, a panel of clinicians from various disciplines, and with diverse experience in wound management, discussed the challenges and rewards of being part of a multidisciplinary team caring for patients with wounds. Panelists included Sharon Baranoski, MSN, RN, CETN; C. Andrew Salzberg, MD; Marlys J. Staley, MS, PT; and David R. Thomas, MD, FACP. Elizabeth A. Ayello, PhD, RN, CS, CETN, was the moderator. An excerpt from this session is published here.

  12. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P; Nunan, R

    2015-01-01

    Summary A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to heal and leave behind a noticeable scar. At the extreme end, chronic wounds – defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months – have become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world and will only increase as our populations advance in age, and with the increasing incidence of diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Here we describe the clinical problems and how, through better dialogue between basic researchers and clinicians, we may extend our current knowledge to enable the development of novel potential therapeutic treatments. What's already known about this topic? Much is known about the sequence of events contributing to normal healing. The two pathologies of wound healing are chronic wounds and scarring. What does this study add? We explain how the cell and molecular mechanisms of healing guide the therapeutic strategies. We introduce zebrafish and the fruit fly, Drosophila as novel wound healing models. We highlight unanswered questions and future directions for wound healing research. PMID:26175283

  14. Management of Open Lower Extremity Wounds With Concomitant Fracture Using a Porcine Urinary Bladder Matrix.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Bruce A; Geiger, Scott E; Deigni, Oliver A; Watson, John Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Open wounds of the distal third of the leg and foot with exposed bone, fractures, and hardware are challenging wounds for which to achieve stable coverage. The orthopedic advances in lower extremity fracture management over the last 30 years have allowed a rethinking of the standard operative approach to close these complex wounds. The ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) products to facilitate constructive remodeling of a wound seemed a reasonable approach for treatment, especially in patients who are often poor surgical candidates for more advanced reconstructive procedures. The authors reviewed 9 patients with 11 open fractures of the leg, ankle, or foot treated with a newer ECM wound healing device to total closure. The clinical course and patient management are reviewed. The authors conclude that newer ECM products can provide a reasonable method of management for patients who have wounds with exposed hardware, distal leg wounds, and open foot fractures compared to prolonged negative pressure wound therapy or complex reconstructive operative procedures.

  15. Efficacy of commercial dressings in managing malodorous wounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gillian; Anand, Subhash C; Rajendran, S; Walker, Ian

    This paper investigates a novel in vitro method of ascertaining quantitative comparative data on a selection of commercial available odour absorbent wound dressing. The aim of this study is to determine and evaluate quantitative desirable data on the efficiency of odour absorbency along with other comparable physical characteristics of commercial odour absorbent dressings. This study is a part of an ongoing research programme into the design and development of novel odour absorbent dressings for managing malodorous wounds. The study also includes the development of a controlled in vitro test method that simulates a more realistic situation. A selection of commercially available activated charcoal dressings were analysed and tested, and comparative evaluation was carried out and discussed.

  16. Principles of wound management of small mammals: hedgehogs, prairie dogs, and sugar gliders.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Divers, Sonia M

    2004-01-01

    The management of wounds is a common scenario for the exotic animal practitioner. When presented with such cases, the practitioner must first adhere to the firmly established principles of wound healing, and then modify available treatment modalities to fit the needs of the species at hand. Practicing wound management on exotic patients can be challenging due to their small size, unusual anatomy, difficult behaviors, and tendency for developing secondary stress-related health problems. A review of the stages of wound healing as well as traditional wound management techniques is provided here. This review is followed by a summary of typical wounds encountered in hedgehogs, prairie dogs, and sugar gliders, as well anatomic, physiologic, and behavioral characteristics that should be taken into consideration when managing wounds on such species.

  17. Management of acute intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Keith R

    2011-08-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) occurs when intestinal absorptive function is inadequate to maintain hydration and nutrition without enteral or parenteral supplements. It has been classified into three types depending on duration of nutrition support and reversibility. Type 1 IF is commonly seen in the peri-operative period as ileus and usually spontaneously resolves within 14 d. Type 2 IF is uncommon and is often associated with an intra-abdominal catastrophe, intestinal resection, sepsis, metabolic disturbances and undernutrition. Type 3 IF is a chronic condition in a metabolically stable patient, which usually requires long-term parenteral nutrition. This paper focuses on Types 1 and 2 IF (or acute IF) that are usually found in surgical wards. The objectives of this paper are to review the incidence, aetiology, prevention, management principles and outcome of acute IF. The paper discusses the resources necessary to manage acute IF, the indications for inter-hospital transfer and the practicalities of how to transfer and receive a patient with acute IF.

  18. Applications of modern sensors and wireless technology in effective wound management.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Nasir; Hariz, Alex; Fitridge, Robert; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-05-01

    The management of chronic wounds has emerged as a major health care challenge during the 21st century consuming, significant portions of health care budgets. Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, leg ulcers, and pressure sores have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. Covering wounds with suitable dressings facilitates the healing process and is common practice in wound management plans. However, standard dressings do not provide insights into the status of the wound underneath. Parameters such as moisture, pressure, temperature and pH inside the dressings are indicative of the healing rate, infection, and wound healing phase. But owing to the lack of information available from within the dressings, these are often changed to inspect the wound, disturbing the normal healing process of wounds in addition to causing pain to the patient. Sensors embedded in the dressing would provide clinicians and nurses with important information that would aid in wound care decision making, improve patient comfort, and reduce the frequency of dressing changes. The potential benefits of this enabling technology would be seen in terms of a reduction in hospitalization time and health care cost. Modern sensing technology along with wireless radio frequency communication technology is poised to make significant advances in wound management. This review discusses issues related to the design and implementation of sensor technology and telemetry systems both incorporated in wound dressings to devise an automated wound monitoring technology, and also surveys the literature available on current sensor and wireless telemetry systems.

  19. Managing acute care.

    PubMed

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  20. [Abdominal gunshot wounds. Ballistic data and practical management].

    PubMed

    Vicq, P; Jourdan, P; Chapuis, O; Baranger, B

    1996-01-01

    The mortality from abdominal gunshot wounds remains high, either in civilian or military cases. The severity factors of these wounds include bullet calibre and energy transfer of the missile. This paper studies some of the ballistics features of abdominal gunshot wounds. Practical guidelines are inferred concerning diagnosis and treatment of these wounds.

  1. Acute Pain Management/Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tedore, Tiffany; Weinberg, Roniel; Witkin, Lisa; Giambrone, Gregory P; Faggiani, Susan L; Fleischut, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Effective and efficient acute pain management strategies have the potential to improve medical outcomes, enhance patient satisfaction, and reduce costs. Pain management records are having an increasing influence on patient choice of health care providers and will affect future financial reimbursement. Dedicated acute pain and regional anesthesia services are invaluable in improving acute pain management. In addition, nonpharmacologic and alternative therapies, as well as information technology, should be viewed as complimentary to traditional pharmacologic treatments commonly used in the management of acute pain. The use of innovative technologies to improve acute pain management may be worthwhile for health care institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Content validation of algorithms to guide negative pressure wound therapy in adults with acute or chronic wounds:a cross-sectional study .

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2012-09-01

    Despite extensive use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and reported patient safety concerns, evidence-based algorithms to guide its safe and appropriate use in various wounds have only recently been developed. Preliminary content validity was established using literature review and expert-based face validity with a small sample of experts (N = 12). To examine the content validity of this set of three NPWT algorithms and to enhance understanding about previously identified wound terminology issues, a cross-sectional, mixed-methods, quantitative study was conducted among wound experts. The paper/pencil survey instrument consisted of the algorithms, a demographic questionnaire, and request to provide definitions of five commonly used terms: acute wound, chronic wound, and primary, secondary, and tertiary intention healing. A Likert scale (range 1 to 4) was included to rate the relevance of each of the 34 unique steps/statements/decision points contained in the algorithms, and space was provided to comment on each component. Convenience-sampling methods were used in three different settings: an international professional wound care meeting; a regional wound, ostomy, continence (WOC) nurses meeting; and an urban university with a suburban satellite campus. Of the 190 wound care experts invited to participate, 114 accepted. Participants' average age was 48 (range 23 to 68) years, and most were registered nurses (72%) practicing in the United States (94%). The content validity of the NPWT components was strong, with an overall mean rating of 3.76 (SD = 0.56, range 3.49 to 3.92; very relevant/appropriate, relevant/appropriate). The overall content validity index for the 5,696 responses received was 0.96 (range 0.88 to 1.0). Qualitative themes included comments about wound terminology and definitions, the presentation of the central algorithm, reading level, helpfulness/ease of use, the use of color, and information placement in the algorithm document. Some

  3. The Management of Combat Wounds: The British Military Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Steven L.A.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the military wound is not an easy entity to define as the wounds seen in conflict can be of many types: those caused by recognized or improvised weapon systems may have similarities to civilian wounds as well as the wounds soldiers sustain outside of battle. This article will focus on the current treatment approaches to combat wounds sustained by the deployed UK Armed Forces personnel. PMID:27785380

  4. A Trial of Wound Irrigation in the Initial Management of Open Fracture Wounds.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Mohit; Jeray, Kyle J; Petrisor, Brad A; Devereaux, P J; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Schemitsch, Emil H; Anglen, Jeff; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Jones, Clifford; Kreder, Hans; Liew, Susan; McKay, Paula; Papp, Steven; Sancheti, Parag; Sprague, Sheila; Stone, Trevor B; Sun, Xin; Tanner, Stephanie L; Tornetta, Paul; Tufescu, Ted; Walter, Stephen; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2015-12-31

    The management of open fractures requires wound irrigation and débridement to remove contaminants, but the effectiveness of various pressures and solutions for irrigation remains controversial. We investigated the effects of castile soap versus normal saline irrigation delivered by means of high, low, or very low irrigation pressure. In this study with a 2-by-3 factorial design, conducted at 41 clinical centers, we randomly assigned patients who had an open fracture of an extremity to undergo irrigation with one of three irrigation pressures (high pressure [>20 psi], low pressure [5 to 10 psi], or very low pressure [1 to 2 psi]) and one of two irrigation solutions (castile soap or normal saline). The primary end point was reoperation within 12 months after the index surgery for promotion of wound or bone healing or treatment of a wound infection. A total of 2551 patients underwent randomization, of whom 2447 were deemed eligible and included in the final analyses. Reoperation occurred in 109 of 826 patients (13.2%) in the high-pressure group, 103 of 809 (12.7%) in the low-pressure group, and 111 of 812 (13.7%) in the very-low-pressure group. Hazard ratios for the three pairwise comparisons were as follows: for low versus high pressure, 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70 to 1.20; P=0.53), for high versus very low pressure, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.33; P=0.89), and for low versus very low pressure, 0.93 (95% CI, 0.71 to 1.23; P=0.62). Reoperation occurred in 182 of 1229 patients (14.8%) in the soap group and in 141 of 1218 (11.6%) in the saline group (hazard ratio, 1.32, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.66; P=0.01). The rates of reoperation were similar regardless of irrigation pressure, a finding that indicates that very low pressure is an acceptable, low-cost alternative for the irrigation of open fractures. The reoperation rate was higher in the soap group than in the saline group. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and others; FLOW Clinical

  5. Promotion of acute-phase skin wound healing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa C4 -HSL.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Emi; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Miyairi, Shinichi; Tanno, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Gotoh, Naomasa; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2016-12-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing system, which produces N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12 -HSL) and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C4 -HSL), regulates the virulence factors. In our previous study, 3-oxo-C12 -HSL, encoded by lasI gene, was shown to promote wound healing. However, the effect of C4 -HSL, encoded by rhlI gene, remains to be elucidated. We addressed the effect of C4 -HSL on wounds in P. aeruginosa infection. Wounds were created on the backs of Sprague-Dawley SD rats, and P. aeruginosa PAO1 (PAO1) or its rhlI deletion mutant (ΔrhlI) or lasI deletion mutant (ΔlasI) was inoculated onto the wound. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with anti-C4 -HSL antiserum or treated with C4 -HSL at the wound surface. PAO1 inoculation led to significant acceleration of wound healing, which was associated with neutrophil infiltration and TNF-α synthesis. These responses were reversed, except for TNF-α production, when ΔrhlI was inoculated instead of PAO1 or when rats were co-treated with PAO1 and anti-C4 -HSL antiserum. In contrast, the healing process and neutrophil infiltration, but not TNF-α synthesis, were accelerated when C4 -HSL was administered in the absence of PAO1. This acceleration was not affected by anti-TNF-α antibody. These results suggest that C4 -HSL may be involved in the acceleration of acute wound healing in P. aeruginosa infection by modifying the neutrophilic inflammation. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Management of Chronic Non-healing Wounds by Hirudotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Arsheed; Jan, Afroza; Wajid, MA; Tariq, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    A chronic wound is a wound that does not heal in an orderly set of stages and in a predictable amount of time or wounds that do not heal within three months are often considered chronic. Chronic wounds often remain in the inflammatory stage for too long and may never heal or may take years. Chronic wound patients often report pain as dominant in their lives. Persistent pain is the main problem for patients with chronic ulcers. Many wounds pose no challenge to the body’s innate ability to heal; some wounds, however, may not heal easily either because of the severity of the wounds themselves or because of the poor state of health of the individual. Any wound that does not heal within a few weeks should be examined by a healthcare professional because it might be infected, might reflect an underlying disease. PMID:28289608

  7. The acute effects of preoperative ozone theraphy on surgical wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Hasan; Simsek, Tuncer; Turkon, Hakan; Kalkan, Yıldıray; Ozkul, Faruk; Ozkan, M Turgut Alper; Erbas, Mesut; Altinisik, Ugur; Demiraran, Yavuz

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of preoperative rectal ozone insufflation on surgical wound healing over the proinflammatory cytokines and histopathological changes. Twenty one rabbits were divided into 3 groups. Sham, surgical wound, and ozone applied (6 sessions, every other day 70 µg/mL in 12 mL O2-O3 mixture rectally) surgical wound groups were created. TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels from all rabbits were studied at the basal, 24th hour, and 72nd hour. The histopathological examination was done by removing the surgical scar tissue at the end of 72nd hour. TNF-alfa and IL-6 levels were significantly lower compared to the control group, in the rabbits treated with ozone. The increase in angiogenesis, the decrease in the number of inflammatory cells, epidermal and dermal regeneration, better collagen deposition, and increased keratinisation in stratum corneum were observed in the histopathological examination. It was determined that the wound healing noticeably accelerated in the ozone group. Preoperative rectal ozone insufflation had a positive effect on surgical wound healing in acute period.

  8. Recent advances in topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-05-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no 'magical dressings'. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  9. Acute Management of Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Gropman, Andrea; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Summar, Marshall L.; Ueda, Keiko; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Pena, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Sutton, V. Reid; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Propionic Acidemia or aciduria is an intoxication-type disorder of organic metabolism. Patients deteriorate in times of increased metabolic demand and subsequent catabolism. Metabolic decompensation can manifest with lethargy, vomiting, coma and death if not appropriately treated. On January 28-30, 2011 in Washington, D.C., Children's National Medical Center hosted a group of clinicians, scientists and parental group representatives to design recommendations for acute management of individuals with Propionic Acidemia. Although many of the recommendations are geared towards the previously undiagnosed neonate, the recommendations for a severely metabolically decompensated individual are applicable to any known patient as well. Initial management is critical for prevention of morbidity and mortality. The following manuscript provides recommendations for initial treatment and evaluation, a discussion of issues concerning transport to a metabolic center (if patient presents to a non-metabolic center), acceleration of management and preparation for discharge. PMID:22000903

  10. War wounds of the foot and ankle: causes, characteristics, and initial management.

    PubMed

    Bluman, Eric M; Ficke, James R; Covey, Dana C

    2010-03-01

    Foot and ankle trauma sustained in the Global War on Terror have unique causes and characteristics. At least one-quarter of all battle injuries involve the lower extremity. These severe lower extremity wounds require specialized early treatment. Ballistic mechanisms cause almost all injuries, and as such, most combat foot and ankle wounds are open in nature. Wounds are characteristically caused by blast mechanisms, but high velocity gunshot injuries are also common. The severe and polytraumatic nature of injuries sustained frequently call for damage control orthopaedics to be utilized. Cautious early treatment of irregular and highly exudative ballistic wounds with subatmospheric wound dressings may ease their early management.

  11. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey's antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey's clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims. PMID:25386217

  12. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds. PMID:23162236

  13. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  14. Effectiveness of medical hypnosis for pain reduction and faster wound healing in pediatric acute burn injury: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chester, Stephen J; Stockton, Kellie; De Young, Alexandra; Kipping, Belinda; Tyack, Zephanie; Griffin, Bronwyn; Chester, Ralph L; Kimble, Roy M

    2016-04-29

    Burns and the associated wound care procedures can be extremely painful and anxiety-provoking for children. Burn injured children and adolescents are therefore at greater risk of experiencing a range of psychological reactions, in particular posttraumatic stress disorder, which can persist for months to years after the injury. Non-pharmacological intervention is critical for comprehensive pain and anxiety management and is used alongside pharmacological analgesia and anxiolysis. However, effective non-pharmacological pain and anxiety management during pediatric burn procedures is an area still needing improvement. Medical hypnosis has received support as a technique for effectively decreasing pain and anxiety levels in adults undergoing burn wound care and in children during a variety of painful medical procedures (e.g., bone marrow aspirations, lumbar punctures, voiding cystourethrograms, and post-surgical pain). Pain reduction during burn wound care procedures is linked with improved wound healing rates. To date, no randomized controlled trials have investigated the use of medical hypnosis in pediatric burn populations. Therefore this study aims to determine if medical hypnosis decreases pain, anxiety, and biological stress markers during wound care procedures; improves wound healing times; and decreases rates of traumatic stress reactions in pediatric burn patients. This is a single-center, superiority, parallel-group, prospective randomized controlled trial. Children (4 to 16 years, inclusive) with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing application or change are randomly assigned to either the (1) intervention group (medical hypnosis) or (2) control group (standard care). A minimum of 33 participants are recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain, anxiety, stress, and wound healing are taken at every dressing change until ≥95 % wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection assesses impact on posttraumatic stress

  15. Efficacy of a children’s procedural preparation and distraction device on healing in acute burn wound care procedures: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The intense pain and anxiety triggered by burns and their associated wound care procedures are well established in the literature. Non-pharmacological intervention is a critical component of total pain management protocols and is used as an adjunct to pharmacological analgesia. An example is virtual reality, which has been used effectively to dampen pain intensity and unpleasantness. Possible links or causal relationships between pain/anxiety/stress and burn wound healing have previously not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships, specifically by determining if a newly developed multi-modal procedural preparation and distraction device (Ditto™) used during acute burn wound care procedures will reduce the pain and anxiety of a child and increase the rate of re-epithelialization. Methods/design Children (4 to 12 years) with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing change will be randomly assigned to either the (1) Control group (standard distraction) or (2) Ditto™ intervention group (receiving Ditto™, procedural preparation and Ditto™ distraction). It is intended that a minimum of 29 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain intensity, anxiety, stress and healing will be taken at every dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection will aid in determining patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of the Ditto™ intervention, as well as its effect on speed of wound re-epithelialization. Discussion Results of this study will provide data on whether the disease process can be altered by reducing stress, pain and anxiety in the context of acute burn wounds. Trial registration ACTRN12611000913976 PMID:23234491

  16. Managing complex palliative wounds: an interactive educational approach for district nurses.

    PubMed

    Willis, Shirley; Sutton, Joanne

    2013-09-01

    Complex palliative wounds, although uncommon, are extremely distressing for patients because of their associated symptoms. Managing these symptoms presents significant challenges to clinicians. As the majority of these patients will be managed at home, district nurses will be the main providers of care. The quality of the literature in this field is limited due to the small number of patients presenting with these wounds and the difficulties associated with researching issues within palliative care. However, the literature available identifies that community nurses would value greater education in managing these wounds because the accepted wound healing theories and management strategies do not apply. This underpins the rationale for developing an educational resource to provide district nurses with current, evidence-based information to support their wound-management decisions in caring for this patient group. This paper reports the development, through an action research work-based project, of such an interactive educational package.

  17. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  18. Management of soft tissue wounds of the face.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, V

    2012-09-01

    Since time, immemorial soft-tissue injuries to the face have been documented in literature and even depicted in sculptures, reflecting the image of society. In a polytrauma the face may be involved or there may be isolated injury to the face. The face consists of several organs and aesthetic units. The final outcome depends on initial wound care and primary repair. So one should know the "do's and don'ts". Disfigurement following trauma, becomes a social stigma and has the gross detrimental effect on the personality and future of the victim. Therefore, such cases are most appropriately managed by Plastic Surgeons who have a thorough knowledge of applied anatomy, an aesthetic sense and meticulous atraumatic tissue handling expertise, coupled with surgical skill to repair all the composite structures simultaneously.

  19. Management of soft tissue wounds of the face

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, V.

    2012-01-01

    Since time, immemorial soft-tissue injuries to the face have been documented in literature and even depicted in sculptures, reflecting the image of society. In a polytrauma the face may be involved or there may be isolated injury to the face. The face consists of several organs and aesthetic units. The final outcome depends on initial wound care and primary repair. So one should know the “do's and don’ts”. Disfigurement following trauma, becomes a social stigma and has the gross detrimental effect on the personality and future of the victim. Therefore, such cases are most appropriately managed by Plastic Surgeons who have a thorough knowledge of applied anatomy, an aesthetic sense and meticulous atraumatic tissue handling expertise, coupled with surgical skill to repair all the composite structures simultaneously. PMID:23450264

  20. Skin grafts 2: management of donor site wounds in the community.

    PubMed

    Beldon, Pauline

    2003-09-01

    Skin grafting is a surgical procedure used to quickly restore skin integrity in large wounds or those wounds which cannot be directly closed by suturing. The procedure of skin grafting necessitates the creation of a second wound; the donor site. Although often viewed as secondary importance by surgeons once skin has been harvested from the area, it is the donor site which frequently causes complications such as pain/discomfort and slow healing (Wilkinson, 1997). Because skin graft sites and donor sites are viewed as part of a specialist practice, their wound management is regarded as being 'something different'. However, the donor site is a partial-dermal thickness wound and should be seen as such, rather than a 'special' wound. This may help to lessen the anxiety felt by both patient and nurse in dealing with donor site wounds.

  1. Effects of acute diabetes on rat cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Komesu, Marilena Chinali; Tanga, Marcelo Benetti; Buttros, Kemli Raquel; Nakao, Cristiano

    2004-10-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic hyperglycaemic disorder. Complicated metabolic mechanisms and increased incidence of infections are clinical hallmarks, mostly associated with its chronicity. There is little information about the early pathological processes in diabetes. The objective of our study was to evaluate the healing process during early phases of experimental diabetes on rat skin. METHODS:: Alloxan induced diabetic rats were used. Non-injected animals were used as control. Punch byopsies on dorsal skin had histopathological evaluation of the healing areas made on days 1, 3 and 7 post-surgery. RESULTS:: The results showed that: (1) in diabetics, the inflammation, the initial healing phase, has a slow beginning and tends to last longer; and (2) diabetic animals showed lower density of neutrophils in healing areas up to 3 days after surgery, and in addition, after day 3, when the neutrophils should leave the healing area, and be replaced by macrophages, compared to controls, diabetic animals showed higher numbers of neutrophils. PRINCIPAL CONCLUSION:: Although diabetes is a chronic progressive disease, acute diabetes can be associated to subclinical alterations, and responsible for deficiencies in defense cells and in repair tissue failures.

  2. Acute pain management in children.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-07-15

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal.

  3. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  4. Fish oil supplementation alters levels of lipid mediators of inflammation in microenvironment of acute human wounds

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jodi C.; Massey, Karen; Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds often result from prolonged inflammation involving excessive polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity. Studies show that the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found in fish oils generate bioactive lipid mediators that reduce inflammation and polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment in numerous inflammatory disease models. This study’s purpose was to test the hypotheses that boosting plasma levels of EPA and DHA with oral supplementation would alter lipid mediator levels in acute wound microenvironments and reduce polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels. Eighteen individuals were randomized to 28 days of either EPA + DHA supplementation (Active Group) or placebo. After 28 days, the Active Group had significantly higher plasma levels of EPA (p < 0.001) and DHA (p < 0.001) than the Placebo Group and significantly lower wound fluid levels of two 15-lipoxygenase products of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid [p=0.033] and 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid [p=0.006]), at 24 hours postwounding. The Active Group also had lower mean levels of myeloperoxidase, a leukocyte marker, at 12 hours and significantly more reepithelialization on Day 5 postwounding. We suggest that lipid mediator profiles can be manipulated by altering polyunsaturated fatty acid intake to create a wound microenvironment more conducive to healing. PMID:21362086

  5. Stab wounds of the anterior abdomen. Analysis of a management plan using local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Oreskovich, M R; Carrico, C J

    1983-01-01

    A management plan for stab wounds to the anterior abdomen incorporating local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage was applied to 572 patients. One hundred eighty-five of these patients presented with shock, peritonitis, or evisceration and underwent immediate exploratory laparotomy with the finding of an intraperitoneal organ injury in 183 (99%). The remaining 387 patients with a negative physical examination underwent exploration of the stab wound to determine fascial penetration. Wound exploration was negative in 151 of these patients and they were discharged from the emergency room. Two hundred thirty-six additional patients had penetration of the fascia and underwent peritoneal lavage. Ninety-two per cent of patients with lavage counts greater than 50,000 had an intraperitoneal organ injury. No patients with lavage counts less than 1,000 red cells had an organ injury. Forty-three per cent of patients in the intermediate group (1,000-50,000 RBCs/mm3) had an organ injury and 59% included penetration of a hollow viscus. An approach incorporating local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage followed by exploratory laparotomy for red blood cell counts greater than 1,000 should result in less than 10% negative laparotomies and no missed injuries. PMID:6625712

  6. Acoustic pressure wound therapy for management of mixed partial- and full-thickness burns in a rural wound center.

    PubMed

    Samies, John; Gehling, Marie

    2008-03-01

    Infection, pain, and cosmetically unacceptable scarring frequently complicate full-thickness burns. Outpatient management can be difficult without specialized care. A retrospective case series study was conducted in a rural wound center lacking specialized burn care to assess the clinical effectiveness of acoustic pressure wound therapy, a noncontact low-frequency, nonthermal ultrasound wound therapy that accelerates healing through positive pressure, stimulating fibroblasts, clearing bacteria and debris, and relieving pain. Data from the records of 14 consecutively treated outpatients (age range 5 months to 78 years old) with mixed partial- and full-thickness burns involving the trunk, extremities, or both, averaging 7% of body surface area (range: 1% to 24%), were reviewed. Patients received acoustic pressure wound therapy with standard burn care. Burn thickness was determined by clinical appearance. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated based on scarring characteristics of healed wounds (ie, cosmetic appearance) and pain resolution. Pain was patient-rated using a 10-point visual analog scale (0 = no pain, 10 = severe). Patients were followed for 6 months post-healing. Pain improved with therapy (range: two to 10 treatments). No patient required hospitalization or developed complications related to infection. Pliable, nonhypertrophic scars developed in 86% of patients and hypertrophic scars developed in 14%. Repigmentation was seen in 79% of patients, with only minor irregularities; hypopigmentation occurred in 21%. Scars available for follow-up (71%) remained unchanged. Acoustic pressure wound therapy with standard burn care was found to heal mixed partial- and full-thickness burns and reduced pain in outpatients, resulting in cosmetically acceptable scarring without infectious complications, surgery, or skin grafts and may prove beneficial for inpatient management of extensive full-thickness burns. Further study is warranted.

  7. Surgical management of civilian gunshot wounds to the head.

    PubMed

    Bizhan, Aarabi; Mossop, Corey; Aarabi, Judith Ann

    2015-01-01

    Each year close to 20000 Americans are involved in gunshot wounds to the head (GSWH). Over 90% of the victims of GSWH eventually fail to survive and only a meager 5% of the patients have a chance to continue with a useful life. One of the fundamental jobs of providers is to realize who the best candidate for the best possible management is. Recent evidence indicates that a good Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at the time of admission puts such patients at high priority for management. Lack of abnormal pupillary response to light, trajectory of slug away for central gray, and visibility of basal cisterns upgrade the need for utmost care for such a victim. Surgical management is careful attention to involvement of air sinuses and repair of base dura. Patients with diffuse injury should have intraventricular intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and if needed a timely decompressive craniectomy. Since close to 2% of patients with penetrating brain injury may harbor a vascular injury, subjects with injuries close to the Sylvian fissure and those with the fragment crossing two dural compartments should have computed tomography angiography and if needed digital subtraction angiography to rule out traumatic intracranial aneurysms. In case of a positive study, these patients should have endovascular management of their vascular injuries in order to prevent catastrophic intracerebral hematomas and permanent deficit. Although supported by class III data, subjects of GSWH need to be on broad spectrum antibiotics for a period of 3-5 days. If cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas are observed at any time during the patient's hospital course, they should be taken very seriously and appropriate management is needed to prevent deep intracranial infections.

  8. Developing evidence-based algorithms for negative pressure wound therapy in adults with acute and chronic wounds: literature and expert-based face validation results.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; van Rijswijk, Lia

    2012-04-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is used extensively in the management of acute and chronic wounds, but concerns persist about its efficacy, effectiveness, and safety. Available guidelines and algorithms are wound type-specific, not evidence-based, and many lack clearly described relative and absolute contraindications and stop criteria. The purpose of this research was to: (1) develop evidence-based algorithms for the safe use of NPWT in adults with acute and chronic wounds by nonwound expert clinicians, and (2) obtain face validity for the algorithms. Using NPWT meta-analyses and systematic reviews (n = 10), NPWT guidelines of care (n = 12), general evidence-based guidelines of wound care (n = 11), and a framework for transitioning between moisture-retentive and NPWT care (n = 1), a set of three algorithms was developed. Literature-based validity for each of the 39 discreet algorithm steps/decision points was obtained by reviewing best available evidence from systematic literature reviews (n = 331 publications) and abstraction of all NPWT-relevant publications (n = 182) using the patient-oriented Strength of Recommendation (SORT) taxonomy. Of the 182 NPWT studies abstracted, 25 met criteria for level 1 and 2 evidence but only one general assessment step had both level 1 evidence and an "A" strength of recommendation. Next, an Institutional Review Board-approved, cross-sectional mixed methods survey design face validation pilot study was conducted to solicit comments on, and rate the validity of, the 51 discreet algorithm-related statements, including the 39 decisions/steps. Twelve (12) of the 15 invited interdisciplinary wound experts agreed to participate. The overall algorithm content validity index (CVI) was high (0.96 out of 1). Helpful design suggestions to ensure safe use were made, and participants suggested an examination of commonly used wound definitions in follow-up studies. Results of the literature-based face validation confirm that the

  9. District nurses' knowledge development in wound management: ongoing learning without organizational support.

    PubMed

    Friman, Anne; Wahlberg, Anna Carin; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine; Ebbeskog, Britt

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe district nurses' (DNs') experiences of their knowledge development in wound management when treating patients with different types of wounds at healthcare centers. In primary healthcare, DNs are mainly responsible for wound management. Previous research has focused on DNs' level of expertise regarding wound management, mostly based on quantitative studies. An unanswered question concerns DNs' knowledge development in wound management. The present study therefore intends to broaden understanding and to provide deeper knowledge in regard to the DNs' experiences of their knowledge development when treating patients with wounds. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Subjects were a purposeful sample of 16 DNs from eight healthcare centers in a metropolitan area in Stockholm, Sweden. The study was conducted with qualitative interviews and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The content analysis resulted in three categories and 11 sub-categories. The first category, 'ongoing learning by experience,' was based on experiences of learning alongside clinical practice. The second category 'searching for information,' consisted of various channels for obtaining information. The third category, 'lacking organizational support,' consisted of experiences related to the DNs' work organization, which hindered their development in wound care knowledge. The DNs experienced that they were in a constant state of learning and obtained their wound care knowledge to a great extent through practical work, from their colleagues as well as from various companies. A lack of organizational structures and support from staff management made it difficult for DNs to develop their knowledge and skills in wound management, which can lead to inadequate wound management.

