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Sample records for acute-care community hospitals

  1. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used.

  2. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  3. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Evan S.; Willis, Carla; Rencher, William C; Zhou, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes) and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%). Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0), lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days), costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056), but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%). Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that state Medicaid

  4. Older Jail Inmates and Community Acute Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Chodos, Anna H.; Ahalt, Cyrus; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Myers, Janet; Goldenson, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined older jail inmates’ predetainment acute care use (emergency department or hospitalization in the 3 months before arrest) and their plans for using acute care after release. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study of 247 jail inmates aged 55 years or older assessing sociodemographic characteristics, health, and geriatric conditions associated with predetainment and anticipated postrelease acute care use. Results. We found that 52% of older inmates reported predetainment acute care use and 47% planned to use the emergency department after release. In modified Poisson regression, homelessness was independently associated with predetainment use (relative risk = 1.42; 95% confidence interval = 1.10, 1.83) and having a primary care provider was inversely associated with planned use (relative risk = 0.69; 95% confidence interval = 0.53, 0.89). Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act has expanded Medicaid eligibility to all persons leaving jail in an effort to decrease postrelease acute care use in this high-risk population. Jail-to-community transitional care models that address the health, geriatric, and social factors prevalent in older adults leaving jail, and that focus on linkages to housing and primary care, are needed to enhance the impact of the act on acute care use for this population. PMID:25033146

  5. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  6. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  7. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  8. Systematic review of antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bitterman, R; Hussein, K; Leibovici, L; Carmeli, Y; Paul, M

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic consumption is an easily quantifiable performance measure in hospitals and might be used for monitoring. We conducted a review of published studies and online surveillance reports reporting on antibiotic consumption in acute care hospitals between the years 1997 and 2013. A pooled estimate of antibiotic consumption was calculated using a random effects meta-analysis of rates with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed through subgroup analysis and metaregression. Eighty studies, comprising data from 3130 hospitals, met the inclusion criteria. The pooled rate of hospital-wide consumption was 586 (95% confidence interval 540 to 632) defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 hospital days (HD) for all antibacterials. However, consumption rates were highly heterogeneous. Antibacterial consumption was highest in intensive care units, at 1563 DDD/1000 HD (95% confidence interval 1472 to 1653). Hospital-wide antibacterial consumption was higher in Western Europe and in medium-sized, private and university-affiliated hospitals. The methods of data collection were significantly associated with consumption rates, including data sources, dispensing vs. purchase vs. usage data, counting admission and discharge days and inclusion of low-consumption departments. Heterogeneity remained in all subgroup analyses. Major heterogeneity currently precludes defining acceptable antibiotic consumption ranges in acute care hospitals. Guidelines on antibiotic consumption reporting that will account for case mix and a minimal set of hospital characteristics recommending standardized methods for monitoring and reporting are needed. PMID:26899826

  9. Ownership and financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Augurzky, Boris; Engel, Dirk; Schmidt, Christoph M; Schwierz, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    This paper considers the role of ownership form for the financial sustainability of German acute care hospitals over time. We measure financial sustainability by a hospital-specific yearly probability of default (PD) trying to mirror the ability of hospitals to survive in the market in the long run. The results show that private ownership is associated with significantly lower PDs than public ownership. Moreover, path dependence in the PD is substantial but far from 100%, indicating a large number of improvements and deteriorations in financial sustainability over time. Yet, the general public hospitals have the highest path dependence. Overall, this indicates that public hospitals, which are in a poor financial standing, remain in that state or even deteriorate over time, which may be conflicting with financial sustainability.

  10. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  11. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  12. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  13. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free public access... CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et. al Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year...

  14. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  15. Overutilization of acute-care beds in Veterans Affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Goldman, R L; Martin, D C; Williamson, J; Weir, C; Beauchamp, C; Ashcraft, M

    1996-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals would have substantial overutilization of acute care beds and services because of policies that emphasize inpatient care over ambulatory care. Reviewers from 24 randomly selected VA hospitals applied the InterQual ISD* (Intensity, Severity, Discharge) criteria for appropriateness concurrently to a random sample of 2,432 admissions to acute medical, surgical, and psychiatry services. Reliability of hospital reviewers in applying the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing their reviews with those of a small group of expert reviewers. Validity of the ISD* criteria was tested by comparing the assessments of master reviewers with the implicit judgments of panels of nine physicians. The physician panels validated the ISD* admission criteria for medicine and surgery (74% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.4), whereas the psychiatry criteria were not validated (66% agreement, kappa 0.29). Hospital reviewers reliably used all three criteria sets (> 83% agreement with master reviewers, kappa > 0.6). Rates of nonacute admissions to acute medical and surgical services were > 38% as determined by the hospital and master reviewers and by the physician panels. Nonacute rates of continued stay were > 32% for both medicine and surgery services. Similar rates of nonacute admissions and continued stay were found for all 24 hospitals. Reasons for nonacute admissions and continued stay included lack of an ambulatory care alternative, conservative physician practices, delays in discharge planning, and social factors such as homelessness and long travel distances to the hospital. Using criteria that the authors showed to be reliable and valid, substantial overutilization of acute medicine and surgical beds was found in a representative sample of VA hospitals. Correcting this situation will require changes in physician practice patterns, development of ambulatory care alternatives to inpatient

  16. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  17. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  18. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258), there were a... effective date requirements. ] IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  19. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ...We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  20. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  1. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified. PMID:22617700

  2. Comparing apples to apples: the relative financial performance of Manitoba's acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Watson, Diane; Finlayson, Greg; Jacobs, Philip

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents comparative financial ratios that can be adopted by health system administrators and policy analysts to begin to evaluate the performance of acute care hospitals. We combined financial, statistical and clinical information for 73 acute care hospitals in Manitoba for fiscal 1997/98 to calculate 15 indicators of financial performance. Our findings suggest that there is variability between hospital types in their average costs per weighted case, cost structure and financial performance.

  3. The effectiveness of wellness programs as a strategy for cost containment in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of hospital-based wellness programs in lowering both the acuity of illness of patients and the total expenses of acute care hospitals from a strategic management perspective. The subjects for this cross-sectional study were 164 community hospitals in 27 urban areas of Texas. The findings show that, after controlling for size, the number of wellness programs was significantly and negatively related to both the acuity of illness and total expenses. Further, the number of wellness programs offered did not vary significantly by type of ownership. The study concludes that reimbursement policies designed to provide financial incentives to promote wellness have been effective and suggests future directions for the evolution of health care management. PMID:15816225

  4. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  5. Use of Acute Care Hospitals by Long-Stay Patients: Who, How Much, and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Carolyn; Bruce, Sharon; Kozyrskyj, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The effects of long-term hospitalizations can be severe, especially among older adults. In Manitoba, between fiscal years 1991/1992 and 1999/2000, 40 per cent of acute care hospital days were used by the 5 per cent of patients who had long stays, defined as stays of more than 30 days. These proportions were remarkably stable, despite major changes…

  6. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism.

  7. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  8. Effects of outsourced nursing on quality outcomes in long-term acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Raymond; Kerr, Bernard J; Burtner, Joan; Ledlow, Gerald; Fulton, Larry V

    2011-03-01

    Use of outsourced nurses is often a stop-gap measure for unplanned vacancies in smaller healthcare facilities such as long-term acute-care hospitals (LTACHs). However, the relationship of utilization levels (low, medium, or high percentages) of nonemployees covering staff schedules often is perceived to have negative relationships with quality outcomes. To assess this issue, the authors discuss the outcomes of their national study of LTACH hospitals that indicated no relationship existed between variations in percentage of staffing by contracted nurses and selected outcomes in this post-acute-care setting.

  9. Exploring Reasons for Bed Pressures in Winnipeg Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menec, Verena H.; Bruce, Sharon; MacWilliam, Leonard R.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital overcrowding has plagued Winnipeg and other Canadian cities for years. This study explored factors related to overcrowding. Hospital files were used to examine patterns of hospital use from fiscal years 1996/1997 to 1999/2000. Chart reviews were conducted to examine appropriateness of admissions and hospital stays during one pressure…

  10. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  11. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance. PMID:1399656

  12. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-10-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance.

  13. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  14. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  15. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  16. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  17. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  18. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  19. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  20. Measuring gain-sharing dividends in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barbusca, A; Cleek, M

    1994-01-01

    Hospitals have responded to industry consolidation by increasing productivity with nonmanagement, group-incentive compensation, known as gain sharing. A nationwide study conducted to obtain quantitative performance data for gain-sharing programs revealed that they are most successful during the initial stages of the program. Many variables affect the size of employee bonuses and the duration of employee support. Employers must identify how to appropriately install their gain-sharing program so that employee motivation, participation, and trust in management are maximized. PMID:8206759

  1. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  2. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  3. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  4. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  5. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective. PMID:11708394

  6. The Conscientious Practice Policy: a futility policy for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Mark R

    2005-08-01

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the conflict that may occur when patients or their families insist on a therapy that the physician feels would be futile. In 1999 the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association recommended that all health-care institutions adopt a policy on medical futility that follows a fair process. Development of such a policy has proved problematic for many hospitals. The Conscientious Practice Policy at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital was developed as a response to the AMA recommendation. It outlines a specific process to be followed in the event that a physician wishes to refuse to provide a requested therapy, whether that refusal is based on perceived futility or other concerns. The policy was subsequently modified slightly and adopted by two other Connecticut acute care hospitals.

  7. End-of-life care in an acute care hospital: linking policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-07-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be effective, health care professionals who provide hospital care will need to respond to its patient-centered purpose. Health services will also be called upon to train health care professionals to work with dying people in a more participatory way and to assist them to develop the clinical processes that support shared decision making. Health professionals who manage clinical workplaces become central in reshaping this practice environment by promoting patient-centered care policy objectives and restructuring health service systems to routinely incorporate patient and family preferences about care at key points in the patient's care episode.

  8. Acute Care For Elders Units Produced Shorter Hospital Stays At Lower Cost While Maintaining Patients’ Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Palmer, Robert M.; Kresevic, Denise M.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Kowal, Jerome; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

    2013-01-01

    Acute Care for Elders Units offer enhanced care for older adults in specially designed hospital units. The care is delivered by interdisciplinary teams, which can include geriatricians, advanced practice nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physical therapists. In a randomized controlled trial of 1,632 elderly patients, length-of-stay was significantly shorter—6.7 days per patient versus 7.3 days per patient—among those receiving care in the Acute Care for Elders Unit compared to usual care. This difference produced lower total inpatient costs—$9,477 per patient versus $10,451 per patient—while maintaining patients’ functional abilities and not increasing hospital readmission rates. The practices of Acute Care for Elders Units, and the principles they embody, can provide hospitals with effective strategies for lowering costs while preserving quality of care for hospitalized elders. PMID:22665834

  9. Frequency of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dawn Marie; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; McNulty, Rita; Click, Elizabeth R; Glembocki, Margaret M

    2012-03-01

    A new culture bolstering collaborative behavior among nurses and physicians is needed to merge the unique strengths of both professions into opportunities to improve patient outcomes. To meet this challenge it is fundamental to comprehend the current uses of collaborative behaviors among nurses and physicians. The purpose of this descriptive study was to delineate frequently used from infrequently used collaborative behaviors of nurses and physicians in order to generate data to support specific interventions for improving collaborative behavior. The setting was an acute care hospital, and participants included 114 registered nurses and 33 physicians with active privileges. The Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale was used to measure the frequency of use of nurse-physician collaborative behaviors self-reported by nurses and physicians. The background variables of gender, age, education, ethnicity, years of experience, years practiced at the current acute care hospital, practice setting and professional certification were accessed. In addition to analyzing the frequency of collaborative behaviors, this study compares levels of collaborative behavior reported by nurses and physicians. PMID:22145999

  10. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  11. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  12. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  13. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  14. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  15. Effects of Medicare BBA spending reductions on the profitability of general acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sear, Alan M

    2004-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 was intended to reduce spending by about $115 billion from the Medicare Hospital Insurance trust fund over a five-year period. Several studies were funded by the hospital industry that indicated that the actual reductions would be far greater than $115 billion and that these reductions would have a devastating effect on U.S. hospital finances. In 1999, Congress passed the Balanced Budget Refinement Act, which added back about $11 billion in spending for fiscal years 2000 through 2002. In 2000, Congress passed the Benefits Improvement and Protection Act, which restored another $37 billion in spending over a five-year period. These cutbacks were going into effect at the same time as a cyclical decline in hospital operating margins occurred. This study was designed to determine if any separate effect of the Balanced Budget Act could be detected in the operating margins of general acute care hospitals in Tampa Bay, Florida. Operating margins were analyzed for 25 hospitals for a 12-year period (1990 through 2001), and a regression model was tested in which the dependent variable was the difference in mean operating margins for each hospital between the 1990 through 1997 period and the 1998 through 2001 period. The mean percentage of hospital revenue derived from Medicare, five other revenue source variables, and three hospital structural variables were used as the predictor variables. A statistically significant decline in operating margins was seen between these two periods, but Medicare revenue did not account for a significant amount of the variance. Thus, it was concluded that the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 did not significantly affect the operating margins of the study hospitals. Implications for Medicare policy are addressed. PMID:15074120

  16. Pharmacist-initiated prior authorization process to improve patient care in a psychiatric acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shari N; Ojong-Salako, Mebanga

    2015-02-01

    A prior authorization (PA) is a requirement implemented by managed care organizations to help provide medications to consumers in a cost-effective manner. The PA process may be seen as a barrier by prescribers, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and consumers. The lack of a standardized PA process, implemented prior to a patient's discharge from a health care facility, may increase nonadherence to inpatient prescribed medications. Pharmacists and other health care professionals can implement a PA process specific to their institution. This article describes a pharmacist-initiated PA process implemented at an acute care psychiatric hospital. This process was initiated secondary to a need for a standardized process at the facility. To date, the process has been seen as a valuable aspect to patient care. Plans to expand this process include collecting data with regards to adherence and readmissions as well as applying for a grant to help develop a program to automate the PA program at this facility.

  17. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  18. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  19. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered.

  20. A Comparison of Free-Standing versus Co-Located Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Barnato, Amber E.; Lave, Judith R.; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Le, Tri Q.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) provide specialized treatment for patients with chronic critical illness. Increasingly LTACs are co-located within traditional short-stay hospitals rather than operated as free-standing facilities, which may affect LTAC utilization patterns and outcomes. Methods We compared free-standing and co-located LTACs using 2005 data from the United States Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We used bivariate analyses to examine patient characteristics and timing of LTAC transfer, and used propensity matching and multivariable regression to examine mortality, readmissions, and costs after transfer. Results Of 379 LTACs in our sample, 192 (50.7%) were free-standing and 187 (49.3%) were co-located in a short-stay hospital. Co-located LTACs were smaller (median bed size: 34 vs. 66, p <0.001) and more likely to be for-profit (72.2% v. 68.8%, p = 0.001) than freestanding LTACs. Co-located LTACs admitted patients later in their hospital course (average time prior to transfer: 15.5 days vs. 14.0 days) and were more likely to admit patients for ventilator weaning (15.9% vs. 12.4%). In the multivariate propensity-matched analysis, patients in co-located LTACs experienced higher 180-day mortality (adjusted relative risk: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00–1.11, p = 0.04) but lower readmission rates (adjusted relative risk: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.75–0.98, p = 0.02). Costs were similar between the two hospital types (mean difference in costs within 180 days of transfer: -$3,580, 95% CI: -$8,720 –$1,550, p = 0.17). Conclusions Compared to patients in free-standing LTACs, patients in co-located LTACs experience slightly higher mortality but lower readmission rates, with no change in overall resource use as measured by 180 day costs. PMID:26440102

  1. 76 FR 19365 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... payments published in the FY 2011 IPPS final rule (75 FR 50042). Overall, all hospitals will experience an... exceptions policy (see the FY 2005 IPPS final rule, 69 FR 49105). ** This hospital has been assigned a wage... 2011 IPPS/LTCHPPS final rule) appeared in the August 16, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 50042) and...

  2. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), make...

  3. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Disease FR Federal Register HAI Healthcare-Associated Infection HBIPS Hospital-Based Inpatient Psychiatric... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), there were a number of....asp . III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2012-9985 of May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27870), make the...

  4. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... FR 60315) included several corrections to figures and data for the Hospital Readmissions Reduction... August 31, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 53258), we published a final rule entitled ``Medicare Program... the October 3, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 60315); October 17, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR...

  5. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    .... Background In FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010 (75 FR 50042), there were a number of technical errors... FR Doc. 2010-19092 of August 16, 2010, make the following corrections: A. Corrections to the Preamble..., 485, and 489 RIN 0938-AP80; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective...

  6. 75 FR 34614 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Hefter, (410) 786-4487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010... correction notice. III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2010-12563 of June 2, 2010, make the following... care hospital prospective payment system (FY 2010 IPPS/RY 2010 LTCH PPS) notice), there were...

  7. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Hospital Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A Issues. Susanne Seagrave, (410) 786-0044, Physician Order and Certification for Payment of Inpatient... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH...

  8. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  9. Clinical review: the hospital of the future - building intelligent environments to facilitate safe and effective acute care delivery.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brian W; Litell, John M; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gajic, Ognjen

    2012-12-12

    The translation of knowledge into rational care is as essential and pressing a task as the development of new diagnostic or therapeutic devices, and is arguably more important. The emerging science of health care delivery has identified the central role of human factor ergonomics in the prevention of medical error, omission, and waste. Novel informatics and systems engineering strategies provide an excellent opportunity to improve the design of acute care delivery. In this article, future hospitals are envisioned as organizations built around smart environments that facilitate consistent delivery of effective, equitable, and error-free care focused on patient-centered rather than provider-centered outcomes.

  10. Predicting pressure ulcer risk with the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales in acute care hospitals in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Enid; Pang, Samantha; Wong, Thomas; Ho, Jacqueline; Shao-ling, Xue; Li-jun, Tao

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a modified Braden scale, to evaluate its predictive validity, and to identify a more valid pressure ulcer risk calculator for application in acute care hospitals in Mainland China among the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales. The initial modified Braden scale, with the addition of skin type and body build for height, was proposed in this study. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects who were admitted to two acute care hospitals in Mainland China within 24 hr and free of pressure ulcers upon admission were assessed with the initial modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales by three nurse assessors. This was followed by a daily skin assessment to note any pressure ulcer by a nurse assessor. Nine subjects had pressure ulcers detected at Stages I (89%) and II (11%) after an average stay of 11 days. The descriptive analysis of each subscale scoring item in the initial modified Braden scale indicated that skin type and body build for height were the most distinct predictive factors whereas nutrition was the least distinct factor for predicting pressure ulcer development. Based on these findings, the modified Braden scale was further developed with the addition of skin type and body build for height and by exclusion of nutrition. The predictive validity test reported that the modified Braden scale demonstrated a better balance of sensitivity (89%) and specificity (75%) at a cutoff score of 16, with a higher positive predictive value (7%), than the Braden and Norton scales. This finding revealed that for this sample, the modified Braden scale is more effective in pressure ulcer risk prediction than the other two scales. Because the modified Braden scale is not 100% sensitive and specific, to increase clinical efficacy in the prevention of pressure ulcer, it is recommended that it be adopted combined with nursing judgment to predict pressure ulcer development in acute care settings in Mainland China.

  11. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S.; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims: With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. Background: DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. Methods/Design: A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting

  12. Barriers to the Adoption of Safety-Engineered Needles Following a Regulatory Standard: Lessons Learned from Three Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrea; Mustard, Cameron A.; Holness, D. Linn; Nichol, Kathryn; Breslin, F. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of jurisdictions have introduced regulation to accelerate the adoption of safety-engineered needles (SENs). This study examined the transition to SENs in three acute care hospitals prior to and following the implementation of a regulatory standard in Ontario. This paper focuses on the ongoing barriers to the prevention of needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. Methods: Information from document review and 30 informant interviews were used to prepare three case studies detailing each organization's implementation activities and outcomes. Results: All three hospitals responded to the regulatory requirements with integrity and needlestick injuries declined. However, needlestick injuries continued to occur during the activation of safety devices, during procedures and during instrument disposal. The study documented substantial barriers to further progress in needlestick injury prevention. Conclusions: Healthcare organizations should focus on understanding their site-specific challenges that contribute to ongoing injury risk to better understand issues related to product limitations, practice constraints and the work environment. PMID:26571471

  13. Is there a link between the hospital-acquired injurious fall rates in US acute care hospitals and these institutions' implementation levels of computerized systems?

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Hu, Hsou Mei; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2011-12-01

    Medicare no longer reimburses acute care hospitals for the costs of additional care required due to hospital-acquired injuries. Consequently, this study explored the effective computerized systems to inform practice for better interventions to reduce fall risk. It provided a correlation between type of computerized system and hospital-acquired injurious fall rates at acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York. It used multiple publicly available data sets, with the hospital as the unit of analysis. Descriptive and Pearson correlation analyses were used. The analysis included 462 hospitals. Significant correlations could be categorized into two groups: (1) meaningful computerized systems that were associated with lower injurious fall rates: the decision support systems for drug allergy alerts, drug-drug interaction alerts, and drug-laboratory interaction alerts; and (2) computerized systems that were associated with higher injurious fall rates: the decision support system for drug-drug interaction alerts and the computerized provider order entry system for radiology tests. Future research may include additional states, multiple years of data, and patient-level data to validate this study's findings. This effort may further inform policy makers and the public about effective clinical computerized systems provided to clinicians to improve their practice decisions and care outcomes.

  14. Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adalsteinn D; Alikhan, L Miin; Sandoval, Guillermo A; Seeman, Neil; Baker, G Ross; Pink, George H

    2005-01-01

    To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required. PMID:16078398

  15. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  16. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  17. A Performance Analysis of Long-term Acute-Care Hospitals Owned by Large, Multistate Investor-Owned Companies.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Preethy; Liu, Xinliang; McCue, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a descriptive assessment of the operating performance of for-profit long-term acute-care hospitals owned by multistate, investor-owned companies (large FP LTCHs) compared with FP LTCHs owned by smaller FP companies (small FP LTCHs) and nonprofit LTCHs (NP LTCHs). The study used the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services cost report data for 290 LTCHs from 2010 through 2012 to compare the financial performance of large and small FP LTCHs and NP LTCHs. The study found that the median operating profit margin for large FP LTCHs was 8.06%, which was twice as high as that of the small FP LTCHs and NP LTCHs (4.78% and 2.80%, respectively). Larger size, serving a greater proportion of private pay and more complex patients and incurring lower operating expenses, including salary expenses, may account for the higher operating margin of the large FP LTCHs. PMID:27111686

  18. Lessons learned from study of depression in cardiovascular patients in an acute-care heart and vascular hospital.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Brennan, J Michael; Vish, Nancy; Adams, Jenny; Muldoon, Mary; Renbarger, Tara; Garner, John

    2013-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease, but questions about the effectiveness of screening and intervention remain unanswered. To evaluate the effects of proactive intervention at an acute-care heart and vascular hospital, patients who reported depressive symptoms on admission were randomized to an active, counseling-based depression intervention plus standard care (referral to a primary or psychiatric care physician) or to standard care alone. Despite early termination of patient enrollment because of lower-than-expected recruitment rates, the project had a positive impact. By involving and educating staff, the investigators raised awareness and improved the process of identifying and helping depressed patients. The lessons in study design and execution gained from this experience will help ensure success in future studies of this condition.

  19. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79. PMID:26456803

  20. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79.

  1. The influence of insurance status on waiting times in German acute care hospitals: an empirical analysis of new data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate in Germany about the assumption that patients with private health insurance (PHI) benefit from better access to medical care, including shorter waiting times (Lüngen et al. 2008), compared to patients with statutory health insurance (SHI). Problem Existing analyses of the determinants for waiting times in Germany are a) based on patient self-reports and b) do not cover the inpatient sector. This paper aims to fill both gaps by (i) generating new primary data and (ii) analyzing waiting times in German hospitals. Methods We requested individual appointments from 485 hospitals within an experimental study design, allowing us to analyze the impact of PHI versus SHI on waiting times (Asplin et al. 2005). Results In German acute care hospitals patients with PHI have significantly shorter waiting times than patients with SHI. Conclusion Discrimination in waiting times by insurance status does occur in the German acute hospital sector. Since there is very little transparency in treatment quality in Germany, we do not know whether discrimination in waiting times leads to discrimination in the quality of treatment. This is an important issue for future research. PMID:20025744

  2. The Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative education program for acute care nurses and staff.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Janice L; Lach, Helen W; McGillick, Janis; Murphy-White, Maggie; Carroll, Maria B; Armstrong, Johanna L

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias have 3.2 million hospital stays annually, which is significantly more than older individuals without dementia. Hospitalized patients with dementia are at greater risk of delirium, falls, overwhelming functional decline that may extend the hospital stay, and prolonged or complicated rehabilitation. These risks highlight the need for staff education on the special care needs of this vulnerable population. This article describes a one-day education program, the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative, designed to teach staff how to provide the specialized care required by patients with dementia. Participants (N = 355) from five different hospitals, including 221 nurses, completed a pretest-posttest evaluation for the program. Changes in participants attitudes and practices, confidence, and knowledge were evaluated. Scores indicated significant improvement on the posttest. The evaluation provides further evidence for recommending dissemination of the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative. PMID:25299008

  3. A strategy for enhancing financial performance: a study of general acute care hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mankyu; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the determinants of hospital profitability were evaluated using a sample of 142 hospitals that had undergone hospital standardization inspections by the South Korea Hospital Association over the 4-year period from 1998 to 2001. The measures of profitability used as dependent variables in this study were pretax return on assets, after-tax return on assets, basic earning power, pretax operating margin, and after-tax operating margin. Among those determinants, it was found that ownership type, teaching status, inventory turnover, and the average charge per adjusted inpatient day positively and statistically significantly affected all 5 of these profitability measures. However, the labor expenses per adjusted inpatient day and administrative expenses per adjusted inpatient day negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures. The debt ratio negatively and statistically significantly affected all 5 profitability measures, with the exception of basic earning power. None of the market factors assessed were shown to significantly affect profitability. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the profitability of hospitals can be improved despite deteriorating external environmental conditions by facilitating the formation of sound financial structures with optimal capital supplies, optimizing the management of total assets with special emphasis placed on inventory management, and introducing efficient control of fixed costs including labor and administrative expenses.

  4. Health information technology adoption in U.S. acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Seblega, Binyam; Wan, Thomas; Unruh, Lynn; Agiro, Abiy; Miao, Li

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies show that the healthcare industry lags behind many other economic sectors in the adoption of information technology. The purpose of this study is to understand differences in structural characteristics between providers that do and that do not adopt Health Information Technology (HIT) applications. Publicly available secondary data were used from three sources: American Hospital Association (AHA) annual survey, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) analytics annual survey, and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Fifty-two information technologies were grouped into three clusters: clinical, administrative, and strategic decision making ITs. Negative binomial regression was applied with adoption of technology as the dependent variables and eight organizational and contextual factors as the independent variables. Hospitals adopt a relatively larger proportion of administrative information technology as compared to clinical and strategic IT. Large size, urban location and HMO penetration were found to be the most influential hospital characteristics that positively affect information technology adoption. There are still considerable variations in the adoption of information technology across hospitals and in the type of technology adopted. Organizational factors appear to be more influential than market factors when it comes to information technology adoption. The future research may examine whether the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program in 2011 would increase the information technology uses in hospitals as it provides financial incentives for HER adoptions and uses among providers.

  5. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  6. Anticipating Change: How Many Acute Care Hospital Beds Will Manitoba Regions Need in 2020?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Greg; Stewart, David Kenney; Tate, Robert B.; MacWilliam, Leonard R.; Roos, Noralou P.

    2005-01-01

    Being able to anticipate future needs for health services presents a challenge for health planners. Using existing population projections, two models are presented to estimate the demand for hospital beds in regions of Manitoba in 2020. The first, a current-use projection model, simply projects the average use for a recent three-year period into…

  7. Variations in Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: Results from a national survey of university-affiliated hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Madore, John C.; Collins, Courtney E.; Ayturk, M. Didem; Velmahos, George C.; Britt, LD; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, no studies have reported nationwide adoption of Acute Care Surgery (ACS) or identified structural and/or process variations for the care of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients within such models. METHODS We surveyed surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at University HealthSystems Consortium hospitals using an 8-page postal/email questionnaire querying respondents on hospital and EGS structure/process measures. Survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate comparisons, and multivariable regression models. RESULTS 258 of 319 (81%) potential respondents completed surveys. 81 hospitals (31%) had implemented ACS while 134 (52%) had a traditional general surgeon on-call model (GSOC). 38 (15%) hospitals had another model (HYBRID). Larger bed, university-based, teaching hospitals with Level 1 trauma center verification status located in urban areas were more likely to have adopted ACS. In multivariable modeling, hospital type, setting, and trauma center verification predicted ACS implementation. EGS processes of care varied with 28% GSOC having block time vs 67% ACS (p<0.0001); 45% GSOC providing ICU care to EGS patients in a surgical/trauma ICU vs 93% ACS (p<0.0001); GSOC sharing call among 5.7 (+/− 3.2) surgeons vs 7.9 (+/−2.3) ACS surgeons (p<0.0001); and 13% GSOC taking in-house EGS call vs 75% ACS (p<0.0001). Among ACS hospitals there were variations in patient cohorting (25% EGS patients alone; 21% EGS+trauma; 17% EGS+elective; 30% EGS+trauma+elective), data collection (26% had prospective EGS registries), and patient handoffs (56% had attending surgeon presence), call responsibilities (averaging 4.8 (+/− 1.3) calls per month with 60% providing extra call stipend and 40% with no post-call clinical duties). CONCLUSION The potential of the ACS on the national crisis in access to EGS care is not fully met. Variations in EGS processes of care among adopters of ACS suggest that standardized criteria for ACS

  8. Case management in an acute-care hospital: collaborating for quality, cost-effective patient care.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Kim; Wen, Victoria; Bather, Michelle; Park, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Case management has recently been advanced as a valuable component in achieving quality patient care that is also cost-effective. At St. Michael's Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, case managers from a variety of professional backgrounds are central to a new care initiative--Rapid Assessment and Planning to Inform Disposition (RAPID)--in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Unit that is designed to improve patient care and reconcile high emergency department volumes through "smart bed spacing." Involved in both planning and RAPID, GIM's case managers are the link between patient care and utilization management. These stewards of finite resources strive to make the best use of dollars spent while maintaining a commitment to quality care. Collaborating closely with physicians and others across the hospital, GIM's case managers have been instrumental in bringing about significant improvements in care coordination, utilization management and process redesign. PMID:24844723

  9. Cost savings associated with increased RN staffing in acute care hospitals: simulation exercise.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Mueller, Christine; Duval, Sue; Wilt, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Increasing nurse-to-patient staffing has been recommended as a means to improve patient safety. In this study, researchers analyzed the savings-cost ratio of increased RN-to-patient ratios for patients in ICUs and patients in surgical and medical units based on a meta-analysis of published observational studies. Increased RN staffing was associated with lower hospital-related mortality and adverse patient events and generates societal net savings from avoided patient adverse events. This finding appears to hold in ICUs and, to some extent, in surgical units, but not in medical units. Hospitals do not experience sufficient monetary benefit from reduced length of stay corresponding to an increased RN staffing. Policy decisions about RN staffing should include cost-utility analyses. PMID:19927445

  10. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed. PMID:17563327

  11. Duration of Colonization With Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria at Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals in Chicago, Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Haverkate, Manon R.; Weiner, Shayna; Lolans, Karen; Moore, Nicholas M.; Weinstein, Robert A.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hayden, Mary K.; Bootsma, Martin C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. High prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae has been reported in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs), in part because of frequent readmissions of colonized patients. Knowledge of the duration of colonization with KPC is essential to identify patients at risk of KPC colonization upon readmission and to make predictions on the effects of transmission control measures. Methods. We analyzed data on surveillance isolates that were collected at 4 LTACHs in the Chicago region during a period of bundled interventions, to simultaneously estimate the duration of colonization during an LTACH admission and between LTACH (re)admissions. A maximum-likelihood method was used, taking interval-censoring into account. Results. Eighty-three percent of patients remained colonized for at least 4 weeks, which was the median duration of LTACH stay. Between LTACH admissions, the median duration of colonization was 270 days (95% confidence interval, 91–∞). Conclusions. Only 17% of LTACH patients lost colonization with KPC within 4 weeks. Approximately half of the KPC-positive patients were still carriers when readmitted after 9 months. Infection control practices should take prolonged carriage into account to limit transmission of KPCs in LTACHs.

  12. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a cross-sectional prevalence study in the Australian acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jill L; Coyer, Fiona M; Osborne, Sonya R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the prevalence of incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in Australian acute care patients and to describe the products worn to manage incontinence, and those provided at the bedside for perineal skin care. Data on 376 inpatients were collected over 2 days at a major Australian teaching hospital. The mean age of the sample group was 62 years and 52% of the patients were male. The prevalence rate of incontinence was 24% (91/376). Urinary incontinence was significantly more prevalent in females (10%) than males (6%) (χ(2)  = 4·458, df = 1, P = 0·035). IAD occurred in 10% (38/376) of the sample group, with 42% (38/91) of incontinent patients having IAD. Semi-formed and liquid stool were associated with IAD (χ(2)  = 5·520, df = 1, P = 0·027). Clinical indication of fungal infection was present in 32% (12/38) of patients with IAD. Absorbent disposable briefs were the most common incontinence aids used (80%, 70/91), with soap/water and disposable washcloths being the clean-up products most commonly available (60%, 55/91) at the bedside. Further data are needed to validate this high prevalence. Studies that address prevention of IAD and the effectiveness of management strategies are also needed. PMID:24974872

  13. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  14. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment: rural nurses' knowledge and use in a rural acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Sherryl; White, Sarahlouise

    2013-02-01

    It is estimated that about 2000 people die as a result of venous thromboembolism (VTE) each year, with a further 30,000 being hospitalized. Prophylaxis significantly reduces VTE morbidity and mortality, and thus represents a real long-term health-care benefit. The aim of this study was twofold: (i) to assess the current level of compliance to VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis best practice guidelines within an Australian rural hospital; and (ii) to determine the effectiveness of nurse education on that compliance. VTE compliance information was obtained from auditing patient notes for a 3-month period prior to nurse education and was repeated after the education. Nurse knowledge of VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis use was also measured. Both compliance with and knowledge of best practice VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis increased following nurse education. Although the sample size was relatively small, this study has shown nurse education to be effective at increasing VTE compliance and awareness within an Australian rural hospital. This relatively inexpensive and simple intervention bears consideration and could lead to reductions in the morbidity and mortality associated with VTE, as well as reduction in associated health-care costs.

  15. Business strategy and financial structure: an empirical analysis of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ginn, G O; Young, G J; Beekun, R I

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between business strategy and financial structure in the U.S. hospital industry. We studied two dimensions of financial structure--liquidity and leverage. Liquidity was assessed by the acid ratio, and leverage was assessed using the equity funding ratio. Drawing from managerial, finance, and resource dependence perspectives, we developed and tested hypotheses about the relationship between Miles and Snow strategy types and financial structure. Relevant contextual financial and organizational variables were controlled for statistically through the Multivariate Analysis of Covariance technique. The relationship between business strategy and financial structure was found to be significant. Among the Miles and Snow strategy types, defenders were found to have relatively high liquidity and low leverage. Prospectors typically had low liquidity and high leverage. Implications for financial planning, competitive assessment, and reimbursement policy are discussed.

  16. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Diane K.; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. Methods We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. Results The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = −.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Discussion Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations. PMID:26049719

  17. Review of peripherally inserted central catheters in the Singapore acute-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chlebicki, M P; Teo, E K

    2003-10-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are frequently used whenever reliable central venous access is required for a prolonged period of time. The objective of this study was to review utilisation profile, complication rates and outcomes of patients who were treated in our hospital with the therapy that required placement of the peripherally inserted central catheter. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who had peripherally inserted central catheter placed between the beginning of July and the end of October 2002. Five patients who remained hospitalised at the time of review (six weeks after the last day of study period) were excluded. Seventy-eight patients with 94 peripherally inserted central catheters were analysed in detail. Sixty-four peripherally inserted central catheters (68.1%) were placed for prolonged antibiotic therapy, 27 (28.7%) mainly to administer total parenteral nutrition and 3 (3.2%) were inserted for other reasons. Catheters were in place before removal for a mean 17.2 days. Forty-eight catheters (51.1%) were removed after completion of therapy on average 20.2 days after insertion. Complications were frequent but minor. Thirty-three catheters (35.1%) were removed due to catheter-related complications. The most common complication were phlebitis followed by accidental removal. In summary, peripherally inserted central catheters proved to be reasonably safe and a reliable way of providing therapy requiring prolonged intravenous access. Complications were frequent but relatively minor. Complication rates in our study were similar to those reported in other studies on this subject. Peripherally inserted central catheters remain a convenient and reasonable alternative to other centrally or peripherally inserted venous devices.

  18. The Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Colonization and Infection among Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Residents.

    PubMed

    Mills, John P; Talati, Naasha J; Alby, Kevin; Han, Jennifer H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE An improved understanding of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) is needed. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for colonization or infection with CRKP in LTACH residents. METHODS A case-control study was performed at a university-affiliated LTACH from 2008 to 2013. Cases were defined as all patients with clinical cultures positive for CRKP and controls were those with clinical cultures positive for carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae (CSKP). A multivariate model was developed to identify risk factors for CRKP infection or colonization. RESULTS A total of 222 patients were identified with K. pneumoniae clinical cultures during the study period; 99 (45%) were case patients and 123 (55%) were control patients. Our multivariate analysis identified factors associated with a significant risk for CRKP colonization or infection: solid organ or stem cell transplantation (OR, 5.05; 95% CI, 1.23-20.8; P=.03), mechanical ventilation (OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.24-5.28; P=.01), fecal incontinence (OR, 5.78; 95% CI, 1.52-22.0; P=.01), and exposure in the prior 30 days to meropenem (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.04-12.1; P=.04), vancomycin (OR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.18-7.32; P=.02), and metronidazole (OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 1.28-14.0; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Rates of colonization and infection with CRKP were high in the LTACH setting, with nearly half of K. pneumoniae cultures demonstrating carbapenem resistance. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of CRKP in LTACHs, including targeted surveillance screening of high-risk patients and effective antibiotic stewardship measures. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):55-60. PMID:26455382

  19. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures. PMID:26606762

  20. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures.

  1. Hospitalization Rates of Nursing Home Residents and Community-Dwelling Seniors in British Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Lisa A.; McGregor, Margaret J.; McGrail, Kimberlyn M.; Tate, Robert B.; Broemling, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The overall use of acute care services by nursing home (NH) residents in Canada has not been well documented. Our objectives were to identify the major causes of hospitalization among NH facility residents and to compare rates to those of community-dwelling seniors. A retrospective cohort was defined using population-level health administrative…

  2. Injury and illness surveillance in hospitals and acute-care facilities after Hurricanes Katrina And Rita--New Orleans area, Louisiana, September 25-October 15, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    In response to Hurricane Katrina, CDC and the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (LDHH) implemented active surveillance on September 9, 2005, to monitor for injuries and illnesses at functioning hospitals and other acute-care facilities in the greater New Orleans area (Jefferson, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, and St. Tammany parishes). On September 20, the system was interrupted because of mandatory evacuation for Hurricane Rita. Surveillance was reestablished on September 24, and repopulation of Orleans Parish began on September 30. This report updates a previous report on injuries and illness surveillance during September 8-25, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina and describes frequencies of these events during the days after Hurricane Rita and during repopulation of the city. The results indicate that 17,446 visits occurred at participating facilities during this period. Whereas the proportion of relief workers who had acute respiratory illnesses and unintentional injuries was higher compared with residents, the proportion of falls and motor-vehicle crashes among relief workers was lower. Moreover, although the collection of detailed data using a paper-based active surveillance system was required in response to Hurricane Katrina, the burden of this system required the implementation of an electronic syndromic surveillance system, which is more sustainable.

  3. Nurse staffing and system integration and change indicators in acute care hospitals: evidence from a balanced scorecard.

    PubMed

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Peterson, Jessica; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Pink, George H; McKillop, Ian; Daniel, Imtiaz; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships between financial indicators for nurse staffing and organizational system integration and change indicators. These indicators, along with hospital location and type, were examined in relation to the nursing financial indicators. Results showed that different indicators predicted each of the outcome variables. Nursing care hours were predicted by the hospital type, geographic location, and the system. Both nursing and patient care hours were significantly related to dissemination and benchmarking of clinical data.

  4. Nurse staffing and system integration and change indicators in acute care hospitals: evidence from a balanced scorecard.

