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Sample records for acutely admitted psychiatric

  1. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  2. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii) to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46%) showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%), than in aggression toward other people (20%). A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%), followed by depression (16%) and personality disorders (14%), and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge), while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge) and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge). Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%). Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self-reported compliance

  3. Characterization of Older Emergency Department Patients Admitted to Psychiatric Units

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Kirk A.; Kohli, Erol; Chen, Oriana; Frey, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many older patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with psychiatric complaints require admission to geropsychiatric units (GPUs). The medical evaluation needed prior to this is not understood. Our goal was to understand ED evaluation practices for patients admitted to the GPU through the ED and understand the medical problems identified after admission. Methods Via retrospective chart review, we abstracted demographics, medical history, ED complaint, evaluation, length of stay, and diagnosis. The number of patients later transferred from the GPU and the reasons for such transfers were also recorded. Results Of 100 patients reviewed, the average age was 78 years. Admission diagnoses were agitation/mania (30%), depression/suicidal ideation (28%), change in mental status/confusion (12%) and other (30%). Most had at least one prior psychiatric and medical diagnosis (77%, 60%). Common ED tests ordered were basic metabolic panel (BMP) (96%), complete blood count (CBC) (94%), urinalysis (UA) (89%), electrocardiogram (EKG) (69%), alcohol level (62%), urine toxicology (61%), chest X-ray (51%), and CT scan of the head (71%). Abnormal findings included urinalysis (24.7%), CBC (23.4%), toxicology (23%), BMP (21.9%), head CT (21.1%), chest X-ray (13.7%), ECG changes (10.1%), and alcohol (4.8%). Five of the 100 GPU admissions were later transferred to a medical floor. Conclusion Most GPU admissions have previous psychiatric and medical issues and are admitted for agitation/mania or depression/suicidal ideation. A certain percentage of patients are transferred out due to medical issues despite ED evaluation. However, it is unlikely that further ED testing would reduce this percentage. Further research of medical screening for geropsychiatric patients may elucidate ideal medical clearance procedures. PMID:26491495

  4. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt. PMID:22380459

  5. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Lisby, Marianne; Mainz, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Background Very little is known about the general appropriateness of prescribing for psychiatric patients. Aims To identify prevalence and types of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) of psychotropic and somatic medications, to assess the severity of potential clinical consequences and to identify possible predictive factors of PIP in a sample of adult psychiatric in-patients. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional design using medication reviews by clinical pharmacologists to identify PIP during a 3-month period. The setting was in-patient units in a psychiatric department of a Danish university hospital during a 3-month period (September 2013-November 2013). Patients medication lists (n = 207) were reviewed at the time of admission and all identified PIPs were assessed for potential consequences by clinical pharmacologists. Results There were 349 PIP identified in 1291 prescriptions. The proportion of patients found to have at least one PIP was 123/207 (59%) and the proportions of patients with at least one PIP assessed to be potentially serious or fatal was 69/207 (33%) and 24/207 (12%), respectively. Interactions between drugs 125/207 (36%) and too high doses of drugs 56/207 (16%) were the most frequent PIP. Predictive factors for PIP were polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and having one or more somatic diagnoses. Conclusion PIP is common in psychiatric patients and potentially fatal. Particularly polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and concomitant somatic illness were associated with the probability of PIP. Improving the quality of prescribing might benefit from an interprofessional approach and thus better training of physicians and nurses is needed in order to minimize PIP. PMID:26824679

  6. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  7. Clinical Features, Psychiatric Assessment, and Longitudinal Outcome of Suicide Attempters Admitted to a Tertiary Emergency Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alcinéia Donizeti; Sponholz, Alcion; Mantovani, Célia; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Botega, Neury José; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize admissions to an emergency hospital due to suicide attempts and verify outcomes in 2 years. Data were collected from medical records and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The sample consisted of 412 patients (58.7% women; mean age = 32.6 years old, SD = 14.3). Self-poisoning was the most frequent method (84.0%), and they were diagnosed mainly as depressive (40.3%) and borderline personality disorders (19.1%). Previous suicide attempts and current psychiatric treatment were reported by, respectively, 32.0% and 28.4%. Fifteen patients (3.6%, 9 males) died during hospitalization. At discharge, 79.3% were referred to community-based psychiatric services. Being male (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.25-3.55), using violent methods (i.e., hanging, firearms, and knives) (OR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.02-3.75) and psychiatric treatment history (OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.53-4.36) were predictors for psychiatric hospitalization. Of 258 patients followed for 2 years, 10 (3.9%) died (3 suicide), and 24 (9.3%) undertook new suicide attempts. Patients with a history of psychiatric treatment had higher risks of new suicide attempts (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.07-5.65). Suicide attempters admitted to emergency hospitals exhibit severe psychiatric disorders, and despite interventions, they continue to present high risks for suicide attempts and death. PMID:25961847

  8. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  9. Patients with methamphetamine psychosis admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Japan. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, A; Sugiyama, A; Kuroki, N; Toda, S; Kato, N; Nakatani, Y; Horita, N; Kaneko, T

    1994-06-01

    To examine the clinical characteristics of methamphetamine (MAP) psychosis in Japan, we evaluated 104 patients with MAP psychosis (80 men and 24 women) admitted to the closed psychiatric units of Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital between 1988 and 1991. There has recently been a steep increase in the number of admissions for MAP psychosis, reflecting the growth of the epidemic of MAP abuse in Japan. Although more than half of the patients were discharged within one month, 16 patients were hospitalized for more than 3 months. Most of the patients showed paranoid psychotic state similar to schizophrenia, consistent with previous reports. Despite the abstinence from MAP and antipsychotic medication, psychotic symptoms tended to persist in some of the patients. The etiological role of MAP psychosis in the development of long-lasting psychotic state was discussed. PMID:8085475

  10. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward. PMID:21142988

  11. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents. PMID:24356389

  12. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  13. Quantitative EEG findings in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    PubMed Central

    Bjørk, Marte Helene; Sand, Trond; Bråthen, Geir; Linaker, Olav M; Morken, Gunnar; Nilsen, Brigt M; Vaaler, Arne Einar

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with brief depressive episodes and concurrent rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms do not fit current diagnostic criteria and they can be difficult to diagnose and treat in an acute psychiatric setting. We wanted to study whether these patients had signs of more epileptic or organic brain dysfunction than patients with depression without additional symptomatology. Methods Sixteen acutely admitted patients diagnosed with a brief depressive episode as well as another concurrent psychiatric diagnosis were included. Sixteen patients with major depression served as controls. Three electroencephalographic studies (EEG) were visually interpreted and the background activity was also analysed with quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Results The group with brief depression and concurrent symptoms had multiple abnormal features in their standard EEG compared to patients with major depression, but they did not show significantly more epileptiform activity. They also had significantly higher temporal QEEG delta amplitude and interhemispheric temporal delta asymmetry. Conclusion Organic brain dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of patients with brief depressive episodes mixed with rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms. This subgroup of depressed patients should be investigated further in order to clarify the pathophysiology and to establish the optimal evaluation scheme and treatment in an acute psychiatric setting. PMID:19014422

  14. Clinical profile and outcomes of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit.

    PubMed

    Christl, Bettina; Reilly, Nicole; Yin, Carolyn; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the clinical profile of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit as well as change in their clinical, parenting, attachment and quality of life outcomes. Data was collected from 191 mothers through self-report measures at admission and discharge. Change was analysed in terms of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score, parenting confidence, maternal attachment to the infant and overall functioning. Psychosocial factors impacting on symptom severity and recovery were examined. Most women (64.8 %) were admitted in the first 3 months after birth with an ICD-10 unipolar depressive episode (52.3 %) or anxiety disorder (25.7 %), and 47.6 % had comorbid diagnoses. Improvement from admission to discharge was seen with large effect sizes (≥one standard deviation, i.e. μ) in terms of clinical symptoms (EPDS, μ = 1.7), parenting confidence (Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale (KPCS), μ = 1.1) and attachment to their infant (Maternal Postpartum Attachment Scale (MPAS), μ = 0.9) as well as overall level of functioning (SF-14, μ = 1.9). The majority (73.3 %) recovered symptomatically, and this was associated with increasing maternal age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.129, p = 0.002) and lower levels of psychosocial risk at admission (OR = 0.963, p = 0.008). Improvement in parenting confidence was associated with increasing maternal age (OR = 1.17, p = 0.003). No predictive factors were found for improvement in maternal attachment after controlling for admission scores. In the short term, joint admission of mothers with their infants is highly beneficial in terms of clinical, functional and parenting outcomes, but follow up studies are needed to assess the longer term benefits for mother-infant dyads. The use of an observational tool to enhance our assessment of maternal-infant interaction and some measure of maternal emotional dysregulation-both important mediators of development of secure infant

  15. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943

  16. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  17. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  18. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  19. Correlates of sexual abuse in a sample of adolescent girls admitted to psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Kanamüller, Juha; Riala, Kaisa; Nivala, Maija; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2014-01-01

    We examined correlations of child sexual abuse among 300 adolescent girls in psychiatric inpatient treatment. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.)-based psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime and from data on family and behavioral characteristics from the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI). A total of 79 girls (26.3%) had experienced child sexual abuse during their lifetime. Child sexual abuse was associated with an adolescent's home environment, sibling status, smoking, posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis, self-mutilating behavior, and suicidal behavior. At least 62% of the perpetrators were acquaintances of the victims. Correlates of child sexual abuse can be used to identify child sexual abuse victims and persons at heightened risk for child sexual abuse. PMID:25101753

  20. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  1. Differences in Psychopathology Between Immigrant and Native Adolescents Admitted to a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Ana; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; Morer, Astrid; Martínez, Esteban; Lázaro, Luisa

    2015-12-01

    It has been postulated that immigrant children are at increased risk of mental health problems. This study examined differences in psychopathology between immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents admitted for the first time to a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Participants were 234 adolescents (191 non-immigrants and 43 immigrants). There were significant differences between the two groups in relation to certain stressors: parental separation, family breakdown, being under state custody, physical and/or psychological maltreatment and sexual abuse. Differences between the main diagnoses of the two groups were found in relation to schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. There are differences between immigrants and natives in terms of diagnosis, and these differences are influenced by ethnicity and stressors. Future studies should seek to identify protective factors in order to prevent mental health disorders in the immigrant population. PMID:25476167

  2. Multiple sclerosis presenting with acute remitting psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, W B

    1979-01-01

    Two patients are described in whom acute symptoms of apparently primary psychiatric disease could be diagnosed in retrospect as due to multiple sclerosis. In both patients the initial symptoms recovered completely. In a third patient, also presenting with mental symptoms, this diagnosis would not have been suspected on clinical grounds but is suggested by the results of modern diagnostic techniques. Images PMID:501386

  3. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits. PMID:17676531

  4. Being in a process of transition to psychosis, as narrated by adults with psychotic illnesses acutely admitted to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sebergsen, K; Norberg, A; Talseth, A-G

    2014-01-01

    Accessible summary Early intervention to prevent and reduce new episodes of psychosis involves patients, relatives and mental health personnel recognizing the early signs of psychosis. Twelve participants with psychotic illnesses narrated how they experienced becoming psychotic before they were admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The results of this study demonstrate that participants and their close others who sensed, understood and articulated experienced changes as signs of psychosis established a dialogue with mental health personnel and initiated treatment and care. Participants who did not perceive the experienced changes as signs of psychosis articulated the experienced changes as an awareness of a poor health condition and illness. These participants, who had no other people to advocate for them, appeared to experience poor communication and coercion during intervention. Abstract To assist in improving early interventions for psychosis, this study explored how adult people narrated their experience of becoming psychotic, and how contact with mental health personnel was established. Narrative interviews were conducted with 12 participants with psychotic illnesses recruited from acute psychiatric wards. The interviews were content analysed. Participants described being in a process of transition to psychosis as follows: experiencing changes as well-known signs of psychosis, experiencing sudden unexpected changes as signs of psychosis and experiencing unidentified changes as signs of illness. Our results show that participants and their close others who knew the signs of psychosis established a dialogue with mental health personnel and were better equipped to prevent and mitigate the psychosis. Our results demonstrate that participants who did not perceive the signs of psychosis and did not have other people to advocate for them were at risk for delayed treatment, poor communication and coercive interventions. Furthermore, participants who did not know the

  5. Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality for Patients with Acute Leukemia Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Danielle; Christian, Michael; Ibrahimova, Narmin; Kumar, Vikram; Jacob, Gabriella; Kiss, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives were to describe the management and outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) patients admitted to the ICU and to identify predictors of ICU mortality. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected from the medical records of all patients with AML or ALL admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital ICU from August 2009 to December 2012. Results. 151 AL patients (117 AML, 34 ALL) were admitted to the ICU. Mean age was 54 (SD 15) years, median APACHE II score was 27 (IQR 22–33), and 50% were female. While in ICU, 128 (85%) patients had sepsis and 56 (37%) had ARDS. The majority of patients required invasive organ support: 94 (62%) required mechanical ventilation while 23 (15%) received renal replacement therapy. Multivariable analysis identified SOFA score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.38) and invasive ventilation (OR 9.64, 95% CI 3.39–27.4) as independent predictors of ICU mortality. Ninety-four (62%) patients survived to ICU discharge. Only 39% of these 94 patients discharged were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Conclusions. AL patients admitted to the ICU had a 62% ICU survival rate; yet only 25% of cohort patients were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Higher admission SOFA scores and invasive ventilation are independently associated with a greater risk of dying in the ICU. PMID:27445524

  6. The Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempt of Youth Admitted to an In-patient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Vanderkooy, John; Chevalier, Pat; Heintzman, John; Warne, Amanda; Barrick, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-harm and the psychosocial factors associated with self-harming behaviours in youth admitted to an in-patient psychiatric unit. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of standardized measures were administered to youth and a separate survey to their caregivers while the youth were in hospital. Results: The mean age of the 123 youth who participated was 15.74 (SD 1.51) years, and 90 of 121 (74.38%) reported being female. Of the 115 who completed this question, 101 (87.83%) indicated that they thought of injuring themselves and 89 (77.39%) did engage in NSSI within the past month, and 78 of 116 (67%) reported that they had made an attempt to take their life. Youth who reported that they had attempted suicide (lifetime) reported significantly less difficulty with emotion regulation than youth who engaged in NSSI only, or both NSSI and suicide attempts. Conclusions: These youth reported a very high prevalence of self-harm, and in general substantial difficulty with regulating their emotions, and difficulty with their interpersonal relationships. The psychosocial distinctions evident between groups may have practical utility. PMID:24872825

  7. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  8. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  9. Factors Associated with Acute Malnutrition among Children Admitted to a Diarrhoea Treatment Facility in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Connor; Sultana, Tania; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Iqbal Hossain, M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the risk factors for acute malnutrition (weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) < −2), a case-control study was conducted during June–September 2012 in 449 children aged 6–59 months (178 with WHZ < −2 and 271 comparing children with WHZ ≥ −2 and no edema) admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b in Bangladesh. The overall mean ± SD age was 12.0 ± 7.6 months, 38.5% (no difference between case and controls). The mean ± SD WHZ of cases and controls was −3.24 ± 1.01 versus −0.74 ± 0.95 (P < 0.001), respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that children with acute malnutrition were more likely than controls to be older (age > 1 year) (adjusted OR (AOR): 3.1, P = 0.004); have an undernourished mother (body mass index < 18.5), (AOR: 2.8, P = 0.017); have a father with no or a low-paying job (AOR: 5.8, P < 0.001); come from a family having a monthly income of <10,000 taka, (1 US$ = 80 taka) (AOR: 2.9, P = 0.008); and often have stopped predominant breastfeeding before 4 months of age (AOR: 2.7, P = 0.013). Improved understanding of these characteristics enables the design and targeting of preventive-intervention programs of childhood acute malnutrition. PMID:24734048

  10. Prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullatef, W K; Al-Aqeedi, R F; Dabdoob, W; Hajar, H A; Bener, A; Gehani, A A

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as determined by elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and random plasma glucose (RPG) levels. This prospective study recruited 583 patients admitted with ACS without previous diagnosis of DM during 1-year period. Glycosylated hemoglobin was checked for most patients especially those with high values of FPG and or RPG. Patients were classified according to their glycemic state into 123 (21.1%) with DM, 82 (14.1%) with prediabetes, and 57(9.8%) with stress hyperglycemia, while 321 (55%) were classified as nondiabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin estimation in the setting of ACS was helpful in the diagnosis of DM to eliminate the effect of stress-induced hyperglycemia that might accompany this condition. PMID:22550348

  11. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  12. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality.

  13. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score) were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%). Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18) and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4). The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28%) and externalizing (26%) disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA) at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement) in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2), with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission. Conclusions Acute

  14. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prosdócimo, Ana Cláudia Giaxa; Lucina, Luciane Boreki; Marcia, Olandoski; Jobs, Priscila Megda João; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Baldanzi, Fernanda Fachin; Costantini, Costantino Ortiz; Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria Teresa; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI), which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE), emotional distancing (EmD), dehumanization (De) and professional fulfillment (PF). The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI) was applied to evaluate global stress. Results Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital. PMID:25517388

  15. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  16. Procalcitonin levels in acute exacerbation of COPD admitted in ICU: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Daubin, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Vabret, Astrid; Ramakers, Michel; Fradin, Sabine; Terzi, Nicolas; Freymuth, François; Charbonneau, Pierre; du Cheyron, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are recommended for severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Serum procalcitonin (PCT) could be a useful tool for selecting patients with a lower probability of developing bacterial infection, but its measurement has not been investigated in this population. Methods We conducted a single center prospective cohort study in consecutive COPD patients admitted to the ICU for AECOPD between September 2005 and September 2006. Sputum samples or tracheal aspirates were tested for the presence of bacteria and viruses. PCT levels were measured at the time of admittance, six hours, and 24 hours using a sensitive immunoassay. Results Thirty nine AECOPD patients were included, 31 of which (79%) required a ventilator support at admission. The median [25%–75% interquartile range] PCT level, assessed in 35/39 patients, was: 0.096 μg/L [IQR, 0.065 to 0.178] at the time of admission, 0.113 μg/L [IQR, 0.074 to 0.548] at six hours, and 0.137 μg/L [IQR, 0.088 to 0.252] at 24 hours. The highest PCT (PCTmax) levels were less than 0.1 μg/L in 14/35 (40%) patients and more than 0.25 μg/L in 10/35 (29%) patients, suggesting low and high probability of bacterial infection, respectively. Five species of bacteria and nine species of viruses were detected in 12/39 (31%) patients. Among the four patients positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one had a PCTmax less than 0.25 μg/L and three had a PCTmax less than 0.1 μg/L. The one patient positive for Haemophilus influenzae had a PCTmax more than 0.25 μg/L. The presence or absence of viruses did not influence PCT at time of admission (0.068 vs 0.098 μg/L respectively, P = 0.80). Conclusion The likelihood of bacterial infection is low among COPD patients admitted to ICU for AECOPD (40% with PCT < 0.1 μg/L) suggesting a possible inappropriate use of antibiotics. Further studies are necessary to assess the impact of a procalcitonin

  17. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  18. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children’s Specialized Hospital during the period between January 2013 and December 2013. A total of 85 full term asphyxiated neonates who were admitted in NICU and diagnosed as HIE were enrolled in this study. with 50 (58.8%) less than 7 days of age, 31(36.5%) between (8–15) days and 4(4.7%) between (16–28) days. Males were found to be more affected than females (58.9% and 41.1%) respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery was the mode of delivery in 48(56.4%), assisted vaginal delivery in 14(16.5%), emergency caesarian in 19(22.4%) and elective caesarian section in. Percentage of AKI in those babies was 54.1%(46). With 30(65%) from those had non-oliguric type. Ten babies (21.7%) had serum creatinine between (1.5 – 2mg/dl), 29 (63.04%) between (2 – 3mg/dl) and 7(15.22%) between (3–4mg/ dl). This means that the majority of patients presented in injury stage. Hyperkalemia was found in (37.6%), hyponatremia in (27.1%) and hypocalceamia in (25.8%). Most of the babies with AKI had stage (ii) HIE. All babies were treated conservatively and 4(8.6%) died. In conclusion AKI was observed to be a common complication in asphyxiated neonates.

  19. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  20. Aripiprazole treatment of Asperger’s syndrome in the acute psychiatric setting: case report

    PubMed Central

    Dratcu, Luiz; McKay, Gavin; Singaravelu, Vinod; Krishnamurthy, Venkat

    2007-01-01

    Asperger’s syndrome (AS) is under-recognized and may be misdiagnosed as schizophrenia in adults because of symptom overlap. Pharmacological treatment usually targets associated behavioral and mental symptoms rather than the actual core features of AS. We report a middle-aged male patient who, after many years of previous contact with mental health services, and on account of his psychotic symptoms and diagnosis of schizophrenia, was admitted to an inner-city acute psychiatric unit, where a primary diagnosis of AS was established for the first time in his life. His impairing clinical features of AS improved markedly following treatment using aripiprazole, a novel atypical antipsychotic that acts as a partial agonist at dopamine D2 receptors. As well as sharing clinical features, there is an overlap in underlying neurobiology of AS and schizophrenia, including dopamine dysfunction, that provides a rationale for using antipsychotics of this class in the clinical management not only of associated psychotic symptoms but also of the core features of AS itself. PMID:19300548

  1. Acute behavioral crises in psychiatric inpatients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): recognition of concomitant medical or non-ASD psychiatric conditions predicts enhanced improvement.

    PubMed

    Guinchat, Vincent; Cravero, Cora; Diaz, Lautaro; Périsse, Didier; Xavier, Jean; Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2015-03-01

    During adolescence, some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) engage in severe challenging behaviors, such as aggression, self-injury, disruption, agitation and tantrums. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute behavioral crises in adolescents with ASD admitted to a dedicated neurobehavioral unit. We included retrospectively in 2008 and 2009 29 adolescents and young adults with ASD hospitalized for severe challenging behaviors and proposed a guideline (Perisse et al., 2010) that we applied prospectively for 29 patients recruited for the same indications between 2010 and 2012. In total, 58 patients were admitted (n=70 hospitalizations, mean age=15.66 (±4.07) years, 76% male). We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), comorbid organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. We explored predictors of Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFS) score and duration of hospitalization at discharge. All but 2 patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability (ID), and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. During the inpatient stay (mean=84.3 (±94.9) days), patients doubled on average their GAFS scores (mean=17.66 (±9.05) at admission vs. mean=31.4 (±9.48) at discharge). Most common etiologies for acute behavioral crises were organic causes [n=20 (28%), including epilepsy: n=10 (14%) and painful medical conditions: n=10 (14%)], environmental causes [n=17 (25%) including lack of treatment: n=11 (16%) and adjustment disorder: n=6 (9%)], and non-ASD psychiatric condition [n=33 (48%) including catatonia: n=5 (7%), major depressive episode: n=6 (9%), bipolar disorder: n=4 (6%), schizophrenia: n=6 (9%), other/unknown diagnosis: n=12 (17%)]. We found no influence of age, gender, socio-economic status, migration, level of ID, or history of seizure on improvement of GAFS score at discharge

  2. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia. PMID:25318929

  3. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  4. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  5. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  6. Early sleep psychiatric intervention for acute insomnia: implications from a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Go; Endo, Takuro

    2012-04-15

    Insomnia is a common problem among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and patients suffering from acute insomnia with psychiatric comorbidity are more likely to develop chronic insomnia without appropriate intervention. Here we report a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder with acute insomnia, successfully treated with early sleep psychiatric non-pharmacological intervention. The augmentation of medication runs a risk of exacerbating daytime impairment. Clinicians usually prescribe medication, such as antidepressants and hypnotics without reflections for such complaints. However, the use of these sedative agents is often problematic, especially when patients have kept a good QOL activity in daily life. The rapid recovery from acute insomnia in this case suggests that the appropriate use of actigraphy is a favorable non-pharmacological intervention in acute insomnia. PMID:22505865

  7. Clinical Application of the "Scribble Technique" with Adults in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The "scribble technique," described by Florence Cane's book, "The Artist in Each of Us" (1983), has historically been employed by art therapists as a technique to reduce inhibitions and liberate spontaneous imagery from the unconscious. Reviews the technique and presents examples produced by adult patients in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward.…

  8. Norovirus infection in children admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Pará, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; de Carvalho, Thaís Cristina Nascimento; Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Dos Santos, Mirleide Cordeiro; de Sousa, Maisa Silva; Justino, Maria Cleonice Aguiar; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-04-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic, non-bacterial outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis, and are also a major cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis in infants. The aim of the present study was to identify norovirus infections in children not infected by rotavirus admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis in Belém. A total of 348 fecal specimens were obtained from children with diarrhea aged less than 5 years, all of whom had tested negative for rotavirus, between May 2008 and April 2010. Fecal samples were screened for norovirus antigen using enzyme-immunoassay (EIA). Specimens were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using the primers Mon432/434-Mon431/433 for detection of the GI and GII norovirus strains, respectively. Based on both methods, the overall norovirus positivity rate was 36.5% (127/348). Of the 169 samples collected in the first year, 44.4% (n = 75) tested positive for norovirus using both methods, 35.5% (n = 60) by EIA and 40.8% (n = 69) by RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as a reference standard, a sensitivity of 78.3%, specificity of 94%, and agreement of 87.6% were recorded. Genome sequencing was obtained for 22 (31.9%) of the 69 positive samples, of which 90.9% (20/22) were genotype GII.4d and 9.1% (2/22) were genotype GII.b. Norovirus infection was most frequent in children under 2 years of age (41.5%-115/277). The peak incidence (62.1%) of norovirus-related acute gastroenteritis in these patients (not infected by rotavirus) was observed in February 2010. These findings emphasize the importance of norovirus as a cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children in Belém, Pará, Northern Brazil. PMID:23359323

  9. Physical activity levels improve following discharge in people admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ling Ling Y; Alison, Jennifer A; McKenzie, David K; McKeough, Zoe J

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the physical activity level of people admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) and whether physical activity changed immediately after discharge and 6 weeks post hospital admission. In this prospective observational study, people admitted to hospital with an AECOPD had physical activity levels monitored using the SenseWear(®) Armband (model MF-SW) for 3 days in hospital (T1), during the first week at home following discharge (T2), and at home during the sixth week after admission (T3). Fifty participants (mean age (SD) 71 (10) years) completed the study. There was a linear increase in average steps per day over the three time periods (T1, mean (SD) 1385 (1972) steps/day; T2, 2040 (2680); T3, 2328 (2745); analysis of variance (ANOVA) p = 0.001) and time spent in moderate activity (3.0-6.0 metabolic equivalents; minutes/day) (T1, mean (SD) 16 (27) minutes/day; T2, 32 (46) minutes/day; T3, 35 (58) minutes/day; ANOVA p = 0.008). For both outcomes, post hoc t-tests showed significant improvements from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3, but not between T2 and T3. Physical activity was low in hospital and significantly improved in the week after discharge but showed no further significant improvement at 6 weeks following a hospitalized AECOPD. PMID:26374299

  10. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  11. Infections in Children Admitted with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition in Niger

    PubMed Central

    Page, Anne-Laure; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Sayadi, Sani; Aberrane, Said; Janssens, Ann-Carole; Rieux, Claire; Djibo, Ali; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Ducou-le-Pointe, Hubert; Grais, Rebecca F.; Schaefer, Myrto; Guerin, Philippe J.; Baron, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Although malnutrition affects thousands of children throughout the Sahel each year and predisposes them to infections, there is little data on the etiology of infections in these populations. We present a clinical and biological characterization of infections in hospitalized children with complicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in Maradi, Niger. Methods Children with complicated SAM hospitalized in the intensive care unit of a therapeutic feeding center, with no antibiotics in the previous 7 days, were included. A clinical examination, blood, urine and stool cultures, and chest radiography were performed systematically on admission. Results Among the 311 children included in the study, gastroenteritis was the most frequent clinical diagnosis on admission, followed by respiratory tract infections and malaria. Blood or urine culture was positive in 17% and 16% of cases, respectively, and 36% had abnormal chest radiography. Enterobacteria were sensitive to most antibiotics, except amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole. Twenty-nine (9%) children died, most frequently from sepsis. Clinical signs were poor indicators of infection and initial diagnoses correlated poorly with biologically or radiography-confirmed diagnoses. Conclusions These data confirm the high level of infections and poor correlation with clinical signs in children with complicated SAM, and provide antibiotic resistance profiles from an area with limited microbiological data. These results contribute unique data to the ongoing debate on the use and choice of broad-spectrum antibiotics as first-line treatment in children with complicated SAM and reinforce the call for an update of international guidelines on management of complicated SAM based on more recent data. PMID:23874731

  12. How CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT Can Help Practitioners for Patients Admitted with Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Emergency Departments?

    PubMed Central

    Brousse, Georges; Arnaud, Benjamin; Geneste, Julie; Pereira, Bruno; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Teissedre, Frederique; Perrier, Christophe; Schwan, Raymund; Malet, Laurent; Schmidt, Jeannot; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI), we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score. Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8 g/L), in a 2-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF, and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the mini international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence) as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females) was 46 years. Approximately 12% of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78% with dependence (DSM-IV). Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing, or longer more intensive motivational intervention. PMID:25009509

  13. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  14. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  15. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD): A confirmatory factor analysis with 1442 psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Rufino, Katrina A; Rogers, Megan L; Ellis, Thomas E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) is a newly proposed diagnostic entity that characterizes rapid onset suicidal intent. This study aims to confirm the factor structure of ASAD among psychiatric inpatients, and to determine the clinical utility of ASAD in predicting suicide attempt status. Overall, 1442 psychiatric inpatients completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms theorized to comprise the ASAD construct. Utilizing these data, a confirmatory factor analysis with a one-factor solution was performed. Regression analyses were employed to determine if the ASAD construct predicted past suicide attempts, and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were employed to determine if ASAD symptoms differed by the presence and number of past suicide attempts. The one-factor solution indicated good fit: χ(2)(77) = 309.1, p < 0.001, Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.05. Controlling for depressive disorders and current symptoms, the ASAD construct significantly predicted the presence of a past suicide attempt. Moreover, ASAD differentiated in the expected directions between individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts, individuals with a single suicide attempt, and individuals with no history of a suicide attempt. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) appears to be a unified construct that predicts suicidal behavior and is distinct from an already-defined mood disorder. PMID:27344228

  16. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  17. Cross sectional study of contribution of clinical assessment and simple cardiac investigations to diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, N. D.; McNeill, G.; Pringle, T.; Ogston, S.; Struthers, A. D.; Pringle, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the comparative contribution of clinical assessment, electrocardiography, and chest radiography to the diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted to a general medical ward with acute dyspnoea. DESIGN: Prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Acute medical admissions ward of a teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 71 randomly selected patients admitted with acute dyspnoea. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity and specificity of each investigation and logistic regression analysis of each variable in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction. RESULTS: Clinical assessment in this cohort of patients with severe dyspnoea was generally sensitive (sensitivity 81%). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of clinical assessment. In the first group (37 patients) the diagnosis of systolic dysfunction was clear, in the second (22) it was in doubt, and in the third (12) it was unlikely. The sensitivity of clinical assessment in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction was 81% and the specificity was 47%. The specificity of diagnosis was improved by electrocardiography (69%) and chest radiography (92%). Logistic regression analysis showed that isolated pulmonary crepitations were a comparatively poor predictor of left ventricular systolic dysfunction chi 2 = 10.215, P = 0.0014) but that a full clinical examination had reasonable predictive value (chi 2 = 24.82, P < 0.00001). The combination of clinical assessment and chest radiography improved the accuracy of diagnosis (chi 2 = 28.08, P < 0.00001), as did the combination of clinical assessment and electrocardiography (chi 2 = 32.41, P < 0.00001). CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea is comparatively accurate. Patients with abnormal results on chest radiography, electrocardiography, and clinical examination have a high likelihood of having left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Echocardiography contributes little more to

  18. Reducing conflict and containment rates on acute psychiatric wards: The Safewards cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Simpson, Alan; Stewart, Duncan; Hodsoll, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute psychiatric wards manage patients whose actions may threaten safety (conflict). Staff act to avert or minimise harm (containment). The Safewards model enabled the identification of ten interventions to reduce the frequency of both. Objective To test the efficacy of these interventions. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with psychiatric hospitals and wards as the units of randomisation. The main outcomes were rates of conflict and containment. Participants Staff and patients in 31 randomly chosen wards at 15 randomly chosen hospitals. Results For shifts with conflict or containment incidents, the experimental condition reduced the rate of conflict events by 15% (95% CI 5.6–23.7%) relative to the control intervention. The rate of containment events for the experimental intervention was reduced by 26.4% (95% CI 9.9–34.3%). Conclusions Simple interventions aiming to improve staff relationships with patients can reduce the frequency of conflict and containment. Trial registration IRSCTN38001825. PMID:26166187

  19. Correlates of MMPI--a scales in acute psychiatric and forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Carlo O C; Graham, John R; Sellbom, Martin; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Forbey, Johnathan D; O'Connell, Carol; Rogers, Robert; White, Robert S

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand the empirical basis for interpretation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A; Butcher et al., 1992). Participants were 157 boys from a forensic setting and 197 girls from an acute psychiatric inpatient setting. Criterion variables were identified from sources such as psychiatrist report, parent report, and psychosocial history. Results generally support the construct validity of MMPI-A scales. Scales measuring internalizing problems were more highly correlated with criterion measures of internalizing behaviors than measures of externalizing behaviors, whereas scales measuring externalizing problems were more highly correlated with externalizing variables than with internalizing criteria. Implications of this study include an expanded empirical foundation for interpretation of the MMPI-A, greater understanding of the constructs it measures, and evidence supporting the generalizability of these constructs across settings. PMID:19365769

  20. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  1. Relationship between Psychiatric Nurse Work Environments and Nurse Burnout in Acute Care General Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Aiken, Linda H.; McClaine, Lakeetra; Hanlon, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Following deinstitutionalization, inpatient psychiatric services moved from state institutions to general hospitals. Despite the magnitude of these changes, evaluations of the quality of inpatient care environments in general hospitals are limited. This study examined the extent to which organizational factors of the inpatient psychiatric environments are associated with psychiatric nurse burnout. Organizational factors were measured by an instrument endorsed by the National Quality Forum. Robust clustered regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between organizational factors in 67 hospitals and levels of burnout for 353 psychiatric nurses. Lower levels of psychiatric nurse burnout was significantly associated with inpatient environments that had better overall quality work environments, more effective managers, strong nurse-physician relationships, and higher psychiatric nurse-to-patient staffing ratios. These results suggest that adjustments in organizational management of inpatient psychiatric environments could have a positive effect on psychiatric nurses’ capacity to sustain safe and effective patient care environments. PMID:20144031

  2. 'The time it takes…' How doctors spend their time admitting a patient during the acute medical take.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Jodie; Khan, Waleed; Subbe, Christian P; Franklin, Marc; Abulela, Iman; Khan, Anwar; Mohammed, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Patient safety depends on adequate staffing but the number of doctors required for safe staffing for medical emergencies is not known. We measured the duration of the admission process for patients seen by medical teams in emergency departments (EDs) and acute medical units. History taking and examination by a core medical trainee took 22 minutes for a patient referred from the ED and 21 minutes for a patient referred from primary care. A complete admission clerking with prescription and ordering of investigations ranged from a mean of 15 minutes for a consultant in acute medicine to a mean of 55 minutes for a foundation year 1 trainee. The duration of post-take ward rounds also showed significant variability.Our data can be used to model staffing patterns if combined with information about admission numbers and local set up. PMID:27481373

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46-12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  4. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46–12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  5. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  6. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered. PMID:20550641

  7. [Interest of ambulatory simplified acute physiology score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in an intensive care unit of an infectious diseases unit in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Dia, N M; Diallo, I; Manga, N M; Diop, S A; Fortes-Deguenonvo, L; Lakhe, N A; Ka, D; Seydi, M; Diop, B M; Sow, P S

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of patients by a scale of gravity allows a better categorization of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Our study had for objective to estimate interest of Ambulatory Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in ICU of infectious diseases department of FANN hospital. It was about a descriptive and analytical retrospective study, made from the data found in patients' files admitted into the USI infectious diseases department of FANN hospital in Dakar, from January 1(st), 2009 till December 31st, 2009.The data of 354 patients' files were analyzed. The sex-ratio was 1.77 with an average age of 37.6 years ± 19.4 years old [5-94 years]. The majority of the patients were unemployed paid (39.6%). The most frequent failures were the following ones: neurological (80.5%), cardio-respiratory (16.7%). The average duration of stay was 6.2 days ± 8.2 days going of less than 24 hours to more than 10 weeks. The deaths arose much more at night (53.1%) than in the daytime (46.9%) and the strongest rate of death was recorded in January (61.5%), most low in October (26.7%). The global mortality was 48.3%. The rate of lethality according to the highest main diagnosis was allocated to the AIDS (80.5%). The average ambulatory simplified acute physiology score was 5.3 ± 3.6 with extremes of 0 and 18. The deaths in our series increased with this index (p = 0.000005). The female patients had a rate of lethality higher than that of the men people, 55.5% against 44.2% (p = 0.03). In spite of a predictive score of a high survival (ASAPS < 8), certain number of patients died (n = 105) that is 61.4% of the deaths. The metabolic disturbances, hyperleukocytosis or leukopenia when realised, the presence of a chronic disease, seemed also to influence this lethality. ASAPS only, although interesting, would not good estimate the gravity of patients, where from the necessity thus of a minimum biological balance sheet. It seems better adapted

  8. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  9. Lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is associated with poorer outcomes in intensive care unit admitted patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulated studies have shown that hematological parameters [e.g., red blood cell distribution width (RDW), hemoglobin, platelet count] and serum potassium level can impact the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, no previous study has evaluated the prognostic values of these laboratory tests simultaneously. Methods This study is based on an intensive care unit (ICU) database named Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II). Adult patients with AMI were included, and their hematological parameters and serum ion levels on admission were extracted. The relationships between these laboratory tests and hospital mortality were evaluated using a logistic regression model and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The effects of these laboratory tests on 1-year mortality were evaluated using a Cox hazard regression model and Kaplan-Meier curve analysis. Results In univariable analysis, increased white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil percentage, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), RDW, potassium and decreased red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), hematocrit and percentage of lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil and eosinophil were significantly associated with hospital mortality. In multivariable analyses, basophil percentage, potassium, WBC and MCHC were independently associated with hospital morality, while WBC, RDW, MCHC, potassium and percentages of neutrophil and lymphocyte were associated with 1-year mortality. Conclusions Hematological parameters and serum potassium can provide prognostic information in AMI patients. MCHC is an independent prognostic factor for both short and long term outcomes of AMI. PMID:27294086

  10. [Acute alcohol intoxication among children and adolescents admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice during 2000-2010--preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Halla; Agnieszka, Zachurzok-Buczyńska; Gawlik, Aneta; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol drinking at the young age is a risk factor of alcohol addiction later in life, and is connected with school problems, binge drinking, tobacco addiction, illegal drug use, violence, crime commitment, and risky sexual behaviors. Alcohol drinking in the last 12 months is declared by 78% Polish children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of admissions due to alcohol intoxication to the Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Pediatric Center of Silesia and the identification of the risk factors of the acute alcohol intoxication among Polish children and adolescents. Ten-year retrospective study includes investigation of patients medical records from the Department of Pediatrics. Among 8048 patients hospitalized in the Department of Pediatrics between the years 2000-2010, 220 (2.7%) cases of acute alcohol poisoning occurred The detailed data analysis from 139 patients [66 (47.5%) girls, 73 (52,5%) boys] was done. In the years 2006-2010 the number of girls admitted to the department increased in comparison to boys. The largest group of patients was at age between 14 and 16 years [61 (44%) children]. The blood alcohol concentration at the moment of admission to the hospital was 0.1 to 4.0 per thousand. In most cases (92.8%) the alcohol intoxication was intentional. Five percent of them were suicide attempts. In the youngest group of children alcohol abuse was unintentional. 23 (16.5%) of patients initially needed admission to the intensive care unit. In 30 (21.6%) patient the family was incomplete and five times more often father was absent. The alcohol addiction occurs in 18 (13.0%) fathers and 10 (7.2%) mothers of our patients. It is concluded that over the last decade the number of girls admitted due to alcohol abuse increased. Children at school grade between 7-9 are intoxicated most often. One six of intoxicated patents needed hospitalization at intensive care unit. PMID:23421032

  11. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  12. Effective Factors in Door-to-Needle Time for Streptokinase Administration in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Admitted to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Omraninava, Ali; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Masoumi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular incidents are a common cause of death around the world. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) poses high risks for the patient due to plaque rupture or erosion along with a superimposed non-occlusive thrombus; therefore, timely treatment with antithrombotic agents plays a key role in reducing an AMI mortality rate. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the time interval between the admission of AMI-suspected patients and treatment initiation. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 patients admitted to the emergency department of Imam Hussein hospital in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using checklists, completed by the patients’ next of kin or the emergency staff. To analyze the data, student t- test and analysis of variance were used. Results: In this study, 31 female and 79 male subjects were included, respectively. The mean time to receive the first dose of streptokinase was 66.39 minutes (73.74 minutes for females and 63.5 minutes for male patients), varying from 49.92 minutes in the morning to 69.78 minutes in the afternoon and 72.68 minutes during night shifts. Conclusions: The door-to-needle (DTN) time, in a standard setting, is recommended to be less than 30 minutes. According to the results of this study, the DTN time is comparatively two times longer in females and afternoon and night shifts. Different variables including emergency staff, physicians, patients’ characteristics, and environmental/physical factors induced this difference. PMID:27218043