  10. Acute Cutaneous Wounds Treated with Human Decellularised Dermis Show Enhanced Angiogenesis during Healing

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Nicholas S.; Morris, Julie; Benatar, Brian; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of skin substitutes upon angiogenesis during wound healing is unclear. Objectives To compare the angiogenic response in acute cutaneous human wounds treated with autogenic, allogenic and xenogenic skin substitutes to those left to heal by secondary intention. Methods On day 0, four 5mm full-thickness punch biopsies were harvested from fifty healthy volunteers (sites 1-4). In all cases, site 1 healed by secondary intention (control), site 2 was treated with collagen-GAG scaffold (CG), cadaveric decellularised dermis (DCD) was applied to site 3, whilst excised tissue was re-inserted into site 4 (autograft). Depending on study group allocation, healing tissue from sites 1-4 was excised on day 7, 14, 21 or 28. All specimens were bisected, with half used in histological and immunohistochemical evaluation whilst extracted RNA from the remainder enabled whole genome microarrays and qRT-PCR of highlighted angiogenesis-related genes. All wounds were serially imaged over 6 weeks using laser-doppler imaging and spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis. Results Inherent structural differences between skin substitutes influenced the distribution and organisation of capillary networks within regenerating dermis. Haemoglobin flux (p = 0.0035), oxyhaemoglobin concentration (p = 0.0005), and vessel number derived from CD31-based immunohistochemistry (p = 0.046) were significantly greater in DCD wounds at later time points. This correlated with time-matched increases in mRNA expression of membrane-type 6 matrix metalloproteinase (MT6-MMP) (p = 0.021) and prokineticin 2 (PROK2) (p = 0.004). Conclusion Corroborating evidence from invasive and non-invasive modalities demonstrated that treatment with DCD resulted in increased angiogenesis after wounding. Significantly elevated mRNA expression of pro-angiogenic PROK2 and extracellular matrix protease MT6-MMP seen only in the DCD group may contribute to observed responses. PMID:25602294

  11. Management of traumatic war wounds using vacuum-assisted closure dressings in an austere environment.

    PubMed

    Machen, Shaun

    2007-01-01

    The study was undertaken to develop a protocol for the ongoing management of traumatic war wounds in the austere environment of a combat support hospital. A total of 286 surgical procedures were performed by a single orthopaedic surgeon during a 5-month period at a combat support hospital in Iraq. Over 150 procedures were performed on Iraqi soldiers, detainees, and civilians who would receive their definitive care at the combat support hospital, and who would remain as inpatients until their wounds were healed enough for discharge. Initially, all extremity wounds were treated with surgical irrigation and debridement followed by twice daily dressing changes on the wards. As the ward census increased to 75 patients, it became necessary to develop alternate forms of wound management. Field expedient vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) dressings were instituted. These dressings were created with fluffs or prep sponges, suction tubing, Ioband, and portable suction machines. The VAC dressings were left in place for 3 to 4 days and then changed. Traumatic, contaminated, and infected wounds were rapidly debrided and granulation tissue was induced. The portable suction pumps, however, were extremely noisy and failed with continued use. Machines and sponges manufactured by KCI Inc. were purchased. The VAC dressing became an invaluable tool for managing, closing, and preparing wounds for skin grafting. Over 50 traumatic war wounds were treated with the VAC dressing. The clinical courses of 20 of these wounds were carefully documented with digital photography. Over 50 traumatic war wounds were effectively treated with initial irrigation and debridement, followed by serial application of VAC dressings. VAC dressings rapidly debrided contaminated wounds, reduced edema, decreased wound size, and induced granulation tissue. Wounds were then treated by delayed primary closure, local flap coverage, or skin grafting. An effective protocol utilizing VAC dressings was developed for the

  12. Cost-effective wound management: a survey of 1717 nurses.

    PubMed

    Newton, Heather

    2017-06-22

    Delivering high-quality wound care requires a mix of knowledge and skills, which nurses aim to update by attending educational events such as conferences and study days. This article describes the data obtained from 30 educational study days, which took place across England, Scotland and Wales. It will explore nurses' knowledge in relation to the cost-effectiveness and clinical efficacy of current wound care practices, based on the answers of 1717 delegates that attended the events. It will also outline the results in relation to reducing expenditure on wound dressings and the importance of performing an accurate wound assessment.

  13. Development of a wound-management formulary for use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Preece, Jane

    2004-11-01

    A wound-management formulary is an important aid to health-care professionals looking for the most appropriate product for a particular patient. Some of the basic principles of compiling such a formulary are described, providing a step-by-step guide, and concentrating principally on one for wound dressings.

  14. The current concepts in management of animal (dog, cat, snake, scorpion) and human bite wounds.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Hassan; Rhee, Peter; Pandit, Viraj; Tang, Andrew; Gries, Lynn; Joseph, Bellal

    2015-03-01

    Animal and human bite wounds represent a significant global health issue. In the United States, animal and human bites are a very common health issue, causing significant morbidity and even, in rare scenarios, mortality. Most animal bite wounds in the United States are caused by dogs, with cat bites being a distant second. Human bite wounds constitute a dominant subset of all bite wounds. Several studies of bite wounds have reported improved outcomes with early diagnosis and immediate treatment. However, the available literature on the initial treatment provides a plethora of conflicting opinions and results. In this review, our aim was to identify and assess the current evidence on the management of animal (dog, cat, insects, scorpions, and snakes) and human bite wounds. Review article, level III.

  15. Palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Krasner, Diane L; Kennedy, Bruce; Wardle, David; Moir, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    To provide information about palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: 1. Recognize study findings, assessment tools, and non-pharmacologic strategies used for patients with palliative wounds. 2. Summarize pharmacologic and dressing treatment strategies used for wound care management of palliative patients. The principles of palliative wound care should be integrated along the continuum of wound care to address the whole person care needs of palliative patients and their circles of care, which includes members of the patient unit including family, significant others, caregivers, and other healthcare professionals that may be external to the current interprofessional team. Palliative patients often present with chronic debilitating diseases, advanced diseases associated with major organ failure (renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or cardiac), profound dementia, complex psychosocial issues, diminished self-care abilities, and challenging wound-related symptoms. This article introduces key concepts and strategies for palliative wound care that are essential for interprofessional team members to incorporate in clinical practice when caring for palliative patients with wounds and their circles of care.

  16. Clinical evaluation of a thin absorbent skin adhesive dressing for wound management.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, J; Callaghan, R; Wibaux, A; Johnson, P; Carty, N

    2014-11-01

    This article assesses the use of BeneHold Thin Absorbent Skin Adhesive (TASA) wound dressings in a large UK primary care organisation. These wound dressings are thin (0.12 mm), breathable, transparent, and are able to absorb and retain wound exudate. This non-comparative evaluation was undertaken to explore the clinical advantages this differentiated combination of physical properties offered. The dressings are CE-marked medical devices, and were used on patients with acute and chronic wounds that were assessed and classified as light to moderately exuding. Clinical performance was evaluated with respect to the dressing's ease of use (application and removal, conformability, mould-ability, rolling and edge-lift), debridement, protection of the peri-wound, wear time, fluid handling, wound bed residue, visibility of the wound, and clinical acceptability. The evaluating clinicians used an agreed audit tool to collect data from case reports to document the progression of wounds of various aetiologies, including chronic and acute, for a maximum period of four weeks. Qualitative feedback on dressing performance was also collected at the evaluation's end, both from the clinicians' and patients' perspectives Results: Some 15 patients were assessed. The wear time was up to seven days in many cases, and on average was 3.9 days longer than their previous dressings. Clinicians perceived that wounds progressed toward healing in all but two cases, where the wounds remained unchanged. Out of five cases where wounds presented with necrosis, all underwent significant autolytic debridement underneath the new dressings. Transparency was a noted benefit from both the clinicians' and patients' perspectives because it enabled continuous monitoring of the full wound bed and peri-wound skin without the need to disrupt the dressing. The dressing was well-received by both clinicians and patients in all fifteen cases. The thin absorbent skin adhesive dressing was found to be a promising new

  17. Interaction of penetrating missiles with tissues: some common misapprehensions and implications for wound management.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G J; Ryan, J M

    1990-06-01

    It is apparent from review of published papers and books that misunderstanding and confusion exists in the minds of many authors describing the interaction of penetrating missiles with tissues. These misapprehensions may influence the management of wounds by suggesting didactic approaches based upon a preconceived notion of the nature and severity of the wound for different types of projectiles. This review considers the biophysics of penetrating missile wounds, highlights some of the more common misconceptions and seeks to reconcile the conflicting and confusing management doctrines that are promulgated in the literature-differences that arise not only from two scenarios, peace and war, but also from misapprehensions of the wounding process. Wounds of war and of peacetime differ both in the nature of the wound and in the propensity for wound infection. Additionally, the limitations imposed by war dictate the type of management that may be practised and result in procedures that would be considered inappropriate by some in civilian clinical practice. Many of the procedures described in civilian peacetime settings, such as reliance on antibiotics alone for the control of infection in penetrating wounds, or minimal excision and debridement, can yield good results but would herald disaster if transposed to a war setting.

  18. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Imran, Farrah-Hani; Karim, Rahamah; Maat, Noor Hidayah

    2016-05-12

    Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days post-admission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3% of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Nunan, R

    2015-08-01

    A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to heal and leave behind a noticeable scar. At the extreme end, chronic wounds - defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months - have become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world and will only increase as our populations advance in age, and with the increasing incidence of diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Here we describe the clinical problems and how, through better dialogue between basic researchers and clinicians, we may extend our current knowledge to enable the development of novel potential therapeutic treatments. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Acute inflammation is persistent locally in burn wounds: a pivotal role for complement and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    van de Goot, Franklin; Krijnen, Paul A J; Begieneman, Mark P V; Ulrich, Magda M W; Middelkoop, Esther; Niessen, Hans W M

    2009-01-01

    Severe burns can cause major complications, such as infection and deforming scar formation. Burn wounds induce an excessive inflammatory response. Serum levels of complement and the acute phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) are upregulated in response to burn injury and have been shown to be related to the severity of burn trauma and to the clinical outcome. However, complement and CRP have not been investigated on a tissue level locally at the site of the burn trauma. Protein levels and localization of complement activation product C3d and CRP were determined semi-quantitatively in burn eschar between 2 and 46 days after injury, using immunohistochemistry. CD68 and myeloperoxidase (MPO), markers for macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes, respectively, were also analyzed on these biopsies. Skin biopsies of very recent surgical wounds (seconds old) served as controls. C3d and CRP are present at high levels in the burn wound. Protein levels of both mediators are significantly elevated up to at least 46 days after injury in comparison with control wounds. In line with this, neutrophils and macrophages infiltrate the burn wound in high numbers up to at least 46 days after injury. The excessive presence of the inflammatory mediators, complement and CRP, and the increased infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in burn wounds up to 46 days after injury implicate a persistent ongoing acute inflammation locally in the burn wound up to weeks after the initial trauma.

  1. Acute bronchitis: Evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Blush, Raymond R

    2013-10-10

    Acute bronchitis affects millions of individuals, significantly impacting patient health and the healthcare industry. Understanding evaluation and treatment guidelines for acute bronchitis allows the nurse practitioner to practice comprehensive care for patients. This article reviews evidence-based practices when caring for the patient with acute bronchitis, promoting optimization of healthy outcomes.

  2. Management of Large Sternal Wound Infections With the Superior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Eburdery, H; Grolleau, J L; Berthier, C; Bertheuil, N; Chaput, B

    2016-01-01

    The management of sternal wound infections often requires pedicled flaps. In recent years, the emergence of perforator flaps has changed our management of wounds involving tissue loss. For sternal wounds, the superior epigastric artery perforator (SEAP) flap can be used with the propeller procedure with minimal donor site morbidity. In our practice, this flap has replaced the traditional latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps in the treatment of many sternal wounds. We report our experience with 4 patients with large sternal wound infection after cardiothoracic operations. The SEAP flap appears a safe alternative for low-morbidity coverage of sternal infections. Moreover, muscle flaps remain available in case the SEAP flap fails. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Wound prevention in the surgical intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Le Moel, Carole; Mounier, Roman; Ardic-Pulas, Taline

    2012-11-01

    Literature reports a high prevalence of wounds in the hospital environment. A study devoted to wounds encountered in post-surgical intensive care has been carried out in a university hospital. This work highlighted the diversity of acute wounds mainly observed in intensive care and the difficulties nurses have in managing them.

  4. Management of acute pancreatitis in emergency.

    PubMed

    Ojetti, V; Migneco, A; Manno, A; Verbo, A; Rizzo, G; Gentiloni Silveri, N

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the medical and endoscopic approachs to patients with acute mild or severe pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas whose the main determinant of the outcome is the extent of pancreatic necrosis. After the diagnosis, a severity assessment using scoring systems and early contrast enhanced Computed Tomography should be performed in all patients within 48 hours from the admission. All cases of severe acute pancreatitis should be managed initially in intensive care units with full systems support. Patients with gallstone pancreatitis should have definitive Endoscopic Retrograde Colangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) or surgical management of the gallstones.

  5. The Use of NPWT-i Technology in Complex Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Robert A; Punch, Laurie; Van Epps, Jeffrey; Gordon-Burroughs, Sherilyn; Martinez, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Advanced wound management of complex surgical wounds remains a significant challenge as more patients are being hospitalized with infected wounds. Reducing recurrent infections and promoting granulation tissue formation is essential to overall wound healing. Wounds with acute infection and critical colonization require advanced multimodal approaches including systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and primary wound care. The goal in surgical wound management is to optimize clinical outcomes such as time to wound closure and functional recovery. A review of current literature suggests that negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWT-i) is a viable adjunct therapy in the management of infected wounds especially in patients with medical comorbidities. The aim of this case series is to highlight the ability of NPWT-i as adjunct to prepare the wound bed for closure on infected surgical wounds that would normally require multiple operations to obtain source control. PMID:28083464

  6. The Use of NPWT-i Technology in Complex Surgical Wounds.

    PubMed

    Rupert, Paula; Ochoa, Robert A; Punch, Laurie; Van Epps, Jeffrey; Gordon-Burroughs, Sherilyn; Martinez, Sylvia

    2016-12-08

    Advanced wound management of complex surgical wounds remains a significant challenge as more patients are being hospitalized with infected wounds. Reducing recurrent infections and promoting granulation tissue formation is essential to overall wound healing. Wounds with acute infection and critical colonization require advanced multimodal approaches including systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and primary wound care. The goal in surgical wound management is to optimize clinical outcomes such as time to wound closure and functional recovery. A review of current literature suggests that negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWT-i) is a viable adjunct therapy in the management of infected wounds especially in patients with medical comorbidities. The aim of this case series is to highlight the ability of NPWT-i as adjunct to prepare the wound bed for closure on infected surgical wounds that would normally require multiple operations to obtain source control.

  7. Organization and management of the treatment for the wounded in 8.12 Tinjin Port Explosion, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xia; Li, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Cong-Zhe; Zhu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tianjin Medical University General Hospital treated 233 wounded in 8.12 Tinjin Port explosion. Here we would like to analyze the treatment process for the wounded, and share the experiences of orga- nization and management for emergency rescue operation.

  8. Therapy of acute wounds with water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA).

    PubMed

    Hartel, Mark; Illing, Peter; Mercer, James B; Lademann, Jürgen; Daeschlein, Georg; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2007-12-28

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) as a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and with a low thermal load to the skin surface acts both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA produces a therapeutically usable field of heat in the tissue and increases tissue temperature, tissue oxygen partial pressure, and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient tissue supply with energy and oxygen and consequently as well for wound healing and infection defense. wIRA can considerably alleviate the pain (with remarkably less need for analgesics) and diminish an elevated wound exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. wIRA can advance wound healing or improve an impaired wound healing both in acute and in chronic wounds including infected wounds. Even the normal wound healing process can be improved.A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study with 111 patients after major abdominal surgery at the University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany, showed with 20 minutes irradiation twice a day (starting on the second postoperative day) in the group with wIRA and visible light VIS (wIRA(+VIS), approximately 75% wIRA, 25% VIS) compared to a control group with only VIS a significant and relevant pain reduction combined with a markedly decreased required dose of analgesics: during 230 single irradiations with wIRA(+VIS) the pain decreased without any exception (median of decrease of pain on postoperative days 2-6 was 13.4 on a 100 mm visual analog scale VAS 0-100), while pain remained unchanged in the control group (p<0.001). The required dose of analgesics was 57-70% lower in the subgroups with wIRA(+VIS) compared to the control subgroups with only VIS (median 598 versus 1398 ml ropivacaine, p<0.001, for peridural catheter analgesia; 31 versus 102 mg piritramide, p=0.001, for patient-controlled analgesia; 3.4 versus 10.2 g metamizole, p=0.005, for intravenous and

  9. Therapy of acute wounds with water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA)

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Mark; Illing, Peter; Mercer, James B.; Lademann, Jürgen; Daeschlein, Georg; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2007-01-01

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) as a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and with a low thermal load to the skin surface acts both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA produces a therapeutically usable field of heat in the tissue and increases tissue temperature, tissue oxygen partial pressure, and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient tissue supply with energy and oxygen and consequently as well for wound healing and infection defense. wIRA can considerably alleviate the pain (with remarkably less need for analgesics) and diminish an elevated wound exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. wIRA can advance wound healing or improve an impaired wound healing both in acute and in chronic wounds including infected wounds. Even the normal wound healing process can be improved. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study with 111 patients after major abdominal surgery at the University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany, showed with 20 minutes irradiation twice a day (starting on the second postoperative day) in the group with wIRA and visible light VIS (wIRA(+VIS), approximately 75% wIRA, 25% VIS) compared to a control group with only VIS a significant and relevant pain reduction combined with a markedly decreased required dose of analgesics: during 230 single irradiations with wIRA(+VIS) the pain decreased without any exception (median of decrease of pain on postoperative days 2-6 was 13.4 on a 100 mm visual analog scale VAS 0-100), while pain remained unchanged in the control group (p<0.001). The required dose of analgesics was 57-70% lower in the subgroups with wIRA(+VIS) compared to the control subgroups with only VIS (median 598 versus 1398 ml ropivacaine, p<0.001, for peridural catheter analgesia; 31 versus 102 mg piritramide, p=0.001, for patient-controlled analgesia; 3.4 versus 10.2 g metamizole, p=0.005, for intravenous

  10. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain: new powerful tool for closed wound management: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Jun; Han, DaeHee; Song, Hyunsuk; Jang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Ha; Park, Myong Chul

    2014-07-01

    Although various reconstructive flap surgeries have been successfully performed, there still are difficult wound complications, such as seroma formation, wound margin necrosis, delayed wound healing, and even flap failures. The negative-pressure wound therapy has been described in detail in the literature to assist open chronic/complex wound closure in reconstructive surgery. However, the negative-pressure wound therapy was difficult to be applied under the incisional closed wounds. A total of 23 patients underwent the various reconstructive flap surgeries with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain. Instead of using regular suction units, Barovac (50-90 mm Hg, Sewoon Medical, Seoul, Republic of Korea) drainage tubes were connected to the wall suction unit, providing continuous high-powered negative pressure. In addition, continuous subatmospheric suction pressure (100-300 mm Hg) was applied. Outcome of the measures was obtained from the incidence of seroma, volume of postoperative drainage, hospitalization period, and incidence of other typical wound complications. Dead space was evaluated postoperatively with ultrasonography. Using continuous high-pressure negative suction drain, successful management of seroma was obtained without any major complication such as wound infection, flap loss, and wound margin necrosis, except for only 1 case of seroma after discharge from the hospital. The indwelling time of the drain in the latissimus dorsi donor site was significantly reduced in comparison with the authors' previous data (P = 0.047). The volume of drainage and hospitalization period were also reduced; however, these were not statistically significant. The dead space with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain was more reduced than in the control group in the immediate postoperative period and confirmed with ultrasonography. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain might be the simple and powerful solution in the management of challenging

  11. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model.

    PubMed

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  12. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model

    PubMed Central

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  13. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  14. A multinational health professional perspective of the prevalence of mood disorders in patients with acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dominic; Solowiej, Kazia; Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has started to identify mood disorders and problems associated with acute and chronic wounds, which have been shown to contribute to delayed healing, poor patient well-being and a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, mood disorders have been shown to have a negative impact on financial costs for service providers and the wider society in terms of treatment and sickness absence. This study aimed to survey a multinational sample of health professionals to explore their perspective and awareness of mood disorders amongst acute and chronic wound patients. Responses were received from n = 908 health professionals working in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. A strong awareness of the prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be widespread among the health professionals across the world, in addition to a view on the potential factors contributing to these problems with mood. Despite this, it was thought that few patients were actually receiving treatment for their mood disorders. Implications for clinical practice include the need for health professionals to engage actively with their patients to enable them to learn from their experiences. Studies that explore the benefits of treatments and techniques appropriate for minimising mood disorders in patients with wounds would provide empirical evidence for health professionals to make recommendations for patients with acute and chronic wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  16. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    PubMed

    Karna, S L Rajasekhar; D'Arpa, Peter; Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  17. The influence of captive adolescent male chimpanzees on wounding: management and welfare implications.

    PubMed

    Ross, S R; Bloomsmith, M A; Bettinger, T L; Wagner, K E

    2009-11-01

    Adolescence, the period lasting from the onset of puberty to the emergence of physical and sexual maturity, is a period of social change for many species including chimpanzees. Several reports have implicitly linked the physiological changes that occur during male chimpanzee adolescence to significant disruption in the social group, which in turn may result in serious agonism and wounding. To assess the association between adolescent males and wounding rates, 38 institutions housing 399 chimpanzees among 59 social groups, recorded all wounds incurred by chimpanzees over a 6-month period. The rate of wounding did not differ between groups with or without adolescent males. Adolescent males received the most wounds, but were no more likely to cause wounds than group members of any other sex-age class. Social groups with multiple adult males experienced lower wounding rates than those with a single adult male. Results indicate that (1) adolescent male chimpanzees may receive, but not inflict, more wounds than chimpanzees in other sex-age classes; and (2) management strategies that support natural social groupings may control and limit group agonism.

  18. Recent patents on topical application of honey in wound and burn management.

    PubMed

    Benhanifia, Mokhtar B; Boukraâ, Laïd; Hammoudi, Si M; Sulaiman, Siti A; Manivannan, Lavaniya

    2011-01-01

    Topical application of honey to burn and wounds has been found to be effective in controlling infection and producing a clean granulating bed. It is suggested that the wound healing effect of honey may in part be related to the release of inflammatory cytokines from surrounding tissue cells, mainly monocytes and macrophages. It has been reported that honey hastens wound healing by accelerating wound contractions. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated that there was a significant acceleration of dermal repair in wound treated with honey. Macroscopic and microscopic observations under in vivo assessment suggested that the topical application of honey might have favourable influences on the various phases of burn and wound healing hence accelerating the healing process. The regulatory effects of honey are related to components other than the sugars. However, the mechanisms by which honey affects the release of anti inflammatory agents and growth factors from monocytic cells are as yet unclear. Whether honey affects other cell types, particularly endothelial cells and fibroblasts, involved in wound healing also needs to be clarified. The present article is a short review of recent patents on the healing effect of honey in wound and burn management.

  19. Advanced Wound Therapies in the Management of Severe Military Lower Limb Trauma: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Lt Col S. L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the treatment of injuries resulting from land mine explosions using a holistic approach that includes gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and encompasses wound bed preparation, exudate management, and infection control. Method: In the treatment of 3 traumatic injuries, each requiring limb amputation, we describe the application of NPWT using the Chariker-Jeter system, which uses a single layer of saline-moistened antimicrobial gauze laid directly onto the wound bed. A silicone drain is placed on the gauze and then more gauze is placed over the drain to fill the wound. This is then covered with a clear semipermeable film, cut so that there is a 2- to 3-cm border around the wound allowing it to be sealed onto healthy skin. Results: In each of the cases described, we were able to achieve wound closure prior to successful skin grafting, and the patients have recovered well despite the severity of their injuries. Conclusion: We discuss the potential advantages of the Chariker-Jeter system over polyurethane foam as a method of delivering NPWT in highly extensive and irregular-shaped wounds created by land mine explosions while stressing the importance of thorough and effective wound bed preparation. PMID:19696875

  20. Closed suction drainage versus closed simple drainage in the management of modified radical mastectomy wounds.

    PubMed

    Ezeome, E R; Adebamowo, C A

    2008-09-01

    To compare the outcomes of modified radical mastectomy wounds managed by closed wound drainage with suction and without suction. A prospective randomised trial was conducted at the University College Hospital in Ibadan, and the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital in Enugu. Fifty women who required modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer were randomised to have closed wound drainage with suction (26 patients) and closed wound drainage without suction (24 patients). There was no significant difference in the intraoperative and postoperative variables. Suction drainage drained less volume of fluid and stayed for a shorter time in the wound, but the differences were not significant. There was no difference in the length of hospital stay, time to stitch removal, and number of dressing changes. More haematomas and wound infections occurred in the simple drain group while more seromas occurred in the suction drain group, but these were not significant. The suction drain was more difficult to manage and the cost was 15 times higher than the simple drainage system. Closed simple drains are not inferior to suction drains in mastectomy wounds and, considering the cost saving and simplicity of postoperative care, they are preferable to suction drains.

  1. Carbon fibre composites: integrated electrochemical sensors for wound management.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Duncan; Forsythe, Stephen; Davis, James

    2008-07-01

    The applicability of employing a carbon fibre mesh as an electrochemical sensing substructure for assessing urate transformations within wound exudates is evaluated. Prototype sensor assemblies have been designed and their response characteristics towards uric acid and other common physiological components are detailed. Modification of the carbon fibre sensor through surface anodization and the application of cellulose acetate permselective barriers have been shown to lead to optimized responses and much greater sensitivity (1440% increase) and specificity. These could enable the accurate periodic monitoring of uric acid in wound fluid. The performance characteristics of the composite sensors in whole blood, serum and blister fluid have been investigated.

  2. Soft Tissue Management of War Wounds to the Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Baechler, Martin F.; Groth, Adam T.; Nesti, Leon J.; Martin, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    The recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in severe foot and ankle wounds to many United States service members. Amputation of the severely damaged extremity often is the only option, while amputation of the potentially salvageable extremity may be chosen by the patient and the surgeon as the preferred reconstructive treatment.1 When salvage is pursued, enormous challenges are encountered in managing the complex wounds of war. The cumulative experiences of military surgeons have been invaluable in advancing reconstructive surgery of the war-wounded foot and ankle.2,3 This work details the experiences of United States military reconstructive surgeons in the soft tissue management of the war wounds of the foot and ankle resulting from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:20189120

  3. Critical care issues in managing complex open abdominal wound.

    PubMed

    Dutton, William D; Diaz, Jose J; Miller, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, surgical specialties have introduced and expanded the role of open abdominal management in complicated operative cases, necessitating an intensivist's understanding of the indications and unique intensive care unit (ICU) issues related to the open abdomen. When presented with the open abdomen, resuscitation to correct shock is of primary concern. This is accomplished by correction of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy in trauma and adequate resolution of intra-abdominal hypertension or source control in general surgery. These patients typically require deep sedation and often paralysis and benefit from low-volume ventilatory strategies to prevent and treat acute lung injury. Antibiotics must be tailored to the clinical situation, but in most cases, 24 hours of perioperative treatment is all that is required. In cases of gross contamination and peritonitis, a 5- to 7-day course of broad-spectrum antibiotics may be of benefit.Adequate source control has been demonstrated to have the greatest impact on outcome and when the patient's clinical milieu dictates, bedside washouts. Enteral nutrition should be instituted as early as possible after intestinal continuity has been reestablished. Additional protein is required to account for losses from the open abdomen. Reconstruction may require staging, but in general, should proceed following resolution of shock and control of sepsis. Elevated multiorgan dysfunction score, Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), and a rise in peak inspiratory pressure portend poor source control and could result in failure of fascial closure. If unable to proceed to fascial closure, then considerations should be made for planned ventral hernia and subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction.

  4. Wound management of ulcerated haemangioma of infancy - an audit.

    PubMed

    Lokmic, Zerina; Grainger, Taya; Atapattu, Nadeeja V; Phillips, Roderic J; Penington, Anthony J

    2017-03-01

    Haemangioma of infancy, a benign tumour of blood vessels, is the most common tumour of infancy. Ulceration, the most common complication, presents a unique wound care challenge. A retrospective audit of medical records of children with haemangioma of infancy who presented to the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, between January 2000 and December 2014 was undertaken with an aim to examine wound management of ulcerated haemangioma of infancy. In total, 535 hospital medical records were identified as suitable, of which 352 were randomly selected and audited, of which 84 patients had ulcerated haemangioma of infancy, and 62 were subject to wound management. Of these, 35 were successfully managed by wound dressings, 9 were not fully healed at the time of last review, and 18 were referred for surgical excision. Patients attended an average of five outpatient visits, and the average time from presentation to documented healing was 105 days. There were a total of 225 episodes of wound dressing, for which there was a documented follow-up appointment at which healing could be assessed. Although a wide range of dressings were used, there was no clear pattern of benefit of one dressing over another. Wounds were less likely to be healed after the use of a silver-impregnated dressing. Pain was poorly documented. Clinical assessment of whether wounds were infected was of no help in planning treatment. There is considerable variability in the management of this difficult wound group, and further prospective studies are required. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Outcomes in controlled and comparative studies on non-healing wounds: recommendations to improve the quality of evidence in wound management.

    PubMed

    Gottrup, F; Apelqvist, J; Price, P

    2010-06-01

    While there is a consensus that clinical practice should be evidence based, this can be difficult to achieve due to confusion about the value of the various approaches to wound management. To address this, the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) set up a Patient Outcome Group whose remit was to produce recommendations on clinical data collection in wound care. This document, produced by the group and disseminated by JWC, identifies criteria for producing rigorous outcomes in both randomised controlled trials and clinical studies, and describes how to ensure studies are consistent and reproducible.

  6. Wound Dressings and Comparative Effectiveness Data

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Aditya; Granick, Mark S.; Tomaselli, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Injury to the skin provides a unique challenge, as wound healing is a complex and intricate process. Acute wounds have the potential to move from the acute wound to chronic wounds, requiring the physician to have a thorough understanding of outside interventions to bring these wounds back into the healing cascade. Recent Advances: The development of new and effective interventions in wound care remains an area of intense research. Negative pressure wound therapy has undoubtedly changed wound care from this point forward and has proven beneficial for a variety of wounds. Hydroconductive dressings are another category that is emerging with studies underway. Other modalities such as hyperbaric oxygen, growth factors, biologic dressings, skin substitutes, and regenerative materials have also proven efficacious in advancing the wound-healing process through a variety of mechanisms. Critical Issues: There is an overwhelming amount of wound dressings available in the market. This implies the lack of full understanding of wound care and management. The point of using advanced dressings is to improve upon specific wound characteristics to bring it as close to “ideal” as possible. It is only after properly assessing the wound characteristics and obtaining knowledge about available products that the “ideal” dressing may be chosen. Future Directions: The future of wound healing at this point remains unknown. Few high-quality, randomized controlled trials evaluating wound dressings exist and do not clearly demonstrate superiority of many materials or categories. Comparative effectiveness research can be used as a tool to evaluate topical therapy for wound care moving into the future. Until further data emerge, education on the available products and logical clinical thought must prevail. PMID:25126472

  7. Management of stab wounds to the anterior abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Rezende-Neto, João Baptista; Vieira, Hélio Machado; Rodrigues, Bruno de Lima; Rizoli, Sandro; Nascimento, Barto; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of the Publication "Evidence Based Telemedicine - Trauma and Emergency Surgery" (TBE-CiTE), through literature review, selected three recent articles on the treatment of victims stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The first study looked at the role of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment of patients with stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The second examined the use of laparoscopy over serial physical examinations to evaluate patients in need of laparotomy. The third did a review of surgical exploration of the abdominal wound, use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage and CT for the early identification of significant lesions and the best time for intervention. There was consensus to laparotomy in the presence of hemodynamic instability or signs of peritonitis, or evisceration. The wound should be explored under local anesthesia and if there is no injury to the aponeurosis the patient can be discharged. In the presence of penetration into the abdominal cavity, serial abdominal examinations are safe without CT. Laparoscopy is well indicated when there is doubt about any intracavitary lesion, in centers experienced in this method.

  8. Time to get serious about assessing - and managing - psychosocial issues associated with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Susan J

    2013-03-01

    This article comprises a review of the literature published during the period January 2011 to June 2012 on the topic of the psychosocial impact of wounds and strategies to manage them. There is a growing discussion of the reciprocal link between psychological influences and wound healing. Although the mechanisms underlying these influences are not well understood, evidence from the reviewed literature adds to the existing body of evidence demonstrating that negative psychological states can impair immune function and wound healing. Despite this recognition, there are still few studies that provide strategies to address the identified psychosocial issues associated with wounds, particularly those of chronic duration. A wide range of psychosocial factors likely to be associated with a wound have been identified. The importance of understanding the nature and extent of their impact is illustrated by the patients' experiences of living with a chronic wound which they rate as serious as cancer or myocardial infarction. Although there is currently limited evidence on which to base management strategies, it is recommended that interventions should commence with a comprehensive individualized assessment which can then inform the development of an appropriate management plan that includes the identified psychosocial issues.