    PubMed

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Peterson, Jessica; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Pink, George H; McKillop, Ian; Daniel, Imtiaz; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships between financial indicators for nurse staffing and organizational system integration and change indicators. These indicators, along with hospital location and type, were examined in relation to the nursing financial indicators. Results showed that different indicators predicted each of the outcome variables. Nursing care hours were predicted by the hospital type, geographic location, and the system. Both nursing and patient care hours were significantly related to dissemination and benchmarking of clinical data. PMID:18562867

  5. Assessing Risk Factors for Hospital-Based, Acute Care Within Thirty Days of Craniosynostosis Surgery Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Fox, Justin P; Gerety, Patrick A; Li, Jing; Wes, Ari M; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-09-01

    While in-hospital outcomes and long-term results of craniosynostosis surgery have been described, no large studies have reported on postoperative readmission and emergency department (ED) visits. The authors conducted this study to describe the incidence, associated diagnoses, and risk factors for these encounters within 30 days of craniosynostosis surgery.Using 4 state-level databases, the authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients <3 years of age who underwent surgery for craniosynostosis. The primary outcome was any hospital based, acute care (HBAC; ED visit or hospital readmission) within 30 days of discharge. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to identify factors associated with this outcome.The final sample included 1120 patients. On average, patients were ages 4.6 months with the majority being male (67.3%) and having Medicaid (52%) or private (48.0%) insurance. Ninety-nine patients (8.8%) had at least 1 HBAC encounter within 30 days and 13 patients (1.2%) had 2 or more. The majority of encounters were managed in the ED without hospital admission (56.6%). In univariate analysis, age, race, insurance status, and initial length of stay significantly differed between the HBAC and non-HBAC groups. In multivariate analysis, only African-American race (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.98 [1.49-23.94]) and Hispanic ethnicity (AOR = 5.31 [1.88-14.97]) were associated with more frequent HBAC encounters.Nearly 10% of patients with craniosynostosis require HBAC postoperatively with ED visits accounting for the majority of these encounters. Race is independently associated with HBAC, the cause of which is unknown and will be the focus of future research. PMID:27526238

  6. Emergence of blaKPC-containing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a long-term acute care hospital: a new challenge to our healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Endimiani, Andrea; DePasquale, John M.; Forero, Sandra; Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M.; Roberts-Pollack, Daneshia; Fiorella, Paul D.; Pickens, Nancy; Kitchel, Brandon; Casiano-Colón, Aida E.; Tenover, Fred C.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To characterize isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC carbapenemase (KPC-Kp) associated with an outbreak in a long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) in South Florida. Methods During 21 March to 20 April 2008, 241 K. pneumoniae isolates detected at Integrated Regional Laboratories (Ft. Lauderdale, FL) for which the ertapenem MICs were ≥4 mg/L were studied. PCR, cloning and sequence analysis were used to detect blaKPC and to characterize the β-lactamase and outer membrane proteins (Omps). The expression level of KPC enzymes was studied by immunoblotting. Genetic relatedness of isolates was investigated with rep-PCR and PFGE. Clinical records of patients were investigated. Results Seven KPC-Kp strains were isolated from different patients located at a single LTACH, with a further three isolates being recovered from patients at different hospitals. All KPC-Kp isolates in patients from the LTACH and from one hospital patient were genetically related and shared PFGE patterns that clustered with known sequence type (ST) 258 strains. These strains were highly resistant to carbapenems (MICs ≥ 32 mg/L) due to an increased level of KPC expression and loss of Omps. Rectal colonization was documented in all LTACH patients with KPC-Kp isolates. Treatment failures were common (crude mortality rate of 69%). Active surveillance and enhanced infection control practices terminated the KPC-Kp outbreak. Conclusions The detection of KPC-Kp in an LTACH represents a serious infection control and therapeutic challenge in a new clinical setting. The speed at which the epidemic of KPC-Kp is spreading in our healthcare system mandates urgent action. PMID:19740911

  7. Reduction of Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia by Multimodal Comprehensive Care for Vulnerable Geriatric Patients in an Acute Care Hospital: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Miwako; Ito, Mio; Ishikawa, Shogo; Takebayashi, Yoichi; Tierney, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a key challenge in geriatric dementia care. A multimodal comprehensive care methodology, Humanitude, with eye contact, verbal communication, and touch as its elements, was provided to three geriatric dementia patients for whom conventional nursing care failed in an acute care hospital. Each episode was evaluated by video analysis. All patients had advanced dementia with BPSD. Failure of care was identified by patient's shouting, screaming, or abrupt movements of limbs. In this case series, conventional care failed for all three patients. Each element of care communication was much shorter than in Humanitude care, which was accepted by the patients. The average of the elements performed during the care was eye contact 0.6%, verbal communication 15.7%, and touch 0.1% in conventional care and 12.5%, 54.8%, and 44.5% in Humanitude care, respectively. The duration of aggressive behavior of each patient during care was 25.0%, 25.4%, and 66.3% in conventional care and 0%, 0%, and 0.3% in Humanitude, respectively. In our case series, conventional care was provided by less eye contact, verbal communication, and touch. The multimodal comprehensive care approach, Humanitude, decreased BPSD and showed success by patients' acceptance of care. PMID:27069478

  8. African Americans show increased risk for pressure ulcers: a retrospective analysis of acute care hospitals in America.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Mary; Guy, Jeffrey; Barbul, Adrian; Nanney, Lillian B; Abumrad, Naji N

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier study, we reported a significantly increased risk of pressure ulcer hospital discharge diagnoses in African Americans, higher age groups, and those with certain medical conditions. The objectives of the present study were to: (a) investigate the demographics associated with a higher odds ratio (OR) in African Americans and (b) determine whether African Americans have different rates of medical risk factors. The 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was queried. Patients with pressure ulcers were identified by discharge diagnoses using ICD-9 codes 707.0-707.09. Discharge diagnosis was examined using the agency for healthcare research and quality clinical classifications software (CCS). The present study used identified CCS discharge diagnoses present in at least 5% of all patients, with an OR>2. African Americans exhibited a higher incidence of an OR>2 for 28 identified CCS risk factors for pressure ulcers. The pressure ulcer diagnoses tended to occur at younger ages in African Americans. No significant differences were noted in African Americans with pressure ulcers when a subanalysis was conducted by zip code income quartile, region of the country, or teaching status of the hospital. Hospitalized African Americans exhibit an age-dependent, higher prevalence of pressure ulcers compared with Caucasians. Socioeconomic factors tracked within the Nationwide Inpatient Sample do not provide an explanation for this phenomenon.

  9. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( <2.5 g/dL) (P = 0.002), antidepressant use (P = 0.035), vitamin use (P = 0.006), history of surgery (P <0.001), PU size (P = 0.003), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score (P = 0.020), Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration

  10. [Clinical Analysis of Evaluation of the Swallowing Function before Gastrostomy in an Acute-care Hospital for Elderly People].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yurika; Ohno, Keiko; Honjyo, Motomu

    2015-12-01

    The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, while defining a significant reduction of the medical fee points for gastrostomy in the medical fee revision of fiscal year 2014, assigned additional fee points for evaluation of the swallowing function by videofluoroscopy (VF) or videoendoscopy (VE) prior to gastrostomy. In addition, for facilities that carried out more than 50 gastrostomy operations, evaluation of the swallowing function was made mandatory in all cases and 35% of oral ingestion recovery rate to require the full amount calculation. Therefore, we evaluated the data on swallowing function evaluation in patients and gastrostomy at our hospital. During a 3-year period from February 2012, 114 patients who underwent gastrostomy at our hospital were enrolled. We evaluated the background disease, indications for gastrostomy, conduct/non-conduct of swallowing function tests prior to gastrostomy, videoendoscopic score (VE score), and the functional oral intake score before and after gastrostomy in the patients. The predominant background diseases were cerebrovascular disease (33%), Parkinson's syndrome (26%), and Alzheimer's disease (11%). The indications for gastrostomy were dysphagia (38%), request for gastrostomy from other hospitals or nursing care home (24%), and malnutrition due to anorexia (18%). The severity of the dysfunction was classified based on the VE score as mild (28%), moderate (47%), or severe (25%). Dysphagia did not reach the majority of reasons for gastrostomy and not few of background diseases were progressive neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it remains under debate whether it is necessary to perform swallowing functional evaluation by VE or VF in all cases prior to gastrostomy. In some cases in which gastrostomy was indicated, the VE scores were not so high. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation based on the pathophysiology and social background is needed to judge the indication for gastrostomy. Leading support

  11. [Clinical Analysis of Evaluation of the Swallowing Function before Gastrostomy in an Acute-care Hospital for Elderly People].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yurika; Ohno, Keiko; Honjyo, Motomu

    2015-12-01

    The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, while defining a significant reduction of the medical fee points for gastrostomy in the medical fee revision of fiscal year 2014, assigned additional fee points for evaluation of the swallowing function by videofluoroscopy (VF) or videoendoscopy (VE) prior to gastrostomy. In addition, for facilities that carried out more than 50 gastrostomy operations, evaluation of the swallowing function was made mandatory in all cases and 35% of oral ingestion recovery rate to require the full amount calculation. Therefore, we evaluated the data on swallowing function evaluation in patients and gastrostomy at our hospital. During a 3-year period from February 2012, 114 patients who underwent gastrostomy at our hospital were enrolled. We evaluated the background disease, indications for gastrostomy, conduct/non-conduct of swallowing function tests prior to gastrostomy, videoendoscopic score (VE score), and the functional oral intake score before and after gastrostomy in the patients. The predominant background diseases were cerebrovascular disease (33%), Parkinson's syndrome (26%), and Alzheimer's disease (11%). The indications for gastrostomy were dysphagia (38%), request for gastrostomy from other hospitals or nursing care home (24%), and malnutrition due to anorexia (18%). The severity of the dysfunction was classified based on the VE score as mild (28%), moderate (47%), or severe (25%). Dysphagia did not reach the majority of reasons for gastrostomy and not few of background diseases were progressive neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it remains under debate whether it is necessary to perform swallowing functional evaluation by VE or VF in all cases prior to gastrostomy. In some cases in which gastrostomy was indicated, the VE scores were not so high. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation based on the pathophysiology and social background is needed to judge the indication for gastrostomy. Leading support

  12. Development and implementation of a participative intervention to improve the psychosocial work environment and mental health in an acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, R; Brisson, C; Vinet, A; Vézina, M; Lower, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and implementation phases of a participative intervention aimed at reducing four theory grounded and empirically supported adverse psychosocial work factors (high psychological demands, low decision latitude, low social support, and low reward), and their mental health effects. Methods The intervention was realised among 500 care providers in an acute care hospital. A prior risk evaluation was performed, using a quantitative approach, to determine the prevalence of adverse psychosocial work factors and of psychological distress in the hospital compared to an appropriate reference population. In addition, a qualitative approach included observation in the care units, interviews with key informants, and collaborative work with an intervention team (IT) including all stakeholders. Results The prior risk evaluation showed a high prevalence of adverse psychosocial factors and psychological distress among care providers compared to a representative sample of workers from the general population. Psychosocial variables at work associated with psychological distress in the prior risk evaluation were high psychological demands (prevalence ratio (PR) = 2.27), low social support from supervisors and co‐workers (PR = 1.35), low reward (PR = 2.92), and effort‐reward imbalance (PR = 2.65). These results showed the empirical relevance of an intervention on the four selected adverse psychosocial factors among care providers. Qualitative methods permitted the identification of 56 adverse conditions and of their solutions. Targets of intervention were related to team work and team spirit, staffing processes, work organisation, training, communication, and ergonomy. Conclusion This study adds to the scarce literature describing the development and implementation of preventive intervention aimed at reducing psychosocial factors at work and their health effects. Even if adverse conditions in the psychosocial environment and

  13. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  14. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  15. Smoking cessation strategies by nurses in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saovarot K

    2008-01-01

    Smoking Cessation Strategies by Nurses in an Acute Care Setting is a pilot educational project for registered nurses (RNs) at a teaching community hospital in the Southeast. The purpose of this project is to provide an inservice education session using the recommendation of the National Guideline Clearinghouse in Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Guideline from the U.S. Public Health Service. A convenience sample of 49 RNs completed a 10-question pretest and 10-question posttest on perceptions about smoking cessation assessment, strategies, and documentation. After the inservice education, the result showed a significant improvement of RN perception in smoking cessation assessment, strategies, and documentation.

  16. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little.

  17. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  18. Adapting the ABCDEF Bundle to Meet the Needs of Patients Requiring Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in the Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Setting: Historical Perspectives and Practical Implications.

    PubMed

    Balas, Michele C; Devlin, John W; Verceles, Avelino C; Morris, Peter; Ely, E Wesley

    2016-02-01

    When robust clinical trials are lacking, clinicians are often forced to extrapolate safe and effective evidence-based interventions from one patient care setting to another. This article is about such an extrapolation from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting. Chronic critical illness is an emerging, disabling, costly, and yet relatively silent epidemic that is central to both of these settings. The number of chronically critically ill patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation is expected to reach unprecedented levels over the next decade. Despite the prevalence, numerous distressing symptoms, and exceptionally poor outcomes associated with chronic critical illness, to date there is very limited scientific evidence available to guide the care and management of this exceptionally vulnerable population, particularly in LTACHs. Recent studies conducted in the traditional ICU setting suggest interprofessional, multicomponent strategies aimed at effectively assessing, preventing, and managing pain, agitation, delirium, and weakness, such as the ABCDEF bundle, may play an important role in the recovery of the chronically critically ill. This article reviews what is known about the chronically critically ill, provide readers with some important historical perspectives on the ABCDEF bundle, and address some controversies and practical implications of adopting the ABCDEF bundle into the everyday care of patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation in the LTACH setting. We believe developing new and better ways of addressing both the science and organizational aspects of managing the common and distressing symptoms associated with chronic critical illness and prolonged mechanical ventilation will ultimately improve the quality of life for the many patients and families admitted to LTACHs annually. PMID:26820279

  19. Strategic change in hospitals: an examination of the response of the acute care hospital to the turbulent environment of the 1980s.

    PubMed Central

    Ginn, G O

    1990-01-01

    Changes in strategies of hospitals responding to the turbulent health care environment of the 1980s are examined both in the aggregate and from the perspective of the individual hospital. The Miles and Snow typology is used to determine strategy type. Both investor-owned and not-for-profit hospitals were well represented in the broad mix of hospital types sampled. In addition, freestanding hospitals and members of multihospital systems were present in the sample. Last, hospitals of all sizes were included. Strategic change was evaluated by classifying hospitals by strategy type in each of two consecutive five-year time periods (1976 through 1980 and 1981 through 1985). Changes in reimbursement policies, the emergence of new technologies, changing consumer expectations, and new sources of competition made the environment for hospitals progressively more turbulent in the latter period and provided an opportune setting to evaluate strategic change. Results showed that a significant number of hospitals did change strategy as the environment changed, and in the direction anticipated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether prior strategy, type of ownership, system membership, or size would predict which hospitals would change strategy as the environment changed: only prior strategy was found to be a predictor of strategy change. PMID:2211128

  20. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  1. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  2. Surveillance of hospital-acquired infections in Liguria, Italy: results from a regional prevalence study in adult and paediatric acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Durando, P; Icardi, G; Ansaldi, F; Crimi, P; Sticchi, C; Compagnino, F; Fabbri, P; Baldelli, I; Bellina, D; Sacco, R; Assensi, M; Cenderello, N; Orengo, G; Oreste, P; Nannini, M; Olivari, C; Campora, O; Vizio, M

    2009-01-01

    A multi-hospital prevalence study of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) was carried out between 19 March and 6 April 2007 in Liguria, Italy, being the first to be performed in this region. Of the 29 existing public acute hospitals, 25 took part in the investigation (86.2%). In total, 3176 patients were enrolled in the study, representing a regional average bed-occupancy rate of nearly 70%. Three-hundred and ten HAIs were diagnosed from 283 patients, with an overall prevalence of infections and cases of 9.8% and 8.9%, respectively. Prevalence varied considerably between hospitals, ranging from 0 to 24.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.53-33.27]. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) (30.0%) and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) (26.1%) presented the highest relative frequency, followed by bloodstream infections (BSIs) (14.8%), surgical site infections (11.6%) and gastrointestinal infections (6.5%). Intensive care units (ICUs) and haemato-oncological units showed the highest specific prevalence of HAI, respectively 42.5% (95% CI: 34.48-50.52) and 13.3% (6.28-20.32), with RTI and BSI as the predominant infections. Spinal units (33.3%; 13.14-53.46) and functional-rehabilitation units (18.9%; 17.75-24.06) demonstrated a high rate of urinary tract infections. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the main risk factors and conditions associated with HAI, both overall and by site. Our study provides an overall picture of the epidemiology of HAI in Liguria, which may be usefully employed as a starting point to plan and organise future surveillance and control programmes.

  3. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia requiring admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Klimek, J J; Ajemian, E; Fontecchio, S; Gracewski, J; Klemas, B; Jimenez, L

    1983-06-01

    Patients who develop bacterial pneumonia in the community often require admission to acute-care hospitals. Knowledge of the incidence of pneumonia due to different pathogens that are brought into an institution from the community may play a role in determining the patterns of infecting organisms responsible for hospital-acquired pneumonia. For 1 year, we prospectively reviewed the records of patients admitted to our 1000-bed community hospital with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients had clinical signs and symptoms, positive radiologic findings, and pure cultures of potential pathogens from sputum, blood, pleural fluid, lung aspirate, lung biopsy, or transtracheal aspirate. Pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed by serum indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) titer greater than or equal to 1:256 and clinical signs and symptoms along with response to erythromycin. Of 204 patients with bacterial pneumonia, the following pathogens were implicated: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus species, L. pneumophila, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, oral anaerobic bacteria, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and others. Most patients were more than 50 years of age and many had evidence of underlying pulmonary disease. The etiology of CABP may not be as predictable as in the past. Empiric antimicrobial therapy for CABP should include agents with activity against the pathogens prevalent in the community.

  4. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons’ medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients’ data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. Methods In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. Results The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients’ condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of

  5. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  6. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  7. Rural Implications of Medicare's Post-Acute-Care Transfer Payment Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenman, Julie A.; Mueller, Curt D.

    2005-01-01

    Under the Medicare post-acute-care (PAC) transfer policy, acute-care hospitals are reimbursed under a per-diem formula whenever beneficiaries are discharged from selected diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to a skilled nursing facility, home health care, or a prospective payment system (PPS)-excluded facility. Total per-diem payments are below the…

  8. Notes from the Field: Probable Mucormycosis Among Adult Solid Organ Transplant Recipients at an Acute Care Hospital - Pennsylvania, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Novosad, Shannon A; Vasquez, Amber M; Nambiar, Atmaram; Arduino, Matthew J; Christensen, Erick; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Keckler, M Shannon; Miller, Jeffrey; Perz, Joseph F; Lockhart, Shawn R; Chiller, Tom; Gould, Carolyn; Sehulster, Lynne; Brandt, Mary E; Weber, J Todd; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-01-01

    On September 17, 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) notified CDC of a cluster of three potentially health care-associated mucormycete infections that occurred among solid organ transplant recipients during a 12-month period at hospital A. On September 18, hospital B reported that it had identified an additional transplant recipient with mucormycosis. Hospitals A and B are part of the same health care system and are connected by a pedestrian bridge. PADOH requested CDC's assistance with an on-site investigation, which started on September 22, to identify possible sources of infection and prevent additional infections. PMID:27171735

  9. Notes from the Field: Probable Mucormycosis Among Adult Solid Organ Transplant Recipients at an Acute Care Hospital - Pennsylvania, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Novosad, Shannon A; Vasquez, Amber M; Nambiar, Atmaram; Arduino, Matthew J; Christensen, Erick; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Keckler, M Shannon; Miller, Jeffrey; Perz, Joseph F; Lockhart, Shawn R; Chiller, Tom; Gould, Carolyn; Sehulster, Lynne; Brandt, Mary E; Weber, J Todd; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-05-13

    On September 17, 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (PADOH) notified CDC of a cluster of three potentially health care-associated mucormycete infections that occurred among solid organ transplant recipients during a 12-month period at hospital A. On September 18, hospital B reported that it had identified an additional transplant recipient with mucormycosis. Hospitals A and B are part of the same health care system and are connected by a pedestrian bridge. PADOH requested CDC's assistance with an on-site investigation, which started on September 22, to identify possible sources of infection and prevent additional infections.

  10. Establishing interfaces between community- and hospital-based service systems for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G

    1989-05-01

    The gerontological service delivery system often fails to integrate the different types of services needed at different times by older clients. Social workers need to address the urgent and increasing need for communication among acute care hospitals that are diversifying into areas previously the domain of community-based providers of services for the aged. Coordinated care case management programs were developed in seven hospitals to determine whether hospitals could serve as a logical entry point of frail elderly persons into the system. Examination of the experiences of these hospitals illustrated the need for models of service integration and resulted in several approaches to comprehensive service delivery and coordination. Social work professionals in both acute and long-term care settings need to understand all aspects of the service delivery system to ensure that elderly clients receive appropriate levels and continuity of care in a complex and constantly changing system.

  11. A point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in four acute-care teaching hospitals utilizing the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) audit tool.

    PubMed

    Aldeyab, M A; Kearney, M P; McElnay, J C; Magee, F A; Conlon, G; MacIntyre, J; McCullagh, B; Ferguson, C; Friel, A; Gormley, C; McElroy, S; Boyce, T; McCorry, A; Muller, A; Goossens, H; Scott, M G

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this research was to assess current patterns of hospital antibiotic prescribing in Northern Ireland and to determine targets for improving the quality of antibiotic prescribing. A point prevalence survey was conducted in four acute teaching hospitals. The most commonly used antibiotics were combinations of penicillins including β-lactamase inhibitors (33·6%), metronidazole (9·1%), and macrolides (8·1%). The indication for treatment was recorded in 84·3% of the prescribing episodes. A small fraction (3·9%) of the surgical prophylactic antibiotic prescriptions was for >24 h. The results showed that overall 52·4% of the prescribed antibiotics were in compliance with the hospital antibiotic guidelines. The findings identified the following indicators as targets for quality improvement: indication recorded in patient notes, the duration of surgical prophylaxis and compliance with hospital antibiotic guidelines. The results strongly suggest that antibiotic use could be improved by taking steps to address the identified targets for quality improvement.

  12. Community services' involvement in the discharge of older adults from hospital into the community

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Michelle; Grimmer, Karen; Kumar, Saravana

    2013-01-01

    Background Community services are playing an increasing role in supporting older adults who are discharged from hospital with ongoing non-acute care needs. However, there is a paucity of information regarding how community services are involved in the discharge process of older individuals from hospital into the community. Methods Twenty-nine databases were searched from 1980 to 2012 (inclusive) for relevant primary published research, of any study design, as well as relevant unpublished work (e.g. clinical guidelines) which investigated community services' involvement in the discharge of older individuals from hospital into the community. Data analysis and quality appraisal (using McMaster critical appraisal tools) were undertaken predominately by the lead author. Data was synthesised qualitatively. Results Twelve papers were eligible for inclusion (five randomised controlled trials, four before and after studies and three controlled trials), involving a total of 8440 older adults (>65 years). These papers reported on a range of interventions. During data synthesis, descriptors were assigned to four emergent discharge methods: Virtual Interface Model, In-reach Interface Model, Out-reach Interface Model and Independent Interface Model. In each model, the findings were mixed in terms of health care and patient and carer outcomes. Conclusions It is plausible that each model identified in this systematic review has a role to play in successfully discharging different cohorts of older adults from hospital. Further research is required to identify appropriate population groups for various discharge models and to select suitable outcome measures to determine the effectiveness of these models, considering all stakeholders' involved. PMID:24179455

  13. Constructing a Pre-Emptive System Based on a Multidimentional Matrix and Autocompletion to Improve Diagnostic Coding in Acute Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noussa-Yao, Joseph; Heudes, Didier; Escudie, Jean-Baptiste; Degoulet, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Short-stay MSO (Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics) hospitalization activities in public and private hospitals providing public services are funded through charges for the services provided (T2A in French). Coding must be well matched to the severity of the patient's condition, to ensure that appropriate funding is provided to the hospital. We propose the use of an autocompletion process and multidimensional matrix, to help physicians to improve the expression of information and to optimize clinical coding. With this approach, physicians without knowledge of the encoding rules begin from a rough concept, which is gradually refined through semantic proximity and uses information on the associated codes stemming of optimized knowledge bases of diagnosis code. PMID:27577340

  14. Managing Opioid Use Disorder During and After Acute Hospitalization: A Case-Based Review Clarifying Methadone Regulation for Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Noska, Amanda; Mohan, Aron; Wakeman, Sarah; Rich, Josiah; Boutwell, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment with an opioid agonist such as methadone or buprenorphine is the standard of care for opioid use disorder. Persons with opioid use disorder are frequently hospitalized, and may be undertreated due to provider misinformation regarding the legality of prescribing methadone for inpatients. Using a case-based review, this article aims to describe effective management of active opioid withdrawal and ongoing opioid use disorder using methadone or buprenorphine among acutely ill, hospitalized patients. Methods We reviewed pertinent medical and legal literature and consulted with national legal experts regarding methadone for opioid withdrawal and opioid maintenance therapy in hospitalized, general medical and surgical patients, and describe a real-life example of successful implementation of inpatient methadone for these purposes. Results Patients with opioid use disorders can be effectively and legally initiated on methadone maintenance therapy or buprenorphine during an inpatient hospitalization by clinical providers and successfully transitioned to an outpatient methadone maintenance or buprenorphine clinic after discharge for ongoing treatment. Conclusions Inpatient methadone or buprenorphine prescribing is safe and evidence-based, and can be used to effectively treat opioid withdrawal and also serves as a bridge to outpatient treatment of opioid use disorders. PMID:26258153

  15. Clinical Profile, Acute Care, and Middle-Term Outcomes of Cocaine-Associated ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in an Inner-City Community.

    PubMed

    Shitole, Sanyog G; Kayo, Noel; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Alapati, Venkatesh; Nordin, Charles; Southern, William; Christia, Panagiota; Faillace, Robert T; Scheuer, James; Kizer, Jorge R

    2016-04-15

    Although cocaine is a well-recognized risk factor for coronary disease, detailed information is lacking regarding related behavioral and clinical features of cocaine-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), particularly in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban settings. Nor are systematic or extended follow-up data available on outcomes for cocaine-associated STEMI in the contemporary era of percutaneous coronary intervention. We leveraged a prospective STEMI registry from a large health system serving an inner-city community to characterize the clinical features, acute management, and middle-term outcomes of cocaine-related versus cocaine-unrelated STEMI. Of the 1,003 patients included, 60% were black or Hispanic. Compared with cocaine-unrelated STEMI, cocaine-related STEMI (n = 58) was associated with younger age, male gender, lower socioeconomic score, current smoking, high alcohol consumption, and human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity but less commonly with diabetes or hypertension. Cocaine users less often received drug-eluting stents or β blockers at discharge. During median follow-up of 2.7 years, rates of death, death or any rehospitalization, and death or cardiovascular rehospitalization did not differ significantly between cocaine users and nonusers but were especially high for death or any hospitalization in the 2 groups (31.4 vs 32.4 per 100 person-years, p = 0.887). Adjusted hazard ratios for outcomes were likewise not significantly different. In conclusion, in this low-income community, cocaine use occurred in a substantial fraction of STEMI cases, who were younger than their nonuser counterparts but had more prevalent high-risk habits and exhibited similarly high rates of adverse outcomes. These data suggest that programs targeting cocaine abuse and related behaviors could contribute importantly to disease prevention in disadvantaged communities. PMID:26897639

  16. Clinical Profile, Acute Care, and Middle-Term Outcomes of Cocaine-Associated ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in an Inner-City Community.

    PubMed

    Shitole, Sanyog G; Kayo, Noel; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Alapati, Venkatesh; Nordin, Charles; Southern, William; Christia, Panagiota; Faillace, Robert T; Scheuer, James; Kizer, Jorge R

    2016-04-15

    Although cocaine is a well-recognized risk factor for coronary disease, detailed information is lacking regarding related behavioral and clinical features of cocaine-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), particularly in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban settings. Nor are systematic or extended follow-up data available on outcomes for cocaine-associated STEMI in the contemporary era of percutaneous coronary intervention. We leveraged a prospective STEMI registry from a large health system serving an inner-city community to characterize the clinical features, acute management, and middle-term outcomes of cocaine-related versus cocaine-unrelated STEMI. Of the 1,003 patients included, 60% were black or Hispanic. Compared with cocaine-unrelated STEMI, cocaine-related STEMI (n = 58) was associated with younger age, male gender, lower socioeconomic score, current smoking, high alcohol consumption, and human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity but less commonly with diabetes or hypertension. Cocaine users less often received drug-eluting stents or β blockers at discharge. During median follow-up of 2.7 years, rates of death, death or any rehospitalization, and death or cardiovascular rehospitalization did not differ significantly between cocaine users and nonusers but were especially high for death or any hospitalization in the 2 groups (31.4 vs 32.4 per 100 person-years, p = 0.887). Adjusted hazard ratios for outcomes were likewise not significantly different. In conclusion, in this low-income community, cocaine use occurred in a substantial fraction of STEMI cases, who were younger than their nonuser counterparts but had more prevalent high-risk habits and exhibited similarly high rates of adverse outcomes. These data suggest that programs targeting cocaine abuse and related behaviors could contribute importantly to disease prevention in disadvantaged communities.

  17. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  18. Serum procalcitonin is a marker for prediction of readmission from an intermediate care to an acute care hospital in neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jia Xu; King, Nicolas; Low, Sharon; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Readmission of patients to acute hospitals contributes significantly toward inefficient utilization of healthcare resources, with studies quoting up to 90% being preventable. We aim to report and analyze the factors involved in the readmission of neurosurgical patients who had been previously transferred to an intermediate step-down care facility, and explore possible predictive markers for such readmissions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all 129 neurosurgical patients who were transferred from out acute tertiary hospital to an intermediate care facility. The cases were segregated into those who were readmitted and those who were not readmitted back to our acute center. The demographic data, clinical features, diagnoses, treatment modalities, pretransfer laboratory findings, and inpatient complications were compared with readmission rate. Results: There were 23 patients (17.8%) who were readmitted to our acute hospital. The most common causes of readmission was infection (n = 12, 52.2%). We found a statistically significant correlation between the higher pretransfer procalcitonin levels with the readmission of our patients (P = 0.037). There was also a significant difference noted between ethnic groups (P = 0.026) and having no complications of disease or treatment (P = 0.008), with readmission. Conclusion: Procalcitonin is a pro-hormone known to correlate with infection and poor neurological status. We have found that its serum values correlate significantly with the readmission rates of neurosurgical patients in our study. We postulate that by ensuring normality in procalcitonin levels prior to transfer to an intermediate care facility, potentially half of neurosurgical readmissions can be prevented. PMID:26430533

  19. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services. PMID:24310710

  20. Bundling Post-Acute Care Services into MS-DRG Payments

    PubMed Central

    Vertrees, James C.; Averill, Richard F.; Eisenhandler, Jon; Quain, Anthony; Switalski, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective A bundled hospital payment system that encompasses both acute and post-acute care has been proposed as a means of creating financial incentives in the Medicare fee-for-service system to foster care coordination and to improve the current disorganized system of post care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the statistical stability of alternative designs of a hospital payment system that includes post-acute care services to determine the feasibility of using a combined hospital and post-acute care bundle as a unit of payment. Methods The Medicare Severity-Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) were subdivided into clinical subclasses that measured a patient's chronic illness burden to test whether a patient's chronic illness burden had a substantial impact on post-acute care expenditures. Using Medicare data the statistical performance of the MS-DRGs with and without the chronic illness subclasses was evaluated across a wide range of post-acute care windows and combinations of post-acute care service bundles using both submitted charges and Medicare payments. Results The statistical performance of the MS-DRGs as measured by R2 was consistently better when the chronic illness subclasses are included indicating that MS-DRGs by themselves are an inadequate unit of payment for post-acute care payment bundles. In general, R2 values increased as the post-acute care window length increased and decreased as more services were added to the post-acute care bundle. Discussion The study results suggest that it is feasible to develop a payment system that incorporates significant post-acute care services into the MS-DRG inpatient payment bundle. This expansion of the basic DRG payment approach can provide a strong financial incentive for providers to better coordinate care potentially leading to improved efficiency and outcome quality. PMID:24753970

  1. The role of non-operating income in community benefit provision by not-for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Song, Paula H; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Reiter, Kristin L

    2013-01-01

    Not-for-profit hospitals are under increased public scrutiny for providing what some view as insufficient levels of community benefit compared to their tax-exempt benefits. One potential driver of community benefit is financial surplus, which arises from both patient care (operating) activities and non-patient care (non-operating) activities. This study addresses the effect of hospitals' non-operating income on not-for-profit hospitals' provision of community benefit. The study sample includes 217 unique not-for-profit, non-governmental, general, acute care hospitals in California between 1997 and 2010 that filed annual reports with the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD). We model the effect of hospitals' operating and non-operating incomes on hospitals' community benefit, controlling for observable hospital characteristics such as scale and system membership, local competition, time trends, and hospital fixed effects. Our results indicate that non-operating income has no effect on levels of community benefit provided by not-for-profit hospitals. This finding suggests that not-for-profit hospitals budget for uncompensated care at levels that are prioritized over other potential investments if non-operating income falls, but remain fixed if non-operating income rises.

  2. Risk factors for new detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in acute-care hospitals that employ strict infection control procedures.

    PubMed

    Padiglione, Alexander A; Wolfe, Rory; Grabsch, Elizabeth A; Olden, Di; Pearson, Stephen; Franklin, Clare; Spelman, Denis; Mayall, Barrie; Johnson, Paul D R; Grayson, M Lindsay

    2003-08-01

    Accurate assessment of the risk factors for colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) among high-risk patients is often confounded by nosocomial VRE transmission. We undertook a 15-month prospective cohort study of adults admitted to high-risk units (hematology, renal, transplant, and intensive care) in three teaching hospitals that used identical strict infection control and isolation procedures for VRE to minimize nosocomial spread. Rectal swab specimens for culture were regularly obtained, and the results were compared with patient demographic factors and antibiotic exposure data. Compliance with screening was defined as "optimal" (100% compliance) or "acceptable" (minor protocol violations were allowed, but a negative rectal swab specimen culture was required within 1 week of becoming colonized with VRE). Colonization with VRE was detected in 1.56% (66 of 4,215) of admissions (0.45% at admission and 0.83% after admission; the acquisition time was uncertain for 0.28%), representing 1.91% of patients. No patients developed infection with VRE. The subsequent rate of new acquisition of VRE was 1.4/1,000 patient days. Renal units had the highest rate (3.23/1,000 patient days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54 to 6.77/1,000 patient days). vanB Enterococcus faecium was the most common species (71%), but other species included vanB Enterococcus faecalis (21%), vanA E. faecium (6%), and vanA E. faecalis (2%). The majority of isolates were nonclonal by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Multivariate analysis of risk factors in patients with an acceptable screening suggested that being managed by a renal unit (hazard ratio [HR] compared to the results for patients managed in an intensive care unit, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 17.0 [P = 0.02]) and recent administration of either ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 11.6 [P = 0.03]) or carbapenems (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0, 8.0 [P = 0.05]), but not vancomycin or broad-spectrum cephalosporins

  3. Risk Factors for New Detection of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Acute-Care Hospitals That Employ Strict Infection Control Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Padiglione, Alexander A.; Wolfe, Rory; Grabsch, Elizabeth A.; Olden, Di; Pearson, Stephen; Franklin, Clare; Spelman, Denis; Mayall, Barrie; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Grayson, M. Lindsay

    2003-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the risk factors for colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) among high-risk patients is often confounded by nosocomial VRE transmission. We undertook a 15-month prospective cohort study of adults admitted to high-risk units (hematology, renal, transplant, and intensive care) in three teaching hospitals that used identical strict infection control and isolation procedures for VRE to minimize nosocomial spread. Rectal swab specimens for culture were regularly obtained, and the results were compared with patient demographic factors and antibiotic exposure data. Compliance with screening was defined as “optimal” (100% compliance) or “acceptable” (minor protocol violations were allowed, but a negative rectal swab specimen culture was required within 1 week of becoming colonized with VRE). Colonization with VRE was detected in 1.56% (66 of 4,215) of admissions (0.45% at admission and 0.83% after admission; the acquisition time was uncertain for 0.28%), representing 1.91% of patients. No patients developed infection with VRE. The subsequent rate of new acquisition of VRE was 1.4/1,000 patient days. Renal units had the highest rate (3.23/1,000 patient days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54 to 6.77/1,000 patient days). vanB Enterococcus faecium was the most common species (71%), but other species included vanB Enterococcus faecalis (21%), vanA E. faecium (6%), and vanA E. faecalis (2%). The majority of isolates were nonclonal by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Multivariate analysis of risk factors in patients with an acceptable screening suggested that being managed by a renal unit (hazard ratio [HR] compared to the results for patients managed in an intensive care unit, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 17.0 [P = 0.02]) and recent administration of either ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 11.6 [P = 0.03]) or carbapenems (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0, 8.0 [P = 0.05]), but not vancomycin or broad

  4. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination.

  5. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  6. Utilization of Post-Acute Care following Distal Radius Fracture among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lin; Mahmoudi, Elham; Giladi, Aviram M.; Shauver, Melissa; Chung, Kevin C.; Waljee, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the utilization and cost of post-acute care following isolated distal radius fractures (DRF) among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods We examined utilization of post-acute care among Medicare beneficiaries who experienced an isolated DRF (n=38,479) during 2007 using 100% Medicare claims data. We analyzed the effect of patient factors on hospital admission following DRF and the receipt of post-acute care delivered by skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), home healthcare agencies (HHAs), and outpatient OT/PT for the recovery of DRF. Results In this cohort of isolated DRF patients, 1,694 (4.4%) were admitted to hospitals following DRF, and 20% received post-acute care. Women and patients with more comorbid conditions were more likely to require hospital admission. The utilization of post-acute care was higher among women, patients who resided in urban areas, and patients of higher socioeconomic status. The average cost per patient of post-acute care services from IRFs and SNFs ($15,888/patient) was significantly higher than the average cost other aspects of DRF care and accounted for 69% of the total DRF-related expenditure among patients who received inpatient rehabilitation. Conclusions Sociodemographic factors, including sex, socioeconomic status, and age, were significantly correlated with the use of post-acute care following isolated DRFs, and post-acute care accounted for a substantial proportion of the total expenditures related to these common injuries among the elderly. Identifying patients who will derive the greatest benefit from post-acute care can inform strategies to improve the cost-efficiency of rehabilitation and optimize scarce healthcare resources. Level of evidence Therapeutic, III PMID:26527599

  7. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  8. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  9. National Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Switzerland 2008-2014: Different Patterns and Trends for University and Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buetti, Niccolò; Marschall, Jonas; Atkinson, Andrew; Kronenberg, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in Switzerland, comparing selected pathogens in community and university hospitals. DESIGN Observational, retrospective, multicenter laboratory surveillance study. METHODS Data on bloodstream infections from 2008 through 2014 were obtained from the Swiss infection surveillance system, which is part of the Swiss Centre for Antibiotic Resistance (ANRESIS). We compared pathogen prevalences across 26 acute care hospitals. A subanalysis for community-acquired and hospital-acquired bloodstream infections in community and university hospitals was performed. RESULTS A total of 42,802 bloodstream infection episodes were analyzed. The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (28.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (12.4%), and polymicrobial bloodstream infections (11.4%). The proportion of E. coli increased from 27.5% in 2008 to 29.6% in 2014 (P = .04). E. coli and S. aureus were more commonly reported in community than university hospitals (34.3% vs 22.7%, P<.001 and 13.9% vs 11.1%, P<.001, respectively). Fifty percent of episodes were community-acquired, with E. coli again being more common in community hospitals (41.0% vs 32.4%, P<.001). The proportion of E. coli in community-acquired bloodstream infections increased in community hospitals only. Community-acquired polymicrobial infections (9.9% vs 5.6%, P<.001) and community-acquired coagulase-negative staphylococci (6.7% vs 3.4%, P<0.001) were more prevalent in university hospitals. CONCLUSIONS The role of E. coli as predominant pathogen in bloodstream infections has become more pronounced. There are distinct patterns in community and university hospitals, potentially influencing empirical antibiotic treatment. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1060-1067.

  10. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  11. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  12. Hospital management contracts: institutional and community perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, J R; Zuckerman, H S

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that external management by contract can improve the performance of managed hospitals. This article presents a conceptual framework which develops specific hypotheses concerning improved hospital operating efficiency, increased ability to meet hospital objectives, and increased ability to meet community objectives. Next, changes in the process and structure of management under contractual arrangements, based on observations from two not-for-profit hospital systems, are described. Finally, the effects of these management changes over time on hospital and community objectives are presented. These effects suggest progressive stages in the development of management contracts. The first stage focuses on stabilizing hospital financial performance. Stage two involves recruitment and retention efforts to secure necessary personnel. In the third stage, attention shifts to strategic planning and marketing. PMID:6490378

  13. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  14. Remote Antimicrobial Stewardship in Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Zachary H; Nicolsen, Nicole C; Allen, Nichole; Cook, Paul P

    2015-11-13

    Antimicrobial stewardship has become standard practice at university medical centers, but the practice is more difficult to implement in remote community hospitals that lack infectious diseases trained practitioners. Starting in 2011, six community hospitals within the Vidant Health system began an antimicrobial stewardship program utilizing pharmacists who reviewed charts remotely from Vidant Medical Center. Pharmacists made recommendations within the electronic medical record (EMR) to streamline, discontinue, or switch antimicrobial agents. Totals of charts reviewed, recommendations made, recommendations accepted, and categories of intervention were recorded. Linear regression was utilized to measure changes in antimicrobial use over time. For the four larger hospitals, recommendations for changes were made in an average of 45 charts per month per hospital and physician acceptance of the pharmacists' recommendations varied between 83% and 88%. There was no significant decrease in total antimicrobial use, but much of the use was outside of the stewardship program's review. Quinolone use decreased by more than 50% in two of the four larger hospitals. Remote antimicrobial stewardship utilizing an EMR is feasible in community hospitals and is generally received favorably by physicians. As more community hospitals adopt EMRs, there is an opportunity to expand antimicrobial stewardship beyond the academic medical center.

  15. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients.

  16. Factors Related to Successful Transition to Practice for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Deborah L; Dolansky, Mary A; Casey, Kathy; Kelley, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The transition from student to acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) has been recognized as a time of stress. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational-comparative design pilot study was to examine: (1) the relationships among personal resources, community resources, successful transition, and job retention; (2) the difference between ACNPs with 0 to 4 years and ACNPs with more than 4 years of prior experience as a registered nurse in an intensive care unit or emergency department; and (3) the skills/procedures that ACNPs found difficult to perform independently. Thirty-four participants were recruited from a social media site for nurse practitioners. Organizational support, communication, and leadership were the most important elements of successful transition into the ACNP role. This information can help ACNP faculty and hospital orientation/fellowship program educators to help ACNPs transition into their first position after graduation.