  13. Psychiatric side effects of acute high-dose corticosteroid therapy in neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Itay; Fireman, Liora; Benninger, Felix; Weizman, Abraham; Steiner, Israel

    2016-07-01

    It has been implied that high-dose corticosteroids (CSs) commonly cause psychiatric side effects. Here, we examined the rate and risk factors of psychiatric side effects during high-dose CS treatment in patients with neurological disorders. Patients treated with high-dose intravenous CSs for neurological disorders were evaluated for depression, mania, and psychosis using the Beck Depression Inventory, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale before CS treatment, immediately after, and 1 month following treatment. Forty-nine consecutive patients were monitored. There was a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale scores as well as in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores throughout the study period and a transitory increase in the Young Mania Rating Scale score immediately after CS administration. Thus, a tendency to develop transient mild euphoria during high-dose CS treatment exists, but is reversible at 1 month, whereas a reduction in depressive symptoms tended to persist. Overall, our data indicate that high-dose CS treatment for neurological diseases is relatively safe with respect to psychiatric complications. PMID:26938038

  14. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  15. The Revolving Door Phenomenon in an Italian Acute Psychiatric Ward: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis of the Potential Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Sagona, Marco; Landi, Giulia; Martire, Lisa; Piemonte, Chiara; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2016-09-01

    To highlight the revolving door (RD) phenomenon in an acute psychiatric ward, we retrospectively identified the patients hospitalized three or more times in a calendar year from 1/1/2009 to 31/12/2013 as RD patients (RDP). We collected sociodemographic and clinical variables of RDP and statistically analyzed the potential RD risk factors. We divided RDP into "high" and "extremely high" utilizers and evaluated the variables related to more frequent readmissions. RDP represented 5.68% of all patients and their hospitalizations (RDH) 25% of all admissions. The statistically significant risk factors for all RDH were "disability pension," "substance abuse/dependence," "mild/severe aggressiveness," and "psychiatric and social rehabilitative programs". The comparison between "high" and "extremely high" utilizers showed that "manic episodes" and "personality disorders," among the diagnoses, "familial relational conflicts" and "violence/suicidality", among the hospitalization reasons, were statistically significant risk factors for more frequent readmissions. RD phenomenon was greatly affected by severe clinical conditions with social disability. PMID:27227558

  16. Outcome of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome on palliative treatment: insights from the nationwide AMIS Plus Registry 1997–2014

    PubMed Central

    Erne, Paul; Radovanovic, Dragana; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bertel, Osmund; Urban, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective Compliance with guidelines is increasingly used to benchmark the quality of hospital care, however, very little is known on patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and treated palliatively. This study aimed to evaluate the baseline characteristics and outcomes of these patients. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Eighty-two Swiss hospitals enrolled patients from 1997 to 2014. Participants All patients with ACS enrolled in the AMIS Plus registry (n=45 091) were analysed according to three treatment groups: palliative treatment, defined as use of aspirin and analgesics only and no reperfusion; conservative treatment, defined as any treatment including antithrombotics or anticoagulants, heparins, P2Y12 inhibitors, GPIIb/IIIa but no pharmacological or mechanical reperfusion; and reperfusion treatment (thrombolysis and/or percutaneous coronary intervention during initial hospitalisation). The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality and the secondary measure was 1-year mortality. Results Of the patients, 1485 (3.3%) were palliatively treated, 11 119 (24.7%) were conservatively treated and 32 487 (72.0%) underwent reperfusion therapy. In 1997, 6% of all patients were treated palliatively and this continuously decreased to 2% in 2013. Baseline characteristics of palliative patients differed in comparison with conservatively treated and reperfusion patients in age, gender and comorbidities (all p<0.001). These patients had more in-hospital complications such as postadmission onset of cardiogenic shock (15.6% vs 5.2%; p<0.001), stroke (1.8% vs 0.8%; p=0.001) and a higher in-hospital mortality (25.8% vs 5.6%; p<0.001).The subgroup of patients followed 1 year after discharge (n=8316) had a higher rate of reinfarction (9.2% vs 3.4%; p=0.003) and mortality (14.0% vs 3.5%; p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with ACS treated palliatively were older, sicker, with more heart failure at admission and very high in-hospital mortality. While

  17. Caregivers' perceptions of coercion in psychiatric hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Veronica; Madigan, Kevin; Roche, Eric; Bainbridge, Emma; McGuinness, David; Tierney, Kevin; Feeney, Larkin; Hallahan, Brian; McDonald, Colm; O'Donoghue, Brian

    2015-08-30

    While knowledge on service users' perspective on their admissions to psychiatric wards has improved substantially in the last decade, there is a paucity of knowledge of the perspectives of caregivers. This study aimed to determine caregiver's perception of the levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures and procedural justice experienced by service users during their admission to acute psychiatric in-patient units. The perspective of caregivers were then compared to the perspectives of their related service users, who had been admitted to five psychiatric units in Ireland. Caregivers were interviewed using an adapted version of the MacArthur admission experience interview. Sixty-six caregivers participated in this study and the majority were parents. Seventy one percent of service users were admitted involuntarily and nearly half had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Caregivers of involuntarily admitted individuals perceived the service users' admission as less coercive than reported by the service users. Caregivers also perceived a higher level of procedural justice in comparison to the level reported by service users. Reducing the disparity of perceptions between caregivers and service users could result in caregivers having a greater understanding of the admission process and why some service users may be reluctant to be admitted. PMID:26163727

  18. A replication study of the City nurse intervention: reducing conflict and containment on three acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Bowers, L; Flood, C; Brennan, G; Allan, T

    2008-11-01

    Conflict and containment on acute inpatient psychiatric wards pose a threat to patient and staff safety, and it is desirable to minimize the frequency of these events. Research has indicated that certain staff attitudes and behaviours might serve to accomplish this, namely, positive appreciation, emotional regulation and effective structure. A previous test of an intervention based on these principles, on two wards, showed a good outcome. In this study, we tested the same intervention on three further wards. Two 'City nurses' were employed to work with three acute wards, assisting with the implementation of changes according to the working model of conflict and containment generation. Evaluation was via before-and-after measures, with parallel data collected from five control wards. While simple before-and-after analysis of the two experimental wards showed significant reductions in conflict and containment, when a comparison with controls was conducted, with control for patient occupancy and clustering of results by ward, no effect of the intervention was found. The results were therefore ambiguous, and neither confirm nor contradict the efficacy of the intervention. A further intervention study may need to be conducted with a larger sample size to achieve adequate statistical power. PMID:18844799

  19. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  20. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  1. Perceptions on the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia on acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    2003-12-01

    Policy development and practice for hospital mental health care has shifted towards a user-focused and evidence-based direction. Important within this policy development has been a guideline for inpatient care, particularly the establishment of an inpatient Acute Care Forum. A vehicle to both commission and develop this agenda is the Implementation of a care pathway. A research study was designed to explore how a care pathway could be developed for inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Interviews with a range of health care professionals and observation of the process of care pathway development were the data-collection tools. Analysis was driven by emergent themes across the data set. Themes were then presented as one possible interpretation of the factors to be considered for the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Clinicians experienced many difficulties in finding and including evidence-based practice (EBP) within a care pathway. Professions on the whole felt that there was a certain futility to psychiatric care given the paucity of evidence to support practice. This may contribute towards the poor use of hospital care as a therapeutic intervention as part of the wider spectrum of care. Difficulties arise when trying to develop a care pathway with EBP, given the paucity of knowledge on why certain interventions are only partially effective. The development of a care pathway may inform the priorities of the inpatient Acute Care Forum for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. A care pathway should not be constrained, however, to EBP and should incorporate therapeutic activities to improve the overall experience of service users. Limitations on the study and the collection of evidence supporting these conclusions conclude the paper. PMID:15005479

  2. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  3. What proportion of primary psychiatric interventions are based on evidence from randomised controlled trials?

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J R; Game, D; Jenkins, N E; Peterson, L A; Pottinger, G R; Sackett, D L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the proportion of psychiatric inpatients receiving primary interventions based on randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Retrospective survey. SETTING: Acute adult general psychiatric ward. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted to the ward during a 28 day period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary interventions were classified according to whether or not they were supported by evidence from randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews. RESULTS: The primary interventions received by 26/40 (65%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 51% to 79%) of patients admitted during the period were based on randomised trials or systematic reviews. CONCLUSIONS: When patients were used as the denominator, most primary interventions given in acute general psychiatry were based on experimental evidence. The evidence was difficult to locate; there is an urgent need for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials in this area. PMID:10164145

  4. Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2015-02-01

    Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ≤24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur. PMID:25444670

  5. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. PMID:24070990

  6. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  7. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain–Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  8. A randomized trial of a mental health consumer-managed alternative to civil commitment for acute psychiatric crisis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Stoneking, Beth C; Humphreys, Keith; Sundby, Evan; Bond, Jason

    2008-09-01

    This experiment compared the effectiveness of an unlocked, mental health consumer-managed, crisis residential program (CRP) to a locked, inpatient psychiatric facility (LIPF) for adults civilly committed for severe psychiatric problems. Following screening and informed consent, participants (n = 393) were randomized to the CRP or the LIPF and interviewed at baseline and at 30-day, 6-month, and 1-year post admission. Outcomes were costs, level of functioning, psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, enrichment, and service satisfaction. Treatment outcomes were compared using hierarchical linear models. Participants in the CRP experienced significantly greater improvement on interviewer-rated and self-reported psychopathology than did participants in the LIPF condition; service satisfaction was dramatically higher in the CRP condition. CRP-style facilities are a viable alternative to psychiatric hospitalization for many individuals facing civil commitment. PMID:18626766

  9. Effectiveness of a drinking-motive-tailored emergency-room intervention among adolescents admitted to hospital due to acute alcohol intoxication - A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wurdak, Mara; Wolstein, Jörg; Kuntsche, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test the effectiveness of a drinking-motive-tailored intervention for adolescents hospitalized due to alcohol intoxication in eight cities in Germany between December 2011 and May 2012 against a similar, non-motive-tailored intervention. In a randomized controlled trial, 254 adolescents received a psychosocial intervention plus motive-tailored (intervention group; IG) or general exercises (control group; CG). Adolescents in the IG received exercises in accordance with their drinking motives as indicated at baseline (e.g. alternative ways of spending leisure time or dealing with stress). Exercises for the CG contained alcohol-related information in general (e.g. legal issues). The data of 81 adolescents (age: M = 15.6, SD = 1.0; 42.0% female) who participated in both the baseline and the follow-up were compared using ANOVA with repeated measurements and effect sizes (available case analyses). Adolescents reported lower alcohol use at the four-week follow-up independently of the kind of intervention. Significant interaction effects between time and IG were found for girls in terms of drinking frequency (F = 7.770, p < 0.01) and binge drinking (F = 7.0005, p < 0.05) but not for boys. For the former, the proportional reductions and corresponding effect sizes of drinking frequency (d = - 1.18), binge drinking (d = - 1.61) and drunkenness (d = - 2.87) were much higher than the .8 threshold for large effects. Conducting psychosocial interventions in a motive-tailored way appears more effective for girls admitted to hospital due to alcohol intoxication than without motive-tailoring. Further research is required to address the specific needs of boys in such interventions. (German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS ID: DRKS00005588). PMID:26844193

  10. Effectiveness of a drinking-motive-tailored emergency-room intervention among adolescents admitted to hospital due to acute alcohol intoxication — A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wurdak, Mara; Wolstein, Jörg; Kuntsche, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test the effectiveness of a drinking-motive-tailored intervention for adolescents hospitalized due to alcohol intoxication in eight cities in Germany between December 2011 and May 2012 against a similar, non-motive-tailored intervention. In a randomized controlled trial, 254 adolescents received a psychosocial intervention plus motive-tailored (intervention group; IG) or general exercises (control group; CG). Adolescents in the IG received exercises in accordance with their drinking motives as indicated at baseline (e.g. alternative ways of spending leisure time or dealing with stress). Exercises for the CG contained alcohol-related information in general (e.g. legal issues). The data of 81 adolescents (age: M = 15.6, SD = 1.0; 42.0% female) who participated in both the baseline and the follow-up were compared using ANOVA with repeated measurements and effect sizes (available case analyses). Adolescents reported lower alcohol use at the four-week follow-up independently of the kind of intervention. Significant interaction effects between time and IG were found for girls in terms of drinking frequency (F = 7.770, p < 0.01) and binge drinking (F = 7.0005, p < 0.05) but not for boys. For the former, the proportional reductions and corresponding effect sizes of drinking frequency (d = − 1.18), binge drinking (d = − 1.61) and drunkenness (d = − 2.87) were much higher than the .8 threshold for large effects. Conducting psychosocial interventions in a motive-tailored way appears more effective for girls admitted to hospital due to alcohol intoxication than without motive-tailoring. Further research is required to address the specific needs of boys in such interventions. (German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS ID: DRKS00005588). PMID:26844193

  11. Emergency preparedness of Research Center for Radiation Medicine and its hospital to admit and treat the patients with signs of acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Belyi, D A; Khomenko, V I; Bebeshko, V G

    2009-06-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the Research Center for Radiation Medicine (RCRM) was established in Kiev (Ukraine). Its main task was to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness and be ready to examine and treat patients who suffer as a result of hypothetical radiation accident. Based on the previous experience, this institution's specialists worked out new diagnostic criteria and drug treatment schemata for acute radiation sickness, created a database on 75 patients with this diagnosis and improved educational programmes for medical students and physicians working in the field of radiation medicine. RCRM collaborates fruitfully with western partners through the joint research projects and connects with the World Health Organization's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network centre. Collaboration with Kiev Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation allows RCRM to use aseptic wards having highly filtered air for the treatment of most severely irradiated patients. PMID:19429648

  12. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society. PMID:16643343

  13. Comparison of assessment and management of suicidal risk for acute psychiatric assessment between two state sponsored hospitals in England and Italy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranbir; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The risk of suicide is one of the most important risk factors looked into for acute psychiatric assessments that influences the management plan. The prevalence of suicide is on a rise across European countries; as a consequence, the different countries have created specific guidelines and policies in order to prevent suicides in the acute settings. These guidelines are based on both different cultural aspects as well as the different organization of the mental health system in the different countries. This paper wants to present the comparison between the guidelines of two European countries, England and Italy, in order to evaluate the systems, understand differences and common contact points. The different European countries could learn one from the other and a European shared point of view may be a way forward to create better understanding and preventing the risk of suicide across the population. PMID:26417782

  14. Effect of Patient Sex on the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Newly Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Admitted by an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Terán, Joaquín; Masa, Juan Fernando; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background The cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) differ by sex. We hypothesized that sex influences the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with OSA. OSA was defined as an apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI)>15 events·h-1. We evaluated the severity of ACS according to the ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, number of stents implanted and plasma peak troponin level. Methods We included 663 men (mean±SD, AHI 37±18 events·h-1) and 133 women (AHI 35±18 events·h-1) with OSA. Results The men were younger than the women (59±11 versus 66±11 years, p<0.0001), exhibited a higher neck circumference (p<0.0001), and were more likely to be smokers and alcohol users than women (p<0.0001, p = 0.0005, respectively). Body mass index and percentage of hypertensive patients or diabetics were similar between sexes. We observed a slight tendency for a higher Killip classification in women, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). For men, we observed that the number of diseased vessels and the number of stents implanted were higher (p = 0.02, p = 0.001, respectively), and a decrease in the ejection fraction (p = 0.002). Conclusions This study shows that sex in OSA influences the severity of ACS. Men show a lower ejection fraction and an increased number of diseased vessels and number of stents implanted. PMID:27416494

  15. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  16. A "facilitated" model of inpatient psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Olden, K W; Johnson, M P

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe a model for an effective partnership between a large health maintenance organization and a fee-for-service acute inpatient psychiatric unit. They present data from five years of experience with the model on a unit serving a catchment area of one million plan members. The model, which is based on "facilitated" care rather than managed care, emphasizes crisis intervention and a strong medical orientation. The HMO contracted with seven psychiatrists to provide treatment and helped develop a value system shared by the physicians and hospital staff. A clinician represented the HMO on the unit and played a key decision-making role in patient care. A total of 4,945 patients were admitted over five years. Costs per admission were reduced 47 percent during this period; the readmission rate was 16.9 percent. Implementation of the model resulted in the delivery of high-quality cost-effective care. PMID:8225303

  17. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  18. Ventricular premature beats on Holter monitoring in patients admitted with chest pain, in whom acute myocardial infarction is not confirmed. The prognostic value and relationship to scars or ischemia on thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, J.K.; Sorensen, J.N.; Kromann-Andersen, B.; Kjeldgaard, K.M.; Christoffersen, K.; van Duijvendijk, K.; Reiber, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Ambulatory 24-h Holter monitoring was carried out in 198 patients who had been admitted because of suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) due to chest pain, but in whom AMI was not confirmed. During a follow-up period of 12-24 months (median 14 months) 16 cardiac events (i.e., nonfatal AMI or cardiac death) occurred. Ventricular premature beats (VPBs) were found in 65.2% of the patients, complex VPBs in 28.8%. Pairs of VPBs which were seen in 10.0% of the patients were the only important type of VPBs significantly related to an impaired prognosis. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed in 144 of the patients. VPBs were significantly related to scar formation (i.e., to permanent defects, but not to ischemia, specifically, to transient defects). It is concluded that ventricular arrhythmias in this patient category indicate presence of chronic ischemic heart disease, and that pairs of VPBs seem to identify patients at risk for cardiac events.

  19. ADMIT: ALMA Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Douglas N.; Xu, Lisa; Looney, Leslie; Teuben, Peter J.; Pound, Marc W.; Rauch, Kevin P.; Mundy, Lee G.; Kern, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining Toolkit) is a toolkit for the creation and analysis of new science products from ALMA data. ADMIT is an ALMA Development Project written purely in Python. While specifically targeted for ALMA science and production use after the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to radio-astronomical data. ADMIT quickly provides users with a detailed overview of their science products: line identifications, line 'cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection), etc. Users can download the small ADMIT pipeline product (< 20MB), analyze the results, then fine-tune and re-run the ADMIT pipeline (or any part thereof) on their own machines and interactively inspect the results. ADMIT will have both a GUI and command line interface available for this purpose. By analyzing multiple data cubes simultaneously, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will be possible. Users will also be able to enhance the capabilities of ADMIT by creating customized ADMIT tasks satisfying any special processing needs. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  20. Admit: Alma Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Douglas; Looney, Leslie; Xu, Lisa; Pound, Marc W.; Teuben, Peter J.; Rauch, Kevin P.; Mundy, Lee; Kern, Jeffrey S.

    2015-06-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining Toolkit) is a toolkit for the creation and analysis of new science products from ALMA data. ADMIT is an ALMA Development Project written purely in Python. While specifically targeted for ALMA science and production use after the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to radio-astronomical data. ADMIT quickly provides users with a detailed overview of their science products: line identifications, line 'cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection), etc. Users can download the small ADMIT pipeline product (<20MB), analyze the results, then fine-tune and re-run the ADMIT pipeline (or any part thereof) on their own machines and interactively inspect the results. ADMIT will have both a GUI and command line interface available for this purpose. By analyzing multiple data cubes simultaneously, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will be possible. Users will also be able to enhance the capabilities of ADMIT by creating customized ADMIT tasks satisfying any special processing needs. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  1. Relation between parasuicide, suicide, psychiatric admissions, and socioeconomic deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnell, D. J.; Peters, T. J.; Kammerling, R. M.; Brooks, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relations between parasuicide, suicide, psychiatric inpatient admissions, and socioeconomic deprivation. DESIGN--Ecological analysis with data from routine information systems and the 1991 census. SETTING--24 localities in the area covered by the Bristol and District Health Authority (population 817,000), consisting of aggregations of neighbouring wards, with an average population of 34,000. SUBJECTS--6089 subjects aged over 10 years admitted to hospital after parasuicide between April 1990 and March 1994; 997 suicides occurring 1982-91; 4763 subjects aged 10-64 years admitted with acute psychiatric illness between April 1990 and March 1994. RESULTS--Localities varied significantly in standardised admission ratios for parasuicide and standardised mortality ratios for suicide (P < 0.001). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between the standardised mortality ratio for suicide and standardised admission ratio for parasuicide was 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.88). Correlation between parasuicide and Townsend score was 0.86 (0.70 to 0.94) and between suicide and Townsend score 0.73 (0.46 to 0.88). The partial correlation coefficient between suicide and parasuicide after the Townsend score was adjusted for was 0.29 (-0.13 to 0.62). The correlation between standardised admission ratio for parasuicide and standardised admission ratio for psychiatric illness was 0.76 (0.51 to 0.89) and between standardised mortality ratio for suicide and standardised admission ratio for psychiatric illness was 0.72 (0.45 to 0.87). CONCLUSION--A strong ecological association exists between suicide and parasuicide, with socioeconomic deprivation accounting for much of this relation. This strong association provides supporting evidence for the importance of social policy measures in attaining Health of the Nation targets on mental health. PMID:7627035

  2. Simple Measures of Hopelessness and Impulsivity are Associated with Acute Suicidal Ideation and Attempts in Patients in Psychiatric Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, David J.; May, Roberta S.; Bruer, Emily H.; Sheehan, David V.; Alphs, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the authors’ predictions 1) that hopelessness would positively correlate with suicidal ideation and that impulsivity (either transient urges to self-harm or impulsive acting out) would positively correlate with suicidal behavior, and 2) that the recent or long-standing nature of the traits will have corresponding effects on reported histories of suicidal ideation and behavior. Design: Questionnaire validation trial in which each subject received every measure in counterbalanced fashion. Setting: Inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings associated with a medium-sized medical school in the southeastern United States. Participants: Forty-five subjects presenting with varying levels of suicidal ideation and behavior completed measures providing information about their histories of suicidal ideation and behavior, recent feelings of hopelessness, feelings of general hopelessness, recent feelings of difficulty controlling urges to self-harm, and feeling about general levels of impulsivity. Measurements: The InterSePT Scale for Suicidal Thinking–Plus, the Sheehan-Suicidality Tracking Scale, the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale, and six additional questions to assess hopelessness and impulsivity. Results: Recent and trait hopelessness correlated positively with suicidal ideation. Patients who reported any suicide attempt endorsed higher levels of general impulsivity than those who did not report a history of at least one suicide attempt. Those enrolled in the study secondary to a very recent suicide attempt reported more difficulties with recent suicidal impulses. Conclusion: Simple measures of hopelessness and impulsivity are associated with suicidal ideation and attempts and may add to determination of suicide risk. PMID:25520888

  3. Psychiatric disorders impacting critical illness.

    PubMed

    Struble, Laura M; Sullivan, Barbara J; Hartman, Laurie S

    2014-03-01

    An astounding 30% to 50% of older patients who are hospitalized for a medical condition also have a psychiatric disorder. The intent of this article is to prepare acute care nurses to meet the mental health needs of older adults with a critical illness and prevent untoward sequelae of medical events. The authors discuss the importance of baseline assessment data, issues related to informed consent, manifestations of common psychiatric disorders that may be seen in older adults in the acute care setting, as well as strategies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24484928

  4. [Psychiatric rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Dusek, K

    1990-04-01

    The author presents a brief account of the development of psychiatric rehabilitation during the past two centuries. He draws attention to new trends in rehabilitation of the mentally sick during the post-war period and at present. He describes the system of rehabilitation in the Soviet Union which began to develop as a results of efforts in the Bekhterev Institute in Leningrad. In our country the law on social security in 1964 created conditions for protected workshop and protected work places. In 1973 methodical instructions of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs issued instructions which specified the principles of planning, establishment and operation of these facilities. At the end of 1986 the Ministry of Health CSR issued an amendment to the concept of psychiatry which contains the organization of psychiatric rehabilitation not only in in-patient but in particular in out-patient psychiatric facilities. PMID:2194684

  5. Psychiatric Adjustment in the Year after Meningococcal Disease in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Daniel; Nadel, Simon; Gledhill, Julia; Gordon, Fabiana; Garralda, M. Elena

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychiatric status after meningococcal disease. Method: Cohort study of 66 children (34 boys, 32 girls) ages 4 to 17 years admitted to pediatric hospitals with meningococcal disease. The main outcome measure was psychiatric disorder (1-year period and point prevalence on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia…

  6. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  7. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  8. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  9. The importance of not jumping to conclusions: syphilis as an organic cause of neurological, psychiatric and endocrine presentations.

    PubMed

    Noblett, Joanne; Roberts, Emmert

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to an acute psychiatric ward under section 2 of the Mental Health Act after presenting with auditory hallucinations and partition delusions. He had been known to mental health services since 2005 but had never been treated with psychotropic medication or given a formal psychiatric diagnosis. He was also diagnosed with hypopituitarism of unknown aetiology in 2002. In light of this presentation, his medical history was reviewed in full, hormone levels and a full delirium screen including blood borne virus and syphilis serology was completed to ensure no organic cause had been missed. The treponemal antibody was positive, and he reported no previous syphilis treatment, as such a diagnosis of neurosyphilis was performed. This case demonstrates a patient presenting with two potential complications of syphilis; psychosis and hypopituitarism where screening for this infection had not been previously considered. PMID:25716037

  10. Non-Psychiatric Health Problems among Psychiatric Inpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, L.; Abend, S.; Ravin, P.; Mastis, K.; Hunt, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical distress resulting from medical problems has been found to cause increased behaviour problems in patients with intellectual disabilities (ID). Despite this fact, little has been documented on the medical problems of individuals with ID admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. We conducted an exploratory investigation based on…

  11. [Acute pancreatitis after ingestion of ibuprofen in a 16-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Bruusgaard-Mouritsen, Mads Emil; Leerhøy, Bonna; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2015-07-01

    This is a case report of a 16-year-old boy with possible drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) caused by ibuprofen. The patient had a history of psychiatric, but no somatic, disease, and he was admitted with a clinical presentation consistent with acute pancreatitis after a bolus ingestion of 10 g of ibuprofen in a suicidal attempt. No evidence of other causality for acute pancreatitis was identified. The patient was treated with a standard pancreatitis treatment regime and was discharged against medical advice after four days. The case represents a possible causality between ibuprofen and DIP. PMID:26239856

  12. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  13. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  14. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for ‘excessive’ all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  15. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  16. The Low Proportion and Associated Factors of Involuntary Admission in the Psychiatric Emergency Service in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jen-Pang; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chou, Pesus

    2015-01-01

    Background The involuntary admission regulated under the Mental Health Act has become an increasingly important issue in the developed countries in recent years. Most studies about the distribution and associated factors of involuntary admission were carried out in the western countries; however, the results may vary in different areas with different legal and socio-cultural backgrounds. Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion and associated factors of involuntary admission in a psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan. Methods The study cohort included patients admitted from a psychiatric emergency service over a two-year period. Demographic, psychiatric emergency service utilization, and clinical variables were compared between those who were voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to explore the associated factors of involuntary admission. Results Among 2,777 admitted patients, 110 (4.0%) were involuntarily admitted. Police referrals and presenting problems as violence assessed by psychiatric nurses were found to be associated with involuntary admission. These patients were more likely to be involuntarily admitted during the night shift and stayed longer in the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusions The proportion of involuntary admissions in Taiwan was in the lower range when compared to Western countries. Dangerous conditions evaluated by the psychiatric nurses and police rather than diagnosis made by the psychiatrists were related factors of involuntary admission. As it spent more time to admit involuntary patients, it was suggested that multidisciplinary professionals should be included in and educated for during the process of involuntary admission. PMID:26046529

  17. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  18. [Authority in the psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Laemmel, K

    1983-01-01

    patient. Attempts of intrusion into the independence and authority of the psychiatric hospital can also occur from the families of the patients, the admitting physicians or the mass media who developed a last a somewhat unsavory interest into the psychiatric institution. To deal with these challenges authoritative authority is mandatory as much as the understanding of the dynamics of human behavior. Special problems exist for the psychiatric service within a general hospital. As the most recent arrival from the banishment in the outskirts into the fold of medicine, it has to prove itself first.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6635585

  19. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  20. Factors affecting the decision to hospitalise children admitted to the emergency department due to non-fatal suicide attempts by pills

    PubMed Central

    Gokalp, Gamze; Anil, Murat; Bal, Alkan; Bicilioglu, Yuksel; Kamit Can, Fulya; Anil, Ayse Berna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Suicide attempts (SAs) in the paediatric age group represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to examine the factors affecting the decision to hospitalize children with a diagnosis of non-fatal SA by pills. Methods: Children <18 years of age admitted with SA by pills during 2014 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: Group-I comprised hospitalised patients and Group-II included those who were discharged from the PED. These two groups were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics recorded upon PED admission. Results: A total of 196 patients were included in the study. The number of pills taken for self-poisoning in Group-I (median: 20 pills) was higher than that in Group-II (median: 12 pills) (p < 0.001), and the rate of pathological findings during the first paediatric psychiatric consultation was higher in Group-I (91.1%) than in the Group-II (54.8%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Factors affecting the disposition decision in cases of children who performed non-fatal SA via pills included the amount of medication taken for the suicide attempt and the presence of psychiatric disorders, as determined by a paediatric psychiatrist during the acute phase. PMID:27375723

  1. [Psychiatric complications of alcoholism: alcohol withdrawal syndrome and other psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Maciel, Cláudia; Kerr-Corrêa, Florence

    2004-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is an acute condition secondary to total or partial reduction of alcohol consumption, characterized by self limited signs and symptoms and different degrees of severity. It can be complicated by several clinical and/or other psychiatric related problems. The objective of this article is to review the most important psychiatric complications to alcohol withdrawal syndrome as well as other psychiatric disorders associated with alcohol dependence as Wernicke Korsakoff and Marchiava Bignami syndromes. We aim to promote early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions, minimizing morbidity and mortality associated with them. PMID:15729445

  2. Profiles of Personal Resiliency in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.; Gulab, Nazli A.

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain whether children and adolescents whose ages ranged from 9 to 17 years described distinct profiles of personal resiliency, the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) were administered to 100 youth who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit and were diagnosed with various "DSM-IV-TR" disorders along with the Beck…

  3. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  4. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment. PMID:18717266

  5. The challenge of admitting the very elderly to intensive care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Angus, Derek C; Boumendil, Ariane; Guidet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has increased the demand for healthcare resources. The number of patients aged 80 years and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) increased during the past decade, as has the intensity of care for such patients. Yet, many physicians remain reluctant to admit the oldest, arguing a "squandering" of societal resources, that ICU care could be deleterious, or that ICU care may not actually be what the patient or family wants in this instance. Other ICU physicians are strong advocates for admission of a selected elderly population. These discrepant opinions may partly be explained by the current lack of validated criteria to select accurately the patients (of any age) who will benefit most from ICU hospitalization. This review describes the epidemiology of the elderly aged 80 years and older admitted in the ICU, their long-term outcomes, and to discuss some of the solutions to cope with the burden of an aging population receiving acute care hospitalization. PMID:21906383

  6. Use of Inpatient Psychiatric Services by Children and Youth under Age 18, United States, 1980. Mental Health Statistical Note No. 175.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazzo-Sayre, Laura J.; And Others

    The report examines data from three sample surveys of admissions during 1980 to the inpatient psychiatric services of state and mental hospitals and private psychiatric hospitals and the separate inpatient psychiatric services of non-federal general hospitals. Findings revealed that an estimated 81,532 persons under 18 years were admitted to…

  7. Psychiatric Rehabilitation in a Community Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goveia, Leonard H.; Tutko, Thomas A.

    A research project was designed to compare the therapeutic effectiveness of treatment in a state hospital with treatment in a supportive, residential halfway-house facility involving patients in the acute initial stages of a psychiatric episode. Psychological tests were administered to randomly assigned patients at admission to the two facilities,…

  8. The admissions process in two state psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P

    1981-06-01

    In this study, a conceptual model of the factors influencing the admissions process was tested in two state psychiatric hospitals. The factors included in the model fell into four categories: characteristics of patients, characteristics of admitting personnel, system factors, and patient assessment. The attitudes of individuals accompanying an applicant were found to be most important. Patients referred by police, courts, family, friends, or agency personnel were more likely to be admitted than self-referrals. Pathological behaviors that had a significant impact on the admissions process were those that indicated the presence of mental disorder or danger to self or others. The availability of alternatives to hospitalization was not found to be significant, a finding that suggests that admitting personnel, particularly psychiatrists, should be educated about community alternatives if spiraling rates of psychiatric admission are to be reduced. PMID:7262846

  9. Profile of psychiatric patients presenting to a tertiary care emergency department of Karachi.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Zaman; Ejaz, Kiran; Nakeer, Rooham; Iftikhar, Sundus

    2015-05-01

    This study reviewed the presentations of psychiatric patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED), The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Psychiatric patients admitted through the ED to the psychiatry ward were compared to those admitted through the same units other than the psychiatry ward, from 2006 to 2010 using medical records. Psychiatric patients were defined as those in whom psychiatry consult was generated and 1127 cases were included in study. There were 550 (48.8%) female patients. Most common presentations in the ED were sleep-related problems (n=205, 15.9%) followed by aggressive behavior (n=191, 14.8%). Depression was the most common diagnosis made in the ED (n=331, 29.3%) and at the time of discharge from the hospital (n=354, 29.5%). Psychiatric patients presenting to the ED had signs and symptoms which one generally disregards. However, these minor indicators can lead to major events in a patient's life. PMID:26008672

  10. Acute cocaine-related health problems in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency departments may be a useful information source to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with acute cocaine-related medical problems. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of 165 acute, laboratory-confirmed cocaine intoxications admitted to an urban emergency department in Switzerland between January 2007 and March 2011. Results A total of 165 patients with a mean age of 32 years were included. Most patients were male (73%) and unemployed (65%). Only a minority (16%) had abused cocaine alone while 84% of the patients had used at least one additional substance, most commonly ethanol (41%), opioids (38%), or cannabis (36%) as confirmed by their detection in blood samples. The most frequently reported symptoms were chest pain (21%), palpitations (19%), anxiety (36%) and restlessness (36%). Psychiatric symptoms were present in 64%. Hypertension and tachycardia were observed in 53% and 44% of the patients, respectively. Severe poisonings only occurred in patients with multiple substance intoxication (15%). Severe intoxications were non-significantly more frequent with injected drug use compared to nasal, oral, or inhalational drug use. Severe complications included acute myocardial infarction (2 cases), stroke (one case), and seizures (3 cases). Most patients (75%) were discharged home within 24 h after admission. A psychiatric evaluation in the ED was performed in 24% of the patients and 19% were referred to a psychiatric clinic. Conclusions Patients with acute cocaine intoxication often used cocaine together with ethanol and opioids and presented with sympathomimetic toxicity and/or psychiatric disorders. Severe acute toxicity was more frequent with multiple substance use. Toxicity was typically short-lasting but psychiatric evaluation and referral was often needed. PMID:24666782

  11. Occupational stress in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P J

    1993-04-01

    Psychiatric nursing is invariably assumed to be a stressful area of nursing practice. Empirical evidence to support this proposition is limited, however, due to the lack of research in this field. The purpose of this project was to examine occupational stress in a specified area of psychiatric nursing. The research was exploratory and therefore the concern was discovery and description rather than the testing of clear hypotheses and the development of causal relationships. The study has four main objectives. First, to describe the various stressors present in the work of the psychiatric nurse in the acute admission wards of two district health authorities. Secondly, to measure the effects of stress using a recognized and well-validated instrument for recording levels of burnout. Thirdly, through the use of a particular theoretical framework to identify the types of coping strategy used by the participants in the study. Fourthly, to note any clear associations between the stressors, the effects of stress and the ways of coping identified in the study. The conceptual basis for the project was Lazarus's cognitive theory of stress and coping and Maslach's model of burnout. PMID:8496507

  12. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors. PMID:26925025

  13. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors. PMID:26925025

  14. Management challenges in psychiatric patients with severe mandibular pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kunchur, R; Goss, A N

    2011-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted to the psychiatric unit of a major hospital as he was threatening self-harm due to uncontrolled left mandibular pain. Although he had significant psychiatric issues, psychiatric treatment did not help him. Further review at three weeks post-admission showed that he had had many months of unsuccessful dental treatment and this had triggered his psychiatric crisis. Multidisciplinary investigation and communication showed that he had trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vascular changes in his temporal lobe. He responded well to explanation and anti-neuralgic medication. Simple guidelines on how dental practitioners can cope with such patients are presented. PMID:21332745

  15. ADMIT: The ALMA Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Pound, M.; Mundy, L.; Rauch, K.; Friedel, D.; Looney, L.; Xu, L.; Kern, J.

    2015-09-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining ToolkiT), a toolkit for the creation of new science products from ALMA data, is being developed as an ALMA Development Project. It is written in Python and, while specifically targeted for a uniform analysis of the ALMA science products that come out of the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to (radio) astronomical data. It first provides users with a detailed view of their science products created by ADMIT inside the ALMA pipeline: line identifications, line ‘cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection). Using descriptor vectors the ALMA data archive is enriched with useful information to make archive data mining possible. Users can also opt to download the (small) ADMIT pipeline product, then fine-tune and re-run the pipeline and inspect their hopefully improved data. By running many projects in a parallel fashion, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will also be possible. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  16. Severe, Persistent and Fatal Delirium in Psychogeriatric Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jans, Ingrid S.; Oudewortel, Letty; Brandt, Paulien M.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although delirium is generally regarded as a transient syndrome, persistence of delirium in patients with cognitive impairment – even with fatal outcome – has been reported as well. This study aims to describe the clinical features and neuropathological correlates of this type of delirium. Methods Inclusion criteria for this case series were: (1) severe persistent delirium until death, (2) history of cognitive decline and (3) consent for brain autopsy. Medical records were examined in combination with collected clinical data and neuropathological findings. Result In 15 patients, all living at home before admission, episodes with delirium lasted for 4.2 months on average. No distinct medical causes of persistent delirium could be identified. Pathological diagnoses included Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies as well as single cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. Conclusion Severe, persistent and fatal delirium in patients with cognitive impairment can occur relatively early in the disease trajectory and is associated with diverse neuropathologies. PMID:26195981

  17. Delayed psychiatric sequelae among Falklands war veterans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth H.; Lovett, Jonathan W.T.

    1987-01-01

    The only published account to date of psychiatric complications among Falklands war veterans suggests that acute reactions are rare. Reported here are three cases of severe delayed reactions in Falklands veterans from South Wales. All three cases demonstrate a common pattern similar to that shown by Vietnam war veterans. Possible aetiological factors and prevention are discussed. It seems likely that relatives of combatants will also be affected and general practitioners are in a unique position to recognize and treat these problems. PMID:3668924

  18. Association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Abdullah Cüneyt; Findikli, Ebru; Korkmaz, Sevda; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background Here we aimed to investigate sociodemographic characteristics, psychiatric history, and association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic. Methods This study consists of 73 violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic who were literate and agreed to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form created by us to investigate alcohol-substance abuse, suicide attempt, previous history of trauma, self and family history of psychiatric disorders and Beck Anxiety Inventory was given to the patients. Results Of the patients exposed to violence 63% (n=46) were female and 27% (n=27) were male. Of these patients, 68.5% (n=50) were married, 43.8% (n=25) were workers, 34.2% were housewives, 11% were unemployed, and 11% were civil servants. Of the violence-exposed patients, 56.2% (n=41) were primary school, 21.9% (n=16) were high school, and 21.9% (n=16) were university graduates. Smoking and alcohol use rates were 54.8% (n=40) and 17.8% (n=13), respectively. The most common trauma type was assault using physical force with a ratio of 78.1% (n=57). In addition, anxiety scores were high in 42.5% (n=31) and moderate in 9.6% (n=7) of the patients. Mentioned psychiatric disorder was present in 17.8% (n=13) of the patients and 19.2% (n=14) of the patients’ relatives. The correlation between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety scores revealed that married patients had higher anxiety scores (P<0.01) and patients assaulted by their parents had lower anxiety scores (P<0.00). Conclusion A total of 63% of the violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency room were females, 56.2% were primary school graduates, and 43.8% were factory workers; this result shows that low socioeconomical status and education level affect exposure to trauma especially in females. In addition, ~20% of the patients and patients’ relatives had a psychiatric disorder and 53.4% of perpetrators

  19. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  20. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Families Guide Skip breadcrumb navigation Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Quick Links Facts For Families Guide Facts For ... Families Guide - Search No. 52; Updated November 2012 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate ...