  9. Wearable light management system for light stimulated healing of large area chronic wounds (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, David; Mayer, Jan; Fricke, Sören; Schnieper, Marc; Ferrini, Rolando

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals, and health care systems, affecting over 40 million patients and creating costs of approximately 40 billion € annually. We will present a medical device for photo-stimulated wound care based on a wearable large area flexible and disposable light management system consisting of a waveguide with incorporated micro- and nanometer scale optical structures for efficient light in-coupling, waveguiding and homogeneous illumination of large area wounds. The working principle of this innovative device is based on the therapeutic effects of visible light to facilitate the self-healing process of chronic wounds. On the one hand, light exposure in the red (656nm) induces growth of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in deeper layers of the skin. On the other hand, blue light (453nm) is known to have antibacterial effects predominately at the surface layers of the skin. In order to be compliant with medical requirements the system will consist of two elements: a disposable wound dressing with embedded flexible optical waveguides for the light management and illumination of the wound area, and a non-disposable compact module containing the light sources, a controller, a rechargeable battery, and a data transmission unit. In particular, we will report on the developed light management system. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, a demonstrator will be presented and its performances will be reported to demonstrate the potential of this innovative device.

  10. The acute management of haemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, CRG

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the acute thrombosis and strangulation of haemorrhoids is a common condition, there is no consensus as to its most effective treatment. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken for papers describing the aetiology and treatment of the acute complications of haemorrhoids. Results The anatomy and treatments for strangulated internal haemorrhoids and thrombosed perianal varices are discussed. Studies of the effectiveness and complications of conservative and operative treatments are reviewed. Conclusions Ambiguities exist in the terminology used to describe the two separate pathologies that make up the acute complications of haemorrhoids. These complications have traditionally been treated conservatively. There is evidence that early operative intervention for strangulated internal haemorrhoids is safe and effective. A suggested algorithm for treatment is given, based on the published literature. PMID:25245728

  11. The acute management of haemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Hardy, A; Cohen, C R G

    2014-10-01

    Although the acute thrombosis and strangulation of haemorrhoids is a common condition, there is no consensus as to its most effective treatment. A PubMed search was undertaken for papers describing the aetiology and treatment of the acute complications of haemorrhoids. The anatomy and treatments for strangulated internal haemorrhoids and thrombosed perianal varices are discussed. Studies of the effectiveness and complications of conservative and operative treatments are reviewed. Ambiguities exist in the terminology used to describe the two separate pathologies that make up the acute complications of haemorrhoids. These complications have traditionally been treated conservatively. There is evidence that early operative intervention for strangulated internal haemorrhoids is safe and effective. A suggested algorithm for treatment is given, based on the published literature.

  12. 77 FR 31337 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed... Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured...

  13. 77 FR 3454 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the... Committee meeting of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the...

  14. 76 FR 56743 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed... Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured...

  15. 78 FR 38015 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the... Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill,...

  16. 78 FR 66902 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded... Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill,...

  17. Temporary Rectal Stenting for Management of Severe Perineal Wounds in Two Dogs.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Owen T; Cuddy, Laura C; Coisman, James G; Covey, Jennifer L; Ellison, Gary W

    Perineal wounds in dogs present a challenge due to limited local availability of skin for closure and constant exposure to fecal contaminants. This report describes temporary rectal stenting in two dogs following severe perineal wounds. Dog 1 presented with a 4 × 4 cm full-thickness perineal slough secondary to multiple rectal perforations. A 12 mm internal diameter endotracheal tube was placed per-rectum as a temporary stent to minimize fecal contamination. The stent was removed 18 days after placement, and the perineal wound had healed at 32 days post-stent placement, when a minor rectal stricture associated with mild, intermittent tenesmus was detected. Long-term outcome was deemed good. Dog 2 presented with multiple necrotic wounds with myiasis, circumferentially surrounding the anus and extending along the tail. A 14 mm internal diameter endotracheal tube was placed per-rectum. The perineal and tail wounds were managed with surgical debridement and wet-to-dry and honey dressings prior to caudectomy and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Delayed secondary wound closure and stent removal were performed on day six without complication. Long-term outcome was deemed excellent. Temporary rectal stenting may be a useful technique for fecal diversion to facilitate resolution of complex perineal injuries, including rectal perforation.

  18. Practical management of acute asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Hallstrand, Teal S; Fahy, John V

    2002-02-01

    All asthma patients are at risk for acute asthma exacerbations. Moderate to severe exacerbations account for many emergency department visits and subsequent hospitalizations each year. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of acute asthma. The purpose of this review is to provide practical guidance in the assessment and treatment of adults with acute asthma in the hospital setting. Managing patients with acute asthma involves assessing the severity of the exacerbation, implementing measures to rapidly reverse airflow limitation, and instituting therapies that limit the progression of airway inflammation. Some patients may benefit from other supportive measures such as heliox and noninvasive ventilation. If the patient continues to deteriorate and requires mechanical ventilation, then ventilator settings that minimize the risk of hyperinflation should be chosen. After an episode of acute asthma, long-term preventive medications, especially inhaled corticosteroids, should be prescribed and education should be provided to prevent future episodes.

  19. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  20. Setting up an acute pain management service.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Gandhi, Kishor; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2014-12-01

    Successful implementation of an acute pain management service involves a team approach in which team members have clearly defined roles. Clinical protocols are designed to help address common problems and prevent errors. As the complexity of surgery and patients' diseases continues to increase, current knowledge of new analgesic medications, acute pain literature, and skills in regional anesthesia techniques is imperative. Emphasizing a multimodal approach can improve analgesia and decrease opioid-related side effects.

  1. Management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Harik, Nada S; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In children, osteomyelitis is primarily hematogenous in origin and acute in nature. The principal cause of osteomyelitis in children is Staphylococcus aureus, and both the epidemiology and pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, including osteomyelitis, have changed in recent years owing to the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This review focuses on advances in the diagnosis and overall management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children with these changes in mind. PMID:20109047

  2. Decorin blocks scarring and cystic cavitation in acute and induces scar dissolution in chronic spinal cord wounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Bansal, Daljeet; Tizzard, Katie; Surey, Sarina; Esmaeili, Maryam; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2014-04-01

    In the injured central nervous system (CNS), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/2-induced scarring and wound cavitation impede axon regeneration implying that a combination of both scar suppression and axogenic treatments is required to achieve functional recovery. After treating acute and chronic dorsal funicular spinal cord lesions (DFL) in adult rats with the pan-TGF-β1/2 antagonist Decorin, we report that in: (1), acute DFL, the development of all injury parameters was significantly retarded e.g., wound cavity area by 68%, encapsulation of the wound by a glia limitans accessoria (GLA) by 65%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 94%, fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 87%, 48% and 48%, respectively, and both macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 60%; and (2), chronic DFL, all the above parameters were attenuated to a lesser extent e.g., wound cavity area by 11%, GLA encapsulation by 25%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 31%, extracellular fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 58%, 22% and 29%, respectively, and macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 44%. Moreover, in acute and chronic DFL, levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were raised (by 236% and 482%, respectively), as were active-MMP-2 (by 64% and 91%, respectively) and active-MMP-9 (by 122% and 18%, respectively), while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was suppressed (by 56% and 23%, respectively) and active-TIMP-1 and active TIMP-2 were both lower but only significantly suppressed in acute DFL (by 56 and 21%, respectively). These findings demonstrate that both scar tissue mass and cavitation are attenuated in acute and chronic spinal cord wounds by Decorin treatment and suggest that the dominant effect of Decorin during acute scarring is anti-fibrogenic through suppression of inflammatory fibrosis by neutralisation of TGF-β1/2 whereas, in chronic lesions, Decorin-induction of tPA and MMP (concomitant with reduced complimentary levels of TIMP and PAI-1

  3. Evaluation of the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Edmond P H; Chin, Weng Yee; Wan, Eric Y F; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-05-01

    To examine the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing the healing progress in acute and chronic wounds. It is important to establish the responsiveness of instruments used in conducting wound care assessments to ensure that they are able to capture changes in wound healing accurately over time. Prospective longitudinal observational study. The key study instrument was the PUSH tool. Internal responsiveness was assessed using paired t-testing and effect size statistics. External responsiveness was assessed using multiple linear regression. All new patients with at least one eligible acute or chronic wound, enrolled in the Nurse and Allied Health Clinic-Wound Care programme between 1 December 2012 - 31 March 2013 were included for analysis (N = 541). Overall, the PUSH tool was able to detect statistically significant changes in wound healing between baseline and discharge. The effect size statistics were large. The internal responsiveness of the PUSH tool was confirmed in patients with a variety of different wound types including venous ulcers, pressure ulcers, neuropathic ulcers, burns and scalds, skin tears, surgical wounds and traumatic wounds. After controlling for age, gender and wound type, subjects in the 'wound improved but not healed' group had a smaller change in PUSH scores than those in the 'wound healed' group. Subjects in the 'wound static or worsened' group had the smallest change in PUSH scores. The external responsiveness was confirmed. The internal and external responsiveness of the PUSH tool confirmed that it can be used to track the healing progress of both acute and chronic wounds. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The use of a dermal substitute to preserve maximal foot length in diabetic foot wounds with tendon and bone exposure following urgent surgical debridement for acute infection.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Giacomo; Caminiti, Maurizio; Curci, Vincenzo; Quarantiello, Antonella; Faglia, Ezio

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the utility of a dermal substitute for preserving maximal foot length after urgent surgical debridement. Patients referred to our Diabetic Foot Center with foot lesions were assessed for sensory-motor neuropathy, infection and critical limb ischaemia. The presence of acute foot infection indicated the need for immediate surgical debridement. The degree of amputation, if necessary, was based on the amount of apparently non infected vital tissue. When vital tendon/bone tissue remained exposed, the lesion was covered with a dermal substitute. From January to December 2008, 393 patients underwent surgical treatment for diabetic foot syndrome; 30 patients underwent immediate surgical debridement resulting in exposed tendon and/or bone tissues. An average of 4.4 +/- 2.1 days following surgical debridement, all 30 patients underwent dermal regeneration template grafting to cover-exposed healthy tendon and bone tissues, instead of achieving primary wound closure with a proximal amputation. After 21 days, a skin graft was performed. Complete wound healing occurred in 26 patients (86.7%). In these patients, the amputation level was significantly more distal (P < 0.003) with respect to that potentially required for immediate wound closure. The average healing time was 74.1 +/- 28.9 days. Four patients underwent a more proximal amputation. No patients underwent major amputation. The use of the dermal substitute for treating exposed tendon and bone tissues allowed timely wound healing and preserved maximal foot length. Continued follow-up will allow assessment of long-term relapse and complication rates. Such treatment could constitute part of the comprehensive management of diabetic wounds.

  5. The management of chronic wounds: factors that affect nurses' decision-making.

    PubMed

    Boxer, E; Maynard, C

    1999-09-01

    This study sought to determine how registered nurses make decisions regarding the management of chronic wounds. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of both Likert-type and open-ended questions was used to survey registered nurses working in hospitals and community services in a large Australian city. A total of 140 questionnaires were returned from a variety of clinical settings. The study revealed that registered nurses had a significant role in chronic wound management. However, they relied primarily on their own experience and that of colleagues for decision making in which they had varying degrees of autonomy. The authors conclude that nurses and medical staff require more objective, research-based education on wound assessment and management.

  6. Modern medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Larry B

    2014-01-01

    The modern management of patients with ischemic stroke begins by having a system in place that organizes the provision of preventive, acute treatment, and rehabilitative services. In the acute setting, initial evaluation is aimed at rapidly establishing a diagnosis by excluding stroke mimics, distinguishing between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, and determining if the patient is a candidate for treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA, alteplase). In some centers, select patients who do not qualify for administration of IV-tPA may be considered for endovascular intervention. General measures include the use of platelet antiaggregants, treatment of fever, blood pressure management, and continuation of statins if the patient has already been taking them. Post-acute evaluation and management is aimed at secondary prevention and optimizing recovery, including recognition and treatment of post-stroke depression.

  7. The Use Of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) In The Management Of Enteroatmospheric Fistula--Case Report And Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jaguścik, Rajmund; Walczak, Dominik A; Porzeżyńska, Joanna; Trzeciak, Piotr W

    2015-10-01

    An enteric fistula that occurs in an open abdomen is called an enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) and is the most challenging complication for a surgical team to deal with. The treatment of EAF requires a multidisciplinary approach. First of all, sepsis has to be managed. Any fluid, electrolyte and metabolic disorders need to be corrected. Oral intake must be stopped and total parenteral nutrition introduced. The control and drainage of the effluent from the fistula is a separate issue. Since there are no fixed algorithms for the treatment of EAF, surgeons need to develop their own, often highly unconventional solutions. We present the case of a 24-year-old man who developed enteroatmospheric fistula after laparotomy and relaparotomy due to acute necrotic pancreatitis. Both the laparostomy and the fistula were successfully managed using modified negative pressure wound therapy. The literature regarding this issue was also reviewed.

  8. Acute Ultraviolet Radiation Perturbs Epithelialization but not the Biomechanical Strength of Full-thickness Cutaneous Wounds.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Lerche, Catharina M; Wulf, Hans Christian; Jorgensen, Lars N; Liedberg, Ann-Sofie H; Hansson, Christer; Ågren, Magnus S

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that priming of the skin with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) before being injured would enhance wound healing. Four groups, each comprising 20 immunocompetent hairless mice, were exposed to simulated solar irradiation in escalating UVR doses; 0 standard erythema dose (SED) = control, 1 SED, 3 SED and 5 SED. Twenty-four hours after UV irradiation, inflammation was quantified by skin reflectance (erythema) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) tissue levels, and two 6 mm full-thickness excisional wounds and one 3 cm incisional wound were inflicted. Epidermal hyperplasia was assessed by quantitative histology. Five days after wounding, wound coverage by neoepithelium and wound width of the excisional wounds was quantified in hematoxylin-eosin sections, and breaking strength was measured in strips from incisional wounds. Erythema (P < 0.001), MPO levels (P < 0.0005) and epidermal cell layers (P < 0.001) increased dose-dependently by UV exposure of dorsal skin. In the excisional wounds, epithelial coverage decreased (P = 0.024) by increasing the UVR dose, whereas there was no significant difference (P = 0.765) in wound MPO levels. Neither wound width (P = 0.850) nor breaking strength (P = 0.320) differed among the groups. Solar-simulated UVR 24 h before wounding impaired epithelialization but was not detrimental for surgical incisional wound healing.

  9. Alginate dressings in surgery and wound management--Part 1.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S

    2000-02-01

    Large quantities of alginate dressings are used each year to treat exuding wounds, such as leg ulcers, pressure sores and infected surgical wounds. Originally these dressings were a loose fleece formed primarily from fibres of calcium alginate. More recently they have been developed so that the fibres have been entangled to form a product with more cohesive structure, which increases the fabric's strength when it is soaked with exudate or blood. Some products also contain a significant proportion of sodium alginate to improve the gelling properties of the dressing in use. Other dressings have been produced from freeze-dried alginate. Once in contact with an exuding wound, an ion-exchange reaction takes place between the calcium ions in the dressing and sodium ions in serum or wound fluid. When a significant proportion of the calcium ions on the fibre have been replaced by sodium, the fibre swells and partially dissolves forming a gel-like mass. The degree of swelling is determined principally by the chemical composition of the alginate, which depends on its botanical source. Although it is recognised that the differences between the various brands of dressings may influence their handling characteristics--particularly when wet--it is generally assumed that these differences are of limited relevance to the dressing's performance clinically or at a cellular level. There is some evidence to suggest, however, that these assumptions may be wrong and that alginates may influence wound healing in a number of ways not yet fully understood. This three-part review of the literature encompasses the history, origin, structure, chemistry and clinical applications of alginates and alginate dressings. This review reveals that, despite their widespread use, alginates have been the subject of very few well-controlled clinical studies. There is fairly convincing evidence, however, that they do offer advantages over more traditional dressings for at least some clinical indications

  10. Estimating the costs associated with the management of patients with chronic wounds using linked routine data.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ceri J; Humphreys, Ioan; Fletcher, Jacqui; Harding, Keith; Chamberlain, George; Macey, Steven

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are known to represent a significant burden to patients and National Health Service (NHS) alike. However, previous attempts to estimate the costs associated with the management of chronic wounds have been based on literature studies or broad estimates derived from incidence rates and extrapolations from relatively small-scale studies. The aim of this study is therefore to determine the extent of resource utilisation by patients classed as having chronic wounds within Wales using linked routine data - available through the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) database - to estimate the costs associated with the management of these patients by the NHS in Wales. The SAIL database brings together, and anonymously links, a wide range of person-based data from general practitioner (GP) practices within Wales, which includes primary and secondary care consultations to create an encrypted anonymised linking field for each individual. This linkage allows the patient pathway to be tracked through the NHS system both retrospectively and prospectively from a specific reference date. The estimated costs were derived by extrapolating to an all-Wales level from the results gleaned from the SAIL database using the respective READ codes to capture relevant patients with chronic wounds. The number of patients identified as having chronic wounds within the SAIL database was 78 090, which equates to 190 463 across Wales as a whole and a prevalence of 6% of the Welsh population. The total cost of managing patients with chronic wounds in Wales amounted to £328·8 million - an average cost of £1727 per patient and 5·5% of total expenditure on the health service in Wales. A relatively few READ codes represented a significant proportion of expenditure, with diabetic foot ulcers, leg ulcers, foot ulcers, varicose eczema, bed sores and postoperative wound care constituting 93% of total expenditure. When a more conservative perspective was used in relation to

  11. Differentially expressed miRNAs in acute wound healing of the skin: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; He, Quanyong; Luo, Chengqun; Qian, Liyuan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) from scar and normal skin areas in patients who suffered acute injuries in the skin. A total of 9 patients with acute injuries in the skin who received surgical treatment from December 2012 to March 2013 were included in this pilot study. Specimens from the hypertrophic scar and normal skin areas were obtained from the same patient during surgery. To screen for differentially expressed miRNAs, we applied 3 statistical methods, namely the traditional t test, the false discovery rate (FDR), and a novel sure independence screening procedure based on the distance correlation (DC-SIS). We examined the functional trends and metabolic and regulatory pathways for the target genes of the identified miRNAs, and explored interaction of these miRNAs in the implication of scar healing using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. DC-SIS identified 18 differentially expressed miRNAs, 4 of which (miR-149, miR-203a, miR-222, miR-122) were also identified by FDR. The target genes of the 4 miRNAs exhibit a variety of biological functions, and are involved in various pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase, Wnt signaling, and focal adhesion. We identified 1 network in which 14 out of the 18 differentially expressed miRNAs were involved. Many of the miRNAs in the network target genes were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis.In this pilot study, we identified several miRNAs exhibiting differential expression in patients who suffered acute injuries in the skin. Further studies on these miRNAs are needed to validate our findings and explore their roles in the wound healing process of the skin.

  12. Debridement Techniques in Pediatric Trauma and Burn-Related Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; King, Timothy W.; Gosain, Ankush

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Traumatic injuries are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the initial assessment and management of traumatic and burn wounds in children. Special attention is given to wound cleansing, debridement techniques, and considerations for pain management and psychosocial support for children and families. Recent Advances: Basic and translational research over the last 5–7 years has advanced our knowledge related to the optimal care of acute pediatric traumatic and burn wounds. Data concerning methods, volume, solution and timing for irrigation of acute traumatic wounds, timing and methods of wound debridement, including hydrosurgery and plasma knife coblation, and wound dressings are presented. Additionally, data concerning the long-term psychosocial outcomes following acute injury are presented. Critical Issues: The care of pediatric trauma and burn-related wounds requires prompt assessment, pain control, cleansing, debridement, application of appropriate dressings, and close follow-up. Ideally, a knowledgeable multidisciplinary team cares for these patients. A limitation in the care of these patients is the relative paucity of data specific to the care of acute traumatic wounds in the pediatric population. Future Directions: Research is ongoing in the arenas of new debridement techniques and instruments, and in wound dressing technology. Dedicated research on these topics in the pediatric population will serve to strengthen and advance the care of pediatric patients with acute traumatic and burn wounds. PMID:26487978

  13. Debridement Techniques in Pediatric Trauma and Burn-Related Wounds.

    PubMed

    Block, Lisa; King, Timothy W; Gosain, Ankush

    2015-10-01

    Significance: Traumatic injuries are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the initial assessment and management of traumatic and burn wounds in children. Special attention is given to wound cleansing, debridement techniques, and considerations for pain management and psychosocial support for children and families. Recent Advances: Basic and translational research over the last 5-7 years has advanced our knowledge related to the optimal care of acute pediatric traumatic and burn wounds. Data concerning methods, volume, solution and timing for irrigation of acute traumatic wounds, timing and methods of wound debridement, including hydrosurgery and plasma knife coblation, and wound dressings are presented. Additionally, data concerning the long-term psychosocial outcomes following acute injury are presented. Critical Issues: The care of pediatric trauma and burn-related wounds requires prompt assessment, pain control, cleansing, debridement, application of appropriate dressings, and close follow-up. Ideally, a knowledgeable multidisciplinary team cares for these patients. A limitation in the care of these patients is the relative paucity of data specific to the care of acute traumatic wounds in the pediatric population. Future Directions: Research is ongoing in the arenas of new debridement techniques and instruments, and in wound dressing technology. Dedicated research on these topics in the pediatric population will serve to strengthen and advance the care of pediatric patients with acute traumatic and burn wounds.

  14. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation.

  15. An algorithmic approach for managing orthopaedic surgical wounds of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugenia H; Garcia, Ryan; Pien, Irene; Thomas, Steven; Levin, L Scott; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2014-06-01

    Wound breakdown after orthopaedic foot and ankle surgery may necessitate secondary soft tissue coverage. The foot and ankle region is challenging to reconstruct for orthopaedic and plastic surgeons owing to its complex bony anatomy and unique functional demands. Therefore, identifying strategies for plastic surgery of these wounds may help guide surgeons in defining the best treatment plan. We evaluated our current algorithmic approach for managing orthopaedic surgical wounds of the foot and ankle with respect to whether (1) prophylactic or simultaneous soft tissue coverage affected wound-healing complications (secondary plastic surgery, orthopaedic hardware removal, malunion, further orthopaedic surgery, ultimate failure) and (2) postoperative referral for soft tissue management was associated with wound location, size, and orthopaedic procedure. We retrospectively reviewed 112 patients who underwent elective orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery and required concomitant plastic surgery at our institution. Study end points included secondary plastic surgery procedures, hardware removal for infection, foot or ankle malunion, further orthopaedic surgery, and wound-healing failure as defined by a chronic nonhealing wound or need for amputation. Minimum followup was 0.6 months (mean, 24.9 months; range, 0.6-197 months). Four patients were lost to complete followup. We developed an algorithm that centers on two critical points of care: preoperative evaluation by the orthopaedic surgeon and evaluation and treatment by the plastic surgeon after referral. Compared with postoperative intervention, prophylactic or simultaneous soft tissue coverage did not lead to differences in frequency of secondary plastic surgery procedures (p = 0.55), hardware removal procedures (p = 0.13), malunions (p = 0.47), further orthopaedic surgery (p = 0.48), and ultimate failure (p = 0.27). Patients referred postoperatively for soft tissue management most frequently had dorsal ankle wounds (p < 0

  16. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  17. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  18. Intravenous Adenosine for Surgical Management of Penetrating Heart Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kokotsakis, John; Hountis, Panagiotis; Antonopoulos, Nikolaos; Skouteli, Elian; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2007-01-01

    Accurate suturing of penetrating cardiac injuries is difficult. Heart motion, ongoing blood loss, arrhythmias due to heart manipulation, and the near-death condition of the patient can all affect the outcome. Rapid intravenous injection of adenosine induces temporary asystole that enables placement of sutures in a motionless surgical field. Use of this technique improves surgical conditions, and it is faster than other methods. Herein, we describe our experience with the use of intravenous adenosine to successfully treat 3 patients who had penetrating heart wounds. PMID:17420798

  19. Soft tissue management of war wounds to the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Martin F; Groth, Adam T; Nesti, Leon J; Martin, Barry D

    2010-03-01

    This article details the experiences of United States military reconstructive surgeons in the soft tissue management of war wounds of the foot and ankle resulting from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. War wounds from this conflict are commonly caused by blast and fragmentation, and are characteristically extensive, heterogeneous, and severe. Multiple serial débridement episodes are routinely necessary because of deterioration of the wounds over time, which is in contrast to civilian trauma wherein fewer débridement episodes are generally required. Wound therapy adjuncts, such as subatmospheric wound dressing and synthetic dermal replacement, have been used extensively with favorable results. Pedicled flaps, such as the distally based sural neurofasciocutaneous flap, are reliable, and avoid the risks and technical demands associated with microsurgery. Free tissue transfer, such as the anterolateral thigh flap, the latissimus dorsi muscle flap, and the rectus abdominis muscle flap, are powerful reconstructive tools, and have been extensively used in the reconstruction of war wounds of the foot and ankle.

  20. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    PubMed

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function.

  1. Managing acute upper GI bleeding, preventing recurrences.

    PubMed

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Qadeer, Mohammed A; Vargo, John J

    2010-02-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is common and potentially life-threatening and needs a prompt assessment and aggressive medical management. All patients need to undergo endoscopy to diagnose, assess, and possibly treat any underlying lesion. In addition, patients found to have bleeding ulcers should receive a proton pump inhibitor, the dosage and duration of treatment depending on the endoscopic findings and clinical factors.

  2. Community-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    In August 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) presented a vignette to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) on a proposed targeted health care delivery model for chronic care. The proposed model was defined as multidisciplinary, ambulatory, community-based care that bridged the gap between primary and tertiary care, and was intended for individuals with a chronic disease who were at risk of a hospital admission or emergency department visit. The goals of this care model were thought to include: the prevention of emergency department visits, a reduction in hospital admissions and re-admissions, facilitation of earlier hospital discharge, a reduction or delay in long-term care admissions, and an improvement in mortality and other disease-specific patient outcomes.OHTAC approved the development of an evidence-based assessment to determine the effectiveness of specialized community based care for the management of heart failure, Type 2 diabetes and chronic wounds.PLEASE VISIT THE MEDICAL ADVISORY SECRETARIAT WEB SITE AT: www.health.gov.on.ca/ohtas to review the following reports associated with the Specialized Multidisciplinary Community-Based care series.Specialized multidisciplinary community-based care series: a summary of evidence-based analysesCommunity-based care for the specialized management of heart failure: an evidence-based analysisCommunity-based care for chronic wound management: an evidence-based analysisPlease note that the evidence-based analysis of specialized community-based care for the management of diabetes titled: "Community-based care for the management of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based analysis" has been published as part of the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform at this URL: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/ohtas/tech_diabetes_20091020.htmlPLEASE VISIT THE TORONTO HEALTH ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT COLLABORATIVE WEB SITE AT: http

  3. Comparison of the effect of topical versus systemic L-arginine on wound healing in acute incisional diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zandifar, Alireza; Seifabadi, Sima; Zandifar, Ehsan; Beheshti, Sajedeh Sohrabi; Aslani, Abolfazl; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired wound healing. The amino acid L-arginine is the only substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the topical versus systemic L-arginine treatment on total nitrite (NOx) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in wound fluid and rate of wound healing in an acute incisional diabetic wound model. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 Sprague-Dawley rats were used of which 32 were rendered diabetic. Animals underwent a dorsal skin incision. Dm-sys-arg group (N = 8, diabetic) and Norm-sys-arg group (N = 8, normoglycemic) were gavaged with L-arginine. Dm-sys-control group (N = 8, diabetic) and Norm-sys-control group (N = 8, normoglycemic) were gavaged with water. Dm-top-arg group (N = 8, diabetic) and norm-top-arg group (N = 8, normoglycemic) received topical L-arginine gel. Dm-top-control group (N = 8, diabetic) received gel vehicle. On the day 5 the amount of NOx in wound fluid was measured by Griess reaction. VEGF/total protein in wound fluids was also measured on day 5 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All wound tissue specimens were fixed and stained to be evaluated for rate of healing. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 18.0, Chicago, IL, USA) through One-way analysis of variance test and Tukey's post-hoc. Results: In dm-sys-arg group, the level of NOx on day 5 was significantly more than dm-top-arg group (P < 0.05). VEGF content in L-arginine treated groups were significantly more than controls (P < 0.05). Rate of diabetic wound healing in dm-sys-arg group was significantly more than dm-top-arg group. Conclusion: Systemic L-arginine is more efficient than topical L-arginine in wound healing. This process is mediated at least in part, by increasing VEGF and NO in the wound fluid. PMID:26109968

  4. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  5. Using leptospermum honey to manage wounds impaired by radiotherapy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Robson, Val; Cooper, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced tissue injury and wounds with radiation-impaired healing are traumatic for patients and challenging for their caregivers. Standardized management approaches do not exist. The effect of Leptospermum honey as a primary dressing for managing these wounds was assessed in four patients (age range 63 to 93 years) who had previously undergone radiotherapy that left them with fragile friable areas of damaged skin that did not respond to conventional treatment. Compromised areas involved the neck, cheek, groin/perineum, and chest. In patients 1 and 2, after topical application of honey via hydrofiber rope and nonadhesive foam, respectively, improvements in the size and condition of wound/periwound area and a reduction in pain were noted before death or loss to follow-up. After including honey in the treatment regimen of patients 3 and 4, complete healing was noted in 2.5 weeks (with honey and paraffin) and 6 weeks (with honey-soaked hydrofiber rope), respectively. No adverse events were reported. Honey as an adjunct to conventional wound/skin care post radiation therapy shows promise for less painful healing in these chronic wounds. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm these observations.

  6. In Vitro Models in Biocompatibility Assessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Keong, Lim Chin; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2009-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (β-1,4-D-glucosamine) has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability to an uncertain degree. Hence, the modified biomedical-grade of chitosan derivatives should be pre-examined in vitro in order to produce high-quality, biocompatible dressings. In vitro toxicity examinations are more favorable than those performed in vivo, as the results are more reproducible and predictive. In this paper, basic in vitro tools were used to evaluate cellular and molecular responses with regard to the biocompatibility of biomedical-grade chitosan. Three paramount experimental parameters of biocompatibility in vitro namely cytocompatibility, genotoxicity and skin pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, were generally reviewed for biomedical-grade chitosan as wound dressing. PMID:19399250

  7. Acute pain: effective management requires comprehensive assessment.

    PubMed

    Radnovich, Richard; Chapman, C Richard; Gudin, Jeffrey A; Panchal, Sunil J; Webster, Lynn R; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Pain is among the most common reasons that patients seek medical care, and inadequate assessment may result in suboptimal management. Acute pain in response to trauma or surgery can be complex, variable, and dynamic, but its assessment is often simplistic and brief. One-dimensional rating scale measures of pain severity facilitate rapid evaluation and often form the basis of treatment algorithms. However, additional features of pain should inform the selection of a treatment regimen, and can include pain qualities, duration, impact on functional capabilities, and underlying cause. Patient age, sex, psychosocial features, and comorbid conditions are also important features to consider. Use of a multidimensional tool is recommended for assessing many of these features if time permits. Additionally, clinicians often fail to recognize or consider the potentially detrimental long-term effects of acute pain. As the United States continues to experience a prescription drug crisis, a "universal precautions" approach including abuse risk assessment and abuse deterrence strategies should be implemented for patients receiving opioids. Increased efforts and research are necessary to enhance the utility of available acute pain assessment tools. Developing more comprehensive tools for patient assessment is the first step in achieving the ultimate goal of effective acute pain management. The objectives of this review are to summarize issues regarding the complexity of acute pain and to provide suggestions for its evaluation.

  8. Current Perspectives of Prophylaxis and Management of Acute Infective Endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Tranos, Paris; Dervenis, Nikolaos; Vakalis, Athanasios N; Asteriadis, Solon; Stavrakas, Panagiotis; Konstas, Anastasios G P

    2016-05-01

    Endophthalmitis is an intraocular inflammatory condition which may or may not be caused by infective agents. Noninfectious (sterile) endophthalmitis may be attributable to various causes including postoperative retained soft lens matter or toxicity following introduction of other agents into the eye. Infectious endophthalmitis is further subdivided into endogenous and exogenous. In endogenous endophthalmitis there is hematogenous spread of organisms from a distant source of infection whereas in exogenous endophthalmitis direct microbial inoculation may occur usually following ocular surgery or penetrating eye injury with or without intraocular foreign bodies. Acute infective endophthalmitis is usually exogenous induced by inoculation of pathogens following ocular surgery, open-globe injury and intravitreal injections. More infrequently the infective source is internal and septicemia spreads to the eye resulting in endogenous endophthalmitis. Several risk factors have been implicated including immunosuppression, ocular surface abnormalities, poor surgical wound construction, complicated cataract surgery with vitreous loss and certain types of intraocular lens. Comprehensive guidelines and recommendations on prophylaxis and monitoring of surgical cases have been proposed to minimize the risk of acute endophthalmitis. Early diagnosis and prompt management of infective endophthalmitis employing appropriately selected intravitreal antibiotics are essential to optimize visual outcome.

  9. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two feet was the most used method of diagnosing Charcot foot. Along with clinical inspection, temperature difference was also the measurement used for monitoring of healing. None of the suggested formalised classification systems were used to any extent. Most responders use detachable bandages for offloading (83%). All centres use some form of a multidisciplinary team, with the most common permanent members being orthopaedic surgeons (71%), wound specialist nurses (76%), podiatrists (65%), endocrinologists (47%) and diabetes specialist nurses (41%). We conducted a survey of the diagnosis and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. none. not relevant.