  17. Factors Related to Successful Transition to Practice for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Deborah L; Dolansky, Mary A; Casey, Kathy; Kelley, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The transition from student to acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) has been recognized as a time of stress. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational-comparative design pilot study was to examine: (1) the relationships among personal resources, community resources, successful transition, and job retention; (2) the difference between ACNPs with 0 to 4 years and ACNPs with more than 4 years of prior experience as a registered nurse in an intensive care unit or emergency department; and (3) the skills/procedures that ACNPs found difficult to perform independently. Thirty-four participants were recruited from a social media site for nurse practitioners. Organizational support, communication, and leadership were the most important elements of successful transition into the ACNP role. This information can help ACNP faculty and hospital orientation/fellowship program educators to help ACNPs transition into their first position after graduation. PMID:27153306

  18. Community benefit activities of private, nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Clement, Jan P; Hsieh, Hui-Min

    2010-12-01

    The definition of hospital community benefits has been intensely debated for many years. Recently, consensus has developed about one group of activities being central to community benefits because of its focus on care for the poor and on needed community services for which any payments received are low relative to costs. Disagreements continue, however, about the treatment of bad debt expense and Medicare shortfalls. A recent revision of the Internal Revenue Service's Form 990 Schedule H, which is required of all nonprofit hospitals, highlights the agreed-on set of activities but does not dismiss the disputed items. Our study is the first to apply definitions used in the new IRS form to assess how conclusions about the adequacy of nonprofit hospital community benefits could be affected if bad debt expenses and Medicare shortfalls are included or excluded. Specifically, we examine 2005 financial data for California and Florida hospitals. Overall, we find that conclusions about community benefit adequacy are very different depending on which definition of community benefits is used. We provide thoughts on new directions for the current policy debate about the treatment of bad debts and Medicare shortfalls in light of these findings. PMID:21451160

  19. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Pringle, Patricia L.; Santry, Heena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public/charity, university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents’ views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. Results We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a healthcare delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS due to increased desirability for trauma/critical care careers and improved outcomes for EGS was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true healthcare delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Conclusions Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care-delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. PMID:25891673

  20. Community Factors and Hospital Readmission Rates

    PubMed Central

    Herrin, Jeph; St Andre, Justin; Kenward, Kevin; Joshi, Maulik S; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Hines, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between community factors and hospital readmission rates. Data Sources/Study Setting We examined all hospitals with publicly reported 30-day readmission rates for patients discharged during July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2010, with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia (PN). We linked these to publicly available county data from the Area Resource File, the Census, Nursing Home Compare, and the Neilsen PopFacts datasets. Study Design We used hierarchical linear models to assess the effect of county demographic, access to care, and nursing home quality characteristics on the pooled 30-day risk-standardized readmission rate. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Not applicable. Principal Findings The study sample included 4,073 hospitals. Fifty-eight percent of national variation in hospital readmission rates was explained by the county in which the hospital was located. In multivariable analysis, a number of county characteristics were found to be independently associated with higher readmission rates, the strongest associations being for measures of access to care. These county characteristics explained almost half of the total variation across counties. Conclusions Community factors, as measured by county characteristics, explain a substantial amount of variation in hospital readmission rates. PMID:24712374

  1. Financing the future of independent community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Richman, Alan P

    2011-11-01

    Effingham Hospital, a critical access hospital, undertook a modernization initiative to expand the limited scope of its inpatient services to improve financial performance and ability to build liquidity reserves. FHA Section 242 mortgage insurance was the only means for Effingham to credit enhance its debt and obtain a low-interest rate loan. Effingham needed to convince residents and county commissioners to pledge 27 years of additional tax support to offset its annual uncompensated care. The hospital won support from the community and the commissioners, in part because of the educational outreach of the CEO, CFO, and board in articulating the imperative for maintaining local hospital care and the present and future economic benefits for Effingham County.

  2. Green 'heart' for new community hospital.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Replacing a healthcare facility first opened in 1908 as a 20-bed cottage hospital, the recently opened 'new' Finchley Memorial Hospital in north-west London was designed by architects, Murphy Philipps, 'to be at the heart of a health campus', surrounded by green space for use by both the hospital itself, and the local community. The 28 million pounds hospital, which has achieved a BREAAM Excellent rating - with an annual energy target of just 35 GJ/100 m3 set by SHINE, the Department of Health-backed learning network for sustainable healthcare buildings - has also featured as one of only 20 projects in the RIBA Health Buildings Exhibition. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, met with lead architect, Marc Levinson, to find out more about the key elements, and the thinking, that went into the design.

  3. Analysis of the Community Benefit Standard in Texas Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worthy, James Corbett; Anderson, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    The federal government provides special tax-exemption status, known as the community benefit standard, to some nonprofit hospitals. It is not known if hospitals that claim the community benefit standard provide more or different services from those provided by hospitals that do not claim the community benefit status. Guided by the socioecological model, this quantitative study investigated 95 hospitals serving 52 counties in South Texas--43 that claimed a community benefit and 52 that did not. The independent variables were hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard versus hospitals that did not. The dependent variables were the three essential criteria and the 13 reported services used to meet the community benefit standard. The study results show that all hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard met two of the three required criteria. However, only 22 of 43 hospitals had a full-time emergency department (ED), the third criterion. Χ² analysis showed statistically significant differences for only two of the five common services: having an ED and community education for community benefit hospitals versus noncommunity benefit hospitals. On average, hospitals that claimed the community benefit spent 100 times more money on community services than hospitals that did not claim the community benefit. Further investigation is needed to determine the reasons for the gap in services pertaining to EDs, trauma care, neonatal intensive care, free-standing clinics, collaborative efforts, other medical services, education of patients, community health education, and other education services. PMID:27111928

  4. Analysis of the Community Benefit Standard in Texas Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worthy, James Corbett; Anderson, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    The federal government provides special tax-exemption status, known as the community benefit standard, to some nonprofit hospitals. It is not known if hospitals that claim the community benefit standard provide more or different services from those provided by hospitals that do not claim the community benefit status. Guided by the socioecological model, this quantitative study investigated 95 hospitals serving 52 counties in South Texas--43 that claimed a community benefit and 52 that did not. The independent variables were hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard versus hospitals that did not. The dependent variables were the three essential criteria and the 13 reported services used to meet the community benefit standard. The study results show that all hospitals that claimed the community benefit standard met two of the three required criteria. However, only 22 of 43 hospitals had a full-time emergency department (ED), the third criterion. Χ² analysis showed statistically significant differences for only two of the five common services: having an ED and community education for community benefit hospitals versus noncommunity benefit hospitals. On average, hospitals that claimed the community benefit spent 100 times more money on community services than hospitals that did not claim the community benefit. Further investigation is needed to determine the reasons for the gap in services pertaining to EDs, trauma care, neonatal intensive care, free-standing clinics, collaborative efforts, other medical services, education of patients, community health education, and other education services.

  5. Community orientation in hospitals: an institutional and resource dependence perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, E J; Rosko, M D; Zinn, J S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize community orientation-defined as the generation, dissemination, and use of community health-need intelligence-as a strategic response to environmental pressures, and to test a theoretically justified model of the predictors of community orientation in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The analysis used data for 4,578 hospitals obtained from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the 1994 Medicare Hospital Cost Report data sets. Market-level data came from the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN: Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of hospital size, dependence on managed care, ownership, network, system and alliance memberships, and level of diffusion of community-orientation practices in the area on the degree of community orientation in hospitals. The model, based on Oliver's (1991) framework of organizational responsiveness to environmental pressures, controlled for the effects of industry concentration and lagged profitability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Degree of community orientation is significantly related to hospital size; ownership; dependence on managed care; and membership in a network, system, or alliance. It is also significantly related to the diffusion of community-orientation practices among other area hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Degree of community orientation is influenced by the nature of environmental pressures and by hospital interests. It is higher in hospitals that are large, nonprofit, or members of a network, system, or alliance; in hospitals that are more dependent on managed care; and in hospitals that operate in areas with higher diffusion of community-orientation activities. PMID:11130801

  6. The acute care nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; Goodwin, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    In spite of the long history of nurse practitioner practice in primary healthcare, less is known about nurse practitioners in hospital-based environments because until very recently, they have not been included in the extended class registration (nurse practitioner equivalent) with the College of Nurses of Ontario. Recent changes in the regulation of nurse practitioners in Ontario to include adult, paediatric and anaesthesia, indicates that a workforce review of practice profiles is needed to fully understand the depth and breadth of the role within hospital settings. Here, we present information obtained through a descriptive, self-reported survey of all nurse practitioners working in acute care settings who are not currently regulated in the extended class in Ontario. Results suggest wide acceptance of the role is concentrated around academic teaching hospitals. Continued barriers exist related to legislation and regulation as well as understanding and support for the multiple aspects of this role beyond clinical practice. This information may be used by nurse practitioners, nursing leaders and other administrators to position the role in hospital settings for greater impact on patient care. As well, understanding the need for regulatory and legislative changes to support the hospital-based Nurse Practitioner role will enable greater impact on health human resources and healthcare transformation. PMID:19029848

  7. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions. PMID:26939601

  8. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions.

  9. Treatment of hyperthyroidism in community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Gossain, V.V.; Heath, R.C.; Rovner, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The preferred treatment of hyperthyroidism remains controversial. Most of this data is derived from large, university-based medical centers. We report here our experience with treatment of hyperthyroidism in a community setting. This involves 144 patients with hyperthyroidism who were seen over a 10 year period at Michigan State University Clinical Center and were treated in the community hospitals and private physicians' offices, and by community surgeons. Follow-up data were available on 119 of these patients; 105 of them were hyperthyroid because of Graves' disease and multinodular goiter. Patients were encouraged to make their own decisions regarding choice of therapy, as independently as possible. Sixty-five percent of these patients were treated by 131I, 18% by antithyroid drugs, and 17% by surgery. The mean follow-up period was 2.5 years (range 2 months to 19 years). Hyperthyroidism was controlled in 84% of the patients treated by 131I and 83% of the patients treated by surgery. Forty percent of the patients treated by 131I and 33% treated by surgery became hypothyroid. Fifty percent of the patients achieved remission when treated by antithyroid drugs alone. Our results indicate that when patients are encouraged to make their own decisions regarding the treatment of hyperthyroidism, their choices are similar to those of the thyroidologists. Secondly, the results obtained with different modalities of treatment for hyperthyroidism in a community setting are similar to those obtained in university medical centers.

  10. Demographic diversity, value congruence, and workplace outcomes in acute care.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michael G; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. PMID:22377771

  11. Demographic Diversity, Value Congruence, and Workplace Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Michael G.; Mark, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. PMID:22377771

  12. Demographic diversity, value congruence, and workplace outcomes in acute care.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michael G; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes.

  13. Minimizing physical restraints in acute care.

    PubMed

    Struck, Bryan D

    2005-08-01

    The use of restraints to protect patients and insure continuation of care is an accepted fact in today's medical practice. However over the last 20 years a growing body of evidence supports the idea that restraints are harmful and should be used as the last resort. Since 1987, federal law requires long term care facilities to be restraint free. This article describes the use of restraints in the acute care setting, complications of using restraints and efforts to minimize restraint use in order to compliant with national policies.

  14. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness. PMID:27363258

  15. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness.

  16. From cottage to community hospitals: Watlington Cottage Hospital and its regional context, 1874-2000.

    PubMed

    Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    The appearance in England from the 1850s of 'cottage hospitals' in considerable numbers constituted a new and distinctive form of hospital provision. The historiography of hospital care has emphasised the role of the large teaching hospitals, to the neglect of the smaller and general practitioner hospitals. This article inverts that attention, by examining their history and shift in function to 'community hospitals'within their regional setting in the period up to 2000. As the planning of hospitals on a regional basis began from the 1920s, the impact of NHS organisational and planning mechanisms on smaller hospitals is explored through case studies at two levels. The strategy for community hospitals of the Oxford NHS Region--one of the first Regions to formulate such a strategy--and the impact of that strategy on one hospital, Watlington Cottage Hospital, is critically examined through its existence from 1874 to 2000. PMID:23057181

  17. Six medical students in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael C. P.; Bass, Sydney; Emery, Arnold W.; Thomson, Thomas A.; Vaughan, Gerrard A.; Wong, Wilfred T. Y.; Youngash, Ronald N.; Zack, Phillip S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes part of an education experiment at the University of British Columbia at Vancouver. Six final-year medical students spent approximately 12 weeks in a community. Their time was divided between the hospital and various doctors' offices. They answered a simple questionnaire to describe their experiences and commented favourably upon the opportunities for direct patient contact, learning basic skills, informal teaching by both family physicians and consultants, and the variety of work available. They had the opportunity to follow up the progress of the patient and learn the natural history of common illnesses. They achieved their basic objectives. We conclude from their reports and informal conversation that the experiment was successful and recommend other institutions to try similar programs. PMID:4758859

  18. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  19. Finding your first job in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Aaron G

    2011-12-01

    Community hospitals offer excellent opportunities for graduating orthopaedic trauma fellows. To successfully compete for these jobs, applicants today must be better prepared than their predecessors. Organizing your practice aspirations and researching job opportunities before the interview are necessary for an effective job search. Often, a collaborative effort with hospital administrators is required to establish a viable practice that fulfills the unique needs of the hospital and surrounding community while concurrently satisfying your practice goals. Issues to consider in defining your desired practice, guidelines on how to prepare for an interview with a community hospital, and suggestions on how to justify the expense of establishing your practice are presented.

  20. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (2) The hospital is located between 15 and 25 miles... conditions, the other like hospitals are inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (3.... (i) Sole community hospital status is effective 30 days after the date of CMS's written...

  1. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Polypharmacy Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ridderhoff, Kevin J; Hull, Jessica R; Sandberg, Sheila K

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of central nervous system depressants (CNSD) and psychotropics are one of the many factors that contribute to suicidal behavior in soldiers. U.S. Army policy requires medication screening for any soldier prescribed 4 or more medications when at least 1 of the medications is a CNSD or psychotropic. Constant deployments challenged health care provider ability to comply with required screenings, and senior leaders sought proactive intervention to reduce medication risks upon return of the 101 st Airborne Division (Air Assault) from deployment in 2011. A pharmacy-led team established the Polypharmacy Clinic (PC) at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital. Of the 3,999 soldiers assigned, 540 (13.5%) met the initial screening criteria. Success of the pilot program led to the mandatory screening of all other Fort Campbell, Kentucky, brigades. During the first 12 months, 895 soldiers were seen by a clinical pharmacist, and 1,574 interventions were documented. Significant interventions included medication added (121), medication changed (258), medication stopped (164), lab monitoring recommended (172), adverse reaction mitigated (41), therapeutic duplication prevented (61), and drug-drug interaction identified (93). Additionally, 55 soldiers were recommended for temporary duty profiles based on their adverse drug effects. Ten soldiers were recommended for enhanced controlled substance monitoring. Placing soldiers on clinically appropriate medications and removing potentially harmful medications from their possession are examples of how the PC positively impacted the Commanding General's ability to deploy a fully medically ready force. Soldiers consistently remarked favorably on the thorough medication counseling provided at their PC appointments. Innovative notes within the electronic health record summarized relevant findings regarding soldiers' medications, which allowed providers to quickly pinpoint and adjust medication regimens. With each identified high

  2. When Hospitals Join the Community: Practical Considerations and Ethical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel; Gardner, William; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2016-01-01

    Written from the perspective of hospitals, this article examines, in theory and in practice, challenges associated with hospitals' efforts to engage in neighborhood development more fully with the communities that neighbor them. Increasingly, these efforts include significant investments in housing, safety, and educational initiatives. These investments stretch the traditional expertise of medical practitioners and administrators and raise ethical and political questions about how best to engage and work with communities. After first describing the contexts within which hospital-community relationships arise, we examine ethical and political considerations likely to bear on the success of these projects. We conclude with recommendations to hospitals for operating within communities in a way that is consistent with hospitals' ethical commitments. PMID:27524759

  3. When Hospitals Join the Community: Practical Considerations and Ethical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Daniel; Gardner, William; Kelleher, Kelly J

    2016-01-01

    Written from the perspective of hospitals, this article examines, in theory and in practice, challenges associated with hospitals' efforts to engage in neighborhood development more fully with the communities that neighbor them. Increasingly, these efforts include significant investments in housing, safety, and educational initiatives. These investments stretch the traditional expertise of medical practitioners and administrators and raise ethical and political questions about how best to engage and work with communities. After first describing the contexts within which hospital-community relationships arise, we examine ethical and political considerations likely to bear on the success of these projects. We conclude with recommendations to hospitals for operating within communities in a way that is consistent with hospitals' ethical commitments.

  4. The Effect of Rural Hospital Closures on Community Economic Health

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, George M; Slifkin, Rebecca T; Randolph, Randy K; Poley, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of rural hospital closures on the local economy. Data Sources U.S. Census Bureau, OSCAR, Medicare Cost Reports, and surveys of individuals knowledgeable about local hospital closures. Study Design Economic data at the county level for 1990–2000 were combined with information on hospital closures. The study sample was restricted to rural counties experiencing a closure during the sample period. Longitudinal regression methods were used to estimate the effect of hospital closure on per-capita income, unemployment rate, and other community economic measures. Models included both leading and lagged closure terms allowing a preclosure economic downturn as well as time for the closure to be fully realized by the community. Data Collection Information on closures was collected by contacting every state hospital association, reconciling information gathered with that contained in the American Hospital Association file and OIG reports. Principal Findings Results indicate that the closure of the sole hospital in the community reduces per-capita income by $703 (p<0.05) or 4 percent (p<0.05) and increases the unemployment rate by 1.6 percentage points (p<0.01). Closures in communities with alternative sources of hospital care had no long-term economic impact, although income decreased for 2 years following the closure. Conclusions The local economic effects of a hospital closure should be considered when regulations that affect hospitals' financial well-being are designed or changed. PMID:16584460

  5. Managing patients with behavioral health problems in acute care: balancing safety and financial viability.

    PubMed

    Rape, Cyndy; Mann, Tammy; Schooley, John; Ramey, Jana

    2015-01-01

    With a recent decrease in community resources for the mental health population, acute care facilities must seek creative, cost-effective ways to protect and care for these vulnerable individuals. This article describes 1 facility's journey to maintaining patient and staff safety while reducing cost. Success factors of this program include staff engagement, environmental modifications, and a nurse-driven, sitter-reduction process. PMID:25479169

  6. Financial and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute care.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, J R; Burkhardt, J; Alexander, J A; Magnus, S A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the financial, market, and organizational determinants of hospital diversification into subacute inpatient care by acute care hospitals in order to guide hospital managers in undertaking such diversification efforts. STUDY SETTING: All nongovernment, general, acute care, community hospitals that were operating during the years 1985 through 1991 (3,986 hospitals in total). DATA SOURCES: Cross-sectional, time-series data were drawn from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals, the Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) Medicare Cost Reports, a latitude and longitude listing for all community hospital addresses, and the Area Resource File (ARF) published in 1992, which provides county level environmental variables. STUDY DESIGN: The study is longitudinal, enabling the specification of temporal patterns in conversion, causal inferences, and the treatment of right-censoring problems. The unit of analysis is the individual hospital. KEY FINDINGS: Significant differences were found in the average level of subacute care offered by investor-owned versus tax-exempt hospitals. After controlling for selection bias, financial performance, risk, size, occupancy, and other variables, IO hospitals offered 31.3 percent less subacute care than did NFP hospitals. Financial performance and risk are predictors of IO hospitals' diversification into subacute care, but not of NFP hospitals' activities in this market. Resource availability appears to expedite expansion into subacute care for both types of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Investment criteria and strategy differ between investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals. PMID:10201852

  7. Urinary tract infections in patients admitted to rehabilitation from acute care settings: a descriptive research study.

    PubMed

    Romito, Diane; Beaudoin, JoAnn M; Stein, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The use of an indwelling urinary catheter comes with associated risks. At a hospital in southern California, nurses on the acute rehabilitation unit suspected their patients were arriving from acute care with undiagnosed urinary tract infections (UTIs). This descriptive research study quantified the incidence of UTI on admission to a rehabilitation unit and correlations with catheter use. During the study period, 132 patients were admitted to acute rehabilitation from an acute care setting, and 123 met criteria to participate in the study. Among participants, 12% had a UTI upon admission. Questionnaires examined nursing attitudes toward appropriate urinary catheter use and proactive catheter removal. The data revealed that nurses want to be involved in decisions about urinary catheter use and that medical/surgical and rehabilitation nurses agree strongly about advocating for patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

  8. Is accounting for acute care beds enough? A proposal for measuring infection prevention personnel resources.

    PubMed

    Gase, Kathleen A; Babcock, Hilary M

    2015-02-01

    There is still little known about how infection prevention (IP) staffing affects patient outcomes across the country. Current evaluations mainly focus on the ratio of IP resources to acute care beds (ACBs) and have not strongly correlated with patient outcomes. The scope of IP and the role of the infection preventionist in health care have expanded and changed dramatically since the Study on the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control (SENIC Project) recommended a 1 IP resource to 250 ACB ration in the 1980s. Without a universally accepted model for accounting for additional IP responsibilities, it is difficult to truly assess IP staffing needs. A previously suggested alternative staffing model was applied to acute care hospitals in our organization to determine its utility.

  9. Does case management for patients with heart failure based in the community reduce unplanned hospital admissions? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, A L; Johnson, R; King, A; Morris, R W; Purdy, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled trials (non-RCTs, NRCTs) is to investigate the effectiveness and related costs of case management (CM) for patients with heart failure (HF) predominantly based in the community in reducing unplanned readmissions and length of stay (LOS). Setting CM initiated either while as an inpatient, or on discharge from acute care hospitals, or in the community and then continuing on in the community. Participants Adults with a diagnosis of HF and resident in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Intervention CM based on nurse coordinated multicomponent care which is applicable to the primary care-based health systems. Primary and secondary outcomes Primary outcomes of interest were unplanned (re)admissions, LOS and any related cost data. Secondary outcomes were primary healthcare resources. Results 22 studies were included: 17 RCTs and 5 NRCTs. 17 studies described hospital-initiated CM (n=4794) and 5 described community-initiated CM of HF (n=3832). Hospital-initiated CM reduced readmissions (rate ratio 0.74 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.92), p=0.008) and LOS (mean difference −1.28 days (95% CI −2.04 to −0.52), p=0.001) in favour of CM compared with usual care. 9 trials described cost data of which 6 reported no difference between CM and usual care. There were 4 studies of community-initiated CM versus usual care (2 RCTs and 2 NRCTs) with only the 2 NRCTs showing a reduction in admissions. Conclusions Hospital-initiated CM can be successful in reducing unplanned hospital readmissions for HF and length of hospital stay for people with HF. 9 trials described cost data; no clear difference emerged between CM and usual care. There was limited evidence for community-initiated CM which suggested it does not reduce admission. PMID:27165648

  10. Audit of surgical practice in a community hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D B

    1984-01-01

    The results of a prospective analysis of one year's surgery on inpatients in a busy community hospital showed that a high quality of surgery may be achieved with safety and low rates of complications. The results of a retrospective analysis of certain aspects of surgery was just as encouraging. Surgery that is performed in a community hospital is convenient for the patient, provides continuity of care by the general practitioner, and waiting list times are short. Surgical facilities can form an integral part of the comprehensive service provided by a community hospital and can lighten the caseload for minor surgery at the district general hospital. Close liaison between the two hospitals is essential. PMID:6424831

  11. [What should general hospital psychiatry do in a community?].

    PubMed

    Takehisa, Takahashi

    2003-01-01

    Some experiences in Nagano Red Cross hospital and Nagano Prefecture are presented, and the role of general hospital psychiatry (GHP) in a community is discussed. Psychiatric services in Nagano prefecture with population 2.21 million consist of four blocks. Our unit is in north block, providing treatment for acute phase and, in 2000, 1504 cases were new outpatients, daily outpatients were 198 cases and new inpatients were 604 cases including 146 emergency inpatients. In fiscal 2001, 25.6% of notifications of involuntary hospitalization from all psychiatric hospitals were submitted from GHP occupying 12.9% psychiatric beds, and 129 notifications from our unit were largest in Nagano prefecture. Total 7 GHPs with beds are presented by some data, suggesting two types as GHP. One type has relatively many new inpatients by small beds with short-term hospitalization like our GHP, and another type has relatively small new inpatients by large beds with long-term hospitalization like conventional mental hospital. It is necessary for GHP to pursue the former type, and to functionally differentiate from psychiatric hospital. Results of psychiatric emergency system in Nagano prefecture are presented. Designated hospitals are our GHP with 60 beds in north block, Prefectural Hospital with 310 beds in south block, National Sanatorium with 280 beds in east block and rotating 5 psychiatric hospitals with total 968 beds in west block. GHP with 60 beds hospitalized more emergency new cases than other psychiatric hospitals with large beds and discharged 84% of emergency inpatients to their home. Recently, short-term hospitalization of general hospital beds has rapidly progressed, and shared goal settings are needed, and treatment plans with teamwork by various types of experts have started from community-based home care. This teamwork will be expected throughout community psychiatric services. Although until today GHP's ward unit is financially disadvantageous, patients anticipate

  12. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  13. Community hospitals and the Internet: lessons from pilot connections.

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, S; Holt, M C; Horner, M; Rambo, N

    1994-01-01

    Community hospitals in rural and isolated areas have had little access to the Internet. In 1992, the National Library of Medicine funded a pilot project to be conducted by the University of Washington and seven community hospitals in the northwestern United States. The goals of the project were to connect the hospitals to the Internet and study the uses made of this resource. A number of administrative, technical, financial, and organizational problems were dealt with in the attempt to establish the Internet connections and introduce this resource to these health care settings. This paper examines these issues and presents conclusions drawn from the experiences of the project team. PMID:7841910

  14. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and, Community Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M. Moss

    1973-01-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients. PMID:4725343

  15. Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital and community involvement.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, M M

    1973-07-01

    Community involvement is not just one facet of the new Martin Luther King, Jr., General Hospital's existence. It is the mainstream from which all other activities flow. In addition to meeting the conventional needs of a conventional hospital staff with the core collection of texts and journals, this library goes one step further. It acts as a resource for its community health workers, dietitians, and nurses in their various outreach programs. It serves as a stimulus for the high school or community college student who may be curious about a health career. It also finds time to provide reading material for its patients.

  16. Identifying Key Hospital Service Quality Factors in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain

    2015-01-01

    Background The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. Objective As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. Methods We defined social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea’s two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. Results To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is

  17. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents.

  18. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PMID:25486150

  19. Alternative Level of Care: Canada's Hospital Beds, the Evidence and Options

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jason M.; Crump, R. Trafford

    2013-01-01

    Patients designated as alternative level of care (ALC) are an ongoing concern for healthcare policy makers across Canada. These patients occupy valuable hospital beds and limit access to acute care services. The objective of this paper is to present policy alternatives to address underlying factors associated with ALC bed use. Three alternatives, and their respective limitations and structural challenges, are discussed. Potential solutions may require a mix of policy options proposed here. Inadequate policy jeopardizes new acute care activity-based funding schemes in British Columbia and Ontario. Failure to address this issue could exacerbate pressures on the existing bottlenecks in the community care system in these and other provinces. PMID:23968671

  20. Internationally educated nurse hiring: geographic distribution, community, and hospital characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Masselink, Leah E; Jones, Cheryl B; Mark, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    As the largest importer of internationally educated nurses (IENs), the United States is considered to be the epicenter of global nurse migration. The purposes of this study were to examine the geographic distribution of IEN hiring and determine associations between community and hospital characteristics and IEN hiring. More community characteristics than hospital characteristics were strongly associated with IEN hiring which suggest perceived community needs and receptivity to lENs could be an important consideration in hospital administrators' decisions to hire IENs. These findings suggest that as the U.S. population ages and becomes increasingly diverse, the demand for IENs is likely to grow. Nurse leaders and faculty may face challenges with regard to the ethical recruitment of IENs from low-income countries, incorporation of IENs into U.S. health care organizations, and continued development of a diverse U.S.-educated nursing workforce. This study expands understanding of the demand side of IEN employment in U.S. hospitals by providing the first in-depth examination of the community and hospital factors related to hospitals' IEN hiring.

  1. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  2. Length of Stay and Achievement of Functional Milestones in a Rural First Nations Population in Northwestern Ontario during Acute-Care Admission after Total Hip Replacement: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Nicole; Hopman, Wilma M.; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To understand the postoperative acute-care physiotherapy course for First Nations people returning after total hip replacement (THR) to remote communities with limited rehabilitation services and to evaluate length of stay and attainment of functional milestones after THR to determine to what extent an urban-based clinical pathway is transferrable to and effective for First Nations patients in a rural setting. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing charts of patients who underwent THR in the Northwest Ontario catchment area from 2007 through 2012. Results: For the 36 patient charts reviewed, median length of stay (LOS) at the Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre (SLMHC) was 7.5 days (range 2–335); median LOS from time of surgery at the regional hospital (Thunder Bay Regional Health Centre) to discharge from SLMHC was 13.5 days; and median time for mobilizing and stairs was 9 days (range 1–93). Conclusion: Commonly accepted urban clinical pathways are not a good fit for smaller rural hospitals from which First Nations patients return to remote communities without rehabilitation services. LOS in a rural acute-care facility is similar to LOS in an urban rehabilitation facility. PMID:26839456

  3. Community hospital successfully implements eRecord and CPOE.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Debra M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Diamond, Joel N; Fera, William; McCormick, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    Despite media attention on converting the nation's paper-based medical record systems to electronic systems, few hospitals, and even fewer community hospitals, have done so. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center St. Margaret has converted to a comprehensive electronic health record system, known as eRecord, in a short time. The authors describe key factors that were critical to the success of the conversion, along with positive results on quality of care.

  4. Outpatient vaginal hysterectomy in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M A; Lalich, R A; Meyer, M M; Widener, J

    1994-08-01

    From Sept 1, 1992 to Dec 31, 1993, 38 outpatient vaginal hysterectomy patients were evaluated for identification of complications after discharge, adequacy of pain relief at home, return to baseline lifestyle, and costs. No complications that would have necessitated an overnight or longer stay were identified. All patients reported adequate pain relief and a more rapid return to activity than they had expected. The hospital cost of outpatient vaginal hysterectomy was about half that of inpatient, and additional significant savings were realized in the cost of postoperative medication. Patients were positive about returning home the day of surgery and would recommend the protocol to others who qualified.

  5. Focus on: Watsonville Community Hospital Biomedical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Shugart, B L

    1986-01-01

    The Journal of Clinical Engineering is pleased to present this FOCUS on the Biomedical Engineering Department of Watsonville Community Hospital (Watsonville, CA). Since the Department's inception in 1983, the growth of the hospital and the surrounding area has resulted in the expansion of the Department and its duties. This paper describes the responsibilities of the two-man Biomedical Engineering Department, which serves this 130-bed hospital and oversees the preventive maintenance and repair of approximately 800 pieces of equipment. In addition, the Department is involved with staff education, equipment inventory control, new equipment purchases, technical consultations, and special projects. PMID:10275912

  6. Reimbursement of sole community hospitals under Medicare's prospective payment System

    PubMed Central

    Freiman, Marc P.; Cromwell, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Under the prospective payment system (PPS), designated sole community hospitals (SCH's), usually smaller than other rural hospitals but offering comparable services, have had higher average cost levels, in part because of underutilization of plant and equipment. This has resulted in negative operating margins on patient revenues, although local financial support and other revenue sources bring margins on total revenues into the positive range. The PPS legislation has also provided SCH's temporary protection from volume declines. SCH's are more likely than other rural hospitals to experience large volume swings, but only for declines greater than the threshold specified under PPS. PMID:10312392

  7. Can community hospitals survive without large scale health reform?

    PubMed

    Unland, James J

    2004-01-01

    This nation's not-for-profit community hospitals, numbering over 4000 and providing the largest percentage of all hospital services to the US population, are threatened as never before by erratic reimbursement, reduced capital access and, more recently, by physicians who now compete both by virtue of outpatient/ambulatory services and by starting "specialty hospitals." This article examines some of these trends and their implications, raising the issue of whether it is time for major restructuring of our reimbursement systems and other significant health reforms. PMID:15151196

  8. Evaluating Michigan's community hospital access: spatial methods for decision support

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Joseph P; Shortridge, Ashton M; Groop, Richard E; Varnakovida, Pariwate; Finn, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    Background Community hospital placement is dictated by a diverse set of geographical factors and historical contingency. In the summer of 2004, a multi-organizational committee headed by the State of Michigan's Department of Community Health approached the authors of this paper with questions about how spatial analyses might be employed to develop a revised community hospital approval procedure. Three objectives were set. First, the committee needed visualizations of both the spatial pattern of Michigan's population and its 139 community hospitals. Second, the committee required a clear, defensible assessment methodology to quantify access to existing hospitals statewide, taking into account factors such as distance to nearest hospital and road network density to estimate travel time. Third, the committee wanted to contrast the spatial distribution of existing community hospitals with a theoretical configuration that best met statewide demand. This paper presents our efforts to first describe the distribution of Michigan's current community hospital pattern and its people, and second, develop two models, access-based and demand-based, to identify areas with inadequate access to existing hospitals. Results Using the product from the access-based model and contiguity and population criteria, two areas were identified as being "under-served." The lower area, located north/northeast of Detroit, contained the greater total land area and population of the two areas. The upper area was centered north of Grand Rapids. A demand-based model was applied to evaluate the existing facility arrangement by allocating daily bed demand in each ZIP code to the closest facility. We found 1,887 beds per day were demanded by ZIP centroids more than 16.1 kilometers from the nearest existing hospital. This represented 12.7% of the average statewide daily bed demand. If a 32.3 kilometer radius was employed, unmet demand dropped to 160 beds per day (1.1%). Conclusion Both modeling

  9. Accountability for Community Benefit: A Reasonable Expectation for Canadian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Ross

    2016-05-01

    North American hospitals have historically struggled to engage in prevention and health promotion activities because they have not been incentivized or held accountable for doing so. However, in order to be exempt from federal taxes, 3,000 non-profit hospitals in the US must now regularly assess the health status of the communities they serve, and take action to address identified health needs. This is called "accountability for community benefit," and it is required under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly known as Obamacare). A modified version of accountability for community benefit warrants exploration in the Canadian context, as it may support Canadian hospitals to direct resources towards prevention and health promotion activities - something many Canadian hospitals want to do, but struggle with in the current accountability environment. This is an important health policy topic because even a small shift in focus by hospitals towards prevention and health promotion has the potential to improve population health and reduce healthcare demand. PMID:27232233

  10. Accountability for Community Benefit: A Reasonable Expectation for Canadian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Ross

    2016-05-01

    North American hospitals have historically struggled to engage in prevention and health promotion activities because they have not been incentivized or held accountable for doing so. However, in order to be exempt from federal taxes, 3,000 non-profit hospitals in the US must now regularly assess the health status of the communities they serve, and take action to address identified health needs. This is called "accountability for community benefit," and it is required under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly known as Obamacare). A modified version of accountability for community benefit warrants exploration in the Canadian context, as it may support Canadian hospitals to direct resources towards prevention and health promotion activities - something many Canadian hospitals want to do, but struggle with in the current accountability environment. This is an important health policy topic because even a small shift in focus by hospitals towards prevention and health promotion has the potential to improve population health and reduce healthcare demand.

  11. Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinusas, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

  12. Developing a restraint use policy for acute care.

    PubMed

    Stolley, J M; King, J; Clarke, M; Joers, A M; Hague, D; Allen, D

    1993-12-01

    Restraint use has been a recent focus of attention in long-term care facilities. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and the Food and Drug Administration have devoted attention to the prudent use of restraints. The authors address efforts of an acute care facility to comply with these regulations.

  13. Sole Community Hospitals: Are They Different? A Statistical Analysis of the Hospitals and Their Treatment under TEFRA and PPS. Hospital Studies Program. Hospital Cost and Utilization Project. Research Note 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Dean E.

    A study examined the treatment of sole community hospitals under the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 (TEFRA) and the Prospective Payment System (PPS) for Medicare as compared to the treatment of hospitals not designated as sole community hospitals under these same two policy guidelines. (A sole community hospital is defined as a…

  14. A multilevel intervention to increase community hospital use of alteplase for acute stroke (INSTINCT): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Phillip A; Meurer, William J; Frederiksen, Shirley M; Kalbfleisch, John D; Xu, Zhenzhen; Haan, Mary N; Silbergleit, Robert; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Use of alteplase improves outcome in some patients with stroke. Several types of barrier frequently prevent its use. We assessed whether a standardised, barrier-assessment, multicomponent intervention could increase alteplase use in community hospitals in Michigan, USA. Methods In a cluster-randomised controlled trial, we selected adult, non-specialty, acute-care community hospitals in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Eligible hospitals discharged at least 100 patients who had had a stroke per year, had less than 100 000 visits to the emergency department per year, and were not academic comprehensive stroke centres. Using a computer-generated randomisation sequence, we selected 12 matched pairs of eligible hospitals. Within pairs, the hospitals were allocated to intervention or control groups with restricted randomisation in January, 2007. Between January, 2007, and December, 2007, intervention hospitals implemented a multicomponent intervention that included qualitative and quantitative assessment of barriers to alteplase use and ways to address the findings, and provided additional support. The primary outcome was change in alteplase use in patients with stroke in emergency departments between the pre-intervention period (January, 2005, to December, 2006) and the post-intervention period (January, 2008, to January, 2010). Physicians in participating hospitals and the coordinating centre could not be masked to group assignment, but were masked to progress made in paired control hospitals. External medical reviewers who were masked to group assignment assessed outcomes. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and target-population (without one pair that was excluded after randomisation) analyses. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00349479. Findings All 24 hospitals completed the study. Overall, 745 of 40 823 patients with stroke received intravenous alteplase treatment. In the ITT analysis, the proportion of patients with

  15. Discounted drug prices for hospitals: result in prescriptions for expensive drugs in the community.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Hospital prescribing has a major influence on community prescribing. In France, pharmaceutical companies can sell drugs to hospitals at dramatically reduced prices in the expectation of increasing sales in community pharmacies. PMID:26417639

  16. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    PubMed

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  17. Revitalized commitment to community. A community benefit plan helps a hospital be a good neighbor.

    PubMed

    Brown, S

    1994-01-01

    Three years ago St. John Hospital and Medical Center, Detroit, made a commitment to strengthen its community relationships and reaffirm its mission of serving those in need by following the Catholic Health Association's Social Accountability Budget. While implementing the program, administrators were surprised to learn the hospital was already participating in many community programs for which it received little or no reimbursement. They also discovered that the hospital had no formal, written charity care policy even though St. John provided more than $14 million in uncompensated care annually. To learn what the needs of the surrounding community were, the hospital went to the clergy, who overwhelmingly identified the needs of the elderly as the number-one priority. A close second was supporting the basic family unit. Other concerns included basic family needs, safe neighborhoods and schools, and teen pregnancy. Although the hospital realized it could not do all that was needed, it felt obliged to be a leader in seeing that the needs were met and drew up a community benefit plan that documented the problems and the solutions. The hospital did what it could and worked with other organizations to address needs such as housing for the elderly, affordable and accessible healthcare, neighborhood improvement and safety, and family services. PMID:10131088

  18. Value of laser-assisted angioplasty in the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Levy, J M; Hessel, S J; Horsley, W W; Cook, G C; Dickey, J E

    1989-03-01

    The experience with laser-assisted angioplasty at a community hospital was reviewed. One hundred twenty patients required angioplasty during a 7-month period, and in only 17-13 of whom had superficial femoral artery occlusions--was the use of lasers deemed appropriate. The success rate was 65% for laser-assisted angioplasty and 98% for balloon angioplasty. Laser-assisted angioplasty was the initial intervention in eight of the 13 superficial femoral artery occlusions. In two cases, a wire had been first advanced across the lesion, and in three cases, attempts to cross the lesion with a wire had been unsuccessful. The availability of the laser did not significantly increase the number of cases amenable to angioplasty, and at present laser angioplasty, does not seem to be cost-effective for community hospitals.

  19. Establishing an acute care nursing bed unit size: employing a decision matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Terry; Pati, Debajyoti

    2008-01-01

    Determining the number of patient rooms for an acute care (medical-surgical) patient unit is a challenge for both healthcare architects and hospital administrators when renovating or designing a new patient tower or wing. Discussions on unit bed size and its impact on hospital operations in healthcare design literature are isolated, and clearly there is opportunity for more extensive research. Finding the optimal solution for unit bed size involves many factors, including the dynamics of the site and existing structures. This opinion paper was developed using a "balanced scorecard" concept to provide decision makers a framework for assessing and choosing a customized solution during the early planning and conceptual design phases. The context of a healthcare balanced scorecard with the quadrants of quality, finance, provider outcomes, and patient outcomes is used to compare the impact of these variables on unit bed size. PMID:22973617

  20. A community hospital's journey into Lean Six Sigma.

    PubMed

    Stuenkel, Kurt; Faulkner, Taunya

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of Lean Six Sigma and 100-day workouts throughout the 304-bed Floyd Medical Center community hospital organization has led to sustainable results and a marked change in culture. The organization-wide learning of such an effort is deep and intehse, and to remain focused and successful it must be a priority of top management. The workout methodology can assist the organization to carry projects to completion and to achieve rapid implementation of desired improvements.

  1. First 101 Robotic General Surgery Cases in a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jarrod C.; Alrajhi, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The general surgeon's robotic learning curve may improve if the experience is classified into categories based on the complexity of the procedures in a small community hospital. The intraoperative time should decrease and the incidence of complications should be comparable to conventional laparoscopy. The learning curve of a single robotic general surgeon in a small community hospital using the da Vinci S platform was analyzed. Methods: Measured parameters were operative time, console time, conversion rates, complications, surgical site infections (SSIs), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), length of stay, and patient demographics. Results: Between March 2014 and August 2015, 101 robotic general surgery cases were performed by a single surgeon in a 266-bed community hospital, including laparoscopic cholecystectomies, inguinal hernia repairs; ventral, incisional, and umbilical hernia repairs; and colorectal, foregut, bariatric, and miscellaneous procedures. Ninety-nine of the cases were completed robotically. Seven patients were readmitted within 30 days. There were 8 complications (7.92%). There were no mortalities and all complications were resolved with good outcomes. The mean operative time was 233.0 minutes. The mean console operative time was 117.6 minutes. Conclusion: A robotic general surgery program can be safely implemented in a small community hospital with extensive training of the surgical team through basic robotic skills courses as well as supplemental educational experiences. Although the use of the robotic platform in general surgery could be limited to complex procedures such as foregut and colorectal surgery, it can also be safely used in a large variety of operations with results similar to those of conventional laparoscopy. PMID:27667913

  2. The transition from acute care to home: a review of issues in discharge teaching and a framework for better practice.

    PubMed

    McBride, Meghan; Andrews, Gavin J

    2013-01-01

    Patients are often sent home with complex discharge plans that can become overwhelming and difficult to follow. By contrast, implementing effective teaching at the time of discharge can lead to a decrease in the rate of hospital readmissions and mortality for patients post discharge (Koelling, Johnson, Cody, & Aaronson, 2005). Unfortunately, many of the discharge teaching practices and programs used in health care settings have been criticized as being ineffective. Ensuring that patients are prepared for the transition from hospital to home after a cardiac event will require a fundamental shift in how teaching is performed in acute care settings. In this paper, the authors identify and examine models and concepts relevant to improving the process of providing discharge education in acute care settings. This includes attention to adult education, self-management and patient-centred care. A practical framework was developed: Important Elements of Effective Discharge Teaching. This framework can be used by frontline staff to initiate realistic practice change and promote the use of evidence-based strategies related to discharge teaching in acute care settings. The Important Elements of Effective Discharge Teaching framework provides health care practitioners with a tool to evaluate and reflect on their current professional practice and provides examples of teaching strategies that are based on best evidence. Nurses can incorporate elements of this framework while providing health teaching to patients after a cardiac event.