  1. Risk factors associated with psychiatric readmission.

    PubMed

    Lorine, Kim; Goenjian, Haig; Kim, Soeun; Steinberg, Alan M; Schmidt, Kendall; Goenjian, Armen K

    2015-06-01

    The present study focused on identifying risk factors for early readmission of patients discharged from an urban community hospital. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted on 207 consecutive inpatient psychiatric admissions that included patients who were readmitted within 15 days, within 3 to 6 months, and not admitted for at least 12 months post-discharge. Findings indicated that a diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (OR = 18; 95% CI 2.70-117.7; p < 0.05), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 9; 95% CI 1.80-40.60; p < 0.05), number of previous psychiatric hospitalizations (OR = 2; 95% CI 1.28-3.73; p < 0.05), and type of residence at initial admission (e.g., homeless, OR = 29; 95% CI 3.99-217; p < 0.05) were significant risk factors for early readmission, where OR compares readmission group 1 versus group 3 in the multinomial logistic regression. Initial positive urine drug screen, history of drug abuse or incarceration, and legal status at initial admission did not predict early readmission. Reducing the risk factors associated with psychiatric readmissions has the potential to lead to the identification and development of preventative intervention strategies that can significantly improve patient safety, quality of care, well-being, and contain health care expenditures. PMID:25974053

  2. Psychiatric morbidity among prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Ayirolimeethal, Anithakumari; Ragesh, G.; Ramanujam, Jayanthi M.; George, Biju

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a considerable lack of scientific estimate of psychiatric morbidity among Indian prisoners. Objective: The objective of the following study is to study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study at District Jail, Kozhikode, Kerala. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 prisoners who were inmates during the period from mid-April to mid-July 2011 participated in the study. The study subjects included both male and female remand or convict prisoners. Socio-demographic data, clinical history and criminological history were collected from each individual. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using MINI-Plus. Statistical Analysis: Done by using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). Results: A total of 175 subjects (68.6%) had a current mental illness. Substance use disorder was the most common diagnosis (47.1%). Antisocial personality disorder was diagnosed in 19.2%, adjustment disorder in 13.7%, mood disorder in 4.3% and psychosis in another 6.3% of prisoners. A high rate of a current psychiatric disorder was seen in male (69.7%) prisoners. A significant association was noticed for the different nature of crimes with psychiatric diagnoses and previous imprisonment. Nearly 4% of prisoners reported a moderate to high suicide risk. Conclusion: Mental health problems among prisoners were quite high. Mentally ill prisoners are at high risk for repeated incarceration. The increased rate of psychiatric disorders should be a concern for mental health professionals and the policy makers. PMID:24891702

  3. Urgent Psychiatric Services: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunderji, Nadiya; de Bibiana, Jason Tan; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Urgent psychiatric services can provide timely access to ambulatory psychiatric assessment and short-term treatment for patients experiencing a mental health crisis or risk of rapid deterioration requiring hospitalization, yet little is known about how best to organize mental health service delivery for this population. Our scoping review was conducted to identify knowledge gaps and inform program development and quality improvement. Method: We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, and EBM Reviews for English-language articles, published from January 1993 to June 2014, using relevant key words and subject headings. Reverse and forward citations were manually searched using reference lists and Google Scholar. Articles were included if they described programs providing ambulatory psychiatric assessment (with or without treatment) within 2 weeks of referral. Results: We identified 10 programs providing urgent psychiatric services. Programs targeted a diagnostically heterogeneous population with acute risks and intensive needs. Most programs included a structured process for triage, strategies to improve accessibility and attendance, interprofessional staffing, short-term treatment, and efforts to improve continuity of care. Despite substantial methodological limitations, studies reported improvements in symptom severity, distress, psychosocial functioning, mental health–related quality of life, subjective well-being, and satisfaction with care, as well as decreased wait times for post-emergency department (ED) ambulatory care, and averted ED visits and admissions. Conclusions: Urgent psychiatric services may be an important part of the continuum of mental health services. Further work is needed to clarify the role of urgent psychiatric services, develop standards or best practices, and evaluate outcomes using rigorous methodologies. PMID:26454727

  4. [Dichotomy of psychiatric and somatic emergency care; fundamental flaw should be addressed].

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Joep H A M; Pelger, E C M Noor; de Pont, Boudewijn J H B; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, acute psychiatric care is characterised by mind-body dualism. For acute psychiatric patients, the first port of call is the general practitioner (GP); after-hour care is provided by the out-of-hours GP service. In contrast to patients with other medical illnesses, the out-of-hours GP service does not usually refer patients with acute psychiatric issues to the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the general hospital, but to the local ambulant psychiatric 'crisis' service. However, some of these patients still end up at the A&E department, as our three cases demonstrate. Integration of the out-of-hours GP service, A&E and acute psychiatric care, therefore, would enable elimination of the current partitioning of somatic and psychiatric medicine in acute emergency care. This solution would not only improve acute emergency care, but would also ensure a targeted and efficient implementation of services and might even lead to a decreased stigmatisation of psychiatric patients in general. PMID:26230348

  5. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Yves; Beaulieu, Lucie; Paradis, Michel; Labonté, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification. Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior), both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression. Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%). Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male), marital status (single/separated), education (high school or less), employment (none), judicial history (any type), substance abuse (prior or active), medication compliance (poor), type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord), reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol), diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders), and outcome (more frequently placed under observation or admitted). Conclusion: Our results suggest that many state-independent variables are associated with aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service. Although their sum may not add up to a specific patient profile, they can nevertheless be useful in service planning, being easily integrated alongside state-dependent rating scales in a

  6. Abortion and psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Nada L

    2003-03-01

    The subject of abortion is fraught with politics, emotions, and misinformation. A widespread practice reaching far back in history, abortion is again in the news. Psychiatry sits at the intersection of the religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, medical, and legal facets of the abortion issue. Although the religions that forbid abortion are more prominent in the media, many religions have more liberal approaches. While the basic right to abortion has been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, several limitations have been permitted, including parental notification or consent (with the possibility of judicial bypass) for minors, waiting periods, and mandatory provision of certain, sometimes biased, information. Before the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion in 1973, many women were maimed or killed by illegal abortions, and psychiatrists were sometimes asked to certify that abortions were justified on psychiatric grounds. Currently, there are active attempts to convince the public and women considering abortion that abortion frequently has negative psychiatric consequences. This assertion is not borne out by the literature: the vast majority of women tolerate abortion without psychiatric sequelae. The psychiatric outcome of abortion is best when patients are able to make autonomous, supported decisions. Psychiatrists need to know the medical and psychiatric facts about abortion. Psychiatrists can then help patients prevent unwanted pregnancies, make informed decisions consonant with their own values and circumstances when they become pregnant, and find appropriate social and medical resources whatever their decisions may be. PMID:15985924

  7. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  8. Psychiatric consultation to the postpartum mother.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eleanor A; Kim, Deborah R

    2015-04-01

    The immediate postpartum period is a time of acute vulnerability to mental illness, which presents unique challenges for the psychiatric consultant. Because the postpartum hospital stay is typically brief, the consultant must have a working knowledge of postpartum physiology and the myriad forms of mental illness that may emerge in this vulnerable time, in order to quickly make a diagnosis and formulate a treatment plan. This review aims to characterize the most common reasons for postpartum consultation, review postpartum physiology and psychiatric conditions, and propose an evidence-based, practical approach to treatment. A literature search using the terms "postpartum," "obstetric," "consultation," and "psychiatry" yielded six studies that identified reasons for psychiatric consultation to the obstetrics and gynecology services. These studies informed the structure of the article such that we review the most common reasons for consultation and how to approach each issue. The most common reason for consultation is past psychiatric history, often in the absence of current symptoms. For each clinical situation, including depression, adverse birth events, and psychosis, we present a differential diagnosis, as well as risk factors, clinical signs, and recommended treatment. PMID:25764006

  9. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Bala, Neeru; Chatrath, Veena

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient's physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse. PMID:22529413

  10. Pharmacogenomics in Psychiatric Practice.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Rif S; Roberts, R Jeannie; El-Mallakh, Peggy L; Findlay, Lillian Jan; Reynolds, Kristen K

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing in psychiatry is becoming an established clinical procedure. Several vendors provide clinical interpretation of combinatorial pharmacogenomic testing of gene variants that have documented predictive implications regarding either pharmacologic response or adverse effects in depression and other psychiatric conditions. Such gene profiles have demonstrated improvements in outcome in depression, and reduction of cost of care of patients with inadequate clinical response. Additionally, several new gene variants are being studied to predict specific response in individuals. Many of these genes have demonstrated a role in the pathophysiology of depression or specific depressive symptoms. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art application of psychiatric pharmacogenomics. PMID:27514465

  11. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  12. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Started State by State Info FAQs Educational Webcasts Links Current Research In the News Legal Issues ... How to write a Psychiatric Advance Directive?" View webcast (15:04) What are Psychiatric Advance Directives? View ...

  13. Migraine and its psychiatric comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Minen, Mia Tova; Begasse De Dhaem, Olivia; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley; Powers, Scott; Schwedt, Todd J; Lipton, Richard; Silbersweig, David

    2016-07-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of psychiatric comorbidities. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the link between migraine and several comorbid psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We present data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification. We discuss the evidence, theories and methods, such as brain functional imaging, to explain the pathophysiological links between migraine and psychiatric disorders. Finally, we provide an overview of the treatment considerations for treating migraine with psychiatric comorbidities. In conclusion, a review of the literature demonstrates the wide variety of psychiatric comorbidities with migraine. However, more research is needed to elucidate the neurocircuitry underlying the association between migraine and the comorbid psychiatric conditions and to determine the most effective treatment for migraine with psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26733600

  14. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  15. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Edith; Williams, Robert B; Ferrell, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions. PMID:19557101

  16. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  17. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis –composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress—as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. PMID:23816860

  18. Associations between Relational Aggression, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Preddy, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between relational aggression, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation in a child clinical population. Participants included 276 children (M age = 9.55 years; 69% Male) who were admitted to a child psychiatric inpatient facility. Findings suggested that relational aggression was associated with depressive…

  19. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  20. Pragmatism rules: the intervention and prevention strategies used by psychiatric nurses working with non-suicidal self-harming individuals.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, A

    2007-02-01

    Self harm in the absence of expressed suicidal intent is an under explored area in psychiatric nursing research. This paper reports on findings of a study undertaken in two acute psychiatric inpatient units in Ireland. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the practices of psychiatric nurses in relation to people who self harm, but who are not considered suicidal. Semi structured interviews were held with eight psychiatric nurses. Content analysis revealed several themes. For the purpose of this paper the prevention and intervention strategies psychiatric nurses engage in when working with non-suicidal self harming individuals are presented. Recommendations for further research are offered. PMID:17244007

  1. The Use of the Addiction Severity Index Psychiatric Composite Scores to Predict Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions.

    PubMed

    Drymalski, Walter M; Nunley, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders indicates a need for integrated behavioral health treatment that addresses both types of disorder simultaneously. One component of this integrated treatment is the use of an assessment process that can concurrently identify the presence of each class of disorder. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) has been extensively used and researched in the field of substance use disorders for over 30 years. The ASI has seven sections, including a section on substance use disorders and a section on psychiatric symptoms, making it a potential candidate for a co-occurring screen during intake. The following study utilized a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to determine an optimal cutoff score on the ASI psychiatric composite score to identify which individuals seeking substance use disorder treatment were admitted to the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division's psychiatric hospital in the year subsequent to their ASI administration. Of the 19,320 individuals who completed an initial ASI in our system, 343 had an inpatient admission. The receiver operating characteristic curve was statistically significant, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A cutoff of 0.27 had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.61, such that over 60% (11,963/19,320) of the sample was excluded. These results suggest that the ASI psychiatric composite score may be a useful initial screen to identify those with potential mental health problems/needs in a behavioral health system attempting to integrate addiction and mental health services. PMID:27580192

  2. Factors associated with readmission of patients at a university hospital psychiatric ward in iran.

    PubMed

    Barekatain, Majid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hassannejad, Razeyeh; Hosseini, Reihane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports. PMID:24236285

  3. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. PMID:23816860

  4. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanthén, Klas; Rask, Mikael; Sunnqvist, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine psychiatric patients' experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients' experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable. PMID:26199931

  5. Correlates of psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever in a Nigerian general hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Aghanwa, H S; Morakinyo, O

    2001-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever in a Nigerian general hospital. Information such as sociodemographic characteristics, symptom manifestations, results of investigations, neuropsychiatric symptoms, outcome and disposal were obtained from the case files of patients admitted for typhoid fever over a period of six years. The patients with psychiatric morbidity conspicuous enough to be documented by the attending physicians-mostly internists-were compared with those with no documented psychiatric morbidity on sociodemographic and clinical indices. Of the 136 cases, 26 (19.1%) had psychiatric morbidity. This included delirium (73.1%), generalized anxiety disorder (3.8%), depressive episode (3.8%), schizophrenia like disorder (3.8%) and monosymptomatic neuropychiatric manifestations such as apathy, hallucinations and irrelevant talking (15.5%). The clinical and sociodemographic indices that were significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity were diarrhea, blood biochemical imbalance and age (P<.05). Adolescents and young adults were more predisposed to developing psychiatric complications. Some factors potentially associated with psychiatric morbidity in typhoid fever have been identified. There is the need to prospectively assess the burden from psychiatric morbidity and identify interventions that may reduce it. PMID:11427249

  6. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Rania; Idowu, Modupe; Brown, Gregory S.; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Person, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP. PMID:25525547

  7. Alternative algebras admitting derivations with invertible values and invertible derivations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaygorodov, I. B.; Popov, Yu S.

    2014-10-01

    We prove an analogue of the Bergen-Herstein-Lanski theorem for alternative algebras: describe all alternative algebras that admit derivations with invertible values. We also prove an analogue of Moens' theorem for alternative algebras (a finite-dimensional alternative algebra over a field of characteristic zero is nilpotent if and only if it admits an invertible Leibniz derivation).

  8. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  9. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  10. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  11. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  12. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  13. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful. PMID:22798096

  14. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill persons in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shyangwa, P M; Joshi, D; Sherchan, S; Thapa, K B

    2009-06-01

    This cross-sectional hospital-based study investigated the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric morbidity among 151 physically ill psychiatric-referred cases admitted various departments in BPKIHS. Consecutive referral cases were initially worked up by junior residents and diagnosis/differential diagnosis was made by consultant according to ICD-10 diagnostic guidelines. Of total 151; M: 77 (50.9%) and F: 74 (49.1); Majority 38 (25.1%) of subjects were young with age 15-24 yrs and 95 (62.9%) were from plains. About 21.8% referrals came from internal medicine followed by emergency department, 9 (5.9%). The highest number of cases 48 (31.7%) had neuropsychiatric illnesses and 17.0% had some medical complications resulted from suicide act. Among psychiatric co morbidity, dissociative/conversion disorders were the commonest 26 (17.2%) followed by alcohol use-related disorders 25 (16.5%) and depressive disorder 20 (13.2%). To conclude, the co-occurrence of medical and psychological/psychiatric conditions is common, which demands timely identification and early interventions in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:19968153

  15. Adolescent cocaine abuse. Addictive potential, behavioral and psychiatric effects.

    PubMed

    Estroff, T W; Schwartz, R H; Hoffmann, N G

    1989-12-01

    Four hundred seventy-nine drug abusing adolescent patients enrolled in seven Straight, Inc. Adolescent Drug-Abuse Treatment Programs in five geographic regions across the United States were studied to determine the severity and patterns of cocaine abuse. Of these, 341 admitted to cocaine use and became part of this survey. Cocaine use was categorized as heavy, intermediate, or light. Areas examined were the addictive spectrum, psychosocial dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. Intermediate and heavy users of cocaine abused significantly less marijuana and inhalants than light cocaine abusers. Heavy and intermediate users were more likely to use cocaine intravenously and to use crack. They developed tachyphylaxis more frequently, progressed to weekly use in less than 3 months more frequently, and became preoccupied with obtaining and using cocaine significantly more frequently. They used more sedative hypnotics to calm themselves and engaged in more criminal behavior, such as stealing from parents and stores and passing bad checks. They had more arrests for possession of drugs, stole more cars, sold more drugs, and were more likely to trade sexual favors to obtain the drug. Heavy and intermediate users were significantly more psychiatrically disturbed than light users, becoming more suspicious, nervous, aggressive, and demonstrating increased symptoms of fatigue, sleeplessness, decreased appetite, and increasing cocaine dysphoria. All of these symptoms could be mistaken for psychiatric disorders. This study suggests that cocaine is as addictive in adolescents as in adults; possibly more so. It also causes psychosocial dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms. Further research into cocaine addiction among adolescents is indicated. PMID:2582695

  16. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Complications.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael J; Aplasca, Alexis; Morales-Theodore, Rosa; Zaharakis, Nikola; Linker, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This article highlights the prevalence of co-occurring disorders among adolescents and underscores the complexity and opportunities of treating these patients in a systematic, comprehensive approach. As evidenced by this review, the need exists to develop and test models of care that integrate co-occurring disorders into both psychiatric and substance abuse treatment settings. The challenge for pediatric practitioners is to provide detailed assessments linked to evidence-based treatment plans to account for the variations in adolescent development and the unique risk factor profile of each patient. The issues related to co-morbidity are vast and continue to grow with rapidly increasing research literature. PMID:27338972

  17. Symposium--psychiatric education.

    PubMed

    Berger, D M

    1976-04-01

    The process of learning in groups, as exemplified by the author's experience in a multidiscipline conference on a surgical ward of a general hospital has been examined. A sequence of six developmental states has been identified: initial ambivalence; passive receptivity; resistance; task orientation; the work group and consolidation. These findings have been compared with those of other studies dealing with sequential stages in group development. The psychiatric consultant's role in expediting these phases and some of the difficulties encountered have been mentioned. PMID:953947

  18. Psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care: the first adolescent forensic psychiatric service in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kahila, K; Kilkku, N; Kaltiala-Heino, R

    2004-04-01

    Finland does not have a history of providing forensic adolescent psychiatric units although the need for this kind of service has been established. According to legislation patients who are minors have to be treated separately from adults, however, this has not been possible in practice. Also, adolescent psychiatric wards have not always been able to admit the most severely ill patients, those with impulsive and aggressive behaviours, because of lack of staff resources, problems associated with protecting other vulnerable patients and a shortage of secure environments. A previous report demonstrated the significant increase in adolescent's involuntary treatment within adult psychiatric wards. Data from this report were acknowledged as an important starting point in the planning process for the psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care. This paper describes the background, development process, plan of action, tailor-made education programme and supporting evidence for the first Finnish adolescent forensic service opened in April 2003 in the Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital. The tool used for planning the unit's activities and staff education programme was the Balanced Score Card approach, the structure and development of which is also outlined within the paper. PMID:15009502

  19. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  20. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  1. The Psychiatric Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Charles R.; Lucas, Alexander R.

    A general textbook on the psychiatric disorders of childhood, the book is intended to be an introductory text for students and practitioners working with children (such as psychiatric and pediatric residents and psychologists, teachers, medical students). The genesis of mental illness is discussed in terms of the contributions of heredity and the…

  2. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). Korea does not maintain official statistical records for occupational psychiatric disorders, but several studies have estimated the number of occupational psychiatric disorders using the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL, formerly KLWC) database. The major compensated occupational psychiatric disorders in Korea were "personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage, and dysfunction", "other mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical diseases", "reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders", and "depressive episodes". The most common work-related psychiatric disorders, excluding accidents, were "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders" followed by "mood disorders". PMID:21258596

  3. New Frontiers in Psychiatric Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuzessery, Zoltan, Ed.

    The second annual educational workshop concerned utilization of psychiatric technicians for technical service to allied professions. Manuscripts are included for the following presentations: (1) "Brief History of Colorado Psychiatric Technicians Association" by Francis L. Hedges, (2) "Hominology--The Approach to the Whole Man" by Theodore C. Kahn,…

  4. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  5. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  6. Suicide Risk Assessments: Which Suicide Risk Factors Psychiatric Residents Consider Significant?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Hwang, Sunyoung; Yeon, Bora; Choi, Kyoung Ho; Oh, Youngmin; Lee, Hae-Kook; Kweon, Yong-Sil; Lee, Chung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients visiting the emergency department (ED) after a suicide attempt are generally assessed for suicide risk by psychiatric residents. Psychiatric residents' competence in evaluating the risk posed by the patients who attempted suicide is critical to preventing suicide. Methods We investigated factors considered important by psychiatric residents when evaluating suicide risk. This study included 140 patients admitted to the ED after attempting suicide. Psychiatric residents rated patients' severity of current and future suicide risk as low/moderate/high using the Brief Emergency Room Suicide Risk Assessment (BESRA). The association between each BESRA variable and level of suicide risk was analyzed. Results Many factors were commonly considered important in evaluating the severity of current and future suicide risk. However, the following factors were only associated with future suicide risk: female gender, having no religion, family psychiatric history, history of axis I disorders, having a will, harboring no regrets, and social isolation. Conclusion Psychiatric residents use diverse factors when assessing suicide risk. Psychiatric residents might put more emphasis on non-modifiable demographic and clinical factors, concrete evidence showing suicide determination, and social isolation to assess the risk of future suicide. PMID:26207124

  7. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatment, may be sufficiently clarified and resolved so that medical progress is expedited. Psychiatric consultation can be used to prevent an untoward psychological reaction to illness, if this is foreseen. This preventive consultation, which is often possible only because of the family physician's awareness of the psychological vulnerability of some of her or his patients, can result in reduced medical and psychiatric morbidity. PMID:21263836

  8. A profile of aggression from adolescence to adulthood: an 18-year follow-up of psychiatrically disturbed and violent adolescents.

    PubMed

    Faretra, G

    1981-07-01

    An 18-year follow-up of 66 aggressive and disturbed adolescents admitted to the children's unit of a large mental hospital in 1960 reveals a high degree of antisocial and criminal behavior persisting into adulthood, with lessening psychiatric involvement as the subjects matured. Factors contributing to this pattern of continuing antisocial behavior are identified, and implications for treatment programs are considered. PMID:7258309

  9. Surgery for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Luigjes, Judy; de Kwaasteniet, Bart P; de Koning, Pelle P; Oudijn, Marloes S; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Surgery in psychiatric disorders has a long history and has regained momentum in the past few decades with deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is an adjustable and reversible neurosurgical intervention using implanted electrodes to deliver controlled electrical pulses to targeted areas of the brain. It holds great promise for therapy-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Several double-blind controlled and open trials have been conducted and the response rate is estimated around 54%. Open trials have shown encouraging results with DBS for therapy-refractory depression and case reports have shown potential effects of DBS on addiction. Another promising indication is Tourette syndrome, where potential efficacy of DBS is shown by several case series and a few controlled trials. Further research should focus on optimizing DBS with respect to target location and increasing the number of controlled double-blinded trials. In addition, new indications for DBS and new target options should be explored in preclinical research. PMID:22465369

  10. Exorcism: a psychiatric viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Trethowan, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    Doctors, for several reasons, should be concerned with exorcism is the view of Professor Trethowan, who in this paper, looks at the main features of exorcism as practised in the middle ages and now appearing in the modern world, as was seen in the recent Ossett case in Britain. He examines in some detail the nature of supposed demoniacal possession and describes its symptoms and signs. He also touches on the social, as opposed to the religious, background in which demoniacal possession flourished (not lacking in the world today), so leading to an examination of the psychodynamic aspects of demoniacal possession and the question of absolute evil. Finally he compares the techniques of exorcism and of modern psychiatric practice. PMID:966260

  11. Ethnic variations in pathways to acute care and compulsory detention for women experiencing a mental health crisis

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Caroline; Cole, Laura; Howard, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Much recent debate on excess rates of compulsory detention and coercive routes to care has focused on young black men; evidence is less clear regarding ethnic variations among women and factors that may mediate these. Aim: To explore ethnic variations in compulsory detentions of women, and to explore the potential role of immediate pathways to admission and clinician-rated reasons for admission as mediators of these differences. Method: All women admitted to an acute psychiatric inpatient ward or a women’s crisis house in four London boroughs during a 12-week period were included. Data were collected regarding their pathways to care, clinician-rated reasons for admission, hospital stays, and social and clinical characteristics. Results: Two hundred and eighty seven (287) women from white British, white other, black Caribbean, black African and black other groups were included. Adjusting for social and clinical characteristics, all groups of black patients and white other patients were significantly more likely to have been compulsorily admitted than white British patients; white British patients were more likely than other groups to be admitted to a crisis house and more likely than all the black groups to be admitted because of perceived suicide risk. Immediate pathways to care differed: white other, black African and black other groups were less likely to have referred themselves in a crisis and more likely to have been in contact with the police. When adjustment was made for differences in pathways to care, the ethnic differences in compulsory admission were considerably reduced. Discussion: There are marked ethnic inequities not only between white British and black women, but also between white British and white other women in experiences of acute admission. Differences between groups in help-seeking behaviours in a crisis may contribute to explaining differences in rates of compulsory admission. PMID:21059630

  12. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area. PMID:8039679

  13. Comparison of psychiatric day hospital patient and inpatient scores on the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Piersma, H L; Boes, J L

    1997-10-01

    This study contrasts self-reported symptomatology on the MCMI-III of a sample of 97 psychiatric patients admitted directly to inpatient care with a sample of 75 patients admitted directly to day hospital treatment. The predominant Axis I diagnosis of patients in both samples was an affective disorder. Effect sizes of the degree of change from admission to retesting one week later were calculated and fell generally within the medium effect size range. There were no MCMI-III subscale differences between groups at either test time. A test item dealing with suicidal ideation did differentiate between the groups, with inpatients expressing more suicidal ideation at admission. PMID:9316817

  14. Psychiatric manifestations of treatable hereditary metabolic disorders in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Detecting psychiatric disorders of secondary origin is a crucial concern for the psychiatrist. But how can this reliably be done among a large number of conditions, most of which have a very low prevalence? Metabolic screening undertaken in a population of subjects with psychosis demonstrated the presence of treatable metabolic disorders in a significant number of cases. The nature of the symptoms that should alert the clinician is also a fundamental issue and is not limited to psychosis. Hereditary metabolic disorders (HMD) are a rare but important cause of psychiatric disorders in adolescents and adults, the signs of which may remain isolated for years before other more specific organic signs appear. HMDs that present purely with psychiatric symptoms are very difficult to diagnose due to low awareness of these rare diseases among psychiatrists. However, it is important to identify HMDs in order to refer patients to specialist centres for appropriate management, disease-specific treatment and possible prevention of irreversible physical and neurological complications. Genetic counselling can also be provided. This review focuses on three HMD categories: acute, treatable HMDs (urea cycle abnormalities, remethylation disorders, acute intermittent porphyria); chronic, treatable HMDs (Wilson’s disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C, homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis); and chronic HMDs that are difficult to treat (lysosomal storage diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, creatine deficiency syndrome). We also propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of HMDs in patients with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:25478001

  15. Prolactin monitoring in the acute psychiatry setting.

    PubMed

    Perry, Benjamin I; Goldring, Katie J; Menon, Sharmila J

    2016-01-30

    Hyperprolactinaemia is a common side effect associated with psychotropic medication. Limited guidance on its monitoring and management results in inconsistency in practice due to individual clinical variability. A retrospective service evaluation study was conducted on all patients admitted to an acute psychiatric assessment unit in South Wales, United Kingdom, over one calendar year (n=524), to assess the prevalence and possible causes of hyperprolactinaemia, correlation with symptomatology and monitoring and management by clinicians. The prevalence of hyperprolactinaemia in this population (n=67, 13%) was higher than in the general population. The most common association was medication (n=39, 58%), particularly Risperidone (n=19). Illicit substance use (n=10, 15%), and physical conditions (n=12, 18%) may also have contributed. However, only 44 (66%) received follow-up for their hyperprolactinaemia. There was a statistically significant difference in the sample means of those that did receive follow-up and those who did not, suggesting a degree of bias in patients selected to receive follow-up. These findings suggest that hyperprolactinaemia is relatively common in patients with mental illness, and that comprehensive guidelines need to be established for the monitoring and management thereof. PMID:26631582

  16. Borderline personality disorder associates with violent criminality in women: A population based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Arola, Riikka; Antila, Henna; Riipinen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Kantojärvi, Liisa

    2016-09-01

    Various psychiatric problems in adolescence and early adulthood have been shown to associate with criminal behaviour. In this study the association of personality disorders (PDs) with criminal behaviour was examined in adolescents treated in psychiatric hospitals. The study sample consisted of 508 adolescents (age 13-17) admitted to acute psychiatric impatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. Crime data was obtained from the Finnish Legal Register Centre on September 2013. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to assess psychiatric diagnoses in adolescence. The information on PDs in early adulthood was based on follow-up information on psychiatric treatments in either out- or inpatient settings until the end of 2012, and was extracted from the National Care Register for Health Care provided by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare. A total of 22 (39%) of the 57 subjects with PD had committed a crime. In women, the likelihood for violent criminality was significantly increased in those with Borderline PD (OR 6.09, CI 1.24-29.84, p=0.009) and was also associated with conduct disorder (OR 4.26, CI 1.38-13.19, p=0.012), child welfare placement (OR 11.82, CI 3.61-38.76, p<0.001) and parent's substance use disorder (OR 7.74, CI 2.30-26.10, p=0.001). In men, no association was observed between PD and any kind of criminal behaviour. Significant predictors for violent criminality in males were conduct disorder (OR 4.05, CI 1.75-9.38, p=0.001), substance use disorder (OR 2.51, CI 1.22-5.17, p=0.012) and special services at school (OR 2.58, CI 1.16-5.76, p=0.021). Females with Borderline PD showed an increased risk for violent offending. This suggests Borderline PD as a potential explanatory factor for violent assaults by females and highlights the importance of recognizing the risk for violence in young women with a Borderline PD. PMID:27399875

  17. [Management strategies and choice of antithrombotic treatment in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome--executive summary for clinical practice. Consensus Document of the Regional Chapters of the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU)].

    PubMed

    Uguccioni, Massimo; Pugliese, Francesco; De Luca, Leonardo; Tubaro, Marco; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Colivicchi, Furio; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Ansalone, Gerardo; Avella, Andrea; Azzolini, Paolo; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Brama, Paolo; Cacciatore, Giuseppe; De Luca, Massimo; De Simone, Massimo; Di Fusco, Stefania Angela; Ferraiuolo, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Fabio; Granatelli, Antonino; Loschiavo, Paolo; Mezzanotte, Roberto; Mirante, Enrico; Monti, Francesco; Pajes, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Luciano; Proiettil, Fabrizio; Revello, Alessandra; Rigattieri, Stefano; Sabetta, Francesco; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Scioli, Roberto; Serdoz, Roberto; Susi, Beniamino; Vincentelli, Giovanni Maria; Zuccalà, Giuseppe; Zulli, Luigi

    2013-03-01

    This document has been developed by the Lazio regional chapters of two scientific associations, the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU), whose members are actively involved in the everyday management of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS). The document is aimed at providing a specific, practical, evidence-based guideline for the effective management of antithrombotic treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant) in the complex and ever changing scenario of ACS. The document employs a synthetic approach which considers two main issues: the actual operative context of treatment delivery and the general management strategy. PMID:23923585

  18. Reflective Prompts to Guide Termination of the Psychiatric Clinical Student Nursing Experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-04-01

    The average length of stay on psychiatric inpatient units has decreased in the past 40 years from 24.9 to 7.2 days. Inpatient psychiatric nurses are challenged to meet the standards and scope of practice despite the changing circumstances of their work environment. The amount of time student nurses spend with a given patient has been affected by changes in acute psychiatric inpatient care and decreased length of stay; however, opportunities exist for effective termination of the nurse-client relationship. Facilitation of students' awareness and understanding of the dynamics inherent in the termination process is an important teaching task for psychiatric nursing clinical instructors. In the current article, a clinically focused learning activity using structured prompts to guide and promote psychiatric nursing students' experiences with the process of termination is described and teaching strategies are discussed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(4), 38-43.]. PMID:27042927

  19. Circadian Disruption in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie G; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that abnormalities in circadian rhythms might prove causally or pathophysiologically significant in psychiatric illness. The circadian regulation of hormonal and behavioral timekeeping processes is often altered in patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, and a susceptibility to rhythm instability may contribute to the functional impairment. For some patients, interventions that stabilize or resynchronize circadian rhythms prove therapeutically effective. Circadian disruption in the clinical profiles of most psychiatric illnesses and the treatment efficacy of chronobiological interventions suggest that attention to circadian phenotypes in a range of psychiatric disorders may help to uncover shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26568124

  20. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  1. Psychiatric Emergencies in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael P; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Shah, Asim A; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-11-01

    Psychiatric emergencies in pregnancy can be difficult to manage. The authors (both practicing psychiatrists and emergency clinicians) review the evaluation and treatment of common mental health diagnoses in pregnancy. PMID:26493527

  2. The psychiatric Münchausen

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tovim, David I.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of patients with the Münchausen syndrome who sought admission for fictitious psychiatric illnesses are presented - one case involves an accomplice. The patients' authentic life histories are used in the discussion of the syndrome's aetiological factors.

  3. Emergency Department Length-Of-Stay For Psychiatric Visits Was Significantly Longer Than For Nonpsychiatric Visits, 2002-11.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jane M; Singhal, Astha; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-09-01

    Despite increases in the use of emergency department (EDs) for mental health care, there are limited data on whether psychiatric patients disproportionately contribute to ED crowding. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a national database of ED visits in the period 2002-11 to describe trends in median and ninetieth-percentile length-of-stay for patients with psychiatric versus nonpsychiatric primary diagnoses. Psychiatric patients who visited the ED were transferred to another facility at six times the rate of nonpsychiatric patients. Median lengths-of-stay were similar for psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients among those who were admitted to the hospital (264 versus 269 minutes) but significantly different for those who were admitted for observation (355 versus 279 minutes), transferred (312 versus 195 minutes), or discharged (189 versus 144 minutes). Overall, differences in ED length-of-stay between psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients did not narrow over time. These findings suggest deficiencies in ED capacity for psychiatric care, which may necessitate improvements in both throughput and alternative models of care. PMID:27605653

  4. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  5. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the "tip of the iceberg" of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  6. Dementia in older people admitted to hospital: a regional multi-hospital observational study of prevalence, associations and case recognition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Suzanne; Manning, Edmund; Barrett, Aoife; Brady, Noeleen M.; Browne, Vanessa; O’Shea, Emma; Molloy, David William; O'Regan, Niamh A.; Trawley, Steven; Cahill, Suzanne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Woods, Noel; Meagher, David; Ni Chorcorain, Aoife M.; Linehan, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have indicated a prevalence of dementia in older admissions of ∼42% in a single London teaching hospital, and 21% in four Queensland hospitals. However, there is a lack of published data from any European country on the prevalence of dementia across hospitals and between patient groups. Objective: to determine the prevalence and associations of dementia in older patients admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland. Methods: six hundred and six patients aged ≥70 years were recruited on admission to six hospitals in Cork County. Screening consisted of Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE); patients with scores <27/30 had further assessment with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Final expert diagnosis was based on SMMSE, IQCODE and relevant medical and demographic history. Patients were screened for delirium and depression, and assessed for co-morbidity, functional ability and nutritional status. Results: of 598 older patients admitted to acute hospitals, 25% overall had dementia; with 29% in public hospitals. Prevalence varied between hospitals (P < 0.001); most common in rural hospitals and acute medical admissions. Only 35.6% of patients with dementia had a previous diagnosis. Patients with dementia were older and frailer, with higher co-morbidity, malnutrition and lower functional status (P < 0.001). Delirium was commonly superimposed on dementia (57%) on admission. Conclusion: dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals, particularly in acute medical admissions, and rural hospitals, where services may be less available. Most dementia is not previously diagnosed, emphasising the necessity for cognitive assessment in older people on presentation to hospital. PMID:26420638

  7. Psychiatric manifestations in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Fraidakis, M J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and severe, but treatable, inborn disorder of bile acid biosynthesis and sterol storage with autosomal recessive inheritance and variable clinical presentation. CTX treatment consists of chenodeoxycholic acid and must be started as early as possible to prevent permanent disability. Psychiatric manifestations are rare and non-specific, and often lead to significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Therefore, better recognition of the gamut of psychiatric manifestations in CTX can diminish the risk of misdiagnosis and irreversible neurological deterioration. We hereby describe the psychiatric features in CTX. A complete review of all published cases of CTX in the medical literature was undertaken and the case reports with psychiatric presentation were collected and analyzed. We also describe the psychiatric features in relation to the neurological semeiology in six patients with CTX diagnosed at the La Salpêtrière Hospital. We conclude that psychiatric manifestations in CTX follow a bimodal/bitemporal pattern, appearing early in the disease course in the form of a behavioral/personality disorder associated with learning difficulties or mental retardation, or manifesting in advanced disease in the setting of dementia as rich neuropsychiatric syndromes, such as frontal, orbitofrontal or frontotemporal syndromes of cortico-subcortical dementia encompassing behavioral/personality disturbance, affective/mood disorders or psychotic disorders. Behavioral/personality disturbance in childhood or adolescence, especially when accompanied by learning difficulties, should therefore lead to further investigation to exclude CTX, as early diagnosis and treatment is critical for prognosis. PMID:24002088

  8. How common are ventricular arrhythmias in patients admitted to CCU with chest pain and a non-ischaemic ECG? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Anne-Maree; Klim, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias in a cohort of patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort study. Setting Community teaching hospital. Patients Adults (>18 years) admitted to coronary care unit with chest pain and non-ischaemic ECG. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia during hospital stay. Results 397 patients were studied; median age 64 years, 65% male; median Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction score 3; troponin elevation 43%, final diagnosis myocardial infarction 32%. No patient in the study suffered a serious ventricular arrhythmia (0%, 95% CI 0 to 1.0%). Conclusion Patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome with a non-ischaemic ECG have a very low rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia.

  9. Infant psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Margarete I

    2013-02-01

    Infant mental health problems include difficulties to regulate emotions or attention, crying, sleeping or feeding problems as well as aggressive behavior. Early identifications of these problems help to change developmental trajectories and improve developmental outcomes. Psychiatric assessment and classification have to take into account the rapid processes of development as well as the inseparable linkage between symptoms of the infant, psychosocial risks in the family environment, and parent-child relations. The proposed DSM-5 classification system presents a systematic description of mental health disorders which are relevant for infant psychiatry. However, the proposal has provided rather limited attention to developmental differences and parent-infant relations. Therefore, additional classification systems, like the Zero-to-Three (DC: 0-3R), are strongly recommended. In terms of assessment and in accordance with the guidelines of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, infant psychiatrists have to consider the close relation between somatic and mental health and the interplay between behaviors of the caregiver and the infant. Therefore, the assessment has to be multidisciplinary and relationship based. A standard assessment in infancy includes a clinical interview, behavior observations, caregiver questionnaires, and a pediatric screening. All assessments should pay attention to motor, cognitive, language, and social-emotional development. Because infant development is embedded in the family context, socio-economic factors, parents' mental problems, including drug abuse, domestic violence, and trauma history should be assessed. The treatment has to be oriented toward symptoms and development and has to address underlying medical conditions. The focus should be on parent-child interactions. Evidence-based interventions are based on attachment theory, use social-learning perspectives, and behavioral approaches. PMID:23229140

  10. Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

    PubMed

    Höglund, Pontus; Levander, Sten; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Radovic, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education. PMID:19811835

  11. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Fein, George

    2015-12-01

    We review our clinical studies of psychiatric comorbidity in short-term and long-term abstinent and in treatment naïve alcoholics (STAA, LTAA and TNA). TNA ypically have less severe alcoholism than treated abstinent samples and evidence less severe psychiatric disturbance. Lifetime psychiatric diagnoses are the norm for STAA and LTAA but not for TNA. Individuals with alcohol and drug use disorders show greater antisocial personality disturbance, but do not show differences in the mood or anxiety domains or in borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The studies show that alcoholics can achieve and maintain abstinence in the face of ongoing mood, anxiety, or BPD problems. By contrast, for ASPD, LTAA essentially stop current antisocial behaviors in all seven domains of antisocial behaviors. We believe that ongoing antisocial behavior is not consistent with maintaining abstinence, and that LTAA modify their antisocial behavior despite continued elevated social deviance proneness and antisocial dispositionality. Abstinent individuals without lifetime psychiatric disorders and TNA show more (subdiagnostic threshold) psychiatric symptoms and abnormal psychological measures than non-alcoholic controls in the mood, anxiety, BPD, and antisocial domains. In summary, our studies show that although LTAA have achieved multi-year abstinence, they still report significant psychological distress compared to NAC. We believe this distress may negatively affect their quality of life. This suggests the importance of developing effective care models to address comorbid mental health problems in LTAA. We also show that antisocial personality disorder symptoms decline to the levels seen in normal controls, and that excluding individuals from research with a psychiatric diagnosis does not control for subdiagnostic psychiatric differences between alcoholics and controls. PMID:26590836

  12. Admitting Failure (With a Little Help from My Friends)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Teachers who are no longer considered novices can have a difficult time admitting failures. There is an expectation that teachers should be "on" all the time, but disorientation can happen even to veteran teachers--or maybe especially to veteran teachers--if expectations are too high. Sarah Cooper, an experienced teacher and dean of…

  13. A Profile of the Newly-Admitted Nursing Home Resident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erber, Joan T.; Dye, Carol J.