  10. TGF-β1 expression in wound healing is acutely affected by experimental malnutrition and early enteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudia Cristina; Torrinhas, Raquel Susana; Giorgi, Ricardo; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Logullo, Angela Flavia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2014-10-01

    Malnutrition is associated with the delay or failure of healing. We assessed the effect of experimental malnutrition and early enteral feeding with standard diet or diet supplemented with arginine and antioxidants on the levels of mRNA encoding growth factors in acute, open wound healing. Standardised cutaneous dorsal wounds and gastrostomies for enteral feeding were created in malnourished (M, n = 27) and eutrophic control (E, n = 30) Lewis male adult rats. Both M and E rats received isocaloric and isonitrogenous regimens with oral chow and saline (C), standard (S) or supplemented (A) enteral diets. On post-trauma day 7, mRNA levels of growth factor genes were analysed in wound granulation tissue by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). M(C) rats had significantly lower transforming growth factor β(TGF-β1 ) mRNA levels than E(C) rats (2·58 ± 0·83 versus 3·53 ± 0·57, P < 0·01) and in comparison with M(S) and M(A) rats (4·66 ± 2·49 and 4·61 ± 2·11, respectively; P < 0·05). VEGF and KGF-7 mRNA levels were lower in M(A) rats than in E(A) rats (0·74 ± 0·16 versus 1·25 ± 0·66; and 1·07 ± 0·45 versus 1·79 ± 0·89, respectively; P≤ 0·04), but did not differ from levels in E(C) and M(C) animals. In experimental open acute wound healing, previous malnutrition decreased local mRNA levels of TGF-β1 genes, which was minimised by early enteral feeding with standard or supplemented diets. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Emergency care for acute wound entering of plutonium and americium into the body (real case)].

    PubMed

    Krasniuk, V I; Gasteva, G N; Blinov, A P; Kuz'menko, L G

    2005-01-01

    The article describes a case of slowly soluble plutonium and americium compounds entering human body via skin wound. During the wound healing, the authors followed features of biokinetics of the radioactive substances, determined the major route of their excretion, evaluated efficiency of surgical d-bridement and complexation medicine (pentacin). clinical and biophysicdata collected could serve to increase efficiency of urgent therapeutic and prophylactic measures aimed to individuals with wounds contaminated with radioactive substances.

  12. Effects of nicotine on corneal wound healing following acute alkali burn.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Won; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that smoking is a pivotal risk factor for the progression of several chronic diseases. Nicotine, the addictive component of cigarettes, has powerful pathophysiological properties in the body. Although the effects of cigarette smoking on corneal re-epithelialization have been studied, the effects of nicotine on corneal wound healing-related neovascularization and fibrosis have not been fully demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic administration of nicotine on corneal wound healing following acute insult induced by an alkali burn. BALB/C female mice randomly received either vehicle (2% saccharin) or nicotine (100 or 200 μg/ml in 2% saccharin) in drinking water ad libitum. After 1 week, animals were re-randomized and the experimental group was subjected to a corneal alkali burn, and then nicotine was administered until day 14 after the alkali burn. A corneal alkali burn model was generated by placing a piece of 2 mm-diameter filter paper soaked in 1N NaOH on the right eye. Histopathological analysis and the expression level of the pro-angiogenic genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) revealed that chronic nicotine administration enhanced alkali burn-induced corneal neovascularization. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of the pro-fibrogenic factors α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and collagen α1 (Col1) was enhanced in the high-concentration nicotine-treated group compared with the vehicle group after corneal injury. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed that the αSMA-positive area was increased in chronic nicotine-treated mice after corneal alkali burn. An in vitro assay found that expression of the α3, α7, and β1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits was significantly increased by chemical injury in human corneal fibroblast cells. Moreover, alkali-induced fibrogenic gene expression and

  13. Role of mesenchymal stem cells on cornea wound healing induced by acute alkali burn.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lin; Li, Zhan-rong; Su, Wen-ru; Li, Yong-ping; Lin, Miao-li; Zhang, Wen-xin; Liu, Yi; Wan, Qian; Liang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subconjunctivally administered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on corneal wound healing in the acute stage of an alkali burn. A corneal alkali burn model was generated by placing a piece of 3-mm diameter filter paper soaked in NaOH on the right eye of 48 Sprague-Dawley female rats. 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of a suspension of 2×10(6) MSCs in 0.1 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on day 0 and day 3 after the corneal alkali burn. The other 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of an equal amount of PBS as a control. Deficiencies of the corneal epithelium and the area of corneal neovascularization (CNV) were evaluated on days 3 and 7 after the corneal alkali burn. Infiltrated CD68(+) cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. The mRNA expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). In addition, VEGF protein levels were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MSCs significantly enhanced the recovery of the corneal epithelium and decreased the CNV area compared with the control group. On day 7, the quantity of infiltrated CD68(+) cells was significantly lower in the MSC group and the mRNA levels of MIP-1α, TNF-α, and VEGF and the protein levels of VEGF were also down-regulated. However, the expression of MCP-1 was not different between the two groups. Our results suggest that subconjunctival injection of MSCs significantly accelerates corneal wound healing, attenuates inflammation and reduces CNV in alkaline-burned corneas; these effects were found to be related to a reduction of infiltrated CD68(+) cells and the down-regulation of MIP-1α, TNF-α and VEGF.

  14. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cornea Wound Healing Induced by Acute Alkali Burn

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lin; Li, Zhan-rong; Su, Wen-ru; Li, Yong-ping; Lin, Miao-li; Zhang, Wen-xin; Liu, Yi; Wan, Qian; Liang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subconjunctivally administered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on corneal wound healing in the acute stage of an alkali burn. A corneal alkali burn model was generated by placing a piece of 3-mm diameter filter paper soaked in NaOH on the right eye of 48 Sprague-Dawley female rats. 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of a suspension of 2×106 MSCs in 0.1 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on day 0 and day 3 after the corneal alkali burn. The other 24 rats were administered a subconjunctival injection of an equal amount of PBS as a control. Deficiencies of the corneal epithelium and the area of corneal neovascularization (CNV) were evaluated on days 3 and 7 after the corneal alkali burn. Infiltrated CD68+ cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. The mRNA expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). In addition, VEGF protein levels were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MSCs significantly enhanced the recovery of the corneal epithelium and decreased the CNV area compared with the control group. On day 7, the quantity of infiltrated CD68+ cells was significantly lower in the MSC group and the mRNA levels of MIP-1α, TNF-α, and VEGF and the protein levels of VEGF were also down-regulated. However, the expression of MCP-1 was not different between the two groups. Our results suggest that subconjunctival injection of MSCs significantly accelerates corneal wound healing, attenuates inflammation and reduces CNV in alkaline-burned corneas; these effects were found to be related to a reduction of infiltrated CD68+ cells and the down-regulation of MIP-1α, TNF-α and VEGF. PMID:22363499

  15. VAC therapy for wound management in patients with contraindications to surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Negosanti, Luca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Nejad, Parissa; Pinto, Valentina; Tavaniello, Beatrice; Palo, Stefano; Oranges, Carlo Maria; Fabbri, Erich; Michelina, Veronica Vietti; Zannetti, Guido; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of complex wounds often requires multiple surgical debridement and eventually reconstruction with skin grafts or flaps, under local or general anesthesia. When the patient's general conditions contraindicate surgical procedures, topical negative pressure with vacuum assisted closure (VAC)) device can achieve wound healing with reduction of healing time and simpler management. We treated with VAC device four patients with complex wounds and important contraindications to surgery. In all the patients, we used VAC device with common protocol of topical negative pressure. The healing was obtained in a period variable between 18 and 40 days; the results were satisfactory in three cases, one patient developed an aesthetically unpleasant scar. We present our experience to propose VAC when surgical procedures are contraindicated.

  16. Anesthesia with topical lidocaine hydrochloride gauzes in acute traumatic wounds in triage, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, Milan L; Leenders, Noukje; Goddijn, Helma; Schep, Niels W; Lirk, Philipp; Goslings, J Carel; Hollmann, Markus W

    2016-09-01

    Topical application of lidocaine in wounds has been studied in combination with vasoconstrictive additives, but the effect without these additives is unknown. The objective was to examine use of lidocaine-soaked gauzes without vasoconstrictive agents, in traumatic wounds in adult patients, applied in triage. A prospective pilot study was performed during 6 weeks in the Emergency Department of a level 1 trauma center. Wounds of consecutive adult patients were treated with a nursing protocol, consisting of lidocaine hydrochloride administration directly into the wound and leaving a lidocaine-soaked gauze, until wound treatment. Primary outcome was need for infiltration anesthesia. Secondary outcomes were Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores, adverse events and patient and physician satisfaction. Forty patients with a traumatic wound were included, 85% male with a wound on the arm. Thirty-seven patients needed a painful procedure as wound treatment. When suturing was necessary, 77% required additional infiltration anesthesia. Mean NRS pain scores decreased from 3.3 to 2.2 after application of the lidocaine gauze. No adverse events were recorded. Of the patients, 60% were satisfied with use of the lidocaine gauzes, compared to 40% of physicians. Lidocaine hydrochloride (2%) gauzes without vasoconstrictive additives cannot replace infiltration anesthesia in traumatic wounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Negative-pressure wound therapy for management of diabetic foot wounds: a review of the mechanism of action, clinical applications, and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammed Y.; Teo, Rachel; Nather, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) plays an important role in the treatment of complex wounds. Its effect on limb salvage in the management of the diabetic foot is well described in the literature. However, a successful outcome in this subgroup of diabetic patients requires a multidisciplinary approach with careful patient selection, appropriate surgical debridement, targeted antibiotic therapy, and optimization of healing markers. Evolving NPWT technology including instillation therapy, nanocrystalline adjuncts, and portable systems can further improve results if used with correct indications. This review article summarizes current knowledge about the role of NPWT in the management of the diabetic foot and its mode of action, clinical applications, and recent developments. PMID:26140663

  18. Management of acute childhood fevers.

    PubMed

    Teuten, Polly; Paul, Siba Prosad; Heaton, Paul Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Feverish illnesses commonly affect children and are the second most frequent reason for a child to be admitted to hospital. Most cases are viral in origin, usually with a good prognosis. Fever can be caused by severe and rapidly progressive illness which needs urgent referral to hospital for potentially life-saving treatment, and community practitioners must be able to identify such cases showing 'red flag'features. The fear of serious disease among parents and carers may result in 'fever phobia' leading to minor illnesses being managed inappropriately. Community practitioners are well placed to reassure and support families, and to provide education regarding the facts about fever, the appropriate use of antipyretic medication, how to avoid dehydration, and the beneficial role of immunisation in preventing infection.

  19. Deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery: management and risk factor analysis for mortality.

    PubMed

    Yumun, Gunduz; Erdolu, Burak; Toktas, Faruk; Eris, Cuneyt; Ay, Derih; Turk, Tamer; As, Ahmet Kagan

    2014-08-01

    Deep sternal wound infection is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to mortality, and to explore wound management techniques on deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery. Between 2008 and 2013, 58 patients with deep sternal wound infection were analyzed. Risk factors for mortality and morbidity including age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, chronic renal failure, hypertension, diabetes, and treatment choice were investigated. In this study, 19 patients (32.7%) were treated by primary surgical closure (PSC), and 39 patients (67.3%) were treated by delayed surgical closure following a vacuum-assisted closure system (VAC). Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Fourteen patients (24.1%) died in the postoperative first month. The mortality rate and mean duration of hospitalization in the PSC group was higher than in the VAC group (P = .026, P = .034). Significant risk factors for mortality were additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE. Delayed surgical closure following VAC therapy may be associated with shorter hospitalization and lower mortality in patients with deep sternal wound infection. Additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE were associated with mortality.

  20. A novel approach to wound management and prosthetic use with concurrent vacuum-assisted closure therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew; Luff, Robin; Van Den Boom, Monique

    2011-06-01

    Stump healing is critical to post amputation management. When healing is not optimal, immobility is prolonged and patients risk hospital acquired deconditioning. Two clinical cases with unhealed trans-femoral stump wounds are described. Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) dressing with concurrent prosthetic utilisation was undertaken successfully in both cases. Fitting of the prosthetic socket included space for VAC dressing with modifications to allow the suction piping to exit the prosthesis. With VAC application, timely rehabilitation and mobility was enabled despite incomplete wound healing. The two clinical cases described made excellent progress. Discharge home was expedited with the provision of portable VAC pumps. Wounds healed fully without infection. Both patients were able to mobilise sooner than if they had to wait for complete wound closure and, importantly, the consequences of prolonged immobility were minimised. No extra costs were incurred using this novel therapy. Guidance for early mobilisation of trans-femoral amputees with open wounds is limited. These cases provide examples utilising VAC dressings with concurrent prosthetic rehabilitation, facilitating prompt ambulatory retraining, minimising deconditioning and optimising outcomes.

  1. The role of skin substitutes in the management of chronic cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic and venous ulcers, represent disruption of normal healing processes resulting in a pathological state of nonhealing cutaneous inflammation. They place an increasingly significant economic burden on healthcare providers as their prevalence is rising in keeping with an aging population. Current treatment modalities are slow acting and resource intensive. Bioengineered skin substitutes from autogenic, allogenic, or xenogenic sources have emerged as a new and alternative therapeutic option. A range of such products is licensed for clinical use, which differ in terms of structure and cellular content. Placed directly onto a prepared wound bed, skin substitutes may stimulate or accelerate healing by promoting revascularization, cellular migration, and repopulation of wound fields through provision of an appropriate scaffold material to facilitate these processes. Products containing fetal or autologous cells also benefit from early release of bioactive molecules including growth factors and cytokines. To date, limited numbers of randomized controlled trials studying skin substitutes have been published but evidence from case series and case-control studies is encouraging. This review discusses chronic wound biology, the influence that skin substitutes can exert on this environment, the products currently available, and examines the evidence for their use in chronic wound management.

  2. Clinical safety and effectiveness evaluation of a new antimicrobial wound dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Daniel G; Parsons, David; Bowler, Philip G

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a next-generation antimicrobial wound dressing (NGAD; AQUACEL(®) Ag+ Extra™ dressing) designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm. Clinicians were requested to evaluate the NGAD within their standard protocol of care for up to 4 weeks, or as long as deemed clinically appropriate, in challenging wounds that were considered to be impeded by suspected biofilm or infection. Baseline information and post-evaluation dressing safety and effectiveness data were recorded using standardised evaluation forms. This data included wound exudate levels, wound bed appearance including suspected biofilm, wound progression, skin health and dressing usage. A total of 112 wounds from 111 patients were included in the evaluations, with a median duration of 12 months, and biofilm was suspected in over half of all wounds (54%). After the introduction of the NGAD, exudate levels had shifted from predominantly high or moderate to low or moderate levels, while biofilm suspicion fell from 54% to 27% of wounds. Wound bed coverage by tissue type was generally shifted from sloughy or suspected biofilm towards predominantly granulation tissue after the inclusion of the NGAD. Stagnant (65%) and deteriorating wounds (27%) were shifted to improved (65%) or healed wounds (13%), while skin health was also reported to have improved in 63% of wounds. High levels of clinician satisfaction with the dressing effectiveness and change frequency were accompanied by a low number of dressing-related adverse events (n = 3; 2·7%) and other negative observations or comments. This clinical user evaluation supports the growing body of evidence that the anti-biofilm technology in the NGAD results in a safe and effective dressing for the management of a variety of challenging wound types. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Interdisciplinary Management of Acute Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Raphael R; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Söllner, Wolfgang; Frieling, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Christ, Michael

    2015-11-06

    Acute chest pain of non-traumatic origin is a common reason for presentation to physician's offices and emergency rooms. Coronary heart disease is the cause in up to 25% of cases. Because acute chest pain, depending on its etiology, may be associated with a high risk of death, rapid, goal-oriented management is mandatory. This review is based on pertinent articles and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. History-taking, physical examination, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are the first steps in the differential diagnostic process and generally allow the identification of features signifying a high risk of lifethreatening illness. If the ECG reveals ST-segment elevation, cardiac catheterization is indicated. The timedependent measurement of highly sensitive troponin values is a reliable test for the diagnosis or exclusion of acute myocardial infarction. A wide variety of other potential causes (e.g., vascular, musculoskeletal, gastroenterologic, or psychosomatic) must be identified from the history if they are to be treated appropriately. Elderly patients need special attention. Acute chest pain is a major diagnostic challenge for the physician. Common errors are traceable to non-recognition of important causes and to an inadequate diagnostic work-up. Future studies should be designed to help optimize the interdisciplinary management of patients with chest pain.

  4. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  5. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  6. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality. PMID:23821708

  7. The acute swollen knee: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Chinmay; St Mart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    The acutely swollen knee is a common presentation of knee pathology in both primary care and the emergency department. The key to diagnosis and management is a thorough history and examination to determine the primary pathology, which includes inflammation, infection or a structural abnormality in the knee. The location of pain and tenderness can aid to localization of structural pathology even before radiological tests are requested, and indeed inform the investigations that should be carried out. Aspiration of an acutely swollen knee can aid diagnosis and help relieve pain. The management of the swollen knee depends on underlying pathology and can range from anti-inflammatory medication for inflammation to operative intervention for a structural abnormality.

  8. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  9. A Comparison of Biobrane™ and Cadaveric Allograft for Temporizing the Acute Burn Wound: Cost and Procedural Time

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Ryan E.; Merchant, Nishant; Shahrokhi, Shahriar E.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In many circumstances early burn excision and autografting is unsafe or even impossible. In these situations, skin substitute dressings can be utilized for temporary wound coverage. Two commonly used dressings for this purpose are cadaveric allograft and Biobrane™. Materials and Methods Five year retrospective cohort study evaluating upper extremity burns treated with temporary wound coverage (Biobrane™ or allograft). The primary outcome was to determine the impact choice of wound coverage had on operative time and cost. The secondary outcome was the need for revision of upper extremity debridement prior to definitive autografting. Results 45 patients were included in this study: 15 treated with cadaveric allograft and 30 treated with Biobrane™ skin substitute. Biobrane™ had a significantly lower procedure time (21.12 vs. 54.78 minutes per %TBSA excised, p=0.02) and cost (1.30 vs. 2.35 dollars per minute per %TBSA excised, p=0.002). Both techniques resulted in 2 revisions due to complications. Conclusion Biobrane™ is superior to cadaveric allograft as a temporizing skin substitute in the acute burn wound, both in terms of procedure time and associated cost. We believe that this is largely due to the relative ease of application of Biobrane™. Furthermore, given its unique characteristics, Biobrane™ may serve as a triage and transport option for severe burns in the military and mass casualty settings. PMID:25458501

  10. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Krutika T.; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M.; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N.; Richard, Zachary C.; O’Neil, Maura F.; Pritchard, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure. PMID:26751492

  11. They had me in stitches: a Grand Canyon river guide's case report and a review of wilderness wound management literature.

    PubMed

    Spano, Susanne J; Dimock, Brad

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of failed conservative management of a traumatic wound sustained in a wilderness setting. The patient was initially treated with a povidone-iodine scrub, suture closure, and expectant management by 2 physicians who were paying clients on a multiday river rafting expedition. Empiric antibiotic coverage and irrigation of the dehisced wound were initiated several days after initial treatment. The patient arranged his own evacuation 8 days after injury. Hospitalization, intravenous (IV) antibiotics, and surgical debridement with wound vacuum placement led to a full recovery. This case presents several common wound care pitfalls. The sequelae to these pitfalls are more dramatic in a wilderness setting and underscore the importance of early aggressive management and considering prompt evacuation when treating wounds sustained in the wilderness. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society Published by Wilderness Medical Society All rights reserved.

  12. Our Experience in the Management of Traumatic Wound Myiasis: Report of 3 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Abhay T.; Kudva, Adarsh; Patel, Nilesh

    2016-01-01

    Compromised health and hygiene can lead to many complications and one among them is traumatic wound myiasis. Myiasis is the invasion of living tissues by larvae of flies. Three cases of traumatic orofacial wound myiasis and treatment strategies followed for the management of them are reported in this paper. PMID:27812390

  13. The versatility of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam for soft tissue management after severe musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Ivan S

    2008-01-01

    This review serves to outline the current and evolving usages of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) as an adjunctive treatment modality for optimal management of wounds associated with high energy musculoskeletal trauma.

  14. A Bioengineered Living Cell Construct Activates an Acute Wound Healing Response in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rivka C.; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Rosa, Ashley M.; Ramirez, Horacio A.; Badiavas, Evangelos; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2017-01-01

    Chronic non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are widespread and debilitating, with high morbidity and associated costs; approximately $15 billion is spent annually on the care of VLUs in the US. Despite this, there is a paucity of treatments for VLUs, due to the lack of pathophysiologic insight into ulcer development as well as the lack of knowledge regarding biologic actions of existing VLU-targeted therapies. The bioengineered bilayered living cellular construct (BLCC) skin substitute is an FDA-approved biologic treatment for healing VLUs. To elucidate the mechanisms through which the BLCC promotes healing of chronic VLUs, we conducted a clinical trial (NCT01327937) in which patients with non-healing VLUs were treated with either standard care (compression therapy) or the BLCC together with standard care. Tissue was collected from the VLU edge before and 1 week after treatment, and samples underwent comprehensive microarray, mRNA, and protein analyses. Ulcers treated with the BLCC skin substitute displayed three distinct transcriptomic patterns, suggesting that BLCC induced a shift from a non-healing to a healing tissue response involving modulation of inflammatory and growth factor signaling, keratinocyte activation, and attenuation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In these ways, BLCC application orchestrated a shift from the chronic non-healing ulcer microenvironment to a distinctive healing milieu resembling that of an acute, healing wound. Our findings provide in vivo evidence in patient VLU biopsies of pathways that can be targeted in the design of new therapies to promote healing of chronic VLUs. PMID:28053158

  15. Changes in optical properties of tissue during acute wound healing in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Weingarten, Michael S; Zubkov, Leonid; Neidrauer, Michael; Zhu, Linda; Tyagi, Som; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2008-01-01

    Changes of optical properties of wound tissue in hairless rats were quantified by diffuse photon density wave methodology at near-infrared frequencies. The diffusion equation for semi-infinite media was used to calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients based on measurements of phase and amplitude with a frequency domain device. There was an increase in the absorption and scattering coefficients and a decrease in blood saturation of the wounds compared with the nonwounded sites. The changes correlated with the healing stage of the wound. The data obtained were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of wound tissue. These results verified now by two independent animal studies could suggest a noninvasive method to detect the progress of wound healing.

  16. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI. © The Author(s) 2012.

  17. A Retrospective Comparison of the Performance of Two Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Systems in the Management of Wounds of Mixed Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Theresa; Rossington, Alan; Trueman, Paul; Smith, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been shown to be effective in the management of chronic and surgical wounds. The two most widely used modalities of NPWT are vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) therapy (KCI, Inc., San Antonio, Texas) and the RENASYS NPWT system (Smith & Nephew, Hull, United Kingdom). This evaluation compares the performance of the two systems in the management of wounds of mixed etiology. Approach: The evaluation is based on retrospective evaluation of more than 1,000 patients treated with NPWT in a community setting in Canada. Results: Patients were well matched according to their baseline characteristics, including age, sex, and wound characteristics. No difference was seen between the two NPWT systems in terms of the percentage of patients reaching their predetermined treatment goal (90.0% and 93.6%, respectively). The time taken to achieve the treatment goal (median 8 weeks in both groups), percentage reduction in wound area (64.2% and 65.3%, respectively), and weekly rate of reduction in wound area (9.7% and 9.4%, respectively; p = 0.156). Innovation: This evaluation is believed to comprise the largest cohort of patients treated with NPWT published to date and is one of the few studies that have attempted to provide a direct comparison of the performance of alternative NPWT systems. Conclusion: Findings suggest that there are no clinically meaningful differences in the efficacy and performance of the two most widely used NPWT devices, based on consideration of a number of wound outcomes. PMID:28116226

  18. Assessment and management of patients with acute red eye.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Sue

    2013-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of the nurse in the assessment and management of five ocular conditions that give rise to an acute red eye in older people. The conditions discussed are acute closed angle glaucoma, acute iritis, acute conjunctivitis, herpes zoster ophthalmicus and bacterial corneal ulcer.

  19. Effect of locally injected autologous platelet-rich plasma on second intention wound healing of acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Karayannopoulou, M; Psalla, D; Kazakos, G; Loukopoulos, P; Giannakas, N; Savvas, I; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, M; Chantes, A; Papazoglou, L G

    2015-01-01

    Second intention wound healing may be impaired by wound and host factors and thus more advanced therapies are required for a fast and satisfactory outcome. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), rich in growth factors and cytokines essential for tissue repair, could improve wound healing. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of locally injected autologous PRP on second intention healing of acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs. Three 2 x 2 cm full-thickness skin defects were created bilaterally on the dorsolateral area of the trunk of six Beagle dogs. The wounds of one randomly selected side received PRP treatment, whereas the contralateral wounds were left untreated (controls). Wound healing was evaluated by planimetry, laser-Doppler flowmetry measurements of tissue perfusion, and histologically. The rate of wound healing did not differ significantly between the two groups. Tissue perfusion was significantly higher in the PRP-treated group (p = 0.008) compared to controls on day 10. Histological evaluation revealed a trend towards greater collagen production and a significantly better collagen orientation (p = 0.019) in PRP-treated wounds on day 20. Locally injected autologous PRP does not accelerate the healing process, but increases tissue perfusion and may promote the formation of organized collagen bundles in acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs.

  20. Innovations in Wound Infection Prevention and Management and Antimicrobial Countermeasures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    prevalence of MDR infections? – No ICD-9 code for Acinetobacter infection – No ICD-9 codes for MDR Gram negative bacteria infections 2011 MHS...and Management - Diagnostics  Bioburden/ microbiome studies  Studies of resistance and virulence genes  Special media (e.g., CHROMagar)  PCR

  1. Management of secondary hemorrhage from early graft failure in military extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Greer, Lauren T; Patel, Bhavin; Via, Katherine C; Bowman, Jonathan N; Weber, Michael A; Fox, Charles J

    2012-10-01

    Secondary hemorrhage after a dehisced vascular reconstruction is a dreaded complication, yet few reports describe the initial management and outcome of casualties with ruptured grafts from military wounds. We aimed to report a single-center experience of graft ruptures after evacuation of casualties to a tertiary hospital in the continental United States. Trauma records of US combat casualties were retrospectively reviewed from April 2005 to August 2007. Casualties who underwent an extremity vascular reconstruction in Iraq or Afghanistan and experienced a ruptured graft were included. Ten graft ruptures (mean time, 14 days) occurred during the study period. All casualties were males with penetrating injuries by secondary blast effects (5, 50%) or gunshot wounds (5, 50%). Mean age and Injury Severity Score were 28.2 years (range, 20-41 years) and 21.1 (range 10-32), respectively. Repairs were performed on the superficial femoral (4, 40%), popliteal (2, 20%), brachial (1, 10%), axillary (1, 10%), iliac (1, 10%), and common femoral (1, 10%) arteries using reversed saphenous vein grafts (10, 100%). Initial management included control of hemorrhage and extra-anatomic reconstruction with a vein graft (4), prosthetic graft (4), end-to-end anatomosis (1), or primary amputation (1). Secondary complications in those 10 limbs requiring reintervention included 4 thrombotic graft failures (40%), and 1 transfemoral amputation from a graft infection. Ruptures were frequently associated with long-bone fractures (6, 60%), large soft tissue open wounds (5, 50%) and infection (7, 70%). At a mean follow-up of 37 months, the amputation rate in this series was 30%, with an amputation-free survival of 70%. Contaminated military wounds with bony fractures may predispose a graft of any type (vein or prosthetic) to anastomotic dehiscence. Wounds must be carefully debrided, and when grafts cannot be covered with viable muscle, they should be routed around the zone of injury. Therapeutic

  2. Controversies in the Management of Asymptomatic Patients Sustaining Penetrating Thoracoabdominal Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Jose Gustavo; Rasslan, Samir; Utiyama, Edivaldo M.

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging diagnostic issue in the management of thoracoabdominal wounds concerns the assessment of asymptomatic patients. In almost one-third of such cases, diaphragmatic injuries are present even in the absence of any clear clinical signs. The sensitivity of noninvasive diagnostic tests is very low in this situation, and acceptable methods for diagnosis are limited to videolaparoscopy or videothoracoscopy. However, these procedures are performed under general anesthesia and present real, and potentially unnecessary, risks for the patient. On the other hand, diaphragmatic hernias, which can result from unsutured diaphragmatic lesions, are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, the management of asymptomatic patients sustaining wounds to the lower chest is discussed, with a focus on the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries and the necessity of suturing them. PMID:18925332

  3. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Autologous Wound Matrix in the Management of Complicated, Chronic Wounds: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Igal; Kushnir, Alon; Serena, Thomas E; Garfinkel, Doron

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel method using an autologous whole blood clot formed with the RedDress Wound Care System (RD1, RedDress Ltd, Israel), a provisional whole blood clot matrix used in the treatment of chronic wounds of various etiologies. Patients were treated at the bedside with the whole blood clot matrix. Blood was withdrawn from each patient using citrate, mixed with a calcium gluconate/kaolin suspension, and injected into an RD1 clotting tray. Within 10 minutes, a clot was formed, placed upon the wound, and fixed with primary and secondary dressings. Wounds were redressed weekly with a whole blood clot matrix. Treatment was terminated when complete healing was achieved, or when the clinician determined that the wound could not further improve without additional invasive procedures. Seven patients with multiple and serious comorbidities and 9 chronic wounds were treated with 35 clot matrices. Complete healing was achieved in 7 of 9 wounds (78%). In 1 venous ulcer with a nonhealing fistula, 77% healing was achieved. Treatment was terminated in 1 pressure ulcer at 82% closure, because an unexpected mechanical trauma resulted in deterioration; this was the only adverse event reported, unrelated to the product. No systemic adverse events occurred. This pilot study demonstrates the in vitro autologous whole blood clot matrix is effective and safe for treating patients with chronic wounds of different etiologies. A larger clinical trial is needed to assess the relative success rate of the matrix in different types of wounds in a diverse population with comorbidities.

  5. Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for Basic Wound Management in the Austere Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    related to wound management. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or...studies were identified, the expert panel recommendation was based on perceptions of risk vs benefit derived from patient care experience. The panel used a...clinical guidelines11 Grade Description Benefits vs risks and burdens Methodological quality of supporting evidence 1A Strong recommendation, high

  6. Selective Nonoperative Management of Penetrating Torso Injury From Combat Fragmentation Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Selective Nonoperative Management of Penetrating Torso Injury From Combat Fragmentation Wounds Alec C . Beekley, MD, Lorne H. Blackbourne, MD, James A...College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma Resident Trauma Paper Competition. Address for reprints: Alec C . Beekley, MD, FACS, Department of General...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18

  7. Acute diarrhea: evidence-based management.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Kátia Galeão; Castro Antunes, Margarida Maria de; Silva, Gisélia Alves Pontes da

    2015-01-01

    To describe the current recommendations on the best management of pediatric patients with acute diarrheal disease. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar. There has been little progress in the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS) in recent decades, despite being widely reported by international guidelines. Several studies have been performed to improve the effectiveness of ORS. Intravenous hydration with isotonic saline solution, quickly infused, should be given in cases of severe dehydration. Nutrition should be ensured after the dehydration resolution, and is essential for intestinal and immune health. Dietary restrictions are usually not beneficial and may be harmful. Symptomatic medications have limited indication and antibiotics are indicated in specific cases, such as cholera and moderate to severe shigellosis. Hydration and nutrition are the interventions with the greatest impact on the course of acute diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based diagnosis and management of acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Ann Marie

    2014-09-18

    Acute bronchitis is a common respiratory infection seen in primary care settings. This article examines the current evidence for diagnosis and management of acute bronchitis in adults and provides recommendations for primary care clinical practice.