  3. Hospital to community transitions for adults: discharge planners and community service providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Rosemary Kennedy; Chandran, Devyani; Sergeant, Julie F; Koenig, Terry L

    2014-01-01

    Discharges from the hospital to community-based settings are more difficult for older adults when there is lack of communication, resource sharing, and viable partnerships among service providers in these settings. The researchers captured the perspectives of three different groups of participants from hospitals, independent living centers, and Area Agencies on Aging, which has rarely been done in studies on discharge planning. Findings include identification of barriers in the assessment and referral process (e.g., timing of discharge, inattention to client goals, lack of communication and partnerships between hospital discharge planners and community providers), and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Implications are discussed including potential for Medicaid and Medicare cost reductions due to fewer re-hospitalizations.

  4. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient.

  5. Charge Nurse Perspectives on Frontline Leadership in Acute Care Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Rose O.; Schwarzkopf, Ruth; Kiger, Anna J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed. PMID:22191051

  6. Current concepts: management of diarrhea in acute care.

    PubMed

    Fruto, L V

    1994-09-01

    Diarrhea is common in the acute care setting, particularly among critically ill patients. Factors that cause diarrhea are usually multifactorial; some of the most common include medications, hyperosmolar or rapidly delivered tube feedings, atrophy of intestinal epithelium or ischemic bowel, short bowel syndrome, pseudomembranous colitis, infection (Salmonella and Shigella species), opportunistic infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and severe hypoproteinemia. This article reviews different types and mechanisms of diarrhea commonly encountered in acute care. It includes current concepts of managing diarrhea, such as calculation of stool osmotic gap, identification of medications that cause diarrhea, modification of enteral therapy, and the use of antisecretory agents. Nursing responsibilities and contributions in the collaborative assessment and clinical management of diarrhea are also explored. PMID:7704125

  7. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  8. Creating a Nurse-Led Culture to Minimize Horizontal Violence in the Acute Care Setting: A Multi-Interventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Parker, Karen M; Harrington, Ann; Smith, Charlene M; Sellers, Kathleen F; Millenbach, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal violence (HV) is prevalent in nursing. However, few strategies are identified to address this phenomenon that undermines communication and patient safety. Nurses at an acute care hospital implemented multiple interventions to address HV resulting in increased knowledge of hospital policies regarding HV, and significantly (p < .05) less HV prevalence than was reported by nurses in other organizations throughout New York State. With the aid and oversight of nursing professional development specialists, evidence-based interventions to address HV were developed including policies, behavioral performance reviews, and staff/manager educational programs. PMID:26985749

  9. Counting the costs of accreditation in acute care: an activity-based costing approach

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Virginia; Greenfield, David; Hogden, Anne; Forde, Kevin; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the costs of hospital accreditation in Australia. Design Mixed methods design incorporating: stakeholder analysis; survey design and implementation; activity-based costs analysis; and expert panel review. Setting Acute care hospitals accredited by the Australian Council for Health Care Standards. Participants Six acute public hospitals across four States. Results Accreditation costs varied from 0.03% to 0.60% of total hospital operating costs per year, averaged across the 4-year accreditation cycle. Relatively higher costs were associated with the surveys years and with smaller facilities. At a national level these costs translate to $A36.83 million, equivalent to 0.1% of acute public hospital recurrent expenditure in the 2012 fiscal year. Conclusions This is the first time accreditation costs have been independently evaluated across a wide range of hospitals and highlights the additional cost burden for smaller facilities. A better understanding of the costs allows policymakers to assess alternative accreditation and other quality improvement strategies, and understand their impact across a range of facilities. This methodology can be adapted to assess international accreditation programmes. PMID:26351190

  10. Impact of a regional acute care surgery model on patient access and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kreindler, Sara A.; Zhang, Liping; Metge, Colleen J.; Nason, Richard W.; Wright, Brock; Rudnick, Wendy; Moffatt, Michael E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The consolidation of acute care surgery (ACS) services at 3 of 6 hospitals in a Canadian health region sought to alleviate a relative shortage of surgeons able to take emergency call. We examined how this affected patient access and outcomes. Methods Using the generalized linear model and statistical process control, we analyzed ACS-related episodes that occurred between 39 months prior to and 17 months after the model’s implementation (n = 14 713). Results Time to surgery increased after the consolidation. Wait times increased primarily for patients presenting at nonreferral hospitals who were likely to require transfer to a referral hospital. Although ACS teams enabled referral hospitals to handle a much higher volume of patients without increasing within-hospital wait times, overall system wait times were lengthened by the growing frequency of patient transfers. Wait times for inpatient admission were difficult to interpret because there was a trend toward admitting patients directly to the ACS service, bypassing the emergency department (ED). For patients who did go through the ED, wait times for inpatient admission increased after the consolidation; however, this trend was cancelled out by the apparently zero waits of patients who bypassed the ED. Regionalization showed no impact on length of stay, readmissions, mortality or complications. Conclusion Consolidation enabled the region to ensure adequate surgical coverage without harming patients. The need to transfer patients who presented at nonreferral hospitals led to longer waits. PMID:24067516

  11. Evaluation of occupational therapy interventions for elderly patients in Swedish acute care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wressle, Ewa; Filipsson, Viveka; Andersson, Lena; Jacobsson, Beatrice; Martinsson, Karin; Engel, Kristina

    2006-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether occupational therapy interventions in acute care could improve the elderly patient's perception of ability to manage at home after discharge. A pilot study was performed, including 22 patients in the experimental group and 19 in the control group. Occupational therapy interventions were conducted in the experimental group concerning personal care, information, prescription of assistive devices, planning of discharge, and reporting to primary care or community care. The control group was given no occupational therapy interventions. Structured interviews were performed on discharge and at a follow-up in about 14 weeks after discharge. The two groups were comparable concerning gender, age, days of care, and diagnoses. Patients in the experimental group scored lower on mental health and were more anxious on discharge. However, there was no difference between the groups in managing at home after discharge. Patients in the control group had greater need of further contacts with healthcare after discharge. Due to the small sample interpretations must be made with caution. The findings indicate that occupational therapy interventions in acute care might have a positive effect from the perspective of the elderly patient. These results need to be confirmed in a larger study.

  12. Evaluation of occupational therapy interventions for elderly patients in Swedish acute care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wressle, Ewa; Filipsson, Viveka; Andersson, Lena; Jacobsson, Beatrice; Martinsson, Karin; Engel, Kristina

    2006-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether occupational therapy interventions in acute care could improve the elderly patient's perception of ability to manage at home after discharge. A pilot study was performed, including 22 patients in the experimental group and 19 in the control group. Occupational therapy interventions were conducted in the experimental group concerning personal care, information, prescription of assistive devices, planning of discharge, and reporting to primary care or community care. The control group was given no occupational therapy interventions. Structured interviews were performed on discharge and at a follow-up in about 14 weeks after discharge. The two groups were comparable concerning gender, age, days of care, and diagnoses. Patients in the experimental group scored lower on mental health and were more anxious on discharge. However, there was no difference between the groups in managing at home after discharge. Patients in the control group had greater need of further contacts with healthcare after discharge. Due to the small sample interpretations must be made with caution. The findings indicate that occupational therapy interventions in acute care might have a positive effect from the perspective of the elderly patient. These results need to be confirmed in a larger study. PMID:17203670

  13. Hospital study of adult community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J T; Finch, R G; Ward, M J; Macrae, A D

    1982-07-31

    The cause of primary pneumonia was diagnosed in 124 of 127 consecutive adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired illness. Pneumococcal infection was found in 96 (76%) patients and legionnaries' disease was the second commonest infection identified (15%). Other bacterial infections were uncommon. 11 patients had atypical pneumonia, including 7 with psittacosis. There were several mixed infections and most of the 11 patients with viral infections also had bacterial pneumonia. 19 patients died (15%) and mortality was associated with increasing age, the presence of coexisting disease, and the cause of the pneumonia. Recognition of the most likely causes of severe pneumonia allows logical initial antibiotic treatment for such patients admitted to hospital. PMID:6124681

  14. 75 FR 52960 - Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital Demonstration Program: Solicitation of Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... the June 2, 2010 Federal Register (75 FR 30918)). B. Participation in the Demonstration To participate... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Rural Community Hospital... hospitals to participate in the Rural Community Hospital Demonstration program for a 5-year period....

  15. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  16. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  17. Summary of prospective quantification of reimbursement recovery from inpatient acute care outliers.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Gerald S; Paulson, Albert S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify inpatient acute care hospital cases that are eligible for additional financial reimbursement. Acute care hospitals are reimbursed by third-party payers on behalf of their patients. Reimbursement is a fixed amount dependent primarily upon the diagnostic related group (DRG) of the case and the service intensity weight of the individual hospital. This method is used by nearly all third-party payers. For a given case, reimbursement is fixed (all else being equal) until a certain threshold level of charges, the cost outlier threshold, is reached. Above this amount the hospital is partially reimbursed for additional charges above the cost outlier threshold. Hospital discharge information has been described as having an error rate of between 7 and 22 percent in attribution of basic case characteristics. It can be expected that there is a significant error rate in the attribution of charges as well. This could be due to miscategorization of the case, misapplication of charges, or other causes. Identification of likely cases eligible for additional reimbursement would alleviate financial pressure where hospitals would have to absorb high expenses for outlier cases. Determining predicted values for total charges for each case was accomplished by exploring associative relationships between charges and case-specific variables. These variables were clinical, demographic, and administrative. Year-by-year comparisons show that these relationships appear stable throughout the five-year period under study. Beta coefficients developed in Year 1 are applied to develop predictions for Year 3 cases. This was also done for year pairs 2 and 4, and 3 and 5. Based on the predicted and actual value of charges, recovery amounts were calculated for each case in the second year of the year pairs. The year gap is necessary to allow for collection and analysis of the data of the first year of each pair. The analysis was performed in two parts

  18. Economic Impact of the Critical Access Hospital Program on Kentucky's Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ona, Lucia; Davis, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Context: In 1997, the Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Grant Program created the Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Program as a response to the financial distress of rural hospitals. It was believed that this program would reduce the rate of rural hospital closures and improve access to health care services in rural communities. Objective: The…

  19. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL.... For payment purposes, CMS treats as a sole community hospital any hospital that is located in a rural... 1820(i)(1) of the Act as in effect on September 30, 1997, for as long as the hospital continues...

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  1. Evaluating hospitals' provision of community benefit: an argument for an outcome-based approach to nonprofit hospital tax exemption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B; Singh, Simone Rauscher; Jacobson, Peter D

    2013-04-01

    Nonprofit hospitals are exempt from federal income taxation if they pass organizational and operational tests, including satisfying the community-benefit standard. Policymakers, however, have questioned the adequacy of the community benefits that nonprofit hospitals provide in exchange for these exemptions. The Internal Revenue Service recently responded to these concerns by redesigning its tax forms for nonprofit hospitals. The new Form 990 Schedule H requires nonprofit hospitals to provide additional information about their community-benefit activities. This new reporting requirement, however, places an undue focus on input-based community-benefit indicators, in particular expenditures. We argue that expanding the current input-based reporting requirement to include not only monetary inputs but also population health outcomes would achieve greater benefit for society. PMID:23409909

  2. Reframing tobacco dependency management in acute care: A case study.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Annette S H; Guzman, Randolph; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Thurmeier, Rick; Fedorowicz, Anna; Fulmore, Kaitlin

    2016-08-01

    Effective tobacco dependence treatment within acute care tends to be inadequate. The purpose of the Utilizing best practices to Manage Acute care patients Tobacco Dependency (UMAT) was to implement and evaluate an evidence-based intervention to support healthcare staff to effectively manage nicotine withdrawal symptoms of acute surgical patients. Data collection for this one-year longitudinal case study included: relevant patient experiences and staff reported practice, medication usage, and chart review. Over the year each data source suggested changes in tobacco dependence treatment. Key changes in patient survey responses (N=55) included a decrease in daily smoking and cigarette cravings. Of patients who used nicotine replacement therapy, they reported an increase in symptom relief. Staff (N=45) were surveyed at baseline, mid-point and end of study. Reported rates of assessing smoking status did not change over the year, but assessment of withdrawal symptoms emerged as daily practice and questions about cessation diminished. Also delivery of nicotine replacement therapy products increased over the year. Chart reviews showed a shift in content from documenting smoking behavior to withdrawal symptoms and administration of nicotine replacements; also frequency of comments increased. In summary, the evidence-based intervention influenced unit norms and reframed the culture related to tobacco dependence treatment. PMID:27392584

  3. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  4. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  5. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  6. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  7. 42 CFR 412.531 - Special payment provisions when an interruption of a stay occurs in a long-term care hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care hospital to an acute care hospital, IRF, SNF, or the patient's home and readmitted to the same... is discharged from the long-term care hospital to an acute care hospital, an IRF, or a SNF for a...-term care hospital and ends on the 27th day after discharge. (iii) For a discharge to a SNF,...

  8. The accountability of nonprofit hospitals: lessons from Maryland's community benefit reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bradford H; Schlesinger, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Under Internal Revenue Service requirements, nonprofit hospitals will begin filing new community benefit reports in 2010. Maryland has had similar requirements since 2004. This paper, based on interviews at 20 hospitals, describes how Maryland's requirements affected hospitals and their activities. Increases in reported community benefit expenditures since the program began are due to both changes in activities and better data capture. Charity care accounts for one-third of community benefit dollars. A key distinction concerns whether hospitals take an accounting or managerial approach to community benefit. The Maryland experience suggests the issues that will arise when the national requirements are implemented. PMID:19694387

  9. Integrating patient teaching into bedside patient care: a participant-observation study of hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Barber-Parker, Elaine D

    Today's patients are quickly discharged from hospitals and often continue complex treatments at home. Patient teaching is critical and hospital nurses are encouraged to use "every teachable moment." This study explored and described the nature of integrating patient teaching into daily patient care and the factors influencing the delivery of teaching. A fieldwork method, conducted over 12 months, used participant-observation (PO) and a focus group session to answer the research questions. Three experienced registered nurses working on the oncology unit of an acute care community hospital served as informants. Critical attributes and patterns of observed teaching events were described.

  10. 42 CFR 412.108 - Special treatment: Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under § 412.92. (iii) At least 60 percent of the hospital's inpatient days or discharges were... this section, only days and discharges from acute care inpatient hospital stays are counted (including days and discharges from swing beds when used for acute care inpatient hospital services), but...

  11. Nutritional care of the patient: nurses' knowledge and attitudes in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Kowanko, I; Simon, S; Wood, J

    1999-03-01

    Concern is growing about the occurrence of malnutrition in hospitals throughout the developed world. Reduced involvement of nurses in patients' nutritional care may be one of the contributing factors. This study explored nurses' attitudes and knowledge about nutrition and food service in hospital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven nurses from the internal medical service of a large Australian acute care hospital. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that many nurses lacked the in-depth knowledge needed to give proper nutritional care to their patients. Although nurses considered nutritional care to be important many had difficulty in raising its priority above other nursing activities, as a result of time constraints and multitasking issues. Several problems relating to food service arrangements were also highlighted. The findings suggest a need to raise nurses' awareness of the importance of nutrition in patient outcome. This study provides information which will guide in-service nurse education programs about nutrition, and suggests strategies for practice and organizational change.

  12. Community benefit prevails. Are radical changes in hospital tax-exemption laws necessary?

    PubMed

    Seay, J D

    1992-01-01

    Voluntary, not-for-profit hospitals are in danger of losing their tax-exempt status as policymakers lean toward stricter charity care requirements that would penalize hospitals which failed to provide at least a predetermined level of charity care. Proposed legislation abandons community benefit and advocates a relief-of-poverty standard. The relief-of-poverty standard advances the notion that hospitals are not providing enough charity care to merit their tax exemption. However, the voluntary hospitals' share of uncompensated care costs (as a percentage of total costs) increased from 70 percent in 1981 to 75 percent in 1989. The relief-of-poverty standard is inferior to the community benefit standard because it does not take into account that the character of community benefit varies among hospitals and communities. However, community benefit must be better defined. Some current activities--individual hospital reassessments, collective hospital reassessments, voluntary development of criteria, and statutory standards--will be instructive in efforts to arrive at a definition of community benefit that is appropriate for the specific community. Leaders in voluntary, not-for-profit hospitals need to develop positive and equitable criteria for hospital tax exemption. These hospitals' accountability is in question, but it is their integrity that is at stake. PMID:10115598

  13. Dying from cancer in community hospitals or a hospice: closest lay carers' perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    Seamark, D A; Williams, S; Hall, M; Lawrence, C J; Gilbert, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite there being around 400 community hospitals in the United Kingdom, there is little published research on the quality of service provided by these hospitals. AIM: To compare the quality of terminal cancer care in community hospitals with a hospice as assessed by patients' closest lay carer (relative or friend). METHOD: Structured interview (or questionnaire based on the interview proforma) with closest lay carers of all patients dying over one year in 12 community hospitals in east Devon and a purpose-built hospice in the city of Exeter. RESULTS: A total of 292 cases (176 in community hospitals and 116 in a hospice) were identified, resulting in 238 carers being eligible for interview or questionnaire survey. Overall, 106 successful interviews and 55 questionnaires were completed, giving a response rate of 67.6%. Carers gave a near unanimous vote of excellence for the total care given by the hospice, while around 40% of carers of patients in community hospitals considered that improvements were possible. Community hospitals attracted more negative comments than hospices, with criticism being directed at problems of communication, lack of nursing staff, and lack of support in bereavement. Carers of hospice patients were significantly more likely to be present at the time of death than those of community hospital patients [45/70 (64%) vs. 31/89 (35%); chi 2 = 13.6, P < 0.001], an observation possibly because nursing staff in community hospitals are less experienced at dealing with terminally ill patients and such hospitals have fewer adequate facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Lay carers indicated great satisfaction with care given in the hospice and less satisfaction with care given in the community hospitals. However, the community hospitals are non-specialist units with far lower levels of trained staff. Improvements in terms of the communication skills of doctors and nurses, specific training for nurses in palliative care, and structured bereavement care

  14. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  15. High-intensity telemedicine-enhanced acute care for older adults: an innovative healthcare delivery model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish N; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Wood, Nancy; Wasserman, Erin B; Nelson, Dallas L; Dozier, Ann; McConnochie, Kenneth M

    2013-11-01

    Accessing timely acute medical care is a challenge for older adults. This article describes an innovative healthcare model that uses high-intensity telemedicine services to provide rapid acute care for older adults without requiring them to leave their senior living community (SLC) residences. This program, based in a primary care geriatrics practice that cares for SLC residents, is designed to offer acute care through telemedicine for complaints that are felt to need attention before the next available outpatient visit but not to require emergency department (ED) resources. This option gives residents access to care in their residence. Measures used to evaluate the program include successful completion of telemedicine visits, satisfaction of residents and caregivers with telemedicine care, and site of care that would have been recommended had telemedicine been unavailable. During the first 2 years of the program's operation, 281 of 301 requested telemedicine visits were completed successfully. Twelve residents were sent to an ED for care after the telemedicine visit. Ninety-four percent of residents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with telemedicine care. Had telemedicine not been available, residents would have been sent to an ED (48.1%) or urgent care center (27.0%) or been scheduled for an outpatient visit (24.4%). The project demonstrated that high-intensity telemedicine services for acute illnesses are feasible and acceptable and can provide definitive care without requiring ED or urgent care use. Continuation of the program will require evaluation demonstrating equal or better resident-level outcomes and the development of sustainable business models.

  16. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  17. SOCIALIZATION OF THE YOUNGER PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT--THE COMMUNITY AND THE HOSPITAL-A DUAL RESPONSIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIORDANO, JOSEPH; AND OTHERS

    TO ASSIST YOUNG, MENTAL PATIENTS IN OVERCOMING SOME OF THEIR SOCIAL DEFICITS, TWO RESOCIALIZATION PROJECTS (PRE- AND POST-DISCHARGE) WERE INITIATED TO MOVE THE PATIENT FROM A MENTAL HOSPITAL SETTING INTO THE LARGER COMMUNITY, WITH A COMMUNITY CENTER AS THE LEARNING GROUND. CAREFULLY SELECTED PATIENTS FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO…

  18. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Operating Costs § 412.109 Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs). (a) General...

  19. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Gausvik, Christian; Lautar, Ashley; Miller, Lisa; Pallerla, Harini; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR) on an acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer patient care. These results point to the interconnectedness and dual benefit to both job satisfaction and patient quality of care that can come from enhancements to team communication.

  20. Improving Community Health While Satisfying a Critical Community Need: A Case Study for Nonprofit Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kephart, Donna K.; Dillon, Judith F.; McCullough, Jody R.; Blatt, Barbara J.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Background School-based student health screenings identify issues that may affect physical and intellectual development and are an important way to maintain student health. Nonprofit hospitals can provide a unique resource to school districts by assisting in the timely completion of school-based screenings and meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act. This case study describes the collaboration between an academic medical center and a local school district to conduct school-based health screenings. Community Context Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey PRO Wellness Center collaborated with Lebanon School District to facilitate student health screenings, a need identified in part by a community health needs assessment. Methods From June 2012 through February 2013, district-wide student health screenings were planned and implemented by teams of hospital nursing leadership, school district leadership, and school nurses. In fall 2013, students were screened through standardized procedures for height, weight, scoliosis, vision, and hearing. Outcomes In 2 days, 3,105 students (67% of all students in the district) were screened. Letters explaining screening results were mailed to parents of all students screened. Debriefing meetings and follow-up surveys for the participating nurses provided feedback for future screenings. Interpretation The 2-day collaborative screening event decreased the amount of time spent by school nurses in screening students throughout the year and allowed them more time in their role as school wellness champion. Additionally, parents found out early in the school year whether their child needed physician follow-up. Partnerships between school districts and hospitals to conduct student health screenings are a practical option for increasing outreach while satisfying community needs. PMID:26513441

  1. A sociological exploration of the tensions related to interprofessional collaboration in acute-care discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Joanne; Reeves, Scott; Wu, Robert; Silver, Ivan; MacMillan, Kathleen; Kitto, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Patient discharge is a key concern in hospitals, particularly in acute care, given the multifaceted and challenging nature of patients' healthcare needs. Policies on discharge have identified the importance of interprofessional collaboration, yet research has described its limitations in this clinical context. This study aimed to extend our understanding of interprofessional interactions related to discharge in a general internal medicine setting by using sociological theories to illuminate the existence of, and interplay between, structural factors and microlevel practices. An ethnographic approach was employed to obtain an in-depth insight into healthcare providers' perspectives, behaviours, and interactions regarding discharge. Data collection involved observations, interviews, and document analysis. Approximately 65 hours of observations were undertaken, 23 interviews were conducted with healthcare providers, and government and hospital discharge documents were collected. Data were analysed using a directed content approach. The findings indicate the existence of a medically dominated division of healthcare labour in patient discharge with opportunities for some interprofessional negotiations; the role of organizational routines in facilitating and challenging interprofessional negotiations in patient discharge; and tensions in organizational priorities that impact an interprofessional approach to discharge. The findings provide insight into the various levels at which interventions can be targeted to improve interprofessional collaboration in discharge while recognizing the organizational tensions that challenge an interprofessional approach. PMID:26852628

  2. A sociological exploration of the tensions related to interprofessional collaboration in acute-care discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Joanne; Reeves, Scott; Wu, Robert; Silver, Ivan; MacMillan, Kathleen; Kitto, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Patient discharge is a key concern in hospitals, particularly in acute care, given the multifaceted and challenging nature of patients' healthcare needs. Policies on discharge have identified the importance of interprofessional collaboration, yet research has described its limitations in this clinical context. This study aimed to extend our understanding of interprofessional interactions related to discharge in a general internal medicine setting by using sociological theories to illuminate the existence of, and interplay between, structural factors and microlevel practices. An ethnographic approach was employed to obtain an in-depth insight into healthcare providers' perspectives, behaviours, and interactions regarding discharge. Data collection involved observations, interviews, and document analysis. Approximately 65 hours of observations were undertaken, 23 interviews were conducted with healthcare providers, and government and hospital discharge documents were collected. Data were analysed using a directed content approach. The findings indicate the existence of a medically dominated division of healthcare labour in patient discharge with opportunities for some interprofessional negotiations; the role of organizational routines in facilitating and challenging interprofessional negotiations in patient discharge; and tensions in organizational priorities that impact an interprofessional approach to discharge. The findings provide insight into the various levels at which interventions can be targeted to improve interprofessional collaboration in discharge while recognizing the organizational tensions that challenge an interprofessional approach.

  3. Linking the Activity Measure for Post-acute Care and the Quality of Life Outcomes in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Pengsheng; Lai, Jin-shei; Tian, Feng; Coster, Wendy J.; Jette, Alan M.; Straub, Donald; Cella, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To use item response theory (IRT) methods to link physical functioning items in the Activity Measure for Post-acute Care (AM-PAC) and the Quality of Life Outcomes in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QOL) Design Secondary data analysis of the physical functioning items of AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL. We used a non-equivalent group design with 36 core items common to both instruments. We used a test characteristic curve transformation method to for linking AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL scores. Linking was conducted so that both raw scores and scaled AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL scores (converted-logit scores with mean = 50 and SD = 10) could be compared. Setting AM-PAC items were administered to rehabilitation patients in post-acute care settings. Neuro-QOL items were administered to a community sample of adults via the Internet. Participants The AM-PAC sample consisted of 1,041 post acute care patients; the Neuro-QOL sample was 549 community-dwelling adults. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures 25 Mobility items and 11 ADL items common to both instruments were included in the analysis. Results Neuro-QOL items were linked to the AM-PAC scale using the Generalized Partial Credit Model. Mobility and ADL subscale scores from the two instruments were calibrated to the AM-PAC metric. Conclusions An IRT-based linking method placed AM-PAC and NeuroQOL Mobility and ADL scores on a common metric. This linking allowed estimation of AM-PAC Mobility and ADL subscale scores based on Neuro-QOL Mobility and ADL subscale scores, and vice versa. The accuracy of these results should be validated in a future sample in which participants respond to both instruments. PMID:21958921

  4. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 412.92 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) The hospital must provide patient origin data (for example, the number of patients from each zip code... its service area. (B) The hospital must provide patient origin data from all other hospitals...

  5. The contribution of hospitals and health care systems to community health.

    PubMed

    Shortell, Stephen M; Washington, Pamela K; Baxter, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence on hospitals' and health systems' impacts on community health improvement. We begin with an overview of the history of community benefit and then discuss the lack of a widely accepted definition and measurement of community benefit activities as well as the expectations and accountability of tax-exempt not-for-profit hospitals and health systems in community initiatives. We highlight the approaches of two systems and identify strategic, cultural, technical, and structural challenges associated with increasing community benefit and health-improvement activities. We conclude by offering recommendations for policy and practice. PMID:19296780

  6. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... increase equal to the full market basket update of 2.1 percent based on IHS Global Insight, Inc.'s second... 2.1 percent based on IHS Global Insight, Inc.'s second quarter 2009 forecast of the FY 2010 market...). ] Therefore, based on IHS Global Insight, Inc.'s second quarter 2009 forecast of the FY 2010 market...

  7. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... rule (hereinafter referred to as the FY 2013 IPPS/ LTCH PPS final rule) (FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR 53258)), there were several typographical and technical errors in the regulations... the regulations text changes for the FY 2013 LTCH PPS provisions (77 FR 53680), we made the...

  8. 77 FR 65495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ...) 786-4487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-19079 of August 31, 2012 (77 FR... document. We note that in the October 3, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 60315), we corrected a number of the... waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc....

  9. 78 FR 61197 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-18956, which appeared in the August 19, 2013 Federal Register (78 FR 50496), there were a number of technical errors that are identified and corrected in the.... As stated in the FY 2014 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (78 FR 50642), we allowed the public an...

  10. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... March 14, 2011, at 76 FR 13515, is confirmed as final without change. Applicability dates: The update to... of the Payment Window Policy to Services Furnished at Physicians' Practices P. Changes to MS-DRGs... LTCH PPS in the same documents that update the IPPS (73 FR 26797 through 26798). 4. Critical...

  11. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Inpatient Services under Medicare Part A. Ann Marshall, (410) 786-3059, Requirement for Physician Order for... fiscal year FPL Federal poverty line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full... Provider-Specific File PS&R Provider Statistical and Reimbursement PQRS Physician Quality Reporting...

  12. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .63 with a p value of 0.20. Discussion This single center retrospective study indicates that the HOSPITAL score has good discriminatory ability to predict hospital readmissions within 30 days for a medical hospitalist service at a university-affiliated hospital. This data for all causes of hospital readmission is comparable to the discriminatory ability of the HOSPITAL score in the international validation study (C statistics of 0.72 vs. 0.77) conducted at considerably larger hospitals (975 average beds vs. 507 at MMC) for potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. Conclusions The internationally validated HOSPITAL score may be a useful tool in moderate sized community hospitals to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission within 30 days. This easy to use scoring system using readily available data can be used as part of interventional strategies to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. PMID:27651999

  13. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .63 with a p value of 0.20. Discussion This single center retrospective study indicates that the HOSPITAL score has good discriminatory ability to predict hospital readmissions within 30 days for a medical hospitalist service at a university-affiliated hospital. This data for all causes of hospital readmission is comparable to the discriminatory ability of the HOSPITAL score in the international validation study (C statistics of 0.72 vs. 0.77) conducted at considerably larger hospitals (975 average beds vs. 507 at MMC) for potentially avoidable hospital readmissions. Conclusions The internationally validated HOSPITAL score may be a useful tool in moderate sized community hospitals to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission within 30 days. This easy to use scoring system using readily available data can be used as part of interventional strategies to reduce the rate of hospital readmission.

  14. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology().

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Valentino, M; Rimondi, M R; Branchini, M; Baleni, M Casadio; Barozzi, L

    2008-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care.The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography - as an adjunct to chest radiography - on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs.

  15. Bloodstream Infections in Community Hospitals in the 21st Century: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.; Sloane, Richard; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Weber, David J.; Fowler, Vance G.; Smathers, Emily; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While the majority of healthcare in the US is provided in community hospitals, the epidemiology and treatment of bloodstream infections in this setting is unknown. Methods and Findings We undertook this multicenter, retrospective cohort study to 1) describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a network of community hospitals and 2) determine risk factors for inappropriate therapy for bloodstream infections in community hospitals. 1,470 patients were identified as having a BSI in 9 community hospitals in the southeastern US from 2003 through 2006. The majority of BSIs were community-onset, healthcare associated (n = 823, 56%); 432 (29%) patients had community-acquired BSI, and 215 (15%) had hospital-onset, healthcare-associated BSI. BSIs due to multidrug-resistant pathogens occurred in 340 patients (23%). Overall, the three most common pathogens were S. aureus (n = 428, 28%), E. coli (n = 359, 24%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n = 148, 10%), though type of infecting organism varied by location of acquisition (e.g., community-acquired). Inappropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy was given to 542 (38%) patients. Proportions of inappropriate therapy varied by hospital (median = 33%, range 21–71%). Multivariate logistic regression identified the following factors independently associated with failure to receive appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy: hospital where the patient received care (p<0.001), assistance with ≥3 ADLs (p = 0.005), Charlson score (p = 0.05), community-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.01), and hospital-onset, healthcare-associated infection (p = 0.02). Important interaction was observed between Charlson score and location of acquisition. Conclusions Our large, multicenter study provides the most complete picture of BSIs in community hospitals in the US to date. The epidemiology of BSIs in community hospitals has changed: community-onset, healthcare

  16. Improving post-hospital care for people who are homeless: Community-based participatory research to community-based action.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly M; Greysen, S Ryan; Cunningham, Alison; Tynan-McKiernan, Kathleen; Lucas, Georgina I; Rosenthal, Marjorie S

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses how community-based participatory research (CBPR) on hospital care transitions in New Haven, Connecticut led to the development of a new medical respite program to better serve patients who are homeless. Key insights include: • Homelessness is an important driver of hospital utilization and must be addressed in efforts to decrease hospital readmissions. • Hospitals and community organizations often serve a shared patient/client base and can work together to develop innovative programs that are beneficial to all parties. • Community-based participatory research methods are particularly conducive to producing research that is translatable to policy and new programs. • Targeted dissemination of research results played a pivotal role in securing resources and funding for the new program. PMID:26699351

  17. Community benefit in exchange for non-profit hospital tax exemption: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simone Rauscher

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the adequacy of the community benefits that not-for-profit hospitals provide in exchange for tax exemption remains a challenge. While recent changes to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reporting requirements have improved transparency, the lack of clearly defined charitable expectations has resulted in critical scrutiny of not-for-profit hospitals' community benefits and numerous challenges to their tax exempt status. Using data from the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H for 2009, this article documents the wide range of community benefit activities that not-for-profit hospitals in California engage in and compares them to a set of minimum spending thresholds. The findings show that when community benefit was defined narrowly in terms of charity care, very few hospitals would have met any of the minimum spending thresholds. When community benefit was defined as in the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H, however, a majority of hospitals in California would have been considered charitable. Whether focusing on expenditures is the most appropriate way to assess the adequacy of a hospital's community benefits remains an open question. To that end, this article concludes by outlining a more comprehensive evaluation approach that builds on recent changes to non-profit hospital tax exemption implemented by the Affordable Care Act.

  18. Community benefit in exchange for non-profit hospital tax exemption: current trends and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simone Rauscher

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the adequacy of the community benefits that not-for-profit hospitals provide in exchange for tax exemption remains a challenge. While recent changes to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reporting requirements have improved transparency, the lack of clearly defined charitable expectations has resulted in critical scrutiny of not-for-profit hospitals' community benefits and numerous challenges to their tax exempt status. Using data from the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H for 2009, this article documents the wide range of community benefit activities that not-for-profit hospitals in California engage in and compares them to a set of minimum spending thresholds. The findings show that when community benefit was defined narrowly in terms of charity care, very few hospitals would have met any of the minimum spending thresholds. When community benefit was defined as in the revised IRS Form 990 Schedule H, however, a majority of hospitals in California would have been considered charitable. Whether focusing on expenditures is the most appropriate way to assess the adequacy of a hospital's community benefits remains an open question. To that end, this article concludes by outlining a more comprehensive evaluation approach that builds on recent changes to non-profit hospital tax exemption implemented by the Affordable Care Act. PMID:23614265

  19. Nurses' perceptions of how physical environment affects medication errors in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Atiya; Chaudhury, Habib; Valente, Maria

    2011-11-01

    The work that nurses perform in hospital environments is physically and psychologically intense, with the potential for burnout and stress. This issue is compounded by crowded and poorly designed work spaces in nursing units that can contribute to medical mistakes, including medication errors. This article is based on a study that examined the nurses' perception of how the physical environment in hospitals affects medication errors. Literature suggests that reduction of staff stress can be achieved through physical environmental considerations, such as improved air quality, acoustics, and lighting. However, there is no empirical study specifically exploring the relationship between aspects of the physical environment and medication errors. In this study, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with nursing staff (N = 84) in four hospitals in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. The survey included questions on nursing unit design, medication room configurations, perceived incidence of errors, and adverse events. Respondents noted several physical environmental factors that are potentially problematic in the nursing station area and can lead to medication, documentation, and other types of nursing errors. These factors include inadequate space in charting and documentation area, lengthy walking distances to patient rooms, insufficient patient surveillance opportunity/lack of visibility to all parts of the nursing unit, small size of the medication room, inappropriate organization of medical supplies, high noise levels in nursing unit, poor lighting, and lack of privacy in the nursing stations. As administrators in acute care facilities consider strategies for organizational and staff interventions to reduce medication errors, it is important to consider physical environmental factors to have a comprehensive understanding of the issue.

  20. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients With Prolonged Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Afilalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in 2 tertiary care hospitals. Adult patients hospitalized on a psychiatric unit for 30 days were identified. Data was collected from their medical charts and interviews with their health care team. The categorization of acute and nonacute status at day 30 was based on the health care professional’s evaluation. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Results: A total of 262 patients were identified (mean age 45 years), 66% lived at home and 11% were homeless. More than one-half were cognitively impaired and a few had special medical needs. Ninety-seven per cent had been admitted from the emergency department. At day 30, 81% of patients required acute care, while 19% (95% CI 15% to 24%) occupied an acute care bed, despite the resolution of their acute condition. The main reason preventing discharge of nonacute patients was the difficulty or inability to find appropriate resources that met patients’ needs. As for patients who required acute care, the most common psychiatric issues were delusions or hallucinations (34%), inability to take medications independently (23.6%), and inadequate control of aggression or impulsivity (16.5%). Conclusions: Prevention of the discharge of nonacute patients is largely due to the difficulty in finding appropriate resources that meet patients’ needs. Improved access to community and subacute care resources could potentially facilitate the hospital discharge of psychiatric nonacute patients. PMID:26174218

  1. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  2. Promoting the Health of Families and Communities: A Moral Imperative.

    PubMed

    Mason, Diana J

    2016-09-01

    The Hill Burton Act, which was signed into law in 1946 and ended in 1997, was one of the most significant forces that shaped the health care system we have today. Providing grants and loans for the construction and expansion of hospitals across the country, it required beneficiary hospitals to give some amount of uncompensated care to the poor and uninsured in return. The act not only led to our health care system's current emphasis on the acute-care hospital as the primary site of health care delivery, but it also had a profound effect on nursing, fully involving the profession in an acute-care world. The act created jobs for nurses at an unprecedented level. There are over 3.4 million nurses in the United States, and in 2013, 63 percent of all nurses worked for hospitals. Nursing education continues to emphasize acute care, despite the calls for shifting the curriculum to more community-based content and experiences that focus on health promotion and wellness for individuals, families, and communities. It is my premise that the nursing profession and all who profess to be committed to promoting health have a moral obligation to help the nation adopt a Hill-Burton Act of the twenty-first century that will focus on building healthy communities, supporting families in ways that promote health, and helping individuals to live healthier lives. This would require a shift in resources from a costly health care system to investing in community development, whether job creation, building safe places to play and exercise, providing access to affordable and nutritious foods, advancing the quality of education, or other approaches to addressing and improving the social determinants of health. Making this kind of investment would speak to the principles of beneficence, least harm, and justice, particularly for socioeconomically stressed communities.

  3. Promoting the Health of Families and Communities: A Moral Imperative.

    PubMed

    Mason, Diana J

    2016-09-01

    The Hill Burton Act, which was signed into law in 1946 and ended in 1997, was one of the most significant forces that shaped the health care system we have today. Providing grants and loans for the construction and expansion of hospitals across the country, it required beneficiary hospitals to give some amount of uncompensated care to the poor and uninsured in return. The act not only led to our health care system's current emphasis on the acute-care hospital as the primary site of health care delivery, but it also had a profound effect on nursing, fully involving the profession in an acute-care world. The act created jobs for nurses at an unprecedented level. There are over 3.4 million nurses in the United States, and in 2013, 63 percent of all nurses worked for hospitals. Nursing education continues to emphasize acute care, despite the calls for shifting the curriculum to more community-based content and experiences that focus on health promotion and wellness for individuals, families, and communities. It is my premise that the nursing profession and all who profess to be committed to promoting health have a moral obligation to help the nation adopt a Hill-Burton Act of the twenty-first century that will focus on building healthy communities, supporting families in ways that promote health, and helping individuals to live healthier lives. This would require a shift in resources from a costly health care system to investing in community development, whether job creation, building safe places to play and exercise, providing access to affordable and nutritious foods, advancing the quality of education, or other approaches to addressing and improving the social determinants of health. Making this kind of investment would speak to the principles of beneficence, least harm, and justice, particularly for socioeconomically stressed communities. PMID:27649921

  4. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 412.92, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather conditions, the other like hospitals are... from other like hospitals but because of local topography or periods of prolonged severe...

  5. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather conditions, the other like hospitals are... from other like hospitals but because of local topography or periods of prolonged severe weather...) Because of distance, posted speed limits, and predictable weather conditions, the travel time between...

  6. Columbia University's Competency and Evidence-based Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Christine R.; Roberts, W. Dan

    2002-01-01

    Columbia University's acute care nurse practitioner curriculum incorporates evaluation strategies and standards to assess clinical competence and foster evidence-based practice. The curriculum consists of four core courses, supporting sciences, and specialty courses. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  7. Best practices for stroke patient and family education in the acute care setting: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    After a stroke, patients and families face many changes--physical, mental, and emotional. It is imperative that the nurse is able to appropriately educate the patient and family in preparation for discharge from the acute care center.

  8. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  9. The application of the acute care nurse practitioner role in a cardiovascular patient population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Leveille, Marygrace; Bennett, Jasmiry D; Nelson, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an overview of the role of an acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) in an acute care setting caring for patients with cardiovascular issues. Discussion includes the evolution of the ACNP role, the consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse regulation, and a case study highlighting the role of the ACNP while caring for a hemodynamically unstable patient. The case study articulates the ACNP's role as liaison between the patient, family members, collaborating physicians, and nurses.

  10. 78 FR 51061 - TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... Part 199 RIN 0720-AB41 TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals; Correction AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: On Thursday, August 8, 2013 (78 FR 48303-48311),...

  11. 76 FR 39043 - TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Military Contingency Payment Adjustment On August 31, 2009, we published a final rule (74 FR 44752), which... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 TRICARE; Reimbursement of Sole Community Hospitals and Adjustment to Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense (DoD)....

  12. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain...

  13. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  14. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting. PMID:26963227

  15. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  16. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Chin Yee; Tan, Jane An Qi; Foong, Yi-Lin; Koh, Hui Mien; Chen, Denise Zhen Yue; Tan, Jessie Joon Chen; Ng, Chong Jin; Yap, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT) programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD) in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4) were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy) on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music) and days 2 and 3 (with CMT). Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES) and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS). Results Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01) in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01) in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014). Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01) and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045) were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation. PMID:27489560

  17. The Community Health Information Network: A Model for Hospital and Public Library Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartenfeld, Ellen

    1978-01-01

    The Community Health Information Network, a cooperative library network established between a community hospital and six public libraries, is described. This model program provides health education and information services to patient/consumers and library services to health personnel through their public libraries. Funding, factors leading to the…

  18. Rural-Urban Differences in Preventable Hospitalizations among Community-Dwelling Veterans with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Van Houtven, Courtney H.; Sleath, Betsy L.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer's patients living in rural communities may face significant barriers to effective outpatient medical care. Purpose: We sought to examine rural-urban differences in risk for ambulatory care sensitive hospitalizations (ACSH), an indicator of access to outpatient care, in community-dwelling veterans with dementia. Methods: Medicare…

  19. End of an experiment: report from an inner city community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Christina R.