    1982-01-01

    Recently admitted nursing home residents received a battery of psychological tests and were rated on a number of behavioral indices. Results revealed the morale/anxiety dimension was independent of cognitive competency, internally controlled residents were rated high by others in behavioral competency, and self-rating scales measure something…

  14. The Reliability of Psychiatric Diagnosis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Eric; France, Cheryl; El-Missiry, Ahmed; John, Collin

    2006-01-01

    Background: The authors reviewed the topic of reliability of psychiatric diagnosis from the turn of the 20th century to present. The objectives of this paper are to explore the reasons of unreliability of psychiatric diagnosis and propose ways to improve the reliability of psychiatric diagnosis. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on the concept of reliability of psychiatric diagnosis with emphasis on the impact of interviewing skills, use of diagnostic criteria, and structured interviews on the reliability of psychiatric diagnosis. Results: Causes of diagnostic unreliability are attributed to the patient, the clinician and psychiatric nomenclature. The reliability of psychiatric diagnosis can be enhanced by using diagnostic criteria, defining psychiatric symptoms and structuring the interviews. Conclusions: The authors propose the acronym ‘DR.SED,' which stands for diagnostic criteria, reference definitions, structuring the interview, clinical experience, and data. The authors recommend that clinicians use the DR.SED paradigm to improve the reliability of psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:21103149

  15. The Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration-01: methods and results

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Edwin D.; Allen, Michael H.; Claassen, Cindy; Currier, Glenn W.; Bertman, Louise; Glick, Rachel; Park, Jennifer; Feifel, David; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration (PERC), the methods used to create a structured chart review tool and the results of our multicenter study. Method Members of the PERC Steering Committee created a structured chart review tool designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the assessment and management of psychiatric emergency patients. Ten primary indicators were chosen based on the Steering Committee’s professional experience, the published literature and existing consensus panel guidelines. Eight emergency departments completed data abstraction of 50 randomly selected emergency psychiatric patients, with seven providing data from two independent raters. Inter-rater reliability (Kappas) and descriptive statistics were computed. Results Four hundred patient charts were abstracted. Initial concordance between raters was variable, with some sites achieving high agreement and others not. Reconciliation of discordant ratings through re-review of the original source documentation was necessary for four of the sites. Two hundred eighty-five (71%) subjects had some form of laboratory test performed, including 212 (53%) who had urine toxicology screening and 163 (41%) who had blood alcohol levels drawn. Agitation was present in 220 (52%), with 98 (25%) receiving a medication to reduce agitation and 22 (6%) being physically restrained. Self-harm ideation was present in 226 (55%), while other-harm ideation was present in 82 (20%). One hundred seventy-nine (45%) were admitted to an inpatient or observation unit. Conclusion Creating a common standard for documenting, abstracting and reporting on the nature and management of psychiatric emergencies is feasible across a wide range of health care institutions. PMID:19892209

  16. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  17. Safe laparoscopic clearance of the common bile duct in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Plaudis, Haralds; Fokins, Vladimirs; Mukans, Maksims; Pupelis, Guntars

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Laparoscopic treatment of patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis is challenging due to mandatory recovery of the biliary drainage and clearance of the common bile duct (CBD). The aim of our study was to assess postoperative course of cholangitis and biliary sepsis after laparoscopic clearance of the CBD in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. Methods Emergently admitted patients who underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD were included prospectively and stratified in 2 groups i.e., cholangitis positive (CH+) or negative (CH-) group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative imaging data, inflammatory response, surgical intervention, complication rate and outcomes were compared between groups. Results Ninety-nine of a total 320 patients underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD, of which, 60 belonged to the acute cholangitis group (CH+) and 39 to the cholangitis negative group (CH-). Interventions were done on average 4 days after admission, operation duration was 95-105 min, and the conversion rate was 3-7% without differences in the groups. Preoperative inflammatory response was markedly higher in the CH+ group. Inflammation signs on intraoperative choledochoscopy were more evident in patients with cholangitis. Postoperative inflammatory response did not differ between the groups. The overall complication rate was 8.3% and 5.1%, respectively. Laparoscopic clearance of the CBD resulted in 1 lethal case (CH+ group), resulting in 1% mortality rate and a similar 12-month readmission rate. Conclusions Single-stage laparoscopic intraoperative US and choledochoscopy-assisted clearance of the CBD is feasible in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. PMID:27212991

  18. Risk Factors for Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Scrub Typhus Admitted to Intensive Care Unit at a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Lee, Jun Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sang Il; Jung, Sun Young; Cho, Yongseon

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for mechanical ventilation in the patients with scrub typhus admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital. Methods We retrospectively selected and analyzed clinical data from the medical records of 70 patients (32 men, 38 women) admitted to the ICU with scrub typhus between 2004 and 2014. The patients had a mean±standard deviation age of 71.2±11.1 years and were evaluated in two groups: those who had been treated with mechanical ventilation (the MV group, n=19) and those who had not (the non-MV group, n=51). Mean ages of the MV group and the non-MV group were 71.2±8.3 years and 71.2±11.1 years, respectively. Results Significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to acute respiratory failure (p=0.008), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (p=0.015), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (p=0.013), death (p=0.014), and ICU duration (p<0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly associated with mechanical ventilation: acute respiratory failure (p=0.011), SOFA score (p=0.005), APACHE II score (p=0.011), platelet count (p=0.009), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (p=0.011). Conclusion Thus, five factors-acute respiratory failure, SOFA score, APACHE II score, platelet count, and LDH-can be the meaningful indicators for mechanical ventilation for the patients with scrub typhus admitted to ICU. PMID:26770232

  19. Undergraduate college students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Wantz, Richard A; Firmin, Michael W; Stolzfus, Melissa J; Ray, Brigitte N; Holmes, Hannah J; Geib, Ellen F

    2012-11-01

    We surveyed undergraduate students' perceptions of psychiatric nurses' effectiveness and analyzed other sources of data. Students reported that psychiatric nurses' strengths include helping in situations that involve psychiatric symptoms, mental health evaluation, and drug abuse. Psychiatric nurses also were said to be effective when helping an individual with psychiatric symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations. Friends or associates, common knowledge, school and education, and movies are some sources by which students learn about psychiatric nurses. Sources that provided less influential information include insurance carriers, newspapers, and personal experience. PMID:23146011

  20. Psychiatric comorbidity of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2012-06-01

    The onset of psychiatric symptoms and disorders is relatively common in childhood, occurring among youths across the weight spectrum. However, available research suggests that certain psychiatric comorbidities are more prevalent in obese children and adolescents than in healthy weight youths. First, we review research on disordered eating, including evidence to suggest that loss of control eating is associated with weight gain and obesity in youths, as well as poor outcome in family-based treatment of paediatric obesity. Second, we highlight evidence on the relationship between depression and obesity, especially in girls. Third, we present data on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the symptoms of impulsivity and inattention, and childhood obesity. We also consider that some medical conditions and psychotropic medications contribute to weight gain and obesity in children and adolescents. Throughout the review, we emphasize that psychiatric comorbidity may be a cause or consequence of childhood obesity, or they may share common aetiological factors. PMID:22724645

  1. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25577484

  2. [Disease models and change in attitude of involuntarily admitted schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Ullrich, J; Ulmar, G; Starzinski, T

    1995-12-01

    The attitude to illness and therapy of 28 involuntary and 31 voluntary patients admitted to a state psychiatric hospital was investigated by means of a questionnaire at the time of admission and prior to discharge. Involuntary patients have less illness consciousness, and only 17.9% of them but 67.7% of the voluntary patients show insight into their illness; they favour a medical-somatic model of illness and express less positive therapy expectations. Their whole attitude proves to be dysfunctional concerning compliance with medical treatment. Attitudes of involuntary patients changed during the hospital stay and became similar to those of voluntary patients, which hardly changed. This attitudinal change extended to illness consciousness, insight into illness and therapy expectations, whereas models of illness were found to be very stable. One third of the involuntary patients stayed in hospital voluntarily for further treatment. It is discussed that patients attitudes to illness and therapy should be taken more often into consideration and integrated into the planning of therapy. PMID:8586351

  3. Work and common psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M; Harvey, S B; Overland, S; Mykletun, A; Hotopf, M

    2011-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders are now the most common reason for long-term sickness absence. The associated loss in productivity and the payment of disability benefits places a substantial burden on the economies of many developed countries. The occupational dysfunction associated with psychiatric disorders can also lead to poverty and social isolation. As a result the area of work and psychiatric disorders is a high priority for policymakers. There are two main agendas: for many researchers and clinicians the focus is on the need to overcome stigma and ensure people with severe psychiatric disorders have meaningful work; however the public health agenda predominantly relates to the more common disorders such as depression and anxiety, which contribute a greater burden of disability benefits and pensions. In this review we attempt to address this second agenda. The relatively sparse evidence available reveals a complex field with significant interplay between medical, psychological social and cultural factors. Sick leave can be a 'process' as well as an 'event'. In this review we propose a staged model where different risk and protective factors contribute to the onset of psychiatric disorders in the working population, the onset of short-term sickness absence, and the transition from short- to long-term absence. We also examine strategies to manage psychiatric disorder in the workforce with a view towards returning the employee to work. Our aim in this review is to highlight the complexity of the area, to stimulate debate and to identify important gaps in knowledge where further research might benefit both patients and wider society. PMID:21558098

  4. Religious ideas and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Beit-Hallahmi, B; Argyle, M

    1977-01-01

    The evidence presented above points to the need for considering factors other than purely religious ones in determining the role of religious ideas in psychiatric disorders. The occurrence of religious ideas as part of the content of individual delusional systems in psychiatric patients can be explained on the basis of exposure to religious ideas through the social environment. It may be also related to the prominence of religion, vis-a-vis other belief systems, in the social envirnment. When considering psychopathological explanations for intense religious experiences, one has to be conscious again of the social factors involved. When an unusual experience having religious content becomes normative in a certain group (for whatever reasons), trying to explain its appearance on the basis of individual psychodynamics or psychopathology becomes very difficult. There seems to be an inverse relationship between the social nature of a religious experience and its psychopathological nature, i.e., there is more psychopathology in individuals reporting solitary religious experiences, or individual religious ideas. Thus the solitary experience seems to be more influenced by disturbed individual dynamics, but in other cases social factors seem to be crucial. Our overall conclusion is that a psychiatric analysis of the role of religious factors in psychopathology has to be first a social-psychiatric analysis. An individual presenting psychiatric symptoms and religious ideas has to be evaluated in light of his social background, since the specific content of psychiatric symptoms seems to be determined by social background factors. Individual psychodynamics determine the appearance of symptoms, but their particular form will be the result of these background factors, one of which is religion. PMID:863602

  5. Psychiatric Disorders: Diagnosis to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, John H.; State, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings in a range of scientific disciplines are challenging the conventional wisdom regarding the etiology, classification and treatment of psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the current state of the psychiatric diagnostic nosology and recent progress in three areas: genomics, neuroimaging, and therapeutics development. The accelerating pace of novel and unexpected findings is transforming the understanding of mental illness and represents a hopeful sign that the approaches and models that have sustained the field for the past 40 years are yielding to a flood of new data and presaging the emergence of a new and more powerful scientific paradigm. PMID:24679536

  6. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  7. Teaching Psychodynamics to Psychiatric Residents through Psychiatric Outpatient Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Zoppe, Eva Helena C.; Schoueri, Patricia; Castro, Monica; Neto, Francisco Lotufo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates whether a course that was designed for first-year psychiatric residents and that specifically addressed psychodynamic principles fostered residents' progress in knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding these concepts. Methods: The course was given in the 2005 academic year to all residents (N=18) in their first…

  8. Outcomes of Patients Who Have Do Not Resuscitate Status prior to Being Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debjit; Moreno, Carlos; Csete, Marc; Perez, Elizabeth Kury; Cubeddu, Luigi; Farcy, David; Henry, Steven; Glazer, Zachary; Moreno-Walton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Admission of patients who have do not resuscitate (DNR) status to an intensive care unit (ICU) is potentially a misallocation of limited resources to patients who may neither need nor want intensive care. Yet, patients who have DNR status are often admitted to the ICU. This is a retrospective review of patients who had a valid DNR status at the time that they were admitted to an ICU in a single hospital over an eighteen-month period. Thirty-five patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The primary reasons for admission to the ICU were respiratory distress (54.2%) and sepsis (45.7%). Sixteen (45.7%) of the patients died, compared to a 5.4% mortality rate for all patients admitted to our ICU during this period (p < 0.001). APACHE II score was a significant predictor of mortality (18.5 ± 1.3 alive and 23.4 ± 1.4 dead; p = 0.038). Of the 19 patients discharged alive, 9 were discharged home, 5 to hospice, and 4 to a post-acute care facility. Conclusions. Patients who have DNR status and are admitted to the ICU have a higher mortality than other ICU patients. Those who survive have a high likelihood of being discharged to hospice or a post-acute care facility. The value of intensive intervention for these patients is not supported by these results. Only a minority of patients were seen by palliative care and chaplain teams, services which the literature supports as valuable for DNR patients. Our study supports the need for less expensive and less intensive but more appropriate resources for patients and families who have chosen DNR status. PMID:27051551

  9. Utilization of medical services by psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Norfleet, M A; Burnell, G M

    1981-03-01

    The relationship between medical and psychiatric utilization of services was examined in a two-year study of two groups of psychiatric patients: high users of psychiatric services (more than ten visits in one year) and low users of psychiatric services (ten or fewer visits in one year). The high-utilization group made more than 60 per cent of the total psychiatric visits in the two-year period, but only 21 per cent of the total medical visits. However, patients in this group increased their utilization of medical services when psychiatric utilization was reduced, raising the question of whether high-utilization patients tend to substitute medical visits for psychiatric visits. In contrast, patients in the low-utilization group were able to hold their medical utilization constant when they reduced psychiatric utilization. Analysis of factors influencing utilization patterns might allow illness behavior in patients to be predetermined and lead to better and more cost-effective health care. PMID:7203418

  10. Alcohol Abuse and Other Psychiatric Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form ... Health & Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS Other Psychiatric Disorders In the current ...

  11. Psychiatric morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, E B; Hickling, E J; Taylor, A E; Loos, W

    1995-08-01

    The primary purpose of this report was to determine the extent of psychiatric morbidity and comorbidity among a sample of recent victims of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) in comparison to a nonaccident control population. Victims of recent MVAs (N = 158), who sought medical attention as a result of the MVA, were assessed in a University-based research clinic, 1 to 4 months after the accident for acute psychiatric and psychosocial consequences as well as for pre-MVA psychopathology using structured clinical interviews (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, SCID, SCID-II, LIFE Base). Age- and gender-matched controls (N = 93) who had had no MVAs in the past year served as controls. Sixty-two MVA victims (39.2%) met DSM-III-R criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 55 met DSM-IV criteria. The MVA victims who met the criteria for PTSD were more subjectively distressed and had more impairment in role function (performance at work/school/homemaking, relationships with family or friends) than the MVA victims who did not meet the PTSD criteria or the controls. A high percentage (53%) of the MVA-PTSD group also met the criteria for current major depression, with most of that developing after the MVA. A prior history of major depression appears to be a risk factor for developing PTSD after an MVA (p = .0004): 50% of MVA victims who developed PTSD had a history of previous major depression, as compared with 23% of those with a less severe reaction to the MVA. A prior history of PTSD from earlier trauma also is associated with developing PTSD or a subsyndromal form of it (25.2%) (p = .0012). Personal injury MVAs exact substantial psychosocial costs on the victims. Early intervention, especially in vulnerable populations, might prevent some of this. PMID:7643060

  12. How to evacuate a psychiatric hospital: a Hurricane Katrina success story.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joan; Lackey, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the successful evacuation of an entire psychiatric hospital from New Orleans, Louisiana, to Memphis, Tennessee, on a weekend night. The destination site was 400 miles away and buses were used for transport. The evacuation occurred shortly before Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and included 73 adult, adolescent, and child acute psychiatric patients. Thirty-five staff members also participated in the evacuation with their families and pets. This report is significant because little is known about how to implement a disaster plan that involves the transport of an entire psychiatric hospital-patients, nurses, physicians, staff, and family members--to another city. The knowledge gained can also benefit psychiatric nurses and their organizations when establishing or modifying their disaster plans. PMID:18251350

  13. Clinical and Organizational Factors Related to the Reduction of Mechanical Restraint Application in an Acute Ward: An 8-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Miani, Fiorenza; Formicola, Vitantonio; Ferri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of mechanical restraint use in an acute psychiatric ward and to analyze which variables may have significantly influenced the use of this procedure. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in the Servizio Psichiatrico di Diagnosi e Cura (SPDC) of Modena Centro. The following variables of our sample, represented by all restrained patients admitted from 1-1-2005 to 31-12-2012, were analyzed: age, gender, nationality, psychiatric diagnoses, organic comorbidity, state and duration of admission, motivation and duration of restraints, nursing shift and hospitalization day of restraint, number of patients admitted at the time of restraint and institutional changes during the observation period. The above variables were statistically compared with those of all other non-restrained patients admitted to our ward in the same period. Results: Mechanical restraints were primarily used as a safety procedure to manage aggressive behavior of male patients, during the first days of hospitalization and night shifts. Neurocognitive disorders, organic comorbidity, compulsory state and long duration of admission were statistically significantly related to the increase of restraint use (p<.001, multivariate logistic regression). Institutional changes, especially more restricted guidelines concerning restraint application, were statistically significantly related to restraint use reduction (p<.001, chi2 test, multivariate logistic regression). Conclusion: The data obtained highlight that mechanical restraint use was influenced not only by clinical factors, but mainly by staff and policy factors, which have permitted a gradual but significant reduction in the use of this procedure through a multidimensional approach. PMID:25320635

  14. The Psychoactive Effects of Psychiatric Medication: The Elephant in the Room

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Porter, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The psychoactive effects of psychiatric medications have been obscured by the presumption that these medications have disease-specific actions. Exploiting the parallels with the psychoactive effects and uses of recreational substances helps to highlight the psychoactive properties of psychiatric medications and their impact on people with psychiatric problems. We discuss how psychoactive effects produced by different drugs prescribed in psychiatric practice might modify various disturbing and distressing symptoms, and we also consider the costs of these psychoactive effects on the mental well-being of the user. We examine the issue of dependence, and the need for support for people wishing to withdraw from psychiatric medication. We consider how the reality of psychoactive effects undermines the idea that psychiatric drugs work by targeting underlying disease processes, since psychoactive effects can themselves directly modify mental and behavioral symptoms and thus affect the results of placebo-controlled trials. These effects and their impact also raise questions about the validity and importance of modern diagnosis systems. Extensive research is needed to clarify the range of acute and longer-term mental, behavioral, and physical effects induced by psychiatric drugs, both during and after consumption and withdrawal, to enable users and prescribers to exploit their psychoactive effects judiciously in a safe and more informed manner. PMID:24592667

  15. Legal Considerations of Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Barloon, Linda Funk; Hilliard, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    There are major legal issues that affect psychiatric nursing and guidelines for practicing in a legal and responsible manner. Advances in understanding of psychiatric conditions and developments in how nurses care for psychiatric patients result in changes in regulations, case law, and policies that govern nursing practice. Professional development, keeping abreast of current research and literature regarding clinical practice and trends, and involvement in professional organizations are some of the ways that psychiatric nurses can meet the challenges of their profession. PMID:27229273

  16. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH FXTAS

    PubMed Central

    Seritan, Andreea L.; Ortigas, Melina; Seritan, Stefan; Bourgeois, James A.; Hagerman, Randi J.

    2015-01-01

    Carriers of the FMR1 premutation (with 55-200 CGG repeats) may present with multiple medical and psychiatric disorders. Middle-aged carriers (males more often than females) may suffer from fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). FXTAS is a newly discovered neurodegenerative disease characterized by intention tremor and ataxia, along with several other neurological features. Psychiatric manifestations are common in premutation carriers of both genders and include attention deficits, anxiety, depression, irritability, impulse dyscontrol, and substance abuse or dependence. Major depressive disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and specific phobia are among the psychiatric diagnoses often encountered in premutation carriers, including those with FXTAS. Later in the course of the illness, cognitive deficits (including dementia) may occur. In this paper, we discuss common psychiatric phenotypes in FXTAS, based on a thorough review of the literature, as well as our own research experience. Symptomatic pharmacologic treatments are available, although disease modifying agents have not yet been developed. PMID:25620899

  17. Psychiatric Morbidity of Cannabis Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jaydip; Murthy, Pratima; Singh, Swaran P

    2003-01-01

    The paper evaluates the hypothesis that cannabis abuse is associated with a broad range of psychiatric disorders in India, an area with relatively high prevalence of cannabis use. Retrospective case-note review of all cases with cannabis related diagnosis over a 11 -year period, for subjects presenting to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in southern India was carried out. Information pertaining to sociodemographic, personal, social, substance-use related, psychiatric and treatment histories, was gathered. Standardized diagnoses were made according to Diagnostic Criteria for Research of the World Health Organization, on the basis of information available. Cannabis abuse is associated with widespread psychiatric morbidity that spans the major categories of mental disorders under the ICD-10 system, although proportion of patients with psychotic disorders far outweighed those with non-psychotic disorders. Whilst paranoid psychoses were more prevalent, a significant number of patients with affective psychoses, particularly mania, was also noted. Besides being known as either the causative agent or a potent risk factor in cases of paranoid psychoses, cannabis appears to have similar capabilities with regard to affective psychoses, particularly in cases of mania. It is suggested that cannabis has the potential to act as a "life event stressor" amongst subjects vulnerable to develop affective psychoses and the possible aetiopathogenesis of such a finding is discussed. PMID:21206852

  18. Poetry Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Catherine J.

    Poetry therapy has been in use with adult psychiatric patients at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D.C, for 10 years. The treatment used involves reading poetry, listening to recordings, studying poets, and writing poetry. The patients' choice of poems is not restricted by the staff, but different types of poetry appeal to different types of…

  19. Associations among Major Psychiatric Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Abraham W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the frequency and associations of multiple diagnoses in 205 psychiatric inpatients, assessing past and current episodes of illness. Over one-half of the sample received more than one diagnosis. Alcoholism, antisocial personality, and drug dependence formed one group; primary depression, primary mania, and secondary affective disorder,…

  20. Job satisfaction in psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Ward, M; Cowman, S

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, mental health services across Europe have undergone major organizational change with a move from institutional to community care. In such a context, the impact of change on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses has received little attention in the literature. This paper reports on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses and data were collected in 2003. The population of qualified psychiatric nurses (n = 800) working in a defined geographical health board area was surveyed. Methodological triangulation with a between-methods approach was used in the study. Data were collected on job satisfaction using a questionnaire adopted from the Occupational Stress Indicator. A response rate of 346 (43%) was obtained. Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data. Factors influencing levels of job satisfaction predominantly related to the nurses work location. Other factors influencing job satisfaction included choice of work location, work routine, off duty/staff allocation arrangements, teamwork and working environment. The results of the study highlight to employers of psychiatric nurses the importance of work location, including the value of facilitating staff with choices in their working environment, which may influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in mental health services. PMID:17635253

  1. [Psychiatric evaluation in civil law].

    PubMed

    Foerster, K

    1992-03-01

    Aspects of civil law of importance for the psychiatrist as expert witness are those dealing with disability pensions accident insurance, compensation in civil law and rights of the seriously disabled. The legal basis of each is briefly outlined, and some guidelines given for psychiatric court reports. Some outstanding theoretical and practical problems are mentioned. PMID:1579170

  2. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  3. Psychiatric illness and sexual function.

    PubMed

    Segraves, R T

    1998-05-01

    Impaired sexual function has been noted to occur in various psychiatric illnesses. In affective disorders, disturbances of libido, erection and orgasm have been reported. Disordered sexual behavior has also been noted in patients with schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. Clinical speculation suggests that anxiety disorders may also be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual problems. PMID:9647976

  4. Comorbidity of Psychiatric Disorders and Parental Psychiatric Disorders in a Sample of Iranian Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Moini, Rozita

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the psychiatric comorbidity of a clinical sample of children with ADHD and the psychiatric disorders in their parents. Method: Structured psychiatric interviews assessing lifetime psychiatric disorders by "DSM-IV" criteria, using the Farsi version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Results: The mean age…

  5. Validation of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC) in a naturalistic sample of 278 patients with acute psychosis and agitation in a psychiatric emergency room

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the wide use of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC) in a clinical setting to assess agitated patients, a validation study to evaluate its psychometric properties was missing. Methods Data from the observational NATURA study were used. This research describes trends in the use of treatments in patients with acute psychotic episodes and agitation seen in emergency departments. Exploratory principal component factor analysis was performed. Spearman's correlation and regression analyses (linear regression model) as well as equipercentile linking of Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S), Agitation and Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES) and PANSS-EC items were conducted to examine the scale's diagnostic validity. Furthermore, reliability (Cronbach's alpha) and responsiveness were evaluated. Results Factor analysis resulted in one factor being retained according to eigenvalue ≥1. At admission, the PANSS-EC and CGI-S were found to be linearly related, with an average increase of 3.4 points (p < 0.001) on the PANSS-EC for each additional CGI-S point. The PANSS-EC and ACES were found to be linearly and inversely related, with an average decrease of 5.5 points (p < 0.001) on the PANSS-EC for each additional point. The equipercentile method shows the poor sensitivity of the ACES scale. Cronbach's alpha was 0.86 and effect size was 1.44. Conclusions The factorial analyses confirm the unifactorial structure of the PANSS-EC subscale. The PANSS-EC showed a strong linear correlation with rating scales such as CGI-S and ACES. PANSS-EC has also shown an excellent capacity to detect real changes in agitated patients. PMID:21447155

  6. Registration of aggressive incidents in an adolescent forensic psychiatric unit and implications for further practice.

    PubMed

    Tremmery, S; Danckaerts, M; Bruckers, L; Molenberghs, G; De Hert, M; Wampers, M; De Varé, J; de Decker, A

    2014-09-01

    Although aggression is part of daily life in psychiatric units for adolescents, empirical data on its prevalence are sparse. Only few studies have described prevalence of aggressive incidents in adolescent psychiatric wards, and data in forensic psychiatric care are even more limited. Available studies reported high prevalence rates of aggression, ranging from 0.4 to 2.4 incidents of aggression per day across (forensic) child and adolescent psychiatric units. Between 27 and 78 % of all admitted youth committed an aggressive act. In this study, we collected systematically registered data of all aggressive incidents from the first 2 years (2010-2012) on a newly established forensic adolescent psychiatric unit, which used a formal aggression management program embedded in the social competence model, which is based on early intervention in the 'chain of behavior' to prevent any further escalation. The inclusion of also minor aggressive incidents is unique in the literature and the clinical relevance is highlighted. A mean of one incident a day took place, with each adolescent involved in at least one incident. Notably, 1.7 aggressive incidents per month made seclusion of restraint use necessary. Based on the social competence theory, the aggression management model suggests intervening early in the cascade of aggression, in order to prevent further escalation and reduce the need for intrusive interventions. Evidence supported that aggression is a contextual event, as external factors clearly influence the incidence of aggression. Aggression management should be built on both relational and structural security. PMID:24682593

  7. The relation between poor sleep, impulsivity and aggression in forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Spreen, Marinus; Lancel, Marike

    2014-01-17

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with disturbed sleep. Poor sleep can attenuate emotional control, including the regulation of aggression, and thus, may increase the risk of impulsive, aggressive acts. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of sleep problems to subjective and objective aggressiveness and impulsivity in a forensic psychiatric population. Questionnaires on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), chronic severe insomnia (Sleep Diagnosis List), aggressiveness (Aggression Questionnaire) and impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11) were completed by 96 forensic psychiatric inpatients, admitted to two forensic facilities in the Netherlands. To obtain more objective measurements of aggression and impulsivity, observational scores on a professional instrument to assess the risk of future aggression (Historical Clinical Future-30) and reported aggressive incidents were collected from files. Results showed that a worse sleep quality and higher insomnia scores were significantly associated with self-reported aggression and impulsivity, clinician-rated hostility and involvement in aggressive incidents within the facility. Whether a participant was professionally judged as impulsive could not be predicted by sleep quality or the insomnia score. To a large extent the results of this study support the hypothesis that poor sleep is related to impulsive, aggressive behavior in forensic psychiatric patients. It is worthwhile to examine the protective effect of treatment of sleep difficulties on aggressive reactivity in (forensic) psychiatric populations. PMID:24184508

  8. [Treating mother and baby in conjoint hospitalization in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Maizel, S; Fainstein, V; Katzenelson, S K

    1998-09-01

    Since 1990 we have been admitting mothers with postpartum psychiatric morbidity together with their babies to our open psychiatric ward. The aim of conjoint hospitalization is to maintain and develop the bond between mother and baby while treating the mother's psychiatric disorder. The presence of the infant in the hospital allows both a thorough evaluation of the mothers' maternal ability and to use the infant as a facilitator of the mothers' recovery by engaging maternal functions. It prevents the infants from being placed in a foster home for the duration of the mothers' hospitalization. Readily available in Britain and Australia, such conjoint hospitalization is controversial and rarely available elsewhere. In the past 5 years we hospitalized 10 women with 11 babies (1 woman was hospitalized twice, after different births). All women had received psychiatric treatment prior to childbirth, but this was the first psychiatric hospitalization for 2 of them. Diagnoses (DSM-IIIR) were chronic paranoid schizophrenia (4), affective disorder (4), schizo-affective schizophrenia (1) and borderline personality disorder (1). 8 were suffering from active psychotic symptoms on admission. They were treated pharmacologically, received individual and group psychotherapy, and participated in all ward activities. Families were engaged in marital, family and/or individual therapy according to need. All participated in cognitive-behavior treatment tailored to individual need to build and enrich the mother-infant bond. All improved significantly and were able to function independently on discharge, but in 1 case adoption was recommended. PMID:9885632

  9. Academic Accommodations for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souma, Alfred; Rickerson, Nancy; Burgstahler, Sheryl

    This brief paper summarizes the literature on academic accommodations for students with psychiatric disabilities. A definition of psychiatric disability precedes a brief summary of the following specific psychiatric diagnoses: depression, bipolar affective disorder; borderline personality disorder; schizophrenia; and anxiety disorders. Also noted…

  10. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzbold, Marcelo; Diaz, Alexandre; Martins, Evandro Tostes; Rufino, Armanda; Amante, Lúcia Nazareth; Thais, Maria Emília; Quevedo, João; Hohl, Alexandre; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Walz, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed. PMID:19043523

  11. The Banner Psychiatric Center: A Model for Providing Psychiatric Crisis Care to the Community while Easing Behavioral Health Holds in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Little-Upah, Pat; Carson, Chris; Williamson, Robert; Williams, Tom; Cimino, Michael; Mehta, Neena; Buehrle, Jeff; Kisiel, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Banner Health in the Phoenix, AZ, metropolitan area provides individuals in a behavioral health crisis with an alternative to presenting to an Emergency Department (ED). By implementing a process to quickly move patients out of our ED, our health care system has been able to greatly reduce the hold time for behavioral health patients. Through access to psychiatric clinicians around the clock at the Banner Psychiatric Center, patients now receive the appropriate treatment and needed care in a timely manner. Finally, disposition of patients into appropriate levels of care has freed up acute care Level 1 beds to be available to patients who meet those criteria. PMID:23596368

  12. Cognitive functioning in schizophrenia: implications for psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, W D; Fleming, S K; Reed, D; Sullivan, M; Storzbach, D; Lam, M

    1999-01-01

    Research in psychopathology and the cognitive neurosciences suggests new applications in psychiatric rehabilitation. Analysis of performance deficits on laboratory tasks can contribute to treatment planning, individual and family counseling, and staff consultation, much like it does in cases of brain injury and other types of central nervous system neuropathology. Recognition of the nature of cognitive impairments in schizophrenia can inform design of psychosocial techniques such as social and living skills training. Cognitive impairments are increasingly seen as potential targets for pharmacological and psychosocial treatment and rehabilitation. In this article, three key issues for application of cognitive technology in psychiatric rehabilitation of schizophrenia and related disorders are formulated as straightforward, clinically relevant questions: (1) What is the prognostic significance of cognitive impairment in acute psychosis? (2) Can cognitive functioning improve in the chronic, residual course? (3) How does cognitive improvement benefit other aspects of recovery and rehabilitation? These questions are addressed through review of previous findings and new multivariate analyses of cognitive functioning in the acute, post-acute, and chronic residual phases of schizophrenia. PMID:10416731

  13. Stressful life events, hopelessness, and suicidal intent in patients admitted with attempted suicide in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, SV; Faye, AD; Gore, SP; Shah, HR; Kamath, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a psychiatric emergency. Stressors in life and social variables (like marital status, family, and social support) are among the determinants of suicide. Hopelessness and suicidal intent are among the psychological variables that have shown promise in the prediction of suicide. Aims and Objectives: To assess stressful life events, hopelessness, suicidal intent, and sociodemographic variables in patients of attempted suicide. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients admitted with attempted suicide were interviewed. Presumptive Stressful Life Event Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, and Beck Suicidal Intent Scale were used along with a semistructured pro forma for interview. Data were analyzed with statistical tests. Results: Sixty-six percent of the participants were females, 72% were less than 30 years of age. Sixty-six percent of the patients had stressful life event score between 101 and 200 with the mean score of 127. The stressful life event score in those who considered they are in need of psychiatric help was significantly high. Most of the patients had mild (34%) and moderate (40%) degrees of hopelessness, and the mean score was 9.64. The mean suicidal intent in the participants was 25.14, when correlated with hopelessness score significant positive correlation was found. Conclusion: Lethality of the attempt increases with the increase in hopelessness. PMID:27089109

  14. Psychiatric disorders among men voluntarily in treatment for violent behaviour: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, Ingunn Rangul; Heir, Trond

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Although violent behaviour and psychopathology often co-occur, there has been little research on psychiatric disorders among men in treatment for intimate partner violence (IPV). This study aimed to examine the prevalence of a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders among men voluntarily attending treatment for IPV. Setting 5 clinics for IPV treatment, located in the east, south and west of Norway, participated in the study. In a cross-sectional design, men attending therapy for violence against a partner went through a face-to-face structured diagnostic interview, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Participants 222 men contacted the clinic during the inclusion period; 12 men did not attend and 13 men were referred to outpatient clinics. Of the 197 men who were offered therapy, 13 did not provide consent to participate in the study, 2 were excluded and 3 men missed the interview. Results A total of 179 men participated in the study. The majority were ethnic Norwegians (88%). A total of 70.9% of the men fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for at least one ongoing psychiatric disorder. Three categories of disorders stood out with approximately equal prevalences: depressive disorders (40.6%), anxiety disorders (38.5%) including post-traumatic stress disorder (18.4%) and alcohol/substance abuse (40.2%). Antisocial personality disorder was present in approximately 2/10 participants. Comorbidity was high, with nearly half of the men (48.0%) assigned two or more diagnoses. Conclusions Men voluntarily admitted to treatment for IPV harbour a wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Our findings suggest a need for screening procedures for psychiatric disorders as well as adoption of treatment interventions according to different types of psychopathologies and therapeutic needs. Limitations include caution in terms of generalisation to other populations not voluntarily admitted to treatment for IPV, and risk of ignoring symptoms not covered by a

  15. Psychiatric treatments in dermatology: an update.

    PubMed

    Sambhi, R; Lepping, P

    2010-03-01

    There is a considerable degree of connection between psychiatry and dermatology. This connection is relevant both for diagnosis and management of dermatological pathology. This article summarises common psychiatric conditions seen in patients with skin disease, both primary psychiatric disorders and psychiatric disorders secondary to dermatological pathology. Diagnosis of relevant psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, delusional parasitosis and dermatitis artefacta, and psychiatric treatments are discussed. It gives an update of psychopharmacology relevant to the dermatologist including important interactions between psychotropic and dermatological agents. PMID:19874324

  16. Predictors of physical restraint in a psychiatric emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Termeh; Shariat, Seyed Vahid; Jalali Nadoushan, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the negative consequences of using physical restraints, we conducted this study to identify patients who are more frequently restrained in a psychiatric emergency ward as an initial step to limit the use of restraint to the minimum possible. Methods: This was a retrospective case control study conducted in Iran Psychiatric Hospital in Tehran, Iran. We reviewed the files of 607 patients who were admitted during a one year period using convenience sampling; of them, 186 were in the restrained group and 421 in the unrestrained group. Results: Surprisingly, no significant difference was found between the restrained and unrestrained groups in demographic characteristics. The patients who were referred because of violence were diagnosed as having methamphetamine induced psychotic disorder or bipolar I disorder in manic 1episode and had a higher odds of being restrained (OR=2.51, OR=1.61, and OR=1.57 respectively). Being restrained was also associated with a longer duration of hospitalization and duration of staying in the emergency ward. Moreover, patients in their first admission were more frequently restrained. Conclusion: Medical and nursing staff should consider special measures for the patients who are at a higher risk for being restrained. More frequent visits and education for both patients and staff may be effective in reducing the number of physical restraints for these groups of patients. PMID:26913259

  17. Enhancement of recovery from psychiatric illness by methylfolate.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, P S; Toone, B K; Carney, M W; Flynn, T G; Bottiglieri, T; Laundy, M; Chanarin, I; Reynolds, E H

    1990-08-18

    41 (33%) of 123 patients with acute psychiatric disorders (DSM III diagnosis of major depression or schizophrenia) had borderline or definite folate deficiency (red-cell folate below 200 micrograms/l) and took part in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of methylfolate, 15 mg daily, for 6 months in addition to standard psychotropic treatment. Among both depressed and schizophrenic patients methylfolate significantly improved clinical and social recovery. The differences in outcome scores between methylfolate and placebo groups became greater with time. These findings add to the evidence implicating disturbances of methylation in the nervous system in the biology of some forms of mental illness. PMID:1974941

  18. Enhancement of recovery from psychiatric illness by methylfolate.

    PubMed

    Procter, A

    1991-08-01

    "41 (33%) of 123 patients with acute psychiatric disorders (DSM III diagnosis of major depression or schizophrenia) had borderline or definite folate deficiency (red-cell folate below 200 micrograms/l) and took part in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of methylfolate, 15 mg daily, for 6 months in addition to standard psychotropic treatment. Among both depressed and schizophrenic patients methylfolate significantly improved clinical and social recovery. The differences in outcome scores between methylfolate and placebo groups became greater with time. These findings add to the evidence implicating disturbances of methylation in the nervous system in the biology of some forms of mental illness." PMID:1773245

  19. Vitamin D status of adolescent inpatients in a secure psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Simon A.; Riordan-Eva, Elliott; Bhandari, Bharathi; Ferdinandez, Uresh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to use routinely collected data on vitamin D levels of adolescents detained in a secure psychiatric hospital to see if this at-risk group for vitamin D deficiency do in fact have low vitamin D levels. Methods: Vitamin D blood levels were collated from clinical records of inpatients admitted to Bluebird House, a medium secure adolescent unit, since 2012. Corresponding data were gathered to include gender, ethnic status and age. Blood levels were assessed on admission to the unit and after treatment with vitamin D supplementation, if indicated. Results: Only 3 out of the 35 patients (8.6%) had adequate vitamin D levels (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD] > 50 nmol/l). A total of 23 patients (65.7%) had levels consistent with deficiency (25-OHD < 30 nmol/l) with the remaining 9 patients (25.7%) showing levels indicating possible deficiency (25-OHD 30–50 nmol/l. Conclusions: Vitamin D levels were low in our sample of young people admitted to a secure psychiatric hospital. This is the first published study of vitamin D levels in a secure adolescent psychiatric hospital. The results point to the need for routine prescription of vitamin D to adolescents held in secure conditions such as hospitals, secure children’s homes and youth offender institutes. PMID:27536343

  20. Psychiatric disorders in candidates for surgery for epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, R; Schaefer, B; McLachlan, R S; Blume, W T; Wiebe, S; Girvin, J P; Parrent, A; Derry, P A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To provide a descriptive analysis of the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric morbidity among 300 consecutive epileptic patients refractive to treatment and admitted during a six year period for evaluation of their candidature for surgery. METHODS--Patients underwent detailed observation of their seizure and standardised psychiatric assessment. Patients were considered to be refractory to treatment if they continued to manifest seizures with an average frequency of at least once every month even with polytherapy using up to three different anti-convulsants for a period of at least two years. Of the 300 patients, 231 had a temporal lobe focus, 43 had a non-temporal lobe focus, and 26 patients had a generalised and multifocal seizure onset. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS--With the DSM-III-R criteria 142 (47.3%) patients emerged as psychiatric cases. A principal axis I diagnosis was made in 88 (29.3%), and an axis II diagnosis (personality disorder) in another 54 (18.0%) patients. The most common axis I diagnosis was anxiety disorders (10.7%). A schizophrenia-like psychosis was seen in 13 (4.3%). Most patients with personality disorders showed dependent and avoidant personality traits. There was a significantly higher psychotic subscore on the present state examination in the temporal than with the non-temporal group of patients. These findings were not significant when compared with patients with a generalised and multifocal seizure disorder. There were no significant findings between the different seizure focus groups on the neurotic subscores. The findings with regard to laterality of seizure focus and the neurotic or psychotic subscores were not significant. PMID:8676167

  1. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  2. SUICIDAL COMMUNICATION IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Anand, R.; Trivedi, J.K.; Gupta, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    In this enquiry a cross-sectional study of hospitalized psychiatric patients was undertaken to assess prevalence and nature of suicidal behaviour. We have been able to delineate these subjects into three categories i.e. non-communicators, partial communicators and definite communicators on the basis of their scores upon 31ucid.il intent questionnaire. A follow up study of these patients which is in progress may further provide knowledge about relationship between predictive criterion and their final outcome. PMID:21847269

  3. Imaging genetics and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Umeda-Yano, S; Watanabe, Y; Fukunaga, M; Takeda, M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. Imaging genetics is both a tool for the discovery of risk genes for psychiatric disorders and a strategy for characterizing the neural systems affected by risk gene variants to elucidate quantitative and mechanistic aspects of brain function implicated in psychiatric disease. Early studies of imaging genetics included association analyses between brain morphology and single nucleotide polymorphisms whose function is well known, such as catechol-Omethyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). GWAS of psychiatric disorders have identified genes with unknown functions, such as ZNF804A, and imaging genetics has been used to investigate clues of the biological function of these genes. The difficulty in replicating the findings of studies with small sample sizes has motivated the creation of largescale collaborative consortiums, such as ENIGMA, CHARGE and IMAGEN, to collect thousands of images. In a genome-wide association study, the ENIGMA consortium successfully identified common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume at 12q24, and the CHARGE consortium replicated this finding. The new era of imaging genetics has just begun, and the next challenge we face is the discovery of small effect size signals from large data sets obtained from genetics and neuroimaging. New methods and technologies for data reduction with appropriate statistical thresholds, such as polygenic analysis and parallel independent component analysis (ICA), are warranted. Future advances in imaging genetics will aid in the discovery of genes and provide mechanistic insight into psychiatric disorders. PMID:25732148