  9. Safety of Nonoperative Management After Acute Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Amoza Pais, Sonia; Batlle Marin, Xavi; Oronoz Martinez, Begoña; Balen Ribera, Enrique; Yarnoz Irazabal, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The role of surgery in the management of diverticular disease after an episode of acute diverticulitis (AD) managed in a conservative form is evolving. Age, number of episodes of AD, type of episode, and symptoms after the episodes are factors related to the need for elective surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety of conservative management and the risk factors for emergency surgery after a first episode of AD managed without surgery. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 405 patients diagnosed as having had a first episode of AD. Sixty-nine patients underwent emergency surgery on the first admission, and 69 patients had an elective operation in the follow-up (group A). The remaining 267 patients were managed initially without surgery (group B). Thirteen of these 267 patients needed a further urgent surgical procedure. Factors involved in the decision of elective surgery and the probability of emergency surgery after the first episode of AD managed without surgery were evaluated in relation to demographic factors, risk factors, presence of recurrences, and type of the first episode. Results Patients, mean age was 62.7 years, 71 were aged less than 51, and 151 were males. The mean follow-up for patients with nonoperative management was 91.2 months. An elective operation was performed in 69 patients. Compared to patients in group B, those in group A more frequently had a first episode of complicated acute diverticulitis (CAD) (37.1% vs. 16.4%; P = 0.000) and were more likely to be smokers (46.3% vs. 19.3%; P = 0.000) and to suffer more than one episode of AD (42% vs. 26.9%; P = 0.027). Nonoperative management was chosen for 267 patients, but 13 patients needed an emergency operation later. In the multivariate analysis, we found a significant relation between the presence of CAD in the first episode and the need for emergency surgery. There were no differences in surgical mortality between the patients in the two groups, but patients treated

  10. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re‐epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Garcin, Clare L.; Ansell, David M.; Headon, Denis J.; Paus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re‐establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15+ve bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo‐epidermis. However, the identity of the first‐responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15+ve bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin‐mediated partial ablation of K15+ve bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377–1385 PMID:26756547

  11. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Clare L; Ansell, David M; Headon, Denis J; Paus, Ralf; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re-establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15(+ve) bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo-epidermis. However, the identity of the first-responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15(+ve) bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin-mediated partial ablation of K15(+ve) bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377-1385.

  12. Management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2016-12-01

    Surgical management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries should be focused on realigning the torn ends of the ligaments to allow for healing potential. The most widely utilized treatment methods incorporate the use of metal hardware, which can alter the biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint. This leads to a second surgical procedure for hardware removal once the ligaments have healed. Patients with unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries managed with arthroscopy-assisted procedures have shown good and excellent clinical outcomes, without the need for a second operation. These procedures incorporate a coracoclavicular suspension device aimed to function as an internal brace, narrowing the coracoclavicular space thus allowing for healing of the torn coracoclavicular ligaments. The lesser morbidity of a minimally invasive approach and the possibility to diagnose and treat concomitant intraarticular injuries; no obligatory implant removal, and the possibility of having a straight visualization of the inferior aspect of the base of the coracoid (convenient when placing coracoclavicular fixation systems) are the main advantages of the arthroscopic approach over classic open procedures. This article consists on a narrative review of the literature in regard to the management of acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

  13. Does Allevyn foam's management system improve wound healing?

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen

    2007-06-01

    Four technically enhanced Allevyn dressings were used in this study. Patients were asked to evaluate these products and compare them to the performance of the original dressings. The dressings had been enhanced to increase the rate of fluid uptake and their rate of transpiration of the absorbed fluid, thereby radically increasing the overall fluid management profile of the dressings. The dressings had been enhanced to increase the rate of fluid uptake and their rate of transpiration of the absorbed fluid, thereby radically increasing the overall fluid management profile of the dressings. The moisture vapour transmission rate (MVTR) had been enhanced by as much as 915% in two of the dressings. The results showed that 94% of the patients on the study rated the new dressings as being acceptable for the indication. When asked to rate appearance, conformability, dressing fixation, absorbency and wear time of the enhanced dressings against that of the users experience with the original Allevyn dressings, the results showed the enhanced dressings performed well. Patients were particularly impressed with the absorbency of the enhanced dressings with 72% rating it as better than the original. Improved absorbency meant that wear time, appearance, and fixation also scored highly in the ratings.

  14. Use of granulated sugar therapy in the management of sloughy or necrotic wounds: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Murandu, M; Webber, M A; Simms, M H; Dealey, C

    2011-05-01

    To determine the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of three types of sugar and conduct a pilot clinical study with a view to developing a protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). In the in vitro studies three types of granulated sugar (Demerara, granulated beet sugar and granulated cane sugar) were tested to determine their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against 18 Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in a micro-titre broth dilution assay; growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different concentrations of sugar (0.38-25%) was also tested over 12-hours in an agar diffusion assay. The pilot clinical study selected patients from a vascular surgical ward and a vascular outpatient department. All had acute or chronic exuding wounds, some of which were infected. White granulated sugar was applied to the wounds. The following parameters were assessed: surface area; wound characteristics including pain, malodour, appearance (slough/granulation); exudate level; pain level and bacterial load. Patients with diabetes had their blood sugar levels checked daily. All patients completed a short health questionnaire at the start and end of the study. Staff completed a satisfaction questionnaire at the end of the study. The study period was 21 days. In vitro tests demonstrated that sugar inhibits bacterial growth. All three types of sugars had MICs ranging from 6-25% in the bacterial strains tested. The diffusion tests showed that strains were able to grow well in low concentrations of sugar but were completely inhibited in higher concentrations. The two granulated sugars were found to be slightly more effective than Demerara sugar, so the latter was excluded from the clinical pilot study. Twenty-two patients (20 inpatients and two outpatients) with sloughy or necrotic wounds were recruited into the clinical study. Two patients had MRSA and two had Staphylococcus colonisation at baseline. Blood sugar levels

  15. Acute radiation syndrome: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Smith, James M; Kazzi, Ziad N; Farfán, Eduardo B; Chang, Arthur S; Naeem, Syed F

    2010-06-01

    Primary care physicians may be unprepared to diagnose and treat rare, yet potentially fatal, illnesses such as acute radiation syndrome (ARS). ARS, also known as radiation sickness, is caused by exposure to a high dose of penetrating, ionizing radiation over a short period of time. The time to onset of ARS is dependent on the dose received, but even at the lowest doses capable of causing illness, this will occur within a matter of hours to days. This article describes the clinical manifestations of ARS, provides guidelines for assessing its severity, and makes recommendations for managing ARS victims.

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

  17. Management of diabetic foot ulcers with a TLC-NOSF wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Richard, J L; Martini, J; Bonello Faraill, M M; Bemba, J M; Lepeut, M; Truchetet, F; Ehrler, S; Schuldiner, S; Sauvadet, A; Bohbot, S

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, tolerance and acceptability of UrgoStart Contact (Laboratoires Urgo), a new wound dressing impregnated with NOSF, as an MMP regulator in the management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. A multicentre, pilot, prospective, non-controlled open-label clinical trial. Adult patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, who had a grade 1A (Texas classification), uninfected, neuropathic foot ulcer, 1-15cm2 in size and of 1-20 months' duration (mean 6.7 ± 5.2 months) were included in the study. The primary endpoint was the relative reduction of the wound surface area (%) at the end of the study. Secondary endpoints included rate of complete healing, and tolerability and acceptability of the dressing. The wound dressing was changed regularly at the investigator's discretion, in accordance with the wound status and exudate level. Patients were followed up every 2 weeks for a 12-week period. At each visit, patients underwent clinical assessments, and ulcer surface area was measured by planimetry and photographs. Thirty-four diabetic patients with a neuropathic foot ulcer were included but only 33 cases were analysed, as data were completely lost for one patient. At baseline, mean surface area was 2.7±2.4cm2. At the 12-week follow-up, the median surface area reduction was 82.7% (mean reduction 62.7 ± 49.9%) and in 10 of the 33 analysed patients (30%) the wound was healed. Only two of the seven documented local adverse events were deemed to be dressing related. According to the nursing staff, acceptability was considered very satisfactory, particularly in term of conformability and ease of use. This pilot study indicates that use of the new UrgoStart Contact dressing, combined with offloading and debridement,may help promote the healing process of the neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers, and was well tolerated and accepted.

  18. The Management of Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Toskes, Phillip P.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis, which is most generally described as any inflammation of the pancreas, is a serious condition that manifests in either acute or chronic forms. Chronic pancreatitis results from irreversible scarring of the pancreas, resulting from prolonged inflammation. Six major etiologies for chronic pancreatitis have been identified: toxic/ metabolic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent and severe acute pancreatitis, and obstruction. The most common symptom associated with chronic pancreatitis is pain localized to the upper-to-middle abdomen, along with food malabsorption, and eventual development of diabetes. Treatment strategies for acute pancreatitis include fasting and short-term intravenous feeding, fluid therapy, and pain management with narcotics for severe pain or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for milder cases. Patients with chronic disease and symptoms require further care to address digestive issues and the possible development of diabetes. Dietary restrictions are recommended, along with enzyme replacement and vitamin supplementation. More definitive outcomes may be achieved with surgical or endoscopic methods, depending on the role of the pancreatic ducts in the manifestation of disease. PMID:20567557

  19. [Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure.

  20. Assessing and managing wounds of Buruli ulcer patients at the primary and secondary health care levels in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Addison, Naa Okaikor; Pfau, Stefanie; Koka, Eric; Aboagye, Samuel Yaw; Kpeli, Grace; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Junghanss, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Beyond Mycobacterium ulcerans-specific therapy, sound general wound management is required for successful management of Buruli ulcer (BU) patients which places them among the large and diverse group of patients in poor countries with a broken skin barrier. Clinically BU suspicious patients were enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 at a primary health care (PHC) center and a municipal hospital, secondary health care (SHC) center in Ghana. All patients were IS2404 PCR tested and divided into IS2404 PCR positive and negative groups. The course of wound healing was prospectively investigated including predictors of wound closure and assessment of infrastructure, supply and health staff performance. 53 IS2404 PCR positive patients-31 at the PHC center and 22 at the SHC center were enrolled-and additionally, 80 clinically BU suspicious, IS2404 PCR negative patients at the PHC center. The majority of the skin ulcers at the PHC center closed, without the need for surgical intervention (86.7%) compared to 40% at the SHC center, where the majority required split-skin grafting (75%) or excision (12.5%). Only 9% of wounds at the PHC center, but 50% at the SHC center were complicated by bacterial infection. The majority of patients, 54.8% at the PHC center and 68.4% at the SHC center, experienced wound pain, mostly severe and associated with wound dressing. Failure of ulcers to heal was reliably predicted by wound area reduction between week 2 and 4 after initiation of treatment in 75% at the PHC center, and 90% at the SHC center. Obvious reasons for arrested wound healing or deterioration of wound were missed additional severe pathology; at the PHC center (chronic osteomyelitis, chronic lymphedema, squamous cell carcinoma) and at the SHC center (malignant ulceration, chronic lymphedema) in addition to hygiene and wound care deficiencies. When clinically suspicious, but IS2404 PCR negative patients were recaptured in the community, 76/77 (98.7%) of analyzed wounds were

  1. Assessing and managing wounds of Buruli ulcer patients at the primary and secondary health care levels in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Eric; Aboagye, Samuel Yaw; Kpeli, Grace; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Junghanss, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Beyond Mycobacterium ulcerans—specific therapy, sound general wound management is required for successful management of Buruli ulcer (BU) patients which places them among the large and diverse group of patients in poor countries with a broken skin barrier. Methods Clinically BU suspicious patients were enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 at a primary health care (PHC) center and a municipal hospital, secondary health care (SHC) center in Ghana. All patients were IS2404 PCR tested and divided into IS2404 PCR positive and negative groups. The course of wound healing was prospectively investigated including predictors of wound closure and assessment of infrastructure, supply and health staff performance. Results 53 IS2404 PCR positive patients—31 at the PHC center and 22 at the SHC center were enrolled—and additionally, 80 clinically BU suspicious, IS2404 PCR negative patients at the PHC center. The majority of the skin ulcers at the PHC center closed, without the need for surgical intervention (86.7%) compared to 40% at the SHC center, where the majority required split-skin grafting (75%) or excision (12.5%). Only 9% of wounds at the PHC center, but 50% at the SHC center were complicated by bacterial infection. The majority of patients, 54.8% at the PHC center and 68.4% at the SHC center, experienced wound pain, mostly severe and associated with wound dressing. Failure of ulcers to heal was reliably predicted by wound area reduction between week 2 and 4 after initiation of treatment in 75% at the PHC center, and 90% at the SHC center. Obvious reasons for arrested wound healing or deterioration of wound were missed additional severe pathology; at the PHC center (chronic osteomyelitis, chronic lymphedema, squamous cell carcinoma) and at the SHC center (malignant ulceration, chronic lymphedema) in addition to hygiene and wound care deficiencies. When clinically suspicious, but IS2404 PCR negative patients were recaptured in the community, 76

  2. Evaluation and management of acute vascular trauma.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gloria M M; Walker, T Gregory

    2009-06-01

    With the technical advances and the increasing availability of sophisticated imaging equipment, techniques, and protocols, and with continually evolving transcatheter endovascular therapies, minimally invasive imaging and treatment options are being routinely used for the clinical management of trauma patients. Thus, the primary treatment algorithm for managing acute vascular trauma now increasingly involves the interventional radiologist or other endovascular specialist. Endovascular techniques represent an attractive option for both stabilizing and definitively treating patients who have sustained significant trauma, with resultant vascular injury. Endovascular treatment frequently offers the benefit of a focused definitive therapy, even in the presence of massive hemorrhage that allows for preservation of major vessels or injured solid organs and serves as an alternative to an open surgical intervention. This article presents an overview of various endovascular techniques that can be used for trauma patients presenting with vascular injuries.

  3. Management of blood pressure in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, John A; Dawson, Jesse; Quinn, Terence J

    2013-08-01

    The importance of elevated or low arterial blood pressure (BP) early after stroke, and the need for pharmacological intervention to control BP, remains controversial. Debate surrounds if, when and how to intervene. This debate is informed by conflicting results from observational data and underpowered clinical trials and substantive outcome data are lacking. Accordingly, management decisions have largely been left up to the individual treating physician and guidelines are based on 'good practice' and theory rather than level 1, grade A evidence. Substantial progress has been made in recent years, particularly in the field of hemorrhagic stroke, where recently presented and soon to completed large-scale trials may finally give us a firm evidence base. For ischemic stroke, many important studies have informed our understanding of the basic pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of BP management in acute stroke and, although not yet constituting a solid 'evidence base', are helping us from the 'cognitive quick-sand' of small studies and personal experiences.

  4. Role of gentian violet paint in burn wound management: a prospective randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, K N; Soni, P P; Sao, D K; Murthy, R; Deshkar, A M; Nanda, B R

    2013-04-01

    In tribal part of central India burn remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Burn management is carried out in conventional manner in most places. The study carried out at Chhatisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur was Intended to evaluate the efficacy and outcome of 0.5% gentian violet paint local application over conventional dressing treatment of burn wound. The study encompasses 400 patients of burn of varied aetiology admitted in burn ward whose total body surface area of burn was 15% to 50%. The patients receiving conventional treatment were in group I (n=200), and those with gentian violet paint local application formed group II (n= 200). Although, fibrosis of the burn wound, hypertrophic scar were slightly higher in second group it was observed gentian violet paint local application, healed it in 6-8 weeks without severe sepsis and need for skin grafting. From the study it can be concluded that markedly inexpensive gentian violet paint is an useful alternative, for burn wound management.

  5. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN): the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital wound management algorithm.

    PubMed

    Abela, Christopher; Hartmann, Christoph E A; De Leo, A; de Sica Chapman, Anna; Shah, Hetul; Jawad, Mohammad; Bunker, Christopher B; Williams, Greg J P; Leon-Villapalos, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome (TEN) is a potentially catastrophic exfoliative muco-cutaneous disorder first described by Lyell in 1956. It represents the most extensive form of Steven-Johnson syndrome. TEN is defined varyingly around the globe, but in the United Kingdom the consensus opinion describes the process as involving >30% of the total body surface area. It can rapidly become more extensive and threatens life. The estimated annual incidence is approximately 1-2 cases per million population. The risk of mortality increases with surface area involved and meta-analysis of the literature shows this risk to be between 16% and 55%. Over a six month period the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Burns Service treated five consecutive patients with more than 80% total body surface area involvement or a more than 80% mortality risk, using the severity-of-illness score for toxic epidermal necrolysis (SCORTEN). All patients were treated according to the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital wound management algorithm with excellent outcome and no mortalities. The aim of this paper is to propose a generic TEN wound management algorithm according to the severity of skin lesions, using a simple wound grading system. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs. PMID:25992316

  7. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-05-18

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs.

  8. Evidence-based topical management of chronic wounds according to the T.I.M.E. principle.

    PubMed

    Klein, Silvan; Schreml, Stephan; Dolderer, Juergen; Gehmert, Sebastian; Niederbichler, Andreas; Landthaler, Michael; Prantl, Lukas

    2013-09-01

    The number of patients suffering from chronic wound healing disorders in Germany alone is estimated to be 2.5-4 million. Therapy related expenses reach 5-8 billion Euros annually. This number is partially caused by costly dressing changes due to non-standardized approaches and the application of non-evidence-based topical wound therapies. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate a straightforward principle for the management of chronic wounds, and to review the available evidence for the particular therapy options. The T.I.M.E.-principle (Tissue management, Inflammation and infection control, Moisture balance, Epithelial [edge] advancement) was chosen as a systematic strategy for wound bed preparation. Literature was retrieved from the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases and subjected to selective analysis. Topical wound management should be carried out according to a standardized principle and should further be synchronized to the phases of wound healing. Despite the broad implementation of these products in clinical practice, often no benefit exists in the rate of healing, when evaluated in meta-analyses or systematic reviews. This insufficient evidence is additionally limited by varying study designs. In case of non-superiority, the results suggest to prefer relatively inexpensive wound dressings over expensive alternatives. Arbitrary endpoints to prove the effectiveness of wound dressings, contribute to the random use of such therapies. Defining rational endpoints for future studies as well as the deployment of structured therapy strategies will be essential for the economical and evidence-based management of chronic wounds. © The Authors | Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  9. Malodorous fungating wounds: uncertain concepts underlying the management of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Piggin, Catherine

    2003-05-01

    Malodorous fungating wounds can exacerbate the social isolation of patients with palliative care needs through changes in patients' body image. There is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective management approaches for patients with malodorous fungating wounds. This appears to relate to the existence of different theoretical frameworks for understanding altered body image. This article explores the theories used to create frameworks that have been used for interventions with patients experiencing social isolation arising from altered body image. It argues that there is a need for health care professionals to appreciate the lack of consensus within the literature and to understand this in the context of the relationship between theory and research. The author offers research and clinical recommendations.

  10. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical débridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated.

  11. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-15

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  12. Wound management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers: from the basics to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Karen L; Houdek, Matthew T; Kiemele, Lester J

    2015-02-01

    Hospital-based studies have shown that mortality rates in individuals with diabetic foot ulcers are about twice those observed in individuals with diabetes without foot ulcers. To assess the etiology and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Literature review. Systematic review of the literature discussing management of diabetic foot ulcers. Since there were only a few randomized controlled trials on this topic, articles were selected to attempt to be comprehensive rather than a formal assessment of study quality. Chronic nonhealing foot ulcers occur in approximately 15% of patients with diabetes. Many factors contribute to impaired diabetic wound healing. Risk factors include peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, limited joint mobility, foot deformities, abnormal foot pressures, minor trauma, a history of ulceration or amputation, and impaired visual acuity. With the current treatment for nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, a significant number of patients require amputation. Diabetic foot ulcers are optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Offloading and preventative management are important. Dressings play an adjunctive role. There is a critical need to develop novel treatments to improve healing of diabetic foot ulcers. The goal is to have wounds heal and remain healed. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease are major factors involved in a diabetic foot ulcer. Despite current treatment modalities for nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, there are a significant number of patients who require amputations. No known therapy will be effective without concomitant management of ischemia, infection, and adequate offloading. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  13. 77 FR 23667 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed... Medical Care Case management. 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Lunch. 12:30-2 p.m. Task Force...

  14. 78 FR 59918 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded... organizations may submit written statements to the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management,...

  15. Wound management and outcome of 595 electrical burns in a major burn center.

    PubMed

    Li, Haisheng; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Yizhi; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-06-15

    Electrical burns are important causes of trauma worldwide. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics, wound management, and outcome of electric burns. This retrospective study was performed at the Institute of Burn Research of the Third Military Medical University during 2013-2015. Data including the demographics, injury patterns, wound treatment, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. A total of 595 electrical burn patients (93.8% males) were included. The average age was 37.3 ± 14.6 y, and most patients (73.5%) were aged 19∼50 years. Most patients (67.2%) were injured in work-related circumstances. The mean total body surface area was 8.8 ± 11.8% and most wounds (63.5%) were full-thickness burns. Operation times of high-voltage burns and current burns were higher than those of low-voltage burns and arc burns, respectively. Of the 375 operated patients, 83.2% (n = 312) underwent skin autografting and 49.3% (n = 185) required skin flap coverage. Common types of skin flaps were adjacent (50.3%), random (42.2%), and pedicle (35.7%). Amputation was performed in 107 cases (18.0%) and concentrated on the hands (43.9%) and upper limbs (39.3%). The mean length of stay was 42.9 ± 46.3 d and only one death occurred (0.2%). Current burns and higher numbers of operations were major risk factors for amputation and length of stay, respectively. Electrical burns mainly affected adult males with occupational exposures in China. Skin autografts and various skin flaps were commonly used for electric burn wound management. More standardized and effective strategies of treatment and prevention are still needed to decrease amputation rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of Acute Burn Management in 32 Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Krishan; Trehan, Abhishek; Cherian, Meena; Kelley, Edward; Watters, David A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether acute burn management (ABM) is available at health facilities in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The study used the World Health Organization situational analysis tool (SAT) which is designed to assess emergency and essential surgical care and includes data points relevant to the acute management of burns. The SAT was available for 1413 health facilities in 59 countries. A majority (1036, 77.5 %) of the health facilities are able to perform ABM. The main reasons for the referral of ABM are lack of skills (53.4 %) and non-functioning equipment (52.2 %). Considering health centres and district/rural/community hospitals that referred due to lack of supplies/drugs and/or non-functioning equipment, almost half of the facilities were not able to provide continuous and consistent access to the equipment required either for resuscitation or to perform burn wound debridement. Out of the facilities that performed ABM, 379 (36.6 %) are capable of carrying out skin grafts and contracture release, which is indicative of their ability to manage full thickness burns. However the magnitude of full thickness burns managed was limited in half of these facilities, as they did not have access to a blood bank. The initial management of acute burns is generally available in LMICs, however it is constrained by the inability to perform resuscitation (19 %) and/or burn wound debridement (10 %). For more severe burns, an inability to perform skin grafting or contracture release limits definitive management of full thickness burns, whilst lack of availability to blood further compromises the treatment of major burns.

  17. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    traditional or conventional therapy in the literature, although they typically are not the first line of treatment in Ontario. Modern moist interactive dressings are foams, calcium alginates, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, and films. Topical antibacterial agents—antiseptics, topical antibiotics, and newer antimicrobial dressings—are used to treat infection. The Technology Being Reviewed Negative pressure wound therapy is not a new concept in wound therapy. It is also called subatmospheric pressure therapy, vacuum sealing, vacuum pack therapy, and sealing aspirative therapy. The aim of the procedure is to use negative pressure to create suction, which drains the wound of exudate (i.e., fluid, cells, and cellular waste that has escaped from blood vessels and seeped into tissue) and influences the shape and growth of the surface tissues in a way that helps healing. During the procedure, a piece of foam is placed over the wound, and a drain tube is placed over the foam. A large piece of transparent tape is placed over the whole area, including the healthy tissue, to secure the foam and drain the wound. The tube is connected to a vacuum source, and fluid is drawn from the wound through the foam into a disposable canister. Thus, the entire wound area is subjected to negative pressure. The device can be programmed to provide varying degrees of pressure either continuously or intermittently. It has an alarm to alert the provider or patient if the pressure seal breaks or the canister is full. Negative pressure wound therapy may be used for patients with chronic and acute wounds; subacute wounds (dehisced incisions); chronic, diabetic wounds or pressure ulcers; meshed grafts (before and after); or flaps. It should not be used for patients with fistulae to organs/body cavities, necrotic tissue that has not been debrided, untreated osteomyelitis, wound malignancy, wounds that require hemostasis, or for patients who are taking anticoagulants. Review Strategy The inclusion criteria were as

  18. Consensus statement on negative pressure wound therapy (V.A.C. Therapy) for the management of diabetic foot wounds.

    PubMed

    Andros, George; Armstrong, David G; Attinger, Christopher E; Boulton, Andrew J M; Frykberg, Robert G; Joseph, Warren S; Lavery, Lawrence A; Morbach, Stephan; Niezgoda, Jeffrey A; Toursarkissian, Boulos

    2006-06-01

    In 2004, a multidisciplinary expert panel convened at the Tucson Expert Consensus Conference (TECC) to determine appropriate use of negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by a Vacuum Assisted Closure device (V.A.C. THERAPY, KCI, San Antonio, Texas) in the treatment of diabetic foot wounds. These guidelines were updated by a second multidisciplinary expert panel at a consensus conference on the use of V.A.C. THERAPY, held in February 2006, in Miami, Florida. This updated version of the guidelines summarizes current clinical evidence, provides practical guidance, offers best practices to clinicians treating diabetic foot wounds, and helps direct future research. The Miami consensus panel discussed the following 12 key questions regarding V.A.C. (1) How long should V.A.C. THERAPY be used in the treatment of a diabetic foot wound? (2) Should V.A.C." THERAPY be applied without debriding the wound? (3) How should the patient using V.A.C. THERAPY be evaluated on an outpatient basis? (4) When should V.A.C. THERAPY be applied following revascularization? (5) When should V.A.C. THERAPY be applied after incision, drainage, and debridement of infection? (6) Should V.A.C. THERAPY be applied over an active soft tissue infection? (7) How should V.A.C. THERAPY be used in patients with osteomyelitis? (8) How should noncompliance to V.A.C. THERAPY be defined? (9) How should V.A.C. THERAPY be used in combination with other modalities? (10) Should small, superficial wounds be considered for V.A.C. THERAPY? (11) How should success in the use of V.A.C. THERAPY be defined? (12) How can one combine effective offloading and V.A.C. THERAPY?

  19. An integrated wound-care pathway, supported by telemedicine, and competent wound management-Essential in follow-up care of adults with diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Smith-Strøm, Hilde; Iversen, Marjolein M; Graue, Marit; Skeie, Svein; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a feared complication of diabetes. Care delivered via telemedicine is suggested to be a more integrated care pathway to manage diabetic foot ulcers than traditionally delivered healthcare. Our aim was to explore patients' experiences with telemedicine follow-up care as compared to traditional care. Interpretive description was used as an analysis strategy. Data were collected using individual semi-structured interviews in the context of a larger ongoing clustered randomized controlled trial. Twenty-four patients (13 in the intervention group; 11 in the control group), aged 38-88 years were purposively recruited from the RCT in order to obtain a diverse sample in terms of group composition (intervention vs. control), age, gender, marital status, setting, and comorbidities present. The control group received traditional care. Three themes emerged from the interpretive analysis: competence of healthcare professionals, continuity of care, and easy access. This was independed of types of follow-up that had limited impact on the patients' follow-up experiences. Competence of healthcare professionals and continuity of care were crucial, because they can either enhance or jeopardize wound care. If these two latter factors were absent, patients would lose confidence in the wound care process. If this happened, patients pointed out that the expert knowledge of a specialist clinic was essential to receive good care. When telemedicine functioned optimally, telemedicine was an advantage in the treatment, because the images quickly captured changes in the wound healing that immediately could be corrected. Easy access is important for patients, but the importance of accessibility appears to be primary when the other two factors were present. The best wound care pathway for patients with diabetes foot ulcers is depended on a combination of competence and professional skills in wound management, and continuity of care. If telemedicine is functioning as

  20. Tap Water Versus Sterile Normal Saline in Wound Swabbing: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mun Che; Cheung, Kin; Leung, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The use of tap water as a wound-cleansing agent is becoming more common in clinical practice, especially in community settings. The aim of this study was to test whether there are differences in wound infection and wound healing rates when wounds are cleansed with tap water or sterile normal saline. Double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Subjects were recruited from the community nursing service of a local hospital in Hong Kong. The target sample included subjects who were aged 18 years or more, and receiving chronic or acute wound care treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to wound cleansing with tap water (experimental group) or sterile normal saline (control group). Wound assessment was conducted at each home visit, and an assessment of wound size was conducted once a week. The main outcome measures, occurrence of a wound infection and wound healing, were assessed over a period of 6 weeks. Twenty-two subjects (11 subjects in each group) with 30 wounds participated in the study; 16 wounds were managed with tap water cleansing and 14 were randomly allocated to management with the sterile normal saline group. Analysis revealed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in the proportions of wound infection and wound healing. Study findings indicate that tap water is a safe alternative to sterile normal saline for wound cleansing in a community setting.

  1. New concepts in the management of patients with penetrating abdominal wounds.

    PubMed

    Ferrada, R; Birolini, D

    1999-12-01

    In the future, trauma research and care will have to become better, faster, and less expensive. Surgeons in the next millennium must be able to diagnose wounds, initiate correct procedures, and anticipate complications more accurately than before. Violent crime will not abate, nor will the proliferation of more powerful arms; these trends translate into graver traumatic wounds, giving the operating team less time to stabilize patients. Time management and team coordination are becoming key elements for patient survival, especially for patients with potentially fatal wounds, such as those to the heart. The authors have reduced the time from arrival to surgery to a few minutes. The keys to this feat are readiness, team coordination, and high morale. Financial resources will continue to be limited and allocated on a need-first basis. In the future, trauma centers will compete for dwindling funds. Technology is and always will be just a tool, whereas qualified trauma surgeons are irreplaceable, much more so than in any other surgical specialty. Observation, diagnosis, and surgery are, of course, greatly facilitated by ever-evolving technology, but since the time of Hippocrates, split-second decisions can ultimately be made only by the caregiver in the white smock. Trauma surgeons in the next millennium will have to exercise judgment based on knowledge, surgical skills, and contact with patients. To err is human, but in surgery, errors often cause death, and no machine will ever relieve surgeons of that burden.

  2. Upper and lower extremity nerve injuries in pediatric missile wounds: a selective approach to management.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, Andrew A; Sachanandani, Neil S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2011-06-01

    Nerve injuries from missile and gunshot wounds often produce significant disability, and their management is controversial. The role of the surgeon in cases of missile wounds with neurologic deficits is not well defined. Enhancing the trauma team's ability to recognize treatable nerve injuries will lead to improved outcomes. Further, raising awareness of the time-sensitive nature of these injuries will also improve results in these cases. We reviewed a consecutive series of 17 pediatric patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by missile and gunshot wounds in a tertiary care children's hospital. We examined the indications for surgery, presence of associated injuries, mechanisms of injury, demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes. Urban victims were significantly more likely to have been intentionally assaulted than rural or suburban victims and they were also less likely to have completed follow-up care. High-energy weapons were more likely to require surgery compared with low-energy weapons. Patients presenting with tendon injuries were more likely to have a high-grade nerve injury requiring surgery. Patients presenting with tendon lacerations or high-energy mechanisms were significantly more likely to require surgery. Early exploration should be undertaken in cases where transection is likely to have occurred. Early decompression of common entrapment sites distal to repairs or injuries should be performed. Because follow-up is poor in this population, treatment should be prompt and thorough.

  3. Consensus of the German and Austrian Societies for Wound Healing and Wound Management on vacuum closure and the V.A.C. treatment unit.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Wetzel-Roth, W; Zöch, G

    2004-05-01

    Within the framework of the Three-Country Congress on V.A.C. Treatment (Vacuum Assisted Closure Treatment) held on May 16/17, 2003 in Salzburg, a Consensus Conference involving members of the Committees of the German and Austrian Societies for Wound Management was convened. In view of the divergence of opinion on the effectiveness of the treatment among the cost carriers, it appeared appropriate for the two Societies for Wound Healing in Germany and Austria to arrive at a consensus on the importance of and the indications for the management of wounds with the vacuum closure method. Since the first clinical applications in the nineteen-forties, both the indication spectrum and the number of applications have increased continually. In addition to diverse vacuum closure systems, there is patented computer-controlled system technology available that is established V.A.C. treatment. Although this is a hospital-based system, it can also be used on an outpatient basis by appropriately trained physicians and nursing staff and in instructed patients. For some indications, vacuum closure and V.A.C. management is considered the treatment of choice, since no equivalent alternative methods are available. A con-benefit analysis shows that vacuum closure and V.A.C. treatment is cost effective.

  4. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  5. Acute downregulation of connexin43 at wound sites leads to a reduced inflammatory response, enhanced keratinocyte proliferation and wound fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Power, Kieran T; Wang, Chiuhui Mary; Martin, Paul; Becker, David L

    2006-12-15

    Experimental downregulation of connexin43 (Cx43) expression at skin wound sites appears to markedly improve the rate and quality of healing, but the underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Here, we have compared physiological and cell biological aspects of the repair process with and without Cx43 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment. Treated wounds exhibited accelerated skin healing with significantly increased keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation and migration. In vitro knockdown of Cx43 in a fibroblast wound-healing model also resulted in significantly faster healing, associated with increased mRNA for TGF-beta1, and collagen alpha1 and general collagen content at the wound site. Treated wounds showed enhanced formation of granulation tissue and maturation with more rapid angiogenesis, myofibroblast differentiation and wound contraction appeared to be advanced by 2-3 days. Recruitment of both neutrophils and macrophages was markedly reduced within treated wounds, concomitant with reduced leukocyte infiltration. In turn, mRNA levels of CC chemokine ligand 2 and TNF-alpha were reduced in the treated wound. These data suggest that, by reducing Cx43 protein with Cx43-specific antisense oligodeoxynucleotides at wound sites early in the skin healing process repair is enhanced, at least in part, by accelerating cell migration and proliferation, and by attenuating inflammation and the additional damage it can cause.