    1988-01-01

    Community hospitals are associated with the provision of health care in rural rather than urban areas. However, the urban community hospital can reduce the pressure on acute hospitals and decrease the isolation of community health workers. In 1982 a community hospital was established in an inner London health district. This paper examines the role and function of this hospital over a oneyear period in 1986-87 and makes comparisons with the hospital's first two years of operation. The problems identified in the initial evaluation, such as low bed occupancy and the limited participation by general practitioners in the area, were still present. It was found that there had been a decrease in the number of patients treated for musculoskeletal, nervous system and respiratory problems but an increase in circulatory disorders and injuries or poisoning. There was also a marked decrease in the percentage of acute admissions but an increase in admissions for convalescence, rehabilitation and carer relief. Following a severe financial crisis in the health district the hospital was closed temporarily in November 1987. PMID:3256656

  20. Getting more for your money: designing community needs assessments to build collaboration and capacity in hospital system community benefit work.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Dale; Diaz, Heather; Schmidtlein, Mathew C

    2013-11-01

    Most community health needs assessments (CHNAs) are unilateral in nature and fail to include a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, limiting them in their scope. Nonprofit hospitals are required to conduct CHNAs every 3 years to determine where community prevention dollars should be spent. In 2010, a CBPR CHNA approach was conducted with four hospital systems in Northern California. Merging concepts from organization development, the approach included (a) goal determination, (b) use of a guiding framework, (c) creation of a container in which to interact, (d) established feedback loops, and (e) intentional trust-building exercises. The approach was to build lasting relationships between hospital systems that would extend beyond the CHNA. Results using this approach revealed that members representing all four hospital systems (a) began to meet regularly after the CHNA was completed, (b) increased collaboration with other community organizations, (c) expanded their level of intraorganization partnerships, (d) enjoyed the process, (e) felt that their professional knowledge expanded, and (f) felt connected professionally and personally with other hospital representatives. As a result, other joint projects are underway. The results of this study indicate that using CBPR to design a CHNA can build sustained collaborative relationships between study participants that continue.

  1. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  2. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  3. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  4. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  5. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section... hospitals subject to fiscal year 2006 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)...

  6. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  7. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  8. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This section...) Based costs for hospitals subject to fiscal year 1996 rebasing—(1) General rule. Except as provided...

  9. Development of an Acute Care Plastic Surgery Service in the Saskatoon Health Region: Effects on flexor tendon management

    PubMed Central

    Wilgenbusch, Chelsea S; Dust, Peter W; Sunderland, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute care surgery model has gained favour in general surgery, but has yet to be widely adopted in other specialties. An Acute Care Plastic Surgery (ACS) Service was recently implemented in the Saskatoon Health Region in an effort to improve trauma care. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of ACS on the management of flexor tendon lacerations. The authors hypothesize that ACS has resulted in more timely intervention, improved outcomes and decreased ‘after hours’ surgery. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients treated for flexor tendon lacerations from 2007 to 2013 was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on whether they received treatment before (group A) or after (group B) ACS implementation. Variables included dates and times of patient referral, consultation and tendon repair; postoperative complications; and admissions. A surgeon survey was administered on the perceived impact of ACS. RESULTS: Group A was more likely to have surgery performed after hours (P=0.0019) and be admitted to hospital (P=0.0211) compared with group B. Time from referral to consultation and injury-to-surgery interval were slightly increased post-ACS (Group B). Surgeons were highly satisfied with the new system, citing benefits to patients and surgeons. CONCLUSION: ACS was designed to improve trauma care, while favourably impacting surgeon workload. Surprisingly, the injury-to-surgery interval was slightly increased. However, this was not clinically significant and did not lead to increased postoperative complications. This finding was likely due to a favourable change in practice patterns observed after ACS implementation. ACS has resulted in fewer hospital admissions, decreased after-hours surgeries and improved surgeon satisfaction. PMID:26361628

  10. The political correctness of a physician hospital organization may precipitate its demise in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, J S

    1995-01-01

    Health maintenance organizations are placing an increased pressure on physicians and hospitals to assume the risk of providing health care services under capitated agreements. They believe that if the providers' profits are based upon their cost-efficient provision of medical services, they will control their use of medical resources and reduce health care spending. Managing the risks of a capitated contract necessitates the integration of the hospital's and the physician's incentives. However, is the most appropriate legal structure that will enable physicians and hospitals to form risk-sharing contracts with managed care entities and manage these contracts profitably a physician-hospital organization? It is estimated that over 50 percent of the physician-hospital organizations that are created each year fail within the first two years of their operation because of political and financial reasons. A multispecialty group composed of select physicians, who are willing to integrate their practices and who have a low length of stay in the hospital, may be in a better position to manage the risks imposed by capitated contracts.

  11. The association between depressive symptoms in the community, non-psychiatric hospital admission and hospital outcomes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prina, A. Matthew; Cosco, Theodore D.; Dening, Tom; Beekman, Aartjan; Brayne, Carol; Huisman, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to systematically review observational studies that have analysed whether depressive symptoms in the community are associated with higher general hospital admissions, longer hospital stays and increased risk of re-admission. Methods We identified prospective studies that looked at depressive symptoms in the community as a risk factor for non-psychiatric general hospital admissions, length of stay or risk of re-admission. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library Database, and followed up with contact with authors and scanning of reference lists. Results Eleven studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and all were deemed to be of moderate to high quality. Meta-analysis of seven studies with relevant data suggested that depressive symptoms may be a predictor of subsequent admission to a general hospital in unadjusted analyses (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.28–1.44), but findings after adjustment for confounding variables were inconsistent. The narrative synthesis also reported depressive symptoms to be independently associated with longer length of stay, and higher re-admission risk. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation, longer length of stay and a higher re-admission risk. Some of these associations may be mediated by other factors, and should be explored in more details. PMID:25466985

  12. 78 FR 20523 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... rulemaking in the Federal Register (REG-130266-11; 77 FR 38148) (``2012 proposed regulations'') that contains... Charitable Hospitals AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations that provide guidance to charitable...

  13. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals, or it is located in a rural area (as defined in § 412.64) and meets one of the following... new road between itself and a like provider within 35 miles. (C) An increase in the number of beds to... in miles measured over improved roads. An improved road for this purpose is any road that...

  14. Teaching hospital performance: towards a community of shared values?

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marianna; Cardamone, Emma; Cavallaro, Giusy; Minvielle, Etienne; Rania, Francesco; Sicotte, Claude; Trotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the performance dimensions of Italian teaching hospitals (THs) by considering the multiple constituent model approach, using measures that are subjective and based on individual ideals and preferences. Our research replicates a study of a French TH and deepens it by adjusting it to the context of an Italian TH. The purposes of this research were as follows: to identify emerging views on the performance of teaching hospitals and to analyze how these views vary among hospital stakeholders. We conducted an in-depth case study of a TH using a quantitative survey method. The survey uses a questionnaire based on Parsons' social system action theory, which embraces the major models of organizational performance and covers three groups of internal stakeholders: physicians, caregivers and administrative staff. The questionnaires were distributed between April and September 2011. The results confirm that hospital performance is multifaceted and includes the dimensions of efficiency, effectiveness and quality of care, as well as organizational and human features. There is a high degree of consensus among all observed stakeholder groups about these values, and a shared view of performance is emerging. Our research provides useful information for defining management priorities to improve the performance of THs. PMID:24560230

  15. Governance and community benefit: are nonprofit hospitals good candidates for Sarbanes-Oxley type reforms?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Young, Gary J; Weiner, Bryan J; Hearld, Larry R

    2008-04-01

    Recent investigations into the activities of nonprofit hospitals have pointed to weak or lax governance on the part of some of these organizations. As a result of these events, various federal and state initiatives are now either under way or under discussion to strengthen the governance of hospitals and other nonprofit corporations through mandatory board structures and practices. However, despite policy makers' growing interest in these types of governance reforms, there is in fact little empirical evidence to support their contribution to the effectiveness of hospital boards. The purpose of this article is to report the results of a study examining the relationship between the structure and practices of nonprofit hospital boards relative to the hospital's provision of community benefits. Our results point to modest relationships between these sets of variables, suggesting considerable limitations to what federal and state policy makers can accomplish through legislative initiatives to improve the governance of nonprofit hospitals.

  16. An alternate approach to hospital cost control: the Rochester project.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, A A; Saward, E W

    1978-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has demonstrated a need to control costs in general and hospital costs in particular. In New York State, efforts at control have followed one of several paths, including reduction of Medicaid program expenditures, elimination of hospital beds, and prospective reimbursement of hospital costs. Although some success has been achieved in each of these areas, hospital costs containment has not been as successful as had been hoped. A new project called MAXICAP, being developed in the Rochester region, seeks to link payment with regional hospital planning. MAXICAP represents a voluntary attempt by hospitals, third party payers, planners, consumers, and governmental agencies to devise a prospective hospital payment system. Under this system community hospital plans in the Rochester region would be integrated and a cap imposed on both revenues and expenses for acute hospital care. The principal advantage of the MAXICAP is that it offers a mechanism for linking hospital planning with payment functions on a regional basis. The principal disadvantage is that the success of the MAXICAP depends upon the voluntary cooperation of the vast majority of the acute care hospitals in the area--hospitals that may be scattered throughout a relatively large region. PMID:98805

  17. Which Patients, and Where: A Qualitative Study of Patient Transfers from Community Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Emily A.; Veinot, Tiffany; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Interhospital transfer of patients is a routine part of the care at community hospitals, but the current process may lead to sub-optimal patient outcomes. A micro-level analysis of the processes of patient transfer has not previously been performed. Research Design We carried out semi-structured qualitative interviews with care providers at 3 purposively sampled community hospitals in order to describe patient transfer mechanisms, focusing on perceptions of transfers and transfer candidates, choice of transfer destination, and perceived process. We interviewed physicians, nurses and care technicians from emergency departments and intensive care units at the hospitals, and analyzed the resultant transcripts via content analysis. Results Appropriate triage and transfer of patients was a highly valued skill at community hospitals. Based on participant accounts, the transfer process had four components: (1) Identifying Transfer-Eligible Patients; (2) Identifying a Destination Hospital; (3) Negotiating the Transfer; and (4) Accomplishing the Transfer. There were common challenges at each component across hospitals. Protocolization of care was perceived to substantially facilitate transfers. Informal arrangements played a key role in the identification of the receiving hospital, but patient preferences and hospital quality were not discussed as important in decision-making. The process of arranging a patient transfer placed a significant burden on the staff of community hospitals. Conclusions The patient transfer process is often cumbersome, varies by condition, and may not be focused on optimizing patient outcomes. Development of a more fluid transfer infrastructure may aid in implementing policies such as selective referral and regionalization. PMID:21430581

  18. Safety net hospital, community providers collaborate to improve transitions.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    A Care Transitional Task Force at San Francisco General Hospital created a cross-continuum program that has reduced readmissions and increased timely primary care visits for discharged patients. A basic bundle of services includes communication between inpatient and outpatient providers, providing the right information to the next level of providers, and giving patients and family members the right level of education. Transitional care nurses work with heart failure patients of any age and patients over 55 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, renal failure, or who are recovering from a myocardial infarction. The nurses work closely with patients and family members during the hospital stay and follow up weekly for 30 days after discharge. PMID:26964416

  19. [Desirable medical technologists in a community support hospital].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Recently, there have been marked advances in the technological strategies employed in medical examinations. The educational concept to nurture highly capable medical technologists is considered to be a priority issue by not only educators but also employers, even though the medical educational levels have markedly improved in every college and university. It is commonly acknowledged that the results of any examination in the clinical laboratory should be accurate and fed back to medical doctors as soon as possible. The business outline of medical technologists in our hospital is becoming more extensive because we act as a core hospital in the area, and so knowledge regarding many kinds of chemical and transfusion examinations is required in operations performed around the clock. Furthermore, medical doctors, clerical workers, nurses, and volunteers comprise a team of sophisticated workers in our hospital. To accomplish our daily work, character traits such as accuracy, honesty, perseverance, and ability to follow instruction manuals, are the most fundamental and valuable. To nurture a highly career-oriented medical technologist, we propose that the following should be focused on: self-responsibility, reduction of malpractices, economic profitability, brainstorming, education of subsequent generations, and the spirit of cooperativeness and reconciliation. Additionally, it is another basic requirement of competent medical technologists to learn to adapt to laboratory-based changes in their work throughout their career. In conclusion, how to adapt to any social demand and learn strategies in any era should be taught in college or university as well as after graduation because each hospital and institute has a different philosophy and requirements of newcomers. It is important for medical technologists and doctors to develop flexible ways of thinking, although we sometimes might accede to traditional ways. PMID:18709992

  20. [Desirable medical technologists in a community support hospital].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Recently, there have been marked advances in the technological strategies employed in medical examinations. The educational concept to nurture highly capable medical technologists is considered to be a priority issue by not only educators but also employers, even though the medical educational levels have markedly improved in every college and university. It is commonly acknowledged that the results of any examination in the clinical laboratory should be accurate and fed back to medical doctors as soon as possible. The business outline of medical technologists in our hospital is becoming more extensive because we act as a core hospital in the area, and so knowledge regarding many kinds of chemical and transfusion examinations is required in operations performed around the clock. Furthermore, medical doctors, clerical workers, nurses, and volunteers comprise a team of sophisticated workers in our hospital. To accomplish our daily work, character traits such as accuracy, honesty, perseverance, and ability to follow instruction manuals, are the most fundamental and valuable. To nurture a highly career-oriented medical technologist, we propose that the following should be focused on: self-responsibility, reduction of malpractices, economic profitability, brainstorming, education of subsequent generations, and the spirit of cooperativeness and reconciliation. Additionally, it is another basic requirement of competent medical technologists to learn to adapt to laboratory-based changes in their work throughout their career. In conclusion, how to adapt to any social demand and learn strategies in any era should be taught in college or university as well as after graduation because each hospital and institute has a different philosophy and requirements of newcomers. It is important for medical technologists and doctors to develop flexible ways of thinking, although we sometimes might accede to traditional ways.

  1. Heat-recovery incinerator for a community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, D.

    1996-12-01

    This article describes a project which features a heat recovery boiler that uses incinerator exhaust gas to produce free steam for a not-for-profit hospital in Boca Raton, Fla. Free steam is also used to reheat scrubber exhaust gas to provide for plume suppression and improved pollutant dispersion. The project saves $266,129 in annual energy and waste hauling costs. The project also has a simple payback of five years.

  2. A comparison of systemwide and hospital-specific performance measurement tools.

    PubMed

    Yap, Clarence; Siu, Emily; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D

    2005-01-01

    Balanced scorecards are being implemented at the system and organizational levels to help managers link their organizational strategies with performance data to better manage their healthcare systems. Prior to this study, hospitals in Ontario, Canada, received two editions of the system-level scorecard (SLS)--a framework, based on the original balanced scorecard, that includes four quadrants: system integration and management innovation (learning and growth), clinical utilization and outcomes (internal processes), patient satisfaction (customer), and financial performance and condition (financial). This study examines the uptake of the SLS framework and indicators into institution-specific scorecards for 22 acute care institutions and 2 non-acute-care institutions. This study found that larger (teaching and community) hospitals were significantly more likely to use the SLS framework to report performance data than did small hospitals (p < 0.0049 and 0.0507) and that teaching hospitals used the framework significantly more than community hospitals did (p < 0.0529). The majority of hospitals in this study used at least one indicator from the SLS in their own scorecards. However, all hospitals in the study incorporated indicators that required data collection and analysis beyond the SLS framework. The study findings suggest that SLS may assist hospitals in developing institution-specific scorecards for hospital management and that the balanced scorecard model can be modified to meet the needs of a variety of hospitals. Based on the insight from this study and other activities that explore top priorities for hospital management, the issues related to efficiency and human resources should be further examined using SLSs. PMID:16130808

  3. Experiences of hand hygiene among acute care nurses: An interpretative phenomenological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield, Sheryl L; Nolan, Rachael; Crawford, Hannah; Hallam, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Occurrences of healthcare-associated infections are associated with substantial direct and indirect costs. Improvement in hand hygiene among acute care nurses has potential to reduce incidence of healthcare-associated infections. Findings from reviews of intervention research have not conclusively identified components that are more or less efficient or effective. Much prior qualitative research has focused on descriptive analysis of policies and practices rather than providing interpretive explorations of how individuals’ perceptions of hygiene might drive practices. Methods: We conducted qualitative interview research with eight nurses in the United States who were employed in various patient-care roles. We analyzed the data using an interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology to explore how nurses described their perceptions of, and experiences with, hygiene. We developed themes that explored individual, workplace, and management influences on perception of hygiene. Results: Developed themes include practical hygiene, risky business, and hygiene on trial; the latter theme described the conflict between how nurses perceived their own hygiene practices and how they felt hospital management perceived these practices. Other findings included that participants distinguished between policy-mandated use of sanitizer and a personal sense of cleanliness; the latter was more likely to be associated with scrubbing or removal of contaminants than with use of protectants. Conclusion: While participants asserted support for facility hand hygiene policies, their behavior in certain instances might be mediated by broadly defined emergent situations and a belief that it is not currently possible to establish a causal link between an healthcare-associated infections and a specific individual or occurrence. Researchers and infection prevention practitioners might consider soliciting greater input from nurses in planning hand hygiene improvement interventions

  4. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  5. Comparative trends in hospital expenses, finances, utilization, and inputs, 1970-81

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Hewes, Helene T.; Kelly, Nancy L.; Franklin, Saul

    1987-01-01

    The annual surveys of the American Hospital Association historically have been the only national source of statistics on hospital structure and performance. Although valuable, this source has not provided the policy or research community with hospital-specific information on revenues, assets, and financial status. Data on these and other variables from heretofore unpublished Medicare cost report data are presented in this article. Hospital expenses, revenues, profits, indebtedness, utilization, investments, and employees are trended over the 1970-81 period by urban-rural location, teaching status, and ownership. It is indicated in these data that a major transformation in the hospital industry has occurred in response to cost-based Medicare-Medicaid and other factors that made acute care essentially unaffordable to the average citizen. The health maintenance organization movement and Medicare's prospective payment system are seen as logical reactions to this transformation. PMID:10312272

  6. Despite Federal Legislation, Shortages Of Drugs Used In Acute Care Settings Remain Persistent And Prolonged.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene I; Fox, Erin R; Hall, M Kennedy; Ross, Joseph S; Bucholz, Emily M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    Early evidence suggests that provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 are associated with reductions in the total number of new national drug shortages. However, drugs frequently used in acute unscheduled care such as the care delivered in emergency departments may be increasingly affected by shortages. Our estimates, based on reported national drug shortages from 2001 to 2014 collected by the University of Utah's Drug Information Service, show that although the number of new annual shortages has decreased since the act's passage, half of all drug shortages in the study period involved acute care drugs. Shortages affecting acute care drugs became increasingly frequent and prolonged compared with non-acute care drugs (median duration of 242 versus 173 days, respectively). These results suggest that the drug supply for many acutely and critically ill patients in the United States remains vulnerable despite federal efforts. PMID:27140985

  7. Nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Jane

    2005-09-01

    Identification of nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients in acute care settings contributes to transcultural nursing knowledge. This qualitative study aims to describe nurses' experiences of caring for culturally diverse adult patients on medical and surgical wards in an acute care setting. These experiences identify current practice and associated issues for nurses caring for culturally diverse clients. A purposive sample of ten registered nurses was interviewed and transcripts analysed. Main findings were acquiring cultural knowledge, committing to and engaging with culturally diverse patients. Strategies for change developed from these findings focus on increasing cultural competency of nurses by: implementing a formal education program; developing partnerships with patients and their families to increase cultural comfort; and increasing organisational accommodation of the culturally diverse with policy review and extension of resources. Further research to explore issues for bilingual nurses and to describe the experiences of culturally diverse patients and their families in general acute care settings is recommended. PMID:16295344

  8. Nurse practitioners--where do they belong within the organizational structure of the acute care setting?

    PubMed

    el-Sherif, C

    1995-01-01

    Nurse practitioners are expanding their scope of practice and moving into acute care settings. Striving to be part of the nursing organizational structure in the acute care setting will keep NP's practice firmly rooted in nursing theory. Remaining within the nursing realm will enable them to receive support and guidance from their nursing colleagues while advancing the profession through their knowledge and expertise. Within the nursing organizational structure, NPs can become leaders as clinicians and role models. Without the formal support of the nursing organizational structure, the unique skills and contributions nurse practitioners furnish to the profession will be lost, as others will then dictate the NP role and scope of practice within the acute care setting.

  9. Fewer Hospitalizations for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Communities With Smoke-Free Public Policies

    PubMed Central

    Rayens, Mary Kay; Adkins, Sarah; Simpson, Nick; Frazier, Susan; Mannino, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the impact of smoke-free municipal public policies on hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods. We conducted a secondary analysis of hospital discharges with a primary diagnosis of COPD in Kentucky between July 1, 2003, and June 30, 2011 using Poisson regression. We compared the hospitalization rates of regions with and without smoke-free laws, adjusting for personal and population covariates, seasonality, secular trends over time, and geographic region. Results. Controlling for covariates such as sex, age, length of stay, race/ethnicity, education, income, and urban–rural status, among others, we found that those living in a community with a comprehensive smoke-free law or regulation were 22% less likely to experience hospitalizations for COPD than those living in a community with a moderate–weak law or no law. Those living in a community with an established law were 21% less likely to be hospitalized for COPD than those with newer laws or no laws. Conclusions. Strong smoke-free public policies may provide protection against COPD hospitalizations, particularly after 12 months, with the potential to save lives and decrease health care costs. PMID:24825207

  10. Conversations with the community: the Methodist Hospital System's experience with social media.

    PubMed

    Angelle, Denny; Rose, Clare L

    2011-01-01

    The Methodist Hospital System has maintained a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube since 2009. After initial unofficial excursions into the world of social media, we discovered that social media can be a useful tool to extend a conversation with our patients and the community at large and share our hospital's culture with a larger base of like-minded people. But with this new power comes a heightened responsibility--platforms that can potentially reach millions of viewers and readers also provide a potential for misuse that can jeopardize patient privacy and place hospitals at risk. Because of their unique restrictions, even hospitals that use the tools regularly have much left to learn about social media. With constant monitoring and stewardship and a commitment to educating staff, hospitals can effectively use social media tools for marketing and education. PMID:22256507

  11. Nurse Value-Added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Yakusheva, Olga; Lindrooth, Richard; Weiss, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to (1) estimate the relative nurse effectiveness, or individual nurse value-added (NVA), to patients’ clinical condition change during hospitalization; (2) examine nurse characteristics contributing to NVA; and (3) estimate the contribution of value-added nursing care to patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Electronic data on 1,203 staff nurses matched with 7,318 adult medical–surgical patients discharged between July 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011 from an urban Magnet-designated, 854-bed teaching hospital. Study Design Retrospective observational longitudinal analysis using a covariate-adjustment value-added model with nurse fixed effects. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from the study hospital's electronic patient records and human resources databases. Principal Findings Nurse effects were jointly significant and explained 7.9 percent of variance in patient clinical condition change during hospitalization. NVA was positively associated with having a baccalaureate degree or higher (0.55, p = .04) and expertise level (0.66, p = .03). NVA contributed to patient outcomes of shorter length of stay and lower costs. Conclusions Nurses differ in their value-added to patient outcomes. The ability to measure individual nurse relative value-added opens the possibility for development of performance metrics, performance-based rankings, and merit-based salary schemes to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. PMID:25256089

  12. Tax-exempt hospitals and community benefits: a review of state reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred Joseph

    2009-02-01

    In June 2007 the Internal Revenue Service proposed a major overhaul of its reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and released draft Form 990 (the IRS form filed by tax-exempt organizations each year). In December 2007 the IRS promulgated the final Form 990 after incorporating some of the recommendations made in the almost seven hundred public comments on the discussion draft. One recommendation adopted in the final Form 990 is the postponement until tax year 2009 (returns filed in 2010) of the requirement for hospitals to submit detailed information on the percentage of total expenses attributable to charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid costs, and community-health improvement programs (the discussion draft required this information for tax year 2007). Although the IRS will not require tax-exempt hospitals to provide detailed information about community benefits until the 2009 tax year, sixteen states have laws requiring tax-exempt hospitals to enumerate the benefits that they provide to the community. Information about the impact of these laws on the provision of community benefits (e.g., charity and uncompensated care) is examined in this study whose primary purpose is to highlight information policy makers may glean from states that have adopted community-benefit reporting laws. PMID:19234293

  13. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this.

  14. Robotic Transhiatal Esophagectomy in a Community Hospital: Evolution of Technique.

    PubMed

    Horst, Vernon D; Patel, Hetal D; Hewlett, Stan C

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal cancer is an uncommon but highly lethal disease. Surgical resection is the gold standard of treatment for early-stage disease. Traditional surgical approach entailed significant convalescence, hospital stay, and morbidity and mortality. Transhiatal esophagectomy (THE) involves blind dissection of the esophagus with minimal mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Integration of robotic surgery is an alternate platform for minimally invasive approach while maintaining safety and following oncologic principles. We review our technique for minimally invasive THE using robotic technology, demonstrating the safety and efficacy of robotic technology surgery. We present a retrospective review of a single surgeon's data of patients treated with robotic-assisted THE, with a chart review to evaluate pathology, adequacy of surgical resection, nodal harvest, and perioperative course. Robotic THE (rTHE) shows promise as a valid option for esophageal resection, including premalignant and advanced stages of cancer. Adequate transhiatal mediastinal nodal resection can be performed with the robot. PMID:27657589

  15. Getting over the rainbow: one community hospital's vision.

    PubMed

    Reno, Kathy; Cerone, Phyllis; Ferket, Kathy; Wojcieszak, Elaine; Reshoft, Meaghan

    2005-01-01

    Nursing faces a challenging future due to both a projected nursing shortage and changing needs of patients. This will require greater flexibility, an increased knowledge base, and a strengthening of our caring foundations through more evidence-based practices. A nursing taxonomy needs to be determined so that we can support the research of nursing effectiveness through the use of technology. Institutions will need to increase their investments in continuing education, nursing research, and technology to enable more efficient and effective nursing practice. New relationships will need to be forged and new roles designed to maximize the profession's contributions to patient care. Questions that have been asked for decades regarding differentiated nursing practice and entry level into practice will need to be answered. This article describes a large suburban hospital's strategic initiatives that have been designed to meet the nursing challenges of the 21st century.

  16. Re-engineering surgical services in a community teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M; Wreford, M; Barnes, M; Voight, P

    1997-04-01

    The Grace Hospital Surgical Services redesign project began in December 1995 and concluded in November 1996. It was led by the Chief of Surgery, the Surgical/Anesthesia Services Director, and the Associate Director of Critical Care/Trauma. The project was undertaken in order to radically redesign the delivery of surgical services in the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Northwest Region. It encompassed the Grace Hospital Main Operating Room (10 operating theatres) and Post-Anesthesia Recovery Unit, and a satellite Ambulatory Surgery Center in Southfield, Michigan. The four areas of focus were materials management, case scheduling, patient flow/staffing, and business planning. The guiding objectives of the project were to improve upon the quality of surgical services for patients and physicians, to substantially reduce costs, and to increase case volume. Because the Grace Surgical Services redesign project was conducted in a markedly open communicative, and inclusive fashion and drew participation from a broad range of medical professionals, support staff, and management, it created positive ripple effects across the institution by raising staff cost-consciousness, satisfaction, and morale. Other important accomplishments of the project included: Introduction of block scheduling in the ORs, which improved room utilization and turnaround efficiencies, and greatly smoothed the boarding process for physicians. Centralization of all surgical boarding, upgrading of computer equipment to implement "one call" surgery scheduling, and enlarging the capacity for archiving, managing and retrieving OR data. Installation of a 23-hour, overnight recovery unit and provision of physician assistants at the Ambulatory Surgery Center, opening the doors to an expanded number of surgical procedures, and enabling higher quality care for patients. Reduction of FTE positions by 27 percent at the Ambulatory Surgery Center. This yielded a total cost reduction of +1.5 million per annum in the

  17. Is Satisfaction with the Acute-Care Experience Higher amongst Consumers Treated in the Private Sector? A Survey of Public and Private Sector Arthroplasty Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Justine M.; Descallar, Joseph; Grootemaat, Mechteld; Badge, Helen; Harris, Ian A.; Simpson, Grahame; Jenkin, Deanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Consumer satisfaction with the acute-care experience could reasonably be expected to be higher amongst those treated in the private sector compared to those treated in the public sector given the former relies on high-level satisfaction of its consumers and their subsequent recommendations to thrive. The primary aims of this study were to determine, in a knee or hip arthroplasty cohort, if surgery in the private sector predicts greater overall satisfaction with the acute-care experience and greater likelihood to recommend the same hospital. A secondary aim was to determine whether satisfaction across a range of service domains is also higher in the private sector. Methods A telephone survey was conducted 35 days post-surgery. The hospital cohort comprised eight public and seven private high-volume arthroplasty providers. Consumers rated overall satisfaction with care out of 100 and likeliness to recommend their hospital on a 5-point Likert scale. Additional Likert-style questions were asked covering specific service domains. Generalized estimating equation models were used to analyse overall satisfaction (dichotomised as ≥ 90 or < 90) and future recommendations for care (dichotomised as ‘definitely recommend’ or ‘other’), whilst controlling for covariates. The proportions of consumers in each sector reporting the best Likert response for each individual domain were compared using non-parametric tests. Results 457 survey respondents (n = 210 private) were included. Less patient-reported joint impairment pre-surgery [OR 1.03 (95% CI 1.01–1.05)] and absence of an acute complication (OR 2.13 95% CI 1.41–3.23) significantly predicted higher overall satisfaction. Hip arthroplasty [OR 1.84 (1.1–2.96)] and an absence of an acute complication [OR 2.31 (1.28–4.17] significantly predicted greater likelihood for recommending the hospital. The only care domains where the private out-performed the public sector were hospitality (46.7 vs 35.6%, p <0

  18. Enteropathogens associated with acute diarrhea in community and hospital patients in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Oyofo, Buhari A; Subekti, Decy; Tjaniadi, Periska; Machpud, Nunung; Komalarini, S; Setiawan, B; Simanjuntak, C; Punjabi, Narain; Corwin, Andrew L; Wasfy, Momtaz; Campbell, James R; Lesmana, Murad

    2002-10-11

    The prevalence of bacteria, parasite and viral pathogens in 3875 patients with diarrhea in community and hospital settings from March 1997 through August 1999 in Jakarta, Indonesia was determined using routine bacteriology and molecular assay techniques. Bacterial pathogens isolated from hospital patients were, in decreasing frequency, Vibrio cholerae O1, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter jejuni, while S. flexneri, V. cholerae O1, Salmonella spp. and C. jejuni were isolated from the community patients. V. cholerae O1 was isolated more frequently (P<0.005) from the hospital patients than the community patients. Overall, bacterial pathogens were isolated from 538 of 3875 (14%) enrolled cases of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli were detected in 218 (18%) of 1244 rectal swabs. A small percentage of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (1%) and of Clostridium difficile (1.3%) was detected. Parasitic examination of 389 samples resulted in 43 (11%) positives comprising Ascaris lumbricoides (1.5%), Blastocystis hominis (5.7%), Giardia lamblia (0.8%), Trichuris trichiura (2.1%) and Endolimax nana (0.5%). Rotavirus (37.5%), adenovirus (3.3%) and Norwalk-like virus (17.6%) were also detected. Antimicrobial resistance was observed among some isolates. Bacterial isolates were susceptible to quinolones, with the exception of some isolates of C. jejuni which were resistant to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and norfloxacin. Data obtained from this community- and hospital-based study will enable the Indonesian Ministry of Health to plan relevant studies on diarrheal diseases in the archipelago. PMID:12381465

  19. 78 FR 31454 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 53 RIN 1545-BL30 Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction Correction In proposed rule document 2013-12013, appearing on pages...

  20. From Long-Stay Hospitals to Community Care: Reconstructing the Narratives of People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaning, Brian; Adderley, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Raymond, a 62 year old gentleman diagnosed with severe and profound learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorder and severe challenging behaviour, who had lived in long stay campus-based hospital accommodation for 46 years was supported to move to a community project developed to support people to live in their own bespoke flat. This…

  1. The Effects of Monitoring the Use of Gentamicin in a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, David N.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a combined education and monitoring program on the use of gentamicin in a community hospital is described. The data support the tenet that the ways antibiotics are used can be altered by an education program. (Author/LBH)

  2. Project Return: Community Education Initiative and Babygram Hospital Outreach, 1991-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    Project Return, a dropout recovery program to assist pregnant and parenting teenagers and parents of elementary school children to return to school, was first implemented in 1989-90. By 1991-92, there were two components of Project Return: its community education initiative in seven elementary schools, and the Babygram Hospital Outreach Program…

  3. Enhancing the Care Continuum in Rural Areas: Survey of Community Health Center-Rural Hospital Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Michael E.; Xirasagar, Sudha; Elder, Keith T.; Probst, Janice C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Community Health Centers (CHCs) and Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) play a significant role in providing health services for rural residents across the United States. Purpose: The overall goal of this study was to identify the CAHs that have collaborations with CHCs, as well as to recognize the content of the collaborations and the…

  4. The impact of joint ventures on U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P

    2006-01-01

    This quantitative research study assesses the organizational characteristics, market factors, and profitability of US hospitals that operate joint ventures with other health care organizations. Data was obtained from the 2001 American Hospital Association annual survey, the Area Resource File, and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Minimum Data Set. These data files provide essential information on individual acute care hospitals, the communities they serve, and the level of financial performance. Descriptive statistics were evaluated and a logistic regression model was utilized to examine hospitals operating joint ventures. The study found hospitals that operate joint ventures are located in communities with more elderly patients, lower unemployment, and lower HMO penetration. From an operating performance perspective, hospitals that operate joint ventures have a higher occupancy rate, a higher average length of stay, more clinical services, lower long-term debt, and a greater number of managed care contracts. The results also appear to indicate that joint ventures have a positive financial impact on US hospitals. The study has managerial implications supporting the use of joint ventures to improve hospital performance and policy implications on resource allocation. PMID:18975730

  5. The impact of joint ventures on U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P

    2006-01-01

    This quantitative research study assesses the organizational characteristics, market factors, and profitability of US hospitals that operate joint ventures with other health care organizations. Data was obtained from the 2001 American Hospital Association annual survey, the Area Resource File, and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Minimum Data Set. These data files provide essential information on individual acute care hospitals, the communities they serve, and the level of financial performance. Descriptive statistics were evaluated and a logistic regression model was utilized to examine hospitals operating joint ventures. The study found hospitals that operate joint ventures are located in communities with more elderly patients, lower unemployment, and lower HMO penetration. From an operating performance perspective, hospitals that operate joint ventures have a higher occupancy rate, a higher average length of stay, more clinical services, lower long-term debt, and a greater number of managed care contracts. The results also appear to indicate that joint ventures have a positive financial impact on US hospitals. The study has managerial implications supporting the use of joint ventures to improve hospital performance and policy implications on resource allocation.

  6. Cross-cultural healthcare challenges: an insight into small American community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M P; Kothari, V

    1997-01-01

    The healthcare industry in the United States is faced with many strategic challenges, because of the nation's growing culturally diverse population. Growing cultural diversity now calls for better trained medical staff that is capable of handling language, religious and cultural differences. In the rural communities, where cultural diversity is rapidly becoming a demographic fact, small hospitals with limited resources are especially confronted with medical challenges for which they seem to be least prepared. Based on an exploratory research that includes a study of small town hospitals, this paper provides insights into cross-cultural problems facing healthcare professionals in small communities. The paper highlights also the ways in which hospitals are responding to such challenges.

  7. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M.; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Self, Wesley H.; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Kan, J. Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R.; Haynes, Lia M.; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. incidence estimates of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates with radiographic confirmation and current laboratory diagnostics are needed. Methods We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children <18 years in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization and severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection by multiple modalities. Chest radiographs were independently reviewed by study radiologists. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations, overall and by age and pathogen. Results From January 2010-June 2012, we enrolled 2638 (69%) of 3803 eligible children; 2358 (89%) had radiographic pneumonia. Median age was 2 years (interquartile range 1-6); 497 (21%) children required intensive care, and three (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a viral and/or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%); ≥1 virus in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and bacterial-viral co-detection in 155 (7%). Annual pneumonia incidence was 15.7/10,000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-16.5], with highest rates among children <2 years [62.2/10,000 (CI 57.6-67.1)]. Respiratory syncytial virus (37% vs. 8%), adenovirus (15% vs. 3%), and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%) were more commonly detected in children <5 years compared with older children; Mycoplasma pneumoniae (19% vs. 3%) was more common in children ≥5 years. Conclusions Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization burden was highest among the very young, with respiratory viruses most commonly detected. PMID:25714161

  8. Creating Learning Momentum through Overt Teaching Interactions during Real Acute Care Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand…

  9. A Summary of the October 2009 Forum on the Future of Nursing: Acute Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the IOM, seeks to transform nursing as part of larger efforts to reform the health care system. The first of the Initiative's three forums was held on October 19, 2009, and focused on safety, technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration in acute care. Appended are: (1)…

  10. Evaluation of a cyanoacrylate protectant to manage skin tears in the acute care population.

    PubMed

    Mamrosh, Martha A; Valk, Debbie L; Milne, Catherine T

    2013-01-01

    Skin tears are a common problem that can impact the quality of life due to pain and the potential of becoming complicated wounds if not treated properly. The use of a cyanoacrylate skin protectant to manage skin tears was evaluated in 30 patients in an acute care setting.

  11. Development of an Automated, Real Time Surveillance Tool for Predicting Readmissions at a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gildersleeve, R.; Cooper, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Readmissions Reduction Program adjusts payments to hospitals based on 30-day readmission rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. This holds hospitals accountable for a complex phenomenon about which there is little evidence regarding effective interventions. Further study may benefit from a method for efficiently and inexpensively identifying patients at risk of readmission. Several models have been developed to assess this risk, many of which may not translate to a U.S. community hospital setting. Objective To develop a real-time, automated tool to stratify risk of 30-day readmission at a semirural community hospital. Methods A derivation cohort was created by extracting demographic and clinical variables from the data repository for adult discharges from calendar year 2010. Multivariate logistic regression identified variables that were significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission. Those variables were incorporated into a formula to produce a Risk of Readmission Score (RRS). A validation cohort from 2011 assessed the predictive value of the RRS. A SQL stored procedure was created to calculate the RRS for any patient and publish its value, along with an estimate of readmission risk and other factors, to a secure intranet site. Results Eleven variables were significantly associated with readmission in the multivariate analysis of each cohort. The RRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (c-statistic) of 0.74 (95% CI 0.73-0.75) in the derivation cohort and 0.70 (95% CI 0.69-0.71) in the validation cohort. Conclusion Clinical and administrative data available in a typical community hospital database can be used to create a validated, predictive scoring system that automatically assigns a probability of 30-day readmission to hospitalized patients. This does not require manual data extraction or manipulation and uses commonly

  12. North Carolina health network McGaw Prize winner. Attention to community service revives Bladen County Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    1998-01-01

    Bladen County Hospital receives the prestigious 1997 Foster G. McGaw Prize for Excellence in Community Service. The county hospital funneled the $75,000 award money back to the community as seed money for the development of a wellness/fitness center.

  13. Incidence and survival of hospitalized acute decompensated heart failure in four US communities (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study).

    PubMed

    Chang, Patricia P; Chambless, Lloyd E; Shahar, Eyal; Bertoni, Alain G; Russell, Stuart D; Ni, Hanyu; He, Max; Mosley, Thomas H; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Samdarshi, Tandaw E; Wruck, Lisa M; Rosamond, Wayne D

    2014-02-01

    Most population-based estimates of incident hospitalized heart failure (HF) have not differentiated acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) from chronic stable HF nor included racially diverse populations. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study conducted surveillance of hospitalized HF events (age ≥55 years) in 4 US communities. We estimated hospitalized ADHF incidence and survival by race and gender. Potential 2005 to 2009 HF hospitalizations were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes; 6,168 records were reviewed to validate ADHF cases. Population estimates were derived from US Census data; 50% of eligible hospitalizations were classified as ADHF, of which 63.6% were incident ADHF and 36.4% were recurrent ADHF. The average incidence of hospitalized ADHF was 11.6 per 1,000 persons, aged ≥55 years, per year, and recurrent hospitalized ADHF was 6.6 per 1,000 persons/yr. Age-adjusted annual ADHF incidence was highest for black men (15.7 per 1,000), followed by black women (13.3 per 1,000), white men (12.3 per 1,000), and white women (9.9 per 1,000). Of incident ADHF events with heart function assessment (89%), 53% had reduced the ejection fraction (heart failure with reduced ejection fraction [HFrEF]) and 47% had preserved ejection fraction (heart failure with preserved ejection fraction [HFpEF]). Black men had the highest proportion of acute HFrEF events (70%); white women had the highest proportion of acute HFpEF (59%). Age-adjusted 28-day and 1-year case fatality after an incident ADHF was 10.4% and 29.5%, respectively. Survival did not differ by race or gender. In conclusion, ADHF hospitalization and HF type varied by both race and gender, but case fatality rates did not. Further studies are needed to explain why black men are at higher risk of hospitalized ADHF and HFrEF.