  4. Imaging Genetics and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, R; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Umeda-Yano, S; Watanabe, Y; Fukunaga, M; Takeda, M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. Imaging genetics is both a tool for the discovery of risk genes for psychiatric disorders and a strategy for characterizing the neural systems affected by risk gene variants to elucidate quantitative and mechanistic aspects of brain function implicated in psychiatric disease. Early studies of imaging genetics included association analyses between brain morphology and single nucleotide polymorphisms whose function is well known, such as catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). GWAS of psychiatric disorders have identified genes with unknown functions, such as ZNF804A, and imaging genetics has been used to investigate clues of the biological function of these genes. The difficulty in replicating the findings of studies with small sample sizes has motivated the creation of large-scale collaborative consortiums, such as ENIGMA, CHARGE and IMAGEN, to collect thousands of images. In a genome-wide association study, the ENIGMA consortium successfully identified common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume at 12q24, and the CHARGE consortium replicated this finding. The new era of imaging genetics has just begun, and the next challenge we face is the discovery of small effect size signals from large data sets obtained from genetics and neuroimaging. New methods and technologies for data reduction with appropriate statistical thresholds, such as polygenic analysis and parallel independent component analysis (ICA), are warranted. Future advances in imaging genetics will aid in the discovery of genes and provide mechanistic insight into psychiatric disorders. PMID:25732148

  5. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  6. Adult Neurogenesis and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunchai; Wen, Zhexing; Song, Hongjun; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders continue to be among the most challenging disorders to diagnose and treat because there is no single genetic or anatomical locus that is causative for the disease. Current treatments are often blunt tools used to ameliorate the most severe symptoms, at the risk of disrupting functional neural systems. There is a critical need to develop new therapeutic strategies that can target circumscribed functional or anatomical domains of pathology. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be one such domain. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional regulation and forms of learning and memory that include temporal and spatial memory encoding and context discrimination, and that its dysregulation is associated with psychiatric disorders, such as affective disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Further, adult neurogenesis has proven to be an effective model to investigate basic processes of neuronal development and converging evidence suggests that aberrant neural development may be an etiological factor, even in late-onset diseases. Constitutive neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the mature brain reflects large-scale plasticity unique to this region and could be a potential hub for modulation of a subset of cognitive and affective behaviors that are affected by multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:26801682

  7. Explanatory models for psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2008-06-01

    How can we best develop explanatory models for psychiatric disorders? Because causal factors have an impact on psychiatric illness both at micro levels and macro levels, both within and outside of the individual, and involving processes best understood from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives, traditional models of science that strive for single broadly applicable explanatory laws are ill suited for our field. Such models are based on the incorrect assumption that psychiatric illnesses can be understood from a single perspective. A more appropriate scientific model for psychiatry emphasizes the understanding of mechanisms, an approach that fits naturally with a multicausal framework and provides a realistic paradigm for scientific progress, that is, understanding mechanisms through decomposition and reassembly. Simple subunits of complicated mechanisms can be usefully studied in isolation. Reassembling these constituent parts into a functioning whole, which is straightforward for simple additive mechanisms, will be far more challenging in psychiatry where causal networks contain multiple nonlinear interactions and causal loops. Our field has long struggled with the interrelationship between biological and psychological explanatory perspectives. Building from the seminal work of the neuronal modeler and philosopher David Marr, the author suggests that biology will implement but not replace psychology within our explanatory systems. The iterative process of interactions between biology and psychology needed to achieve this implementation will deepen our understanding of both classes of processes. PMID:18483135

  8. Tobacco and psychiatric dual disorders.

    PubMed

    Graham, Noni A; Frost-Pineda, Kimberly; Gold, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in the United States. The relationship between tobacco smoking and several forms of cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic lung disease, and other medical diseases is well recognized and accepted. Recent epidemiological studies are now focusing on the link between tobacco use and psychiatric diseases. Experts now suggest that in the differential diagnosis of "smoker," depression, alcohol dependence, and schizophrenia are highest on the list. Studies are also focusing on the role of secondhand tobacco exposure, either in utero or during childhood, in the risk of dual disorders. Prenatal exposure may alter gene expression and change the risk for a variety of life-long psychiatric diseases, e.g., ADD/ADHD, antisocial personality disorders, substance use disorders, and major depression. Considerable time and effort have been devoted to studying the link between smoking and depression and also schizophrenia. We will focus on less well-studied areas in tobacco use and psychiatric dual disorders (including eating disorders), prenatal and early childhood secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, and the relationship to the genesis of these dual disorders. PMID:19283970

  9. Psychiatric aspects of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Huang, Chih-Kuan; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery has been consistently shown to be effective in long-term marked weight loss and in bringing significant improvement to medical comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome. Empirical data suggest a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among bariatric surgery candidates. In this review, we focus on the studies published recently with a high impact on our understanding of the role of psychiatry in bariatric surgery. Recent findings This article reviews the specific psychopathologies before surgery, changes in psychopathologies after surgery, suicide risk related to bariatric surgery, factors associated with weight loss, and recommendations for presurgical and postsurgical assessment and management. Research indicates a decrease in certain psychiatric symptoms after weight loss with bariatric surgery. However, the risk of suicide and unsuccessful weight loss in some bariatric surgery patients make monitoring following surgery as important as careful assessment and management before surgery. Specific considerations for youth and older populations and future potential research foci are discussed. Summary Recent publications suggest new directions for psychiatric evaluation and interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Future research on outcomes of specific populations, effectiveness of psychopharmacotherapy, and underlying pathophysiology are warranted for the advancement of treating bariatric surgery patients. PMID:25036421

  10. Vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient care unit☆

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Larissa Natacha; Breigeiron, Márcia Koja; Hallmann, Sofia; Witkowski, Maria Carolina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient unit of a university hospital. METHODS: Cross-sectional, descriptive study from April to September 2013 with36 children aged 30 days to 12 years old, admitted to medical-surgical pediatric inpatient units of a university hospital and their caregivers. Data concerning sociocultural, socioeconomic and clinical context of children and their families were collected by interview with the child caregiver and from patients, records, and analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of the total sample, 97.1% (n=132) of children had at least one type of vulnerability, the majority related to the caregiver's level of education, followed by caregiver's financial situation, health history of the child, caregiver's family situation, use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs by the caregiver, family's living conditions, caregiver's schooling, and bonding between the caregiver and the child. Only 2.9% (n=4) of the children did not show any criteria to be classified in a category of vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: Most children were classified has having a social vulnerability. It is imperative to create networks of support between the hospital and the primary healthcare service to promote healthcare practices directed to the needs of the child and family. PMID:25511001

  11. Epidemiology and outcome of severe pneumococcal pneumonia admitted to intensive care unit: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) account for a high proportion of ICU admissions, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the main pathogen responsible for these infections. However, little is known on the clinical features and outcomes of ICU patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. The aims of this study were to provide epidemiological data and to determine risk factors of mortality in patients admitted to ICU for severe S. pneumoniae CAP. Methods We performed a retrospective review of two prospectively-acquired multicentre ICU databases (2001-2008). Patients admitted for management of severe pneumococcal CAP were enrolled if they met the 2001 American Thoracic Society criteria for severe pneumonia, had life-threatening organ failure and had a positive microbiological sample for S. pneumoniae. Patients with bronchitis, aspiration pneumonia or with non-pulmonary pneumococcal infections were excluded. Results Two hundred and twenty two patients were included, with a median SAPS II score reaching 47 [36-64]. Acute respiratory failure (n = 154) and septic shock (n = 54) were their most frequent causes of ICU admission. Septic shock occurred in 170 patients (77%) and mechanical ventilation was required in 186 patients (84%); renal replacement therapy was initiated in 70 patients (32%). Bacteraemia was diagnosed in 101 patients. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibility to penicillin was 39.7%. Although antibiotherapy was adequate in 92.3% of cases, hospital mortality reached 28.8%. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality were age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.08)), male sex (OR 2.83 (95% CI: 1.16-6.91)) and renal replacement therapy (OR 3.78 (95% CI: 1.71-8.36)). Co-morbidities, macrolide administration, concomitant bacteremia or penicillin susceptibility did not influence outcome. Conclusions In ICU, mortality of pneumococcal CAP remains high despite adequate antimicrobial treatment. Baseline demographic data

  12. Mortality in Relation to Frailty in Patients Admitted to a Specialized Geriatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, An; Song, Xiaowei; Dong, Jiahui; Mitnitski, Arnold; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhenhui; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background. In older adults admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), frailty influences prognosis. We examined the relationship between the frailty index (FI) based on deficit accumulation and early and late survival. Methods. Older patients (≥65 years) admitted to a specialized geriatric ICU at the Liuhuaqiao Hospital, Guangzhou, China between July–December 2011 (n = 155; age 82.7±7.1 y; 87.1% men) were followed for 300 days. The FI was calculated as the proportion present of 52 health deficits. FI performance was compared with that of several prognostic scores. Results. The 90-day death rate was 38.7% (n = 60; 27 died within 30 days). The FI score was correlated with the Glasgow Coma Scale, Karnofsky Scale, Palliative Performance Scale, Acute Physiology Score—APACHE II and APACHE IV (r 2 = 0.52 to 0.72, p < 0.001). Patients who died within 30 days had higher mean FI scores (0.41±0.11) than those who survived to 300 days (0.22±0.11; F = 38.91, p < 0.001). Each 1% increase in the FI from the previous level was associated with an 11% increase in the 30-day mortality risk (95% CI: 7%–15%) adjusting for age, sex, and the prognostic scores. The FI discriminated patients who died in 30 days from those who survived with moderately high accuracy (AUC = 0.89±0.03). No one with an FI score >0.46 survived past 90 days. Conclusion. ICU survival was strongly associated with the level of frailty at admission. An FI based on health deficit accumulation may help improve critical care outcome prediction in older adults. PMID:26400736

  13. Psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bui, Quan M; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-05-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient's psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. PMID:25987916

  14. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Quan M.; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient’s psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. PMID:25987916

  15. 76 FR 60602 - Proposed Collection of Information: Annual Letters-Certificates of Authority (A) and Admitted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Admitted Reinsurer (B) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... Admitted Reinsurer (B).'' DATES: Written comments should be received on or before November 28, 2011... (A) and Admitted Reinsurer (B). OMB Number: 1510-0057. Form Number: None. Abstract: This letter...

  16. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric staff

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, Marilyn; Lanza, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Hartley, Dan; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Amandus, Harlan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A study by Hesketh et al. found that 20% of psychiatric nurses were physically assaulted, 43% were threatened with physical assault, and 55% were verbally assaulted at least once during the equivalent of a single work week. From 2005 through 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that mental health occupations had the second highest average annual rate of workplace violence, 21 violent crimes per 1,000 employed persons aged 16 or older. OBJECTIVE An evaluation of risk factors associated with patient aggression towards nursing staff at eight locked psychiatric units. PARTICIPANTS Two-hundred eighty-four nurses in eight acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration throughout the United States between September 2007 and September 2010. METHODS Rates were calculated by dividing the number of incidents by the total number of hours worked by all nurses, then multiplying by 40 (units of incidents per nurse per 40-hour work week). Risk factors associated with these rates were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with a Poisson model. RESULTS Combining the data across all hospitals and weeks, the overall rate was 0.60 for verbal aggression incidents and 0.19 for physical aggression, per nurse per week. For physical incidents, the evening shift (3 pm – 11 pm) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of aggression than the day shift (7 am – 3 pm). Weeks that had a case-mix with a higher percentage of patients with personality disorders were significantly associated with a higher risk of verbal and physical aggression. CONCLUSION Healthcare workers in psychiatric settings are at high risk for aggression from patients. PMID:24894691

  17. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  18. Paraneoplastic Encephalitis, Psychiatric Symptoms, and Hypoventilation in Ovarian Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitaliani, Roberta; Mason, Warren; Ances, Beau; Zwerdling, Theodore; Jiang, Zhilong; Dalmau, Josep

    2007-01-01

    We report four young women who developed acute psychiatric symptoms, seizures, memory deficits, decreased level of consciousness, and central hypoventilation associated with ovarian teratoma (OT) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory abnormalities. Three patients recovered with treatment of the tumor or immunosuppression and one died of the disorder. Five other OT patients with a similar syndrome and response to treatment have been reported. Our patients' serum or CSF showed immunolabeling of antigens that were expressed at the cytoplasmic membrane of hippocampal neurons and processes and readily accessed by antibodies in live neurons. Immunoprobing of a hippocampal-expression library resulted in the isolation of EFA6A, a protein that interacts with a member of the two-pore-domain potassium channel family and is involved in the regulation of the dendritic development of hippocampal neurons. EFA6A-purified antibodies reproduced the hippocampal immunolabeling of all patients' antibodies and colocalized with them at the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that in a young woman with acute psychiatric symptoms, seizures, and central hypoventilation, a paraneoplastic immune-mediated syndrome should be considered. Recognition of this disorder is important because despite the severity of the symptoms, patients usually recover. The location and function of the isolated antigen suggest that the disorder is directly mediated by antibodies. PMID:16178029

  19. Suicidal behaviour and intensity of psychiatric care in a region at high risk for suicide.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Pier Luigi; Orbitello, Barbara; Ciano, Rossana P; Angarano, Alberto; Balestrieri, Matteo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Suicidal behaviour represents a social and health-related issue of prime importance in both the general and psychiatric population. People with mental illness are at great risk of suicide, but indirect evidence suggests that the treatment of psychiatric disorders may prevent suicide. The aim of our study was to compare the risk of suicide in the population of psychiatric patients with that of the general population in Friuli Venezia-Giulia (FVG). METHOD We analyzed the suicide rates, based on the official statistical database, relating to the resident population in FVG during the years 1998-1999. The sucide rates (per 100 000 subjects) were standardised by sex and age. The characteristics of suicidal behaviour in subjects who had been in contact with (Community Mental Health Centres) CMHC (n=65) were compared with that of suicidal subjects not in contact (n=237). RESULTS There was an increase in the suicide phenomenon in the elderly population in FVG over the tested period. The rates were three times higher in males than in females. The rates of patients in contact with CMHC in 1998 and in 1999 were, respectively, 14 and 20 times higher than that of the general population. Most suicidal schizophrenics and 37% of the depressed patients have been previously hospitalised. CONCLUSION The population of north-eastern Italy is at high risk of suicide compared to other regions. The mortality ratio of psychiatric subjects who commit suicide in our sample is elevated. Since Italian community-oriented services rely less on hospitalisation than in other countries, the fact that about 50% of suicidal psychiatric patients have been previously admitted in a psychiatric ward may indicate that previous hospitalisation is a hierarchic factor related to suicide. PMID:24941205

  20. [Administration of medication to use when needed and the care of psychiatric nursing].

    PubMed

    Estrela, Kelly da Silva Rocha; Loyola, Cristina Maria Douat

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to analyze the clinical criteria used for the administration of prescribed medications for use when needed (SOS); and discuss the implication of the findings in this research to clinical psychiatric nursing. The records of female patients admitted to a psychiatric institution in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in the time frame from May to June 2009, were analyzed. In the 38 patient records, 16 prescriptions for medications SOS were found. The mean age of patients was around 45-55 years with a clinical diagnosis of Bipolar Mood Disorder. The medication category most prescribed as SOS was of benzodiazepines, followed by antipsychotics. It was noticed a tendency to not valuing the administration of medication in SOS notes. The study points out the importance to establish clinical criteria to indicate the need, or not, to administer prescribed SOS medications. PMID:25271580

  1. [Treatments for otorhinolaryngological patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Ayako; Sumi, Takuro; Yamada, Masato; Kuwahata, Yuko

    2013-02-01

    There are few systems in place for patients with psychiatric disorders who need treatments for physical complications. In Tokyo, "The Tokyo metropolitan psychiatric emergency system" was established in 1981, and Ome Municipal General Hospital participated in it. Under this system, fifteen patients with psychiatric disorders were treated for otorhinolaryngological diseases in our department from April 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the fifteen patients. The coexisting psychiatric disorders were schizophrenia in twelve patients, and mental retardation, Korsakoff's syndrome, and Alzheimer's dementia in one patient each, respectively. All the patients had been receiving psychiatric treatment. The otorhinolaryngological diseases were head and neck cancer in nine patients, chronic sinusitis in three patients, and benign salivary gland tumor, cholesteatoma, and epistaxis in one patient each, respectively. Among the fifteen patients, thirteen could complete their treatment, but two dropped out due to exacerbation of their psychiatric symptoms. The therapeutic course is uncertain in otorhinolaryngological diseases occurring concomitantly with psychiatric disorders, especially in head and neck cancer, because it may be difficult to prioritize the problem when determining the treatment options and delivering the treatment. Thus, we should treat patients with psychiatric disorders carefully on a case-by-case basis depending on their psychiatric symptoms. It is also important to cooperate with psychiatrists and patients' families. PMID:23539958

  2. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  3. Paranoid symptoms in patients on a general hospital psychiatric unit. Implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Schwab, P J

    1978-03-01

    Paranoid symptoms were found in 40% of patients admitted to a university general hospital psychiatric unit during a ten-month period. Fifty-eight percent of this group had frank paranoid delusions, while the rest had ideas of reference or generalized suspiciousness. Only one half of those who had paranoid delusions had paranoid schizophrenia. A significant number had affective disorders or organic brain disorder. Ideas of reference and suspiciousness were found in many patients who were not psychotic. The therapeutic implications of these findings are reported in three patients who were inadequately treated for affective disorders because the presence of paranoid symptomatology had led to an incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:727891

  4. ASD, a Psychiatric Disorder, or Both? Psychiatric Diagnoses in Adolescents with High-Functioning ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Oswald, Donald P.; Day, Taylor N.; Eack, Shaun M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Varied presentations of emotion dysregulation in autism complicate diagnostic decision making and may lead to inaccurate psychiatric diagnoses or delayed autism diagnosis for high-functioning children. This pilot study aimed to determine the concordance between prior psychiatric diagnoses and the results of an autism-specific psychiatric interview…

  5. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  6. French perspectives on psychiatric classification

    PubMed Central

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the role of the French schools in the development of psychiatric nosology. Boissier de Sauvages published the first French treatise on medical nosology in 1763. Until the 1880s, French schools held a pre-eminent position in the development of psychiatric concepts. From the 1880s until World War I, German-speaking schools exerted the most influence, featuring the work of major figures such as Emil Kraepelin and Eugen Bleuler. French schools were probably hampered by excessive administrative and cultural centralization. Between the 1880s and the 1930s, French schools developed diagnostic categories that set them apart from international classifications. The main examples are Bouffée Délirante, and the complex set of chronic delusional psychoses (CDPs), including chronic hallucinatory psychosis. CDPs were distinguished from schizophrenia by the lack of cognitive deterioration during evolution. Modern French psychiatry is now coming into line with international classification, such as DSM-5 and the upcoming ICD-11. PMID:25987863

  7. Psychiatric rehabilitation education for physicians.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Abraham; Eastwood, Diane

    2013-06-01

    As part of a rapidly spreading reform toward recovery-oriented services, mental health care systems are adopting Psychiatric/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). Accordingly, PSR education and training programs are now available and accessible. Although psychiatrists and sometimes other physicians (such as family physicians) provide important services to people with serious mental illnesses and may, therefore, need knowledge and skill in PSR, it seems that the medical profession has been slow to participate in PSR education. Based on our experience working in Canada as academic psychiatrists who are also Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners (CPRPs), we offer descriptions of several Canadian initiatives that involve physicians in PSR education. Multiple frameworks guide PSR education for physicians. First, guidance is provided by published PSR principles, such as the importance of self-determination (www.psrrpscanada.ca). Second, guidance is provided by adult education (andragogy) principles, emphasizing the importance of addressing attitudes in addition to knowledge and skills (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2011). Third, guidance in Canada is provided by Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) principles, which delineate the multiple roles of physicians beyond that of medical expert (Frank, 2005) and have recently been adopted in Australia (Boyce, Spratt, Davies, & McEvoy, 2011). PMID:23750768

  8. Epigenetic Signaling in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic-stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models is revealing new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. PMID:24709417

  9. Purinergic receptors in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Ute

    2016-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders describe different mental or behavioral patterns, causing suffering or poor coping of ordinary life with manifold presentations. Multifactorial processes can contribute to their development and progression. Purinergic neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the brain have attracted increasing therapeutic interest in the field of psychiatry. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides are well recognized as signaling molecules mediating cell to cell communication. The actions of ATP are mediated by ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor subfamilies, whilst the actions of adenosine are mediated by P1 (A1 or A2) adenosine receptors. Purinergic mechanisms and specific receptor subtypes have been shown to be linked to the regulation of many aspects of behavior and mood and to dysregulation in pathological processes of brain function. In this review the recent knowledge on the role of purinergic receptors in the two most frequent psychiatric diseases, major depression and schizophrenia, as well as on related animal models is summarized. At present the most promising data for therapeutic strategies derive from investigations of the adenosine system emphasizing a unique function of A2A receptors at neurons and astrocytes in these disorders. Among the P2 receptor family, in particular P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors were related to disturbances in major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26518371

  10. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  11. Epigenetic signaling in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models reveals new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. PMID:24709417

  12. Healthcare use by children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with and without psychiatric comorbidities.

    PubMed

    DeBar, Lynn L; Lynch, Frances L; Boles, Myde

    2004-01-01

    This study examined healthcare services used by children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with and without psychiatric comorbidities. The study was conducted in a large health maintenance organization in the Pacific Northwest on all continuously enrolled children aged 5 to 12 from January 1997 through July 1998. The study measured all outpatient medical care, specialty mental health care services, and prescription drug dispensings from computer records. Children with ADHD, with and without other psychiatric comorbidities, use more general medical services than do other groups of children, including outpatient visits, acute care (emergency room [ER] urgent care) visits. ADHD and other psychiatric comorbidities lead to higher use of specialty mental health services and greater use of psychotropic medications. PMID:15263869

  13. [An elderly man with known heart failure admitted with cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Fagerheim, Anne Kristine; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2010-07-01

    A 75-year-old man with post-MI heart failure and an ejection fraction of 15 % was treated with an ACE-inhibitor, spironolactone and a beta-blocker. He had reduced his intake of food and water due to an intercurrent illness the days before admission. He was admitted to our coronary care unit due to bradycardia and hypotension. On arrival his blood pressure was 60/40 mm Hg, and he was in a cardiogenic shock. The electrocardiogram showed broad QRS-complexes and large T waves. Serum-potassium was 9.1 mmol/L and he had acute renal failure with oliguria, probably caused by reduced cardiac output due to hypovolemia combined with taking an ACE inhibitor and spironolactone. Haemodialysis was started and during dialysis QRS complexes became more narrow and heart rate and blood pressure normalized. The patient was discharged 10 days later with normal potassium and creatinine levels. Patients treated with ACE-inhibitors and spironolactone should be monitored closely. During intercurrent illness dehydration may occur and this can lead to renal failure and hyperkalemia which can be life-threatening. The condition should be recognized and addressed promptly, and if indicated haemodialysis should be performed. PMID:20596117

  14. Accommodating Faculty and Staff with Psychiatric Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Barbara A.; Ruger, Peter H.

    This pamphlet discusses the legal protections for employees with psychiatric disabilities, and analyzes the decisions of federal and state courts in cases where employees who claimed a psychiatric disorder challenged an employment decision under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or state law. It…

  15. Behavioral Interviewing in Psychiatric Rehabilitation Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alan

    Psychiatric rehabilitation differs from traditional approaches to mental health, because it places much greater emphasis on the importance of the person's relationship with the environment. In psychiatric rehabilitation, the importance is not placed on finding a cure for the client's mental illness; rather, what matters is the ability to hold a…

  16. Psychiatric Evaluation in Dermatology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sreyoshi; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, PSVN; Sreejayan, K

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an exciting field which deals with the close relationship that exists between dermatological and psychiatric disorders. A combined bio-psycho-social approach is essential for effective evaluation and treatment of these conditions. This review aims to give the practicing clinician an overview of psychiatric evaluation in patients with dermatological conditions. PMID:23372211

  17. Personal Digital Assistants in Psychiatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, John S.; Ton, Hendry

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the various administrative and clinical applications for PDA use in psychiatric care and review the process for implementation in an academic medical center. Method: The authors reviewed the psychiatric literature and tested various hardware and software products. Results: The literature describes various uses of…

  18. Psychiatric disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fazzito, Mirella Martins; Jordy, Sérgio Semeraro; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease showing variable clinical presentation. Optic neuritis is the most common symptom, followed by motor and sensitive manifestations. It is known that this disease may be related to several psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In this study we will discribe 5 cases of MS patients harboring psychiatric disorder related or unchained by the disease itself. PMID:19722046

  19. Nursing 302: An Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaustein, Jenna Rose

    A description is provided of "Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing," a 7-week course offered to juniors and seniors in a bachelor of science nursing program. The first sections present information on curricular placement, time assignments, and the targeted student population, and define psychiatric/mental health nursing. Next, the course…

  20. Teaching Psychiatric Administration to Senior Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, John A.; Sacks, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Describes a course in psychiatric administration which is part of a "standard" psychiatric residency training program. The course combined both didactic and experiential learning for senior residents performing administrative duties for the first time. Includes details of each week's seminar. Discusses course evaluation by both teachers and…

  1. Psychiatric Hospitalization after Deliberate Self-Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory L.; Safranko, Ivan; Lewin, Terry J.; Whyte, Ian M.; Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The decision for psychiatric hospitalization after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is not well understood. This study, a longitudinal cohort study of 3,148 consecutive DSP patients found 920 (29.2%) subjects were referred for psychiatric hospitalization, 576 (18.3%) on involuntary basis. A logistic regression analysis showed increased risk for:…

  2. Sleep in Children With Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal; Ivanenko, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in pediatric psychiatric disorders and constitute key elements in diagnostic symptomatology of various primary psychiatric disorders including bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety disorder. Although sleep is not included in key defining criteria of some impairing illnesses such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia, these disorders present with a very high prevalence of sleep disturbances. The interaction between sleep and psychopathology is very complex with significant interrelationship in development, severity, and prognosis of psychiatric disorders and comorbid sleep disturbances. The research ranging from small intervention case series to large epidemiologic studies have demonstrated the role of specific sleep complaints in specific psychiatric diagnoses. However, the research using objective instruments such as polysomnography and actigraphy remains limited in youth with psychiatric disorders. The intervention studies using pharmaceutical treatment specifically focusing on sleep disturbances in psychiatric disorders are also sparse in the pediatric literature. Early identification of sleep disturbances and behavioral management using cognitive behavior therapy-based tools appear to be the most effective approach for treatment. The use of psychotropic medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of primary psychiatric disorder often alleviate the psychological barriers for sleep but may lead to emergence of other sleep issues such as restless leg syndrome. The safety and efficacy data of hypnotics for primary sleep disorders are limited in pediatrics and should be avoided or used with extreme caution in children with comorbid sleep and psychiatric problems. PMID:26072345

  3. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  4. Psychiatric advance directives: potential challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Alok; Murthy, Pratima; Chatterjee, Sudipto

    2012-01-01

    The advance directive is a statement of an individual's preference for future treatment. The concept initially evolved in the context of end-of-life treatment decision making. Subsequently, in some countries, advance directives have been promoted in the care and treatment of people with serious mental disorders. They have recently been endorsed by the United Nations Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disability. In India, the legal framework related to the care of persons with mental illness is currently being reappraised, and significant changes are being contemplated. Thus, this is an appropriate time to review the existing evidence on psychiatric advance directives and examine the potential challenges involved in making them legally binding. A wide spectrum of mental health 'advance statements' have been developed and implemented in some high-resource countries. Of special interest to mental health contexts is the complex Ulysses contract to accommodate situations where the advance directive can be overridden during phases of acute illness or relapse. There have been mixed experiences with advance directives in the last couple of decades and there is scant evidence to suggest that they are effective in improving actual care. There has been almost no discourse in India on the issue of mental health advance directives. Yet this feature is being considered for implementation in the revised legal framework for the care of persons with mental illness. There are significant barriers to the feasibility and acceptability of legally mandated advance directives. There are logistical barriers to operationalising them in a manner that guarantees quality assurance of the process, and minimises the possibility of misuse. Thus, while the advance directive is a highly desirable clinical tool for collaborative decision making between the person with mental illness and the treatment provider, at this time, more needs to be done before legal enforcement is considered in

  5. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  6. Pattern of ocular trauma admitted in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Quayum, M A; Akhanda, A H

    2009-01-01

    Ocular trauma is an important cause of ocular morbidity. This prospective study was conducted to identify primarily the population at risk, sources of eye injuries and the common barriers for their early management. Cases were selected randomly during the period Aug/2006 to March/2008 among the patients admitted in the department of ophthalmology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, with the history of ocular injury. A total of 100 eyes in 97 patients were included in the study. Age ranges were 1.5 years to 75 years. Male were 78.35% (n=76) & female were 21.65% (n=21). 56.00% (n=56) injuries were accidental occupational injuries. Common sources of eye injury included sharp objects used in occupational activities 43% (n=43), blunt objects 23% (n=23), Chemicals 7% (n=7), Projectile objects 8%, (n=8), Bird-beak 5% (n=5), agricultural trauma 3% (n=3) and miscellaneous 11% (n=11). Young adult males engaged in industrial, mechanical, agricultural or domestic works are at particular risk for ophthalmic trauma. Poverty, ignorance, indigenous treatment, remote communications and lack of supervised and collaborative management seems to be the possible barriers for the early management of ocular injuries. Preventive measures are recommended to adopt not only in the workplaces but also in domestic, recreational, sports and transport settings. PMID:19182740

  7. Sequelae of Aggression in Acutely Suicidal Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, David C. R.; Washburn, Jason J.; Feingold, Alan; Kramer, Anne C.; Ivey, Asha Z.; King, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of aggression on problem course and suicide risk were examined in 270 acutely suicidal adolescents (ages 12-17 years; 184 girls). Participants were assessed during psychiatric hospitalization (T1), 6-months post-hospitalization (T2), and 15 or more months post-hospitalization (T3). Study variables included self- and…

  8. Psychiatric diagnosis: the indispensability of ambivalence

    PubMed Central

    Callard, Felicity

    2014-01-01

    The author analyses how debate over the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has tended to privilege certain conceptions of psychiatric diagnosis over others, as well as to polarise positions regarding psychiatric diagnosis. The article aims to muddy the black and white tenor of many discussions regarding psychiatric diagnosis by moving away from the preoccupation with diagnosis as classification and refocusing attention on diagnosis as a temporally and spatially complex, as well as highly mediated process. The article draws on historical, sociological and first-person perspectives regarding psychiatric diagnosis in order to emphasise the conceptual—and potentially ethical—benefits of ambivalence vis-à-vis the achievements and problems of psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:24515564

  9. Paternal psychiatric disorders and children's psychosocial development.

    PubMed

    Ramchandani, Paul; Psychogiou, Lamprini

    2009-08-22

    Psychiatric disorders of parents are associated with an increased risk of psychological and developmental difficulties in their children. Most research has focused on mothers, neglecting psychiatric disorders affecting fathers. We review findings on paternal psychiatric disorders and their effect on children's psychosocial development. Most psychiatric disorders that affect fathers are associated with an increased risk of behavioural and emotional difficulties in their children, similar in magnitude to that due to maternal psychiatric disorders. Some findings indicate that boys are at greater risk than girls, and that paternal disorders, compared with maternal disorders, might be associated with an increased risk of behavioural rather than emotional problems. Improved paternal mental health is likely to improve children's wellbeing and life course. PMID:19411102

  10. Does early intervention reduce the number of elderly people with dementia admitted to institutions for long term care?

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, D W; Pollitt, P A; Brook, C P; Reiss, B B; Roth, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test whether early diagnosis and practical help reduce the number of elderly people with dementia admitted to institutions. DESIGN--Controlled trial of effect of help from a multidisciplinary team on admission rates of people with dementia. SETTING--Seven general practices in Cambridge. SUBJECTS--2889 subjects aged 75 and over, of whom 159 were identified as having dementia with a two stage community survey. Eighty six subjects were referred for extra help if they or their supporters wished. The other 73 subjects had access to the usual services and served as controls. INTERVENTION--Subjects and families in the action group were offered a wide range of help, including financial benefits, physical aids, home helps, respite admissions, practical advice, and psychiatric assessments. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Permanent admission to long term care within two years after diagnosis. RESULTS--Early intervention did not affect admission rates in subjects who lived with supporters. By contrast, nine of the 14 (64%) subjects with moderate or severe dementia living alone were admitted in the action group in the study's second year compared with only one of 13 (8%) controls (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS--Some people with moderate or severe dementia who lived alone and were at serious risk may have been identified earlier by the resource team. Without the team these people would not have become known to the responsible authorities until families, neighbours, and wardens became unable to cope. The study was conducted during the team's formative period, however, and greater experience might have allowed some subjects to remain at home for longer. PMID:1902752

  11. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haijiang; Yan, Yong; Li, Chunsheng; Guo, Shubin

    2016-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA). PMID:27335786

  12. Data mining in psychiatric research.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Diego; Cornejo, Eduardo; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Guarracino, Mario R; Pardalos, Panos M

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical sciences and computational methods have found new applications in fields like medicine over the last few decades. Modern data acquisition and data analysis protocols have been of great assistance to medical researchers and clinical scientists. Especially in psychiatry, technology and science have made new computational methods available to assist the development of predictive modeling and to identify diseases more accurately. Data mining (or knowledge discovery) aims to extract information from large datasets and solve challenging tasks, like patient assessment, early mental disease diagnosis, and drug efficacy assessment. Accurate and fast data analysis methods are very important, especially when dealing with severe psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia. In this paper, we focus on computational methods related to data analysis and more specifically to data mining. Then, we discuss some related research in the field of psychiatry. PMID:22231840

  13. Computer Consultation for Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Harold P.; Jefferson, James W.; Greist, John H.; Olson, Warren; Klein, Marjorie H.; Salinger, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis has traditionally been unreliable. A new classification system (DSM-III) has been introduced, but its increased complexity places a greater burden on the clinician. We argue that computer diagnostic programs can be useful training and consultative tools, since computers can apply diagnostic logic consistently and demonstrate diagnostic principles in regard to a particular patient. A program that collects information from clinicians to make DSM-III diagnoses is described. It also performs several teaching functions, e.g. explaining branching logic during data collection, indicating criteria necessary to make any specific diagnosis, and indicating which were not met if the diagnosis was not made. Preliminary data are reported on agreement between computer and clinician diagnosis.

  14. [Psychiatric effects of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Imbert, D; Daubech, M J; Tignol, J; Bourgeois, M

    1976-11-01

    The authors report three cases of psychotic complications of cardiac surgery. A review is made from literature and an inventory of psychological and organic factors implicated in this pathology. These complications are still frequent (up to 50% for Braceland, and 70% for Rabiner and al.). For Blacher there is an almost universal "psychosis" in by-pass surgery and frequent "hidden psychosis" (they are ignored and denied both by the staff and the patient). They are caused by the emotional stress, intensive care unit syndrome, or personal vulnerability. The symbolism of the heart and the personality of the cardiac patient are also in cause. Neurologic accidents, hypoxy, embolisms, are now less frequent. The collaboration of a psychiatrist with the cardiologic staff is mandatory. With this collaboration not only psychiatric complications but also somatic morbidity and mortality would be reduced. PMID:1020860

  15. Ethical issues in psychiatric genetics.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2004-11-01

    As knowledge grows regarding the genetic bases of psychiatric disorders, a variety of ethical issues will need to be confronted. Current evidence suggests that the etiology of most psychiatric disorders rests on a combination of multiple genes and environmental factors. As tests for the genes involved become more easily available, pressures will arise to use them for prenatal testing, screening of children and adults, selection of potential adoptees, and pre-marital screening. Common problems that will need to be addressed include popular misunderstanding of the consequences of possessing an affected allele, impact of knowledge of one's genetic make-up on one's sense of self, and the discriminatory use of genetic information to deny persons access to insurance and employment. Although most states have some legislation aimed at preventing discrimination, the laws' coverage is spotty and federal rules are lacking. Physicians may find that newly available genetic information creates new duties for them, including warning third parties who may share the patient's genetic endowment. And genetics research itself has raised questions about when to disclose information to subjects and their family members about the genes that are being studied, and how to define the subjects of the research when information is collected about family members other than the proband. Knowledge of these dilemmas is a first step to resolving them, something that the medical profession will need to attend to in the near-term. Neglect will lead others to set the rules that will control medical practice, including the practice of psychiatry, in the new world of genetic medicine. PMID:15583515

  16. Effectiveness of psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Ove; Arvidsson, Hans; Tjus, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    There is a growing demand for evaluating the process and outcome of mental health care. Most healthcare providers routinely collect and register data related to the process of treatment, and it is important to acquire more knowledge about how to make use of these databases. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of psychiatric inpatient care in relation to different clinical factors, using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) as a measure of outcome. Another objective was to explore the ability of routinely collected and registered data to provide valuable information about patients and their care. The studied psychiatric inpatient sample consisted of 816 care episodes with GAF ratings made both at admission and at discharge for 648 patients. Variables used in the study included GAF score at admission and at discharge, age, gender, diagnosis, length of stay and ward affiliation. The overall mean GAF change was 20.74, and the overall effect size Cohen's d 1.67, which corresponds to a large effect. The mean GAF change for women was 21.6, with an effect size of 1.80, and for men 19.4 with an effect size of 1.52. The effect size spectra including all groups of diagnoses ranged from 1.03 (substance-related disorders) to 2.33 (other mood disorders). Length of stay and ward affiliation also showed significant results concerning GAF change. Some limitations in this study could depend on the absence of randomization procedures and a control group. Another limitation concerns the insufficient control of the inpatient care interventions performed. The results support the capacity of the GAF to function as a measure of outcome in relation to different clinical factors, such as length of stay and diagnosis. Support was also found for the importance and usefulness of routinely collected and registered data. PMID:22775246

  17. Psoriasis and Associated Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, José Luís Pio Da Costa; Reis, José Pedro Gaspar Dos; Figueiredo, Américo Manuel Da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease with a high impact on self-esteem and patients’ health-related quality of life. In the last decades some studies have pointed out mental disorders associated with psoriasis and the etiopathogenic mechanisms behind that co-existence. This work compiles psychopathology associated with psoriasis and further analyzes the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis and mental disorders. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and using the “5S” levels of organization of evidence from healthcare research, as previously described. Results: Psoriasis is linked with many mental disorders, both in the psychotic and neurotic sprectrum. Chronic stress diminishes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulates sympathetic-adrenal-medullary responses, stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Then, it maintains and exacerbates psoriasis and some of its mental disorders. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines connect psoriasis, psychiatric conditions, and other comorbidities of psoriasis (such as atherosclerosis) within a vicious cycle. Furthermore, the etiopathogenesis of the link between each psychiatric comorbidity and psoriasis has its own subtleties, including the cooccurrence of other comorbidities, the parts of the body affected by psoriasis, treatments, and biological and psychosocial factors. Conclusion: The study of psychopathology can amplify our understanding about the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis and associated mental disorders. Patients would benefit from a psychodermatologic approach. The adequate treatment should take into account the mental disorders associated with psoriasis as well as the circumstances under which they occur. PMID:27386050

  18. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Attending Pediatric Out Patient Departments of Tertiary Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jesmin, Akhter; Rahman, Khan Muhammad Zillur; Muntasir, Maruf Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psychiatric disorders are increasingly recognized among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. Psychiatric disorders are more common in children with chronic and acute pediatric disorders. Our study was designed to determine the psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents attending pediatric outpatient departments of tertiary care hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from July 2012 to February 2013 in pediatric outpatient departments of three prime tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A purposive sampling technique was used. A total of 240 male and female children aged 5 to 16 years old were included in the study. We used a semi-structured questionnaire to obtain sociodemographic and other relevant clinical information about the children and their families from their parents or caregivers and a validated parent version of the Bangla Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) for measuring psychopathology. Results The mean age of the children was 9.0± 2.6 years. The majority (71%) of children were in the 5–10 year age group. The male/female ratio was 1.2:1. Among the respondents, 18% were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, and developmental disorders were found in 9.0%, 15.0% and 0.4% respectively. Hyperkinetic disorder was the single most frequent (5.0%) psychiatric disorder. Conclusions A significant number of children were found to have psychiatric disorders. Our study indicates the importance of identification and subsequent management of psychiatric conditions among the pediatric population. PMID:27403237