  6. Guideline for the management of wounds in patients with lower-extremity neuropathic disease: an executive summary.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Penny Ellen; Fields-Varnado, Myra

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the WOCN Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients with Lower Extremity Neuropathic Disease. It is intended for use by physicians, nurses, therapists, and other health care professionals who work with adults who have or are at risk for, lower-extremity neuropathic disease (LEND), and includes updated scientific literature available from January 2003 through February 2012. The full guideline contains definitions of lower extremity neuropathic disorders and disease, prevalence of the problem, relevance and significance of the disorders, as well as comprehensive information about etiology, the nervous system, pathogenesis, and the overall management goals for patients at risk for developing neuropathic foot ulcers. A detailed assessment section describes how to conduct a full clinical history and physical examination. The guideline also provides two approaches to interventions. The first focuses on prevention strategies to reduce the risk of developing LEND wounds or recurrence, including life-long foot offloading, routine dermal temperature surveillance, use of adjunctive therapies, medication management, and implementing lower extremity amputation prevention measures and patient self-care education. The second approach summarized LEND wound management strategies including wound cleansing, debridement, infection management, maintenance of intact peri-wound skin, nutrition considerations, pain and paresthesia management, edema management, offloading and management of gait and foot deformity, medication management, surgical options, adjunctive therapies, patient education, and health care provider follow-up. A comprehensive reference list, glossary of terms, and several appendices regarding an algorithm to determine wound etiology, pharmacology, Lower Extremity Amputation (LEAP) Program, diabetes foot screening and other information is available at the end of the guideline.

  7. Management of Bronchopleural Fistula Complicated by Skin Wound Necrosis after Thoracomyoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Mirko; Zaccagna, Gino; Di Francescantonio, William; Crisci, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Skin necrosis is a rare complication after thoracomyoplasty and usually needs conservative treatment. We described positive findings with surgical approach. A 54-year-old man showed bronchopleural fistula after undergoing right pneumonectomy for lung cancer, treated with thoracomyoplasty. On the 20th postoperative day, a skin wound lesion was noted, whose deterioration required a skin flap transposition. Patient was discharged from hospital on the 7th postoperative day and did not show relapse at the 7th year follow-up. Surgery can be the most viable alternative to medical treatments in the management of a chest wall cutaneous complication even in high-risk patients. PMID:28203496

  8. Management of Bronchopleural Fistula Complicated by Skin Wound Necrosis after Thoracomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Divisi, Duilio; Barone, Mirko; Zaccagna, Gino; Di Francescantonio, William; Crisci, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Skin necrosis is a rare complication after thoracomyoplasty and usually needs conservative treatment. We described positive findings with surgical approach. A 54-year-old man showed bronchopleural fistula after undergoing right pneumonectomy for lung cancer, treated with thoracomyoplasty. On the 20th postoperative day, a skin wound lesion was noted, whose deterioration required a skin flap transposition. Patient was discharged from hospital on the 7th postoperative day and did not show relapse at the 7th year follow-up. Surgery can be the most viable alternative to medical treatments in the management of a chest wall cutaneous complication even in high-risk patients.

  9. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.

    1988-07-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references.

  10. [Management of acute exacerbations of COPD].

    PubMed

    Rabbat, A; Guetta, A; Lorut, C; Lefebvre, A; Roche, N; Huchon, G

    2010-10-01

    Exacerbations of COPD are common and cause a considerable burden to the patient and the healthcare system. To optimize the hospital care of patients with exacerbations of COPD, clinicians should be aware of some key points: management of exacerbations is broadly based on clinical features and severity. Initial clinical evaluation is crucial to define those patients requiring hospital admission and those who could be managed as outpatients. In hospitalized patients, the appropriate level of care should be determined by the initial severity and response to initial medical treatment. Medical treatment should follow recent recommendations, including rest, titrated oxygen therapy, inhaled or nebulized short-acting bronchodilators (Beta2-agonists and anticholinergic agents), DVT prevention with LMWH, steroids in most severely ill patients, unless there are contraindications and antibiotics in the case of a clear bacterial infectious aetiology. Severe exacerbations may lead to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Unless contraindicated, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) should be the first line ventilatory support for these patients. NIV should be commenced early, before severe acidosis ensues, to avoid the need for endotracheal intubation and to reduce mortality and treatment failures. Several randomised controlled clinical trials support the use of NIV in the management of acute exacerbations of COPD, demonstrating a decreased need for mechanical ventilation and an improved survival. In most severe cases, NIV should be provided in ICU. Although it has been shown that for less severe patients (with pH values>7.30), NIV can be administered safely and effectively on general medical wards, a lead respiratory consultant and trained nurses are mandatory. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube should be considered when patients have contraindications to the use of NIV or fail to improve on NIV. The duration of mechanical ventilation should be shortened as much as

  11. Actinidia deliciosa (kiwifruit), a new drug for enzymatic debridement of acute burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Hafezi, Farhad; Rad, Hamid Elmi; Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Nouhi, Amirhossein; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2010-05-01

    Actinidia deliciosa (kiwifruit) is used as a meat tenderizer. It acts rapidly and efficiently to soften meat, liquefying it if allowed to work for more than a few hours. Observing this effect and the lack of studies addressing this subject in the literature, the authors sought to investigate the use of this natural remedy in an animal model for eschar separation and debridement. Thirty-five male rats were divided randomly into three groups. Under general anaesthesia, a limited standard full-thickness burn was produced on the back of each rat. For the intervention group (G1, 15 rats), the wounds were covered with fresh kiwifruit; for control groups 2 and 3 (G2, 15 rats; G3, five rats), the dressing was a neutral ointment (Emulsifier 1220). Weekly wound observations were documented for all the groups. G1 and G2 were sacrificed on Day 20, and group 3 was kept alive until complete eschar separation. The wounds of the rats in groups 1 and 2 were excised and subjected to microscopic evaluation. On Day 20, all eschars had detached and fallen off in the intervention group (G1), whereas in groups G2 and G3 the eschars were still firmly attached to the base of the wounds (except in two rats of G2); this finding was statistically significant (p<0.001). The average wound surface area in group G1 was 212 mm(2) (SD=88.80938) whereas in G2 it was 388 mm(2) (SD=140.6967). Thus, the wound surface area was significantly (p<0.001) smaller in the intervention group. The eschars in G3 separated spontaneously between days 30 and 42, while in all the rats of the kiwi-treated group, this phenomenon occurred before Day 20. The pathological study revealed no considerable differences between G1 and G2 (p<0.05). Debridement and scar contraction occurred faster in the kiwi-treated group than in the untreated group. Following rapid enzymatic debridement, healing appeared to progress normally, with no evidence of damage to adjacent healthy tissue. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights

  12. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  13. 76 FR 71331 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of... on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed..., 2011, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST, each day. ADDRESSES: St. Anthony Riverwalk Wyndham...

  14. 78 FR 28580 - Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and Transition of Recovering Wounded, Ill, and Injured Members of the Armed Forces AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary of... Federal Advisory Committee meeting of the Department of Defense Task Force on the Care, Management, and...

  15. Guidelines for management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amal Kumar; Kumar, Soumitra

    2011-12-01

    These Guidelines summarize and evaluate all currently available evidence on Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) with the aim of assisting physicians in selecting the best management strategies for a typical patient, suffering from AMI, taking into account the impact on outcome, as well as the risk/benefit ratio of particular diagnostic or therapeutic means. Rapid diagnosis and early risk stratification of patients presenting with AMI are important to identify patients in whom early interventions can improve outcome. AMI can be defined from a number of different perspectives related to clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG), biochemical, and pathological characteristics. Quantitative assessment of risk is useful for clinical decision making. For patients with the clinical presentation of AMI within 12 h after symptom onset, early mechanical (PCI) or pharmacological reperfusion should be performed. Platelet activation and subsequent aggregation play a dominant role in the propagation of arterial thrombosis and consequently are the key therapeutic targets in the management of AMI. Adjunctive therapy with antiplatelets and antithrombotics is essential. A recommendation for routine urgent PCI (within 24 h) following successful fibrinolysis seems to be most practical option. In India, pharmacoinvasive therapy is the best option.

  16. Acute management--how should we intervene?

    PubMed

    Kontny, F

    2000-01-01

    A crucial question in the acute management of the patient with unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD) is whether to carry out early intervention, performing angiography soon after presentation and following this with revascularization where appropriate, or whether to follow a noninvasive medical strategy as far as possible unless symptoms necessitate intervention. The body of literature addressing this question is sparse, but the recent Fast Revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC II) study has provided new insights into the problem. Using a factorial design to randomize patients to invasive or noninvasive management strategies, and to short- or long-term treatment with the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) dalteparin sodium (Fragmin), it was shown in FRISC II that early invasive treatment (within 7 days), when combined with optimal medical pretreatment with dalteparin sodium, aspirin, and appropriate antianginal medication, is associated with improved clinical outcomes, relative to a "watchful waiting" approach based on noninvasive therapy. Thus, an early invasive approach following aggressive medical pretreatment should be the preferred strategy for patients with UCAD who present with signs of ischemia on the electrocardiogram or raised biochemical markers of myocardial damage at admission.

  17. Novel algorithm for management of acute epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Yazawa, Satoshi; Kanao, Kent; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Miyajima, Akira; Saito, Shiro; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-01-01

    To identify predictive factors for the severity of epididymitis and to develop an algorithm guiding decisions on how to manage patients with this disease. A retrospective study was carried out on 160 epididymitis patients at Keio University Hospital. We classified cases into severe and non-severe groups, and compared clinical findings at the first visit. Based on statistical analyses, we developed an algorithm for predicting severe cases. We validated the algorithm by applying it to an external cohort of 96 patients at Tokyo Medical Center. The efficacy of the algorithm was investigated by a decision curve analysis. A total of 19 patients (11.9%) had severe epididymitis. Patient characteristics including older age, previous history of diabetes mellitus and fever, as well as laboratory data including a higher white blood cell count, C-reactive protein level and blood urea nitrogen level were independently associated with severity. A predictive algorithm was created with the ability to classify epididymitis cases into three risk groups. In the Keio University Hospital cohort, 100%, 23.5%, and 3.4% of cases in the high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups, respectively, became severe. The specificity of the algorithm for predicting severe epididymitis proved to be 100% in the Keio University Hospital cohort and 98.8% in the Tokyo Medical Center cohort. The decision curve analysis also showed the high efficacy of the algorithm. This algorithm might aid in decision-making for the clinical management of acute epididymitis. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. The use of topical, un-buffered sodium hypochlorite in the management of burn wound infection.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, E; Whitelaw, A; Kahn, D; Rode, H

    2012-06-01

    Burn wound infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The bactericidal action of sodium hypochlorite has been known for centuries and it has been in clinical practice for over 70 years. Whereas a buffered sodium hypochlorite solution is not universally available, an un-buffered solution is cheap and easy to prepare. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum concentration with regard to safety and efficacy, as well as shelf life of an un-buffered sodium hypochlorite solution for the topical management of burn wound infections. Human fibroblasts were exposed to serial dilutions of un-buffered sodium hypochlorite solutions for 30 min and assessed for viability. Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes were exposed to the same dilutions of un-buffered sodium hypochlorite to establish the minimum bactericidal concentration. The pH, osmolality and electrolyte concentrations were measured. These experiments were repeated with solution stored at room temperature for 6 consecutive days. 24% of fibroblasts were viable after exposure to a 0.025% solution and 98.9% with a 0.003% solution. The MBC for the P. aeruginosa isolates was 0.003%, for S. aureus was 0.006% and for S. pyogenes was 0.0015%. This remained constant for 6 consecutive days. The un-buffered 0.0025% solution has a pH of 10, an osmolality of 168 sodium concentration of 89 mmol/dl and chloride of 84 mmol/dl. This remained stable for 14 days. An un-buffered solution of sodium hypochlorite with a concentration of 0.006% would be suitable for the topical management of burn wound infections caused by common pathogens. It has a shelf life of at least 6 days. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel hydrogel of poloxamer 407 and chitosan obtained by gamma irradiation exhibits physicochemical properties for wound management.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Santillan-Reyes, Erika; Lima, E; Madrid-Martínez, Abigail; Krötzsch, E; Quintanar-Guerrero, D; Garciadiego-Cázares, David; Martínez-Jiménez, Alejandro; Hernández Morales, M; Ortega-Peña, Silvestre; Contreras-Figueroa, M E; Cortina-Ramírez, G E; Abarca-Buis, René Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Application of polymers cross-linked by gamma irradiation on cutaneous wounds has resulted in the improvement of healing. Chitosan (CH) and poloxamer 407 (P407)-based hydrogels confer different advantages in wound management. To combine the properties of both compounds, a gamma-irradiated mixture of 0.75/25% (w/w) CH and P407, respectively, was obtained (CH-P), and several physical, chemical, and biological analyses were performed. Notably, gamma radiation induced changes in the mixture's thermal behavior, viscosity, and swelling, and exhibited stability at neutral pH. The thermal reversibility provided by P407 and the bacteriostatic effect of CH were maintained. Mice full-thickness wounds treated with CH-P diminished the wound area during the first days. Consequently, with this treatment, increased levels of macrophages, α-SMA, and collagen deposition in wounds were observed, indicating a more mature scar tissue. In conclusion, the new hydrogel CH-P, at physiologic pH, combined the beneficial characteristics of both polymers and produced new properties for wound management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided.

  1. Wound Healing in Patients With Impaired Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Maroz, Natallia; Simman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Renal impairment has long been known to affect wound healing. However, information on differences in the spectrum of wound healing depending on the type of renal insufficiency is limited. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be observed with different wound types. On one hand, it follows acute traumatic conditions such as crush injury, burns, and post-surgical wounds, and on the other hand, it arises as simultaneous targeting of skin and kidneys by autoimmune-mediated vasculitis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) often occur in older people, who have limited physical mobility and predisposition for developing pressure-related wounds. The common risk factors for poor wound healing, generally observed in patients with CKD and ESRD, include poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, chronic venous insufficiency, and aging. ESRD patients have a unique spectrum of wounds related to impaired calcium-phosphorus metabolism, including calciphylaxis, in addition to having the risk factors presented by CKD patients. Overall, there is a wide range of uremic toxins: they may affect local mechanisms of wound healing and also adversely affect the functioning of multiple systems. In the present literature review, we discuss the association between different types of renal impairments and their effects on wound healing and examine this association from different aspects related to the management of wounds in renal impairment patients.

  2. Management of Hard Tissue Avulsive Wounds and Management of Orofacial Fractures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-16

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Bioceramics Prosthetic Materials Avulsive Wounds 6 03 Ceramic Implants Implant Materials Porous Ceramics 02 Biomaterials...ceramics that can successfully serve as a scaffold for bone ingrowth. Later studies at Battelle were aimed at increasing the strength of the bioceramic ...serve as a scaffold for bone ingrowth. Later studies at Battelle were aimed at increasing the strength of the bioceramic , as well as simultaneously

  3. Assessing and Managing Acute Pain: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Jungquist, Carla R; Vallerand, April Hazard; Sicoutris, Corinna; Kwon, Kyung N; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Acute pain, which is usually sudden in onset and time limited, serves a biological protective function, warning the body of impending danger. However, while acute pain often resolves over time with normal healing, unrelieved acute pain can disrupt activities of daily living and transition to chronic pain. This article describes the effects of unrelieved acute pain on patients and clinical outcomes. The authors call on nurses to assess and manage acute pain in accordance with evidence-based guidelines, expert consensus reports, and position statements from professional nursing organizations in order to minimize the likelihood of its becoming chronic.

  4. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  5. Cultural Understanding of Wounds, Buruli Ulcers and Their Management at the Obom Sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Eric; Okyere, Daniel; Adongo, Philip Baba; Ahorlu, Collins K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted with the aim to understand some of the cultural belief systems in the management of wounds and patients practices that could contaminate wounds at the Obom sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of Ghana. Methods This was an ethnographic study using in-depth interviews, Focus Group Discussions and participant observation techniques for data collection. Observations were done on Buruli ulcer patients to document how they integrate local and modern wound management practices in the day-to-day handling of their wounds. Content analysis was done after the data were subjected to thematic coding and representative narratives selected for presentation. Results It was usually believed that wounds were caused by charms or spirits and, therefore, required the attention of a native healer. In instances where some patients’ wounds were dressed in the hospital by clinicians whose condition/age/sex contradict the belief of the patient, the affected often redress the wounds later at home. Some of the materials often used for such wound dressing include urine and concoctions made of charcoal and gunpowder with the belief of driving out evil spirits from the wounds. Conclusion Clinicians must therefore be aware of these cultural beliefs and take them into consideration when managing Buruli ulcer wounds to prevent redressing at home after clinical treatment. This may go a long way to reduce secondary infections that have been observed in Buruli ulcer wounds. PMID:27438292

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nicole J; Elster, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  8. Acute toxicity of subcutaneously administered depleted uranium and the effects of CBMIDA in the simulated wounds of rats.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Satoshi; Ikeda, Mizuyo; Nakamura, Mariko; Yan, Xueming; Xie, Yuyuan

    2009-04-01

    We examined the acute toxicity of depleted uranium (DU) after subcutaneous injection as a simulated wound model (experiment I), and the effects of a chelating agent, catechol-3,6-bis(methyleiminodiacetic acid) (CBMIDA), on the removal and damages caused by uranium by local treatment for wounds in rats (experiment II). Experiment I: To examine the initial behavior and toxicity of uranium of different chemical forms, male Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with 4 and 16 mg kg-1 DU in a solution of pH 1 and 7. The rats were killed 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after DU injection. The DU (pH 1) injection site on the skin was altered markedly by acid burn, and the chemical action of uranium compared with that of DU (pH 7). After the injection of 4 mg kg-1 DU (pH 1), about 60% of the uranium was retained 1-3 h at the injected sites and then decreased to 16% at 24 h. However, the concentration of uranium in the injected site after 16 mg kg-1 DU (pH 1) injection did not change significantly. Urinary excretion rates of uranium (pH 1) increased in a time-independent manner after the injection. Depositions of uranium in the liver, kidneys and femur were found at 1 h after DU injection, and the results of serum and urinary examinations indicated that severe damage in the organs, including the kidney, was induced. The results of the DU (pH 7) were useful for estimating the chemical toxicity of uranium. Experiment II: The effects of CBMIDA by local treatment for wounds with DU were examined. CBMIDA (480 mg kg-1) was infused into the DU-injected site 0, 10, 30, 60, 120 min, and 24 h after the subcutaneous injection of 4 mg kg-1 DU (pH 1 and 7). The uranium at the injected sites decreased to 4-17% of that at 24 h in the DU (pH 1) group without CBMIDA treatment in experiment I, when it was administered within 120 min after DU injection. In addition, CBMIDA had excellent efficacy in excreting the uranium in urine and feces and decreasing the concentrations of uranium in the kidneys and

  9. Unprecedented Silver Resistance in Clinically Isolated Enterobacteriaceae: Major Implications for Burn and Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Rhy; Austin, Cindy; Mitchell, Amber; Zank, Sara; Durham, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Increased utilization of inorganic silver as an adjunctive to many medical devices has raised concerns of emergent silver resistance in clinical bacteria. Although the molecular basis for silver resistance has been previously characterized, to date, significant phenotypic expression of these genes in clinical settings is yet to be observed. Here, we identified the first strains of clinical bacteria expressing silver resistance at a level that could significantly impact wound care and the use of silver-based dressings. Screening of 859 clinical isolates confirmed 31 harbored at least 1 silver resistance gene. Despite the presence of these genes, MIC testing revealed most of the bacteria displayed little or no increase in resistance to ionic silver (200 to 300 μM Ag+). However, 2 isolates (Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae) were capable of robust growth at exceedingly high silver concentrations, with MIC values reaching 5,500 μM Ag+. DNA sequencing of these two strains revealed the presence of genes homologous to known genetic determinants of heavy metal resistance. Darkening of the bacteria's pigment was observed after exposure to high silver concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the presence of silver nanoparticles embedded in the extracellular polymeric substance of both isolates. This finding suggested that the isolates may neutralize ionic silver via reduction to elemental silver. Antimicrobial testing revealed both organisms to be completely resistant to many commercially available silver-impregnated burn and wound dressings. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence of clinical bacteria capable of expressing silver resistance at levels that could significantly impact wound management. PMID:26014954

  10. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  11. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, Henrik Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  12. Current concepts in acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Mai-Phuong; Yagiela, John A

    2003-05-01

    Analgesics most commonly prescribed in dentistry for acute pain relief include the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, acetaminophen, and various opioid-containing analgesic combinations. The NSAIDs and presumably acetaminophen act by inhibiting cyclooxgenase enzymes responsible for the formation of prostaglandins that promote pain and inflammation. Opioids such as codeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone stimulate endogenous opioid receptors to bring about analgesic and other effects. Numerous clinical studies have confirmed that moderate to severe pain of dental origin is best managed through the use of ibuprofen or another NSAID whose maximum analgesic effect is at least equal to that of standard doses of acetaminophen-opioid combinations. If an NSAID cannot be prescribed because of patient intolerance, analgesic preparations that combine effective doses of an orally active opioid with 600 to 1,000 mg of acetaminophen are preferred in the healthy adult. On occasion, prescribing both an NSAID and an acetaminophen-opioid combination may be helpful in patients not responding to a single product. In all cases, however, the primary analgesic should be taken on a fixed schedule, not on a "prn" (or as needed) basis, which only guarantees the patient will experience pain.

  13. Management of the Acutely Burned Hand.

    PubMed

    Pan, Brian S; Vu, Anthony T; Yakuboff, Kevin P

    2015-07-01

    Despite contributing a small percentage to the total body surface area, hands are the most commonly burned body part and are involved in over 90% of severe burns. Although the mortality of isolated hand burns is negligible, morbidity can be substantial given our need for functioning hands when performing activities of daily living. The greatest challenges of treating hand burns are 2-fold. First, determining the depth of injury can be difficult even for the most experienced surgeon, but despite many diagnostic options, clinical examination remains the gold standard. Second, appropriate postoperative hand therapy is crucial and requires a multidisciplinary approach with an experienced burn surgeon, hand surgeon, and hand therapist. Ultimately, the goals of treatment should include preservation of function and aesthetics. In this review, we present an approach to the management of the acutely burned hand with discussion of both conservative and surgical options. Regardless of the initial treatment decision, subsequent care for this subset of patients should be aimed at preventing debilitating postburn scar contractures that can severely limit hand function and ultimately require reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospital Management of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Ashraf S

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalizations for elderly adults in the United States. One in 5 Americans will be >65 years of age by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of HF in this group, the number of Americans requiring hospitalization for this disorder is expected to rise significantly. We reviewed the most recent and ongoing studies and recommendations for the management of patients hospitalized due to decompensated HF. The Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, together with the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association heart failure guidelines, earlier retrospective and prospective studies including the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation (DOSE), the Trial of Intensified vs Standard Medical Therapy in the Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF), the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure (OPTIMIZE-HF), the Rapid Emergency Department Heart Failure Outpatient Trial (REDHOT) and the Comparison of Medical, Pacing and Defibrillation Therapies in Heart Failure (COMPANION) trial were reviewed for current practices pertaining to these patients. Gaps in our knowledge of optimal use of patient-specific information (biomarkers and comorbid conditions) still exist.

  15. Clinical management of acute HIV infection: best practice remains unknown.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sigall K; Little, Susan J; Rosenberg, Eric S

    2010-10-15

    Best practice for the clinical management of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains unknown. Although some data suggest possible immunologic, virologic, or clinical benefit of early treatment, other studies show no difference in these outcomes over time, after early treatment is discontinued. The literature on acute HIV infection is predominantly small nonrandomized studies, which further limits interpretation. As a result, the physician is left to grapple with these uncertainties while making clinical decisions for patients with acute HIV infection. Here we review the literature, focusing on the potential advantages and disadvantages of treating acute HIV infection outlined in treatment guidelines, and summarize the presentations on clinical management of acute HIV infection from the 2009 Acute HIV Infection Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts.

  16. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  17. Septic necrosis of the midline wound in postoperative peritonitis. Successful management by debridement, myocutaneous advancement, and primary skin closure.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, E; Palmer, D L; Frileux, P; Hannoun, L; Nordlinger, B; Tiret, E; Honiger, J; Parc, R

    1988-01-01

    Wound management following laparotomy for postoperative peritonitis and varying degrees of parietal necrosis remains a challenging and controversial problem. Because maintained peritoneal integrity and primary wound closure offer the best opportunity for survival, an original technique involving bilateral incisions to relax skin and rectus fascia is proposed. This technique permits medial myocutaneous advancement and primary tension-free skin closure of midline laparotomy incisions. Sixty-nine patients with severe postoperative peritonitis were treated according from 1980 through 1985. Nine of these patients died of advanced multiple organ failure soon after referral, and eight more died after prolonged treatment. Fourteen patients had one or more reoperations for complications. Only nine wound failures resulted, including five eviscerations and four wound infections followed by progressive dehiscence. The bilateral relaxing incisions healed secondarily without complication. Survivors developed midline wound hernia; ten of the 52 surviving patients have had these repaired. This method of primary closure is safe when performed in conjunction with rigorous surgical care of intraperitoneal infection and may enhance survival. We recommend the technique to surgeons who treat severe postoperative peritonitis and septic necrosis of midline laparotomy wounds. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Figs. 8A and B. Fig. 9. PMID:3281613

  18. Management of low-caliber, low-velocity gunshot wounds of the maxillofacial region.

    PubMed

    Haug, R H

    1989-11-01

    Low-velocity, low-caliber missile wounds have a wounding profile different from that of high-velocity, high-caliber missiles. The pathophysiology of these types of injuries is discussed. Care for such injuries should be conservative.

  19. The evolution of the management of penetrating wounds of the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Blatchford, J W; Anderson, R W

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to neurological surgery, which has its origins in the treppaned skulls of Neolithic man, the realization of cardiac surgery awaited the successful suture of a wound of the heart, an accomplishment of the nineteenth century. While the problem of pneumothorax has been cited as contributing to the delay in the development of surgery of the chest, exposure of the heart can be accomplished extrapleurally: hence, the late development of cardiac suture can be traced more to the ancient premise of the inviolability of the heart, a view which persisted up to the time of the first cardiorrhaphy. The successful demonstration of the heart suture in man quickly led to its widespread adoption. Subsequently, two schools of thought regarding the initial management of penetrating cardiac wounds developed, one advocating conservative treatment with pericardiocentesis, the other prompt cardiorrhaphy. The increasing safety of thoracotomy, along with an appreciation of the unpredictable and frequently catastrophic course following an initial favorable response to pericardiocentesis resulted in the gradual emergence of cardiorrhaphy as the procedure of choice, relegating pericardiocentesis to a diagnostic or temporizing measure. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. PMID:3901944

  20. A systematic review of quantitative burn wound microbiology in the management of burns patients.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Fenella D; Lee, Kwang Chear; Kwei, Johnny; Dretzke, Janine; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Moiemen, Naiem S

    2017-08-04

    The early diagnosis of infection or sepsis in burns are important for patient care. Globally, a large number of burn centres advocate quantitative cultures of wound biopsies for patient management, since there is assumed to be a direct link between the bioburden of a burn wound and the risk of microbial invasion. Given the conflicting study findings in this area, a systematic review was warranted. Bibliographic databases were searched with no language restrictions to August 2015. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed in duplicate using pre-defined criteria. Substantial heterogeneity precluded quantitative synthesis, and findings were described narratively, sub-grouped by clinical question. Twenty six laboratory and/or clinical studies were included. Substantial heterogeneity hampered comparisons across studies and interpretation of findings. Limited evidence suggests that (i) more than one quantitative microbiology sample is required to obtain reliable estimates of bacterial load; (ii) biopsies are more sensitive than swabs in diagnosing or predicting sepsis; (iii) high bacterial loads may predict worse clinical outcomes, and (iv) both quantitative and semi-quantitative culture reports need to be interpreted with caution and in the context of other clinical risk factors. The evidence base for the utility and reliability of quantitative microbiology for diagnosing or predicting clinical outcomes in burns patients is limited and often poorly reported. Consequently future research is warranted. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications.

  2. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  3. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  4. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  5. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  6. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-07-13

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2-3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5-12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10-20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10-12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are-prodromal: 0-2 days from exposure, latent: 2-20 days, and manifest illness: 21-60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome.

  7. Management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Steven A; Bidani, Akhil

    2002-05-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of ARDS. It is now recognized that ARDS is a manifestation of a diffuse process that results from a complicated cascade of events following an initial insult or injury. Mechanical ventilation and PEEP are still important components of supportive therapy. To avoid ventilator-associated lung injury there is emphasis on targeting ventilator management based on measurement of pulmonary mechanics. For those with resistant hypoxia and severe pulmonary hypertension adjunctive modalities, such as prone positioning and low-dose iNO, may provide important benefit. Alternative modes of supporting gas exchange, such as with partial liquid ventilation and extracorporeal gas-exchange, may serve as rescue therapies. Advances in cell and molecular biology have contributed to a better understanding of the role of inflammatory cells and mediators that contribute to the acute lung injury and the pathophysiology of the syndrome that manifests as ARDS. Based on this new understanding, the potential targets for intervention to ameliorate the systemic inflammatory response have proliferated. Examples include the cytokine network and its receptors, antioxidants, and endothelins. Apart from the challenge of testing these agents in experimental models, it seems likely that determination of the optimum combination of agents will become an equally important endeavor. A particular challenge is to develop better methods of predicting which of the many at-risk patients will go on to full-blown ARDS and MODS, thereby targeting subgroups of patients most likely to benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies. Similarly, the adverse effects of immunosuppressive therapy may be diminished by improved, perhaps molecular, techniques to detect microbial pathogens and permit differentiation between Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis.

  8. Total Posterior Leg Open Wound Management With Free Anterolateral Thigh Flap: Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Soleiman; Chou, Stephanie; Rosing, James; Sahar, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue coverage of the exposed Achilles tendon is a unique reconstructive challenge. In this report, we describe the management of a large posterior leg wound with exposed Achilles tendon using a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. A careful review of alternative reconstructive options is included, along with their respective advantages and disadvantages. A 32-year-old white man suffered a fulminant right lower extremity soft tissue infection requiring extensive debridement of the entire posterior surface of the right leg. The resulting large soft tissue defect included exposure of the Achilles tendon. Reconstruction of the defect was achieved with an ALT flap and split-thickness skin graft for coverage of the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle, respectively. The patient was able to ambulate independently within 2 months of the procedure. PMID:24106563

  9. Continuous wound infiltration system for postoperative pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Banghyun; Kim, Kidong; Ahn, Soyeon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2017-05-01

    Major open surgery for gynecologic cancer usually involves a long midline skin incision and induces severe postoperative surgical site pain (POSP) that may not be effectively controlled with the conventional management. We investigated whether combining a continuous wound infiltration system (CWIS, ON-Q PainBuster(®)) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) effectively decreases POSP, compared with IV PCA alone, in gynecologic oncology patients. This retrospective study included 62 Korean patients who received a long midline skin incision during gynecologic cancer surgery. The combined therapy group (n = 31), which received CWIS (0.5% ropivacaine infused over 72 h) and IV PCA (fentanyl citrate), and the IV PCA only group (n = 31) were determined using 1:1 matching. POSP was assessed using resting numeric rating scale (NRS) scores measured for 96 h after surgery, which were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The slopes of the predicted NRS values from the linear mixed model were significantly different between the groups. Compared with the control group, the combined therapy group had lower predicted NRS scores for the first 72 h, but higher predicted scores between 72 and 96 h. Moreover, the mean NRS scores over the first 48 h postoperation were significantly lower in the combined therapy group than in the control group; the scores were similar in both groups during the remaining period. With the exception of a higher body mass index in the CWIS group, the other variables, such as the dosage and usage time of fentanyl citrate, use of additional painkillers, and side effects, including wound complications, did not differ between groups. Combined therapy using CWIS and IV PCA may be a useful strategy for POSP management in gynecologic oncology patients.

  10. Management of Vertebral Stenosis Complicated by Presence of Acute Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat; Arat, Anil Cil, Barbaros E.; Sahin, Gurdal; Turkbey, Baris; Elibol, Bulent

    2007-04-15

    A 44-year-old male presented with multiple punctate acute infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation and a computed tomographic angiogram showing stenosis of the right vertebral origin. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a new intraluminal filling defect at the origin of the stenotic vertebral artery where antegrade flow was maintained. This filling defect was accepted to be an acute thrombus of the vertebral origin, most likely due to rupture of a vulnerable plaque. The patient was treated with intravenous heparin. A control angiogram revealed dissolution of the acute thrombus under anticoagulation and the patient was treated with stenting with distal protection. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no additional acute ischemic lesions. We were unable to find a similar report in the English literature documenting successful management of an acute vertebral ostial thrombus with anticoagulation. Anticoagulation might be considered prior to endovascular treatment of symptomatic vertebral stenoses complicated by the presence of acute thrombus.