  14. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  15. Post-Acute Care Services Received by Older Adults Following a Cardiac Event: A Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Zullo, Melissa; Shishehbor, Mehdi; Moore, Shirley M.; Rimm, Alfred A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-acute care (PAC) is available for older adults who need additional services after hospitalization for acute cardiac events. With the aging population and an increase in the prevalence of cardiac disease, it is important to determine current PAC use for cardiac patients to assist health care workers to meet the needs of older cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the current PAC use and factors associated with PAC use for older adults following hospitalization for a cardiac event that includes coronary artery bypass graph (CABG) and valve surgeries, myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and heart failure (HF). Methods and Results A cross-sectional design and the 2003 Medicare Part A database were used for this study. The sample (n=1,493,521) consisted of patients aged 65 years and older discharged after their first cardiac event. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with PAC use. Overall, PAC use was 55% for cardiac valve surgery, 50% for MI, 45% for HF, 44% for CABG, and 5% for PCI. Medical patients use more skilled nursing facility care and surgical patients use more home health care. Only 0.1–3.4% of the cardiac patients use intermediate rehabilitation facilities. Compared to those who do not use PAC, those who use home health care and skilled nursing facility care are older, female, have a longer hospital length of stay, and more comorbidity. Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans were less likely to use PAC after hospitalization for an MI or HF. Conclusions The current rate of PAC use indicates that almost half of non-disabled Medicare patients discharged from the hospital following a cardiac event use one of these services. Healthcare professionals can increase PAC use for Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans by including culturally targeted communication. Optimizing recovery for cardiac patients who use PAC may require focused cardiac rehabilitation

  16. HOSPITAL NUTRITIONAL CARE: PROPOSITIONS ENDORSED BY THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Diez-Garcia, Rosa Wanda; Zangiacomi Martinez, Edson; Penaforte, Fernanda Rodrigues de Oliveira; Japur, Camila Cremonezi

    2015-09-01

    Antecedentes/objetivos: la incidencia de desnutrición hospitalaria y sus consecuencias tanto para el paciente como para el hospital ha exigido procedimientos que aseguren un servicio de atención nutricional hospitalaria de buena calidad. Basado en los informes de la literatura, este estudio tuvo como objetivo construir proposiciones sobre los cuidados nutricionales hospitalarios, que después fueran evaluados y aprobados por la comunidad científica. Métodos: fueron desarrolladas cuarenta y una proposiciones relativas a la atención nutricional clínica del paciente y a la gestión del servicio de alimentación por el Servicio de Alimentación y Nutrición Hospitalaria. Un total de cien profesionales, investigadores y profesores evaluaron las proposiciones. Para analizar si los evaluadores estaban de acuerdo con las proposiciones se utilizó una escala Likert de cinco puntos (estoy en total desacuerdo, estoy parcialmente en desacuerdo, no tengo opinión, estoy parcialmente de acuerdo, estoy totalmente de acuerdo) asociada a cada proposición. Fue considerada concordancia cuando el 70% o más de los evaluadores estaban de acuerdo (totalmente o parcialmente) con la proposición. Para el análisis estadístico fue utilizado el procedimiento Proc Corresp del software SAS 10, versión 8, estadística descriptiva y análisis de correspondencias. Resultados: más del 90% de los entrevistados estaban total o parcialmente de acuerdo con el 85% (35) de las 41 proposiciones; entre el 80 y 90% de los entrevistados estaban total o parcialmente de acuerdo con el 15% (6) de las 41 proposiciones. Todos los criterios propuestos tuvieron más del 70% de concordancia (total y parcial). El menor valor de concordancia total fue del 70%, atribuido a la proposición que sugiere la participación del paciente en la intervención nutricional. Conclusiones: la comunidad científica presentó alto nivel de concordancia con las proposiciones para la atención nutricional hospitalaria, lo

  17. Lessons learned from implementation of computerized provider order entry in 5 community hospitals: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) can improve patient safety, quality and efficiency, but hospitals face a host of barriers to adopting CPOE, ranging from resistance among physicians to the cost of the systems. In response to the incentives for meaningful use of health information technology and other market forces, hospitals in the United States are increasingly moving toward the adoption of CPOE. The purpose of this study was to characterize the experiences of hospitals that have successfully implemented CPOE. Methods We used a qualitative approach to observe clinical activities and capture the experiences of physicians, nurses, pharmacists and administrators at five community hospitals in Massachusetts (USA) that adopted CPOE in the past few years. We conducted formal, structured observations of care processes in diverse inpatient settings within each of the hospitals and completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinicians and staff by telephone. After transcribing the audiorecorded interviews, we analyzed the content of the transcripts iteratively, guided by principles of the Immersion and Crystallization analytic approach. Our objective was to identify attitudes, behaviors and experiences that would constitute useful lessons for other hospitals embarking on CPOE implementation. Results Analysis of observations and interviews resulted in findings about the CPOE implementation process in five domains: governance, preparation, support, perceptions and consequences. Successful institutions implemented clear organizational decision-making mechanisms that involved clinicians (governance). They anticipated the need for education and training of a wide range of users (preparation). These hospitals deployed ample human resources for live, in-person training and support during implementation. Successful implementation hinged on the ability of clinical leaders to address and manage perceptions and the fear of change. Implementation proceeded

  18. Nursing outside hospitals: the working experience of community nurses. Educational characteristics and job perceptions.

    PubMed

    Temple-Smith, M J; Johnson, K A; Dunt, D R

    1989-01-01

    The community nursing practice research project reports the results of a mailed questionnaire survey of nurses employed outside hospitals and nursing homes in Victoria in 1985. Two 10 per cent random samples stratified across practice areas were selected from listings of community nurses providing detailed employment information to the Victorian Nursing Council. An 84 per cent response rate was obtained from these listings yielding 689 responses. This paper reports that part of the study relevant to job entry, job satisfaction, job mobility and perceived career options as well as educational preparation. One half of community nurses entered community nursing after five years of hospital experience. The major reasons for choosing employment in community health nursing were its conditions of work, its autonomy and a dissatisfaction with hospital nursing, rather than a specific orientation to community nursing. These can be appreciated in terms of competing demands by the nurse's family life and her sense of growing professional maturity. Job satisfaction was high, with 87 per cent of nurses in the study population being satisfied or very satisfied. Only one quarter considered opportunities for career advancement to exist in their practice area. In the event only one fifth of nurses regarded promotion as important. The high levels of job satisfaction and the low importance attached to promotion are explicable given the nature of female employment and dissatisfaction with hospital nursing. Despite this high level of job satisfaction, one third of nurses believed they would not be nursing in five years time. Less than one third of nurses felt there was adequate opportunity for advancement in their practice area.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2605904

  19. The application of a biometric identification technique for linking community and hospital data in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Odei-Lartey, Eliezer Ofori; Boateng, Dennis; Danso, Samuel; Kwarteng, Anthony; Abokyi, Livesy; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Gyaase, Stephaney; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background The reliability of counts for estimating population dynamics and disease burdens in communities depends on the availability of a common unique identifier for matching general population data with health facility data. Biometric data has been explored as a feasible common identifier between the health data and sociocultural data of resident members in rural communities within the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in the central part of Ghana. Objective Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using fingerprint identification to link community data and hospital data in a rural African setting. Design A combination of biometrics and other personal identification techniques were used to identify individual's resident within a surveillance population seeking care in two district hospitals. Visits from resident individuals were successfully recorded and categorized by the success of the techniques applied during identification. The successes of visits that involved identification by fingerprint were further examined by age. Results A total of 27,662 hospital visits were linked to resident individuals. Over 85% of those visits were successfully identified using at least one identification method. Over 65% were successfully identified and linked using their fingerprints. Supervisory support from the hospital administration was critical in integrating this identification system into its routine activities. No concerns were expressed by community members about the fingerprint registration and identification processes. Conclusions Fingerprint identification should be combined with other methods to be feasible in identifying community members in African rural settings. This can be enhanced in communities with some basic Demographic Surveillance System or census information. PMID:26993473

  20. Interprofessional learning at work: what spatial theory can tell us about workplace learning in an acute care ward.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Linda Rosemary; Hopwood, Nick; Boud, David

    2014-05-01

    It is widely recognized that every workplace potentially provides a rich source of learning. Studies focusing on health care contexts have shown that social interaction within and between professions is crucial in enabling professionals to learn through work, address problems and cope with challenges of clinical practice. While hospital environments are beginning to be understood in spatial terms, the links between space and interprofessional learning at work have not been explored. This paper draws on Lefebvre's tri-partite theoretical framework of perceived, conceived and lived space to enrich understandings of interprofessional learning on an acute care ward in an Australian teaching hospital. Qualitative analysis was undertaken using data from observations of Registered Nurses at work and semi-structured interviews linked to observed events. The paper focuses on a ward round, the medical workroom and the Registrar's room, comparing and contrasting the intended (conceived), practiced (perceived) and pedagogically experienced (lived) spatial dimensions. The paper concludes that spatial theory has much to offer understandings of interprofessional learning in work, and the features of work environments and daily practices that produce spaces that enable or constrain learning. PMID:24404847

  1. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Interprofessional learning at work: what spatial theory can tell us about workplace learning in an acute care ward.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Linda Rosemary; Hopwood, Nick; Boud, David

    2014-05-01

    It is widely recognized that every workplace potentially provides a rich source of learning. Studies focusing on health care contexts have shown that social interaction within and between professions is crucial in enabling professionals to learn through work, address problems and cope with challenges of clinical practice. While hospital environments are beginning to be understood in spatial terms, the links between space and interprofessional learning at work have not been explored. This paper draws on Lefebvre's tri-partite theoretical framework of perceived, conceived and lived space to enrich understandings of interprofessional learning on an acute care ward in an Australian teaching hospital. Qualitative analysis was undertaken using data from observations of Registered Nurses at work and semi-structured interviews linked to observed events. The paper focuses on a ward round, the medical workroom and the Registrar's room, comparing and contrasting the intended (conceived), practiced (perceived) and pedagogically experienced (lived) spatial dimensions. The paper concludes that spatial theory has much to offer understandings of interprofessional learning in work, and the features of work environments and daily practices that produce spaces that enable or constrain learning.

  3. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27305338

  4. EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL CLOSURE ON OLDER ADULTS: A FOCUS GROUP STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Countouris, Malamo; Gilmore, Sandra; Yonas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The closing of hospitals has exacerbated challenges for older adults in accessing healthcare, especially those living in economically underserved settings. Through focus groups and a community-engaged approach, our study examined and documented the emergent health needs of older adults following the closing of a local hospital in an economically disadvantaged community. Focus groups were reconvened to assess progress and health needs over time. Analyses of the focus groups (n=37, mean age 77, 84% female) illustrated the impact of the closure and the emergence of the following dominant themes: perceptions of the hospital system, including feelings of abandonment and social isolation; transportation challenges in accessing health care resources; and lack of knowledge and literacy regarding available health care and obtaining health services. Discussion sessions with hospital administrators and participants afforded an opportunity for sharing data and additional assessment. The data and relationships developed with community participants and health system representatives resulted in the production of an information resource about access to health services, tailored for older adults. PMID:24448403

  5. The business case for a diabetes self-management intervention in a community general hospital.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Ashley; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing and increasingly compelling body of evidence that self-management interventions for persons with type 2 diabetes can be both effective and cost-effective from a societal perspective. Yet, the evidence is elusive that these interventions can produce a positive business case for a sponsoring provider organization in the short term. The lack of a business case limits the enthusiasm for provider organizations to implement these proven quality-enhancing interventions more widely. This article provides a case example of a self-management intervention in a community general hospital targeting an underserved population who have significant barriers to receiving regular health care. The 3-component program sought to improve meaningful access to care, increase health literacy related to type 2 diabetes, and partner with the enrollees to make long-term lifestyle changes. The intervention not only resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.77%) but saved the hospital an average of $551 per active patient per year, primarily by reducing hospital visits. With only 255 actively enrolled patients, the hospital can recover fully its total direct annual personnel and operating costs for the program. Because the program serves patients who would have been seen at other hospitals, it also enhanced care quality and reduced costs for the broader community in which the program is embedded.

  6. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  7. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  8. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%–23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%–6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%–20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7–4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9–11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusions The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive

  9. Risks with older adults in acute care settings: UK occupational therapists' and physiotherapists' perceptions of risks associated with discharge and professional practice.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Anita; McIntyre, Anne; Wiggett, Claire

    2012-06-01

    Internationally, there is evidence that hospital discharge to home for older adults is a complex and challenging process that is dependent upon multidisciplinary team working. At the centre of the discharge process is the management of risk, which involves occupational therapists and other healthcare professionals managing perceived dangers and determining why some dangers are seen as presenting risks while others are not. This study did not aim to explore interprofessional differences but to ascertain a greater understanding of professionals' perceptions of risk in acute care settings. This qualitative study utilised 12 semi-structured interviews with seven occupational therapists and five physiotherapists in the United Kingdom (UK). During the interview, therapists were asked to read and answer questions on a validated vignette. The interview data were subjected to thematic content analysis and the vignettes to template analysis. Our research is one of the first studies to explore therapists' perceptions of risk with older adults in acute care settings. Our study has highlighted that perception of risk does have an impact on discharge decision-making and location. Therapists used negative terminology to refer to patients who wanted to take risks, which could be a reflection of the therapists' anxiety. Mental capacity, and patients' functioning and safety were key factors in risk decision-making with older adults. Our research has highlighted the potential value of multidisciplinary working to manage risk situations and the need for reflection and discussion regarding how persons who do not have capacity wishes are managed within acute care settings. There is a need to develop an interprofessional care pathway to guide clinicians through the risk decision-making process which needs to ensure that the client's opinions and wishes are taken into account throughout.

  10. Understanding Nurses' Perceptions of Electronic Health Record Use in an Acute Care Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; McGillis Hall, Linda; Nagle, Lynn; Trbovich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in health care environments in an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficiency of care. However, not all of these potential benefits have been demonstrated in empirical research. One of the reasons for this may be a number of barriers that prevent nurses from being able to incorporate EHRs into their professional practice. A review of the literature revealed a number of barriers to, and facilitators of EHR use by nurses. Among these, EHR usability, organizational context, and individual nurse characteristics were found to be concepts that influence use. It is currently unknown how these concepts together might influence nurses' perceptions of their ability to use the technology to support the nursing process. In this poster, the authors will describe a study aimed at achieving a better understanding of nurses' perceptions of their EHR use by investigating the concepts of EHR usability, organizational context and select individual nurse characteristics. PMID:27332345

  11. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  12. Contract management in USA hospitals: service duplication and access within local markets.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen; Dor, Avi

    2008-08-01

    This paper examines the extent to which hospitals that are under external contract management engage in service duplication, as well as the degree to which the various services they offer contribute to or detract from community access. The study incorporates all USA hospitals using data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, supplemented by county level measures obtained from the area resource file (ARF). Using data on the 3794 hospitals classified as acute care facilities in 2002, we performed a set of logistic regressions that analyzed whether a hospital offered each of 74 distinct services. For each service (regression), key independent variables measured the number of other hospitals in the local market area that also offered the service. Local area market definitions are the areas circumscribed by the hospital within distances of 10 and 20 miles. Results suggest that contract-managed (CM) hospitals display a more competitive pattern (service duplication) than hospitals in general, but CM hospitals that are the sole provider of services locally are less likely to offer services than traditionally managed sole hospital providers. Contract management does not appear to offer any particular advantages in improving access to hospital services.

  13. Capital cost reimbursement to community hospitals under Federal health insurance programs.

    PubMed

    Kinney, E D; Lefkowitz, B

    1982-01-01

    Issues in current capital cost reimbursement to community hospitals by Medicare and Medicaid are described, and options for change analyzed. Major reforms in the way the federal government pays for capital costs--in particular substitution of other methods of payment for existing depreciation reimbursement--could have significant impact on the structure of the health care system and on government expenditures. While such reforms are likely to engender substantial political opposition, they may be facilitated by broader changes in the reimbursement system.

  14. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies. PMID:25599523

  15. Technical and scale efficiency of public community hospitals in Eritrea: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eritrean gross national income of Int$610 per capita is lower than the average for Africa (Int$1620) and considerably lower than the global average (Int$6977). It is therefore imperative that the country’s resources, including those specifically allocated to the health sector, are put to optimal use. The objectives of this study were (a) to estimate the relative technical and scale efficiency of public secondary level community hospitals in Eritrea, based on data generated in 2007, (b) to estimate the magnitudes of output increases and/or input reductions that would have been required to make relatively inefficient hospitals more efficient, and (c) to estimate using Tobit regression analysis the impact of institutional and contextual/environmental variables on hospital inefficiencies. Methods A two-stage Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method is used to estimate efficiency of hospitals and to explain the inefficiencies. In the first stage, the efficient frontier and the hospital-level efficiency scores are first estimated using DEA. In the second stage, the estimated DEA efficiency scores are regressed on some institutional and contextual/environmental variables using a Tobit model. In 2007 there were a total of 20 secondary public community hospitals in Eritrea, nineteen of which generated data that could be included in the study. The input and output data were obtained from the Ministry of Health (MOH) annual health service activity report of 2007. Since our study employs data that are five years old, the results are not meant to uncritically inform current decision-making processes, but rather to illustrate the potential value of such efficiency analyses. Results The key findings were as follows: (i) the average constant returns to scale technical efficiency score was 90.3%; (ii) the average variable returns to scale technical efficiency score was 96.9%; and (iii) the average scale efficiency score was 93.3%. In 2007, the inefficient hospitals could

  16. From bench to bedside: research and testing of Internet resources and connections in community hospital libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, N.; Fuller, S.

    1993-01-01

    Access to information becomes more valuable with the continuing proliferation of medical knowledge and the increasing economic pressure being experienced by health care organizations. This is particularly so for community hospitals in rural or isolated areas, where the economic pressures are at least as great as in urban areas and where access to information is often inadequate. These conditions have implications for the quality of patient care and for economic viability. In response to this, the National Library of Medicine, the University of Washington, and seven community hospitals in five Pacific Northwest states have joined forces in a broad-scale technology diffusion project to facilitate the application of research work to clinical care. There are three components to the project: 1) a pilot connections component to extend Internet access to the community hospitals, 2) a research component to test the performance of a client/server model for network access to anatomical text and images, and 3) a clinical component to develop a registry of DNA diagnostic laboratories facilitating the provision of genetic information to clinicians. The pilot connections component is described and preliminary findings are reported. PMID:8130534

  17. The GDAHA hospital performance reports project: a successful community-based quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Snow, Richard J; Engler, David; Krella, Joseph M

    2003-01-01

    During the past decade there has been increasing distribution of hospital performance information but few examples of how this information is affecting the quality of health care delivery. This article describes the methods of implementation and factors influencing a successful community-based quality improvement initiative in Dayton, Ohio, involving a collaborative of five competing hospitals in partnership with the business community and local and state hospital associations. The initiative contributed to a 36% reduction in acute myocardial infarction mortality over a 3-year period by changing reperfusion patterns in patients with ST segment elevated myocardial infarction. Identification of an opportunity gap, root cause analysis, and development of process measures used to facilitate health care provider change are summarized. The driving and restraining forces that have shaped this initiative from a report card to a quality improvement program are outlined and a list of five contributors to success are presented. These factors can serve as a basis for how other communities can benefit from this collaborative model.

  18. The impact of healthcare issues on the future of the nursing profession: the resulting increased influence of community-based and public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Swiadek, John W

    2009-01-01

    Several key issues, such as the necessity for cost containment, role conflicts between healthcare professions, nursing shortages, and organizational difficulties of healthcare organizations, significantly influence current healthcare delivery. These circumstances, which constitute a compelling need for responsive and effective change, are examined in terms of their impact upon the nursing profession. A review of the referenced journals and textbooks reveals that national nursing efforts will shift from acute care hospital-oriented provisions to community-based public health orientations. This evolution will result in improved health outcomes, less need for tertiary treatment, and savings for hospitals and insurance companies. PMID:19187050

  19. When to say when: responding to a suicide attempt in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Drori, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Attempted suicide represents a personal tragedy for the patient and their loved ones and can be a challenge for acute care physicians. Medical professionals generally view it as their obligation to aggressively treat patients who are critically ill after a suicide attempt, on the presumption that a suicidal patient lacks decision making capacity from severe psychiatric impairment. However, physicians may be confronted by deliberative patient statements, advanced directives or surrogate decision makers who urge the withholding or withdrawal of life sustaining treatments based on the patient's underlying medical condition or life experience. How acute care providers weigh these expressions of patient wishes versus their own views of beneficence, non-maleficence and professional integrity poses a significant ethical challenge. This article presents a case that exemplifies the medical and ethical tensions that can arise in treating a patient following a suicide attempt and how to approach their resolution.

  20. Post-acute care and vertical integration after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Shay, Patrick D; Mick, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated changes resulting from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act-including the proposed adoption of bundled payment systems and the promotion of accountable care organizations-have generated considerable controversy as U.S. healthcare industry observers debate whether such changes will motivate vertical integration activity. Using examples of accountable care organizations and bundled payment systems in the American post-acute healthcare sector, this article applies economic and sociological perspectives from organization theory to predict that as acute care organizations vary in the degree to which they experience environmental uncertainty, asset specificity, and network embeddedness, their motivation to integrate post-acute care services will also vary, resulting in a spectrum of integrative behavior.

  1. [University clinics in the competitive hospital market].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C E; Möller, J; Hesslau, U; Bauer, M; Gabbert, T; Kremer, B

    2005-07-01

    In recent years Germany has faced a growing economization and competition among hospitals. To protect their interests hospitals have to operate similarly to other commercial businesses. Academic hospitals face difficult circumstances in this competition. They have to facilitate research and education activities which require additional financial and personnel resources but also provide maximum acute care treatment at all times. This causes additional disadvantages in terms of financial resources, compared to private hospital chains. Such examples of financial shortcomings have led to the privatization of academic research centres in Germany. An alternative strategy to privatization of academic acute care hospitals is the change of their legal status into a capital company or into a foundation, according to US experiences. Public private partnerships (PPPs) may also represent a potential alternative, as they have already produced a growing number of successful examples in the public sector in Germany. Academic acute care hospitals can also choose a strategic reorganization of their targets, similar to their privately held competitors in the market. Potential economies in scale may be achieved in areas such as medical treatment, research and personnel planning.However, it is vital that academic acute care hospitals start to act productively and also individually. This article provides a number of managerial pathways and options to maintain and strengthen operational competitiveness. PMID:15942750

  2. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  3. Ethical issues arising in pharmacoepidemiologic research in a community hospital in Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tzimis, L

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents the various issues encountered in planning, designing, performing, and reporting pharmacoepidemiologic research. Five hundred and fifty-one indigent patients insured by Social Care visited the Hospital Pharmacy of Chania General Hospital, and were compared with 551 patients insured under Social Security funds who visited three community pharmacies. The study had no external funding. Before we started the study, we officially sought approval from the Scientific Committee of our Hospital and from the local Pharmaceutical Association. We asked also for approval from the Medical School of the University of Crete. Patient privacy was of great concern in the design and performance of the study. The law in Greece, according to the directives of European Union, affects the way we use records in hospitals and protect patient rights. After these studies were completed, we made proposals to the authorities concerning continuous health education for both patients and health workers. Pharmacoepidemiologic research is difficult in hospitals outside universities or institutions, because of the lack of adequate funding and grants to support research staff.

  4. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.; Self, W.H.; Wunderink, R.G.; Fakhran, S.; Balk, R.; Bramley, A.M.; Reed, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Anderson, E.J.; Courtney, D.M.; Chappell, J.D.; Qi, C.; Hart, E.M.; Carroll, F.; Trabue, C.; Donnelly, H.K.; Williams, D.J.; Zhu, Y.; Arnold, S.R.; Ampofo, K.; Waterer, G.W.; Levine, M.; Lindstrom, S.; Winchell, J.M.; Katz, J.M.; Erdman, D.; Schneider, E.; Hicks, L.A.; McCullers, J.A.; Pavia, A.T.; Edwards, K.M.; Finelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radio-graphically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. METHODS We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. RESULTS From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radio-graphic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia

  5. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and Missouri…

  6. Can the US minimum data set be used for predicting admissions to acute care facilities?

    PubMed

    Abbott, P A; Quirolgico, S; Candidate, D; Manchand, R; Canfield, K; Adya, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of Knowledge Discovery in Large Datasets (KDD) and data mining applications in healthcare particularly as related to the Minimum Data Set, a resident assessment tool which is used in US long-term care facilities. The US Health Care Finance Administration, which mandates the use of this tool, has accumulated massive warehouses of MDS data. The pressure in healthcare to increase efficiency and effectiveness while improving patient outcomes requires that we find new ways to harness these vast resources. The intent of this preliminary study design paper is to discuss the development of an approach which utilizes the MDS, in conjunction with KDD and classification algorithms, in an attempt to predict admission from a long-term care facility to an acute care facility. The use of acute care services by long term care residents is a negative outcome, potentially avoidable, and expensive. The value of the MDS warehouse can be realized by the use of the stored data in ways that can improve patient outcomes and avoid the use of expensive acute care services. This study, when completed, will test whether the MDS warehouse can be used to describe patient outcomes and possibly be of predictive value. PMID:10384674

  7. Closing Italian Forensic Psychiatry Hospitals in Favor of Treating Insanity Acquittees in the Community.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Felthous, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Originally a hedge against the death penalty, the insanity defense came to offer hospitalization as an alternative to imprisonment. In the late 19th century Italy opened inpatient services first for mentally ill prisoners and then for offenders found not guilty by reason of insanity. Within the past decade, a series of decrees has resulted in transferring the responsibility for treating NGRI acquittees and "dangerous" mentally ill prisoners from the Department of Justice to the Department of Health, and their treatment from Italy's high security forensic psychiatric hospitals (OPGs) to community regional facilities (REMSs, Residences for the Execution of Security Measures), community mental health facilities, one of which is located in each region of Italy. Today community REMSs provide the treatment and management of socially dangerous offenders. The dynamic evolution of Italy's progressive mental health system for insanity acquittees, to our knowledge the most libertarian, community oriented approach of any country, is retraced. Discussion includes cautionary concerns as well as potential opportunities for improvements in mental health services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Closing Italian Forensic Psychiatry Hospitals in Favor of Treating Insanity Acquittees in the Community.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, Felice; Felthous, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Originally a hedge against the death penalty, the insanity defense came to offer hospitalization as an alternative to imprisonment. In the late 19th century Italy opened inpatient services first for mentally ill prisoners and then for offenders found not guilty by reason of insanity. Within the past decade, a series of decrees has resulted in transferring the responsibility for treating NGRI acquittees and "dangerous" mentally ill prisoners from the Department of Justice to the Department of Health, and their treatment from Italy's high security forensic psychiatric hospitals (OPGs) to community regional facilities (REMSs, Residences for the Execution of Security Measures), community mental health facilities, one of which is located in each region of Italy. Today community REMSs provide the treatment and management of socially dangerous offenders. The dynamic evolution of Italy's progressive mental health system for insanity acquittees, to our knowledge the most libertarian, community oriented approach of any country, is retraced. Discussion includes cautionary concerns as well as potential opportunities for improvements in mental health services. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27256003

  9. A Review of Tools to Assist Hospitals in Meeting Community Health Assessment and Implementation Strategy Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Bazos, Dorothy A.; Sutherland, Kaleb A.; LaFave, Lea R. Ayers; Fedrizzi, Rudolph; Hoebeke, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Recent changes in U.S. national policies and regulations have created an opportunity for meaningful collaborations to take place between health systems, public health departments, and social service organizations. For medical systems, and particularly tax-exempt hospitals, new requirements include community health assessments (CHAs) and implementation strategies to address identified health needs. Individuals and groups responsible for meeting the new CHA and implementation strategy requirements may be unsure about the best ways to achieve specific aspects of the CHA process. In this report, we provide an in-depth review and rating of tools developed by public health and community experts that cover the steps necessary to meet the new requirements. A team of three community and public health experts and the authors developed a rating sheet based on a well-known community health improvement process model and on the steps in the new requirements to identify and systematically rate nine comprehensive tools. The ratings and recommendations provide a guide for hospitals in choosing tools that will best assist them in meeting the new requirements. PMID:26904778

  10. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  11. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  12. A limited-service rural hospital model: the freestanding emergency department.

    PubMed

    Avery, S

    1999-01-01

    A rural hospital that has been downsized to a freestanding emergency department is an important model in that it offers a possible solution to a community's need to have emergency-care services locally available. This model could include other important local services, such as skilled-nursing and outpatient services. This study looks at the financial feasibility of a rural hospital shutting down acute-care services and maintaining emergency services. Expenses were determined, and changes to revenue and expenses were estimated. Reimbursement was assumed static. Medicare cost reports and hospital financial disclosure reports were used in investigating three model categories: an urgent-care clinic with emergency services; a hospital-based emergency department with an outpatient clinic; a hospital-based emergency department with an outpatient clinic and a hospital-based skilled-nursing facility. Even with best-case assumptions regarding continued reimbursement, results show only a small increase in net income and, in two cases, large losses compared with the size of the hospital operations. A subsidy would be required from the community or an affiliated hospital or network for the model to remain financially stable. The regulatory barriers to implementation are noted, as well as the potential problems with the human aspects of implementation--staffing, recruitment and retention, professional education and quality. If the model rural hospital is an affiliate or partner with one or more health care facility, which could assist with financial and staffing needs, it may be feasible. PMID:10511753

  13. Effectiveness of various hospital-based solutions against community- acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perona, Paul J; Johnson, Aaron J; Perona, John P; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be particularly burdensome and difficult to eradicate. One of the measures that infection control officers have emphasized in our hospitals has been the use of various hand sanitizers throughout the hospital. Our objective was to determine the level of growth inhibition of common hand sanitizers and surgical scrub solutions that are used to prevent the spread of community-acquired strains of MRSA. Various hospital and surgical agents (n = 13) were applied to community-acquired MRSA bacteria that had been cultured on agar plates. These different commercially available solutions were incubated for 48 h, and the plates were assessed to determine the level of growth inhibition (0, 25, 75, or 100%). The negative control was a test in which no agent was added to the MRSA culture, while a positive control tested 100% alcohol. Eight of the solutions tested had 100% growth inhibition, four solutions had partial growth inhibition effects, and one solution did not inhibit MRSA. Of the solutions with alcohol, the 62% solution did not kill MRSA, while the 80% solution only inhibited MRSA. Both the 95 and 100% alcohol solutions had 100% growth inhibition. Of the two surgical scrub solutions, only the one with iodine had 100% growth inhibition, whereas the solution with chloroxylenol (PCMX 3%) had only partial growth inhibition. This study suggests that the solutions with high levels of alcohol, chlorhexidine, or iodine appear to better kill MRSA and might best be used to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA in both the hospital and the surgical environment. PMID:24266441

  14. Studies of antibiotic resistance within the patient, hospitals and the community using simple mathematical models.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, D J; Anderson, R M

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in a wide variety of important pathogens of humans presents a worldwide threat to public health. This paper describes recent work on the use of mathematical models of the emergence and spread of resistance bacteria, on scales ranging from within the patient, in hospitals and within communities of people. Model development starts within the treated patient, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles are melded within a framework that mirrors the interaction between bacterial population growth, drug treatment and the immunological responses targeted at the pathogen. The model helps identify areas in which more precise information is needed, particularly in the context of how drugs influence pathogen birth and death rates (pharmacodynamics). The next area addressed is the spread of multiply drug-resistant bacteria in hospital settings. Models of the transmission dynamics of the pathogen provide a framework for assessing the relative merits of different forms of intervention, and provide criteria for control or eradication. The model is applied to the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in an intensive care setting. This model framework is generalized to consider the spread of resistant organisms between hospitals. The model framework allows for heterogeneity in hospital size and highlights the importance of large hospitals in the maintenance of resistant organisms within a defined country. The spread of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in England and Wales provides a template for model construction and analysis. The final section addresses the emergence and spread of resistant organisms in communities of people and the dependence on the intensity of selection as measured by the volume or rate of drug use. Model output is fitted to data for Finland and Iceland and conclusions drawn concerning the key factors determining the rate of spread and decay once drug pressure is relaxed. PMID:10365398

  15. Chasing Zero: A Nurse-Driven Process for Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Reduction In a Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Due to treatment costs and lack of reimbursement, community hospitals are charged with implementing innovative strategies that will reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI). A nurse-driven system for decreasing the number of hospital-acquired CAUTI is effective and useful for a community hospital. One nurse with accountability for implementing a simple evidence-based protocol can dramatically decrease the total incidence of hospital-acquired CAUTI. The basis for the success of this initiative relied heavily on the ease of using the eight-point Question the Foley criteria, the availability of the electronic medical record, interdisciplinary collaboration, and support from nursing and physician administration. With collaboration and support from nursing leadership, the goals for patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired CAUTI can become a reality in a short period of time. PMID:27281867

  16. Chasing Zero: A Nurse-Driven Process For Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Reduction in a Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Due to treatment costs and lack of reimbursement, community hospitals are charged with implementing innovative strategies that will reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI). A nurse-driven system for decreasing the number of hospital-acquired CAUTI is effective and useful for a community hospital. One nurse with accountability for implementing a simple evidence-based protocol can dramatically decrease the total incidence of hospital-acquired CAUTI. The basis for the success of this initiative relied heavily on the ease of using the eight-point Question the Foley criteria, the availability of the electronic medical record, interdisciplinary collaboration, and support from nursing and physician administration. With collaboration and support from nursing leadership, the goals for patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired CAUTI can become a reality in a short period of time. PMID:26845820

  17. Net Income of Pharmacy Faculty Compared to Community and Hospital Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A.; Dickey, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the net cumulative income of community pharmacists, hospital pharmacists, and full-time pharmacy faculty members (residency-trained or with a PhD after obtaining a PharmD) in pharmacy practice, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and social and administrative sciences. Methods. Markov modeling was conducted to calculate net projected cumulative earnings of career paths by estimating the costs of education, including the costs of obtaining degrees and student loans. Results. The economic model spanned 49 years, from ages 18 to 67 years. Earning a PharmD and pursuing an academic career resulted in projected net cumulative lifetime earnings ranging from approximately $4.7 million to $6.3 million. A pharmacy practice faculty position following public pharmacy school and one year of residency resulted in higher net cumulative income than community pharmacy. Faculty members with postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) training also had higher net income than other faculty and hospital pharmacy career paths, given similar years of prepharmacy education and type of pharmacy school attended. Faculty members with either a PharmD or PhD in the pharmacology discipline may net as much as $5.9 million and outpace all other PhD graduates by at least $75 000 in lifetime earnings. Projected career earnings of postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) trained faculty and PharmD/PhD faculty members were lower than those of community pharmacists. Findings were more variable when comparing pharmacy faculty members and hospital pharmacists. Conclusion. With the exception of PGY1 trained academic pharmacists, faculty projected net cumulative incomes generally lagged behind community pharmacists, likely because of delayed entry into the job market as a result of advanced training/education. However, nonsalary benefits such as greater flexibility and autonomy may enhance the desirability of academic pharmacy as a career path. PMID:27756925

  18. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  19. Partnering to Promote Evidence-Based Practice in a Community Hospital: Implications for Nursing Professional Development Specialists.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Martha E F; Collier, Andrea; Collins, Mara; Crowley, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Nursing professional development specialists working in community hospitals face significant barriers to evidence-based practice that academic medical centers do not. This article describes 7 years of a multifaceted, service academic partnership in a large, urban, community hospital. The partnership has strengthened the nursing professional development role in promoting evidence-based practice across the scope of practice and serves as a model for others. PMID:27187827

  20. Prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospital and community sewage in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Basode, Vinod Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Sewage samples were collected from hospital and community sewage tanks, and bacterial strains and antibiotic sensitivity patterns were analyzed using the VITEK 2 microbial identification system p(bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). Three of the 12 isolates (25%) from the hospital sewage and 1 of the 13 isolates (7.69%) from the community sewage was extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria.

  1. Understanding the prevalence of inpatient falls associated with toileting in adult acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study determined the prevalence of inpatient falls that were associated with toileting in a Michigan community hospital. Of all falls, 45.2% were related to toileting. The most common theme was falling on the way from the bed or chair to the bathroom. Nurses should focus on safe patient transfers and on using the completed risk assessment and should develop an individualized prevention plan for each patient based on their needs. PMID:19553863

  2. Collective response to public health emergencies and large-scale disasters: putting hospitals at the core of community resilience.

    PubMed

    Paturas, James L; Smith, Deborah; Smith, Stewart; Albanese, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare organisations are a critical part of a community's resilience and play a prominent role as the backbone of medical response to natural and manmade disasters. The importance of healthcare organisations, in particular hospitals, to remain operational extends beyond the necessity to sustain uninterrupted medical services for the community, in the aftermath of a large-scale disaster. Hospitals are viewed as safe havens where affected individuals go for shelter, food, water and psychosocial assistance, as well as to obtain information about missing family members or learn of impending dangers related to the incident. The ability of hospitals to respond effectively to high-consequence incidents producing a massive arrival of patients that disrupt daily operations requires surge capacity and capability. The activation of hospital emergency support functions provides an approach by which hospitals manage a short-term shortfall of hospital personnel through the reallocation of hospital employees, thereby obviating the reliance on external qualified volunteers for surge capacity and capability. Recent revisions to the Joint Commission's hospital emergency preparedness standard have impelled healthcare facilities to participate actively in community-wide planning, rather than confining planning exclusively to a single healthcare facility, in order to harmonise disaster management strategies and effectively coordinate the allocation of community resources and expertise across all local response agencies.

  3. Energy engineering analysis program. Kimbrough Army Community Hospital, Ft. George G, Meade, Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    Mueller Associates, Inc. (MAI) was retained by the Baltimore District of Army Corps of Engineers in September of 1985 to perform energy conservation services at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. The contract included studies of the following buildings: number 2480 - Kimbrough Army Community Hospital (KACH), number 8472 - Dental Clinic, number 2481 - Barracks, number 2484 - Medical Supply Warehouse. The Scope of this study included the following objectives: Perform a complete energy audit and analysis of the entire Kimbrough Army Community Hospital including the attached Outpatient Clinic. Investigate the feasibility of an Energy Monitoring and Control System (EMCS) for the hospital. Investigate exhaust systems in the Dental Clinic. Investigate window replacement and chilled water temperature of the Barracks. Investigate the feasibility of infra-red heaters, loading dock door seals, and air stratification in the Medical Supply Warehouse. Identify all energy conservation opportunities, including low cost/no cost items and perform complete evaluations of each. Prepare programming documentation for all energy conservation investment program projects including DD Form 1391, a life cycle cost analysis summary sheet with backup calculations, and a Project Development Brochure. Prepare implementation documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation opportunities.

  4. Results of curative therapy for esophageal cancer in a community training hospital.

    PubMed

    Averbach, Andrew; Akbarov, Alisher; Sidel, Todd; Mech, Karl; Parandian, Bahman; Waterfield, William; Poussin-Rosillo, Hipolito; Chang, David; Sardi, Armando

    2002-01-01

    A 12-year experience of therapy for esophageal carcinoma in a community-based cancer center was reviewed retrospectively. Of a total of 88 patients with histologically proven carcinoma of the esophagus 30 (34.1%) underwent curative esophagectomy. Twelve patients received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Fourteen esophagectomies were performed transhiatally and 16 via the thoracolaparotomy approach. The average distance from incisors was 32.2 and 32.1 cm, respectively. Overall morbidity was 36.7%, with major complications in 30% of patients. Mortality was 3.3%. A comparison of patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (12 patients) and surgery alone (18 patients) showed no statistical difference in morbidity, mortality, or length of hospital stay. Analysis of these parameters in groups of patients operated via the transhiatal versus thoracolaparotomy approach demonstrated statistically lower morbidity (14.3% versus 56.3%, respectively), with no difference in mortality and a trend toward a shorter hospital stay in the former group. Overall survival at 3 years was 63.9%. In the combined therapy group, 90.9% of patients survived 3 years compared to 40.4% in the surgery only group (P = 0.0177). There was a trend toward better survival in the group of patients treated via the transhiatal approach. This study demonstrated that curative therapy for esophageal carcinoma can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality in a community teaching hospital.

  5. Community treatment orders and reduced time in hospital: a nationwide study, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark; Macpherson, Melanie; Macleod, Callum; Lyons, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Community treatment orders (CTOs) were introduced in Scotland in 2005, but are controversial owing to a lack of supportive randomised evidence. The non-randomised studies provide mixed results on their efficacy and utility. We aimed to examine hospital bed day usage across Scotland both before and after CTOs were initiated in a national cohort of patients, spanning 5 years. Results In total, 1558 individuals who were subject to a CTO between 2007 and 2012, of whom 63% were male, were included. After CTO initiation the number of hospital bed days fell, on average, from 66 to 39 per annum per patient. Those with a longer psychiatric history appeared to benefit more from a CTO, in terms of reduced time in hospital. Clinical implications Our data offer cautious support for the use of CTOs in routine practice, in terms of reducing time spent in psychiatric hospital. This finding is balanced by the more rigorous randomised studies which do not find any benefit to CTOs. PMID:27280031

  6. Reconciling concepts of time and person-centred care of the older person with cognitive impairment in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Carole; Nilsson, Anita; Edvardsson, David

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this analysis was to examine the concept of time to rejuvenate and extend existing narratives of time within the nursing literature. In particular, we hope to promote a new trajectory in nursing research and practice which focuses on time and person-centred care, specifically of older people with cognitive impairment hospitalized in the acute care setting. We consider the explanatory power of concepts such as clock time, process time, fast care, slow care and time debt for elucidating the relationship between 'good care' and 'time use'. We conclude by offering two additional concepts of time, plurotemporality and person-centred time (PCT) which we propose will help advance of nursing knowledge and practice. Nurse clinicians and researchers can use these alternative concepts of time to explore and describe different temporal structures that honour the patient's values and preferences using experiential, observation-based nursing research approaches. PMID:27659589

  7. The impact of the individual mandate and Internal Revenue Service Form 990 Schedule H on community benefits from nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Principe, Kristine; Adams, E Kathleen; Maynard, Jenifer; Becker, Edmund R

    2012-02-01

    In response to a growing concern that nonprofit hospitals are not providing sufficient benefit to their communities in return for their tax-exempt status, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) now requires nonprofit hospitals to formally document the extent of their community contributions. While the IRS is increasing financial scrutiny of nonprofit hospitals, many provisions in the recently passed historical health reform legislation will also have a significant impact on the provision of uncompensated care and other community benefits. We argue that health reform does not render the nonprofit organizational form obsolete. Rather, health reform should strengthen the nonprofit hospitals' ability to fulfill their missions by better targeting subsidies for uncompensated care and potentially increasing subsidized health services provision, many of which affect the public's health.