  19. Scientists Admitting to Plagiarism: A Meta-analysis of Surveys.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Vanja; Fanelli, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of anonymous surveys asking scientists whether they ever committed various forms of plagiarism. From May to December 2011 we searched 35 bibliographic databases, five grey literature databases and hand searched nine journals for potentially relevant studies. We included surveys that asked scientists if, in a given recall period, they had committed or knew of a colleague who committed plagiarism, and from each survey extracted the proportion of those who reported at least one case. Studies that focused on academic (i.e. student) plagiarism were excluded. Literature searches returned 12,460 titles from which 17 relevant survey studies were identified. Meta-analysis of studies reporting committed (N = 7) and witnessed (N = 11) plagiarism yielded a pooled estimate of, respectively, 1.7% (95% CI 1.2-2.4) and 30% (95% CI 17-46). Basic methodological factors, including sample size, year of survey, delivery method and whether survey questions were explicit rather than indirect made a significant difference on survey results. Even after controlling for these methodological factors, between-study differences in admission rates were significantly above those expected by sampling error alone and remained largely unexplained. Despite several limitations of the data and of this meta-analysis, we draw three robust conclusions: (1) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is higher than for data fabrication and falsification; (2) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is correlated to that of fabrication and falsification; (3) The rate at which scientists admit having committed either form of misconduct (i.e. fabrication, falsification and plagiarism) in surveys has declined over time. PMID:25352123

  20. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  1. Response to the NCEPOD report: development of a care bundle for patients admitted with decompensated cirrhosis—the first 24 h

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Stuart; Dyson, Jessica; Austin, Andrew; Hudson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the prevalence of chronic liver disease in the UK, and as a result, hospital admissions and deaths due to liver disease have also increased. The 2013 National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) of patients with alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD) found that less than half the number of patients who died from ARLD received ‘good care’, and avoidable deaths were identified. In order to improve the care of patients admitted with ARLD, the NCEPOD report recommended that a ‘toolkit’ for the acute management of patients admitted with decompensated ARLD be developed and made widely available. As a result, we have developed a ‘care bundle’ for patients admitted with decompensated cirrhosis (of all aetiologies) to ensure that effective evidence-based treatments are delivered within the first 24 h. This care bundle provides a checklist to ensure that all appropriate investigations are undertaken when a patient with decompensated cirrhosis presents and provides clinicians with clear guidance on the initial management of alcohol withdrawal, infection, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding and encephalopathy. The first 24 h are particularly important, as early intervention can reduce mortality and shorten hospital stay, and specialist gastroenterology/liver advice is not always available during this period. This review will discuss the care bundle and the evidence base behind the treatment recommendations made. PMID:26834955

  2. The NAPPH (National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals) today--under new management. Interview by John Herrmann.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, R L

    1992-01-01

    When Robert L. Trachtenberg took over the executive directorship of the National Association of Private Psychiatric Hospitals some five months ago, he walked into a situation wherein several psychiatric specialty hospitals in Texas were under fire. "There were a lot of questions," Trachtenberg says, "and challenges to the credibility of psychiatric hospitals." He was referring to the Texas state investigation into abuses by personnel within psychiatric hospitals. Last year, the Texas Senate Interim Committee on Health and Human Services conducted an eight-month investigation into the conduct of the state's psychiatric hospitals after a newspaper article recounted the unconventional way in which a 14-year old boy was picked up and admitted to a psychiatric facility. After a number of public hearings, three private agencies overseeing Texas psychiatric hospitals adopted rules to prevent further problems in the areas of patient rights, fraudulent billing, patient recruitment and the admission and discharge process. The Senate Interim Committee, however, felt these rules needed to be codified into law and has drafted over 30 bills to be presented to the Texas legislature as omnibus legislation next January. Trachtenberg went to work to iron out methods to encourage better overseeing and state governance, as well as tackling the related issues of standards of care and managed care/utilization review. His background as Deputy Administrator of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration within HHS provided him with a broad spectrum of knowledge about the field of psychiatry and its problems, and his vast experience in federal government--over 32 years of running domestic programs--enable him to have a keen sense of what can get done, and how. Health Systems REVIEW recently discussed the role of the NAPPH under its new leader, Bob Trachtenberg. What follows is an edited version of that conversation. PMID:10122848

  3. Psychiatric comorbidities in dystonia: emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Zurowski, Mateusz; McDonald, William M; Fox, Susan; Marsh, Laura

    2013-06-15

    Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent in patients with dystonia and have a profound effect on quality of life. Patients with dystonia frequently meet criteria for anxiety disorders, especially social phobia, and major depressive disorder. Deficits in emotional processing have also been demonstrated in some dystonia populations. Onset of psychiatric disturbances in patients with dystonia often precedes onset of motor symptoms, suggesting that the pathophysiology of dystonia itself contributes to the genesis of psychiatric disturbances. This article examines the hypothesis that mood and anxiety disorders are intrinsic to the neurobiology of dystonia, citing the available literature, which is derived mostly from research on focal isolated dystonias. Limitations of studies are identified, and the role of emotional reactivity, especially in the context of pain secondary to dystonia, is recognized. Available evidence underscores the need to develop dystonia assessment tools that incorporate psychiatric measures. Such tools would allow for a better understanding of the full spectrum of dystonia presentations and facilitate research on the treatment of dystonia as well as the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in the context of dystonia. This article, solicited for a special Movement Disorders issue on novel research findings and emerging concepts in dystonia, addresses the following issues: (1) To what extent are psychiatric disturbances related to the pathophysiology of dystonia? (2) What is the impact of psychiatric disturbances on outcome measures of current assessment tools for dystonia? (3) How do psychiatric comorbidities influence the treatment of dystonia? Answers to these questions will lead to an increased appreciation of psychiatric disorders in dystonia, a better understanding of brain physiology, more nuanced research questions pertaining to this population, better clinical scales that can be used to further patient management and research, and improved

  4. Psychiatric inpatient services in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    HUME, P B; RUDIN, E

    1960-10-01

    Traditional asylum care of psychiatric patients leads to the isolation, confinement, and restraint of the patients, and to isolation of psychiatric practice from the rest of medicine. Modern psychiatric advances have demonstrated the disadvantages to both patients and their families of such isolation, confinement and restraint. It is in the best interests of patients and professional workers that inpatient psychiatric services be continuous with, and contiguous to, other medical services and to rehabilitation services of all kinds. Examination of currently available information reveals a shortage of psychiatric beds in California, particularly for diagnosis and brief treatment. Thus, not only is there a need to develop psychiatric inpatient facilities, but also an opportunity to develop them along several different lines. Since both the Hill-Burton Act (federal) and the Short-Doyle Act (state) give financial assistance to only those psychiatric services established in general hospitals or affiliated with general hospitals, this requirement calls for examination in the light of experience with services so operated. At first, the Short-Doyle Act was perceived as a panacea for the psychiatric ills of the state. Now it is beginning to be recognized as one method of providing additional mental health resources, rather than the exclusive method. As more short-term cases are treated in local, tax-supported, psychiatric units in general hospitals, an impact can be expected on the state hospital program. In its administration of the Short-Doyle Act, the Department of Mental Hygiene attempts to respond to community needs as locally determined. It tries to insure local option and encourage local responsibility while furthering high standards of staffing and of service. PMID:13716797

  5. Influencing behavior to improve attendance at occupational therapy in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Zschokke, J; Freeberg, M R; Errickson, E

    1975-01-01

    In order to increase attendance at occupational therapy of acute psychiatric patients, two reinforcement procedures were tried: Procedure 1 used prompting and social reinforcement, where Procedure 2, in addition, used a positive reinforcer. The two procedures increased both the attendance and the percentage of time used significantly when compared to baseline. The results are discussed in terms of applications and consistency with other findings. PMID:1181939

  6. Mortality and Revascularization following Admission for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Implication for Rural Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Thad E.; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Kaboli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Annually, over 3,000 rural veterans are admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet no studies of AMI have utilized the VA rural definition. Methods: This retrospective cohort study identified 15,870 patients admitted for AMI to all VA hospitals. Rural residence was identified…

  7. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. PMID:27229272

  8. Psychiatric disorder in the general hospital.

    PubMed

    Mayou, R; Hawton, K

    1986-08-01

    There have been many reports of psychiatric disorder in medical populations, but few have used standard methods on representative patient groups. Even so, there is consistent evidence for considerable psychiatric morbidity in in-patient, out-patient and casualty department populations, much of which is unrecognised by hospital doctors. We require a better classification of psychiatric disorder in the general hospital, improved research measures, and more evidence about the nature and course of the many different types of problem so that we can provide precise advice for their management of routine clinical practice. PMID:3535978

  9. Psychiatric nurses' self-rated competence.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, Beatrice; Algotsson, Martina; Bergström, Annelie; Lützén, Kim

    2012-07-01

    This study explored the self-rated competence of 52 Swedish psychiatric nurses in three clinical environments: forensic psychiatry, general psychiatric inpatient care, and clinical non-residential psychiatric care. A questionnaire wtih 56 statements from nine areas of expertise was completed. Forensic nurses were more skilled in safety and quality and in dealing with violence and conflicts. Non-specialist nurses appreciated their skills more so than specialist nurses in health promotion and illness prevention and conduct, information, and education. Women were inclined to invite patients' relatives for education and information. Men attended to a patients' spiritual needs; they also coped with violence and managed conflicts. PMID:22757599

  10. Psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology in patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, O; Ozmen, E; Küey, L; Kültür, S; Yeşil, M; Postaci, N; Bayata, S

    1997-06-01

    Implantation of a permanent pacemaker requires a psychological effort on the patient's part for adaptation in the acute term, and chronically, it restricts activities of the patient and may cause some psychiatric disturbances. To investigate psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology of the patients with permanent pacemakers, 84 pacemaker patients were diagnosed using the DSM-III-R criteria and depressive symptoms were determined by modified Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (mHDRS). Sixteen (19.1%) patients had been given a psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorder (5.9%) and major depressive episode (4.7%). Nine patients (10.7%) were diagnosed as having clinical depression (mHDRS > or = 17). The mean score of mHDRS was 7.57 +/- 7.46, and the severity of depression was significantly higher in females. The most frequent symptoms are difficulties in work and activities (53.6%), psychic anxiety (48.8%), loss of energy (42.9%), and hypochondriasis and insomnia (39.3%). Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, loss of energy, loss of interest, insomnia, and hypochondriasis were significantly more frequent in females. Uneducated patients had a more significant loss of energy than educated patients. Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, and somatic concerns and symptoms were more frequent in patients with permanent pacemakers than in the general population. These symptoms, resembling mixed anxiety-depression disorder, were related to fears of having a permanent pacemaker, since our series were composed of uneducated patients who did not have enough knowledge about the device. PMID:9227759

  11. Affective responses across psychiatric disorders-A dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Hägele, Claudia; Friedel, Eva; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Sterzer, Philipp; Beck, Anne; Bermpohl, Felix; Stoy, Meline; Held-Poschardt, Dada; Wittmann, André; Ströhle, Andreas; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Studying psychiatric disorders across nosological boundaries aims at a better understanding of mental disorders by identifying comprehensive signatures of core symptoms. Here, we studied neurobiological correlates of emotion processing in several major psychiatric disorders. We assessed differences between diagnostic groups, and investigated whether there is a psychopathological correlate of emotion processing that transcends disorder categories. 135 patient with psychiatric disorders (alcohol dependence, n=29; schizophrenia, n=37; major depressive disorder (MDD), n=25; acute manic episode of bipolar disorder, n=12; panic disorder, n=12, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), n=20) and healthy controls (n=40) underwent an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with affectively positive, aversive and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Between-group differences were assessed with full-factorial ANOVAs, with age, gender and smoking habits as covariates. Self-ratings of depressed mood and anxiety were correlated with activation clusters showing significant stimulus-evoked fMRI activation. Furthermore, we examined functional connectivity with the amygdala as seed region during the processing of aversive pictures. During the presentation of pleasant stimuli, we observed across all subjects significant activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right precuneus, while a significant activation of the left amygdala and the bilateral middle temporal gyrus was found during the presentation of aversive stimuli. We did neither find any significant interaction with diagnostic group, nor any correlation with depression and anxiety scores at the activated clusters or with amygdala connectivity. Positive and aversive IAPS-stimuli were consistently processed in limbic and prefrontal brain areas, irrespective of diagnostic category. A dimensional correlate of these

  12. Influenza epidemiology in adults admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2014: the Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Dwyer, Dominic E; Hewagama, Saliya; Korman, Tony; Irving, Louis; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hunter, Cameron; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter; Simpson, Graham; Upman, John; Bowler, Simon; Macartney, Kristine; Blyth, Christopher; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2014 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 3 April to 31 October 2014 (the 2014 influenza season), 1,692 adult patients (>16 years) were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 15 of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals (excluding 2 paediatric hospitals). Of these, 47% were over 65 years of age, 10% were Indigenous Australians, 3.3% were pregnant and 85% had chronic co-morbidities. The majority of cases were due to influenza A. Influenza B was detected in 7% of patients. There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2014. These are estimated to represent a national annual burden of around 15,000 admissions and almost 100,000 bed-days nationally. PMID:26620349

  13. "Auctoritas" psychiatric expert system shell.

    PubMed

    Kovács, M; Juranovics, J

    1995-01-01

    We present a short description of a complex psychiatric computer expert system, including functions that help the physicians and the hospital staff in the administrative, diagnostic, therapeutic, statistical, and scientific work. There are separate data-storing, health insurance-supporting, or simple advisory programs, but we can not avail a system--in our country--that provides us with all these functions together. Hence the aim of our program is to produce a universal computer system that makes the patients' long distance follow-up possible. Our diagnostic expert system shell, which is appropriate for using the symptoms and criteria scheme of the internationally accepted diagnostic systems such as DSM and ICD, helps to archive homogeneous, up-to-date psychiatric nosology; this is essential for the correct diagnostic, statistical, and scientific work. Let us introduce our expert system. It consists of four parts: administration, diagnostic decision support system, activities concerning treatment, and statistics. The part called "Administration" contains all data about actual and emitted in-patients and out-patients, including their particulars and data necessary for health insurance (duration of treatment, diagnosis); here we find and edit medical documents. The most important part of the "Auctoritas" system is the "Diagnostic decision support system." In practice, expert systems use decision trees with yes-no logic, fuzzy logic, and pattern matching on the basis of the method of deduction; and backward chaining or forward chaining on the basis of the direction of deduction. Our system uses the methods of fuzzy logic and backward chaining. In other medical disciplines, good results are achieved by applying the pattern matching method; to make validity and verification researches, however, these systems are inappropriate. The diagnoses relying on the up-to-date psychiatric diagnostic systems--DSM-IV and ICD-X--are based on classical logic and can be correctly

  14. Predicting Healthcare Utilization by Patients Admitted for COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Anupama Murthy; Balasubramanian, Nithilavalli; Chandrasekaran, Siddhuraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization, especially length of hospital stay and ICU admission, for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) determine overall outcomes in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost burden. Predicting prolonged hospital stay (PHS) and prolonged intensive care (PIC) for AECOPD is useful for rational allocation of resources in healthcare centres. Aim To characterize the pattern of healthcare utilization by COPD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation, and to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of ‘prolonged hospital stay’ (PHS) and ‘prolonged intensive care’(PIC) Materials and Methods This study attempted through retrospective data analysis, to identify risk factors and evolve prediction models for increased healthcare utilization namely PHS and PIC for AECOPD. The data were extracted from 255 eligible admissions for AECOPD by 166 patients from Aug 2012 to July 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors and models were tested with area under receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Independent predictors of prolonged hospital stay (≥ 6 days) were chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high HbA1c level and positive isolates in sputum culture. Independent predictors of prolonged intensive care (for ≥ 48 hours) were past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high leukocyte count and positive culture isolates in sputum. Prediction models evolved from variables available at admission showed AUC 0.805 (95% CI 0.729 – 0.881) and 0.825 (95% CI 0.75 – 0.90) for PHS and ICU admissions respectively. Conclusion Our prediction models derived from simple and easily available variables show good discriminative properties in predicting PHS and PIC for AECOPD. When prospectively validated, these models are useful for rational allocation of services especially in resource

  15. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  16. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  17. [Breach of secrecy by handing out psychiatric certificates].

    PubMed

    Dieckhöfer, K; Riemer, M

    2011-06-01

    The article reports about a medical malpractice case against the director of a psychiatric University Hospital, who was convicted for breach of secrecy by the Oberlandesgericht in Munich. The court found him guilty of issuing and giving to the plaintiff's wife an unauthorised psychiatric certificate, stating that the plaintiff, a carpet dealer for oriental rugs, who was caught in a war of roses with his wife at this time and was never a patient of the psychiatrist, let alone properly examined by him or his staff, suffered from an acute and severe psychosis with immediate need for compulsory admission. This all happened behind his back and enabled the wife to spread rumors of the alleged mental illness of her husband. Banks and trading partners therefore shunned him, which nearly caused his bankruptcy. This is why this unusual case led to the decision that the psychiatrist had to reimburse Euro 15000 for pain and suffering and additionally cover all material damages resulting from the tort. PMID:21698947

  18. Palliative care needs of HIV exposed and infected children admitted to the inpatient paediatric unit in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakawesi, Jane; Kasirye, Ivy; Kavuma, David; Muziru, Benjamin; Businge, Alice; Naluwooza, Jackie; Kabunga, Grace; Karamagi, Yvonne; Akankwasa, Edith; Odiit, Mary; Mukasa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric palliative care is an emerging subspecialty that focuses on achieving the best possible quality of life for children with life-limiting conditions and also for their families. It is a response to the suffering and unique needs of such children. Globally there is limited documented data available on the palliative care needs of children with HIV. A retrospective review of data of all the HIV exposed and positive children who were admitted to the ward from January to December 2012 was done to document their palliative care needs. A total of 243 children were admitted to the ward during the stated period. Of these, 139 (57.2%) were female and 104 (42.8%) were male. Among them 131 (54%) were aged five years and below whereas 112 (46%) were above five years. Some of the identified palliative care needs documented included physical needs: pneumonia 46 (19%), severe acute malnutrition 38 (16%), mild and moderate acute malnutrition 23 (9.6%), and respiratory tract infections 22 (9.3%). Social needs: poor social support 21 (41%), financial instability 16 (31%), and child neglect 4 (8%). Psychological needs: antiretroviral treatment (ART) counselling 127 (36%), HIV counselling and testing for the child and family 63 (18%), adherence support 53 (15%), and others 11 (3%). Spiritual needs: discontinuing ART because of belief in spiritual healing 18 (81%), loss of hope because of severe ill health 1 (5%), and others 3 (14%). These results emphasise the need for palliative care in children with HIV even in the era of ART. The needs identified are in keeping with studies done elsewhere and are similar to the palliative care needs of children with other life-limiting illnesses such as cancer. Conclusion HIV positive and exposed children plus their families have vast palliative care needs and a holistic approach is the key in their management. PMID:25624870

  19. [Psychiatric drugs as risk factor in fatal heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Fijnheer, R; van de Ven, P J; Erkelens, D W

    1995-07-01

    Two men aged 33 and 31 years suffered a fatal heat stroke on a warm summer day. One of them used pimozide and clomipramine, the other zuclopenthixol, dexetimide, droperidol, promethazine and propranolol as psychiatric medication. Both of them had a body temperature > 42.3 degrees C, without perspiring. At first only a comatose situation with practically normal laboratory values existed; this was rapidly followed by massive liver damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, anaemia, thrombopenia and acute renal failure. In spite of adequate and rapid treatment these complications were fatal. Both patients used medication with an antidopaminergic and anticholinergic (side) effect. The set point of the temperature regulation centre can be elevated by the antidopaminergic activity of antipsychotics. Use of anticholinergic medication can disturb the thermoregulation via inhibition of the parasympathicomimetically mediated sweat secretion. It is recommended to point out the danger of unusually high outdoor temperatures to patients using this medication. PMID:7617062

  20. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  1. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  2. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  3. Training in Psychiatric Genomics during Residency: A New Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Joel G.; Goebert, Deborah; Matsu, Courtenay; Mrazek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors ascertained the amount of training in psychiatric genomics that is provided in North American psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A sample of 217 chief residents in psychiatric residency programs in the United States and Canada were identified by e-mail and surveyed to assess their training in psychiatric genetics and…

  4. Cultural Competence in Child Psychiatric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. faces a changing demographic landscape that is increasingly multiracial. The application of a cultural competence model for assessing and treating the psychiatric disorders of minority youths in light of this demographic change is discussed.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Security at a "model" psychiatric center.

    PubMed

    Camacho, H S; Cottrell, P A

    1997-01-01

    The security problems faced by a recently opened psychiatric center located on the campus of a hospital--including staffing, fire safety, access control, patient restraints, and budget cuts--and how they are being dealt with. PMID:10173429

  7. The effectiveness of anticonvulsants in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Grunze, Heinz C R

    2008-01-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs are widely used in psychiatric indications. These include mainly alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal syndromes, panic and anxiety disorders, dementia, schizophrenia, affective disorders, bipolar affective disorders in particular, and, to some extent, personality disorders. A further area in which neurology and psychiatry overlap is pain conditions, in which some anticonvulsants, and also typical psychiatric medications such as antidepressants, are helpful. From the beginning of their psychiatric use, anticonvulsants have also been used to ameliorate specific symptoms of psychiatric disorders independently of their causality and underlying illness, eg, aggression, and, more recently, cognitive impairment, as seen in affective disorders and schizophrenia. With new anticonvulsants currently under development, it is likely that their use in psychiatry will further increase, and that psychiatrists need to learn about their differential efficacy and safety profiles to the same extent as do neurologists. PMID:18472486

  8. [Psychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report].

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Mary, S; Brazo, P; Dollfus, S

    2003-01-01

    Psychiatric manifestations are frequently associated with pernicious anemia including depression, mania, psychosis, dementia. We report a case of a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency, who has presented severe depression with delusion and Capgras' syndrome, delusion with lability of mood and hypomania successively, during a period of two Months. Case report - Mme V., a 64-Year-old woman, was admitted to the hospital because of confusion. She had no history of psychiatric problems. She had history of diabetes, hypertension and femoral prosthesis. The red blood count revealed a normocytosis with anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl). At admission she was uncooperative, disoriented in time and presented memory and attention impairment and sleep disorders. She seemed sad and older than her real age. Facial expression and spontaneous movements were reduced, her speech and movements were very slow. She had depressed mood, guilt complex, incurability and devaluation impressions. She had a Capgras' syndrome and delusion of persecution. Her neurologic examination, cerebral scanner and EEG were postponed because of uncooperation. Further investigations confirmed anemia (hemoglobin=11,4 g/dl) and revealed vitamin B12 deficiency (52 pmol/l) and normal folate level. Antibodies to parietal cells were positive in the serum and antibodies to intrinsic factor were negative. An iron deficiency was associated (serum iron=7 micromol/l; serum ferritin concentration=24 mg/l; serum transferrin concentration=3,16 g/l). This association explained normocytocis anemia. Thyroid function, hepatic and renal tests, glycemia, TP, TCA, VS, VDRL-TPHA were normal. Vitamin B12 replacement therapy was started with hydroxycobalamin 1 000 ng/day im for 10 days and iron replacement therapy. Her mental state improved dramatically within a few days. After one week of treatment the only remaining symptoms were lability of mood, delusion of persecution, Capgras' syndrome but disappeared totally 9 days after the

  9. Psychiatric morbidity of overseas patients in inner London: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Fredy J; Parshall, Alice M

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the referral, admission, treatment, and outcome of overseas patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in central London. Ethical, legal and economic implications, and the involvement of consulates in the admission process, are discussed. Method Assessment and review of overseas patients admitted between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 1999. Non-parametric statistical tests were used, and relevant outcomes described. Results 19% of admissions were overseas patients. Mean age was 38 years. 90% were unattached; 84% were white, 71% from European countries. 45% spoke fluent English. Differences in socio-economic status between home country and England were found. 74% were unwell on arrival; 65% travelled to England as tourists. 65% of admissions came via the police. 32% had been ill for more than one year before admission; 68% had psychiatric history. 77% were admitted and 48% discharged under section of the Mental Health Act. 74% had psychotic disorders, all of them with positive symptoms. 55% showed little to moderate improvement in mental state; 10% were on Enhanced Care Programme Approach. Relatives of 48% of patients were contacted. The Hospital repatriated 52% of patients; the Mental Health Team followed up 13% of those discharged. The average length of admission was 43.4 days (range 1–365). Total cost of admissions was GBP350, 600 ($577, 490); average individual cost was GBP11, 116 (range GBP200-81, 000). Conclusions Mentally ill overseas individuals are a vulnerable group that need recognition by health organisations to adapt current practice to better serve their needs. The involvement of consulates needs further evaluation. PMID:15845140

  10. Excited delirium: A psychiatric review.

    PubMed

    Lipsedge, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    The term 'excited delirium' (ED) is used to explain sudden and unexpected restraint-related deaths. Since the 1990s, ED has often been identified as the principal cause of death in restrained individuals, rather than the restraint procedure itself. Forensic pathologists and psychiatrists attach different meanings to the term delirium. For psychiatrists, delirium is a specific technical term, which implies a grave and potentially life-threatening underlying physical illness. If a patient dies during a bout of delirium, psychiatrists assume that there will be autopsy evidence to demonstrate the primary underlying organic cause. Conversely, pathologists appear to be using the term ED to refer to restraint-related deaths in either highly disturbed cocaine users or psychiatric patients in a state of extreme agitation. In these cases, there is no underlying physical disorder other than a terminal cardiac arrhythmia. As the term ED has different meanings for psychiatrists and for pathologists, it would be helpful for these two professional groups to develop a mutually agreed terminology. PMID:26055153

  11. Subjectivity and Severe Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, John

    2011-01-01

    To have a complete human science in the mental health field it is essential to give adequate attention to both the objective and the subjective data related to people with psychiatric disorders. The tendency in the past has been to ignore or discount one or the other of these data sources. Subjective data are particularly neglected, sometimes considered (only) part of the “art” of medicine since the usual methodologies of the physical sciences in themselves are not adequate to reflect the nature, elusiveness, and complexity of human subjective experience. The complete experience of hallucinated voices, for instance, often includes not only the voices themselves but also terrible anguish and terrifying inability to concentrate. But even such descriptors fall unnecessarily short of reflecting the data of the experience, thus leaving research, theory, and treatment with incomplete information. To represent adequately the subjective data it is essential to recognize that besides the usual discursive knowledge and methods of traditional physical science, a second kind of knowledge and method is required to reflect the depth of human experience. To accomplish this, we must employ approaches to narrative and the arts that are uniquely capable of capturing the nature of these experiences. Only by attending seriously in our research, training, theory, and practice to the unique nature of subjective data is it possible to have a true human science for our field. PMID:20961994

  12. Psychiatric resilience: longitudinal twin study†

    PubMed Central

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Myers, John M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The source of variability in people’s response to stressful life events is poorly understood. Aims We examine the genetic and environmental underpinning of resilience (i.e. the difference between the twins’ internalising symptoms and their predicted symptoms based on cumulative stressful life events). Method Stressful life event exposure and internalising symptoms were assessed at two time points in 7500 adult twins. Using the residual between actual and predicted internalising symptom total score, twin modelling was conducted for each wave separately and longitudinally. Results Resilience was found to have a moderate genetic heritability at each wave (∼31%). Qualitative gender effects were found. Incorporating error of measurement into the model increased the estimated heritability for the latent construct of resilience (∼50%). When measurement error and occasion-specific effects were removed, environmental influences contributed roughly equally to level of resilience. Conclusions Both genes and environment influence level of psychiatric resilience, and are largely stable over time. Environmental influences can have an enduring effect on resilience. PMID:24723629

  13. Add grace to psychiatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Shobha V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The uniqueness of mindset of an individual makes psychiatric practice interesting, sensitive, and at times subjective. The practice in setup of an organization makes the situation more complex in view of administrative regulations, existing work culture, and issues like confidentiality, etc., Dilemmas are often faced while balancing loyalty between an organization and the patients, values of the therapist and the patient, and different dimension of justice coming from different cultural backgrounds of the patients and the treating doctors. A lot of mental work needs to be put in by the practitioner to consistently adhere to medical ethics and professional approach for taking key decisions despite of contradictory external forces from within and without. Aims: I thought of sharing my experiences especially in setup of an organization with my colleagues so that the decision-taking process becomes somewhat easy and balancing for them. Settings and Design: I have to try to interpret my clinical experiences gathered while working with my patients from the Department of Atomic Energy as well as from my private practice. Conclusion: The need of psycho education to self and others from time to time never ceases simply to make the practice more objective, justified, and graceful. PMID:23825861

  14. Psychiatrically hospitalized college students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosecan, A S; Goldberg, R L; Wise, T N

    1992-07-01

    This pilot study presents data on an underreported group: college students who require psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study is too small to sustain broad generalizations, the authors found indications of significant correlations between students' hospitalization and the academic cycle, substance abuse, and distance from home. It is hoped that other institutions will undertake similar studies of this group of students to provide a broader body of data from which to draw inferences regarding prevention, intervention, and psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:1506564

  15. Anabolic steroid abuse: psychiatric and physical costs.

    PubMed

    Talih, Farid; Fattal, Omar; Malone, Donald

    2007-05-01

    The psychiatric effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (i.e., testosterone and its derivatives) have been less well studied than their physical effects but are reported to include depression, mania, psychosis, and aggression. Dependence can also occur, with withdrawal involving psychiatric and physical symptoms. Adverse effects of steroid abuse should be managed by discontinuing the drugs-by tapering if necessary-and by treating the symptoms. PMID:17506239

  16. Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes for Comorbid Patients in Psychiatric Day Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Magura, Stephen; Rosenblum, Andrew; Betzler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The study’s purpose was to determine treatment outcomes for patients who present with drug use vs. those presenting with no drug use at admission to a psychiatric day treatment program. Consecutively admitted patients completed confidential interviews which included psychological distress and quality of life measures and provided urine specimens for toxicology at admission and six month follow-up. Subjects positive by past 30 day self-report or urinalysis were categorized as drug users. Major psychiatric diagnoses were: major depression 25%; bipolar, 13%; other mood 13%; schizoaffective 13%; schizophrenia 13%. Drug use at admission was: cocaine 35%; marijuana 33%; opiates 18%, (meth)amphetamines, 6% For each of these drugs, the percentage of patients positive at admission who remitted from using the drug significantly exceeded the percentage negative at baseline who initiated using the drug. Overall, there were significant decreases in psychological distress and significant improvement on quality of life, but no change on positive affect. There were no significant differences between drug users and non-drug users on symptom reduction and improvement in quality of life. Psychiatric day treatment appears to benefit comorbid patients by reducing the net number of patients who actively use certain common drugs and by improving psychological status and quality of life to the same degree as for non-drug using patients. PMID:20333262

  17. Assessment and determinants of aggression in a forensic psychiatric institution in Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Chan, Oliver; Chow, Kavin Kit-wan

    2014-12-15

    Institutional aggression in forensic psychiatric setting is an under-researched subject, despite the magnitude of the problem. No studies have been conducted on the assessment of risk and the examination of predictors of aggression among the Chinese forensic psychiatric population. Our study aimed to examine the determinants of aggression in the only forensic psychiatric institution in Hong Kong, and to test the psychometric properties of a risk-assessment instrument, the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression (DASA). We recruited a representative sample of 530 consecutively admitted detainees. Qualified nurses completed two risk-assessment instruments, the DASA and the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), once daily during the participants׳ first 14 days of admission. Aggressive incidents were recorded using the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R), and participants׳ data were collected for multivariate analyses. We showed that female gender, diagnoses of personality disorder and substance-related disorder, and admission at other correctional institutions were associated with institutional aggression. Aggression was perpetrated by 17.7% of the participants, and the DASA was demonstrated to have good psychometric properties in assessing and predicting aggressive incidents. Our findings preliminarily support the use of daily in-patient risk-assessment and affirm the role of dynamic factors in institutional aggression. PMID:25175913

  18. Identification of Trauma Exposure and PTSD in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Jennifer F.; Gudiño, Omar G.; Biggs, Emily A.; Diamond, Ursula N.; Weis, J. Rebecca; Cloitre, Marylene

    2013-01-01

    Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), though prevalent among adolescent psychiatric inpatients, are under-identified in standard clinical practice. In a retrospective chart review of 140 adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit, we examine associations between probable PTSD identified through the Child PTSD Symptom Scale and adolescents' service use and clinical characteristics. Results suggest a large discrepancy between rates of probable PTSD identified through standardized assessment and during the emergency room psychiatric evaluation (28.6% vs. 2.2%). Adolescents with probable PTSD had greater clinical severity and service utilization, an increased likelihood of being diagnosed with bipolar disorder (27.5% vs. 9.2%) and being prescribed antipsychotic medications (47.5% vs. 27.6%), and were prescribed more psychotropic medications. Upon discharge, those with probable PTSD were more likely to be assigned a diagnosis of PTSD (45% vs. 7.1%), a comorbid diagnoses of major depressive disorder (30% vs. 14.3%), to be prescribed an antidepressant medication (52.5% vs. 33.7%), and they continued to be prescribed more medications. The under-identification of trauma exposure and PTSD have important implications for the care of adolescents given that accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for providing effective care. Improved methods for identifying trauma-related problems in standard clinical practice are needed. PMID:22522731

  19. A Semester Late: A Phenomenological Study Examining the Experiences of Spring Admits in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth-Francis, Chrissy

    2013-01-01

    More than 25% of new college students begin their higher education careers outside of the traditional fall start date (National Student Clearinghouse, 2012). This study examines the social, personal, and academic experiences of spring admits at a large, private research institution in the western United States. In this study, a spring admit is…

  20. The College Selection Process of Freshmen Admitted to UC Davis: The Range of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Bonnie L.

    Considerations in selecting a college were studied with a random sample of 768 freshmen admitted to the University of California (UC), Davis, in fall 1984. Major findings are: freshmen admitted to UC Davis had considerable breadth of knowledge about many other colleges and academic programs; over 80 percent applied to colleges besides UC Davis;…

  1. Differences between Newly Admitted Nursing Home Residents in Rural and Nonrural Areas in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Jane Nelson; Phillips, Charles D.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research in specific locales indicates that individuals admitted to rural nursing homes have lower care needs than individuals admitted to nursing homes in urban areas, and that rural nursing homes differ in their mix of short-stay and chronic-care residents. This research investigates whether differences in acuity are a function…

  2. [The development of psychiatric and mental health nursing in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiin-Ru; Shiau, Shu-Jen; Su, Shu-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Psychiatric mental health is critical to ensuring the health and wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. While psychiatric mental health work continues to become increasingly complex and challenging, the demand for psychiatric nurses with evidence-based skills continues to grow. Psychiatric mental health nurses (PMHNs) are the primary providers of professional psychiatric mental health care services. PMFNs emphasize humanistic values and focus on servicing patient and family needs. In Taiwan, the Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Association constructs the competence-credentialing model for psychiatric mental health nursing that underpins the values, attitudes, and beliefs of PMHNs and ensures that the mental health nursing practice promotes public health and wellbeing. In addition, this association promotes advanced psychiatric nursing education, research, and practice, influences the national health agenda, and discusses and disseminates information on psychiatric mental health care issues in order to influence the direction, nature, and quality of psychiatric and mental health care. PMID:24519338

  3. Functional Disability Among Late Middle-Aged and Older Adults Admitted to a Safety-Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Pierluissi, Edgar; Guzman, David; Kessell, Eric R.; Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Sarkar, Urmimala; Schneidermann, Michelle; Critchfield, Jeffrey M.; Kushel, Margot B.

    2014-01-01

    to a safety-net hospital. Late middle-aged patients admitted to safety-net hospitals may benefit from models of acute care currently used for older patients that prevent adverse outcomes associated with functional disability. PMID:25367281

  4. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%), females (78.0%), married (76%) and housewives (56.0%). Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%). Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1) was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%), followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2) (18%) and depressive episode (F32) (14%). In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively. PMID:23766573

  5. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Miao; Wang, Zhijiang; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect "faulty wiring" or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism) based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective. PMID:26604764

  6. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Miao; Wang, Zhijiang; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect “faulty wiring” or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism) based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective. PMID:26604764

  7. Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Brumm, V L; Bilder, D; Waisbren, S E

    2010-01-01

    Psychological and psychiatric problems are well documented across the lifespan of individuals with early-treated phenylketonuria (PKU). Early-treated children and adolescents tend to display attentional problems, school problems, lower achievement motivation, decreased social competence, decreased autonomy, and low-self-esteem. As they enter adulthood, early-treated individuals may carry forward low self-esteem and lack of autonomy but also tend to develop depressed mood, generalized anxiety, phobias, decreased positive emotions, social maturity deficits, and social isolation. The correlation between level of metabolic control and severity of symptoms suggests a biological basis of psychiatric dysfunction. Additionally, psychosocial factors such as the burden of living with a chronic illness may contribute to psychological and psychiatric outcomes in PKU. The lack of a PKU-specific psychiatric phenotype combined with the observation that not everyone with PKU is affected highlights the complexity of the problem. More research on psychiatric and psychological outcomes in PKU is required. Of particular importance is the routine monitoring of emotional, behavioral, and psychosocial symptoms in individuals with this metabolic disorder. Longitudinal studies are required to evaluate the impact of new and emerging therapies on psychiatric and psychosocial functioning in PKU. Unidentified or untreated emotional and behavioral symptoms may have a significant, lifelong impact on the quality of life and social status of patients. PMID:20123472

  8. A review of reception order in the management of mentally ill persons in a psychiatric institute

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Nakkeerar; Ramanathan, Rajkumar; Kumar, Venkatesh Madhan; Chellappan, Dhanabalan Kalingarayan Palayam; Ramasamy, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mentally ill prisoners, when requiring admission in a psychiatric facility, have to be admitted only by a reception order of a judicial magistrate and convicts by warrants issued by the Government to jail superintendents and the superintendent of the hospital. Both can be only under Section 27 of The Mental Health Act, 1987. Materials and Methods: A study of the contents of reception order and warrants regarding the acts and section under which they were issued over 1 year period for the admission of the patients in the criminal ward of the Institute of Mental Health was carried out. Results: Only three reception orders quoted Section 27 out of 54 patients admitted under a reception order. Nineteen patients were admitted by the jail superintendents. Discussion: Various issues that were found in the reception order and their consequences are discussed, and a possible response to these issues is mooted. Conclusion: Almost none of the reception orders were found to be proper. This deficit needs to be rectified by sensitizing the various authorities. PMID:27385850

  9. Norms, Reliability, and Item Analysis of the Hopelessness Scale in General Psychiatric, Forensic Psychiatric, and College Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Thomas W.

    1982-01-01

    Administered the Hopelessness Scale to criminal psychiatric inpatients, general psychiatric inpatients, and college students. Both psychiatric groups endorsed significantly more items in the hopeless direction. Found the scale more reliable with the psychiatric patients. Item analysis of the Hopelessness Scale suggests that three items were not…

  10. Steroid-induced acute psychosis in a child with asthma: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Lee, K M; Lin, Y Z; Huang, F Y

    2001-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl was admitted due to severe asthmatic attack. She was treated with methylprednisolone (40 mg i.v. q6h), aminophylline (loading with 5 mg/kg and maintained with 0.6 mg/kg/hr i.v. drip), nebulized terbutaline sulphate (5 mg q6h), oral procaterol 12.5 micrograms bid, along with oxygen therapy. Acute psychotic reaction with visual hallucination, delusion, panic reaction and myoclonic movement of hands developed on day 3 of admission. The patient had no previous history of psychiatric problems. The theophylline level was 9.89 micrograms/ml at the moment of psychotic reaction. After the dose of methylprednisolone was reduced from 40 mg to 20 mg i.v. q6h and shifted to other anti-asthma treatment by procaterol metered dose inhaler via spacer, the psychotic reaction disappeared a few hours later. The psychotic reaction was thought to be due to steroid therapy since no other causes could explain the psychotic reaction. PMID:11431864

  11. Engram formation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors substantially influence beginning and progression of mental illness, reinforcing or reducing the consequences of genetic vulnerability. Often initiated by early traumatic events, “engrams” or memories are formed that may give rise to a slow and subtle progression of psychiatric disorders. The large delay between beginning and time of onset (diagnosis) may be explained by efficient compensatory mechanisms observed in brain metabolism that use optional pathways in highly redundant molecular interactions. To this end, research has to deal with mechanisms of learning and long-term memory formation, which involves (a) epigenetic changes, (b) altered neuronal activities, and (c) changes in neuron-glia communication. On the epigenetic level, apparently DNA-methylations are more stable than histone modifications, although both closely interact. Neuronal activities basically deliver digital information, which clearly can serve as basis for memory formation (LTP). However, research in this respect has long time neglected the importance of glia. They are more actively involved in the control of neuronal activities than thought before. They can both reinforce and inhibit neuronal activities by transducing neuronal information from frequency-encoded to amplitude and frequency-modulated calcium wave patterns spreading in the glial syncytium by use of gap junctions. In this way, they serve integrative functions. In conclusion, we are dealing with two concepts of encoding information that mutually control each other and synergize: a digital (neuronal) and a wave-like (glial) computing, forming neuron-glia functional units with inbuilt feedback loops to maintain balance of excitation and inhibition. To better understand mental illness, we have to gain more insight into the dynamics of adverse environmental impact on those cellular and molecular systems. This report summarizes existing knowledge and draws some outline about further research in molecular

  12. Torture: psychiatric sequelae and phenomenology.

    PubMed

    Doerr-Zegers, O; Hartmann, L; Lira, E; Weinstein, E

    1992-05-01

    Torture has been defined by the United Nations (declaration of December 9, 1975) as "every act by which a public functionary (or another person at his instigation) intentionally inflicts on another person serious pain or suffering, ...physical or mental, with the object of obtaining information or of punishing him...or of intimidating that person or others." In Chile, from the 1973 military coup d'Etat up to the 1988 plebiscite, torture was practiced in a systematic way, as a method of interrogation and as a means of intimidation of detainees and, indirectly, of the population at large. In the beginning, torture was applied in military station units and in police stations, in the facilities of sport fields and prisoners' camps; but above all, in clandestine detention centers and prisons belonging to the secret police (Amnesty International 1977, 1983; CODEPU 1984, 1985, 1986; Lira and Weinstein 1987; Muñoz 1986; Rodríguez de Ruiz-Tagle 1978). In spite of the bloodshed of the 1973 coup d'Etat, the phenomenon of torture came as a total surprise for the detainees, who had very often voluntarily surrendered themselves to the new authorities, and who, given the civil traditions of the country, expected treatment in accordance with a society subject to the law. The military government regularly denied having undertaken the practice of torture. According to Lira and Weinstein (20), this denial of such an extreme experience or horror made it even more difficult to overcome the trauma and fostered the development of chronic psychiatric pathology. PMID:1603873

  13. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  14. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  15. Rethinking Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Care: The Importance of Integrated Interventions for Suicidal Youth With Substance Use Problems

    PubMed Central

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents psychiatrically hospitalized following a suicide attempt are at high risk for a repeat attempt or suicide completion, and substance use is consistently implicated as a risk factor for continued suicidal behavior in adolescents. Despite this knowledge, there have been few studies that have investigated the effectiveness of combined suicidality and substance use interventions within acute psychiatric care settings for suicidal youth with substance use problems. While social workers are well-positioned to deliver such interventions, greater emphasis on teaching integrated therapeutic techniques in social work curriculum and professional training is needed to ensure their implementation. PMID:26674510

  16. Psychiatric Service Use and Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaumik, S.; Tyrer, F. C.; McGrother, C.; Ganghadaran, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: UK policies aim to facilitate access to general psychiatric services for adults with intellectual disability (ID). If this is to be achieved, it is important to have a clear idea of the characteristics and proportion of people with ID who currently access specialist psychiatric services and the nature and extent of psychiatric…

  17. Psychiatric genetics in China: achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Thomas G.; Burmeister, Margit; Sham, Pak Chung; Yao, Yong-gang; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Chen, Chao; An, Yu; Dai, Jiapei; Yue, Weihua; Li, Miao Xin; Xue, Hong; Su, Bing; Chen, Li; Shi, Yongyong; Qiao, Mingqi; Liu, Tiebang; Xia, Kun; Chan, Raymond C.K.