  11. Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy and conventional dressing methods for fibula free flap donor site management in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Bach, Christine A; Guilleré, Lia; Yildiz, Sinasi; Wagner, Isabelle; Darmon, Serge; Chabolle, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy in fibula free flap donor site management in head and neck cancer. We conducted a single-center retrospective study from 2007 to 2013 comparing fibula free flap donor site healing time after conventional bolster dressing or negative pressure wound therapy. Thirteen patients were treated by conventional dressing and 16 patients were treated by negative pressure wound therapy. The mean graft loss rate was higher in the bolster group (37%) than in the negative pressure wound therapy group (19%). The mean total healing time was significantly shorter in the negative pressure wound therapy group than in the bolster group (67 days vs 163 days; p = .02). The use of negative pressure wound therapy for fibula free flap donor site management facilitates early patient mobilization, ensures better graft acceptance, and significantly decreases the healing time. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Should we use platelet-rich plasma as an adjunct therapy to treat "acute wounds," "burns," and "laser therapies": A review and a proposal of a quality criteria checklist for further studies.

    PubMed

    Picard, Frédéric; Hersant, Barbara; Bosc, Romain; Meningaud, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma seems to help wound healing. The goal of this review is to determine if the adjunction of platelet-rich plasma enhances the clinical outcome of acute wounds, burns, and laser therapies. A PubMed and Cochrane library search was performed by two reviewers with the senior author as a consultant. Medical Subject Headings search terms used were the following: ["Platelet-rich plasma" OR "Platelet gel" OR "Platelet growth factor"] AND ["Acute wound" OR "Wound" OR "Burn" OR "Laser"]. We included controlled studies assessing the clinical outcome of acute wounds, burns, and laser therapies treated by platelet-rich plasma. Nine randomized controlled studies, six prospective controlled studies, and two retrospective controlled studies were included. Regarding acute wounds, three randomized controlled trials found a statistical benefit regarding either the healing time, the return back to work time, the quality of life, or the pain and three prospective controlled studies found a statistical difference regarding the velocity of healing. Platelet-rich plasma decreased the intensity or duration of erythema after laser therapy in four randomized studies. Regarding the long-term outcome of laser therapies, two studies found a statistical benefit and two others did not. Platelet-rich plasma accelerates acute wound healing and decreases erythema after laser therapies. Its use on burns has not been enough studied.

  13. Management of burns in intensive and acute care.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Conwy, Gabby

    Patients with major burns require specialist care in burn centres, taking into account the complex systemic response to a burn injury, avoidance of complications, specialist wound care and supportive multidisciplinary management. Occasionally, these patients may be managed in other settings, such as emergency departments or general intensive care units and ward areas, for example after an explosion or major disaster. Therefore, general nurses require an understanding of patients' complex needs, and should be aware of the latest developments in burn care and up-to-date evidence to ensure best practice.

  14. Concurrent in vitro release of silver sulfadiazine and bupivacaine from semi-interpenetrating networks for wound management.

    PubMed

    Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Bader, Rebecca A; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2009-01-01

    In situ photopolymerized semi-interpenetrating networks (sIPNs) composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and gelatin are promising multifunctional matrices for a regenerative medicine approach to dermal wound treatment. In addition to previously demonstrated efficacy in critical defects, sIPNs also function as drug delivery matrices for compounds loaded as either soluble or covalently linked components. Simultaneous release of silver sulfadiazine and bupivacaine from the sIPN would provide multiple-hit management of dermal wounds that minimizes infection, and manages pain along with sIPN absorption of exudates and facilitation of epidermal regrowth. We characterized the release of soluble silver sulfadiazine and bupivacaine and compared it with an established release model. Efficacy of released silver sulfadiazine was confirmed in vitro on Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bupivacaine loaded without silver sulfadiazine showed incomplete release, whereas simultaneous loading with silver sulfadiazine facilitated 100% bupivacaine release. Silver sulfadiazine released at 98% without bupivacaine and 96% with bupivacaine. Silver sulfadiazine released onto bacterial cultures inhibited all three strains dose dependently. sIPNs effectively release bupivacaine and silver sulfadiazine while maintaining the antimicrobial activity of silver sulfadiazine. Drug loaded sIPNs have potential to improve wound management by providing multi-drug delivery along with an effective wound treatment.

  15. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  16. Relationship of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Certified Nurses and Healthcare-Acquired Conditions in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Cramer, Emily

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the (a) number and types of employed WOC certified nurses in acute care hospitals, (b) rates of hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), and (c) effectiveness of WOC certified nurses with respect to lowering HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of data from National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS: The sample comprised 928 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) hospitals that participated in the 2012 NDNQI RN Survey (source of specialty certification data) and collected HAPI, CAUTI, and nurse staffing data during the years 2012 to 2013. METHODS: We analyzed years 2012 to 2013 data from the NDNQI. Descriptive statistics summarized the number and types of employed WOC certified nurses, the rate of HAPI and CAUTI, and HAPI risk assessment and prevention intervention rates. Chi-square analyses were used to compare the characteristics of hospitals that do and do not employ WOC certified nurses. Analysis-of-covariance models were used to test the association between WOC certified nurses and HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. RESULTS: Just more than one-third of the study hospitals (36.6%) employed WOC certified nurses. Certified continence care nurses (CCCNs) were employed in fewest number. Hospitals employing wound care specialty certified nurses (CWOCN, CWCN, and CWON) had lower HAPI rates and better pressure injury risk assessment and prevention practices. Stage 3 and 4 HAPI occurrences among hospitals employing CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs (0.27%) were nearly half the rate of hospitals not employing these nurses (0.51%). There were no significant relationships between nurses with specialty certification in continence care (CWOCN, CCCN) or ostomy care (CWOCN, COCN) and CAUTI rates. CONCLUSIONS: CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs are an important factor in achieving better HAPI outcomes in acute care settings. The

  17. Relationship of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Certified Nurses and Healthcare-Acquired Conditions in Acute Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Diane K; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Cramer, Emily

    The purpose of this study was to describe the (a) number and types of employed WOC certified nurses in acute care hospitals, (b) rates of hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), and (c) effectiveness of WOC certified nurses with respect to lowering HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. Retrospective analysis of data from National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample comprised 928 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) hospitals that participated in the 2012 NDNQI RN Survey (source of specialty certification data) and collected HAPI, CAUTI, and nurse staffing data during the years 2012 to 2013. We analyzed years 2012 to 2013 data from the NDNQI. Descriptive statistics summarized the number and types of employed WOC certified nurses, the rate of HAPI and CAUTI, and HAPI risk assessment and prevention intervention rates. Chi-square analyses were used to compare the characteristics of hospitals that do and do not employ WOC certified nurses. Analysis-of-covariance models were used to test the association between WOC certified nurses and HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. Just more than one-third of the study hospitals (36.6%) employed WOC certified nurses. Certified continence care nurses (CCCNs) were employed in fewest number. Hospitals employing wound care specialty certified nurses (CWOCN, CWCN, and CWON) had lower HAPI rates and better pressure injury risk assessment and prevention practices. Stage 3 and 4 HAPI occurrences among hospitals employing CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs (0.27%) were nearly half the rate of hospitals not employing these nurses (0.51%). There were no significant relationships between nurses with specialty certification in continence care (CWOCN, CCCN) or ostomy care (CWOCN, COCN) and CAUTI rates. CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs are an important factor in achieving better HAPI outcomes in acute care settings. The role of CWOCNs, CCCNs, and COCNs in CAUTI prevention warrants further

  18. Novel application of vacuum sealing drainage with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate for managing infective wounds of gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Wu, Xing-Huo; Liu, Rong; Yang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Wu, Qiang; Xia, Tian; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Ye, Zhe-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic gas gangrene is a fatal infection mainly caused by Clostridium perfringens. It is a challenge to manage gas gangrene in open wounds and control infection after debridement or amputation. The aim of the present study was to use vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate to manage infective wounds of gas gangrene and observe its clinical efficacy. A total of 48 patients with open traumatic gas gangrene infection were included in this study. Amputations were done for 27 patients, and limb salvage procedures were performed for the others. After amputation or aggressive debridement, the VSD system, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam dressing and polyurethane (PU) film, with continuous irrigation of 1:5000 potassium permanganate solutions, was applied to the wounds. During the follow-up, all the patients healed without recurrence within 8-18 months. There were four complications. Cardiac arrest during amputation surgery occurred in one patient who suffered from severe septic shock. Emergent resuscitation was performed and the patient returned to stable condition. One patient suffered from mixed infection of Staphylococcal aureus, and a second-stage debridement was performed. One patient suffered from severe pain of the limb after the debridement. Exploratory operation was done and the possible reason was trauma of a local peripheral nerve. Three cases of crush syndrome had dialysis treatment for concomitant renal failure. In conclusion, VSD can convert open wound to closed wound, and evacuate necrotic tissues. Furthermore, potassium permanganate solutions help eliminate anaerobic microenvironment and achieve good therapeutic effect on gas gangrene and mixed infection. VSD with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate is a novel, simple and feasible alternative for severe traumatic open wounds with gas gangrene infection.

  19. Nonsurgical management of acute and chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Shen, Francis H; Samartzis, Dino; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2006-08-01

    A variety of nonsurgical treatment alternatives exists for acute and chronic low back pain. Patients should receive appropriate education about the favorable natural history of low back pain, basic body mechanics, and methods (eg, exercises, activity modification, behavioral modification) that can reduce symptoms. Nonprescription medication is efficacious for mild to moderate pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alone or in combination with muscle relaxants, relieve pain and improve overall symptoms of acute low back pain. Exercise therapy has limited value for acute low back pain, but strong evidence supports exercise therapy in the management of chronic low back pain. Moderately strong evidence supports the use of manipulation in acute back pain. Evidence is weak for the use of epidural corticosteroid injections in patients with acute low back pain, strong for short-term relief of chronic low back pain, and limited for long-term relief of chronic low back pain. The use of facet injections in the management of acute low back pain is not supported by evidence, nor is the effectiveness of orthoses, traction, magnets, or acupuncture. Trigger point injections are not indicated for nonspecific acute or chronic low back pain, and sacroiliac joint injections are not indicated in the routine management of low back pain. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

  20. Stabilization and Management of the Acutely Agitated or Psychotic Patient.

    PubMed

    Deal, Nathan; Hong, Michelle; Matorin, Anu; Shah, Asim A

    2015-11-01

    Acutely agitated or psychotic patients are particularly challenging to manage in the emergency department. Often these patients present with little or no history, and an adequate assessment may initially be difficult because of the condition of the patient. This article discusses basic concepts regarding agitation, and the related management goals and strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Cynodon dactylon for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Pandit, Srikanta; Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Banerjee, Saheli; Poyra, Nandini; Seal, Tapan

    2017-02-02

    Research in the field of wound healing is very recent. The concept of wound healing is changing from day to day. Ayurveda is the richest source of plant drugs for management of wounds and Cynodon dactylon L. is one such. The plant is used as hemostatic and wound healing agent from ethnopharmacological point of view. Aim of the present study is scientific validation of the plant for wound healing activity in detail. Aqueous extract of the plant was prepared and phytochemical constituents were detected by HPLC analysis. Acute and dermatological toxicity study of the extract was performed. Pharmacological testing of 15% ointment (w/w) of the extract with respect to placebo control and standard comparator framycetin were done on full thickness punch wound in Wister rats and effects were evaluated based on parameters like wound contraction size (mm(2)), tensile strength (g); tissue DNA, RNA, protein, hydroxyproline and histological examination. The ointment was applied on selected clinical cases of chronic and complicated wounds and efficacy was evaluated on basis of scoring on granulation, epithelialization, vascularity as well as routine hematological investigations. Significant results (p<0.05) were observed both in pharmacological and clinical studies. The present research with aqueous extract of Cynodon dactylon explores its potential wound healing activity in animal model and subsequent feasibility in human subjects. Phenolic acids and flavonoids present in c. dactylon supports its wound healing property for its anti-oxidative activity that are responsible for collagenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the role of stem cells in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine; Paus, Ralf; Tiede, Stephan; Day, Philip; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2009-11-01

    The skin offers a perfect model system for studying the wound healing cascade, which involves a finely tuned interplay between several cell types, pathways and processes. The dysregulation of these factors may lead to wound healing disorders resulting in chronic wounds, as well as abnormal scars such as hypertrophic and keloid scars. As the contribution of stem cells towards tissue regeneration and wound healing is increasingly appreciated, a rising number of stem cell therapies for cutaneous wounds are currently under development, encouraged by emerging preliminary findings in both animal models and human studies. However, we still lack an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which stem cells contribute to cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this review is, therefore, to present a critical synthesis of our current understanding of the role of stem cells in normal cutaneous wound healing. In addition to summarizing wound healing principles and related key molecular and cellular players, we discuss the potential participation of different cutaneous stem cell populations in wound healing, and list corresponding stem cells markers. In summary, this review delineates current strategies, future applications, and limitations of stem cell-based or stem cell-targeted therapy in the management of acute and chronic skin wounds.

  3. Management of acute upside-down stomach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upside-down stomach (UDS) is characterized by herniation of the entire stomach or most gastric portions into the posterior mediastinum. Symptoms may vary heavily as they are related to reflux and mechanically impaired gastric emptying. UDS is associated with a risk of incarceration and volvulus development which both might be complicated by acute gastric outlet obstruction, advanced ischemia, gastric bleeding and perforation. Case presentation A 32-year-old male presented with acute intolerant epigastralgia and anterior chest pain associated with acute onset of nausea and vomiting. He reported on a previous surgical intervention due to a hiatal hernia. Chest radiography and computer tomography showed an incarcerated UDS. After immediate esophago-gastroscopy, urgent laparoscopic reduction, repair with a 360° floppy Nissen fundoplication and insertion of a gradually absorbable GORE® BIO-A®-mesh was performed. Conclusion Given the high risk of life-threatening complications of an incarcerated UDS as ischemia, gastric perforation or severe bleeding, emergent surgery is indicated. In stable patients with acute presentation of large paraesophageal hernia or UDS exhibiting acute mechanical gastric outlet obstruction, after esophago-gastroscopy laparoscopic reduction and hernia repair followed by an anti-reflux procedure is suggested. However, in cases of unstable patients open repair is the surgical method of choice. Here, we present an exceptionally challenging case of a young patient with a giant recurrent hiatal hernia becoming clinically manifest in an incarcerated UDS. PMID:24228771

  4. Endovascular management of acute limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Peeters, P; Verbist, J; Keirse, K; Deloose, K; Bosiers, M

    2010-06-01

    Acute limb ischemia (ALI) refers to a rapid worsening of limb perfusion resulting in rest pain, ischemic ulcers or gangrene. With an estimated incidence of 140 million/year, ALI is serious limb-threatening and life-threatening medical emergency demanding prompt action. Three prospective, randomized clinical trials provide data on trombolytic therapy versus surgical intervention in patients with acute lower extremity ischemia. Although they did not give us the final answer, satisfactory results are reported for percutaneous thrombolysis compared with surgery. Moreover, they suggest an important advantage of thrombolysis in acute bypass graft occlusions. Therefore, we believe thrombolytic therapy should be a part of the vascular surgeon's armamentarium to safely and successfully treat ALI patients.

  5. Loxoscelism and negative pressure wound therapy (vacuum-assisted closure): a clinical case series.

    PubMed

    Wong, S Lindsey; Defranzo, Andrew J; Morykwas, Michael J; Argenta, Louis C

    2009-11-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles sp) bites continue to be a significant challenge to manage clinically. Sequelae from these lesions range from chronic necrotic ulcers that persist for months to an acute life-threatening course of sepsis. Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) has been described for use in both acute and chronic wounds. We present a novel application for the use of this therapy in a retrospective review of eight clinical cases treated with the VAC.

  6. Effect of Fibrin Packing on Managing Hepatic Hemorrhage and Liver Wound Healing in a Model of Liver Stab Wound in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemi, Mehrzad; Safari, Azam; Nezafat, Navid; Tahamtan, Mahmoodreza; Negahdaripour, Manica; Azarpira, Negar; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of fibrin perihepatic packing on controlling liver hemorrhage and liver wound healing.   Methods: In this animal experimental study, 20 adult male Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 200-220 g, were included. Stab wound injury was created by number 15 scalpel, so that bilateral liver capsules and liver tissue were cut, and acute bleeding was accrued. The animals were divided into 2 study groups: control (with a primary gauze packing treatment) and test group (with fibrin packing treatment). Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels were measured as a liver function test during the treatment period. Blood loss was calculated for estimation of hepatic hemorrhage during surgery. After four weeks, the liver wound repair was evaluated by sampling and Hematoxylin and Eosin staining (H&E). Results: In the test group, all of animals were alive (mortality rate= 0%). Significantly, ALT and AST levels were raised after surgery, followed by a decrease ALT (p=0.783) and AST (p=0.947) to the normal level during 4 days. Estimated blood loss was 2.89 ± 0.73 mL (about 19.65% of estimated blood volume). Hematocrit levels returned to the normal level (p=0.109) after 48 hours. In the control group, the mortality rate was 50% during 12h after surgery. ALT (p=0.773) and AST (p=0.853) were decreased to normal level during 6 days, and estimated blood loss was 4.98 ± 0.77 mL (about 32.98% of estimated blood volume) in the remaining animals. Moreover, hematocrit levels returned to the normal level (p=0.432) after 72 hours. Estimated blood loss in the test group was significantly less than control group (p<0.001). Total serum bilirubin levels were not significantly different from the normal level, before and after surgery in both groups. Histopathology sections from the post-hepatectomy specimens showed that the site of the previous incision was completely repaired, and a dense fibrous septum

  7. High-output stomas: challenges with a large laparostomy wound.

    PubMed

    Slater, Rebecca

    This article explores the management of patients with high-output stomas fashioned under acute surgical conditions where management may be difficult owing to the presence of a large laparostomy wound. Available products that meet the technical demands required to manage these patients, achieve optimal wound healing, manage high-output stoma and encourage patient independence are considered. A number of strategies to meet the physical and nutritional requirements of these patients are discussed along with the importance of the multidisciplinary team working together to provide holistic care.

  8. Management of acute paracetamol poisoning in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K G; Ranganathan, S Sri; Dawson, A H; Buckley, N; Fernandopulle, B M R

    2008-09-01

    To compare the management of acute paracetamol poisoning with the best evidence available, and to determine the effect of plasma paracetamol level estimation on the management. Descriptive study with an intervention. Medical wards of the National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo. Patients admitted with a history of acute paracetamol poisoning. Measurement of plasma paracetamol. Data were obtained from the patients, medical staff and medical records. Plasma paracetamol was estimated between 4-24 hours of paracetamol ingestion. The current management practices were compared with the best evidence on acute paracetamol poisoning management. 157 patients were included. The mean ingested dose of paracetamol was 333 mg/kg body weight. Majority of the patients (84%) were transfers. Induced emesis and activated charcoal were given to 91% of patients. N-acetylcysteine was given to 66, methionine to 55, and both to 2. Aclinically important delay in the administration of antidotes was noted; 68% of patients received antidotes after 8 hours of the acute ingestion. Only 31 (26%) had paracetamol levels above the Rumack-Matthew normogram. 74 patients received an antidote despite having a plasma paracetamol level below the toxic level according to the normogram. Management of acute paracetamol poisoning could be improved by following best available evidence and adapting cheaper methods for plasma paracetamol estimation.

  9. Emergency management of acute adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, A. F.; Ho, K.

    1995-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute asthma and the development of new, effective therapies, patients still die. While physicians agree that most asthma deaths could be prevented if patients were treated adequately, evidence suggests that both patients and physicians continue to underestimate the severity of asthma attacks and delay adequate treatment. PMID:8563508

  10. Successful percutaneous management of acute left ventricular assist device stoppage.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Snyder, Trevor; Chaffin, John S; Elkins, C Craig; Kanaly, Paul J; Long, James W

    2010-01-01

    The HeartMate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a small axial-flow next-generation pump. Acute stoppage of this device is a potentially lethal complication. As these devices proliferate, many patients will be in areas remote to their implant center. Therefore, percutaneous stabilization of these patients before definitive surgical replacement could be potentially life saving. We present two cases of acute LVAD stoppage managed successfully using percutaneous means.

  11. [The management of acute pancreatitis according to the modern guidelines].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G; Andercou, O; Andercou, A; Marian, D; Tamasan, A; Span, M

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a critical illness as the organism that produces a significant mortality despite diagnostic and therapeutic acquisitions. While new mechanisms have been identified for production and were crystallized management principles, a number of controversies remain awaiting resolution in the near future. Aim is to establish, based on their experience and literature data, place the current means of diagnosis and treatment in close correlation with the pathophysiological events of acute pancreatitis.

  12. Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC therapy) for the management of patients with high-energy soft tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Herscovici, Dolfi; Sanders, Roy W; Scaduto, Julia M; Infante, Anthony; DiPasquale, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the results of a vacuum-assisted closure device in patients presenting with open high-energy soft tissue injuries. Consecutive nonrandomized clinical study. From August 1999 through October 2000, 21 patients, with 21 high-energy soft tissue wounds (6 tibial, 10 ankle, and 5 with wounds of the forearm, elbow, femur, pelvis, and a below-knee stump) were treated with a vacuum-assisted closure device at a Level 1 trauma center. A negative atmospheric pressure device used for the management of complex open injuries. Infected wounds had dressings changed every 48 hours, whereas all others had dressings changed every 72 to 96 hours. The duration of vacuum-assisted closure use, final wound closure outcome, costs versus standard dressing changes or free flaps, and a list of all complications were recorded. All patients were followed for 6 months postcoverage. Patients averaged 4.1 sponge changes, 77% performed at bedside, with the device used an average of 19.3 days. Twelve wounds (57%) required either no further treatment or a split-thickness skin graft, and 9 (43%) required a free tissue transfer. The vacuum-assisted closure appears to be a viable adjunct for the treatment of open high-energy injuries. Application can be performed as a bedside procedure but additional soft tissue reconstruction may be needed for definitive coverage. This device does not replace the need for formal debridement of necrotic tissue, but it may avoid the need for a free tissue transfer in some patients with large traumatic wounds.

  13. Teaching Wound Care Management: A Model for the Budget Conscious Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.

    2012-01-01

    For the author, the concept of wound care has always been a challenging topic to demonstrate. How to teach the concept without having a student in need of wound care or without having to spend money to buy another simulation manikin/model? The author has recently created a simulation to demonstrate and practice the cleaning, closing, and dressing…

  14. Teaching Wound Care Management: A Model for the Budget Conscious Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.

    2012-01-01

    For the author, the concept of wound care has always been a challenging topic to demonstrate. How to teach the concept without having a student in need of wound care or without having to spend money to buy another simulation manikin/model? The author has recently created a simulation to demonstrate and practice the cleaning, closing, and dressing…

  15. The potential role of female flowers inflorescence of Typha domingensis Pers. in wound management.

    PubMed

    Akkol, Esra Küpeli; Süntar, Ipek; Keles, Hikmet; Yesilada, Erdem

    2011-02-16

    Female flowers inflorescence of Typha species including Typha domingensis Pers. are used externally for burns and wound healing in Turkish folk medicine. In order to verify the folkloric assertion, the female and male flowers inflorescences were individually submitted to in vivo wound models. Ointment formulations prepared directly either from the male or female flowers inflorescences of Typha domingensis in 5% and 10% concentrations were submitted to activity testing. After that, female flowers inflorescence was further submitted to successive extractions with solvents in increasing polarity; i.e., n-hexane, chloroform, methanol and water and the wound healing activity of each extract was investigated. The linear incision and circular excision wound models were used for the evaluation of the healing potential of the test materials in rats and mice. Tissue sections were also evaluated by histopathological techniques. Remarkable wound healing activity was observed only for the female flowers inflorescence at 5% concentration in ointment base and its methanolic and aqueous extracts. The wound healing effect was found comparable to that of reference ointment Madecassol(®). The results of histopathological evaluation supported the outcome of both linear incision and circular excision wound models. The experimental study revealed that the female flowers inflorescence of Typha domingensis displayed notable wound healing activity in mice and rats, at the models tested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  17. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  18. The Impact of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Orthopaedic Infection.

    PubMed

    Webb, Lawrence X

    2017-04-01

    By hastening the resolution of edema and improving local microcirculation, topical negative pressure wound therapy (TNP) aids the establishment of early wound coverage. Its use in the setting of type III open fractures is reviewed. The author's initial use of TNP for closed surgical incisions and how it morphed its way into being applied to closed surgical wounds with heightened likelihood for infection is presented. Several case studies are presented to illustrate the role and the technique for management of acute or subacute infections involving bone and implant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The wound/burn guidelines - 6: Guidelines for the management of burns.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Sakai, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Madokoro, Naoki; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Kodera, Masanari; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Yamasaki, Osamu; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-09-01

    Burns are a common type of skin injury encountered at all levels of medical facilities from private clinics to core hospitals. Minor burns heal by topical treatment alone, but moderate to severe burns require systemic management, and skin grafting is often necessary also for topical treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment or delay of initial treatment may exert adverse effects on the subsequent treatment and course. Therefore, accurate evaluation of the severity and initiation of appropriate treatment are necessary. The Guidelines for the Management of Burn Injuries were issued in March 2009 from the Japanese Society for Burn Injuries as guidelines concerning burns, but they were focused on the treatment for extensive and severe burns in the acute period. Therefore, we prepared guidelines intended to support the appropriate diagnosis and initial treatment for patients with burns that are commonly encountered including minor as well as moderate and severe cases. Because of this intention of the present guidelines, there is no recommendation of individual surgical procedures.

  20. Management of GI emergencies: peptic ulcer acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2013-10-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common medical emergency. Management of acute ulcer bleeding requires prompt assessment for risk stratification, evaluation for early endoscopy, initiation of pharmacotherapy and treatment of co-morbid diseases. Tremendous advances in endoscopic technique and pharmacotherapy in the past few decades have reduced recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality of the disease. Strategies to minimize recurrence have been defined for various types of peptic ulcers. This article reviews the current management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Experience with a new negative pressure incision management system in prevention of groin wound infection in vascular surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Matatov, Tim; Reddy, Kaavya N; Doucet, Linda D; Zhao, Cynthia X; Zhang, Wayne W

    2013-03-01

    Groin wound infection is an important cause of postoperative morbidity in vascular surgery patients, especially when prosthetic grafts are involved. The objective of this study was to investigate if Prevena (Kinetic Concepts, Inc, San Antonio, Tex), a negative pressure incision management system, could reduce the risk of groin wound infection in patients after vascular surgery. Ninety patients (115 groin incisions) underwent longitudinal or transverse femoral cutdown for vascular procedures. A retrospective chart review was performed on 63 consecutive incisions in patients in the non-Prevena group from December 2009 to November 2010 and on 52 consecutive incisions in patients in the Prevena group from January 2011 to December 2011. Prevena was applied intraoperatively and removed 5 to 7 days postoperatively. The non-Prevena group received either a skin adhesive or absorbent dressing. Groin incisions were assessed, and infection was graded based on Szilagyi classifications. Student t-test and two-sample proportion z test were used for statistical analyses. A P value < .05 was considered statistically significant. Comorbidities and known risk factors for infection were compared; there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Prosthetic material was used in 34 (65%) incisions in the Prevena group and 29 (46%) incisions in the non-Prevena group. Fifty (96%) incisions within the Prevena group and 60 (96%) in the non-Prevena group were classified as clean surgical wounds. Wounds were evaluated at 7 days and 30 days postoperatively. Of 63 groin incisions in 49 patients in the non-Prevena group, 19 (30%) incisions had groin wound infections. Wound infections were classified into Szilagyi grade I (10; 16%), Szilagyi grade II (7; 11%), and Szilagyi grade III (2; 3%). Of 52 groin incisions in 41 patients in the Prevena group, three (6%) incisions had Szilagyi grade I wound infections. No grade II or III infections occurred in this group. Overall

  2. Current strategies for endoscopic management of acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Tan, Damien

    2017-04-01

    At the pancreatobiliary session of Endoscopic Forum Japan (EFJ) 2016, current strategies for the endoscopic management of acute cholangitis were discussed. The topics consisted of two major parts, namely endoscopic management of acute cholangitis caused by common bile duct stones (CBDS) and biliary stent occlusion. Endoscopists from nine Japanese high-volume centers along with two overseas centers participated in the questionnaires and discussion. Strategies for management of cholangitis due to CBDS were agreed upon, and the clinical guideline of acute cholangitis (Tokyo guidelines 2013) was accepted. The best timing for drainage in Grade 2 (moderate) cholangitis urgent or early (<24 h) was inconclusive, and more data is required on this issue. Another controversy was the feasibility of one step stone extraction in the patient with cholangitis vs stone removal after the cholangitis had resolved. There were various opinions with regards to the management of acute cholangitis due to stent occlusion, and the strategies differed according to the stricture location (distal or hilar) and stent type initially placed (Covered or uncovered metal stent). Strategies for management of cholangitis caused by CBD stones are well established according to the TG13. More evidence is required before further recommendations can be made with regards to cholangitis due to stent occlusion. We aim to clarify this in the near future with questionnaires and consensus from experts. © 2017 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  3. Compromised wounds in Canada.

    PubMed

    Denny, Keith; Lawand, Christina; Perry, Sheril D

    2014-01-01

    Wounds are a serious healthcare issue with profound personal, clinical and economic implications. Using a working definition of compromised wounds, this study examines the prevalence of wounds by type and by healthcare setting using data from hospitals, home care, hospital-based continuing care and long-term care facilities within fiscal year 2011-2012 in Canada. It also evaluates several risk factors associated with wounds, such as diabetes, circulatory disease and age. Compromised wounds were reported in almost 4% of in-patient acute hospitalizations and in more than 7% of home care clients, almost 10% of long-term care clients and almost 30% of hospital-based continuing care clients. Patients with diabetes were much more likely to have a compromised wound than were patients without the disease. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Tissue engineering for the management of chronic wounds: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds constitute a significant and growing biomedical burden. With the increasing growth of populations prone to dysfunctional wound healing, there is an urgent and unmet need for novel strategies to both prevent and treat these complications. Tissue engineering offers the potential to create functional skin, and the synergistic efforts of biomedical engineers, material scientists, and molecular and cell biologists have yielded promising therapies for non-healing wounds. However, traditional paradigms for wound healing focus largely on the role of inflammatory cells and fail to incorporate more recent research highlighting the importance of stem cells and matrix dynamics in skin repair. Approaches to chronic wound healing centred on inflammation alone are inadequate to guide the development of regenerative medicine-based technologies. As the molecular pathways and biologic defects underlying non-healing wounds are further elucidated, multifaceted bioengineering systems must advance in parallel to exploit this knowledge. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts in tissue engineering for chronic wounds and speculate on areas for future research in this increasingly interdisciplinary field.

  5. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a nested qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Waterfield, J; Ismail, Khaled M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore women's lived experiences of a dehisced perineal wound following childbirth and how they felt participating in a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT). Design A nested qualitative study using semistructured interviews, underpinned by descriptive phenomenology. Participants and setting A purposive sample of six women at 6–9 months postnatal who participated in the RCT were interviewed in their own homes. Results Following Giorgi's analytical framework the verbatim transcripts were analysed for key themes. Women's lived experiences revealed 4 emerging themes: (1) Physical impact, with sub-themes focusing upon avoiding infection, perineal pain and the impact of the wound dehiscence upon daily activities; (2) Psychosocial impact, with sub-themes of denial, sense of failure or self-blame, fear, isolation and altered body image; (3) Sexual impact; and (4) Satisfaction with wound healing. A fifth theme ‘participating in the RCT’ was ‘a priori’ with sub-themes centred upon understanding the randomisation process, completing the trial questionnaires, attending for hospital appointments and acceptability of the treatment options. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to grant women the opportunity to voice their personal experiences of a dehisced perineal wound and their views on the management offered. The powerful testimonies presented disclose the extent of morbidity experienced while also revealing a strong preference for a treatment option. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020; results. PMID:28188152

  6. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Submandibular Fistula After Reconstruction for Osteoradionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Ming; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Zhuang, Pei-Lin; Wang, You-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Liang; Zhang, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Although negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for complicated wounds has been extensively studied, it is rarely used in cases involving a submandibular fistula due to radiation-induced osteoradionecrosis of the mandible. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of NPWT for submandibular fistulas after reconstruction for osteoradionecrosis. Nine patients with submandibular fistulas after reconstruction for osteoradionecrosis treated with NPWT between 2011 and 2014 were included in the study. The wound healing was documented. The NPWT device was removed postoperatively between days 7 and 12 (mean duration, 9.6 days). The wound bed was filled with healthy granulation tissue, and successful healing by second intention was observed in all patients within 2 weeks. No complications were observed. The follow-up ranged from 4 to 27 months (mean, 18 months); the fistulas exhibited excellent healing, and no recurrence or infection was observed. NPWT is a safe, effective technique for managing submandibular fistulas after reconstruction for osteoradionecrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  8. Review article: the current management of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Craig, D G N; Lee, A; Hayes, P C; Simpson, K J

    2010-02-01

    Acute liver failure is a devastating clinical syndrome with a persistently high mortality rate despite critical care advances. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is a life-saving treatment in selected cases, but effective use of this limited resource requires accurate prognostication because of surgical risks and the requirement for subsequent life-long immunosuppression. To review the aetiology of acute liver failure, discuss the evidence behind critical care management strategies and examine potential treatment alternatives to OLT. Literature review using Ovid, PubMed and recent conference abstracts. Paracetamol remains the most common aetiology of acute liver failure in developed countries, whereas acute viral aetiologies predominate elsewhere. Cerebral oedema is a major cause of death, and its prevention and prompt recognition are vital components of critical care support, which strives to provide multiorgan support and 'buy time' to permit either organ regeneration or psychological and physical assessment prior to acquisition of a donor organ. Artificial liver support systems do not improve mortality in acute liver failure, whilst most other interventions have limited evidence bases to support their use. Acute liver failure remains a truly challenging condition to manage, and requires early recognition and transfer of patients to specialist centres providing intensive, multidisciplinary input and, in some cases, OLT.