  8. Exposure to Community Violence is Associated with Asthma Hospitalizations and ED Visits

    PubMed Central

    Apter, Andrea J.; Garcia, Laura A.; Boyd, Rhonda C.; Wang, Xingmei; Bogen, Daniel K.; Have, Thomas Ten

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to community violence (ECV) has been associated with asthma morbidity of children living in inner-city neighborhoods. Objective To examine with prospective longitudinal data whether ECV is independently associated with asthma-related health outcomes in adults. Methods Adults with moderate-severe asthma, recruited from clinics serving inner-city neighborhoods, completed questionnaires covering socio-demographics, asthma severity, and ECV and were followed for 26 weeks. Longitudinal models were employed to assess unadjusted and adjusted associations of subsequent asthma outcomes (emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, FEV1, quality of life). Results 397 adults, 47±14 years, 73% female, 70% African American, 7% Latino, mean FEV1 66%±19%, 133 with hospitalizations and 222 with ED visits for asthma in the year before entry were evaluated. 91 reported ECV. Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income, those exposed to violence had 2.27 (95% CI: 1.32-3.90) times more asthma-related ED visits per month and 2.49 (95% CI: 1.11-5.60) times more asthma-related hospitalizations per month over the 26-week study period compared to those unexposed. Violence-exposed participants also had 1.71 (95% CI: 1.14-2.56) times more overall ED visits per month and 1.72 (95% CI: 0.95-3.11) times more overall hospitalizations per month from any cause. Asthma-related quality of life was lower in the violence-exposed participants (-0.40 (95%CI: -0.77-0.025), p=0.04). Effect modification by depressive symptoms was only statistically significant for the ECV association with overall ED visits and quality of life outcomes (p<.01). Conclusion In adults, ECV is associated with increased hospitalizations and emergency care for asthma or any condition and with asthma-related quality of life. PMID:20816190

  9. [Efficacy and safety of levofloxacin treatment of community--acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Karwat, Krzysztof J; Grabczak, Magdalena; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy and safety of levofloxacin in the treatment of community-aquired pneumonia (CAP) in outpatient with ineffective antibiotic management, requiring hospitalization. The examined group included 25 patients (11 M, 14 F) of mean age 70+/-17,5 years with abnormalities in X-ray on admission to hospital. Risk factors for pneumonia and previous antibacterial therapy were analyzed. In the hospital they were treated for 7 days with levofloxacin 500 mg twice a day administred intravenously. Body temperature, blood cell count, ESR, CRP, AST, ALT, LDH, CPK, creatine, urea, potassium, sodium, ABG, and ECG were measured on admission and in the 3-rd and 7- th day of therapy. The chest X-rays were performed and analyzed on hospital discharge. 18 patients were aged > 65 yrs, cardiovascular diseases co-existed in 14, COPD in 9, smoking habit in 12, renal failure in 3, diabetes in 3 and alkohol addiction in 1 cases. On admission 4 patients had respiratory failure, 10 hypoxaemia. During therapy a decrease of body temperature (p<0,001), concentration of CRP (p<0,004) and LDH (p<0,03), CPK (p<0,04) and increase of PaO2 (p<0,012) were observed. The changes of other parameters were not statistically significant. We did not observe any changes in ECG. On discharge from the hospital in 16 patients complete regression and in 6 patients partial regression of lesions in chest X-ray examination were observed. In 3 patients levofloxacin therapy was noneffective: in 2 because of persistent high body temperature after 3 days of treatment and in 1 patients because of recurrent of fever. Adverse events were mild. Transient exacerbation of renal failure was observed in 3 patients. Our study demonstrates that levofloxacine ni dose 2x500 mg given intravenously for 7 days is effective and safe in treatment of CAP in patients with previously ineffective antibacterial therapy.

  10. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  11. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation—A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient. PMID:27347986

  12. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-06-24

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient.

  13. Effect of evaluations of competency to stand trial on the state hospital in an era of increased community services.

    PubMed

    Geller, J L; Fisher, W H; Kaye, N S

    1991-08-01

    The authors studied court-ordered inpatient evaluations of competency to stand trial at two Massachusetts state hospitals for the period from 1972 to 1987, with particular attention to the effects of a 1978 federal court consent decree that created an extensive system of community-based services in the catchment area of one of the hospitals. The authors found that the broad array of community services developed under the consent decree did not reduce commitments to the state hospital for evaluation of competency to stand trial at the same rate as it reduced civil commitments, with the result that the composition of the patient population changed to include a significantly larger proportion of patients referred by the criminal justice system. This proportion was as high as 17.8 percent in 1985. These patients used a disproportionate share of the hospital's resources, staying in the hospital for a median of 28 days, compared with 12 days for all other patients.

  14. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  15. The association between functional disability and acute care utilization among the elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Yi; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Li, Chung-Pin; Fang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Nicole; Chou, Yiing-Jeng

    2013-01-01

    Disability is associated with increased long-term care use among the elderly, but its association with utilization of acute care is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between functional disability and acute medical care utilization among the elderly. This nationwide, population-based cohort study was based on data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), linking to the 2004-2007 National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data. A total of 1521 elderly subjects aged 65 years or above were observed from the year 2004 to 2006; this sample was considered to be a national representative sample. The utilization of acute medical care (including outpatient services, emergency services, and inpatient services) and medical expenditure were measured. Functional disability was measured by determining limitations on activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and mobility. After adjusting for age, comorbidity, and sociodemographic characteristics, functional disability that affected IADLs or mobility was a significant factor contributing to the increased use of care. A clear proportional relationship existed between disability and utilization, and this pattern persisted across different types of acute care services. Disability affecting IADLs or mobility, rather than ADLs, was a more sensitive predictor of acute medical care utilization. Compared to elderly persons with no limitations, the medical expenditure of those with moderate-to-severe limitations was 2-3 times higher for outpatient, emergency, and inpatient services. In conclusion, functional disability among the elderly is a significant factor contributing to the increased use of acute care services.

  16. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  17. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  18. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  19. Healing Environments: Integrative Medicine and Palliative Care in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Estores, Irene M; Frye, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    Conventional medicine is excellent at saving lives; however, it has little to offer to address the physical, mental, and emotional distress associated with life-threatening or life-limiting disease. An integrative approach to palliative care in acute care settings can meet this need by creating healing environments that support patients, families, and health care professionals. Mindful use of language enhances the innate healing response, improves communication, and invites patients and families to participate in their care. Staff should be offered access to skills training to cultivate compassion and mindful practice to enhance both patient and self-care.

  20. Population Screening Using Sewage Reveals Pan-Resistant Bacteria in Hospital and Community Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mileguir, Fernando; Azar, Roberto; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Rahav, Galia; Shamiss, Ari; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pan-resistant bacteria worldwide possesses a threat to global health. It is difficult to evaluate the extent of carriage of resistant bacteria in the population. Sewage sampling is a possible way to monitor populations. We evaluated the presence of pan-resistant bacteria in Israeli sewage collected from all over Israel, by modifying the pour plate method for heterotrophic plate count technique using commercial selective agar plates. This method enables convenient and fast sewage sampling and detection. We found that sewage in Israel contains multiple pan-resistant bacteria including carbapenemase resistant Enterobacteriacae carrying blaKPC and blaNDM-1, MRSA and VRE. blaKPC carrying Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae were the most common Enterobacteriacae drug resistant bacteria found in the sewage locations we sampled. Klebsiella pneumonia, Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Citrobacter spp. were the 4 main CRE isolated from Israeli sewage and also from clinical samples in our clinical microbiology laboratory. Hospitals and Community sewage had similar percentage of positive samplings for blaKPC and blaNDM-1. VRE was found to be more abundant in sewage in Israel than MRSA but there were more locations positive for MRSA and VRE bacteria in Hospital sewage than in the Community. Therefore, our upgrade of the pour plate method for heterotrophic plate count technique using commercial selective agar plates can be a useful tool for routine screening and monitoring of the population for pan-resistant bacteria using sewage. PMID:27780222

  1. Antibiotic Consumption During a 4-year Period in a Community Hospital with an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

    PubMed Central

    Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Arias, Ariadna Villanueva; Fernandez, Eliezer Alemán; Guerrero, Yaquelín Batista; Serrano, Ramon N. Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to evaluate the trend of antibiotic consumption in patients admitted to a community hospital in Qatar with an antimicrobial stewardship program. Methods This observational study was carried out in a 75-bed facility in Western Qatar over a 4-year period (2012–2015). The monitoring of antimicrobial consumption from inpatient wards was performed from the pharmacy records and presented as defined daily dose (DDD) divided by the patient days and expressed as 100 bed-days (DBD). Results The consumption of antimicrobials in 2012 was 171.3 DBD, and increased to 252.7 DBD in 2013, 229.1 DBD in 2014, and 184.7 DBD in 2015. Cephalosporins use reduced from 98.2 DBD in 2013 to 51.5 DBD in 2015 while the consumption of penicillins increased during the beginning of 2014 with a slight decrease in 2015. Carbapenems consumption during 2014–2015 was lower than previous years, and vice-versa for aminoglycosides. Fluoroquinolones had a sustained increase with 37.1% increased consumption in 2015 compared to the two previous years. There was an increase in the use of intravenous (IV) (108.5%) and oral azithromycin (55.1%) and the use of oral (152.8%) and IV moxifloxacin (22.9%). Conclusions We observed a decrease in antibiotic use in patients admitted to a community hospital with an antimicrobial stewardship program, but the increase in fluoroquinolones consumption is a concern that requires focused strategies. PMID:27602189

  2. Hospital-integrated PACS: R&D effort of the European communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottes, Fenno P.; Bakker, Albert R.; Mattheus, Rudy A.; Osteaux, Michel; Kouwenberg, Jef M.

    1990-08-01

    A PACS research project under the name " FOUNDATIONS FOR A HOSPITAL INThGRATED PICTURE ARCHIVING AND COMMUNICATION SYSTEM" is currently conducted. The overall objective is the modular conception of an experimental knowledge-based medical information management and distribution system. Image/text document access and display will be based on an intelligent user interface for diagnostic image workstations. The concept will comprise the integration of PA.S with the functions of the Hospital Information System. It will be based upon standards and be realized by an interactive collaborationbetween 7 european research groups from universities, hospitals and industries. The multi-disciplinary groups will consist of engineers, computer scientists, medical doctors (both radiologists and clinicians) and physicists. The HIPACS project has a budget of ECU 1.3 million, of which 50% is provided by the Commission of European Communities (CEC) within the scope of the exploratory phase of the Advanced Informatics in Medicine (AIM) research programme. HIPACS is directed by Prof. M. Osteaux, the prime contractor. This paper first explains the backgrounds of the AIM program. Next, the objectives of the HIPACS project are reviewed. The cooperating partners and their (scheduled) research activities are listed. Finally, the continuation of HIPACS within scope of the main phase of AIM is discussed.

  3. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Walson Army Community Hospital, Fort Dix, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    1984-12-31

    In September of 1984, the firm of Einhorn Yaffee Prescott, P.C. was retained by the Army Corps of Engineers to perform energy conservation services for the Walson Army Community Hospital at Fort Dix and the Ainsworth Clinic at Fort Hamilton. The architectural/engineerinq/health planning field team studied the existing heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and electrical systems, results of all prior or ongoing energy conservation studies, projects, and designs or plans, the facilities operation and environment, and past energy usage. A comprehensive report has been prepared which documents the work accomplished, the results and the recommendations. This report reflects a joint effort between the field investigation team and the hospital staff. The scope of this study included the following objectives: Perform a complete energy audit and analysis of the entire hospital facility. Identify all energy conservation opportunities, including low cost/no cost items and perform complete evaluations of each. Prepare programming documentation for all energy conservation investment program projects including DD Form 1391, a life cycle cost analysis summary sheet with backup calculations and a Project Development Brochure. Prepare implementation documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. List and prioritize all recommended energy conservation opportunities.

  4. Outcomes and Resource Use of Sepsis-associated Stays by Presence on Admission, Severity, and Hospital Type

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Carol M.; Kiehne, Lisa B.; Nicolas, Juan C.; Rose, Alexis L.; Shirkey, Beverly A.; Masud, Faisal; Wray, Nelda P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To establish a baseline for the incidence of sepsis by severity and presence on admission in acute care hospital settings before implementation of a broad sepsis screening and response initiative. Methods: A retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge abstracts of 5672 patients, aged 18 years and above, with sepsis-associated stays between February 2012 and January 2013 at an academic medical center and 5 community hospitals in Texas. Results: Sepsis was present on admission in almost 85% of cases and acquired in-hospital in the remainder. The overall inpatient death rate was 17.2%, but was higher in hospital-acquired sepsis (38.6%, medical; 29.2%, surgical) and Stages 2 (17.6%) and 3 (36.4%) compared with Stage 1 (5.9%). Patients treated at the academic medical center had a higher death rate (22.5% vs. 15.1%, P<0.001) and were more costly ($68,050±184,541 vs. $19,498±31,506, P<0.001) versus community hospitals. Conclusions: Greater emphasis is needed on public awareness of sepsis and the detection of sepsis in the prehospitalization and early hospitalization period. Hospital characteristics and case mix should be accounted for in cross-hospital comparisons of sepsis outcomes and costs. PMID:26759980

  5. Multi-hospital Community NICU Quality Improvement Improves Survival of ELBW Infants.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jack D; Soltau, Thomas; McCaughn, Danny; Miller, Jason; O'Mara, Patrick; Robbins, Kenny; Temple, David M; Wender, David F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement or high reliability in medicine is an evolving science where we seek to integrate evidence-based medicine, structural resources, process management, leadership models, culture, and education. Newborn Associates is a community-based neonatology practice that staffs and manages neonatal intensive care units (NICU's) at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, St Dominic's Hospital and Woman's Hospital within the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. These hospitals participate in the Vermont-Oxford Neonatal Network (VON), which is a voluntary national network of about 1000 NICU groups that submit data allowing them to benchmark their patient outcome. This network currently holds data on 1.5 million infants. Participation may also include the Newborn Improvement Quality Collaborative (NICQ) which is an intensive quality improvement program where 40-60 of the almost 1000 VON centers participate each year or the iNICQ, which is an internet-based collaborative involving about 150 centers per year. From 2008-2009, our group concentrated efforts on quality improvement which included consolidating resources of three corporately managed hospitals to allow focused care of babies under 800-1000 grams at a single center, expanding participation in the VON NICQ to include all physicians and centers, and establishing a group QI focused committee aimed at sharing practice bundles and adopting quality improvement methodology. The goal of this article is to report the impact of these QI activities on survival of the smallest preterm infants who weigh less than 1500 grams at birth. Two epochs were compared: 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. 551 VLBW (< 1 500 grams) infants from epoch I were compared to 583 VLBW infants from epoch 2. Mortality in this group decreased from 18% to 11.1% (OR 0.62,95% CI 0.44-0.88). Mortality in the 501-750 grams birth weight category decreased from 45.7% to 18% (OR 0.39,95% CI 0

  6. Multi-hospital Community NICU Quality Improvement Improves Survival of ELBW Infants.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jack D; Soltau, Thomas; McCaughn, Danny; Miller, Jason; O'Mara, Patrick; Robbins, Kenny; Temple, David M; Wender, David F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement or high reliability in medicine is an evolving science where we seek to integrate evidence-based medicine, structural resources, process management, leadership models, culture, and education. Newborn Associates is a community-based neonatology practice that staffs and manages neonatal intensive care units (NICU's) at Central Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, River Oaks Hospital, St Dominic's Hospital and Woman's Hospital within the Jackson, Mississippi, metropolitan area. These hospitals participate in the Vermont-Oxford Neonatal Network (VON), which is a voluntary national network of about 1000 NICU groups that submit data allowing them to benchmark their patient outcome. This network currently holds data on 1.5 million infants. Participation may also include the Newborn Improvement Quality Collaborative (NICQ) which is an intensive quality improvement program where 40-60 of the almost 1000 VON centers participate each year or the iNICQ, which is an internet-based collaborative involving about 150 centers per year. From 2008-2009, our group concentrated efforts on quality improvement which included consolidating resources of three corporately managed hospitals to allow focused care of babies under 800-1000 grams at a single center, expanding participation in the VON NICQ to include all physicians and centers, and establishing a group QI focused committee aimed at sharing practice bundles and adopting quality improvement methodology. The goal of this article is to report the impact of these QI activities on survival of the smallest preterm infants who weigh less than 1500 grams at birth. Two epochs were compared: 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. 551 VLBW (< 1 500 grams) infants from epoch I were compared to 583 VLBW infants from epoch 2. Mortality in this group decreased from 18% to 11.1% (OR 0.62,95% CI 0.44-0.88). Mortality in the 501-750 grams birth weight category decreased from 45.7% to 18% (OR 0.39,95% CI 0

  7. Diagnosis of atypical pathogens in patients hospitalized with community-acquired respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Peter M; Dorigo-Zetsma, J Wendeline; van der Zee, Anneke; van Bon, Marion; van Opstal, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    The object of our study was to determine the proportion of atypical respiratory pathogens among patients hospitalized with a community-acquired respiratory infection. From September 1997 to May 1999, 159 patients (57% male, median age 55, range 1-88 y) admitted to 3 regional hospitals for a community acquired respiratory infection, were enrolled in the study. Microbiological diagnosis for the atypical pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila was performed with PCR on a throat swab, sputum and/or broncho alveolar lavage (BAL). In addition, Legionella species other than L. pneumophila (L. non-pneumophila species) were detected by PCR. Two serum samples were collected and processed for M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae serology. In total, 27 patients (17%) were diagnosed with an atypical pathogen. Infection with M. pneumoniae was detected in 19 patients (12%) (PCR positive n = 7), with C. pneumoniae in 5 patients (3%) (PCR positive n = 0) and with L. pneumophila in 4 patients (2.5%) (PCR positive n = 4). In 54 (34%) patients routine microbiological investigations revealed aetiological agents other than the 3 atypical pathogens, the most frequently diagnosed pathogens being Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 18), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 17), Gram-negative rods (n = 13), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 6) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 6). More than 1 pathogen was found in 13 patients. Atypical pathogens were found more often in the young age group (0-18 y), in contrast to bacterial pathogens that were found more often in the older age groups (> or = 65 y). Atypical pathogens were found less often in patients with a clinical presentation of atypical pneumonia. Legionella species other than L. pneumophila were found by PCR in 13 patients (8%), and in 6 patients in combination with another pathogen. An atypical pathogen (M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae or L. pneumophila) was found in 17% of the patients hospitalized with a community acquired

  8. Bottle-blowing in hospital-treated patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Björkqvist, M; Wiberg, B; Bodin, L; Bárány, M; Holmberg, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine whether bottle-blowing has any positive effects in patients with pneumonia. In a prospective open study 145 adults with untreated community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization were randomized to early mobilization (group A), to sit up and take 20 deep breaths on 10 occasions daily (group B), or to sit up and to blow bubbles in a bottle containing 10 cm water through a plastic tube 20 times on 10 occasions daily (group C). Peak expiratory flow (PEF), vital capacity (VC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined on admission, and on days 4 and 42. Fever duration and hospital stay were recorded. In a subset of 16 patients, single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide was measured on 3 occasions. The patients in group A were hospitalized for a mean of 5.3 days, group B for 4.6 days and group C for 3.9 days. Treatment was a significant factor (p = 0.037) in a Cox regression model, with group C significantly better than group A (p = 0.01). The number of days with fever was 2.3, 1.7 and 1.6 in groups A, B and C respectively. These differences were not significant (p = 0.28). No significant differences were found between the groups regarding CRP, PEF, VC, FEV1, or diffusion capacity. Intensive bottle-blowing shortens the hospital stay in patients with pneumonia. The underlying mechanism is not clear.

  9. Has competition increased hospital technical efficiency?

    PubMed

    Lee, Keon-Hyung; Park, Jungwon; Lim, Seunghoo; Park, Sang-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Hospital competition and managed care have affected the hospital industry in various ways including technical efficiency. Hospital efficiency has become an important topic, and it is important to properly measure hospital efficiency in order to evaluate the impact of policies on the hospital industry. The primary independent variable is hospital competition. By using the 2001-2004 inpatient discharge data from Florida, we calculate the degree of hospital competition in Florida for 4 years. Hospital efficiency scores are developed using the Data Envelopment Analysis and by using the selected input and output variables from the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals for those acute care general hospitals in Florida. By using the hospital efficiency score as a dependent variable, we analyze the effects of hospital competition on hospital efficiency from 2001 to 2004 and find that when a hospital was located in a less competitive market in 2003, its technical efficiency score was lower than those in a more competitive market.

  10. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  11. A questionnaire survey exploring healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards teamwork and safety in acute care areas in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Chan Woong; Lee, Sang Jin; Oh, Je Hyeok; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Chung, Hyun Soo; Ryu, Ji Yeong; Jang, Hye Young; Choi, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Jin; Jung, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although human factors are important in terms of patient safety, there have been very few reports on the attitudes of healthcare professionals working in acute care settings in South Korea. In the present study, we investigated the attitudes of such professionals, their cultures and their management systems. Design A questionnaire survey with 65 items covering nine themes affecting patient safety. Nine themes were compared via a three-or-more-way analysis of variance, with interaction, followed by multiple comparisons among several groups. Setting Intensive care units, emergency departments and surgical units of nine urban hospitals. Participants 592 nurses and 160 physicians. Intervention None. Outcome measures Mean scores using a five-point scale and combined response scores for each of the nine themes. Results The mean score for information-sharing was the highest (3.78±0.49) and that for confidence/assertion was the lowest (2.97±0.34). The mean scores for teamwork, error management, work value, organisational climate, leadership, stress and fatigue level, and error/procedural compliance were intermediate. Physicians showed lower scores in leadership and higher scores in information-sharing than nurses. Respondents with 24 months or less of a clinical career showed higher scores in leadership, stress and fatigue, and error scores and lower scores in work value than more experienced respondents. Conclusions Our results suggest that medical personnel in Korea are relatively reluctant to disclose error or assert their different opinions with others. Many did not adequately recognise the negative effects of fatigue and stress, attributed errors to personal incompetence, and error-management systems were inadequate. Discrepancies in leadership and information-sharing were evident between professional groups, and leadership, stress, fatigue level, work value and error scores varied with the length of work experience. These can be used as baseline data

  12. Atypical crusted "Norwegian" scabies: report of nosocomial transmission in a community hospital and an approach to control.

    PubMed

    Lerche, N W; Currier, R W; Juranek, D D; Baer, W; Dubay, N J

    1983-06-01

    During August, 1981, a person with an unrecognized case of atypical Norwegian scabies was admitted to a community hospital in Chariton, Iowa. Twenty cases of symptomatic scabies were reported among hospital staff; mites were recovered from four. Subsequent evaluation confirmed scabies transmission to family and friends of this patient before hospitalization; twelve cases of symptomatic scabies, three of them slide positive, were identified in this group. The patient was treated sequentially with 1 percent lindane lotion, 10 percent crotamiton lotion, and 6 percent sulfur ointment to successfully eradicate the infestation. Secondary cases in the hospital and community were treated with 10 percent crotamiton which also was used to prophylactically treat exposed contacts. Control measures and patient management are presented.

  13. Community-based urgent care in Israel and worldwide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent treatment of acute lower acuity situations has come to be defined as urgent rather than emergent care. The location of urgent care delivery has been shifting from exclusively hospital or office settings to other community locales. Aims To review the concept of urgent care and the new models of health care delivery in the niche between hospitals and primary care. To highlight the roles of urgent care in Israel and compare these roles with those in other countries. Method Narrative review of the literature. Main findings The new models of community based urgent care include 1) the urgent care center; 2) the retail or convenience clinic, 3) the free standing emergency center, and 4) the walk-in clinic. These models fall on a continuum of comprehensiveness. They offer care at a lower cost than hospital-based emergency departments and greater temporal convenience than primary care physicians. However, their impact on emergency department utilization and overcrowding or primary care physician overload is unclear. Israel has integrated its urgent care centers into its national health system by encouraging the use of urgent care centers and by requiring all health insurance funds to reimburse patients who use these centers. This integration is similar to the approach in England; however, the type of service is different in that the service in England is provided by nurses. It is different from most other countries where urgent care facilities are primarily private ventures. Conclusions Community-based acute care facilities are becoming a part of the medical landscape in a number of countries. Still, they remain primarily on the fringe of organized medicine. Despite the important role of community-based acute care facilities in Israel, no nationwide study has been done in two decades. Health policy planning in Israel necessitates further study of urgent care use and its clinical outcomes. PMID:24152917

  14. A day in the life: a case series of acute care palliative medicine--the Cleveland model.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Heintz, Jessica; Legrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care in advanced disease is complex. Knowledge and experience of symptom control and management of multiple complications are essential. An interdisciplinary team is also required to meet the medical and psychosocial needs in life-limiting illness. Acute care palliative medicine is a new concept in the spectrum of palliative care services. Acute care palliative medicine, integrated into a tertiary academic medical center, provides expert medical management and specialized care as part of the spectrum of acute medical care services to this challenging patient population. The authors describe a case series to provide a snapshot of a typical day in an acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit. The cases illustrate the sophisticated medical care involved for each individual and the important skill sets of the palliative medicine specialist required to provide high-quality acute medical care for the very ill.

  15. Community spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria detected in social insurance hospitals throughout Japan.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Mayumi; Komatsu, Masaru; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Misaho; Uchida, Takae; Yonezawa, Hitoshi; Inagaki, Kenji; Omi, Ayako; Matsumoto, Hidenobu; Murotani, Makiko; Iwamoto, Tsukasa; Kodaka, Yoshihiro; Kieda, Hideto; Tokiwa, Manabu; Masuwa, Bunji; Kinoshita, Mari; Saito, Kazuei; Katou, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the status of community-acquired infections involving four extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis) isolated from clinical specimens from 11 social insurance hospitals in Japan in 2012. These are member hospitals of the Japan Community Healthcare Organization, an independent administrative hospital organization. The isolation rates for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and P. mirabilis were 14.0% (165/1176), 3.3% (16/480), 3.1% (4/130), and 15.9% (17/107), respectively. The CTX-M-9 group, the most frequently detected genotype, was found in 77.0% (127/165) of E. coli and 43.8% (7/16) of K. pneumoniae isolates. Among K. oxytoca isolates, 75% (3/4) were the CTX-M-1 group, and all 17 P. mirabilis strains were the CTX-M-2 group. ESBL-producing bacteria isolation rates in each hospital ranged from 5.8% to 21.5% (median 9.5%), and the proportion of community-acquired infections among ESBL-producing bacteria isolates ranged from 1.6% to 30.8% (median 11.4%) in each hospital. Overall, the rates of ESBL-producing bacterial infection in all community-acquired infections and in all hospital infections were 10.6% (115/1081) and 10.7% (87/812), respectively. The ESBL-producing bacteria are not limited to certain regions or hospitals but are spreading in communities throughout Japan.

  16. In California, not-for-profit hospitals spent more operating expenses on charity care than for-profit hospitals spent.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, Erica; Le, Sidney; Hsia, Renee Y

    2015-08-01

    In exchange for sizable tax exemptions, not-for-profit hospitals must engage in activities that meet the Internal Revenue Service's community benefit standard. The provision of charity care-free care to those unable to pay-can help meet that standard. Bad debt, the other form of uncompensated care, cannot be used to meet the standard, although Medicaid shortfalls can. However, the ACA lacks guidelines for providing charity care, and federal law sets no minimum requirements for community benefit activities. Using data from California, we examined whether the levels of charity and uncompensated care provided differed across general acute care hospitals by profit status and other characteristics during 2011-13. The mean proportion of total operating expenses spent on charity care differed significantly between not-for-profit (1.9 percent) and for-profit hospitals (1.4 percent), in contrast to the mean proportion spent on uncompensated care. Both types of spending varied widely across hospitals. Policy makers should consider measures that remove disincentives to meeting the persistent considerable need for charity care-for example, increasing supports to offset rising Medicaid shortfalls resulting from program expansion-and facilitate the tracking of ACA impacts on the distribution of charity care and uncompensated care delivery. PMID:26240242

  17. Prevention of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection in the New York metropolitan region using a collaborative intervention model.

    PubMed

    Koll, Brian S; Ruiz, Rafael E; Calfee, David P; Jalon, Hillary S; Stricof, Rachel L; Adams, Audrey; Smith, Barbara A; Shin, Gina; Gase, Kathleen; Woods, Maria K; Sirtalan, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The incidence, severity, and associated costs of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) have dramatically increased in hospitals over the past decade, indicating an urgent need for strategies to prevent transmission of C. difficile. This article describes a multifaceted collaborative approach to reduce hospital-onset CDI rates in 35 acute care hospitals in the New York metropolitan region. Hospitals participated in a comprehensive CDI reduction intervention and formed interdisciplinary teams to coordinate their efforts. Standardized clinical infection prevention and environmental cleaning protocols were implemented and monitored using checklists. Monthly data reports were provided to hospitals for facility-specific performance evaluation and comparison to aggregate data from all participants. Hospitals also participated in monthly teleconferences to review data and highlight successes, challenges, and strategies to reduce CDI. Incidence of hospital-onset CDI per 10,000 patient days was the primary outcome measure. Additionally, the incidence of nonhospital-associated, community-onset, hospital-associated, and recurrent CDIs were measured. The use of a collaborative model to implement a multifaceted infection prevention strategy was temporally associated with a significant reduction in hospital-onset CDI rates in participating New York metropolitan regional hospitals.

  18. Differential phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of qnrS1-harboring plasmids carried by hospital and community commensal enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Vien, Le Thi Minh; Abuoun, Manal; Morrison, Victoria; Thomson, Nicholas; Campbell, James I; Woodward, Martin J; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Baker, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    The qnrS1 gene induces reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in enterobacteria. We investigated the structure, antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype, and antimicrobial resistance gene characteristics of qnrS1 plasmids from hospitalized patients and community controls in southern Vietnam. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities, resistance gene characteristics, and plasmid structures of qnrS1 plasmids from the hospital differed from those from the community. Our data imply that the characteristics of the two plasmid groups are indicative of distinct selective pressures in the differing environments. PMID:21282449

  19. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication. PMID:21922155

  20. The effects of innovation factors on smartphone adoption among nurses in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new mobile technological device is the smartphone-a phone with advanced features such as Windows Mobile software, access to the Internet, and other computer processing capabilities. This article investigates the decision to adopt a smartphone among healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. The study examines constructs that affect an individual's decision to adopt a smartphone by employing innovation attributes leading to perceived attitudes. We hypothesize that individual intentions to use a smartphone are mostly determined by attitudes toward using a smartphone, which in turn are affected by innovation characteristics. Innovation characteristics are factors that help explain whether a user will adopt a new technology. The study consisted of a survey disseminated to 200 practicing nurses selected from two community hospitals in the southeastern United States. In our model, the innovation characteristics of observability, compatibility, job relevance, internal environment, and external environment were significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. PMID:20697467

  1. Partners advancing clinical excellence: building professional councils for quality improvement at six community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sakowski, Julie Ann; Hooper, Lynda; Holton, Thomas; Brody, Abraham A

    2012-01-01

    Engaging bedside clinicians, especially nurses, is essential for the success of sustainable process improvement programs and thus for improving the quality of health care. Studies have shown that properly implemented professional councils can be effective in engaging and empowering bedside clinicians to create lasting and meaningful improvements. This case study describes a 5-year program to implement and operate staff-led councils to lead evidence-based practice (EBP) quality improvement initiatives at 6 community hospitals. The outcomes presented in this case study demonstrate that staff-led councils have the potential to improve patient safety and quality of care as evidenced by observed reductions in ventilator-associated pneumonias, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and mortality from acute myocardial infarction and severe sepsis.

  2. The effects of innovation factors on smartphone adoption among nurses in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new mobile technological device is the smartphone-a phone with advanced features such as Windows Mobile software, access to the Internet, and other computer processing capabilities. This article investigates the decision to adopt a smartphone among healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. The study examines constructs that affect an individual's decision to adopt a smartphone by employing innovation attributes leading to perceived attitudes. We hypothesize that individual intentions to use a smartphone are mostly determined by attitudes toward using a smartphone, which in turn are affected by innovation characteristics. Innovation characteristics are factors that help explain whether a user will adopt a new technology. The study consisted of a survey disseminated to 200 practicing nurses selected from two community hospitals in the southeastern United States. In our model, the innovation characteristics of observability, compatibility, job relevance, internal environment, and external environment were significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone.

  3. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  4. Community characteristics associated with where urgent care centers are located: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Sidney T; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the community characteristics associated with non-hospital-based urgent care centres wherever they are located. Design National cross-sectional study evaluating the association between non-hospital-based urgent care centers, and their demographic characteristics in a community, using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regressions. Setting Communities in the USA with non-hospital-based urgent care centers, as identified using a 2014 national database from the Urgent Care Association of America. Participants 31 022 communities encompassing 6898 urgent care centers across the USA. Primary and secondary outcome measures Presence of a non-hospital-based urgent care center within a community. Results Communities with non-hospital-based urgent care centers are urban (75.7% with vs 22.2% without; p<0.001 across rural urban commuting area levels), and are located in areas with higher income levels (38.6% in highest quartile with vs 22.3% without; p<0.001 across quartiles) and higher levels of private insurance (29.6% in highest quartile with vs 23.9% without; p<0.001 across quartiles). Conclusions While the growth of the urgent care industry may have other promising implications, policymakers should recognise that it may exacerbate disparities in access to acute care faced by poorer, uninsured patients, and may also have financial implications for providers that are providing overlapping services, such as emergency departments and primary care practices. PMID:27056591

  5. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as “spa-types”, based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as “non-typeable”. Results We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated “non-typeable” using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. Conclusions This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments. PMID:24621342

  6. Early surgery for hospital-acquired and community-acquired active infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hosono, Mitsuharu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-06-01

    Active infective endocarditis (IE) is classified into two groups; hospital acquired IE (HIE) and IE other than HIE, which was defined as community-acquired IE (CIE). Eighty-two patients underwent surgical treatment for active IE. Seventy-one cases were CIE group and eleven were HIE. There were six patients with native valve endocarditis and five cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis in the HIE group. We compared the surgical outcome of both types of active IE retrospectively. The preoperative status of the patients in the HIE group was more critical than that in the CIE group. Streptococcus spp. were the major micro-organisms in the CIE group (39%), while 82% of the HIE cases were caused by Staphylococcus spp. All Staphylococcus organisms in the HIE group were methicillin resistant. There were 10 hospital deaths, three in the CIE group and seven in the HIE group. Operative mortality in the HIE group was significantly higher than in the CIE group (63.6% vs. 4.2%, P<0.001). The outcome of early operation was satisfactory for active CIE, but poor for HIE. These types of active IE should be considered separately.

  7. Latino Population Growth and Hospital Uncompensated Care in California

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Mennis, Jeremy; Alos, Victor A.; Grande, David T.; Roby, Dylan H.; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the association between the size and growth of Latino populations and hospitals’ uncompensated care in California. Methods. Our sample consisted of general acute care hospitals in California operating during 2000 and 2010 (n = 251). We merged California hospital data with US Census data for each hospital service area. We used spatial analysis, multivariate regression, and fixed-effect models. Results. We found a significant association between the growth of California’s Latino population and hospitals’ uncompensated care in the unadjusted regression. This association was still significant after we controlled for hospital and community population characteristics. After we added market characteristics into the final model, this relationship became nonsignificant. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that systematic support is needed in areas with rapid Latino population growth to control hospitals’ uncompensated care, especially if Latinos are excluded from or do not respond to the insurance options made available through the Affordable Care Act. Improving availability of resources for hospitals and providers in areas with high Latino population growth could help alleviate financial pressures. PMID:26066960

  8. Said another way. Is the ADN graduate prepared to practice in community settings?

    PubMed

    Percoco, T A

    1998-01-01

    The downsizing and closing of acute care facilities and the movement to community-based healthcare services are decreasing the need for RNs in acute care facilities. In the past, the associate-degree nurse (ADN) has filled the majority of positions in acute care. With the trend to provide health services in community setting, will the ADN be prepared for positions in community facilities? ADN educators must reevaluate how they are educating students for practice. The author reviews the 1995 recommendations from the Pew Health Professions Commission and relevant current directives from the National League for Nursing.

  9. [Evidence-based pharmacology in community and hospital pharmacies--a vision of the future?].

    PubMed

    Eisert, Albrecht; Günther, Judith

    2003-07-01

    Pharmacists are academically trained drug and medication specialists. Also in the eyes of the law, pharmacists are more than just specialised sales people for medication. As laid out in the regulations governing pharmacies, pharmacists see patients and experts in the fields of medicine, dentistry and veterinary science to whom they have to offer advice. The pharmacist's advisory activities, though, must not interfere with an existing doctor-patient relationship. All pharmaceutical activities in community and hospital pharmacies should therefore be based--similar to the medical faculty--on an evidence-based practice in the sense of an evidence-based pharmacy adopting all principles of Evidence-based Medicine. The challenge for pharmacists and doctors should therefore be to work together to increasingly develop common strategies in order to achieve optimal treatment for the benefit of the patient. Especially in the treatment of chronically ill patients, synergistic effects could be reached through open exchange and a closer linkage between medical and pharmaceutical activities. Such closer contacts between the two disciplines could be made at interdisciplinary colloquia or special subject-specific round table discussions. Pharmaceutical Care (PhC), i.e. the optimisation of medicational therapy of chronically ill patients through accompanying intensive pharmaceutical advice is desirable from the patient's point of view and could take some load off medical practitioners. Any questions as to the use of medication, potential side-effects or undesirable interaction with other medications, but also regarding additional preventive measures can be posed to qualified personnel by the patient collecting his/her medication in the pharmacy. Also, as community pharmacists see themselves as active medication specialists and valuable qualified advisors to the patient with regard of self-medication, increased investment in internal communication between colleagues and external

  10. Evaluation of Dabigatran for Appropriateness of Use and Bleeding Events in a Community Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Anastasia L.; Buehler, Katie S.; Min, Sun H.; Riley, Margaret; Daly, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Warfarin has been the predominant anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Its disadvantages are well-known and include a narrow therapeutic index, drug interactions, and the need for frequent monitoring. Dabigatran etexilate, a direct thrombin inhibitor, presents less complexity in prescribing and has emerged as an alternate therapy to warfarin. Although dabigatran does not require routine monitoring, concerns associated with its use include the lack of a reversal agent, complex dose adjustments, and limited guidance to the management of drug interactions. Objectives The goals of this study are to describe and to evaluate the use of dabigatran at a community hospital to identify areas for improvement in its prescribing. Methods This retrospective chart review of patients at a community hospital in St Louis, MO, included patients who received at least 1 dose of dabigatran between December 2010 and June 2012. The appropriateness of dabigatran was evaluated based on recommendations approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for stroke prophylaxis in the setting of NVAF. The composite end point of bleeding included hospital readmission within 1 year of receiving at least 1 dose of dabigatran at the study institution secondary to bleeding, bleeding associated with a decrease in hemoglobin level by ≥2 g/dL or transfusion of ≥2 units of blood, or a notation of bleeding in the patient's medical record. Results Of the 458 patients included in the evaluation, 76 (16.6%) patients receiving dabigatran were using an inappropriate regimen of this drug, based on dose and frequency on the first day of therapy of dabigatran or the presence of valvular disease. Many patients (42.3%) received at least 1 dose of a concomitant parenteral anticoagulant. The composite end point for bleeding was reported in 66 (14.4%) patients, including 23 (5%) with confirmed gastrointestinal bleeding

  11. Integrating Rapid Diagnostics and Antimicrobial Stewardship in Two Community Hospitals Improved Process Measures and Antibiotic Adjustment Time.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Ashley M; Perez, Katherine K; Musick, William L; Ikwuagwu, Judy O; Attia, Engie; Fasoranti, Oyejoke O; Cernoch, Patricia L; Olsen, Randall J; Musser, James M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the impact of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for rapid pathogen identification directly from early-positive blood cultures coupled with an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in two community hospitals. Process measures and outcomes prior and after implementation of MALDI-TOF/ASP were evaluated. DESIGN Multicenter retrospective study. SETTING Two community hospitals in a system setting, Houston Methodist (HM) Sugar Land Hospital (235 beds) or HM Willowbrook Hospital (241 beds). PATIENTS Patients ≥ 18 years of age with culture-proven Gram-negative bacteremia. INTERVENTION Blood cultures from both hospitals were sent to and processed at our central microbiology laboratory. Clinical pharmacists at respective hospitals were notified of pathogen ID and susceptibility results. RESULTS We evaluated 572 patients for possible inclusion. After pre-defined exclusion criteria, 151 patients were included in the pre-intervention group and 242 were included in the intervention group. After MALDI-TOF/ASP implementation, the mean identification time after culture positivity was significantly reduced from 32 hours (±16 hours) to 6.5 hours (±5.4 hours) (P<.001); mean time to susceptibility results was significantly reduced from 48 (±22) hours to 23 (±14) hours (P<.001); and time to therapy adjustment was significantly reduced from 75 (±59) hours to 30 (±30) hours (P<.001). Mean hospital costs per patient were $3,411 less in the intervention group compared with the pre-intervention group ($18,645 vs $15,234; P=.04). CONCLUSION This study is the first to analyze the impact of MALDI-TOF coupled with an ASP in a community hospital setting. Time to results significantly differed with the use of MALDI-TOF, and time to appropriate therapy was significantly improved with the addition of ASP. PMID:26738993

  12. Fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of salivary gland disorders in the community hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pitts, D B; Hilsinger, R L; Karandy, E; Ross, J C; Caro, J E

    1992-05-01

    From 1983 to 1988, 47 patients with salivary gland disorders were assessed with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) before surgery. The preoperative fine-needle diagnoses were then compared with the postoperative pathologic findings. In the same period, 63 patients from two other community hospitals who had been evaluated preoperatively with FNA were studied retrospectively. The overall sensitivity of FNA for salivary neoplasms was 80.6%. Fine-needle aspiration was more sensitive in identifying benign tumors (88.4%) than malignant neoplasms (58.3%) and was least sensitive in identifying nonneoplastic salivary diseases (35.3%). Pleomorphic adenomas were correctly identified preoperatively in 96.2% of cases, whereas for malignant neoplasms, the diagnostic accuracy was highest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (50%). To demonstrate the strengths of FNA as a diagnostic tool, as well as to delineate its limitations, we present our 5-year experience. Our FNA results are similar to those reported by the major European and American referral centers. Because our medical centers are community based, our results may more accurately reflect those seen by otolaryngologists in private practice. To date, no evidence of tumor seeding along the FNA tract has been reported.

  13. Telling stories and hearing voices: narrative work with voice hearers in acute care.

    PubMed

    Place, C; Foxcroft, R; Shaw, J

    2011-11-01

    Mental health nurses do not always feel at ease talking in detail with voice hearers about their experiences. Using the approach of Romme and Escher, a project was developed to support staff on an acute inpatient ward to explore voice hearing with patients. Romme and Escher suggest that a person's own understanding of their voices and their meaning is the key to recovery. Working together, the nurse helps voice hearers construct a narrative that tells the story of their voices. Examples from the narratives show how they can help increase understanding of a person's voices, and how the mental health nurse in acute care can realistically offer therapeutic interventions that may help a person towards recovery.

  14. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures.

  15. Neural network classification of clinical neurophysiological data for acute care monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sgro, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of neurophysiological monitoring of the 'acute care' patient is to allow the accurate recognition of changing or deteriorating neurological function as close to the moment of occurrence as possible, thus permitting immediate intervention. Results confirm that: (1) neural networks are able to accurately identify electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns and evoked potential (EP) wave components, and measuring EP waveform latencies and amplitudes; (2) neural networks are able to accurately detect EP and EEG recordings that have been contaminated by noise; (3) the best performance was obtained consistently with the back propagation network for EP and the HONN for EEG's; (4) neural network performed consistently better than other methods evaluated; and (5) neural network EEG and EP analyses are readily performed on multichannel data.