    2016-01-01

    To coordinate research efforts in psychiatric genetics in China, a group of Chinese and foreign investigators have established an annual “Summit on Chinese Psychiatric Genetics” to present their latest research and discuss the current state and future directions of this field. To date, two Summits have been held, the first in Changsha in April, 2014, and the second in Kunming in April, 2015. The consensus of roundtable discussions held at these meetings is that psychiatric genetics in China is in need of new policies to promote collaborations aimed at creating a framework for genetic research appropriate for the Chinese population: relying solely on Caucasian population-based studies may result in missed opportunities to diagnose and treat psychiatric disorders. In addition, participants agree on the importance of promoting collaborations and data sharing in areas where China has especially strong resources, such as advanced facilities for non-human primate studies and traditional Chinese medicine: areas that may also provide overseas investigators with unique research opportunities. In this paper, we present an overview of the current state of psychiatric genetics research in China, with emphasis on genome-level studies, and describe challenges and opportunities for future advances, particularly at the dawn of “precision medicine.” Together, we call on administrative bodies, funding agencies, the research community, and the public at large for increased support for research on the genetic basis of psychiatric disorders in the Chinese population. In our opinion, increased public awareness and effective collaborative research hold the keys to the future of psychiatric genetics in China. PMID:26481319

  18. Fitness to Drive of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Sanz, Emilio J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Driving a motor vehicle could be central to the functional autonomy of patients with psychiatric illnesses. For patients, a driver's license could mean independence, the ability to care for themselves, and the freedom to travel when they wish. However, both psychiatric disorders and psychiatric drug treatments can produce changes in perception, information processing and integration, and psychomotor activity that can disturb and/or interfere with the ability to drive safely. Objective: To assess the fitness to drive of psychiatric outpatients in a sample representative of current clinical practice. Method: Cognitive functioning and psychomotor performance of 208 consecutive psychiatric outpatients treated in a community mental health center in the Canary Islands (Spain) were assessed in different clinical situations. The LNDETER 100 battery, an electronic assessment unit–based measurement that consists of 5 screenbased tests, was used to assess concentrated attention and resistance to monotony, multiple discriminative reactions and their correctness, anticipation of speed, bimanual coordination, and the decision making process and tendency to assume risk. The study was conducted from July 2007 to September 2007. Results: Of 208 patients, only 33 had scores compatible with the requirements of a driver's license, and 84% failed at least 1 of the required tests. Of patients with a driver's license who drive almost every day, 79.5% registered scores that would not allow obtaining or renewal of the license. None of the driving patients studied notified the traffic authorities that they had a psychiatric condition that may affect safe driving. No patient stopped driving, although 10% of them recognized that their ability to drive was somehow damaged. Conclusion: Guidance on how best to formulate and deliver recommendations on driving fitness in stable psychiatric patients is lacking and much needed. PMID:19158977

  19. The Risk of Repetition of Attempted Suicide Among Iranian Women with Psychiatric Disorders as Quantified by the Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Shakeri, Jalal; Farnia, Vahid; Abdoli, Nasrin; Akrami, Mohammad R.; Arman, Farid; Shakeri, Hania

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The factors associated with repetition of attempted suicide are poorly categorized in the Iranian population. In this study, the prevalence of different psychiatric disorders among women who attempted suicide and the risk of repetition were assessed.  Methods: Participants were women admitted to the Poisoning Emergency Hospital, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences following failed suicide attempts. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) symptom checklist. Risk of repetition was evaluated using the Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R).  Results: About 72% of individuals had a SBQ-R score >8 and were considered to be at high risk for repeated attempted suicide. Adjustment disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (40.8%). However, the type of psychiatric disorder was not associated with the risk of repetition (p=0.320). Marital status, educational level, employment, substance use, history of suicide among family members, and motivation were not determinant factors for repetition of suicide attempt (p=0.220, 0.880, 0.220, 0.290, 0.350 and 0.270, respectively). Younger women were associated with violent methods of attempted suicide, such as self-cutting, whereas older individuals preferred consumption of poison (p<0.001). Drug overdose was more common among single and married women whereas widows or divorcees preferred self-burning (p=0.004).  Conclusion: About 72% of patients with failed suicide attempts were at high risk for repeated attempts. Age, marital status, and type of psychiatric disorder were the only determinants of suicide method. Adjustment disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders among Iranian women. However, this did not predict the risk of further attempts. PMID:26171123

  20. A novel syndrome with psychiatric features and review of malformation syndromes with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    du Souich, Christèle; Austin, Jehannine C; Friedlander, Robin; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2009-02-15

    Psychiatric disease occurs with increased frequency in a number of malformation syndromes. We hypothesize that the study of these disorders is helpful for understanding the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease. With this objective, we have been screening for individuals with malformations and prominent psychiatric disease. We report on a man with visual and auditory hallucinations and behavioral problems who was the product of an incestuous relationship and had anomalies primarily of his face, hands and feet. His distinctive features define an undescribed acro-auricular malformation syndrome with a psychiatric component. The study of Mendelian syndromes such as the one presented will likely be helpful for isolating novel genes involved in psychiatric illness. PMID:19253384

  1. [Involuntary admission to psychiatric care of people with mild intellectual disability: missed chances in the Dutch Care and Coercion Act].

    PubMed

    Frederiks, Brenda J M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the Dutch Care and Coercion Act (Wet Zorg en Dwang) is to improve the legal position of people with an intellectual disability in cases of involuntary admission to psychiatric care. The present law, the Dutch Psychiatric Act (Wet BOPZ), only offers legal protection to clients who are admitted involuntarily to specific institutions. The Care and Coercion Act will lead to significant changes in the care of people with an intellectual disability and a much larger group of clients with an intellectual disability will fall under the range of this Act. Limitations to freedom - referred to as 'involuntary admission' within the new law - must meet the same criteria for each client. The legislator, however, seems to have paid little attention to those clients with a mild intellectual disability. PMID:25387981

  2. Clinical and immunological analysis of measles patients admitted to a Beijing hospital in 2014 during an outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Zhao, J-J; Hu, Y; Fu, J-L; Huang, H-H; Xie, Y-X; Zhang, X; Shi, L; Zhao, P; Zhang, X-W; Wu, D; Xu, Z; Zhou, Z-P; Qin, E-Q; Wang, F-S

    2016-09-01

    At the end of 2013, China reported a countrywide outbreak of measles. From January to May 2014, we investigated the clinical and immunological features of the cases of the outbreak admitted to our hospital. In this study, all 112 inpatients with clinically diagnosed measles were recruited from the 302 Military Hospital of China. The virus was isolated from throat swabs from these patients, and cytokine profiles were examined. By detecting the measles virus of 30 of the 112 patients, we found that this measles outbreak was of the H1 genotype, which is the major strain in China. The rates of complications, specifically pneumonia and liver injury, differed significantly in patients aged 18 years: pneumonia was more common in children, while liver injury was more common in adults. Pneumonia was a significant independent risk factor affecting measles duration. Compared to healthy subjects, measles patients had fewer CD4+IL-17+, CD4+IFN-γ +, and CD8+IFN-γ + cells in both the acute and recovery phases. In contrast, measles patients in the acute phase had more CD8+IL-22+ cells than those in recovery or healthy subjects. We recommend that future studies focus on the age-related distribution of pneumonia and liver injury as measles-related complications as well as the association between immunological markers and measles prognosis. PMID:27251754

  3. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  4. Suicide mortality and risk factors in the 12 months after discharge from psychiatric inpatient care in Korea: 1989-2006.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Choi, Jae Won; Kyoung Yi, Ki; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-07-30

    This study aimed to determine the suicide mortality within 1 year after discharge from psychiatric inpatient care and identify the risk factors for suicide completion during this period. A total of 8403 patients were admitted to general hospitals in Seoul, Korea, for psychiatric disorders from January 1989 to December 2006. The suicide mortality risk of these patients within 1 year of discharge was compared with that of gender- and age-matched subjects from the general population of Korea. The standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for suicide in the year following discharge were 49.7 for males and 45.5 for females. Patients aged 15-24 years had the highest risk for suicide. Among the different diagnostic groups, patients with personality disorders, schizophrenia, or affective disorders had the highest risk for suicide completion. Suicidal ideation at admission and inpatient stay more than 1 month were also associated with increased risk of suicide. In Korean psychiatric patients, the SMR is much higher in young female patients, a high percentage of patients commit suicide by jumping, and there is a stronger association of long duration of hospitalization and suicide. These factors should be considered in the development and implementation of suicide prevention strategies for Korean psychiatric patients. PMID:23058096

  5. [The clinical and psychosocial profile of inmates in psychiatric hospitals in the State of Ceará, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Melo, Matias Carvalho Aguiar; Albuquerque, Saulo Giovanni Castor; Luz, José Henrique Sousa; Quental, Perpétua Thaís de Lima Feitosa; Sampaio, Alexandre Menezes; Lima, Alexandre Bastos

    2015-02-01

    One of the most vexing problems in the context of psychiatric reform are the inmates of psychiatric hospitals institutionalized for one year or more. The long periods of hospitalization indicate that these inmates have been abandoned, which can aggravate their psychiatric disorders. This article seeks to trace a socio-demographic and clinical profile of the inmates of psychiatric hospitals in the State of Ceará, Brazil. It is a cross-sectional study, based on reviews of medical registers, interviews and application of two scales: the Katz Index and the PANSS. Most of the 39 participants were men, single and of an economically active age. Information on education (69.2%) and religion (66.7%) were not known and for 12.8%, their marital status was unknown. Nearly 75% received no visits from friends or relatives. Two thirds maintained total independence to perform ADLs (Activities of Daily Living). The majority were admitted for primary psychotic disorder (76.8%). These manifested a marked negative syndrome in 96.7% of cases. The study highlights the situation of abandonment and loss of citizenship experienced by chronically institutionalized patients. It is questionable to what extent hospitals are prepared to offer the assistance that this population needs. PMID:25715128

  6. A 12-month, open-label, comparative study of quetiapine and risperidone in the acute and long-term treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Perez, Victor; Cañas, Fernando; Tafalla, Monica

    2008-05-01

    This multicentre, observational, prospective, nonrandomized study compared the effectiveness and tolerability of quetiapine and risperidone in the acute and long-term treatment of schizophrenia in a clinical setting. Patients admitted to an acute unit with schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder (DSM-IV), who were prescribed quetiapine or risperidone (3 : 1 ratio) within the first week of treatment, according to the physician's usual practice, were recruited. In total, 492 patients (quetiapine: 367; risperidone: 125) were followed up at weeks 1 and 2, discharge and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Mean doses at 12 months were: quetiapine 718.5 mg/day and risperidone 7.0 mg/day. Efficacy measures (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness and Improvement) indicated similar results for both agents. No difference was found in rehospitalization rate with either drug. In terms of tolerability, orthostatic hypotension was more frequent with quetiapine, but extrapyramidal symptoms and male sexual dysfunction were more frequent with risperidone. In conclusion, quetiapine and risperidone had comparable effectiveness, but there were differences between treatments in their side effect profile. PMID:18408528

  7. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders. PMID:26898322

  8. Understanding psychiatric institutionalization: a conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since Goffman’s seminal work on psychiatric institutions, deinstitutionalization has become a leading term in the psychiatric debate. It described the process of closure or downsizing of large psychiatric hospitals and the establishment of alternative services in the community. Yet, there is a lack of clarity on what exactly the concept of institutionalization means in present-day psychiatry. This review aims to identify the meaning of psychiatric institutionalization since the early 1960s to present-day. Method A conceptual review of institutionalization in psychiatry was conducted. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize the findings. Results Four main themes were identified in conceptualizing institutionalization: bricks and mortar of care institutions; policy and legal frameworks regulating care; clinical responsibility and paternalism in clinician-patient relationships; and patients’ adaptive behavior to institutionalized care. Conclusions The concept of institutionalization in psychiatry reflects four distinct themes. All themes have some relevance for the contemporary debate on how psychiatric care should develop and on the role of institutional care in psychiatry. PMID:23773398

  9. Parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokiranta, Elina; Brown, Alan S.; Heinimaa, Markus; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Partanen, Auli; Sourander, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The present population-based, case-control study examines associations between specific parental psychiatric disorders and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder (PDD-NOS). The cohort includes 4713 children born between 1987 and 2005 with diagnoses of childhood autism, Asperger’s syndrome or PDD-NOS. Cases were ascertained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, and each was matched to four controls by gender, date of birth, place of birth, and residence in Finland. Controls were selected from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Parents were identified through the Finnish Medical Birth Register and Finnish Central Population Register. Parental psychiatric diagnoses from inpatient care were collected from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess whether parents’ psychiatric disorders predicted ASD after controlling for parents’ age, smoking during pregnancy and weight for gestational age. In summary, parental schizophrenia spectrum disorders and affective disorders were associated with the risk of ASD regardless of the subgroup. PDD-NOS was associated with all parental psychiatric disorders investigated. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings. These results may facilitate the investigation of shared genetic and familial factors between ASD and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:23391634

  10. Admissions to a prison psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Glaser, W F

    1985-03-01

    Fifty consecutive admissions to the psychiatric division in a central metropolitan goal were given DSM III diagnoses and their psychiatric, social and criminal histories analysed. Seventy-two per cent suffered from schizophrenic, affective or organic mental illness, 56% had chronic physical disabilities and 84% had had previous in-patient treatment in either hospital or prison or both. Fifty-four per cent exhibited psychopathology that most clinicians would have thought required urgent attention. Of the current offences committed by this group 54% were against the person (murder, assaults, sex offences and robbery). A significant proportion of these were committed by a distinct subgroup composed of socially isolated schizophrenics with no prior convictions, no physical illness, apparently normal premorbid personalities, and a greater current level of psychiatric disturbance. It is argued that the group as a whole, and this subgroup in particular exemplify the problems of the psychiatrically disturbed offender. Prison psychiatric facilities are inadequate for the range of functions they are being asked to serve and their token placement in the correctional services by-passes many important clinical, social and legal issues. PMID:3859284

  11. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry. PMID:25377290

  12. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  13. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  14. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  15. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  16. 42 CFR 483.354 - General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.354 General requirements for psychiatric residential treatment facilities. A...

  17. Regionalization of psychiatric services for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Shulman, K I

    1991-02-01

    This overview addresses issues related to psychiatric services for the elderly in Canada. The author reviews the developments in the United Kingdom that have led to the establishment of guiding principles which may be applied to the Canadian health care system. These include the clear definition of a target population, a comprehensive approach to services, availability and accessibility, and clear accountability. A model for the establishment of regionalized psychiatric services is proposed, including the integration of hospital-based and community-based services with clearly defined areas of responsibility. In light of the changing demographics in Canada and the prevalence of psychiatric illness in the elderly, this is a matter of growing urgency for the health care system. PMID:2029681

  18. Negative rumor: contagion of a psychiatric department.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei; McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  19. Psychiatric morbidity after screening for breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, C; Roberts, M M; French, K; Robinson, S

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and thirty two women with normal breast screening results were interviewed six months after their attendance at the Edinburgh Breast Screening Clinic. Eight percent of women said screening had made them more anxious about developing breast cancer. Thirty eight percent said they were more aware of the disease since screening but they regarded this as advantageous. Seventy percent of the women were still practising breast self-examination. There was no difference in the psychiatric morbidity of the screened sample when compared with a matched random sample community control group. Neither was there any difference in the General Health Questionnaire case rates before and after screening. Screening does not appear to increase the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity. Twenty nine percent of the interview sample were examining their breasts more than once a month--21% once a week or more. However, these frequent self-examiners did not have a greater prevalence of psychiatric morbidity than their matched controls. PMID:3711771

  20. Negative Rumor: Contagion of a Psychiatric Department

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  1. Psychiatric aspects of brain tumors: A review

    PubMed Central

    Madhusoodanan, Subramoniam; Ting, Mark Bryan; Farah, Tara; Ugur, Umran

    2015-01-01

    Infrequently, psychiatric symptoms may be the only manifestation of brain tumors. They may present with mood symptoms, psychosis, memory problems, personality changes, anxiety, or anorexia. Symptoms may be misleading, complicating the clinical picture. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted regarding reports of brain tumors and psychiatric symptoms from 1956-2014. Search engines used include PubMed, Ovid, Psych Info, MEDLINE, and MedScape. Search terms included psychiatric manifestations/symptoms, brain tumors/neoplasms. Our literature search yielded case reports, case studies, and case series. There are no double blind studies except for post-diagnosis/-surgery studies. Early diagnosis is critical for improved quality of life. Symptoms that suggest work-up with neuroimaging include: new-onset psychosis, mood/memory symptoms, occurrence of new or atypical symptoms, personality changes, and anorexia without body dysmorphic symptoms. This article reviews the existing literature regarding the diagnosis and management of this clinically complex condition. PMID:26425442

  2. DNA Damage in Major Psychiatric Diseases.

    PubMed

    Raza, Muhammad Ummear; Tufan, Turan; Wang, Yan; Hill, Christopher; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Human cells are exposed to exogenous insults and continuous production of different metabolites. These insults and unwanted metabolic products might interfere with the stability of genomic DNA. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that different psychiatric disorders show substantially high levels of oxidative DNA damage in the brain accompanied with morphological and functional alterations. It reveals that damaged genomic DNA may contribute to the pathophysiology of these mental illnesses. In this article, we review the roles of oxidative damage and reduced antioxidant ability in some vastly studied psychiatric disorders and emphasize the inclusion of treatment options involving DNA repair. In addition, while most currently used antidepressants are based on the manipulation of the neurotransmitter regulation in managing different mental abnormalities, they are able to prevent or reverse neurotoxin-induced DNA damage. Therefore, it may be plausible to target on genomic DNA alterations for psychiatric therapies, which is of pivotal importance for future antipsychiatric drug development. PMID:27126805

  3. Delivering difficult news in psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Communication research and investigations into the delivery of bad news are uncommon in psychiatry versus other medical specialties. The question of delivering "bad" diagnostic news in psychiatry has been focused on dementia rather than actual psychiatric disorders and their sequelae. Common problems are that psychiatrists avoid dealing with patients' emotional reactions to bad news and that they avoid providing a clear diagnosis for fear that patients or carers will be distressed. This article aims to provide an overview of key elements of the "breaking bad news" literature, teasing out factors that are relevant to psychiatric practice. Topics explored include: definitions; clinical considerations for delivering difficult news within medical and psychiatric settings; protocols and guidelines; evidence about patient information needs and communication preferences; research into actual delivery of such news; and areas for future education and research. PMID:19832045

  4. Indian – American contributions to psychiatric research

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by Indian – American psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  5. Psychiatric comorbidity in veterans with psychogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Martin; Evrard, Collette; Storzbach, Daniel; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2012-11-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are frequently encountered in epilepsy monitoring units (EMU) at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) and cause significant long-term disability. An understanding of psychiatric factors associated with PNES could aid in earlier diagnosis and treatment. We studied 50 consecutive veterans diagnosed with PNES and 37 veterans diagnosed with epileptic seizures (ES), evaluated at a VAMC EMU. We reviewed all available mental health evaluations prior to EMU evaluation. Univariate comparisons included axis I diagnoses, axis II diagnoses, and psychiatric hospitalizations. Predictive models of seizure classification were evaluated by logistic regression. A diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) preceded the diagnosis of PNES in 58% of patients and the diagnosis of ES in 13.5% (p<0.001). On logistic regression, PTSD was the only significant psychiatric diagnosis (odds ratio 9.2). Major depression and alcohol abuse were common diagnoses but did not differentiate PNES and ES groups. PMID:23103308

  6. Ethical Challenges in Psychiatric Administration and Leadership.

    PubMed

    Moffic, H Steven; Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Silver, Stuart; Koh, Steve

    2015-09-01

    As with all professional ethical principles, those in psychiatry have to evolve over time and societal changes. The current ethical challenges for psychiatric administration and leadership, especially regarding for-profit managed care, need updated solutions. One solution resides in the development by the American Association of Psychiatric Administrators (AAPA) of the first set of ethical principles designed specifically for psychiatric administrators. These principles build on prior Psychological Theories of leadership, such as those of Freud, Kernberg, and Kohut. Supplementing these theories are the actual real life models of psychiatrist leadership as depicted in the memoirs of various psychiatrists. Appreciating these principles, theories, and models may help emerging leaders to better recognize the importance of ethical challenges. A conclusion is that psychiatrists should have the potential to assume more successful leadership positions once again. In such positions, making the skills and well-being of all in the organization seems now to be the foremost ethical priority. PMID:26024739

  7. Childhood Maltreatment, Emotional Dysregulation, and Psychiatric Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dvir, Yael; Ford, Julian D.; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Affect dysregulation, defined as the impaired ability to regulate and/or tolerate negative emotional states, and has been associated with interpersonal trauma and post-traumatic stress. Affect regulation difficulties also play a role in many other psychiatric conditions, including anxiety disorders and mood disorders, specifically major depression in youth and bipolar disorder throughout the life span. Exposure to traumatic events and interpersonal trauma in childhood is associated with a wide range of psychosocial, developmental, and medical impairments in children, adolescents and adults, with emotional dysregulation being a core feature that may help to account for this heightened risk. In order to understand how the developmental effects of childhood maltreatment contribute to emotional dysregulation and psychiatric sequelae, we review emotional regulation and its developmental neurobiology, and examine the research evidence of associations between childhood traumatization, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric co-morbidities in children, adolescents and adults. PMID:24704784

  8. Childhood maltreatment, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Yael; Ford, Julian D; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    Affect dysregulation, defined as the impaired ability to regulate or tolerate negative emotional states, has been associated with interpersonal trauma and posttraumatic stress. Affect-regulation difficulties play a role in many psychiatric conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders, and especially major depression in youth and bipolar disorder throughout the life span. Exposure to traumatic events and interpersonal trauma in childhood is associated with wide-ranging psychosocial, developmental, and medical impairments in children, adolescents, and adults, with emotional dysregulation being a core feature that may help to account for this heightened risk. In order to understand how the developmental effects of childhood maltreatment contribute to emotional dysregulation and psychiatric sequelae, we review emotional regulation and its developmental neurobiology, and examine the research evidence of associations between childhood trauma, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric comorbidities in children, adolescents, and adults. PMID:24704784

  9. [Evaluation of the oropharyngeal tularemia cases admitted to our hospital from the provinces of Central Anatolia].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Melek; Cengiz, Buğra; Unlü, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Eryılmaz, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic infection which has re-emerged in Turkey in recent years as water-borne endemics. Oropharyngeal form is the most frequently reported form of the disease from Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of oropharyngeal tularemia patients admitted to ear, nose & throat outpatient clinic between January-March 2010. A total of 10 patients (age range: 16-80 years, mean age: 43.9 years; nine were male) inhabiting in the provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, sore throat and painful cervical lump. They have been previously diagnosed as tonsillo-pharyngitis at different medical centers and empirical antibiotic therapy has initiated, however, their complaints have not recovered. Endoscopic laryngoscopic examination revealed that oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were normal. Physical examination of the neck yielded localized fixed masses with diameters between 2-7 cm. The lesions were localized at right submandibular (n= 4), upper jugular (n=3) and one of each at left posterior cervical, left submandibular and left jugulodigastric regions. The patients were hospitalized with the pre-diagnosis of "neck mass with unknown origin" for further investigation and treatment. The mean white blood cell count of the cases was 9730 (7500-15.100) cells/µl; the mean erythrocyte sedimantation rate was 68.7 (46-85) mm3/hours and the mean C-reactive protein level was 4.3 (1.5-7.4) µg/dl. Salmonella, Brucella, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus and viral hepatitis serology did not indicate acute infections. Serum and tissue samples were sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency in order to test for tularemia, namely culture, microagglutination test (MAT), direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the patients

  10. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  11. Termination of pregnancy and psychiatric morbidity.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, A C; Hannaford, P C; Frank, P; Kay, C R

    1995-08-01

    Between October 1976 and July 1979, 1509 general practitioners throughout the UK recruited 13,261 women with an unplanned pregnancy to a prospective study comparing the subsequent psychiatric morbidity rate in the women who underwent an induced abortion with that of the women with other pregnancy outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rates of total psychiatric disorder between women who underwent pregnancy termination and those who underwent childbirth. For example, among women who had no previous illness, the standardized rate of any psychiatric illness was 63.5/1000 woman-years for women who underwent abortion compared to 60.8-63.1/1000 woman-years for other women. In fact, the relative risk (RR) for every group was 1. Women with no history of psychosis faced a lower risk of psychosis after abortion than women with an unplanned pregnancy but who did not seek abortion (4.9/1000 woman-years vs. 11.8/1000 woman-years; RR = 0.4). On the other hand, the rates of psychosis requiring hospital admission for the two groups were similar. In women with no earlier history of psychiatric illness, deliberate self-harm (DSH) occurred significantly more often in women who underwent induced abortion (RR = 1.7) or who were refused an abortion (RR = 2.9). Drug overdoses comprised 89% of DSH cases. DSH was associated with a past history of DSH. It had an inverse trend with age. Women with no history of psychiatric illness had a significant increased risk of subsequent DSH whether they underwent abortion (RR = 1.7) or were refused abortion (RR= 2.9). These findings indicate that psychiatric morbidity after induced abortion is similar to that after childbirth. PMID:7582677

  12. Morbidity and mortality of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia, 1993-2003.

    PubMed

    Harris, M Camille; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Medical records from 111 threatened bald eagles (86%, Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and peregrine falcons (14%, Falco peregrinus) admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia from 1993 to 2003 were reviewed to identify submitters, causes of morbidity and mortality, and final disposition. Half of all patients admitted were submitted by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries personnel. Trauma was the most common reason for presentation in bald eagles (70%) and peregrine falcons (81%). Additional causes of morbidity and mortality in bald eagles included toxicoses (10%), infectious diseases (8%), and orphaned young (1%). Neoplasia was confirmed in two trauma cases, suggesting underlying disease might have increased susceptibility to acute traumatic injuries. Peregrine falcons were also admitted for infectious disease (19%). The most frequent infectious disease for both species was West Nile virus. Thirty-nine percent of patients were released back into the wild, 28% were euthanized, 20% died, and 13% were placed in captivity. Postrelease monitoring that would determine whether rehabilitated animals survived to contribute to threatened populations was not performed in this study. PMID:17469277

  13. Burn-Center Quality Improvement: Are Burn Outcomes Dependent On Admitting Facilities and Is There a Volume-Outcome “Sweet-Spot”?

    PubMed Central

    HRANJEC, TJASA; TURRENTINE, FLORENCE E.; STUKENBORG, GEORGE; YOUNG, JEFFREY S.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2012-01-01

    Risk factors of mortality in burn patients such as inhalation injury, patient age, and percent of total body surface area (%TBSA) burned have been identified in previous publications. However, little is known about the variability of mortality outcomes between burn centers and whether the admitting facilities or facility volumes can be recognized as predictors of mortality. De-identified data from 87,665 acute burn observations obtained from the National Burn Repository between 2003 and 2007 were used to estimate a multivariable logistic regression model that could predict patient mortality with reference to the admitting burn facility/facility volume, adjusted for differences in age, inhalation injury, %TBSA burned, and an additional factor, percent full thickness burn (%FTB). As previously reported, all three covariates (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, and age) were found to be highly statistically significant risk factors of mortality in burn patients (P value < 0.0001). The additional variable, %FTB, was also found to be a statistically significant determinant, although it did not greatly improve the multivariable model. The treatment/admitting facility was found to be an independent mortality predictor, with certain hospitals having increased odds of death and others showing a protective effect (decreased odds ratio). Hospitals with high burn volumes had the highest risk of mortality. Mortality outcomes of patients with similar risk factors (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, age, and %FTB) are significantly affected by the treating facility and their admission volumes. PMID:22546129

  14. Psychobiotics: An emerging probiotic in psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal microbial flora plays critical role in maintenance of health. Probiotic organisms have been recognized as an essential therapeutic component in the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis. Current research suggests their health benefits extends beyond intestinal disorders. The neuroactive molecules produced by the gut microbiota has been found to modulate neural signals which affect neurological and psychiatric parameters like sleep, appetite, mood and cognition. Use of these novel probiotics opens up the possibility of restructuring of intestinal microbiota for effective management of various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27621125

  15. Therapeutic touch with adolescent psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P P; Meize-Grochowski, R; Harris, C N

    1996-03-01

    Seven hospitalized, adolescent psychiatric patients who received a total of 31 Therapeutic Touch treatments over two 2-week periods were interviewed about their experience. Findings from the interviews were categorized within 2 overarching themes-the therapeutic relationship and the body/mind connection. The study participants enjoyed the Therapeutic Touch, and in fact, they wanted more of it. This research shows the possibility of Therapeutic Touch as a nursing intervention with adolescent psychiatric patients if all care is taken to obtain their consent and to provide them with a safe environment for touch therapy. PMID:8698982

  16. Psychiatric complications in a surgical ICU.

    PubMed

    Hale, M; Koss, N; Kerstein, M; Camp, K; Barash, P

    1977-01-01

    Pathological behavior patterns are often observed in patients in the ICU. In a Surgical ICU (SICU), 7% (22/322) of a patient population required psychiatric consultation during a 6-month period. As a group, these patients had more prolonged stays, more frequent requirements for mechanical ventilation, a higher incidence of cardiac arrest and a higher mortality rate than the entire SICU population. The psychiatrist was asked to evaluate multiple behavioral syndromes, some of which were irreversible concomitants of grave illnesses. However, with certain syndromes, psychiatric assistance greatly facilitated the resolution of problems that hampered pre- and postoperative management and the patient's eventual recovery. PMID:872605

  17. Genetics and genomics of psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Daniel H.; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genomic investigations have just begun to illuminate the molecular genetic contributions to major psychiatric illnesses, ranging from small-effect-size common variants to larger-effect-size rare mutations. The findings provide causal anchors from which to understand their neurobiological basis. Although these studies represent enormous success, they highlight major challenges reflected in the heterogeneity and polygenicity of all of these conditions and the difficulty of connecting multiple levels of molecular, cellular, and circuit functions to complex human behavior. Nevertheless, these advances place us on the threshold of a new frontier in the pathophysiological understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disease. PMID:26404826

  18. Recovery education: a tool for psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Knutson, M B; Newberry, S; Schaper, A

    2013-12-01

    Patient teaching is vital for nursing care of psychiatric patients. This paper describes the process of developing Recovery Education as a tool for nurses who lead daily patient education groups. Gundersen Lutheran's Recovery Model developed for the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit includes seven Elements of Recovery--Hope, Security, Support/Managing Symptoms, Empowerment, Relationships, Coping and Finding Meaning. Concepts of cognitive behavioural therapy, mindfulness and case-based education were woven through recovery lessons in ready-to-use folders. Statistics on patient satisfaction and patient outcome data were positive. Education for self-management can move patients forward to improve health and healing on their recovery journey. PMID:23445505

  19. Severe Darier's disease in a psychiatric patient*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Lopes, Roberta Simão; Pereira, Medéia Carolina Fernandes; Tebcherani, Antonio Jose; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Darier’s disease is characterized by dense keratotic lesions in the seborrheic areas of the body such as scalp, forehead, nasolabial folds, trunk and inguinal region. It is a rare genodermatosis, an autosomal dominant inherited disease that may be associated with neuropsichiatric disorders. It is caused by ATPA2 gene mutation, presenting cutaneous and dermatologic expressions. Psychiatric symptoms are depression, suicidal attempts, and bipolar affective disorder. We report a case of Darier’s disease in a 48-year-old female patient presenting severe cutaneous and psychiatric manifestations. PMID:26312677

  20. Cooperation and contention in psychiatric work.

    PubMed

    Messinger, Seth D

    2011-07-01

    This article discusses the social organization of psychiatric work in the psychiatric emergency department of a public general hospital located in New York City, based on ethnographic research conducted from 1999 to 2001. Case studies of the care of two patients with ambiguous symptoms are discussed. The analysis applies the ''differences approach'' developed by Mol and colleagues which focuses on the way different professions provide divergent explanations and ontologies for symptoms and illness. The cases illustrate the ways in which social structural constraints are compelling psychiatry to become a multidisciplinary specialty. PMID:21742953

  1. Death and suicide among former child and adolescent psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Ulf; Rydelius, Per-Anders

    2006-01-01

    Background Increased mortality rates among previous child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) patients have been found in Scandinavian studies up to the 1980s. The suicide risk in this group has been estimated to be almost five times higher than expected. This article addresses two questions: Do Swedish CAP patients continue to risk premature death and what kind of information related to psychiatric symptoms and/or behavior problems can predict later suicide? Methods Hospital files, Sweden's census databases (including immigration and emigration) and administrative databases (including the Swedish Hospital Discharge register and the Persons Convicted of Offences register), and the Cause of Death register were examined to determine the mortality rate in a group of 1,400 former CAP inpatients and outpatients over a period of 12–33 years. Observed and expected numbers of deceased were calculated with the prospective method and the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) method. The relative risk or the risk ratio (RR) is presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Significance level tests were made using two-by-two tables and chi-square tests. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model was used for survival analysis. Results Twenty-four males and 14 females died. Compared with the general population, the standardized mortality ratio in this group of CAP patients was significantly higher in both sexes. Behavioral problems, school problems, and co-morbid alcohol or drug abuse and criminality (including alcohol-related crimes) were found to be important predictors. Thirty-two deaths were attributed to suicide, intoxication, drug overdose, or accident; one patient died of an alcohol abuse-related disorder, and five patients died of natural causes. Suicide was the most common cause of death, but only 2 of these 19 cases were initially admitted for attempted suicide. Conclusion We suggest that suicide and death prevention among CAP patients may not be a psychiatric issue per

  2. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, B. A.; Manthey, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED) boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits) from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS) and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1%) requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years), with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140) versus 340 min, CI (304–375); P < 0.001) when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198) compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients) per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue. PMID:22888437

  3. Does HIV status influence the outcome of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit? A prospective double blind study.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwanjee, S.; Muckart, D. J.; Jeena, P. M.; Moodley, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To assess the impact of HIV status (HIV negative, HIV positive, AIDS) on the outcome of patients admitted to intensive care units for diseases unrelated to HIV; (b) to decide whether a positive test result for HIV should be a criterion for excluding patients from intensive care for diseases unrelated to HIV. DESIGN: A prospective double blind study of all admissions over six months. HIV status was determined in all patients by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assay, western blotting, and flow cytometry. The ethics committee considered the clinical implications of the study important enough to waive patients' right to informed consent. Staff and patients were blinded to HIV results. On discharge patients could be advised of their HIV status if they wished. SETTING: A 16 bed surgical intensive care unit. SUBJECTS: All 267 men and 135 women admitted to the unit during the study period. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: APACHE II score (acute physiological, age, and chronic health evaluation), organ failure, septic shock, durations of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and intensive care unit and hospital mortality. RESULTS: No patient had AIDS. 52 patients were tested positive for HIV and 350 patients were tested negative. The two groups were similar in sex distribution but differed significantly in age, incidence of organ failure (37 (71%) v 171 (49%) patients), and incidence of septic shock (20 (38%) v 54 (15%)). After adjustment for age there were no differences in intensive care unit or hospital mortality or in the durations of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidity was higher in HIV positive patients but there was no difference in mortality. In this patient population a positive HIV test result should not be a criterion for excluding a patient from intensive care. PMID:9133887

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  5. Gender differences in the roles and functions of inpatient psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Torkelson, Diane J; Seed, Mary S

    2011-03-01

    This study explored the difference between male and female psychiatric nurses' job performance and job satisfaction levels on an acute care inpatient unit. The amount of time male (n = 28) and female (n = 45) nurses spent on 10 specific functions and roles during a shift were observed and recorded. The nurses also self-rated the amount of time they spent on these specific functions and roles. The observed and self-rated functions were then correlated with job satisfaction. Female nurses were observed and self-rated as spending significantly more time on patient care activities, and these activities were significantly correlated with higher job satisfaction levels. Male nurses who self-rated spending more time on patient care activities had significantly lower job satisfaction scores. Findings confirm the concepts from social role theory that gender identity and expectations influence job performance in psychiatric nursing. The results offer insight for increasing job satisfaction and recruitment/retention efforts. PMID:21323265

  6. Liraglutide-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraj, Santhosh; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Kumar, Champat Raj Roopesh; Nanditha, Arun; Krishnamoorthy, Satheesh; Raghavan, Arun; Raghavan, K; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2014-01-01

    An obese lady of 51 year with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for 13 years was prescribed Liraglutide, a glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) analogue (Victoza) for glycaemic control and reduction of weight. She was on gliclazide and Insulin prior to initiation of Liraglutide. Eight weeks after initiation of GLP -1 analogue, she developed severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She was admitted to a private hospital and evaluated. Biochemical tests and CT scan revealed presence of pancreatitis and she was treated for acute pancreatitis. Liraglutide was withdrawn and symptoms subsided. Subsequent follow-up showed that pancreatic enzyme levels were normal. PMID:25327099

  7. Acute pancreatitis caused by bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Solakoglu, Tevfik; Akyol, Pinar; Guney, Tekin; Dilek, Imdat; Atalay, Roni; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Akin, Ebru; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis has been reported rarely. Bortezomib is a selective and reversible proteasome inhibitor used for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, one case report about acute pancreatitis (AP) caused by bortezomib was published in the international literature. Herein we report a case of AP in a 67-year-old male on bortezomib therapy. On the fourth day after the first administration of bortezomib, the patient admitted to the hospital with symptoms of AP. The common etiological factors for AP were all excluded. Than the patient was diagnosed as bortezomib-induced pancreatitis. PMID:23561979

  8. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jasek, A M; Day, H J

    1994-10-01

    An 83-year-old woman with no previous history of malignancy was admitted to our institution with weakness and anemia and subsequently developed acute tumor lysis syndrome secondary to newly diagnosed Burkitt's leukemia/lymphoma. This syndrome has been previously described in patients with hematologic malignancies; however, its development has been related to the administration of chemotherapy, steroids, or radiotherapy. The spontaneous occurrence of tumor lysis syndrome has not been previously reported; however, Cohen et al. [Am J Med 58:486-491, 1980] report 8 of 37 patients with "clinically insignificant pretreatment derangements" of serum potassium, phosphate, and calcium. PMID:8092128

  9. Application of Variable Life Adjusted Displays (VLAD) on Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The need to improve patient safety has been identified as a major priority for health reform in developed countries, including Australia. We investigated the implementation and appropriateness of Variable Life Adjusted Displays as a quality control procedure to monitor “in-control” versus “out-of-control” processes in Victorian public hospitals. Methods Victorian Admitted Episode Data from Department of Human Services, Victoria for 2004–7 were used. The VLAD is a plot of a cumulative sum of the difference in expected outcome (range 0–1) and observed outcome (0 or 1) for sequential separations. Three outcomes were assessed: in-hospital mortality for acute myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure. Logistic regression was used to obtain a realistic measure of expected mortality over the period 2004–5, adjusting for covariates and comorbidities, to estimate expected mortality risk for the separations between 2005–7. VLAD were plotted for the years 2005–7, by the 11 hospitals with the highest frequency of separations. Signalling limits for 30%, 50% and 75% risk decrease and risk increase were determined and plotted for each VLAD utilizing risk-adjusted cumulative sum techniques. This is a likelihood-ratio test statistic for signalling. If the VLAD signalled by intersecting with a limit, the limit was reset. Results The three logit models displayed reasonable fit to the observed data. There were n = 2999 separations in the AMI model, n = 3598 in the HF model and n = 1922 in the stroke model. The number of separations plotted by VLAD ranged from n = 126 to n = 648. No signals were observed in 64%, 55% and 18% of VLAD for AMI, HF and stroke respectively. For AMI and HF 9% of hospitals signalled at least once for each of 30%, 50% and 75% risk increase, whereas this was 45% for stroke. Hospitals signalling at least once for risk decrease ranged from 18% to 36% across the levels of risk and outcomes. No VLAD signalled