  9. Surgical judgment in the management of abdominal stab wounds. Utilizing clinical criteria from a 10-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W C; Uddo, J F; Nance, F C

    1984-01-01

    A 10-year retrospective study of patients with stab wounds to the abdomen managed under a protocol of selective management has been performed. Patients were assessed on the basis of clinical presentation and physical examination, with minimal diagnostic studies. Peritoneal lavage was not utilized in the evaluation of the patients. Two hundred and nineteen such patients were identified. One hundred and eleven of these patients were treated nonoperatively. Ninety patients were treated by immediate laparotomy. Eighteen patients, initially observed, underwent delayed laparotomy. One patient, not explored despite clear-cut indications for laparotomy, died of sepsis, emphasizing the need for strict adherence to the stated protocol. The negative or unnecessary laparotomy rate was 7.8%. The false-negative examination rate was 5.5%. Overall mortality rate was 2.3%. The accuracy of careful clinical evaluation and observation is comparable to, or better than, any other method currently available to identify intra-abdominal injuries in patients with abdominal stab wounds. The study suggests that selective management of stab wounds of the abdomen may be safely practiced in a smaller community hospital. PMID:6721604

  10. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  11. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  12. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an ‘aged’ population. As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department, intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  13. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge.

  14. Emergency presentation and management of acute severe asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Øymar, Knut; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Acute severe asthma is one of the most common medical emergency situations in childhood, and physicians caring for acutely ill children are regularly faced with this condition. In this article we present a summary of the pathophysiology as well as guidelines for the treatment of acute severe asthma in children. The cornerstones of the management of acute asthma in children are rapid administration of oxygen, inhalations with bronchodilators and systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled bronchodilators may include selective b2-agonists, adrenaline and anticholinergics. Additional treatment in selected cases may involve intravenous administration of theophylline, b2-agonists and magnesium sulphate. Both non-invasive and invasive ventilation may be options when medical treatment fails to prevent respiratory failure. It is important that relevant treatment algorithms exist, applicable to all levels of the treatment chain and reflecting local considerations and circumstances. PMID:19732437

  15. Acute aortic syndromes: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Jacobs, Larry; Amanullah, Aman M

    2008-01-01

    The acute aortic syndromes carry significant morbidity and mortality, especially when detected late. Symptoms may mimic myocardial ischemia, and physical findings may be absent or, if present, can be suggestive of a diverse range of other conditions. Maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion is crucial in establishing the diagnosis. All patients with suspected aortic disease and evidence of acute ischemia on electrocardiogram should undergo diagnostic imaging studies before thrombolytics are administered. The demonstration of an intimal flap separating 2 lumina is the basis for diagnosis. Tear detection and localization are very important because any therapeutic intervention aims to occlude the entry tear. The goals of medical therapy are to reduce the force of left ventricular contractions, decrease the steepness of the rise of the aortic pulse wave, and reduce the systemic arterial pressure to as low a level as possible without compromising perfusion of vital organs. Surgical therapy still remains the gold standard of care for type A aortic dissection, whereas in type B dissection, percutaneous aortic stenting and fenestration techniques have been developed and are sometimes used in conjunction with medical therapy in certain situations.

  16. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  17. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  18. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  19. [Management of an acute exacerbation of asthma and COPD].

    PubMed

    Leuppi, Jörg D; Ott, Sebastian R

    2014-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease are chronic pulmonary diseases which have a high prevalence world-wide. Both conditions can deteriorate acutely and potentially put patients into life-threatening situations. Management of an acute exacerbation starts in the emergency consultation-setting and ends only once the longterm management has been thoroughly assessed and optimised in order to prevent future exacerbations. Exacerbation frequency is strongly associated with long-term morbidity and mortality in both diseases. Recent data have shown that short-course systemic steroids (5 days) for the treatment of an acute exacerbation of COPD are as successful as long-course treatments (14 days) in preventing exacerbations during the subsequent 6 months. Similarly the targeted use of antibiotics is discussed in this review.

  20. Recent advances in the management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Ravaglia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is characterized by acute wheezing in infants or children and is associated with signs or symptoms of respiratory infection; it is rarely symptomatic in adults and the most common etiologic agent is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Usually it does not require investigation, treatment is merely supportive and a conservative approach seems adequate in the majority of children, especially for the youngest ones (<3 months); however, clinical scoring systems have been proposed and admission in hospital should be arranged in case of severe disease or a very young age or important comorbidities. Apnea is a very important aspect of the management of young infants with bronchiolitis. This review focuses on the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic characteristics, as well as the recent advances in management of acute bronchiolitis. PMID:25580257

  1. Acute Aortic Syndromes: Update in Current Medical Management.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline H; Mix, Doran; Cameron, Scott J

    2017-04-01

    Advances in medical therapy and non-surgical percutaneous options to manage the specter of acute aortic syndromes have improved both patient morbidity and mortality. There are key features in the patient history and initial exam which physicians should be attuned to in order to diagnose acute aortic syndromes such as aortic dissection, penetrating aortic ulcer, and intramural hematoma. Once recognized, early initiation of the appropriate pharmacologic therapy is important, and further appreciating the limitations of such therapy before considering a surgical approach is critical to improve patient outcomes. For the undifferentiated patient with acute aortic dissection presenting to facilities who do not routinely manage this condition, adding pharmacologic agents in the correct sequence assures the best chance for a satisfactory outcome.

  2. The Acute Pediatric Scrotum: Presentation, Differential Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Chadwick, David; Thomas, David

    2012-01-01

    Both pediatric and adult urologists frequently evaluate pediatric patients with an acute scrotum. We present a detailed review on the acute pediatric scrotum highlighting the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and management of this common clinical condition. It is important to highlight that a testicular torsion is the most important differential diagnosis and the main priority in each case is to diagnosis and treat a potential testicular torsion is of the essence. The aim of our extensive review is to update/review the appropriate evaluation and management of the acute scrotum and to guide the clinician in distinguishing testicular torsion from the other conditions that commonly mimic this surgical emergency. This review is useful for trainees in UK and Europe who plan to take the FRCS (Urol) examination. PMID:24917714

  3. Diabetic cornea wounds produce significantly weaker electric signals that may contribute to impaired healing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Pfluger, Trisha; Ferreira, Fernando; Liang, Jiebing; Navedo, Manuel F; Zeng, Qunli; Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2016-06-10

    Wounds naturally produce electric signals which serve as powerful cues that stimulate and guide cell migration during wound healing. In diabetic patients, impaired wound healing is one of the most challenging complications in diabetes management. A fundamental gap in knowledge is whether diabetic wounds have abnormal electric signaling. Here we used a vibrating probe to demonstrate that diabetic corneas produced significantly weaker wound electric signals than the normal cornea. This was confirmed in three independent animal models of diabetes: db/db, streptozotocin-induced and mice fed a high-fat diet. Spatial measurements illustrated that diabetic cornea wound currents at the wound edge but not wound center were significantly weaker than normal. Time lapse measurements revealed that the electric currents at diabetic corneas lost the normal rising and plateau phases. The abnormal electric signals correlated significantly with impaired wound healing. Immunostaining suggested lower expression of chloride channel 2 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator in diabetic corneal epithelium. Acute high glucose exposure significantly (albeit moderately) reduced electrotaxis of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro, but did not affect the electric currents at cornea wounds. These data suggest that weaker wound electric signals and impaired electrotaxis may contribute to the impaired wound healing in diabetes.

  4. Managing wound exudate using a super-absorbent polymer dressing: a 53-patient clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cutting, K F

    2009-05-01

    This real-life, observational evaluation shows that, by absorbing and retaining within its structure the corrosive enzymes found in chronic exudate, this dressing both reduces the likelihood of peri-wound maceration and promotes healing.

  5. Measurement of localized tissue water - clinical application of bioimpedance spectroscopy in wound management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, L. C.; Sharpe, K.; Edgar, D.; Finlay, V.; Wood, F.

    2013-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex process which can be impeded by the presence of accumulated cell fluid or oedema. A simple and convenient method for the assessment of wound oedema would aid improvement in patient care. In this proof of concept study we investigated whether bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy has the potential to provide such a tool. A number of important observations were made. Firstly, the method was highly reproducible and data can be obtained from electrodes located at different positions around the region of interest; important given the highly variable topography of surface wounds, e.g. burns. Secondly, the method was highly sensitive with the potential to detect changes of as little as 20 μl in extracellular fluid. Thirdly the relative changes in R0, R∞ and Ri following sub-cutaneous injections of saline were consistent with redistribution of water from the extracellular to intracellular space and /or removal from the local area as may occur during wound healing.

  6. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  7. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  8. Management of acute vertigo with betahistine.

    PubMed

    Bradoo, R A; Nerurkar, N K; Mhapankar, J B; Patil, S F; Kute, D G

    2000-04-01

    This open, prospective study was carried out in 29 outpatients of vertigo with Betahistine treatment at a dose of 16 mg three times daily far a maximum treatment period of 6 weeks or earlier until remission of vertigo attacks. The evaluations were carried out based on three parameters such as frequency, duration, and severity of vertigo attacks. Betahistino showed a significant improvement in the three parameters of frequency, duration and severity of vertigo attacks. Associated symptoms such as tinnitus, nausea, vomiting, headache, faintness showed a significant improvement with the therapy. Subgroup analysis showed a significant improvement of patients with severe and incapacitating verlign attaeks at baseline. Thus, this study proves excellent efficacy and goad tolerability of Betahistine as an anti-vertigo drug at a dose of 16 mg three times daily and gives a new insight for controlling acute or severe vertigo attacks without causing sedation.

  9. Management of the acute migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, Glen; Knutson, Doug; Miser, William F

    2002-12-01

    As many as 30 million Americans have migraine headaches. The impact on patients and their families can be tremendous, and treatment of migraines can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for family physicians. Abortive treatment options include nonspecific and migraine-specific therapy. Nonspecific therapies include analgesics (aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opiates), adjunctive therapies (antiemetics and sedatives), and other nonspecific medications (intranasal lidocaine or steroids). Migraine-specific abortive therapies include ergotamine and its derivatives, and triptans. Complementary and alternative therapies can also be used to abort the headache or enhance the efficacy of another therapeutic modality. Treatment choices for acute migraine should be based on headache severity, migraine frequency, associated symptoms, and comorbidities.

  10. [Acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Arias, F; Manterola, A; Domínguez, M A; Martínez, E; Villafranca, E; Romero, P; Vera, R

    2004-01-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most frequent syndromes in patients with tumours of the head and neck, and the oesophagus. This can be the initial symptom or, more frequently, related to the oncological treatment. We review the most important therapeutic and physio-pathological aspects of acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Deglutition is a complex process in which numerous muscular-skeletal structures intervene under the neurological control of different cranial nerves. The complex neuro-muscular coordination needed for a correct deglutition can be affected by numerous situations, both from the effect of the tumours and from their treatment, basically surgery or radiotherapy. In conclusion, it can be affirmed that for a suitable treatment of oncological dysphagia, a correct initial evaluation and an active treatment are required, since not only the patient's quality of life but, on numerous occasions, the possibility of continuing the treatment and thus maintaining the possibilities of a cure depend on control of the dysphagia.

  11. Managing and Preventing Acute Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR), an uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition, often occurs in men who have benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although the reported incidence of AUR varies in the literature, there are a number of events that are known to precipitate episodes of AUR, including ingestion of certain agents, infection, general anesthesia, and performance of various diagnostic genitourinary procedures. Because it is preferable to avoid the need for catheterization (and the associated risks) in men at high risk for AUR, certain measures have been studied as means to prevent AUR episodes. Specifically, α-blockers and 5-α-reductase inhibitors have been shown to reduce the incidence of initial and subsequent AUR episodes in certain at-risk men. PMID:16985887

  12. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally.

  13. Acute Chest Pain: Emergency Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Since cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders have significant morbidity and mortality, triage of patients who complain of chest pain is paramount. The less sophisticated the triage system, the more important the protocol should be to have these patients evaluated immediately. History and physical are still the most important diagnostic tools; information should be gathered from all available sources. Advanced cardiac life support training is most useful. Eight diagnostic classifications are described, together with the distinctions of onset, duration, location, radiation, precipitating and relieving factors, character and associated symptoms. The protocol for initial management is outlined, emphasizing coincident management wherever possible. Imagesp2005-a PMID:21286539

  14. Management of Madhumehajanya Vrana (diabetic wound) with Katupila (Securinega leucopyrus [Willd] Muell.) Kalka

    PubMed Central

    Ajmeer, Ahamed Shahan; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prevalence of diabetes and its complications have been a burden to the society from the ancient times, in the present and also will be in the future unless proper measures are taken to prevent its manifestation. There have been an increasing number of death associated-amputation cases which are mainly caused by nonhealing wounds. These facts urge researchers to develop new, more effective wound treatments for diabetic patients. Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of Katupila Kalka (Securinega leucopyrus [Willd.] Muell. leaf paste) and Tila Taila (Sesamum indicum oil) in Madhumehajanya Vrana (diabetic wounds/ulcers) with Betadine ointment. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 patients of Madhumehajanya Vrana were chosen and randomly divided into two groups (Group A and B). Patients of Group A were treated with local application of Katupila Kalka with Tila Taila, whereas, in Group B, Betadine ointment was applied on the affected parts, once a day in the morning for 30 days. The relief in signs and symptoms were assessed on scoring pattern. Results: In Group A, diabetic wounds treated with Katupila paste got healed within 28 days with minimal scar formation without any complications, whereas in Group B, wound was healed completely only in two patients within 28 days. In both the groups, no patients reported any adverse drug reaction during the entire course of treatment as well as in follow-up period. Conclusion: Study concluded that the drug Katupila Kalka possesses Vrana Ropana (wound healing) activity with fine scaring. PMID:27313426

  15. [Stab wounds in emergency department].

    PubMed

    Bège, T; Berdah, S V; Brunet, C

    2013-12-01

    Stab wounds represent the most common cause of penetrating wounds, occurring mainly in case of aggression or suicide attempt. Clinical severity depends on the superficial or penetrating aspect of the wound, its location and damaged organs. Medical management must be known because the vital risk is involved in penetrating wounds. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be operated without delay after performing a chest X-ray and ultrasound Focus assisted sonography for trauma (FAST) to guide the surgery. In the stable patients, the general clinical examination, exploration of the wound and medical imaging detect injuries requiring surgical management. Stab penetrating wounds require close and rapid collaboration between medical teams, tailored to the institution's resources.

  16. Acute pain management in symptomatic cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Masudi, Tahir; Capitelli-McMahon, Helen; Anwar, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review the evidence for the use of different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of biliary colic. METHODS The strategies employed included an extensive literature review for articles and studies related to biliary colic from electronic databases including PubMed, Science Direct, Wiley Inter Science, Medline and Cochrane from last 15 years. Keywords: “Biliary colic”, “management of biliary colic”, “non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs”, “cholelithiasis” and “biliary colic management”. Six randomized control trials, 1 non-randomized trial and 1 meta-analysis were included in this review. The outcomes of these studies and their significance have been reviewed in this paper. RESULTS Current evidence suggests there are no set protocols for biliary colic pain management. NSAIDs are potent in the management of biliary colic, not only in terms of symptom control but in disease progression as well. Apart from the studies on diclofenac and ketorolac, there are studies which have shown that intravenous tenoxicam and injectable flurbiprofen are equally effective in managing biliary colic. The efficacy of NSAIDs is superior in terms of lower number of doses and longer duration of action in comparison to other analgesic agents. CONCLUSION This literature review has found that NSAIDs are safe and effective for pain control in biliary colic, and reduce the likelihood of further complications. PMID:27830044

  17. Conservative management of acute scrotal edema.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Karen D

    2014-01-01

    Scrotal edema is a prevalent issue. It is difficult to treat and has a myriad of causes. Historical treatments for scrotal edema have lacked efficacy. If treated before fibrosis occurs, surgery can be avoided. A method for conservative management is outlined.

  18. Acute management of priapism in men.

    PubMed

    Tay, Yeng K; Spernat, Daniel; Rzetelski-West, Kathryn; Appu, Sree; Love, Chris

    2012-04-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Priapism is a rare event. However, various medications and medical conditions may increase the risk. Priapism can be ischaemic, non-ischaemic or stuttering. It is paramount to distinguish the type of priapism, as misdiagnosis may lead to significant morbidity. Ischaemic priapism represents a compartment syndrome of the penis and is therefore a medical emergency. A delay in management may significantly affect future erectile function. Stuttering priapism represents recurrent subacute episodes of ischaemic priapism, which may lead to erectile dysfunction. Thus episodes must be minimised. Non-ischaemic priapism is not a medical emergency. However, misdiagnosis and injection with sympathomimetic agents can result in system absorption and toxicity. This review article provides a summary of the evaluation and management of priapism. Furthermore, a step by step flow chart is provided to guide the clinician through the assessment and management of this complex issue. To review the literature regarding ischaemic, non-ischaemic and stuttering priapism. To provide management recommendations. A Medline search was carried out to identify all relevant papers with management guidelines for priapism. Ischaemic priapism represents a compartment syndrome of the penis and urgent intervention is required to decrease the risk of erectile dysfunction. Non-ischaemic priapism is not a medical emergency; however, it can result in erectile dysfunction. The treatment objective for stuttering priapism is to reduce future episodes with systemic treatments, whilst treating each ischaemic episode as an emergency. Priapism is a complex condition that requires expert care to prevent complications and irreversible erectile dysfunction. © 2012 THE AUTHOR. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  19. 2014 Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients With Lower-Extremity Arterial Disease (LEAD): An Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Phyllis A; Flemister, Bonny G; Droste, Linda R; Johnson, Jan J; Kelechi, Teresa; Ratliff, Catherine R; Varnado, Myra F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the recommendations from the 2014 Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients With Lower-Extremity Arterial Disease (LEAD), published by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN). This article provides an overview of the process used to update and develop the guideline, and specific recommendations from the guideline for assessment, referral for further evaluation, interventions (ie, debridement, dressings, infection, antibiotics, nutrition, pain management, compression issues, medications, surgical options, and adjunctive therapies), and patient education and risk-reduction strategies. The LEAD guideline is a resource for physicians, nurses, therapists, and other healthcare professionals who work with adults who have/or are at risk for wounds due to LEAD. The full text of the published guideline, which includes the available evidence supporting the recommendations and a complete reference list, is available from the WOCN Society, 1120 Rt. 73, Suite 200, Mount Laurel, NJ, 08054; Web site: www.wocn.org. Refer to the Supplemental Digital Content (Supplement Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JWOCN/A31) associated with this article for the complete reference list for the guideline. The guideline has been accepted for publication by the National Guideline Clearinghouse (www.guideline.gov/).

  20. Prospective randomised controlled trial of nanocrystalline silver dressing versus plain gauze as the initial post-debridement management of military wounds on wound microbiology and healing.

    PubMed

    Fries, C A; Ayalew, Y; Penn-Barwell, J G; Porter, K; Jeffery, S L A; Midwinter, M J

    2014-07-01

    Recent conflicts have been characterised by the use of improvised explosive devices causing devastating injuries, including heavily contaminated wounds requiring meticulous surgical debridement. After being rendered surgical clean, these wounds are dressed and the patient transferred back to the UK for on-going treatment. A dressing that would prevent wounds from becoming colonised during transit would be desirable. The aim of this study was to establish whether using nanocrystalline silver dressings, as an adjunct to the initial debridement, would positively affect wound microbiology and wound healing compared to standard plain gauze dressings. Patients were prospectively randomised to receive either silver dressings, in a nanocrystalline preparation (Acticoat™), or standard of care dressings (plain gauze) following their initial debridement in the field hospital. On repatriation to the UK microbiological swabs were taken from the dressing and the wound, and an odour score recorded. Wounds were followed prospectively and time to wound healing was recorded. Additionally, patient demographic data were recorded, as well as the mechanism of injury and Injury Severity Score. 76 patients were recruited to the trial between February 2010 and February 2012. 39 received current dressings and 37 received the trial dressings. Eleven patients were not swabbed. There was no difference (p=0.1384, Fishers) in the primary outcome measure of wound colonisation between the treatment arm (14/33) and the control arm (20/32). Similarly time to wound healing was not statistically different (p=0.5009, Mann-Whitney). Wounds in the control group were scored as being significantly more malodorous (p=0.002, Mann-Whitney) than those in the treatment arm. This is the first randomised controlled trial to report results from an active theatre of war. Performing research under these conditions poses additional challenges to military clinicians. Meticulous debridement of wounds remains the

  1. Management of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Amin, Tejal; Poon, Leona C Y; Teoh, T G; Moorthy, K; Robinson, Stephen; Neary, Nicola; Valabhji, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a recognised rare complication in pregnancy. The reported incidence varies between 3 and 7 in 10 000 pregnancies and is higher in the third trimester. The commonest causes in pregnancy include gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia. Non-gallstone pancreatitis is associated with more complications and poorer outcome with hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis having mortality rates ranging from 7.5 to 9.0% and 10.0 to 17.5% for mother and foetus, respectively. A 40-year-old para 4 woman, who presented at 15(+4) weeks' gestation, was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. Past medical history included Graves' disease and hypertriglyceridaemia. Fenofibrate was discontinued immediately after discovery of the pregnancy. Initial investigations showed elevated amylase (475.0 µ/L) and triglycerides (46.6 mmol/L). Imaging revealed an inflamed pancreas without evidence of biliary obstruction/gallstones hence confirming the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis. Laboratory tests gradually improved (triglyceride 5.2 mmol/L on day 17). On day 18, ultrasound confirmed foetal demise (18(+1) weeks) and a hysterotomy was performed as she had had four previous caesarean sections. Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis has poor outcomes when diagnosed in early pregnancy. Identifying those at risk pre-pregnancy and antenatally can allow close monitoring through pregnancy to optimise care.

  2. Acute Management for the Injured Hand

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Geoffrey J.

    1985-01-01

    If not optimally treated, a hand injury can lead to disability which often has considerable economic and social implications. The role of the primary care physician is to diagnose the injury correctly and initiate management which will keep this disability to a minimum. This is best achieved by making a composite diagnosis to include all the injured components of the hand. The emphasis must be on early mobilization of the injured area and the maintenance of mobility in all joints of the upper limb. Early referral to physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments is highly desirable. The major pitfall in managing hand injuries is over zealous treatment of the fracture at the expense of the soft tissue injury, resulting in iatrogenic stiffness. PMID:21274226

  3. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  4. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    PubMed

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  5. Observation units in the management of acute heart failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fermann, Gregory J; Collins, Sean P

    2010-09-01

    Observation units (OUs) for acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) have proven to be effective in reducing heart failure admissions and may reduce costs. Goals for risk-stratifying patients with AHFS in OUs include determining patients suitable for OU management and determining end points of treatment. Although many provider models and settings exist, management algorithms common to most OUs include monitoring/nursing care, diagnostic procedures, therapy, and educational/social services. The focus of OU management involves an assessment of the factors that led to the decompensation and identification of the predominant clinical features such as hypertension and congestion. Acute therapy still leans heavily on symptom relief with diuretics and nitroglycerin. For newly diagnosed patients, initiation of guideline-recommended therapies like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and beta-blockers is an integral part of OU protocols. Patient education and coordination of outpatient care continues to be paramount in preventing early readmission in this patient population.

  6. Management of Adult Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, D.; Powles, R. L.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; Gauci, C. L.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Malpas, J. S.; Fairley, G. Hamilton; Scott, Ronald Bodley

    1973-01-01

    Consecutive adult patients admitted to St. Bartholomew's Hospital with acute myelogenous leukaemia have been treated with a remission induction drug schedule consisting of daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside. Intermittent five-day courses were used in 72 patients, and a complete remission was obtained in 39 patients (54%). An alternative drug schedule in 22 patients resulted in fewer remissions but this may have been due to age differences in the two groups. Age and initial platelet count were found to be important factors in determining the success of remission induction therapy; the older patients and those with low platelet counts responded less well. A series of 23 patients who achieved remissions was divided into two groups; one received intermittent combination chemotherapy as the only form of maintenance, and the other was given weekly immunotherapy in addition to the chemotherapy. The immunotherapy consisted of irradiated allogeneic leukaemic cells and B.C.G. Eight of the 10 patients on chemotherapy alone have already relapsed compared with five out of 13 patients in the immunotherapy group. It is hoped that these promising initial results with this form of maintenance will be confirmed as more patients enter the maintenance trials. PMID:4513355

  7. Health professionals' decision-making in wound management: a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy; St John, Winsome; Morley, Nicola; Nieuwenhoven, Paul

    2015-06-01

    To develop a conceptual understanding of the decision-making processes used by healthcare professionals in wound care practice. With the global move towards using an evidence-base in standardizing wound care practices and the need to reduce hospital wound care costs, it is important to understand health professionals' decision-making in this important yet under-researched area. A grounded theory approach was used to explore clinical decision-making of healthcare professionals in wound care practice. Interviews were conducted with 20 multi-disciplinary participants from nursing, surgery, infection control and wound care who worked at a metropolitan hospital in Australia. Data were collected during 2012-2013. Constant comparative analysis underpinned by Strauss and Corbin's framework was used to identify clinical decision-making processes. The core category was 'balancing practice-based knowledge with evidence-based knowledge'. Participants' clinical practice and actions embedded the following processes: 'utilizing the best available information', 'using a consistent approach in wound assessment' and 'using a multidisciplinary approach'. The substantive theory explains how practice and evidence knowledge was balanced and the variation in use of intuitive practice-based knowledge versus evidence-based knowledge. Participants considered patients' needs and preferences, costs, outcomes, technologies, others' expertise and established practices. Participants' decision-making tended to be more heavily weighted towards intuitive practice-based processes. These findings offer a better understanding of the processes used by health professionals' in their decision-making in wound care. Such an understanding may inform the development of evidence-based interventions that lead to better patient outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Analysing the medicine-management interface in acute trusts.

    PubMed

    Ong, B N; Boaden, M; Cropper, S

    1997-01-01

    The impact of the NHS reforms, and the resulting purchaser-provider split, has refocused attention on the relationship between management and medicine in acute hospitals. It is timely to assess the explanatory power of various theoretical models regarding the management-medicine interface. Argues that this interface is currently rather fluid and that a dynamic and adaptive model is best suited to understanding the way in which doctors and managers develop their relationship within the changing policy context. Two examples illustrate these shifting boundaries.

  9. Bacteriology of war wounds at the time of injury.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Roop, Stuart A; Hospenthal, Duane R; Dooley, David P; Wenner, Kimberly; Hammock, John; Taufen, Neil; Gourdine, Emmett

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of war wounds occurs either at the time of injury or during the course of therapy. Characterization of the bacteria recovered at the time of initial trauma could influence the selection of empiric antimicrobial agents used to prevent infection. In the spring of 2004, U.S. military casualties who presented to the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad, Iraq, with acute traumatic injuries resulting in open wounds underwent aerobic culture of their wounds to identify the bacteria colonizing the wounds. Forty-nine casualties with 61 separate wounds were evaluated. Wounds were located predominantly in the upper and lower extremities and were primarily from improvised explosive devices or mortars. Thirty wounds (49%) had bacteria recovered on culture, with 40 bacteria identified. Eighteen casualties (20 wounds) had undergone field medical therapy (irrigation and/or antimicrobial treatment); six of these had nine bacterial isolates on culture. Of the 41 wounds from 31 patients who had received no previous therapy, 24 grew 31 bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria (93%), mostly skin-commensal bacteria, were the predominant organisms identified. Only three Gram-negative bacteria were detected, none of which were characterized as broadly resistant to antimicrobial agents. The only resistant bacteria recovered were two isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Our assessment of war wound bacterioly soon after injury reveals a predominance of Gram-positive organisms of low virulence and pathogenicity. The presence of MRSA in wounds likely reflects the increasing incidence of community-acquired MRSA bacteria. These data suggest that the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics with efficacy against more resistant, Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., is unnecessary in early wound management.

  10. Presentation, management and outcome of acute sigmoid diverticulitis requiring hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose A; Baldonedo, Ricardo F; Bear, Isabel G; Otero, Jorge; Pire, Gerardo; Alvarez, Paloma; Jorge, Jose I

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with acute sigmoid diverticulitis requiring hospitalization. From 1986 to 2005, the medical records of 265 patients treated for acute sigmoid diverticulitis requiring hospitalization were retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected with regard to patient's demographics, clinical characteristics, presentations of acute diverticulitis, treatment, morbidity, and mortality. Only 47 patients (17.7%) had a previous diverticulitis episode. Of the 265 patients, 166 (62.6%) were managed without operation, and 99 (37.4%) underwent surgery. Overall and major morbidity in the whole series were 30.2 (80/265) and 15.5% (40/265), respectively; whereas among the patients with surgical management, were 72.7 (72/99), and 35.3% (35/99), respectively. Overall and postoperative mortality rates were 2.6 (7/265) and 6.1% (6/99), respectively. Older age, steroid use, perforation, and co-morbidities were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes. It was concluded that surgery for acute sigmoid diverticulitis requiring hospitalization carries important morbidity and mortality. To achieve improvements in outcome, a selective therapeutic approach should be considered, choosing the best surgical procedure for each complication of diverticular disease. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Acute diarrhoeal diseases--an approach to management.

    PubMed

    Sur, Dipika; Bhattacharya, S K

    2006-05-01

    Acute diarrhoeal diseases rank second amongst all infectious diseases as a killer in children below 5 years of age worldwide. Globally, 1.3 billion episodes occur annually, with an average of 2-3 episodes per child per year. The important aetiologic agents of diarrhoea and the guidelines for management are discussed. Management of acute diarrhoea is entirely based on clinical presentation of the cases. It includes assessment of the degree of dehydration clinically, rehydration therapy, feeding during diarrhoea, use of antibiotic(s) in selected cases, micronutrient supplementation and use of probiotics. Assessment of the degree of dehydration should be done following the WHO guidelines. Dehydration can be managed with oral rehydration salt (ORS) solution or intravenous fluids. Recently WHO has recommended a hypo-osmolar ORS solution for the treatment of all cases of acute diarrhoea including cholera. Feeding during and after diarrhoea (for at least 2-3 weeks) prevents malnutrition and growth retardation. Antibiotic therapy is not recommended for the treatmentof diarrhoea routinely. Only cases of severe cholera and bloody diarrhoea (presumably shigellosis) should be treated with a suitable antibiotic. Pilot studies in several countries have shown that zinc supplementation during diarrhoea reduces the severity and duration of the disease as well as antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial use rate. Probiotics may offer a safe intervention in acute infectious diarrhoea to reduce the duration and severity of the illness.

  12. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults: causes and management

    PubMed Central

    Osula, S; Bell, G; Hornung, R

    2002-01-01

    The case report in this review illustrates an acute myocardial infarction in a young adult probably due to arterial thrombosis that can be attributed to a hypercoagulable state resulting from the nephrotic syndrome. Although rare, acute myocardial infarction should be considered in young adults presenting with chest pain. A detailed clinical history may help to identify the aetiology, and guide subsequent management, but diagnostic coronary angiography is essential. Careful risk factor modification and treatment of the underlying cause should reduce the incidence of recurrent cardiac events. PMID:11796868

  13. Acute Management of Nutritional Demands after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven; Singer, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding nutritional management in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Specific metabolic challenges are present following spinal cord injury. The acute stage is characterized by a reduction in metabolic activity, as well as a negative nitrogen balance that cannot be corrected, even with aggressive nutritional support. Metabolic demands need to be accurately mon