  16. Medication safety program reduces adverse drug events in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M; Kimmel, N; Benage, M; Cox, M; Sanders, N; Spence, D; Chen, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is widespread interest in improving medication safety, particularly in the hospital setting. Numerous suggestions have been made as to how this should be done, but there is a paucity of data demonstrating the effectiveness of any of the interventions that have been proposed. Objectives: To assess the impact of a wide ranging, community hospital based patient safety program on patient harm as measured by the rate of adverse drug events. Design: An audit of discharged hospital patients was conducted from January 2001 to December 2003. Baseline data were collected for the first 6 months and multiple drug protocols and other interventions were instituted on the nursing units and in the pharmacy department over the subsequent 9 months (transition period). These interventions were largely based on information about medication risks acquired from internal medication event reporting. Each month of the study adverse drug events (ADE) were sought from a random sample of inpatient charts. A trigger tool was used to detect clues to ADEs, the presence of which was confirmed or excluded by detailed manual chart review. The severity of these events was categorized using the classification system of the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error and Reporting and Prevention. Main outcome measures and results: Median ADEs per 1000 doses of medication dispensed declined significantly from 2.04 to 0.65 (p<0.001). Median ADEs per 100 patient days declined significantly from 5.07 to 1.30 (p<0.001). The proportion of inpatients with one or more ADE in the baseline period was 31% and declined threefold (p<0.001). The severity of reported medication events also declined. The number of ADEs associated conclusively with patient harm was 1.67 per total doses delivered in the baseline period and declined eightfold (p<0.001). Conclusion: The implementation of a carefully planned series of low cost interventions focused on high risk medications, driven by information

  17. Acute care clinical pharmacy practice: unit- versus service-based models.

    PubMed

    Haas, Curtis E; Eckel, Stephen; Arif, Sally; Beringer, Paul M; Blake, Elizabeth W; Lardieri, Allison B; Lobo, Bob L; Mercer, Jessica M; Moye, Pamela; Orlando, Patricia L; Wargo, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    This commentary from the 2010 Task Force on Acute Care Practice Model of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy was developed to compare and contrast the "unit-based" and "service-based" orientation of the clinical pharmacist within an acute care pharmacy practice model and to offer an informed opinion concerning which should be preferred. The clinical pharmacy practice model must facilitate patient-centered care and therefore must position the pharmacist to be an active member of the interprofessional team focused on providing high-quality pharmaceutical care to the patient. Although both models may have advantages and disadvantages, the most important distinction pertains to the patient care role of the clinical pharmacist. The unit-based pharmacist is often in a position of reacting to an established order or decision and frequently is focused on task-oriented clinical services. By definition, the service-based clinical pharmacist functions as a member of the interprofessional team. As a team member, the pharmacist proactively contributes to the decision-making process and the development of patient-centered care plans. The service-based orientation of the pharmacist is consistent with both the practice vision embraced by ACCP and its definition of clinical pharmacy. The task force strongly recommends that institutions pursue a service-based pharmacy practice model to optimally deploy their clinical pharmacists. Those who elect to adopt this recommendation will face challenges in overcoming several resource, technologic, regulatory, and accreditation barriers. However, such challenges must be confronted if clinical pharmacists are to contribute fully to achieving optimal patient outcomes.

  18. Effect of social networks and well-being on acute care needs.

    PubMed

    Sintonen, Sanna; Pehkonen, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The effect of social surroundings has been noted as an important component of the well-being of elderly people. A strong social network and strong and steady relationships are necessary for coping when illness or functional limitations occur in later life. Vulnerability can affect well-being and functioning particularly when sudden life changes occur. The objective of this study was to analyse how the determinants of social well-being affect individual acute care needs when sudden life changes occur. Empirical evidence was collected using a cross-sectional mail survey in Finland in January 2011 among individuals aged 55-79 years. The age-stratified random sample covered 3000 individuals, and the eventual response rate was 56% (1680). Complete responses were received from 1282 respondents (42.7%). The study focuses on the compactness of social networks, social disability, the stability of social relationships and the fear of loneliness as well as how these factors influence acute care needs. The measurement was based on a latent factor structure, and the key concepts were measured using two ordinal items. The results of the structural model suggest that the need for care is directly affected by social disability and the fear of loneliness. In addition, social disability is a determinant of the fear of loneliness and therefore plays an important role if sudden life changes occur. The compactness of social networks decreases social disability and partly diminishes the fear of loneliness and therefore has an indirect effect on the need for care. The stability of social relationships was influenced by the social networks and disability, but was an insignificant predictor of care needs. To conclude, social networks and well-being can decrease care needs, and supportive actions should be targeted to avoid loneliness and social isolation so that the informal network could be applied as an aspect of care-giving when acute life changes occur.

  19. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412...'s last cost reporting period ending before September 30, 2007 is for less than 12 months, the base... 1, 2005 and before October 1, 2006, that cost reporting period is the base period unless the...

  20. Guidelines for Libraries Serving Hospital Patients and Disabled People in the Community. IFLA Professional Reports, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    These guidelines are based on the experiences of a number of librarians working in the area of library services for hospital patients and disabled people in the community, as well as work done previously by a number of national library associations. The guidelines indicate the essential features of services to disabled people and suggest…

  1. Healthcare-associated, community-acquired and hospital-acquired bacteraemic urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients: a prospective multicentre cohort study in the era of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Horcajada, J P; Shaw, E; Padilla, B; Pintado, V; Calbo, E; Benito, N; Gamallo, R; Gozalo, M; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2013-10-01

    The clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-onset healthcare-associated (HCA) bacteraemia of urinary source are not well defined. We conducted a prospective cohort study at eight tertiary-care hospitals in Spain, from October 2010 to June 2011. All consecutive adult patients hospitalized with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI) were included. HCA-BUTI episodes were compared with community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) BUTI. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify 30-day mortality risk factors. We included 667 episodes of BUTI (246 HCA, 279 CA and 142 HA). Differences between HCA-BUTI and CA-BUTI were female gender (40% vs 69%, p <0.001), McCabe score II-III (48% vs 14%, p <0.001), Pitt score ≥2 (40% vs 31%, p 0.03), isolation of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaciae (13% vs 5%, p <0.001), median hospital stay (9 vs 7 days, p 0.03), inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (21% vs 13%, p 0.02) and mortality (11.4% vs 3.9%, p 0.001). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was more frequently isolated in HA-BUTI (16%) than in HCA-BUTI (4%, p <0.001). Independent factors for mortality were age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01-1.07), McCabe score II-III (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-5.5), Pitt score ≥2 (OR 3.2 (1.8-5.5) and HA-BUTI OR 3.4 (1.2-9.0)). Patients with HCA-BUTI are a specific group with significant clinical and microbiological differences from patients with CA-BUTI, and some similarities with patients with HA-BUTI. Mortality was associated with patient condition, the severity of infection and hospital acquisition.

  2. Minorities, men, and unmarried amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients are more likely to die in an acute care facility.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Stephen A; Nowacek, Dustin G; Burke, James F; Kerber, Kevin A; Skolarus, Lesli E; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest that dying at home is a more favorable experience. This study investigated where amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients die and the patient demographics associated with dying in an acute care facility or nursing home compared to home or hospice. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Multiple Cause Mortality Files from 2005 to 2010 were used to identify ALS patients and to classify place of death. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between patient demographics and place of death. Between 2005 and 2010, 40,911 patients died of ALS in the United States. Place of death was as follows: home or hospice facility 20,231 (50%), acute care facility (25%), and nursing home (20%). African Americans (adjusted multinomial odds ratio (aMOR) 2.56, CI 2.32-2.83), Hispanics (aMOR 1.44, CI 1.30-1.62), and Asians (aMOR 1.87, CI 1.57-2.22) were more likely to die in an acute care facility, whereas females (aMOR 0.76, CI 0.72-0.80) and married individuals were less likely. Hispanics (aMOR 0.68, CI 0.58-0.79) and married individuals were less likely to die in a nursing home. In conclusion, minorities, men, and unmarried individuals are more likely to die in an acute care facility. Further studies are needed to better understand place of death preferences.

  3. Why do Families of Sick Newborns Accept Hospital Care? A Community-Based Cohort Study in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Owais, Aatekah; Sultana, Shazia; Stein, Aryeh D.; Bashir, Nasira H.; Awaldad, Razia; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Sick young infants are at high risk of mortality in developing countries but families often decline hospital referral. Our objective was to identify the predictors of acceptance of referral for hospital care among families of severely ill newborns and infants <59 days old in three low-income communities of Karachi, Pakistan. Study design A cohort of 541 newborns and infants referred from home by community health workers doing household surveillance, and diagnosed with a serious illness at local community clinics between January 1 and December 31, 2007, was followed-up within 1 month of referral to the public hospital. Results Only 24% of families accepted hospital referral. Major reasons for refusal were financial difficulties (67%) and father/elder denying permission (65%). Religious/cultural beliefs were cited by 20% of families. Referral acceptance was higher with recognition of severity of the illness by mother (OR=12.7; 95% CI=4.6–35.2), family’s ability to speak the dominant language at hospital (OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3–3.1), presence of grunting in the infant (OR=3.3; 95% CI=1.2–9.0), and infant temperature <35.5°C (OR=4.1; 95% CI=2.3–7.4). No gender differential was observed. Conclusion Refusal of hospital referral for sick young infants is very common. Interventions that encourage appropriate care seeking, as well as community-based management of young infant illnesses when referral is not feasible are needed to improve neonatal survival in low-income countries. PMID:21273989

  4. The Widespread Presence of a Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clade among Community-Associated and Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, P. Martijn; van Burgh, Sebastian; Burggraaf, Arjan; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M.; van der Zee, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The extent of entry of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from the community into the hospital and subsequent clonal spread amongst patients is unclear. To investigate the extent and direction of clonal spread of these bacteria within a large teaching hospital, we prospectively genotyped multidrug-resistant E. coli obtained from community- and hospital associated patient groups and compared the distribution of diverse genetic markers. Methods A total of 222 E. coli, classified as multi-drug resistant according to national guidelines, were retrieved from both screening (n = 184) and non-screening clinical cultures (n = 38) from outpatients and patients hospitalized for various periods. All isolates were routinely genotyped using an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) assay and real-time PCR for CTX-M genes. Multi-locus sequence typing was additionally performed to confirm clusters. Based on demographics, patients were categorized into two groups: patients that were not hospitalized or less than 72 hours at time of strain isolation (group I) and patients that were hospitalized for at least 72 hours (group II). Results Genotyping showed that most multi-drug resistant E. coli either had unique AFLP profiles or grouped in small clusters of maximally 8 isolates. We identified one large ST131 clade comprising 31% of all isolates, containing several AFLP clusters with similar profiles. Although different AFLP clusters were found in the two patient groups, overall genetic heterogeneity was similar (35% vs 28% of isolates containing unique AFLP profiles, respectively). In addition, similar distributions of CTX-M groups, including CTX-M 15 (40% and 44% of isolates in group I and II, respectively) and ST131 (32% and 30% of isolates, respectively) were found. Conclusion We conclude that multi-drug resistant E. coli from the CTX-M 15 associated lineage ST131 are widespread amongst both community- and hospital associated patient groups, with similar

  5. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    PubMed Central

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  6. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in community hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Asagi, Tsukasa; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kasai, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Yukie; Araake, Minako; Fujino, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Hideko; Sasaki, Satoru; Watari, Hajime; Kojima, Tadashi; Miki, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Kirikae, Teruo

    2007-03-01

    We previously reported an outbreak in a neurosurgery ward of catheter-associated urinary tract infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain IMCJ2.S1, carrying the 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase gene [aac(6')-Iae]. For further epidemiologic studies, 214 clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa showing resistance to imipenem (MIC >or= 16 microg/ml), amikacin (MIC >or= 64 microg/ml), and ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 microg/ml) were collected from 13 hospitals in the same prefecture in Japan. We also collected 70 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa that were sensitive to one or more of these antibiotics and compared their characteristics with those of the MDR P. aeruginosa isolates. Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (99%) were serotype O11. We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and a slide agglutination test for detection of the aac(6')-Iae gene and the AAC(6')-Iae protein, respectively. Of the 212 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 (100%) and 207 (98%) were positive in the LAMP assay and in the agglutination test, respectively. Mutations of gyrA and parC genes resulting in amino acid substitutions were detected in 213 of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates (99%). Of the 214 MDR P. aeruginosa isolates, 212 showed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns with >or=70% similarity to that of IMCJ2.S1 and 83 showed a pattern identical to that of IMCJ2.S1, indicating that clonal expansion of MDR P. aeruginosa occurred in community hospitals in this area. The methods developed in this study to detect aac(6')-Iae were rapid and effective in diagnosing infections caused by various MDR P. aeruginosa clones.

  7. Computerized Provider Order Entry Reduces Length of Stay in a Community Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Peters, K.; Shaha, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Does computerized provider order entry (CPOE) improve clinical, cost, and efficiency outcomes as quantified in shortened hospital length of stay (LOS)? Most prior studies were done in university settings with home-grown electronic records, and are now 20 years old. This study asked whether CPOE exerts a downward force on LOS in the current era of HITECH incentives, using a vendor product in a community hospital. Methods The methodology retrospectively evaluated correlation between CPOE and LOS on a perpatient, per-visit basis over 22 consecutive quarters, organized by discipline. All orders from all areas were eligible, except verbals, and medication orders in the emergency department which were not available via CPOE. These results were compared with quarterly case mix indices organized by discipline. Correlational and regression analyses were cross-checked to ensure validity of R-square coefficients, and data were smoothed for ease of display. Standard models were used to calculate the inflection point. Results Gains in CPOE adoption occurred iteratively house-wide, and in each discipline. LOS decreased in a sigmoid shaped curve. The inflection point shows that once CPOE adoption approaches 60%, further lowering of LOS accelerates. Overall there was a 20.2% reduction in LOS correlated with adoption of CPOE. Case mix index increased during the study period showing that reductions in LOS occurred despite increased patient complexity and resource utilization. Conclusions There was a 20.2% reduction in LOS correlated with rising adoption of CPOE. CPOE contributes to improved clinical, cost, and efficiency outcomes as quantified in reduced LOS, over and above other processes introduced to lower LOS. CPOE enabled a reduction in LOS despite an increase in the case mix index during the time frame of this study. PMID:25298809

  8. Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Community Hospital: Attacking the More Difficult Problems

    PubMed Central

    Philmon, Carla L.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Ward, William S.; Rivers, LaToya L.; Williamson, Sharon A.; Goodman, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic stewardship has been proposed as an important way to reduce or prevent antibiotic resistance. In 2001, a community hospital implemented an antimicrobial management program. It was successful in reducing antimicrobial utilization and expenditure. In 2011, with the implementation of a data-mining tool, the program was expanded and its focus transitioned from control of antimicrobial use to guiding judicious antimicrobial prescribing. Objective: To test the hypothesis that adding a data-mining tool to an existing antimicrobial stewardship program will further increase appropriate use of antimicrobials. Design: Interventional study with historical comparison. Methods: Rules and alerts were built into the data-mining tool to aid in identifying inappropriate antibiotic utilization. Decentralized pharmacists acted on alerts for intravenous (IV) to oral conversion, perioperative antibiotic duration, and restricted antimicrobials. An Infectious Diseases (ID) Pharmacist and ID Physician/Hospital Epidemiologist focused on all other identified alert types such as antibiotic de-escalation, bug-drug mismatch, and double coverage. Electronic chart notes and phone calls to physicians were utilized to make recommendations. Results: During 2012, 2,003 antimicrobial interventions were made with a 90% acceptance rate. Targeted broad-spectrum antimicrobial use decreased by 15% in 2012 compared to 2010, which represented cost savings of $1,621,730. There were no statistically significant changes in antimicrobial resistance, and no adverse patient outcomes were noted. Conclusions: The addition of a data-mining tool to an antimicrobial stewardship program can further decrease inappropriate use of antimicrobials, provide a greater reduction in overall antimicrobial use, and provide increased cost savings without negatively affecting patient outcomes. PMID:25477615

  9. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control. PMID:27625635

  10. Tigecycline Versus Levofloxacin in Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Analysis of Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Nathalie; Cooper, C Angel; Castaing, Nathalie; Gandjini, Hassan; Sarkozy, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of tigecycline (TGC) versus levofloxacin (LEV) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) using pooled data and to perform exploratory analyses of risk factors associated with poor outcome. Materials and Methodology: Pooled analyses of 2 phase 3 studies in patients randomized to intravenous (IV) TGC (100 mg, then 50 mg q12h) or IV LEV (500 mg q24h or q12h). Clinical responses at test of cure visit for the clinically evaluable (CE) and clinical modified intention to treat populations were assessed for patients with risk factors including aged ≥65 years, prior antibiotic failure, bacteremia, multilobar disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, alcohol abuse, altered mental status, hypoxemia, renal insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, white blood cell count >30 x 109/L or <4 x 109/L, CURB-65 score ≥2, Fine score category of III to V and at least 2 clinical instability criteria on physical examination. Results: In the CE population of 574 patients, overall cure rates were similar: TGC (253/282, 89.7%); LEV (252/292, 86.3%). For all but one risk factor, cure rates for TGC were similar to or higher than those for LEV. For individual risk factors, the greatest difference between treatment groups was observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (difference of 22.9 for TGC versus LEV; 95% confidence interval, 4.8 - 39.9). Conclusions: TGC achieved cure rates similar to those of LEV in hospitalized patients with CAP. For patients with risk factors, TGC provided generally favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:23526572

  11. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-Acquired Infections in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haoqin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Tianming; Liu, Hong; Gong, Ye; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST), serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%), ST23 (16.1%), ST12 (13.8%), and ST1 (12.6%). ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS) isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%), Ia (26.4%), V (14.9%), Ib (13.8%), and II (5.7%). Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA) and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA) and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control. PMID:27625635

  13. Critical Incidents of Nonadherence with Standard Precautions Guidelines Among Community Hospital-based Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Kristi J; Waitzkin, Howard; Beekmann, Susan E; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify, categorize, and assess critical incidents of nonadherence to standard precautions. DESIGN Qualitative and quantitative analysis of a written, mail-out survey. SETTING Community hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Statewide stratified random sample of community hospital-based health care workers at risk for blood exposure. MAIN VARIABLE Responses to the question: “Think of an incident during the past year when you didn't adhere to universal precautions. Please describe the situation and why you didn't adhere.” RESULTS Reasons given for not using precautions included: belief that stopping to use standard precautions would have put the patient at risk (22%); using precautions would have interfered with patient care (20%); precautions were not warranted in a specific situation (14%); did not anticipate the potential for exposure (14%); and high job demands that had caused respondent to be in a hurry (11%). Less often, equipment was not available (7%), respondent forgot (6%), respondent thought that the patient did not pose a risk (4%), or the available equipment was not effective (3%). In terms of overall exposure rates, 34% of those who described an incident had experienced a sharps injury during the previous 3 months and 42% had experienced a mucocutaneous exposure. In terms of overall nonadherence, 44% wore gloves less than 100% of the time, while 61% washed their hands less than 100% of the time. Needlestick injuries were lowest among those who had forgotten to use precautions, while mucocutaneous exposures were highest among those who had not anticipated potential exposure while performing the task. Failure to wear gloves routinely was highest among those who said that following precautions interfered with their ability to provide care and among those who believed a particular patient to be low risk; failure to wash hands routinely was also highest among the latter group and lowest among those who said necessary equipment was not available

  14. [The Asahi Model-Regional Mental Health Services at Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The Asahi model, Psychiatric Services of Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital, is characterized by multiple dimensions of mental health services, such as multidisciplinary team approach, medical cooperation, specialized psychiatric treatment of acute care, clozapine and modified ECT, outreach services of home nursing and assertive community treatment, and the close and mutual coordination with housing services and social welfare services. The Asahi Model makes it possible to be deinstitutionalized, to improve patients satisfaction, to shorten hospitalization, to decrease psychiatric emergency visits and to be of service in a natural disaster. It also might prevent the relapse of schizophrenics within twelve months after discharge and improve the quality of mental health staffs trainings to support patients better. In the future, we will need to work on providing sectorized care, early psychosis intervention programs, to construct networking systems of clozapine and modified ECT, to strengthen growth of home nursing, and to take place mental health anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:26552318

  15. Efficiency, ownership, and financing of hospitals: the case of Austria.

    PubMed

    Czypionka, Thomas; Kraus, Markus; Mayer, Susanne; Röhrling, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    While standard economic theory posits that privately owned hospitals are more efficient than their public counterparts, no clear conclusion can yet be drawn for Austria in this regard. As previous Austrian efficiency studies rely on data from the 1990s only and are based on small hospital samples, the generalizability of these results is questionable. To examine the impact of ownership type on efficiency, we apply a Data Envelopment Analysis which extends the existing literature in two respects: first, it evaluates the efficiency of the Austrian acute care sector, using data on 128 public and private non-profit hospitals from the year 2010; second, it additionally focusses on the inpatient sector alone, thus increasing the comparability between hospitals. Overall, the results show that in Austria, private non-profit hospitals outperform public hospitals in terms of technical efficiency. A multiple regression analysis confirms the significant association between efficiency and ownership type. This conclusive result contrasts some international evidence and can most likely be attributed to differences in financial incentives for public and private non-profit hospitals in Austria. Therefore, by drawing on the example of the Austrian acute care hospital sector and existing literature on the German acute care hospital sector, we also discuss the impact of hospital financing systems and their incentives on efficiency. This paper thus also aims at providing a proof of principle, pointing out the importance of the respective market conditions when internationally comparing hospital efficiency by ownership type. PMID:24338279

  16. Efficiency, ownership, and financing of hospitals: the case of Austria.

    PubMed

    Czypionka, Thomas; Kraus, Markus; Mayer, Susanne; Röhrling, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    While standard economic theory posits that privately owned hospitals are more efficient than their public counterparts, no clear conclusion can yet be drawn for Austria in this regard. As previous Austrian efficiency studies rely on data from the 1990s only and are based on small hospital samples, the generalizability of these results is questionable. To examine the impact of ownership type on efficiency, we apply a Data Envelopment Analysis which extends the existing literature in two respects: first, it evaluates the efficiency of the Austrian acute care sector, using data on 128 public and private non-profit hospitals from the year 2010; second, it additionally focusses on the inpatient sector alone, thus increasing the comparability between hospitals. Overall, the results show that in Austria, private non-profit hospitals outperform public hospitals in terms of technical efficiency. A multiple regression analysis confirms the significant association between efficiency and ownership type. This conclusive result contrasts some international evidence and can most likely be attributed to differences in financial incentives for public and private non-profit hospitals in Austria. Therefore, by drawing on the example of the Austrian acute care hospital sector and existing literature on the German acute care hospital sector, we also discuss the impact of hospital financing systems and their incentives on efficiency. This paper thus also aims at providing a proof of principle, pointing out the importance of the respective market conditions when internationally comparing hospital efficiency by ownership type.

  17. Health Care in the Community: Developing Academic/Practice Partnerships for Care Coordination and Managing Transitions.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mary E; Perron, Tracy; Fountain, Donna M; Hinic, Katherine; Vargas, Maryelena; Swan, Beth Ann; Heelan-Fancher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of health care is quickly changing from an acute care to a community-based setting. Faculty development and mastery in the use of new technologies, such as high-definition simulation and virtual communities are crucial for effective student learning outcomes. Students' benefits include opportunities for hands-on experience in various patient care scenarios, realtime faculty feedback regarding their critical reasoning and clinical performance, interdisciplinary collaboration, and access to a nonthreatening learning environment. The results of this study provide some evidence of the benefits of developing faculty and nursing curricula that addresses the shift from an ilness-based, acute hospital model, to a community and population health-based preventive model. PMID:26259341

  18. Establishment of a renal supportive care program: Experience from a rural community hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Hung, Yu-Chien; Lai, Chun-Fu; Ueng, Ruey-Hsiuang; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2016-07-01

    Renal supportive care (RSC) denotes a care program dedicated for patients with acute, chronic renal failure, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), aiming to offer maximal symptom relief and optimize patients' quality of life. The uncertainty of prognosis for patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD, the sociocultural issues inherent to the Taiwanese society, and the void of structured and practical RSC pathway, contributes to the underrecognition and poor utilization of RSC. Taiwanese patients rarely receive information regarding RSC as part of a standardized care and are not commonly offered this option. In National Taiwan University Hospital Jinshan branch, we started a RSC subprogram, supported by the community-based palliative/hospice care main program. We focused on understanding the need and providing the choice of RSC to suitable candidates. A three-step and four-phase protocol was designed and implemented to identify appropriate patients and to enhance the applicability of the RSC. We harnessed family visit and home-based family meeting as a vehicle to understand the patients' preferences, to discover what ESRD patients and their family value most, and to introduce the option of RSC. In the current review, we described our pilot experience of establishing a RSC program in Taiwan, and discuss its potential advantage.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Eravacycline (TP-434), a Novel Fluorocycline, against Hospital and Community Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W.; Fyfe, C.; Grossman, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    Eravacycline (TP-434 or 7-fluoro-9-pyrrolidinoacetamido-6-demethyl-6-deoxytetracycline) is a novel fluorocycline that was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against panels of recently isolated aerobic and anaerobic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Eravacycline showed potent broad-spectrum activity against 90% of the isolates (MIC90) in each panel at concentrations ranging from ≤0.008 to 2 μg/ml for all species panels except those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia (MIC90 values of 32 μg/ml for both organisms). The antibacterial activity of eravacycline was minimally affected by expression of tetracycline-specific efflux and ribosomal protection mechanisms in clinical isolates. Furthermore, eravacycline was active against multidrug-resistant bacteria, including those expressing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and mechanisms conferring resistance to other classes of antibiotics, including carbapenem resistance. Eravacycline has the potential to be a promising new intravenous (i.v.)/oral antibiotic for the empirical treatment of complicated hospital/health care infections and moderate-to-severe community-acquired infections. PMID:23979750

  20. Laser operator training and competency assessment in the community hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Connor, M A; Cook, A F

    1995-09-01

    At the 279 bed Marymount community hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, the importance of providing a safe laser environment for patients as well as staff was identified. The decision was made to cross-train all full-time RNs, LPNs, and SAs to allow flexibility in staffing all laser procedures with a qualified operator. A competency based training program was implemented, utilizing a combination of techniques to assist the adult learner. Selected video tapes were used to teach laser physics and applications. Comprehension was assessed through written and oral quizzing. Individual time was spent familiarizing trainees with the equipment and accessories. Practice setups were performed until that individual reached a comfort level satisfactory to him/her and the laser coordinator. Actual experience in the various surgical specialties was dependent upon our case load. Initially very close supervision was provided. Each trainee was gradually given more autonomy as his/her skills improved and permitted to operate the laser independently after passing our competency assessment. During the first year, each operator was given competency assessment reviews at regular intervals. This approach was found to have both strengths and weaknesses and the program was modified accordingly.

  1. 42 CFR 412.109 - Special treatment: Essential access community hospitals (EACHs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following material to CMS within 60 days of receipt from the hospital: (i) The hospital's documentation and... hospitals (EACHs). 412.109 Section 412.109 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT...

  2. Provider-related barriers to rapid HIV testing in U.S. urban non-profit community clinics, community-based organizations (CBOs) and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Laura M; Howerton, Devery; Lange, James; Setodji, Claude Messan; Becker, Kirsten; Klein, David J; Asch, Steven M

    2010-06-01

    We examined provider-reported barriers to rapid HIV testing in U.S. urban non-profit community clinics, community-based organizations (CBOs), and hospitals. 12 primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs; three per region) were sampled randomly, with sampling weights proportional to AIDS case reports. Across PMSAs, all 671 hospitals and a random sample of 738 clinics/CBOs were telephoned for a survey on rapid HIV test availability. Of the 671 hospitals, 172 hospitals were randomly selected for barriers questions, for which 158 laboratory and 136 department staff were eligible and interviewed in 2005. Of the 738 clinics/CBOs, 276 were randomly selected for barriers questions, 206 were reached, and 118 were eligible and interviewed in 2005-2006. In multivariate models, barriers regarding translation of administrative/quality assurance policies into practice were significantly associated with rapid HIV testing availability. For greater rapid testing diffusion, policies are needed to reduce administrative barriers and provide quality assurance training to non-laboratory staff.

  3. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan. PMID:21667892

  4. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan.

  5. Use and cost of hospitalization in dementia: longitudinal results from a community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Carolyn W.; Cosentino, Stephanie; Ornstein, Katherine; Gu, Yian; Andrews, Howard; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the relative contribution of functional impairment and cognitive deficits on risk of hospitalization and costs. Methods A prospective cohort of Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older who participated in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) were followed approximately every 18 months for over 10 years (1805 never diagnosed with dementia during study period, 221 diagnosed with dementia at enrollment). Hospitalization and Medicare expenditures data (1999–2010) were obtained from Medicare claims. Multivariate analyses were conducted to examine (1) risk of all-cause hospitalizations, (2) hospitalizations from ambulatory care sensitive (ACSs) conditions, (3) hospital length of stay (LOS), and (4) Medicare expenditures. Propensity score matching methods were used to reduce observed differences between demented and non-demented groups at study enrollment. Analyses took into account repeated observations within each individual. Results Compared to propensity-matched individuals without dementia, individuals with dementia had significantly higher risk for all-cause hospitalization, longer LOS, and higher Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were significantly associated with higher risks for hospitalizations, hospital LOS, and Medicare expenditures. Functional and cognitive deficits were associated with higher risks of for some ACS but not all admissions. Conclusions These results allow us to differentiate the impact of functional and cognitive deficits on hospitalizations. To develop strategies to reduce hospitalizations and expenditures, better understanding of which types of hospitalizations and which disease characteristics impact these outcomes will be critical. PMID:25351909

  6. Collegial relationship breakdown: a qualitative exploration of nurses in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Leanne S

    2013-01-01

    Poor collegial relations can cause communication breakdown, staff attrition and difficulties attracting new nursing staff. Underestimating the potential power of nursing team relationships means that opportunities to create better working environments and increase the quality of nursing care can be missed. Previous research on improving collegiality indicates that professionalism and work satisfaction increases and that staff attrition decreases. This study explores challenges, strengths and strategies used in nursing team communication in order to build collegial relationships. A qualitative approach was employed to gather nurses experiences and discussion of communication within their nursing teams and a constant comparison method was utilised for data analysis. A convenience sampling technique was employed to access both Registered Nurses and Enrolled Nurses to partake in six focus groups. Thirty mostly female nurses (ratio of 5:1) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria consisted of being a nurse currently working in acute care settings and the exclusion criteria included nursing staff currently working in closed specialty units (i.e. intensive care units). Results revealed three main themes: (1) externalisation and internalisation of nursing team communication breakdown, (2) the importance of collegiality for retention of nurses and (3) loss of respect, and civility across the healthcare workplace. A clear division between hierarchies of nurses was apparent in how nursing team communication was delivered and managed. Open, respectful and collegial communication is essential in today's dynamic and complex health environments. The nurses in this study highlighted how important nursing communication can be to work motivation and how leadership fosters teamwork. PMID:23898600

  7. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  8. An innovative approach to targeting pain in older people in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Caroline

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports the findings of an exploratory pilot study which used mixed methods to determine (a) the feasibility of the study design for a larger multi site project and (b) whether a pain education promotion approach, termed 'Targeting Pain', using a multidisciplinary educational campaign and promotional media such as staff badges and ward signage, improves the detection and management of pain in older people in an acute care setting. Pre and post evaluation surveys and interviews were used to evaluate the approach. Findings showed an increase in pain assessment and documentation of pain by nursing staff, as well as an increase in the prescription of oral analgesics. However, the study indicated that the uptake regarding pain management from the education campaign was different between professional groups. Although there was a positive response by patients and staff to the use of staff badges, the ward signage failed to attract attention. The mixed methods approach used highlighted several areas that need to be improved for the next phase of the study.

  9. Collegial relationship breakdown: a qualitative exploration of nurses in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Leanne S

    2013-01-01

    Poor collegial relations can cause communication breakdown, staff attrition and difficulties attracting new nursing staff. Underestimating the potential power of nursing team relationships means that opportunities to create better working environments and increase the quality of nursing care can be missed. Previous research on improving collegiality indicates that professionalism and work satisfaction increases and that staff attrition decreases. This study explores challenges, strengths and strategies used in nursing team communication in order to build collegial relationships. A qualitative approach was employed to gather nurses experiences and discussion of communication within their nursing teams and a constant comparison method was utilised for data analysis. A convenience sampling technique was employed to access both Registered Nurses and Enrolled Nurses to partake in six focus groups. Thirty mostly female nurses (ratio of 5:1) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria consisted of being a nurse currently working in acute care settings and the exclusion criteria included nursing staff currently working in closed specialty units (i.e. intensive care units). Results revealed three main themes: (1) externalisation and internalisation of nursing team communication breakdown, (2) the importance of collegiality for retention of nurses and (3) loss of respect, and civility across the healthcare workplace. A clear division between hierarchies of nurses was apparent in how nursing team communication was delivered and managed. Open, respectful and collegial communication is essential in today's dynamic and complex health environments. The nurses in this study highlighted how important nursing communication can be to work motivation and how leadership fosters teamwork.

  10. Utilization of Morning Report by Acute Care Surgery Teams: Results from a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Patricia L.; Collins, Courtney; Santry, Heena P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rigor of hand-offs is increasingly scrutinized in the era of shift-based patient care. Acute Care Surgery (ACS) embraced such a model of care; however, little is known about hand-offs in ACS programs. Methods We conducted 18 open-ended interviews with ACS leaders representing diverse geographic and practice settings. Two independent reviewers analyzed interviews using an inductive approach to elucidate themes regarding use of morning report (NVivo qualitative analysis software). Results 12/18 respondents reported a morning report but only 6/12 included attending-to-attending hand-offs. 1/12 incentivized attendings to participate, 2/12 included nursing staff, and 2/12 included physician extenders. Cited benefits of morning report were safe and effective information exchange (2/12), quality improvement (2/12), multidisciplinary discussion (1/12), and resident education (2/12). 3/12 respondents cited time commitment as the main limitation of morning report. Conclusions Morning report is under-utilized among ACS programs; however, if implemented strategically, it may improve patient care and resident education. PMID:24157348

  11. Adverse outcomes following hospitalization in acutely ill older patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Miller, William C

    2008-01-01

    Background The longitudinal outcomes of patients admitted to acute care for elders units (ACE) are mixed. We studied the associations between socio-demographic and functional measures with hospital length of stay (LOS), and which variables predicted adverse events (non-independent living, readmission, death) 3 and 6 months later. Methods Prospective cohort study of community-living, medical patients age 75 or over admitted to ACE at a teaching hospital. Results The population included 147 subjects, median LOS of 9 days (interquartile range 5–15 days). All returned home/community after hospitalization. Just prior to discharge, baseline timed up and go test (TUG, P < 0.001), bipedal stance balance (P = 0.001), and clinical frailty scale scores (P = 0.02) predicted LOS, with TUG as the only independent predictor (P < 0.001) in multiple regression analysis. By 3 months, 59.9% of subjects remained free of an adverse event, and by 6 months, 49.0% were event free. The 3 and 6-month mortality was 10.2% and 12.9% respectively. Almost one-third of subjects had developed an adverse event by 6 months, with the highest risk within the first 3 months post discharge. An abnormal TUG score was associated with increased adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.59, P = 0.03. A higher FMMSE score (adjusted HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.96, P = 0.003) and independent living before hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.84, P = 0.01) were associated with reduced risk of adverse outcome. Conclusion Some ACE patients demonstrate further functional decline following hospitalization, resulting in loss of independence, repeat hospitalization, or death. Abnormal TUG is associated with prolonged LOS and future adverse outcomes. PMID:18479512

  12. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve.

  13. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial stewardship has been promoted as a key strategy for coping with the problems of antimicrobial resistance and Clostridium difficile. Despite the current call for stewardship in community hospitals, including smaller community hospitals, practical examples of stewardship programs are scarce in the reported literature. The purpose of the current report is to describe the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital employing a core strategy of post-prescriptive audit with intervention and feedback. Methods For one hour twice weekly, an infectious diseases physician and a clinical pharmacist audited medical records of inpatients receiving systemic antimicrobial therapy and made non-binding, written recommendations that were subsequently scored for implementation. Defined daily doses (DDDs; World Health Organization Center for Drug Statistics Methodology) and acquisition costs per admission and per patient-day were calculated monthly for all administered antimicrobial agents. Results The antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) made one or more recommendations for 313 of 367 audits during a 16-month intervention period (September 2009 – December 2010). Physicians implemented recommendation(s) from each of 234 (75%) audits, including from 85 of 115 for which discontinuation of all antimicrobial therapy was recommended. In comparison to an 8-month baseline period (January 2009 – August 2009), there was a 22% decrease in defined daily doses per 100 admissions (P = .006) and a 16% reduction per 1000 patient-days (P = .013). There was a 32% reduction in antimicrobial acquisition cost per admission (P = .013) and a 25% acquisition cost reduction per patient-day (P = .022). Conclusions An effective antimicrobial stewardship program was implemented with limited resources on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital. PMID:23043720

  14. Development of a Patient Registry to Evaluate Hospital Admissions Related to Chemotherapy Toxicity in a Community Cancer Center1

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Treacy, Jean; Maloney, Betty; Lavino, Antoinette; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Most chemotherapy (CT) administration occurs in routine care settings, yet little is known about treatment-related toxicity outside of clinical trials. To examine trends in toxicity, modify practice, and establish benchmarks for severe toxicity in a community cancer center we created a prospective registry of all treatment-related hospitalizations at the North Shore Medical Center Cancer Center, a community-based cancer facility in Peabody, MA. Methods Eligible population consisted of all adult cancer patients admitted to the hospital within 30 days of their last CT administration. Each admission was reviewed by a panel of hospital staff to determine whether admission was treatment-related. Information on admission was collected using a standard form. Results Between October 2001 and December 2003, there were 365 hospitalizations among patients receiving CT, 117 (32%) of which were deemed treatment-related. The median age of the cohort with treatment-related toxicity was 67 years, and 41% were male. Most frequent diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (23%) and colorectal cancer (21%), with 49% of the patients receiving treatment with palliative intent. The most common reasons for admission were gastrointestinal toxicity or infection. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days. Seven patients (6%) died during hospitalization. When the registry was reviewed to identify areas where care may be improved, several admissions for decadron-related hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients with myeloma were noted. This led to introduction of glucose monitoring guidelines with no subsequent admissions for this toxicity since then. Conclusions About one third of hospital admissions in patients receiving CT are treatment-related and most occur in patients with advanced disease. Collection of data on toxicity in the routine care setting is feasible and may facilitate quality improvement. PMID:20871674

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Community in Luanda, Angola: Blurred Boundaries with the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; Santos Silva, Isabel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Although the nosocomial prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Angola is over 60% and one of the highest in Africa, the extent of MRSA in the community is unknown. To fill this gap, we conducted a hospital-based study in which 158 children attending the emergency ward and ambulatory services of a pediatric hospital in Luanda, the capital of Angola, were screened for S. aureus nasal colonization. Overall, 70 (44.3%) individuals were colonized with S. aureus, of which 20 (28.6%) carried MRSA, resulting in a prevalence of 12.7% (20/158) of MRSA in the population screened. Molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing distributed the isolates into two major MRSA clones and one dominant methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) lineage, corresponding to the main clones circulating in hospitals in Luanda. The MRSA isolates mainly belonged to clones A (PFGE type A, spa type t105, ST5-IVa-65%) and B (PFGE B, t3869, ST88-IVa-30%), while MSSA isolates mainly belonged to clone L (PFGE type L, t861, ST508-42%). S. aureus isolates showed resistance to penicillin (96%), rifampin (87%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21%). In conclusion, the prevalence of MRSA among children in the community in Luanda is high and seems to originate from hospitals, warranting continuous monitoring and implementation of additional infection control measures.

  16. [Local communalization of clinical records between the municipal community hospital and local medical institutes by using information technology].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shohei; Shinoki, Keiji; Ibata, Takeshi; Nakashita, Chisako; Doi, Seiko; Hidaka, Kumi; Hata, Akiko; Matsuoka, Mio; Waguchi, Hideko; Mito, Saori; Komuro, Ryutaro

    2012-12-01

    We introduced the electronic health record system in 2002. We produced a community medical network system to consolidate all medical treatment information from the local institute in 2010. Here, we report on the present status of this system that has been in use for the previous 2 years. We obtained a private server, set up a virtual private network(VPN)in our hospital, and installed dedicated terminals to issue an electronic certificate in 50 local institutions. The local institute applies for patient agreement in the community hospital(hospital designation style). They are then entitled to access the information of the designated patient via this local network server for one year. They can access each original medical record, sorted on the basis of the medical attendant and the chief physician; a summary of hospital stay; records of medication prescription; and the results of clinical examinations. Currently, there are approximately 80 new registrations and accesses per month. Information is provided in real time allowing up to date information, helping prescribe the medical treatment at the local institute. However, this information sharing system is read-only, and there is no cooperative clinical pass system. Therefore, this system has a limit to meet the demand for cooperation with the local clinics.

  17. Food Choices and Consequences for the Nutritional Status: Insights into Nutrition Transition in an Hospital Community

    PubMed Central

    Piple, Jitendra; Gora, Ranjeet; Purbiya, Pragati; Puliyel, Ashish; Chugh, Parul; Bahl, Pinky; Puliyel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although economic development is generally accompanied by improvements in the overall nutritional status of the country’s population the ‘nutritional transition’ often involves a shift to high energy diets and less exercise with negative consequences. This pilot study was done to examine if education of parents operates at the household level to influence dietary choices and the nutritional status of children in a small community of hospital workers. Material and Methods 3 groups of persons with varying skill and education levels participated. Weighed food logs were used in all households to calculate ‘adult equivalent’ per-capita-consumption. Nutrients were calculated using nutrients calculator software. BMI was used to classify children as underweight, normal weight and overweight. Results 128 individuals participated from 30 families included 47 children. 10 children (21%) were underweight, 29 (62%) were normal and 8 (17%) were overweight. Energy consumption was highest in families with overweight children 2692 +/-502 compared to 2259 +/-359 in families with normal weight and 2031+/-354 in the family of underweight children. These differences were statistically significant. 42% underweight children belonged to Class 1 at the lowest skill level and there were no overweight children in this group. Most of the overweight children belonged to Class 2. In Class 3 there were no underweight children and the majority was normal weight children. Conclusion Underweight children came from the poorer households. Per capita intake of the family as a whole correlated well with BMI in the children. There was increased obesity in middle income families belonging to Class 2—probably in families who move up the scale from deprivation. Nutritional status in children correlated mostly with maternal education status. PMID:26559817

  18. Acute care nurse practitioners: creating and implementing a model of care for an inpatient general medical service.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jill N; Erickson, Mitchel

    2002-09-01

    Changes in medical education and healthcare reimbursement