  10. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care. PMID:10132548

  11. 3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  12. 4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  13. Clinical profile of patients admitted to the coronary care unit with possible myocardial infarction without diagnostic ECG and/or enzyme changes.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Mohsen, M F; al-Quorain, A; al-Hamdan, A A; Husain, A; Qutub, H; Ladipo, G O

    1993-12-01

    Concern has been expressed about the cost-effectiveness of the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) and solution options offered on account of the large number of patients admitted to the CCU who turn out not to have acute myocardial infarction. In a prospective study over four years, we studied a group of patients admitted to the CCU with suspected myocardial infarction but who did not have diagnostic ECG and/or enzyme changes for the causes of their chest pain. We compared the clinical profile of these patients (Group A) with that of a random sample of patients with confirmed myocardial infarction (Group B). Gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal chest pain, panic and anxiety disorders were the major causes of chest pain in Group A patients. A normal ECG and a normal creatine phosphokinase (CPK) within the first 24 hours, a normal initial random blood sugar, a younger age and absence of coronary risk factors effectively separated Group A patients as low risk from Group B patients as high risk for acute myocardial infarction. These simple parameters will assist physicians providing CCU care in most hospitals in early decision making and in the judicious use of the CCU. PMID:8026351

  14. Psychiatric services in China: or, Mao versus Freud.

    PubMed

    Allodi, F; Dukszta, J

    1978-10-01

    Reportedly, the People's Republic of China has made great progress in health care services, particularly at preventive, primary and community levels. Information on their psychiatric services is still scarce. A group of 12 health professionals visited the country for three weeks in July 1977. This paper provides a description and an analysis of the network of mental health services using a sample of one mental hospital, six general hospitals and a number of health units in cities, factories and communes. The basic principles of policy and administration are those of a collective socialism with strong central guidelines and considerable local administrative initiative. Admissions to the mental hospital in Shanghai reveal that 83% are young acute schizophrenic cases and very few are neurotic or non-psychotic. This distribution stands in great contrast with admissions to mental hospitals in the West, as is the case in Canada, where schizophrenics represent only 12% of all first admissions to mental hospitals and non-psychotic or minor conditions amount to two-thirds. An impressionistic survey of Chinese traditional medicine rooms in general hospitals revealed that a good proportion of their cases (60-70%) are diagnosed as suffering from minor organic or vague organic conditions without evidence of organic pathology and which in the West would be considered as neurotic or psychosomatic conditions. Outside the institutions, in the communes of the rural and urban areas behavioural, interpersonal and family problems are not defined specifically as mental health problems, but handled within the moral and political ideology prevalent in the country. None of the general hospitals visited had a psychiatric unit, but every patient in every hospital or health unit in the cities and countryside received a combination of traditional Chinese medicine (herbal preparations, acupuncture and moxibustion) besides the Western or modern type of treatment. Officially mental illness is not

  15. Prader-Willi syndrome: new insights in the behavioural and psychiatric spectrum.

    PubMed

    Descheemaeker, M J; Vogels, A; Govers, V; Borghgraef, M; Willekens, D; Swillen, A; Verhoeven, W; Fryns, J P

    2002-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by the loss of the paternal contribution of the proximal part (15q11-q13) of the long arm of chromosome 15 (i.e. deletion, disomy and imprinting mutation). The syndrome is associated with distinct physical dysmorphism, as well as with specific behavioural and psychopathological characteristics. Psychiatric symptoms in adolescence and adulthood have been described, including acute cycloid psychosis, and obsessive compulsive, bipolar and pervasive developmental disorders. At the Centre for Human Genetics in Leuven, Belgium, 53 individuals (31 children and adolescents, and 22 adults) have been followed up for 15 years by a special multidisciplinary team. Attention was given to their medical, cognitive, behavioural and emotional development, and the evolution of psychiatric disorders in adolescence and adulthood. This study describes the psychiatric problems in four patients diagnosed with acute cycloid psychosis and traces their development from infancy to adolescence. Four other individuals needed psychiatric evaluation and treatment, and could be diagnosed as having unspecified bipolar disorder, also termed unstable mood disorder. Both groups were compared, and significant differences in early development and later evolution into adulthood were noted. The individuals with PWS who later developed psychotic episodes were described as active and extrovert toddlers, and showed autistic behaviour during their primary school education. Their intellectual functioning was in the moderate to severely retarded range. The individuals with PWS who later developed an unstable mood disorder were described as rather passive and introvert toddlers, and they presented less disturbed behaviour during their primary school education. The intellectual functioning of these subjects was in the normal to borderline range. PMID:11851855

  16. Acute psychosis in propionic acidemia: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Dejean de la Bâtie, C; Barbier, V; Valayannopoulos, V; Touati, G; Maltret, A; Brassier, A; Arnoux, J B; Grévent, D; Chadefaux, B; Ottolenghi, C; Canouï, P; de Lonlay, P

    2014-02-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inborn deficiency of propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity, which leads to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Neurologic complications are frequent, but only a few cases presenting with psychiatric symptoms have been reported so far. We report 2 cases of children with chronic psychiatric symptoms who presented with an acute psychotic episode as teenagers. Both patients had hallucinations, panic and grossly disorganized behavior, for several weeks to several months. They had signs of moderate metabolic decompensation at the beginning of the episode, although the psychiatric symptoms lasted longer than the metabolic imbalance. We propose that these episodes were at least partially imputable to propionic acidemia. Such episodes require psychiatric examination and antipsychotic treatment, which may have to be adapted in case of cardiomyopathy or long QT syndrome. PMID:24334345

  17. Sexual Attitude Reassessment for Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincin, Jerry; Wise, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Sexuality programs are one part of the program at Thresholds, a rehabilitation center for psychiatric patients (17 to 50 years old). A 16 week sexuality group includes seven phases: initial interview; beginning group development (health care, contraception, reproduction, sexuality); masturbation; intercourse; homosexuality; coed group discussion;…

  18. Practice Parameter for Psychiatric Consultation to Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This practice parameter reviews the topic of psychiatric consultation to schools. The review covers the history of school consultation and current consultative models; the process of developing a consultative relationship; school administrative procedures, personnel, and milieu; legal protections for students with mental disabilities; and issues…

  19. Psychiatric Symptoms in Children with Primary Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Pirjo; Sourander, Andre; Metsahonkala, Liisa; Aromaa, Minna; Helenius, Hans; Sillanpaa, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of psychiatric symptoms with migraine and tension-type headache in children. Method: A questionnaire completed by 1,135 Finnish children in the sixth grade identified 154 children with migraine, 138 with tension-type headache, and 407 children who were headache-free. Seventy children were randomly selected…

  20. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Judith L.

    A guide to Nursing 5, a course on psychiatric-mental health nursing offered at East Los Angeles College is presented. The guide first details classroom and clinical course requirements and then identifies long-range and end-of-course objectives. A list of required texts and manuals is followed by an outline of the objectives for each of four…

  1. Glial Contributions to Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    There are several researches that demonstrate the importance of glia for child psychiatric disorders. One study found that levels of two astrocyctic proteins are altered in the brains of adults with autism while another research found that changes in glia are induced by some early adverse experiences.

  2. Skin changes in primary psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka

    2015-01-01

    Primary psychiatric disorders where skin changes appear most frequently include: delusions of parasitosis, body dysmorphic disorder, neurotic excoriations, dermatitis artefacta, and trichotillomania. In all these diseases the primary pathologic condition is of psychiatric nature, and the skin changes are secondary and self-induced. In this review we wanted to present the epidemiology, clinical pictures, and treatment options for these disorders. These patients are more frequently seen in dermatology clinics, as they may be unwilling to acknowledge a psychiatric basis for their psychical symptoms. If we want the treatment to be effective and timely, it is important for the dermatologist to understand the underlying psychopathology of these conditions. Treatment should be gradual. An initially supportive, nonconfrontational, empathic approach to the patient is indicated. Immediate confrontation regarding the suspicion that the patient's lesions are self-induced can be counterproductive in that the patient will often refuse treatment. Frequent visits and symptomatic topical treatments are useful in the beginning. The goal is to establish a trusting and supportive enough relationship with the patient so that he or she will accept a psychiatric referral to explore the complex personality and behavioral issues that often underlie these conditions. PMID:26228818

  3. [Nutrition and dietary supplements in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Himmerich, H; Erbguth, F

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition and specific nutritional supplements can have prophylactic or therapeutic properties with respect to certain psychiatric disorders. A traditional Mediterranean diet, for example, seems to have prophylactic benefits against depression and dementia, whereas overeating and obesity increase the risk for both.Although evidence for nutritional supplements in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is not sufficient for general recommendations, data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCT) seem to point to their use for specific indications. Folate, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), for instance, seem to have antidepressant properties, zinc may be beneficial in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) could reduce extrapyramidal side effects of antipsychotics and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) seems to be effective against negative symptoms, abnormal movements and akathisia in schizophrenia.Psychiatric disorders, in turn, may lead to deficiency of mineral nutrients and vitamins. For instance, vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency is common in alcohol-dependent patients and should therefore be considered during withdrawal treatment. Although vitamin malnutrition is uncommon in developed countries, vitamin deficiency syndromes, such as pernicious anemia or Wernicke's encephalopathy are still relevant differential diagnoses.Some psychopharmacological drugs may additionally change the nutritional habits of the patients in an unfavorable way leading to weight gain and obesity and the risk for further psychiatric problems. PMID:25421417

  4. 42 CFR 415.184 - Psychiatric services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Psychiatric services. 415.184 Section 415.184 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS...

  5. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,…

  6. Out and Down: Incarceration and Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnittker, Jason; Massoglia, Michael; Uggen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are unusually prevalent among current and former inmates, but it is not known what this relationship reflects. A putative causal relationship is contaminated by assorted influences, including childhood disadvantage, the early onset of most disorders, and the criminalization of substance use. Using the National Comorbidity…

  7. Psychiatric Disorders, Comorbidity, and Suicidality in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Nock, Matthew K.; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies have reported that psychiatric disorders are among the strongest predictors of suicidal behavior (i.e., suicide ideation, plans, and attempts). However, surprisingly little is known about the independent associations between each disorder and each suicidal behavior due to a failure to account for comorbidity. Methods This study used data from a representative sample of 5,782 respondents participating in the Mexican National Comorbidity Survey (2001–2002) to examine the unique associations between psychiatric disorders and suicidality. Results A prior psychiatric disorder was present in 48.8% of those with a suicide ideation and in 65.2% of those with an attempt. Discrete-time survival models adjusting for comorbidity revealed that conduct disorder and alcohol abuse/dependence were the strongest predictors of a subsequent suicide attempt. Most disorders predicted suicidal ideation but few predicted the transition from ideation to a suicide plan or attempt. Limitations M-NCS is a household survey that excluded homeless and institutionalized people, andthe diagnostic instrument used did not include an assessment of all DSM-IV disorders which would increase the comorbidity discussed here. Conclusions These results reveal a complex pattern of associations in which diverse psychiatric disorders impact different parts of the pathway to suicide attempts. These findings will help inform clinical and public health efforts aimed at suicide prevention in Mexico and other developing countries. PMID:19926141

  8. 76 FR 40229 - Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... of Prisons 28 CFR Part 549 RIN 1120-AB20 Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment AGENCY: Bureau of... Federal Register on December 29, 2003 (68 FR 74892). We then withdrew that proposed regulation document and proposed revised regulations on June 16, 2008 (73 FR 33957). We received four comments, which...

  9. Reviewing case management in community psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Bush, Tony

    Case management is a process of psychiatric care provision that uses a structured and focused approach to effectively assess individual patient's needs. The aim of this article is to examine the current status of case management in NHS community mental health care in terms of therapeutic impact and relevance. PMID:16209396

  10. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  11. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  12. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  13. Psychiatric Symptoms in Alpha-Mannosidosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malm, D.; Pantel, J.; Linaker, O. M.

    2005-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis is characterized by mild to moderate intellectual disability (ID), moderate to severe neurosensory hearing loss, frequent infections, psychomotor disturbances and skeletal dysmorphism. For the first time, a panel of nine alpha-mannosidosis patients with psychiatric symptoms is presented. The clinical picture has several…

  14. The Contextual Nature of Psychiatric Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenhan, David L.

    1975-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnoses are powerfully influenced by the contexts in which patients are found and the expectations of diagnosticians. The observations of Millon, Spitzer, and Weiner on Rosenhan's "On Being Sane in Insane Places" (AA 521 951) were examined for the implications they held for the meanings of sanity and insanity. (Editor/RK)

  15. Padua University Psychiatric Student Counseling Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Massimo; Piovan, Cristiano; Gambaro, Francesca; Grana, Simona; Frasson, Alberto; Fusco, Elisabetta; Romano, Enza; Semenzin, Massimo; Pavan, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    Although the literature reports a high prevalence of psychological distress among the university student population, still very few intervention schemes have been proposed to manage the problem. The authors describe the main sources of inspiration for the psychiatric counseling service established at Padua University (Italy) and how it operates.…

  16. The EAP and workplace psychiatric injury.

    PubMed

    Lawton, B

    1988-01-01

    The author provides brief historical and current overviews of EAP development, describes such programs' tasks and goals, and discusses how a professionally staffed EAP can address psychiatric injury in the workplace. Based on his experience in a major financial corporation, he describes strategies and interventions used by the EAP he oversees. PMID:3067399

  17. Cholinergic connectivity: it's implications for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scarr, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew S.; Neo, Jaclyn; Udawela, Madhara; Dean, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine has been implicated in both the pathophysiology and treatment of a number of psychiatric disorders, with most of the data related to its role and therapeutic potential focusing on schizophrenia. However, there is little thought given to the consequences of the documented changes in the cholinergic system and how they may affect the functioning of the brain. This review looks at the cholinergic system and its interactions with the intrinsic neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid as well as those with the projection neurotransmitters most implicated in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders; dopamine and serotonin. In addition, with the recent focus on the role of factors normally associated with inflammation in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, links between the cholinergic system and these factors will also be examined. These interfaces are put into context, primarily for schizophrenia, by looking at the changes in each of these systems in the disorder and exploring, theoretically, whether the changes are interconnected with those seen in the cholinergic system. Thus, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the connectivity between the cholinergic system and some of the major areas of research into the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, resulting in a critical appraisal of the potential outcomes of a dysregulated central cholinergic system. PMID:23653591

  18. 42 CFR 415.184 - Psychiatric services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Psychiatric services. 415.184 Section 415.184 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS,...

  19. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Gender Dysphoric Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Annelou L. C.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.; Steensma, Thomas D.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents with a gender identity disorder (GID). We focused on its relation to gender, type of GID diagnosis and eligibility for medical interventions (puberty suppression and cross-sex hormones). Methods: To ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children…

  20. [Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents].

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Santeler, Stefan; Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Kemmler, Georg; Steinmayr-Gensluckner, Maria; Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2008-01-01

    Various studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among homeless people. So far most of these studies deal solely with single men, mainly affected by homelessness. Few data exist for women, children, adolescents and whole families that are more and more affected by poverty and homelessness. This study, conducted in Innsbruck/Austria, determined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents. The adolescents were recruited in a counselling centre and homeless shelter specifically founded for homeless youth. Mental disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SKID-I). 40 adolescents and young adults ranging from 14-23 years (mean 17.9 years) were included in the study. The results show that 58% of the homeless adolescents were exposed to continuous violence in their families and that violence was a major reason for them to leave home. The overall prevalence of diagnosed psychiatric disorders was 80% in the whole sample; the leading disorder was substance abuse/dependence (65%), followed by mood disorders (42.5%), anxiety disorders (17.5%) and eating disorders (17.5%). 57.5% of the adolescents had a history of self-harm and 25% reported at least one suicide attempt. Duration of homelessness had the greatest influence on the prevalence of mental disorders. Longer duration of homelessness was associated with a higher risk of psychiatric disorder or self-harm. These results demonstrate the urgent need for early psychosocial and psychiatric help for homeless adolescents. PMID:18826872

  1. Relationships between Irrational Thinking and Psychiatric Symptomatology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thyer, Bruce A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Extending earlier work on Rational Emotive Therapy associating irrational belief systems with global indices of psychopathology, a correlational study of 62 undergraduates was conducted. Relationships were investigated between irrationality and the Symptom Checklist-90, a self-report measure of specific indices of psychiatric symptomatology.…

  2. Psychological testing of the psychiatrically injured worker.

    PubMed

    Morgenthaler, E S

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide the occupational health worker with an overview of psychological testing, including the rationale for utilizing psychological testing, the psychometric foundations of psychological tests, the types of psychological tests, and the issues related to the psychological assessment of work-related psychiatric and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:3067394

  3. Women in U.S. Psychiatric Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Shaili; Ballamudi, Bhawani

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The number of women in psychiatric training is predicted to increase over time. This article aims to review and evaluate the existing literature on the topic and identify present areas of concern and recommend future areas for research. Method: A Medline search from 1964 to the present day was conducted. Literature on female physicians…

  4. Cigarette smoking among psychiatric patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barros, Fabiana Cristina Ribeiro de; Melo, Ana Paula Souto; Cournos, Francine; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Peixoto, Eliane Rezende de Morais; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate tobacco smoking prevalence among psychiatric patients attended in care facilities in Brazil and assess associated factors. A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted of psychiatric patients (N = 2,475) selected from 26 care facilities. Current and ex-smokers were compared to those who had never smoked. Odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. The current and past smoking prevalence rates were 52.7% and 18.9%, respectively. Being male, aged 40 years or over, drug and alcohol use, unprotected sex and a history of physical violence were factors associated with both current and past smoking, while a low education level (≤ 8 years of schooling), history of homelessness, not practicing a religion, current or previous psychiatric hospitalization, and main psychiatric diagnosis substance use disorders, were factors only associated with current smoking. Tobacco smoking prevalence among this population was high and was higher than the rate in the general population. Appropriate interventions and smoking prevention policies should be incorporated into mental health services. PMID:25099043

  5. Adequacy of Psychiatric Training: A Singaporean Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tor, Phern-Chern; Ng, Tze-Pin; Kua, Ee-Heok

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The specialty training program for psychiatry in Singapore is transitioning to a seamless 5-year training program. It is timely to assess the perceived adequacy of current psychiatric specialty training. Methods: An anonymous survey was sent to all psychiatry trainees and psychiatrists in the public sector to assess the current adequacy…

  6. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  7. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  8. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichstrom, Lars; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne; Angold, Adrian; Egger, Helen Link; Solheim, Elisabet; Sveen, Trude Hamre

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many disorders in childhood and adolescence were already present in the preschool years. However, there is little empirical research on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in young children. A true community study using structured diagnostic tools has yet to be published. Methods: All children born in 2003 or 2004 in the city of…

  9. An audit of urgent referrals by the Procurator Fiscal to the Tayside Forensic Psychiatric Service.

    PubMed

    White, T; Rutherford, H

    2005-10-01

    This study describes the demographic, offence and diagnostic characteristics of subjects referred by the Procurators Fiscal operating from three courts in Tayside, Scotland. A comparison is made of referrals made between 1988 to 1995 and 1997 to 1998. There was an increased rate of referral on an urgent basis over time, primarily involving patients already in contact with the psychiatric services, 37% of whom were detained and admitted to hospital. This urgent assessment ensured that mentally-disordered offenders were not remanded in custody simply for the preparation of a report, and it allowed an early assessment to be made regarding the suitability for diversion from prosecution. This outcome is compatible with guidelines issued by the Home Office in 1990 (Home Office, 1990). PMID:16302376

  10. The Influence of Clinical, Treatment, and Healthcare System Characteristics on Psychiatric Readmission of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fontanella, Cynthia A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictors of readmission for a sample of 522 adolescents enrolled in Medicaid and admitted to three inpatient psychiatric hospitals in Maryland. Comprehensive data on clinical, treatment, and health care system characteristics were collected from archival sources (medical records, Medicaid claims, and Area Resource File). Predictors of readmission were examined with bivariate (Kaplan Meier) and multivariate (Cox Regression) survival techniques. One year readmission rates were 38% with the majority occurring within 3 months after discharge. Adolescent demographic (age and gender), clinical (severity of symptoms, comorbidity, suicidality) and family characteristics (level of family risk) were associated with readmission. However, treatment factors including type of aftercare, post-discharge living environment, medication noncompliance, and hospital provider were among the strongest predictors of readmission. Study findings underscore the importance of careful discharge planning and linkage to appropriate aftercare. The differing rates of readmission across hospitals also suggest that organizational level factors may play a vital role in determining treatment outcomes. PMID:18954182

  11. Religious affiliation and psychiatric diagnosis: the influence of Christian sect membership on diagnosis distribution.

    PubMed

    Dalgalarrondo, P; Lotz, M

    1993-01-01

    Minority religions, sects and cults are an increasingly common socio-cultural phenomenon, of which the effects concerning mental health and illness are still poorly understood. In the present study, we compared socio-demographical and clinical characteristics between members of Christian sects and the remaining general inpatient population admitted to a psychiatric clinic in Germany between 1978 and 1991. In comparison to the general patient population, Christian sect patients presented significantly more frequently with a diagnosis of functional psychoses (P < 0.02) and less frequently with diagnoses of neuroses (P < 0.10). Dissimilarities among sub-cultural groups in help-seeking behavior are suggested to explain the heterogeneous diagnoses distribution found in the study. PMID:8399410

  12. [Borreliosis--simultaneous Lyme carditis and psychiatric disorders--case report].

    PubMed

    Legatowicz-Koprowska, Marta; Gziut, Aneta I; Walczak, Ewa; Gil, Robert J; Wagner, Teresa

    2008-05-01

    Borreliosis is a multisystemic disease transmitted by ticks. Its diagnosis still remains a challenge because of the varied clinical picture and of difficulties in detection of the etiological agent (Borrelia burgdorferi). We report a case of a 53-years-old woman admitted to the Clinic of Cardiology due to life-threatening arhythmias with simultaneous deficits in concentration and memory. A suspicion of borreliosis was driven from the presence of cardiac symptoms as well as of psychiatric and from the case histories of a tick bite. The diagnosis was confirmed both by specific serological test and endomyocardial biopsy which revealed spirochetes. The patient responded to treatment with doxycyclin and ceftriaxone. Cardiologic disorders retreated entirely, while cognitive deficits did only partly. PMID:18634389

  13. [Tertiary syphilis diagnosed in a psychiatric unit in Buenos Aires, XXI century].

    PubMed

    Cestaro, Omar A; Calicchio, Ada D; Loidl, Fabián; Presas, Lina

    2012-01-01

    It is a common belief that syphilis, since its effective treatment, is eradicated. However, because of failure prevention and control it is still present. Therefore, we describe what happened in our service with a young patient who was admitted with a presumptive diagnosis of delusional syndrome with a history of multiple symptoms and signs that led him to wander around different specialties in many hospitals. Semiology led us to think of neurosyphilis which was confirmed by laboratory tests on blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Due was then applied in addition to psychiatric treatment for syphilis, but despite this, the patient had a torpid evolution given the lateness of his picture. In this paper we wish to make a warning to doctors about the need to consider when framing neurosyphilis differential diagnosis and thus avoid the progression of the disease. PMID:23979549

  14. The suitcase simulation: an effective and inexpensive psychiatric nursing teaching activity.

    PubMed

    Masters, Joan C; Kane, Mary Frances; Pike, Mary Ellen

    2014-08-01

    A tabletop simulation was developed as a patient safety activity that involved checking in a patient admitted to a psychiatric care unit. Students were second-degree (n = 79) and traditional (n = 53) BSN students. They were given suitcases or backpacks containing various items, and following a fictional hospital policy, they had to decide whether to give the items to the patient, place them in a secured area, or send them to the pharmacy or security personnel. The activity was evaluated using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET) and two open-ended questions. Students reported that they found the simulation to be enjoyable and a good learning experience. Checking in a patient's belongings is not an activity students typically perform, but the simulation can help prepare them for situations they will experience in the workplace. This inexpensive activity can easily be adapted for staff orientation and competencies. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(8), 39-44.]. PMID:24972383

  15. Introducing Narrative Practices in a Locked, Inpatient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Narrative approaches to psychotherapy are becoming more prevalent throughout the world. We wondered if a narrative-oriented psychotherapy group on a locked, inpatient unit, where most of the patients were present involuntarily, could be useful. The goal would be to help involuntary patients develop a coherent story about how they got to the hospital and what happened that led to their being admitted and link that to a story about what they would do after discharge that would prevent their returning to hospital in the next year. Methods: A daily, one-hour narrative group was implemented on one of three locked adult units in a psychiatric hospital. Quality-improvement procedures were already in place for assessing outcomes by unit using the BASIS-32 (32-item Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale). Unit outcomes were compared for the four quarters before the group was started and then four months after the group had been ongoing. Results: The unit on which the narrative group was implemented had a mean overall improvement in BASIS-32 scores of 2.8 units, compared with 1.0 unit for the other locked units combined. The results were statistically significant at the p < 0.0001 level. No differences were found between units for the four quarters prior to implementation of the intervention, and no other changes occurred during the quarter in which the group was conducted. Qualitative descriptions of the leaders' experiences are included in this report. Conclusions: A daily, one-hour narrative group can make a difference in a locked inpatient unit, presumably by creating cognitive structure for patients in how to understand what has happened to them. Further research is indicated in a randomized, controlled-trial format. PMID:21412477

  16. Patient-Centered Homes and Integrated Behavioral Health Care: Reclaiming the Role of "Consultant" for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The notion of patient-centered care has long been linked with nursing practice since Florence Nightingale. The discipline of nursing is focused on the holistic care of individuals, families, and communities in times of sickness and/or health. However, in psychiatric-mental health nursing, the concepts of mental health and psychiatric illness still remain marginalized in our health care delivery systems, as well as in nursing education, knowledge development, and practice. Even with the concept of patient-centered homes, acute and primary care providers are reluctant to embrace care of those with psychiatric illness in their respective settings. Psychiatric illness was and continues to be in the shadows, hidden and often ignored by the larger community as well as by health care providers. This paper describes a Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) Advanced Nursing Education (ANE) training grant's objective of reintegrating psychiatric-mental health practice into ALL health care delivery systems using the concept of patient-centered nursing care as a foundation for, and promotion of, the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMH-NP) as the "navigator" for not only the patients and their families, but also for their acute and primary care colleagues using an Interprofessional Education Model. The major barriers and lessons learned from this project as well as the need for psychiatric-mental health nurses to reclaim their role as a consultant/liaison in acute, primary, and long-term care settings will be discussed. The PMHNP as a consultant/liaison is being revitalized as an innovative advanced practice nursing health care model in North Carolina. PMID:27144999

  17. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  18. What is Wrong With the Current Psychiatric Medication?

    PubMed Central

    Kubacki, Andrew

    1973-01-01

    Some common aspects of the misuse of psychotropic drugs are discussed against the background of disparate development of psychiatric and medical sciences. Particular attention is granted the anxiolytic agents, antidepressants, and neuroleptic drugs, and the related psychiatric conditions are considered correspondingly. Popular errors in applying psychiatric medication are thus discussed with their adverse consequences. PMID:20469001

  19. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  20. The Use of Homosexuality as a Psychiatric Diagnosis for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachar, Sandra A.

    Although research on homosexuality has utilized psychiatric patients as subjects, few studies have examined the use of homosexuality as a psychiatric diagnosis. Using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) definition of homosexuality as a psychiatric disorder only when homosexuality is ego-dystonic, an intensive review of…

  1. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  2. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  3. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall provide the pretrial inmate with the same level of basic medical (including dental), psychiatric,...

  4. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall provide the pretrial inmate with the same level of basic medical (including dental), psychiatric,...

  5. Burnout and psychiatric disorder among cancer clinicians.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, A. J.; Graham, J.; Richards, M. A.; Cull, A.; Gregory, W. M.; Leaning, M. S.; Snashall, D. C.; Timothy, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The prevalence and causes of 'burnout' and psychiatric disorder among senior oncologists and palliative care specialists have been measured in a national questionnaire-based survey. All consultant non-surgical oncologists in the UK were asked to participate. Sources of work-related stress and satisfaction were measured using study-specific questions which were aggregated into factors. Psychiatric disorder was estimated using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. The three components of 'burnout'--emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and low personal accomplishment--were assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Three hundred and ninety-three out of 476 (83%) consultants returned their questionnaires. The estimated prevalence of psychiatric disorder in cancer clinicians was 28%, and this is similar to the rate among British junior house officers. The study group had equivalent levels of emotional exhaustion and low personal accomplishment to those found in American doctors and nurses, but lower levels of depersonalisation. Among cancer clinicians, 'burnout' was more prevalent among clinical oncologists than among medical oncologists and palliative care specialists. Psychiatric disorder was independently associated with the stress of feeling overloaded (P < 0.0001), dealing with treatment toxicity/errors (P < 0.004) and deriving little satisfaction from professional status/esteem (P = 0.002). 'Burnout' was also related to these factors, and in addition was associated with high stress and low satisfaction from dealing with patients, and with low satisfaction from having adequate resources (each at a level of P < or = 0.002). Clinicians who felt insufficiently trained in communication and management skills had significantly higher levels of distress than those who felt sufficiently trained. If 'burnout' and psychiatric disorder among cancer clinicians are to be reduced, increased resources will be required to lessen overload and to improve training in

  6. Psychopathy in women: Prediction of criminality and violence in UK and USA psychiatric patients resident in the community.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicola S; Snowden, Robert J

    2016-03-30

    Psychopathy is an important clinical construct often used in the assessment and management of psychiatric patients and offenders. This, in part, is due to the strong association between psychopathy, crime, and particularly violent crime. However, there are few studies of these associations in women. These relationships were examined using information from two large databases. The Partnerships in Care database contains data from a sample of forensic psychiatric patients (154 women and 777 men) in the UK that were discharged from secure psychiatric units. Follow-up was via official conviction data within the next 2 years. The MacArthur study examined violence and aggression in a sample of civil psychiatric patients (367 women and 496 men) in the USA following discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital. Follow-up was via a mixture of self-report, informant report and official records. Psychopathy in both samples was measured via the PCL:SV prior to discharge. Psychopathy was a good predictor of target events for the women in both samples and for all time intervals used. No significant gender differences in the PCL:SV's predictive efficacy were found. The results provide a strong evidence-base for the use of psychopathy in women when considering future community behaviour and reoffending. PMID:26833281

  7. Acute Stress Disorder: Conceptual Issues and Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koucky, Ellen M.; Galovski, Tara E.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2012-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) was included as a diagnosis to the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a way of describing pathological reactions in the first month following a trauma. Since that time, ASD has been the focus of some controversy, particularly regarding the theoretical basis…

  8. Bullying behavior in relation to psychiatric disorders and physical health among adolescents: a clinical cohort of 508 underage inpatient adolescents in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Räsänen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa

    2010-06-30

    The aim was to investigate the association of bullying behavior with psychiatric disorders and physical health in a sample of adolescent psychiatric patients, as there have to our knowledge been no previous studies using actual psychiatric diagnoses examining this relationship in boys and girls. We studied 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006 from the geographically large area of Northern Finland. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to obtain psychiatric diagnoses of adolescents according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and information on bullying behavior. Logistic regression analyses showed that having an externalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a bully or a bully-victim (i.e. a person who is both a bully and a victim of bullying) among both the boys (odds ratio, OR=14.4, P=0.001) and the girls (OR=10.0, P<0.001). In addition, having an internalizing disorder increased the likelihood of being a victim of bullying among the boys (OR=3.4, P=0.008), but not the girls. Chronic somatic diseases were also significantly associated with being bullied among the boys (OR=2.5, P=0.041). Our results suggest that adolescents who are involved in bullying behavior should be evaluated psychiatrically, as this might be an early marker of psychiatric disorders. PMID:20471097

  9. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  10. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Karnik, ND; Gupta, VA; Hase, NK

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  11. Immunochromatography-based Diagnosis of Rotavirus Infection in Acute Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Vipin M; Thacker, Sandeep; Namjoshi, Gajanan Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Documentation of rotavirus diarrhea in a rural, resource-poor setting is a difficult task. We analyzed stool samples of 103 children admitted for acute diarrhea in a pediatric hospital in Bijnor, UP, India, using a simple bedside immunochromatography kit. Rotavirus infection was detected in 47 out of total of 103 children (45.6%). PMID:27508549

  12. Critical care in the emergency department: acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nee, Patrick A; Bailey, David J; Todd, Victoria; Lewington, Andrew J; Wootten, Andrea E; Sim, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common among emergency department patients admitted to hospital. There is evidence of inadequate management of the condition leading to adverse outcomes. We present an illustrative case of AKI complicating a gastrointestinal disorder in an older adult. We discuss the clinical presentation, assessment and management of AKI with reference to recent consensus guidelines on classification and treatment. PMID:25969433

  13. [Solitary confinement as risk factor for psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Volkart, R; Rothenfluh, T; Kobelt, W; Dittrich, A; Ernst, K

    1983-01-01

    The subjects of this study are prisoners who were hospitalized from custody in a psychiatric clinic. All of such patients of one psychiatric clinic during the period from 1976 till 1978 were compared with a random sample of other psychiatric patients using case reports and other data. Differences were found concerning social, personal, psychiatric, and criminal history as well as psychopathological state and diagnosis. Compared to the complete population of prisoners of the area, prisoners from solitary confinement (mostly remanding custody) were overrepresented. Other risk factors for psychiatric hospitalization of prisoners are described. The results are discussed from prophylactic, therapeutic, and humanitarian points of view. PMID:6647886

  14. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Bakhla, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Verma, Vijay; Sarkhel, Sujit

    2011-03-01

    This study was done to measure psychiatric morbidity and associated sociodemographic variables among visually impaired children. 92 students of age range 6 to 20 years from four schools for the blind, in Ranchi, were screened with verbal Hindi translation of General Health Questionnaire 60. Diagnostic Interview Schedule Parent version was applied to establish psychiatric diagnosis on primary caretakers of those who scored above cutoff. Fourteen scored above cut off and psychiatric diagnoses of 8 children were established. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among visually impaired children was found to be 8.69% No sociodemographic variable was associated with the occurrence of psychiatric illness. PMID:21169654

  15. Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital of Athens: from its establishment in 1887 to the era of deinstitutionalization.

    PubMed

    Fiste, Markella; Ploumpidis, Dimitrios; Tsiamis, Costas; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Liappas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Dromokaition Psychiatric Hospital opened its doors in 1887, following the donation made by Zorzis Dromokaitis from the island of Chios. Private donations and all forms of charities had contributed to a large extent in the establishment of hospitals across Greece, during the late 19th and the early 20th century. Dromokaition was one of them but it was also unique, as it was the first psychiatric hospital in Athens, admitting patients from every part of the country. This paper aimed at highlighting the long service of the institution through the different historical periods the country went through. We present the chronicle of its foundation, the development of its inner structure, and the medical and organizational influences which it received, along the way. The therapeutic methods used during the first decades of its operation reflected the corresponding European standards of the time. As a model institution from its foundation, it followed closely the prevailing European guidelines, throughout its historical path, either as an independent institution or as an integrated one within the National Health Service. PMID:25694790

  16. Rapunzel syndrome due to ingested hair extensions: Surgical and psychiatric considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Devin C.; Aguilar, Francis; Pradhan, Basant; Grewal, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rapunzel syndrome is a unique clinical manifestation of trichotillomania and trichophagia. The resulting gastric trichobezoar can be massive and necessitate surgical extraction. Presentation of case We present a case involving a 15 year-old female with a known history of trichotillomania. The patient possessed symptoms of nausea and early satiety, and admitted that she had recently consumed a large number of hair extensions. Computed tomography imaging revealed a massive gastric bezoar not amenable to endoscopic extraction. The patient underwent surgical laparotomy, and a large gastric trichobezoar was removed through an anterior gastrotomy. The trichobezoar extended past the pylorus into the duodenum, thus confirming a diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome. Discussion Trichobezoars formed from the consumption of hair extensions is a rare cause of Rapunzel syndrome. Surgical extraction is often necessitated due to the sheer size of the gastric bezoar that results from consuming hair extensions. If not previously established, psychiatric consultation should be pursued in the immediate post-operative course as these patients may require pharmacologic management along with behavioral therapy to avoid further episodes of trichotillomania. Conclusion This case presents a unique and modern manifestation of Rapunzel syndrome. Surgical treatment most often is required when a patient presents with a massive gastric trichobezoar. Regular post-operative psychiatric follow-up is necessary to prevent recurrent episodes. PMID:26629852

  17. Data preparation techniques for a perinatal psychiatric study based on linked data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increase in the use of population-based linked data. However, there is little literature that describes the method of linked data preparation. This paper describes the method for merging data, calculating the statistical variable (SV), recoding psychiatric diagnoses and summarizing hospital admissions for a perinatal psychiatric study. Methods The data preparation techniques described in this paper are based on linked birth data from the New South Wales (NSW) Midwives Data Collection (MDC), the Register of Congenital Conditions (RCC), the Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) and the Pharmaceutical Drugs of Addiction System (PHDAS). Results The master dataset is the meaningfully linked data which include all or major study data collections. The master dataset can be used to improve the data quality, calculate the SV and can be tailored for different analyses. To identify hospital admissions in the periods before pregnancy, during pregnancy and after birth, a statistical variable of time interval (SVTI) needs to be calculated. The methods and SPSS syntax for building a master dataset, calculating the SVTI, recoding the principal diagnoses of mental illness and summarizing hospital admissions are described. Conclusion Linked data preparation, including building the master dataset and calculating the SV, can improve data quality and enhance data function. PMID:22682616

  18. [Incidence and risk factors for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric inpatients].

    PubMed

    Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Hasselbring, Laura; Yazdi, Kurosch; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Stuppäck, Christoph; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Children of mentally ill parents are exposed to a variety of stress- and harmful life events. To which extent the mental illness of one or both parents affects their children's mental development is barely studied. Therefore, over a period of 6 months 142 patients with children below the age of 18 (n=237 children), who were admitted to the Dept. for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 1 of the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, were questioned for abnormalities in their children's mental development. Additionally all these patients were assessed for their family situation, demographic data and psychiatric disorder. 38.4% (n=91) of the children showed mental abnormalities. The most common one were emotional (n=41), social (n=41) and learning (n=34) disabilities. Parental duration of the illness (p=0.001), age of the children (p=0.044), illness of both parents (p=0.008), longlasting family conflicts (p=0.003) and living with only one parent (p=0.012) were correlated significantly with mental abnormalities in children. The results confirm an increase risk for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric patients. This risk varies with existing risk and protective factors, which can be partially influenced. Therefore children of mentally ill parents with problems in their mental development should be detected early. Even if genetic risk factors cannot be changed reducing known psychosocial risk factors and promotion protective factors can significantly influence a healthy development of these vulnerable children. PMID:22136941

  19. Group trauma-informed treatment for adolescent psychiatric inpatients: a preliminary uncontrolled trial.

    PubMed

    Gudiño, Omar G; Weis, J Rebecca; Havens, Jennifer F; Biggs, Emily A; Diamond, Ursula N; Marr, Mollie; Jackson, Christie; Cloitre, Marylene

    2014-08-01

    Despite high rates of trauma exposure (46%-96%) and significant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; 21%-29%) symptoms in adolescent psychiatric inpatients, there is a dearth of research on effective interventions delivered in inpatient settings. The current report describes the development of Brief STAIR-A, a repeatable 3-module version of skills training in affective and interpersonal regulation (STAIR) developed for adolescents in inpatient care. An uncontrolled design was used to conduct a preliminary examination of the group intervention's effectiveness. Adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 38; ages 12 years-17 years) admitted to a public hospital participated in Brief STAIR-A and attended a median of 6 sessions (range 3-36). They completed measures of PTSD and depressive symptom severity, coping skill use, and coping efficacy upon admission and again prior to discharge. Participants reported significant reductions in symptom severity (d = 0.65-0.67), no change in the absolute level of coping skills used (d = 0.16), but greater coping efficacy when discharged from care (d = 0.75). Results from this pilot study suggest that this brief group treatment shows promise for treating adolescents' trauma-related difficulties in inpatient psychiatry settings, but additional research examining its effectiveness is essential. PMID:25070927

  20. Getting in and getting out whole: nurse-patient connections in the psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Van Sant, Judith E; Patterson, Barbara J

    2013-01-01

    As a strong component in patient healing, interpersonal connection in the psychiatric/mental health setting can threaten nurses' health. Participant observation on four behavioral health and addiction units revealed a process of connecting with patients' emotional pain, delineating strategies applicable to nurses' multiple world views and practice styles. Findings from 12 nurses highlighted connectedness as a process and personal decision that, with self-awareness and individualized self-protective/self-separating strategies, can enhance patient healing as well as nurse satisfaction and growth. The evolved model may help nurses ease emotional labor, combat compassion fatigue, enhance performance, and preserve their self in today's complex acute care setting. PMID:23301568